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Sample records for based small biomolecules

  1. A novel platform based on defect-rich knotted graphene nanotubes for detection of small biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Shumin; Song, Yingpan; Chen, Qidi; Guo, Zhiyong; Zhan, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Curvature of the SC-CNTs’ cavities had more local pressure, leading to form k-GNTs. • k-GNTs are divided into sections by knots with abundant edge-plane sites/defects. • k-GNTs exhibited excellent catalytic activity, sensitivity and reproducibility. - Abstract: Detection of disease-related small biomolecules was of great significance for clinical diagnostics and treatment. In this work, we synthesized defect-rich knotted graphene nanotubes (k-GNTs) via chemical oxidative etching of stacked-up carbon nanotubes (SC-CNTs) followed by chemical reduction, to detect disease-related small biomolecules. We further studied the electrochemical properties using three representative redox probes and analyzed their biosensitivity using five biomolecules. The k-GNT-modified electrodes exhibited excellent electrochemical response, with the lowest ΔE p and the highest k 0 . Besides, the modified electrodes could simultaneously detect and discriminate between dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid and uric acid (UA), as well as differentiate phenethylamine (PEA) and epinephrine (EP) existed in newborn rat serum, providing the wide linear detection ranges with high sensitivities for DA, UA, PEA, and EP. These excellent electrocatalytic properties could be ascribe to the unique knotted graphene nanotube structure with high proportion of defect/edge sites, large, accessible, three-dimensional, accessible surface area, fewer oxygen-containing groups and doped N atoms. Our work reveals defect-rich k-GNTs as a promising platform for further applications in electrochemical biosensing and electrocatalysis.

  2. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Small biomolecule immunosensing with plasmonic optical fiber grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaut, Clotilde; Voisin, Valérie; Malachovská, Viera; Dubois, Valentin; Mégret, Patrice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-03-15

    This study reports on the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensor based on tilted fiber Bragg grating technology for direct detection of small biomarkers of interest for lung cancer diagnosis. Since SPR principle relies on the refractive index modifications to sensitively detect mass changes at the gold coated surface, we have proposed here a comparative study in relation to the target size. Two cytokeratin 7 (CK7) samples with a molecular weight ranging from 78 kDa to 2.6 kDa, respectively CK7 full protein and CK7 peptide, have been used for label-free monitoring. This work has first consisted in the elaboration and the characterization of a robust and reproducible bioreceptor, based on antibody/antigen cross-linking. Immobilized antibodies were then utilized as binding agents to investigate the sensitivity of the biosensor towards the two CK7 antigens. Results have highlighted a very good sensitivity of the biosensor response for both samples diluted in phosphate buffer with a higher limit of detection for the larger CK7 full protein. The most groundbreaking nature of this study relies on the detection of small biomolecule CK7 peptides in buffer and in the presence of complex media such as serum, achieving a limit of detection of 0.4 nM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesizing biomolecule-based Boolean logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2013-02-15

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, and hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications.

  5. Synthesizing Biomolecule-based Boolean Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications. PMID:23526588

  6. Biomolecule-based nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Willner, Bilha

    2010-10-13

    Biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotube) hybrid systems provide new materials that combine the unique optical, electronic, or catalytic properties of the nanoelements with the recognition or biocatalytic functions of biomolecules. This article summarizes recent applications of biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotubes) hybrid systems for sensing, synthesis of nanostructures, and for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. The use of metallic nanoparticles for the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes, and as catalytic labels for the development of electrochemical biosensors is discussed. Similarly, biomolecule-quantum dot hybrid systems are implemented for optical biosensing, and for monitoring intracellular metabolic processes. Also, the self-assembly of biomolecule-metal nanoparticle hybrids into nanostructures and functional nanodevices is presented. The future perspectives of the field are addressed by discussing future challenges and highlighting different potential applications.

  7. Understanding small biomolecule-biomaterial interactions: a review of fundamental theoretical and experimental approaches for biomolecule interactions with inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dominique; Garrain, Pierre-Alain; Baaden, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between biomolecules and inorganic surfaces play an important role in natural environments and in industry, including a wide variety of conditions: marine environment, ship hulls (fouling), water treatment, heat exchange, membrane separation, soils, mineral particles at the earth's surface, hospitals (hygiene), art and buildings (degradation and biocorrosion), paper industry (fouling) and more. To better control the first steps leading to adsorption of a biomolecule on an inorganic surface, it is mandatory to understand the adsorption mechanisms of biomolecules of several sizes at the atomic scale, that is, the nature of the chemical interaction between the biomolecule and the surface and the resulting biomolecule conformations once adsorbed at the surface. This remains a challenging and unsolved problem. Here, we review the state of art in experimental and theoretical approaches. We focus on metallic biomaterial surfaces such as TiO(2) and stainless steel, mentioning some remarkable results on hydroxyapatite. Experimental techniques include atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, sum frequency generation and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Theoretical models range from detailed quantum mechanical representations to classical forcefield-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Concentration-related response potentiometric titrations to study the interaction of small molecules with large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi-Asl, Ezat; Daems, Devin; De Wael, Karolien; Van Camp, Guy; Nagels, Luc J

    2014-12-16

    In the present paper, the utility of a special potentiometric titration approach for recognition and calculation of biomolecule/small-molecule interactions is reported. This approach is fast, sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in comparison to the other methods for the determination of the association constant values (Ka) and the interaction energies (ΔG). The potentiometric titration measurement is based on the use of a classical polymeric membrane indicator electrode in a solution of the small-molecule ligand. The biomolecule is used as a titrant. The potential is measured versus a reference electrode and transformed into a concentration-related signal over the entire concentration interval, also at low concentrations, where the millivolt (y-axis) versus log canalyte (x-axis) potentiometric calibration curve is not linear. In the procedure, Ka is calculated for the interaction of cocaine with a cocaine binding aptamer and with an anticocaine antibody. To study the selectivity and cross-reactivity, other oligonucleotides and aptamers are tested, as well as other small ligand molecules such as tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)borate, metergoline, lidocaine, and bromhexine. The calculated Ka compared favorably to the value reported in the literature using surface plasmon resonance. The potentiometric titration approach called "concentration-related response potentiometry" is used to study molecular interaction for seven macromolecular target molecules and four small-molecule ligands.

  9. Printing technologies for biomolecule and cell-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Määttänen, Anni; Sandler, Niklas

    2015-10-30

    Biomolecules, such as enzymes, proteins and other biomacromolecules (polynucleotides, polypeptides, polysaccharides and DNA) that are immobilized on solid surfaces are relevant to many areas of science and technology. These functionalized surfaces have applications in biosensors, chromatography, diagnostic immunoassays, cell culturing, DNA microarrays and other analytical techniques. Printing technologies offer opportunities in this context. The main interests in printing biomolecules are in immobilizing them on surfaces for sensors and catalysts or for controlled delivery of protein-based drugs. Recently, there have been significant developments in the use of inkjet printing for dispensing of proteins, biomacromolecules and cells. This review discusses the use of roll-to-roll and inkjet printing technologies in manufacturing of biomolecule and cell-based applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Artificial tongue based on metal-biomolecule coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-02-25

    We construct an array-based recognition system (the so-called artificial tongue) through the self-assembly of nucleotides, dyes and lanthanide ions. Metal ions are selected as model analytes for verifying its discrimination ability. The work provides valuable insights into the application and development of biomolecule-based materials.

  11. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Renewable-Biomolecule-Based Full Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengfei; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yun; Yang, Jie; Lin, Jie; Guo, Lin

    2016-05-01

    A renewable-biomolecule-based full lithium-ion battery is successfully fabricated for the first time. Naturally derivable emodin and humic acid based electrodes are used as cathode and anode, respectively. The as-assembled batteries exhibit superb specific capacity and substantial operating voltage capable of powering a wearable electronic watch, suggesting the great potential for practical applications with the significant merits of sustainability and biocompatibility. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Microwave synthesis of metal nanocatalysts for the electrochemical oxidation of small biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kathrine Schiørring Steen; Sun, Hongyu; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of small biomolecules provides an approach to generate clean energy from a sustainable resource. It serves as a principle for anode reactions in fuel cells to convert energy stored in chemical bonds into electrical power. Efficient and robust nanocatalysts are essential ...

  14. Stereoselective assembly of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Tian, Chunyong; Zhang, Yufei; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Songping; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-04-14

    A series of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers are fabricated through a coordination-directed assembly process. The chirality and carbon chain length of the amino acids exert a pronounced influence on the assembly process. This study may be extended to design diverse kinds of 1-D metal-biomolecule frameworks (MBioFs).

  15. Accurate and computationally efficient prediction of thermochemical properties of biomolecules using the generalized connectivity-based hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Arkajyoti; Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-08-14

    In this study we have used the connectivity-based hierarchy (CBH) method to derive accurate heats of formation of a range of biomolecules, 18 amino acids and 10 barbituric acid/uracil derivatives. The hierarchy is based on the connectivity of the different atoms in a large molecule. It results in error-cancellation reaction schemes that are automated, general, and can be readily used for a broad range of organic molecules and biomolecules. Herein, we first locate stable conformational and tautomeric forms of these biomolecules using an accurate level of theory (viz. CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p)). Subsequently, the heats of formation of the amino acids are evaluated using the CBH-1 and CBH-2 schemes and routinely employed density functionals or wave function-based methods. The calculated heats of formation obtained herein using modest levels of theory and are in very good agreement with those obtained using more expensive W1-F12 and W2-F12 methods on amino acids and G3 results on barbituric acid derivatives. Overall, the present study (a) highlights the small effect of including multiple conformers in determining the heats of formation of biomolecules and (b) in concurrence with previous CBH studies, proves that use of the more effective error-cancelling isoatomic scheme (CBH-2) results in more accurate heats of formation with modestly sized basis sets along with common density functionals or wave function-based methods.

  16. Recent advances in synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene and its applications in construction of electrochemical (bio)sensors for small biomolecules detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu

    2018-07-01

    Electrochemical (bio)sensors have attracted much attention due to their high sensitivity, fast response time, biocompatibility, low cost and easy miniaturization. Specially, ever-growing necessity and interest have given rise to the fast development of electrochemical (bio)sensors for the detection of small biomolecules. They play enormous roles in the life processes with various biological function, such as life signal transmission, genetic expression and metabolism. Moreover, their amount in body can be used as an indicator for diagnosis of many diseases. For example, an abnormal concentration of blood glucose can indicate hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Graphene (GR) shows great applications in electrochemical (bio)sensors. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) GR that is inclined to stack together due to the strong π-π interaction, monolithic 3D porous GR has larger specific area, superior mechanical strength, better stability, higher conductivity and electrocatalytic activity. So they attracted more and increasing attention as sensing materials for small biomolecules. This review focuses on the recent advances and strategies in the fabrication methods of 3D porous GR and the development of various electrochemical (bio)sensors based on porous GR and its nanocomposites for the detection of small biomolecules. The challenges and future efforts direction of high-performance electrochemical (bio)sensors based on 3D porous GR for more sensitive analysis of small biomolecules are discussed and proposed. It will give readers an overall understanding of their progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for their future efforts and development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Active and Dynamic Nanomaterials Based on Active Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven J.; Rivera, Susan B.; Boal, Andrew K.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Liu, Jun; Bunker, Bruce C.; Bachand, George D.

    2004-03-01

    Living organisms have evolved dynamic and adaptable materials that fundamentally differ from synthetic materials. These biomaterials use chemical energy to drive non-equilibrium assembly processes, and to reconfigure in response to external stimuli or life cycle changes. Two striking examples are the diatom's active assembly of silica into a patterned cytoskeleton, and the chameleon's active transport of pigment particles to rapidly change skin color. Advances in molecular biology and nanoscale materials synthesis now present the opportunity for integrating biomolecules with synthetic components to produce new types of materials with novel assembly and adaptation capabilities. Our group has begun utilizing kinesin motor proteins and microtubules (MTs) to explore the construction of biomimetic materials. Initial work has focused on characterizing and engineering the properties of the biomolecules for robust performance in artificial systems. We have characterized the biochemical and biophysical properties of a kinesin motor protein from a thermostable fungus, and have evaluated strategies for stabilizing and functionalizing the MTs. We also have developed strategies for directed transport of MT shuttles, and for controlling the loading and unloading of nanoscale cargo.

  18. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays Using Rapid Photochemical Surface Patterning in Thiol-Ene-Based Microfluidic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Alexander; Lafleur, Josiane P

    2018-01-01

    In many biochip applications, it is advantageous to be able to immobilize biomolecules at specific locations on the surface of solid supports. In this protocol, we describe a photochemical surface patterning procedure based on thiol-ene/yne photochemistry which allows for the simple and rapid selective patterning of biomolecules on thiol-ene solid supports. We describe the preparation of solid supports which are required for the immobilization, including porous monoliths, as well as two different immobilization schemes based on biotin-streptavidin interactions and covalent linkage via free amino groups respectively.

  19. Control of Target Molecular Recognition in a Small Pore Space with Biomolecule-Recognition Gating Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hiroto; Oshiba, Yuhei; Ohashi, Hidenori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2018-05-01

    A biomolecule-recognition gating membrane, which introduces thermosensitive graft polymer including molecular recognition receptor into porous membrane substrate, can close its pores by recognizing target biomolecule. The present study reports strategies for improving both versatility and sensitivity of the gating membrane. First, the membrane is fabricated by introducing the receptor via a selectively reactive click reaction improving the versatility. Second, the sensitivity of the membrane is enhanced via an active delivering method of the target molecules into the pores. In the method, the tiny signal of the target biomolecule is amplified as obvious pressure change. Furthermore, this offers 15 times higher sensitivity compared to the previously reported passive delivering method (membrane immersion to sample solution) with significantly shorter recognition time. The improvement will aid in applying the gating membrane to membrane sensors in medical fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Extraction of Biomolecules Using Phosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids + K3PO4 Aqueous Biphasic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louros, Cláudia L. S.; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Freire, Mara G.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Pauly, Jérôme; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) provide an alternative and efficient approach for the extraction, recovery and purification of biomolecules through their partitioning between two liquid aqueous phases. In this work, the ability of hydrophilic phosphonium-based ionic liquids (ILs) to form ABS with aqueous K3PO4 solutions was evaluated for the first time. Ternary phase diagrams, and respective tie-lines and tie-lines length, formed by distinct phosphonium-based ILs, water, and K3PO4 at 298 K, were measured and are reported. The studied phosphonium-based ILs have shown to be more effective in promoting ABS compared to the imidazolium-based counterparts with similar anions. Moreover, the extractive capability of such systems was assessed for distinct biomolecules (including amino acids, food colourants and alkaloids). Densities and viscosities of both aqueous phases, at the mass fraction compositions used for the biomolecules extraction, were also determined. The evaluated IL-based ABS have been shown to be prospective extraction media, particularly for hydrophobic biomolecules, with several advantages over conventional polymer-inorganic salt ABS. PMID:20480041

  1. Label Free Detection of Biomolecules Using Charge-Plasma-Based Gate Underlap Dielectric Modulated Junctionless TFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Girish; Raj, Balwinder

    2018-05-01

    Nanoscale devices are emerging as a platform for detecting biomolecules. Various issues were observed during the fabrication process such as random dopant fluctuation and thermal budget. To reduce these issues charge-plasma-based concept is introduced. This paper proposes the implementation of charge-plasma-based gate underlap dielectric modulated junctionless tunnel field effect transistor (DM-JLTFET) for the revelation of biomolecule immobilized in the open cavity gate channel region. In this p+ source and n+ drain regions are introduced by employing different work function over the intrinsic silicon. Also dual material gate architecture is implemented to reduce short channel effect without abandoning any other device characteristic. The sensitivity of biosensor is studied for both the neutral and charge-neutral biomolecules. The effect of device parameters such as channel thickness, cavity length and cavity thickness on drain current have been analyzed through simulations. This paper investigates the performance of charge-plasma-based gate underlap DM-JLTFET for biomolecule sensing applications while varying dielectric constant, charge density at different biasing conditions.

  2. Promising Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Isabel; Carvalho, Ana L; Radhouani, Hajer; Gonçalves, Cristiana; Oliveira, J Miguel; Reis, Rui L

    2018-01-01

    The osteochondral defect (OD) comprises the articular cartilage and its subchondral bone. The treatment of these lesions remains as one of the most problematic clinical issues, since these defects include different tissues, requiring distinct healing approaches. Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has been used for two decades, and it is an effective example of translational medicine; one of the most used cell-based repair strategies includes implantation of autologous cells in degradable scaffolds such as alginate, agarose, collagen, chitosan, chondroitin sulfate, cellulose, silk fibroin, hyaluronic acid, and gelatin, among others. Concerning the repair of osteochondral defects, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine started to design single- or bi-phased scaffold constructs, often containing hydroxyapatite-collagen composites, usually used as a bone substitute. Biomolecules such as natural and synthetic have been explored to recreate the cartilage-bone interface through multilayered biomimetic scaffolds. In this chapter, a succinct description about the most relevant natural and synthetic biomolecules used on cartilage and bone repair, describing the procedures to obtain these biomolecules, their chemical structure, common modifications to improve its characteristics, and also their application in the biomedical fields, is given.

  3. Computational solvation analysis of biomolecules in aqueous ionic liquid mixtures : From large flexible proteins to small rigid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Schröder, Christian

    2018-06-01

    Based on their tunable properties, ionic liquids attracted significant interest to replace conventional, organic solvents in biomolecular applications. Following a Gartner cycle, the expectations on this new class of solvents dropped after the initial hype due to the high viscosity, hydrolysis, and toxicity problems as well as their high cost. Since not all possible combinations of cations and anions can be tested experimentally, fundamental knowledge on the interaction of the ionic liquid ions with water and with biomolecules is mandatory to optimize the solvation behavior, the biodegradability, and the costs of the ionic liquid. Here, we report on current computational approaches to characterize the impact of the ionic liquid ions on the structure and dynamics of the biomolecule and its solvation layer to explore the full potential of ionic liquids.

  4. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy with Free-Electron Lasers: On the Road from Small Molecules to Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jašíková, Lucie; Roithová, Jana

    2018-03-07

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy is commonly used to determine the structure of isolated, mass-selected ions in the gas phase. This method has been widely used since it became available at free-electron laser (FEL) user facilities. Thus, in this Minireview, we examine the use of IRMPD/FEL spectroscopy for investigating ions derived from small molecules, metal complexes, organometallic compounds and biorelevant ions. Furthermore, we outline new applications of IRMPD spectroscopy to study biomolecules. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Tiny Grains Give Huge Gains: Nanocrystal–Based Signal Amplification for Biomolecule Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Ren, Binbin; Zheng, Zhilan; Shen, Han; Bao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystals, despite their tiny sizes, contain thousands to millions of atoms. Here we show that the large number of atoms packed in each metallic nanocrystal can provide a huge gain in signal amplification for biomolecule detection. We have devised a highly sensitive, linear amplification scheme by integrating the dissolution of bound nanocrystals and metal-induced stoichiometric chromogenesis, and demonstrated that signal amplification is fully defined by the size and atom density of nanocrystals, which can be optimized through well-controlled nanocrystal synthesis. Further, the rich library of chromogenic reactions allows implementation of this scheme in various assay formats, as demonstrated by the iron oxide nanoparticle linked immunosorbent assay (ILISA) and blotting assay developed in this study. Our results indicate that, owing to the inherent simplicity, high sensitivity and repeatability, the nanocrystal based amplification scheme can significantly improve biomolecule quantification in both laboratory research and clinical diagnostics. This novel method adds a new dimension to current nanoparticle-based bioassays. PMID:23659350

  6. Synchrotron and small bio-molecules in gas phase and liquid environment: new opportunities in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naves de Brito, A. [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Two techniques are critically related to the photoelectric law, namely: photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. Both are strongly used now a day within synchrotron laboratories. Our group is employing both to investigate fragmentation of bio-molecules in gas phase such as amino acids and DNA basis using V UV and soft x-ray photons. In the near future lager scale instruments developed in Brazil will allow unique opportunities to apply these two spectroscopic methods to molecules immersed in liquids such as water. We will present details from this advanced x-ray source and experimental stations with capabilities not present in other places in the world. Experiments connected to the molecular origin of live will be shown. Among them an experiment where we mimic the atmosphere at Titan moon producing bio- molecules will discussed. Another experiment will be presented where we test the Panspermia viability using special bacteria. We will also present experiments where frozen simple molecules connected to pre-biotic mate- rial are bombardment by UV photons and energetic particles showing interesting trends. Spectroscopic studies of gas phase photo-fragmentation of bio-molecules may be critical to understand in the future these molecules immersed in liquids. We plan to spend some time showing our recent results in this area. (author)

  7. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. - Highlights: • We review the types of carbon nanomaterials used in electrochemical sensors. • Different materials and sensor designs are compared for classes of biomolecules. • Future challenges of better sensor design and implementation are assessed

  8. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill, E-mail: jventon@virginia.edu

    2015-08-05

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. - Highlights: • We review the types of carbon nanomaterials used in electrochemical sensors. • Different materials and sensor designs are compared for classes of biomolecules. • Future challenges of better sensor design and implementation are assessed.

  9. Microfluidic paper-based biomolecule preconcentrator based on ion concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Il; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kwak, Rhokyun; Lee, Jeong Hoon

    2016-06-21

    Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for molecular detection have great potential in the field of point-of-care diagnostics. Currently, a critical problem being faced by μPADs is improving their detection sensitivity. Various preconcentration processes have been developed, but they still have complicated structures and fabrication processes to integrate into μPADs. To address this issue, we have developed a novel paper-based preconcentrator utilizing ion concentration polarization (ICP) with minimal addition on lateral-flow paper. The cation selective membrane (i.e., Nafion) is patterned on adhesive tape, and this tape is then attached to paper-based channels. When an electric field is applied across the Nafion, ICP is initiated to preconcentrate the biomolecules in the paper channel. Departing from previous paper-based preconcentrators, we maintain steady lateral fluid flow with the separated Nafion layer; as a result, fluorescent dyes and proteins (FITC-albumin and bovine serum albumin) are continuously delivered to the preconcentration zone, achieving high preconcentration performance up to 1000-fold. In addition, we demonstrate that the Nafion-patterned tape can be integrated with various geometries (multiplexed preconcentrator) and platforms (string and polymer microfluidic channel). This work would facilitate integration of various ICP devices, including preconcentrators, pH/concentration modulators, and micro mixers, with steady lateral flows in paper-based platforms.

  10. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T; Balatsky, Alexander V; Rehr, John J; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology. (paper)

  11. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Rehr, John J.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2014-03-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology.

  12. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. PMID:26320782

  13. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letian Lyu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR and graphene sheets (GS show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 – 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  14. Effect of channel-width and chirality on graphene field-effect transistor based real-time biomolecule sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Letian; Jaswal, Perveshwer; Xu, Guangyu

    2018-03-01

    Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) hold promise in biomolecule sensing due to the outstanding properties of graphene materials. Charges in biomolecules are transduced into a change in the GFET current, which allows real-time monitoring of the biomolecule concentrations. Here we theoretically evaluate the performance of GFET based real-time biomolecule sensing, aiming to better understand the width-scaling limit in GFET based biosensors. In particular, we study the effect of the channel-width and the chirality on FET sensitivity by taking the percentage change of the FET current per unit charge density as the sensing signal. Firstly, GFETs made of graphene nanoribbons (GNR) and graphene sheets (GS) show comparable sensing signals to each other when gated at 1011 - 1012 cm-2 carrier densities. Sensing signals in GNRs are enhanced when gated near the sub-band thresholds, and increase their values in wider GNRs due to the change in device conductance and quantum capacitance. Secondly, the GNR chirality is found to fine tune the sensing signals. Armchair GNRs with smaller energy bandgaps appear to have an enhanced sensing signal close to 1011 cm-2 carrier densities. These results may help understand the scaling limit in GFET based biosensors along the width direction, and shed light on forming all-electrical bio-arrays.

  15. Reliable structural interpretation of small-angle scattering data from bio-molecules in solution--the importance of quality control and a standard reporting framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, David A; Guss, Jules Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill

    2012-05-17

    Small-angle scattering is becoming an increasingly popular tool for the study of bio-molecular structures in solution. The large number of publications with 3D-structural models generated from small-angle solution scattering data has led to a growing consensus for the need to establish a standard reporting framework for their publication. The International Union of Crystallography recently established a set of guidelines for the necessary information required for the publication of such structural models. Here we describe the rationale for these guidelines and the importance of standardising the way in which small-angle scattering data from bio-molecules and associated structural interpretations are reported.

  16. Enhancing Protease Activity Assay in Droplet-Based Microfluidics Using a Biomolecule Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Song, Yong-Ak; Miller, Miles A.; Kim, Sung Jae; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a biomolecule concentrator and a microdroplet generator, which enhances the limited sensitivity of low-abundance enzyme assays by concentrating biomolecules before encapsulating them into droplet microreactors. We used this platform to detect ultra low levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from diluted cellular supernatant and showed that it significantly (∼10-fold) reduced the time required to complete the assay and the sample volume used. PMID:21671557

  17. Zinc Oxide-Based Self-Powered Potentiometric Chemical Sensors for Biomolecules and Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israr-Qadir, Muhammad; Jamil-Rana, Sadaf; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2017-07-19

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of the chemical sensing devices have always been hindered by the external power supply problem, which has focused new interest in the fabrication of self-powered sensing devices for disease diagnosis and the monitoring of analytes. This review describes the fabrication of ZnO nanomaterial-based sensors synthesized on different conducting substrates for extracellular detection, and the use of a sharp borosilicate glass capillary (diameter, d = 700 nm) to grow ZnO nanostructures for intracellular detection purposes in individual human and frog cells. The electrocatalytic activity and fast electron transfer properties of the ZnO materials provide the necessary energy to operate as well as a quick sensing device output response, where the role of the nanomorphology utilized for the fabrication of the sensor is crucial for the production of the operational energy. Simplicity, design, cost, sensitivity, selectivity and a quick and stable response are the most important features of a reliable sensor for routine applications. The review details the extra- and intra-cellular applications of the biosensors for the detection and monitoring of different metallic ions present in biological matrices, along with the biomolecules glucose and cholesterol.

  18. Biomolecule Analogues 2-Hydroxypyridine and 2-Pyridone Base Pairing on Ice Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubovič, Peter; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Nachtigallová, Dana; Fárník, Michal

    2016-07-14

    Ice nanoparticles (H2O)N, N ≈ 450 generated in a molecular beam experiment pick up individual gas phase molecules of 2-hydroxypyridine and 2-pyridone (HP) evaporated in a pickup cell at temperatures between 298 and 343 K. The mass spectra of the doped nanoparticles show evidence for generation of clusters of adsorbed molecules (HP)n up to n = 8. The clusters are ionized either by 70 eV electrons or by two photons at 315 nm (3.94 eV). The two ionization methods yield different spectra, and their comparison provides an insight into the neutral cluster composition, ionization and intracluster ion-molecule reactions, and cluster fragmentation. Quite a few molecules were reported not to coagulate on ice nanoparticles previously. The (HP)n cluster generation on ice nanoparticles represents the first evidence for coagulating of molecules and cluster formation on free ice nanoparticles. For comparison, we investigate the coagulation of HP molecules picked up on large clusters ArN, N ≈ 205, and also (HP)n clusters generated in supersonic expansions with Ar buffer gas. This comparison points to a propensity for the (HP)2 dimer generation on ice nanoparticles. This shows the feasibility of base pairing for model of biological molecules on free ice nanoparticles. This result is important for hypotheses of the biomolecule synthesis on ice grains in the space. We support our findings by theoretical calculations that show, among others, the HP dimer structures on water clusters.

  19. Biomolecule Analogues 2-Hydroxypyridine and 2-Pyridone Base Pairing on Ice Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rubovič, Peter; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Nachtigallová, Dana; Fárník, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 27 (2016), s. 4720-4730 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-14082S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : doped nanoparticles * argon * biomolecule s Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  20. Photonic crystal fiber based evanescent-wave sensor for detection of biomolecules in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Pedersen, Lars H.; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient evanescent-wave detection of fluorophore-labeled biomolecules in aqueous solutions positioned in the air holes of the microstructured part of a photonic crystal fiber. The air-suspended silica structures located between three neighboring air holes in the cladding c...

  1. DNA-based Nanoconstructs for the Detection of Ions and Biomolecules with Related Raman/SERS Signature Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Kimber L.

    The utilization of DNA aptamers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of ions and biomolecules was investigated. In recent years, there have been many studies based on the use of DNA and RNA aptamers, which are single stranded oligonucleotides capable of binding to biomolecules, other molecules, and ions. In many of these cases, the conformational changes of these DNA and RNA aptamers are suitable to use fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) or nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) techniques to detect such analytes. Coupled with this growth in such uses of aptamers, there has been an expanded use of semiconductor quantum dots as brighter, longer-lasting alternatives to fluorescent dyes in labeling and detection techniques of interest in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) and a zinc aptamer were used to detect mercury, lead, zinc, and cadmium. These probes were tested in a liquid assay as well as on a filter paper coupon. Biomolecules were also studied and detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), including DNA aptamers and C-reactive protein (CRP). Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for sensor development, label-free detection, and has the potential for remote sensing. Raman spectra provide information on the vibrational modes or phonons, between and within molecules. Therefore, unique spectral fingerprints for single molecules can be obtained. SERS is accomplished through the use of substrates with nanometer scale geometries made of metals with many free electrons, such as silver, gold, or copper. In this research silver SERS substrates were used to study the SERS signature of biomolecules that typically produce very weak Raman signals.

  2. Composite system based on biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and ionic liquid: Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Bu Caihong; Zhang Yijun; Du Jie; Lu Xiaoquan; Liu Xiuhui

    2011-01-01

    The combination of biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) and ionic liquid (IL) yields nanostructured biointerfaces, formed a novel kind of structurally uniform and bioelectrocatalytic activity material. Rutin was chosen as a model biomolecules to investigate the composite system. The MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film was characterized by different methods including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). A pair of well-defined quasi reversible redox peaks of rutin was obtained at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by direct electron transfer between the rutin and the GCE electrode. Dramatically enhanced biocatalytic and electrocatalytic activity was exemplified at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL/GCE electrode by the oxidized of tryptophane. The oxidation peak currents of tryptophane in such modified electrode increased linearly with the concentrations of tryptophane in the range from 8 × 10 −8 to 2 × 10 −5 mol L −1 with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10 −8 mol L −1 . The unique composite material based on biomolecules-functionalized carbon nanotube and ionic liquid have wide potential applications in direct electrochemistry, biosensors, and biocatalysis.

  3. Reliable structural interpretation of small-angle scattering data from bio-molecules in solution - the importance of quality control and a standard reporting framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques David A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small-angle scattering is becoming an increasingly popular tool for the study of bio-molecular structures in solution. The large number of publications with 3D-structural models generated from small-angle solution scattering data has led to a growing consensus for the need to establish a standard reporting framework for their publication. The International Union of Crystallography recently established a set of guidelines for the necessary information required for the publication of such structural models. Here we describe the rationale for these guidelines and the importance of standardising the way in which small-angle scattering data from bio-molecules and associated structural interpretations are reported.

  4. Large scale commercial fabrication of high quality graphene-based assays for biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Gao, Yingning; Goldsmith, Brett; Barron, Francie

    Large numbers of high quality graphene transistors with mobility approximately 5000 cm2 / V * s were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition and packaged into ceramic carriers with an open cavity design. The ceramic carrier is compatible with standard electronics assembly, enabling the readout of graphene properties on the benchtop without large, expensive probing systems. After chemical functionalization, these sensors demonstrate sensitivity in the pM range and selectivity to many classes of biomolecules as a three terminal liquid-gated field effect transistor. High precision measurements of protein kinetics captured using this technology, commercially known as AGILE R100, are comparable and can exceed the capabilities of state-of-the-art biomolecule characterization tools. Recently published in Sensors and Actuators B

  5. Development of new probes for NMR based analysis of biomolecules' cellular functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    Most NMR studies are carried out in vitro, but the structure and dynamics of some biomolecules inside cells differ from those in vitro. It thus becomes interesting to analyze biomolecules such as proteins in their natural environment: the cell. Recent progress of in cell NMR allowed to better understand the behaviour of proteins: their dynamics and their interactions with other biomolecules in the cell. But the low concentration of proteins leads to low signal intensity. Moreover, the viscosity of the environment induces faster transverse relaxation, resulting in line broadening for proteins signals. The use of the Long-Lived States and Coherencies (LLS and LLC, respectively) as well as dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (dissolution-DNP) can improve NMR observations in cells. LLS were used to understand and characterize the structure of the N-terminal domain of c-Src, which is intrinsically disordered. To follow the phosphorylation of proteins, a first preliminary study of a 21-aa peptides derived from IKBa electroporated into HepG2 cell lines was carried out. (author)

  6. Biomolecule conjugation strategy using novel water-soluble phosphine-based chelating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Gali, Hariprasad; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2004-08-24

    This invention describes a novel strategy to produce phosphine-functionalized biomolecules (e.g. peptides or proteins) for potential use in the design and development of site-specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis or therapy of specific cancers. Hydrophilic alkyl phosphines, in general, tend to be oxidatively unstable. Therefore, incorporation of such phosphine functionalities on peptide (and other biomolecule) backbones, without oxidizing the P.sup.III centers, is difficult. In this context this discovery reports on a new technology by which phosphines, in the form of bifunctional chelating agents, can be directly incorporated on biomolecular backbones using manual synthetic or solid phase peptide synthesis methodologies. The superior ligating abilities of phosphine ligands, with various diagnostically (e.g. TC-99m) or therapeutically (e.g. Re186/188, Rh-105, Au-199) useful radiometals, coupled with the findings that the resulting complexes demonstrate high in vivo stability makes this approach useful in the development of radiolabeled biomolecules for applications in the design of tumor-specific radiopharmaceuticals.

  7. Tunable separations based on a molecular size effect for biomolecules by poly(ethylene glycol) gel-based capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takuya; Nishimura, Naoki; Furuta, Hayato; Kubota, Kei; Naito, Toyohiro; Otsuka, Koji

    2017-11-10

    We report novel capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels for the effective separations of biomolecules containing sugars and DNAs based on a molecular size effect. The gel capillaries were prepared in a fused silica capillary modified with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate using a variety of the PEG-based hydrogels. After the fundamental evaluations in CGE regarding the separation based on the molecular size effect depending on the crosslinking density, the optimized capillary provided the efficient separation of glucose ladder (G1 to G20). In addition, another capillary showed the successful separation of DNA ladder in the range of 10-1100 base pair, which is superior to an authentic acrylamide-based gel capillary. For both glucose and DNA ladders, the separation ranges against the molecular size were simply controllable by alteration of the concentration and/or units of ethylene oxide in the PEG-based crosslinker. Finally, we demonstrated the separations of real samples, which included sugars carved out from monoclonal antibodies, mAbs, and then the efficient separations based on the molecular size effect were achieved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  9. New Method to Study the Vibrational Modes of Biomolecules in the Terahertz Range Based on a Single-Stage Raman Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanoor, Basanth S; Ronen, Maria; Oren, Ziv; Gerber, Doron; Tischler, Yaakov R

    2017-03-31

    The low-frequency vibrational (LFV) modes of biomolecules reflect specific intramolecular and intermolecular thermally induced fluctuations that are driven by external perturbations, such as ligand binding, protein interaction, electron transfer, and enzymatic activity. Large efforts have been invested over the years to develop methods to access the LFV modes due to their importance in the studies of the mechanisms and biological functions of biomolecules. Here, we present a method to measure the LFV modes of biomolecules based on Raman spectroscopy that combines volume holographic filters with a single-stage spectrometer, to obtain high signal-to-noise-ratio spectra in short acquisition times. We show that this method enables LFV mode characterization of biomolecules even in a hydrated environment. The measured spectra exhibit distinct features originating from intra- and/or intermolecular collective motion and lattice modes. The observed modes are highly sensitive to the overall structure, size, long-range order, and configuration of the molecules, as well as to their environment. Thus, the LFV Raman spectrum acts as a fingerprint of the molecular structure and conformational state of a biomolecule. The comprehensive method we present here is widely applicable, thus enabling high-throughput study of LFV modes of biomolecules.

  10. 2017 publication guidelines for structural modelling of small-angle scattering data from biomolecules in solution: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewhella, Jill; Duff, Anthony P; Durand, Dominique; Gabel, Frank; Guss, J Mitchell; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Hura, Greg L; Jacques, David A; Kirby, Nigel M; Kwan, Ann H; Pérez, Javier; Pollack, Lois; Ryan, Timothy M; Sali, Andrej; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Schwede, Torsten; Svergun, Dmitri I; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Tainer, John A; Vachette, Patrice; Westbrook, John; Whitten, Andrew E

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, preliminary guidelines were published addressing sample quality, data acquisition and reduction, presentation of scattering data and validation, and modelling for biomolecular small-angle scattering (SAS) experiments. Biomolecular SAS has since continued to grow and authors have increasingly adopted the preliminary guidelines. In parallel, integrative/hybrid determination of biomolecular structures is a rapidly growing field that is expanding the scope of structural biology. For SAS to contribute maximally to this field, it is essential to ensure open access to the information required for evaluation of the quality of SAS samples and data, as well as the validity of SAS-based structural models. To this end, the preliminary guidelines for data presentation in a publication are reviewed and updated, and the deposition of data and associated models in a public archive is recommended. These guidelines and recommendations have been prepared in consultation with the members of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) Small-Angle Scattering and Journals Commissions, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) Small-Angle Scattering Validation Task Force and additional experts in the field.

  11. Hydrogels Based on Ag+ -Modulated Assembly of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate for Enriching Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Dong; Wu, Yang; Lin, Nangui; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-11-07

    Supramolecular hydrogels obtained by combining 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with Ag + were fabricated in this work. Their gelation capability was enhanced by increasing the concentration of Ag + or decreasing the pH. The gels are very sensitive to light, which endows them with potential applications as visible-light photosensitive materials. Coordination between the nucleobase of AMP and Ag + , as well as π-π stacking of nucleobases, are considered to be the main driving forces for self-assembly. The hydrogels successfully achieved the encapsulation and enrichment of biomolecules. Hydrogen bonding between the amino group of guest molecules and silver nanoparticles along the nanofibers drives the enrichment and is considered to be a crucial interaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A differential weak measurement system based on Sagnac interferometer for self-referencing biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Guan, Tian; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Zhang, Yilong; Wang, Xiangnan; Shen, Zhiyuan; Yang, Yuxuan; Qiao, Zhen; Ji, Yanhong

    2017-12-01

    A differential weak measurement system was presented, exhibiting the self-referencing function for biomolecule real time detection as a label-free optical biosensor. We built a Sagnac interferometer, which limited horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarization to propagating along the common path but in opposite directions to realize weak measurements with two measuring channels installed in two corners of this Sagnac interferometer. By introducing two half wave plates into the system alternately with the two channels to convert between H and V polarization, we obtained a differential measurement for phase delay, which could quantitatively characterize the refractive index change corresponding to the concentration of samples in the channels. With this system, a real time monitor of molecule concentration in the dialysis process was accomplished, demonstrating the function of self-referencing, which is important for optical label-free molecule detection in a complex biological sample solution.

  13. Analysis of small biomolecules and xenobiotic metabolism using converted graphene-like monolayer plates and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunook; Yun, Hoyeol; Lee, Sang Wook; Yeo, Woon-Seok

    2017-06-01

    We report a method of small molecule analysis using a converted graphene-like monolayer (CGM) plate and laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) without organic matrices. The CGM plate was prepared from self-assembled monolayers of biphenyl-4-thiol on gold using electron beam irradiation followed by an annealing step. The above plate was utilized for the LDI-TOF MS analyses of various small molecules and their mixtures, e.g., amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, oligoethylene glycols, and flavonoids. The CGM plate afforded high signal-to-noise ratios, good limits of detection (1pmol to 10fmol), and reusability for up to 30 cycles. As a practical application, the enzymatic activity of the cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) enzyme in human liver microsomes was assessed in the 7-hydroxylation of coumarin using the CGM plate without other purification steps. We believe that the prepared CGM plate can be practically used with the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, and reusability for the matrix-free analysis of small biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) for normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Kelin

    2017-12-20

    In this paper, a multiscale virtual particle based elastic network model (MVP-ENM) is proposed for the normal mode analysis of large-sized biomolecules. The multiscale virtual particle (MVP) model is proposed for the discretization of biomolecular density data. With this model, large-sized biomolecular structures can be coarse-grained into virtual particles such that a balance between model accuracy and computational cost can be achieved. An elastic network is constructed by assuming "connections" between virtual particles. The connection is described by a special harmonic potential function, which considers the influence from both the mass distributions and distance relations of the virtual particles. Two independent models, i.e., the multiscale virtual particle based Gaussian network model (MVP-GNM) and the multiscale virtual particle based anisotropic network model (MVP-ANM), are proposed. It has been found that in the Debye-Waller factor (B-factor) prediction, the results from our MVP-GNM with a high resolution are as good as the ones from GNM. Even with low resolutions, our MVP-GNM can still capture the global behavior of the B-factor very well with mismatches predominantly from the regions with large B-factor values. Further, it has been demonstrated that the low-frequency eigenmodes from our MVP-ANM are highly consistent with the ones from ANM even with very low resolutions and a coarse grid. Finally, the great advantage of MVP-ANM model for large-sized biomolecules has been demonstrated by using two poliovirus virus structures. The paper ends with a conclusion.

  15. Tools and procedures for visualization of proteins and other biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Protein, peptides, and nucleic acids are biomolecules that drive biological processes in living organisms. An enormous amount of structural data for a large number of these biomolecules has been described with atomic precision in the form of structural "snapshots" that are freely available in public repositories. These snapshots can help explain how the biomolecules function, the nature of interactions between multi-molecular complexes, and even how small-molecule drugs can modulate the biomolecules for clinical benefits. Furthermore, these structural snapshots serve as inputs for sophisticated computer simulations to turn the biomolecules into moving, "breathing" molecular machines for understanding their dynamic properties in real-time computer simulations. In order for the researcher to take advantage of such a wealth of structural data, it is necessary to gain competency in the use of computer molecular visualization tools for exploring the structures and visualizing three-dimensional spatial representations. Here, we present protocols for using two common visualization tools--the Web-based Jmol and the stand-alone PyMOL package--as well as a few examples of other popular tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg Bähler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function?

  17. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg

    2011-08-22

    I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function? [...].

  18. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  19. A soft biomolecule actuator based on a highly functionalized bacterial cellulose nano-fiber network with carboxylic acid groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Jeon, Jin-Han; Park, Sukho; Kee, Chang-Doo; Kim, Seong-Jun; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-01-07

    Upcoming human-related applications such as soft wearable electronics, flexible haptic systems, and active bio-medical devices will require bio-friendly actuating materials. Here, we report a soft biomolecule actuator based on carboxylated bacterial cellulose (CBC), ionic liquid (IL), and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) electrodes. Soft and biocompatible polymer-IL composites were prepared via doping of CBC with ILs. The highly conductive PSS layers were deposited on both sides of the CBC-IL membranes by a dip-coating technique to yield a sandwiched actuator system. Ionic conductivity and ionic exchange capacity of the CBC membrane can be increased up to 22.8 times and 1.5 times compared with pristine bacterial cellulose (BC), respectively, resulting in 8 times large bending deformation than the pure BC actuators with metallic electrodes in an open air environment. The developed CBC-IL actuators show significant progress in the development of biocompatible and soft actuating materials with quick response, low operating voltage and comparatively large bending deformation.

  20. A Phos-tag-based magnetic-bead method for rapid and selective separation of phosphorylated biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunehiro, Masaya; Meki, Yuma; Matsuoka, Kanako; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Kinoshita, Eiji; Koike, Tohru

    2013-04-15

    A simple and efficient method based on magnetic-bead technology has been developed for the separation of phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated low-molecular-weight biomolecules, such as nucleotides, phosphorylated amino acids, or phosphopeptides. The phosphate-binding site on the bead is an alkoxide-bridged dinuclear zinc(II) complex with 1,3-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)propan-2-olate (Phos-tag), which is linked to a hydrophilic cross-linked agarose coating on a magnetic core particle. All steps for the phosphate-affinity separation are conducted in buffers of neutral pH with 50 μL of the magnetic beads in a 1.5-mL microtube. The entire separation protocol for phosphomonoester-type compounds, from addition to elution, requires less than 12 min per sample if the buffers and the zinc(II)-bound Phos-tag magnetic beads have been prepared in advance. The phosphate-affinity magnetic beads are reusable at least 15 times without a decrease in their phosphate-binding ability and they are stable for three months in propan-2-ol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of mesoporous SiO2–ZnO nanocapsules: encapsulation of small biomolecules for drugs and “SiOZO-plex” for gene delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan; Annamanedi, Madhavi; Prashad, Muvva Durga; Arunasree, Kalle M.; Mastai, Yitzhak; Gedanken, Aharon; Paik, Pradip

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new synthesis of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO composite nanocapsules with sizes of 90–150 nm and represents their applications in encapsulation of small biomolecules (fluorescent molecules, drugs, and DNA) for uses in medical biotechnology (e.g., drug and gene delivery) for the first time. The nanocapsule size and morphology have been confirmed through the HRSEM and HRTEM. The mesoporous structure of the novel materials has been confirmed through both BET and HRTEM, and the pore diameter observed to be ca. 2–8 nm with an average diameter of 5.1 nm. The BET surface area of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO was found to be ∼230 m 2 g −1 . Three different types of pores were detected through HRTEM: type-I, normal pores in silica matrix, pore with ZnO nanoparticles at the boundary (type-II) and type-III, the pores with tiny ZnO nanoparticles (∼5–7 nm) inside them. To demonstrate the biocompatibility and cell viability of the nanocapsules, normal and cancerous lymphocyte cells have been chosen and investigated in a systematic way. Fluorescent dye (Rhodamine 6G), anticancer drug e.g., Doxorubicin (DOX) were loaded in all types of pores, and EtBr-labeled DNA molecules were loaded efficiently into the mesopores of second and third types of the composite nanocapsules to manifest the characteristic of mesoporous, and to find out its loading efficacy. The release kinetics of Rhodamine 6G and DOX were studied. The results highlight the potential of novel functional mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO nanoparticles for using as the carrier of drugs and formation of “SiOZO-plex”, a complex of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO with DNA for gene delivery applications.Graphical Abstract

  2. Synthesis of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO nanocapsules: encapsulation of small biomolecules for drugs and 'SiOZO-plex' for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad (India); Annamanedi, Madhavi [School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Department of Animal Sciences (India); Prashad, Muvva Durga [University of Hyderabad, Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Arunasree, Kalle M. [School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Department of Animal Sciences (India); Mastai, Yitzhak; Gedanken, Aharon, E-mail: gedanken@mail.biu.ac.il [Bar-Ilan University, Department of Chemistry, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (Israel); Paik, Pradip, E-mail: ppse@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad (India)

    2013-09-15

    This work presents a new synthesis of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO composite nanocapsules with sizes of 90-150 nm and represents their applications in encapsulation of small biomolecules (fluorescent molecules, drugs, and DNA) for uses in medical biotechnology (e.g., drug and gene delivery) for the first time. The nanocapsule size and morphology have been confirmed through the HRSEM and HRTEM. The mesoporous structure of the novel materials has been confirmed through both BET and HRTEM, and the pore diameter observed to be ca. 2-8 nm with an average diameter of 5.1 nm. The BET surface area of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO was found to be {approx}230 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Three different types of pores were detected through HRTEM: type-I, normal pores in silica matrix, pore with ZnO nanoparticles at the boundary (type-II) and type-III, the pores with tiny ZnO nanoparticles ({approx}5-7 nm) inside them. To demonstrate the biocompatibility and cell viability of the nanocapsules, normal and cancerous lymphocyte cells have been chosen and investigated in a systematic way. Fluorescent dye (Rhodamine 6G), anticancer drug e.g., Doxorubicin (DOX) were loaded in all types of pores, and EtBr-labeled DNA molecules were loaded efficiently into the mesopores of second and third types of the composite nanocapsules to manifest the characteristic of mesoporous, and to find out its loading efficacy. The release kinetics of Rhodamine 6G and DOX were studied. The results highlight the potential of novel functional mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO nanoparticles for using as the carrier of drugs and formation of 'SiOZO-plex', a complex of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO with DNA for gene delivery applications.Graphical Abstract.

  3. Synthesis of vaterite and aragonite crystals using biomolecules of tomato and capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Wang-Hua; Zhao, Ying-Guo; Kang, Yan; Liu, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Yong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of biomolecules of two vegetables-tomato and capsicum is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to characterize the CaCO3 obtained. The biomolecules in the extracts of two vegetables are determined by UV-vis or FTIR. The results indicate that a mixture of calcite and vaterite spheres constructed from small particles is produced with the extract of tomato, while aragonite rods or ellipsoids are formed in the presence of extract of capsicum. The possible formation mechanism of the CaCO3 crystals with tomato biomolecules can be interpreted by particle-aggregation based non-classical crystallization laws. The proteins and/or other biomolecules in tomato and capsicum may control the formation of vaterite and aragonite crystals by adsorbing onto facets of them.

  4. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Zixuan; Mu, Lin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination.

  5. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination. PMID:29309403

  6. Micropatterning of biomolecules on a glass substrate in fused silica microchannels by using photolabile linker-based surface activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.; Mawatari, K.; Kitamori, T.; Xu, Y.; Sato, K.; Tanaka, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a straightforward method for creating micropatterns of multiple biomolecules. The anti-fouling agent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer and a photolabile linker (PL) were covalently linked to an amino-terminated silane surface. Patterns were generated by selective removal of the MPC polymer via UV irradiation. Multiple micropatterns of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rhodamine-labeled goat fragment antigen-binding fragments (FAB) were deposited on a same glass substrate. We also employed micropatterning of multiple biomolecules in that Texas red-labeled BSA and FITC-labeled rabbit anti-mouse IgG were placed inside a microchannel. (author)

  7. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Anna; Czaja, Malgorzata; Chmurzynski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K a , anionic, K AHA - , and cationic, K BHB + , homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K BHA , constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K AHA - values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK BHA reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK a values

  8. Quantification of pH gradients and implications in insulator-based dielectrophoresis of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencoglu, Aytug; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Nguyen, Vi Thanh; Nakano, Asuka; Ros, Alexandra; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2011-09-01

    Direct current (DC) insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) microdevices have the potential to replace traditional alternating current dielectrophoretic devices for many cellular and biomolecular separation applications. The use of large DC fields suggest that electrode reactions and ion transport mechanisms can become important and impact ion distributions in the nanoliters of fluid in iDEP microchannels. This work tracked natural pH gradient formation in a 100 μm wide, 1 cm-long microchannel under applicable iDEP protein manipulation conditions. Using fluorescence microscopy with the pH-sensitive dye FITC Isomer I and the pH-insensitive dye TRITC as a reference, pH was observed to drop drastically in the microchannels within 1 min in a 3000 V/cm electric field; pH drops were observed in the range of 6-10 min within a 100 V/cm electric field and varied based on the buffer conductivity. To address concerns of dye transport impacting intensity data, electrokinetic mobilities of FITC were carefully examined and found to be (i) toward the anode and (ii) 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than H⁺ transport which is responsible for pH drops from the anode toward the cathode. COMSOL simulations of ion transport showed qualitative agreement with experimental results. The results indicate that pH changes are severe enough and rapid enough to influence the net charge of a protein or cause aggregation during iDEP experiments. The results also elucidate reasonable time periods over which the phosphate buffering capacity can counter increases in H⁺ and OH⁻ for unperturbed iDEP manipulations. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Anna [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Czaja, Malgorzata [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, Lech [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-05-15

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K{sub a}, anionic, K{sub AHA{sup -}}, and cationic, K{sub BHB{sup +}}, homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K{sub BHA}, constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K{sub AHA{sup -}} values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK{sub BHA} reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK{sub a} values.

  10. Biomolecules in Astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Meringer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, distribution and future of life in the universe, biomolecules are molecules produced by living organisms. This talk reviews known facts and open questions about biomolecules in the context of Astrobiology and introduces a research project on "Creating a Reference Set of Amino Acids Structures for Use in Multiple Astrobiology Investigations" that tries to find answers using computational methods.

  11. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Dexing; Desai, Amit V.; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Reichert, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. Methods: The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both 64 Cu and 68 Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Results: Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with 64 Cu/ 68 Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. Conclusions: A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions.

  12. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D; Kenis, Paul J A; Reichert, David E

    2013-01-01

    A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both ⁶⁴Cu and ⁶⁸Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with ⁶⁴Cu/⁶⁸Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Desalting by crystallization: detection of attomole biomolecules in picoliter buffers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Xingchuang; Wang, Song; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Sichun; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-10-06

    Sensitive detection of biomolecules in small-volume samples by mass spectrometry is, in many cases, challenging because of the use of buffers to maintain the biological activities of proteins and cells. Here, we report a highly effective desalting method for picoliter samples. It was based on the spontaneous separation of biomolecules from salts during crystallization of the salts. After desalting, the biomolecules were deposited in the tip of the quartz pipet because of the evaporation of the solvent. Subsequent detection of the separated biomolecules was achieved using solvent assisted electric field induced desorption/ionization (SAEFIDI) coupled with mass spectrometry. It allowed for direct desorption/ionization of the biomolecules in situ from the tip of the pipet. The organic component in the assistant solvent inhibited the desorption/ionization of salts, thus assured successful detection of biomolecules. Proteins and peptides down to 50 amol were successfully detected using our method even if there were 3 × 10(5) folds more amount of salts in the sample. The concentration and ion species of the salts had little influence on the detection results.

  14. Biomolecule detection using wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors based on CoFeB spin-valve thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elda Swastika, P.; Antarnusa, G.; Suharyadi, E.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.

    2018-04-01

    A potential wheatstone bridge giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor have been successfully developed for biomolecule detection. [IrMn(10 nm)/CoFe(3 nm)/Cu(2.2 nm)/CoFeB(10 nm)] spin-valve structure has been chosen as the magnetic sensing surface, showing a magnetoresistance (MR) of 6% fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering method. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles used as biomolecular labels (nanotags) was synthesized by co-precipitation method, exhibiting soft magnetic behavior with saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) is 77.2 emu/g, 7.8 emu/g and 51 Oe, respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that Fe3O4 was well crystallized and grew in their inverse spinel structure, highly uniform morphology with an average grain size was about 20 nm. Fe3O4 was coated with polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-4000 for surface functionalization. Detection of biomolecule such as formalin, gelatin from bovine-skin and porcine-skin were dispersed in ethanol at room temperature. Induction would cause a shift in output voltage with a minimum delta output voltage (ΔV) 4.937 mV (10%) for formalin detection, 2.268 mV (7%) for bovine-skin gelatin and 2.943 mV (7%) for porcine-skin gelatin detection. The ΔV of the wheatstone bridge in real-time measurement decrease by increase in biomolecules concentration. The change of ΔV with various concentration of biomolecule indicates that the spin-valve thin film with wheatstone-bridge circuit is potential as a biosensor.

  15. Magnetic GMI sensor for detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Tibu, Mihai; Moga, Anca-Eugenia; Herea, Dumitru D.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic sensor based on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect for the detection of biomolecules was made with a CoFeSiB amorphous magnetic microwire as sensing element. Using soft ferromagnetic cobalt microparticles and field sensitivities of the impedance of about 2.5%/A m -1 in the very low field region (less than 200 A m -1 ) at frequencies close to 10 MHz, a highly sensitive response was measured, appropriate for the detection of low biomolecule concentrations

  16. Sensitivity improvement of an electrical sensor achieved by control of biomolecules based on the negative dielectrophoretic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Jinsik; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jung Ho; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2016-11-15

    Effective control of nano-scale biomolecules can enhance the sensitivity and limit of detection of an interdigitated microelectrode (IME) sensor. Manipulation of the biomolecules by dielectrophoresis (DEP), especially the negative DEP (nDEP) force, so that they are trapped between electrodes (sensing regions) was predicted to increase the binding efficiency of the antibody and target molecules, leading to a more effective reaction. To prove this concept, amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein were respectively trapped between the sensing region owing to the nDEP force under 5V and 0.05V, which was verified with COMSOL simulation. Using the simulation value, the resistance change (ΔR/Rb) of the IME sensor from the specific antibody-antigen reaction of the two biomolecules and the change in fluorescence intensity were compared in the reference (pDEP) and nDEP conditions. The ΔR/Rb value improved by about 2-fold and 1.66-fold with nDEP compared to the reference condition with various protein concentrations, and these increases were confirmed with fluorescence imaging. Overall, nDEP enhanced the detection sensitivity for Aβ42 and PSA by 128% and 258%, respectively, and the limit of detection improved by up to 2-orders of magnitude. These results prove that DEP can improve the biosensor's performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  18. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Frustration in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and especially how biomolecular structure connects to function by means of localized frustration. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. In this review, we also emphasize that frustration, far from being always a bad thing, is an essential feature

  20. 1.9 μm superficially porous packing material with radially oriented pores and tailored pore size for ultra-fast separation of small molecules and biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yi; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ci; Xia, Simin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-08-22

    In this work, 1.9 μm reversed-phase packing materials with superficially porous structure were prepared to achieve the rapid and high efficient separation of peptides and proteins. The silica particles were synthesized via three steps, nonporous silica particle preparation by a modified seeded growth method, mesoporous shell formation by a one pot templated dissolution and redeposition strategy, and pore size expansion via acid-refluxing. By such a method, 1.9 μm superficially porous materials with 0.18 μm shell thickness and tailored pore diameter (10 nm, 15 nm) were obtained. After pore enlargement, the formerly dense arrays of mesoporous structure changed, the radially oriented pores dominated the superficially porous structure. The chromatographic performance of such particles was investigated after C18 derivatization. For packing materials with 1.9 μm diameter and 10 nm pore size, the column efficiency could reach 211,300 plates per m for naphthalene. To achieve the high resolution separation of peptides and proteins, particles with pore diameter of 15 nm were tailored, by which the baseline separation of 5 peptides and 5 intact proteins could be respectively achieved within 1 min, demonstrating the superiority in the high efficiency and high throughput analysis of biomolecules. Furthermore, BSA digests were well separated with peak capacity of 120 in 30 min on a 15 cm-long column. Finally, we compared our columns with a 1.7 μm Kinetex C18 column under the same conditions, our particles with 10nm pore size demonstrated similar performance for separation of the large intact proteins. Moreover, the particles with 15 nm pore size showed more symmetrical peaks for the separation of large proteins (BSA, OVA and IgG) and provided rapid separation of protein extracts from Escherichia coli in 5 min. All these results indicated that the synthesized 1.9 μm superficially porous silica packing materials would be promising in the ultra-fast and high

  1. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  2. Light-induced immobilisation of biomolecules as an attractive alternative to micro-droplet dispensing-based arraying technologies (vol 7, pg 3491, 2007)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duroux, Meg; Skovsen, Esben; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    The present work shows how UV ‘light-induced molecular immobilisation' (LIMI) of biomolecules onto thiol reactive surfaces can be used to make biosensors, without the need for traditional microdispensing technologies. Using ‘LIMI,' arrays of biomolecules can be created with a high degree of repro...

  3. Structure analysis of biomolecules using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gekko, Kunihiko; Matsuo, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    We constructed the vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectrophotometer, which is capable of measuring circular dichroism spectra to 140 nm for aqueous solutions at temperature from -30 to 70degC, using a small-scale SR source at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HiSOR). This spectrophotometer was used for structural analyses of amino acids, saccharides, and proteins in water. The obtained results demonstrate that a synchrotron radiation VUVCD spectroscopy provides more detailed and new information on the structures of biomolecules, based on the high energy transitions of chromophores such as hydroxyl, acetal, and peptide groups. (author)

  4. Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2013-04-21

    Functional polymer brushes have been utilized extensively for the immobilization of biomolecules, which is of crucial importance for the development of biosensors and biotechnology. Recent progress in polymerization methods, in particular surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), has provided a unique means for the design and synthesis of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes. This current review summarizes such recent research activities. The different preparation strategies for biomolecule immobilization through polymer brush spacers are described in detail. The functional groups of the polymer brushes used for biomolecule immobilization include epoxide, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, aldehyde, and amine groups. The recent research activities indicate that functional polymer brushes become versatile and powerful spacers for immobilization of various biomolecules to maximize their functionalities. This review also demonstrates that surface-initiated ATRP is used more frequently than other polymerization methods in the designs of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

  5. Dynamics of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of the biomolecules is shown by the example of myoglobin (Mb). The photodissociation of MbCO with a laser flash and the recapture process of CO were followed optically in the temperature region of 2 to 350 K. The binding procedure exhibits four components which stretch out over many orders of magnitude of time. Above 250 K, the time dependence of the components is exponential, below 180 K, only one component is present which follows an exponential equation. A potential barrier model is shown to explain the observed courses of binding. See also 'Biochemistry', in printing. (BJ/LH) [de

  6. Biomolecule-free, selective detection of o-diphenol and its derivatives with WS2/TiO2-based photoelectrochemical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiguang; Wang, Lingnan; Zhang, Nan; Han, Dongxue; Dong, Xiandui; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Herein, a novel photoelectrochemical platform with WS2/TiO2 composites as optoelectronic materials was designed for selective detection of o-diphenol and its derivatives without any biomolecule auxiliary. First, catechol was chosen as a model compound for the discrimination from resorcinol and hydroquinone; then several o-diphenol derivatives such as dopamine, caffeic acid, and catechin were also detected by employing this proposed photoelectrochemical sensor. Finally, the mechanism of such a selective detection has been elaborately explored. The excellent selectivity and high sensitivity should be attributed to two aspects: (i) chelate effect of adjacent double oxygen atoms in the o-diphenol with the Ti(IV) surface site to form a five/six-atom ring structure, which is considered as the key point for distinction and selective detection. (ii) This selected WS2/TiO2 composites with proper band level between WS2 and TiO2, which could make the photogenerated electron and hole easily separated and results in great improvement of sensitivity. By employing such a photoelectrochemical platform, practical samples including commercial clinic drugs and human urine samples have been successfully performed for dopamine detection. This biomolecule-free WS2/TiO2 based photoelectrochemical platform demonstrates excellent stability, reproducibility, remarkably convenient, and cost-effective advantages, as well as low detection limit (e.g., 0.32 μmol L(-1) for dopamine). It holds great promise to be applied for detection of o-diphenol kind species in environment and food fields.

  7. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  8. Quantum-dot nanoprobes and AOTF based cross talk eliminated six color imaging of biomolecules in cellular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Solji; Arumugam, Parthasarathy; Purushothaman, Baskaran; Kim, Sung-Yon; Min, Dal-Hee; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Joon Myong

    2017-01-01

    Primary cell cultures mimic the physiology and genetic makeup of in-vivo tissue of origin, nonetheless, a complication in the derivation and propagation of primary cell culture limits its use in biological research. However, in-vitro models using primary cells might be a complement model to mimic in vivo response. But, conventional techniques such as western blot and PCR employed to study the expression and activation of proteins requires a large number of cells, hence repeated establishment and maintenance of primary culture are unavoidable. Quantum dot (Q-dot) and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) based multiplex imaging system is a viable alternative choice to evaluate multiple signaling molecules by using a small number of cells. Q-dots have broad excitation and narrow emission spectra, which allows to simultaneously excite multiple Q-dots by using single excitation wavelength. The use of AOTF in the fluorescence detection system enables to scan the fluorescence emission intensity of a Q-dot at their central wavelength, this phenomenon effectively avoids spectral overlap among the neighboring Q-dots. When Q-dots are conjugated with antibodies it acts as effective sensing probes. To validate this, the expression pattern of p-JNK-1, p-GSK3β, p-IRS1ser, p-IRS1tyr, p-FOXO1, and PPAR-γ, involved in the insulin resistance were concurrently monitored in adipocyte and HepG2 co-cell culture model. The observed results clearly indicate that PPAR-γ is the critical component in the development of insulin resistance. Moreover, the results proved that developed Q-dot based AOTF imaging methodology is a sensible choice to concurrently monitor multiple signaling molecules with limited cell population. - Highlights: • Quantum dot (Q-dot) and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) based six-colour imaging. • Expression of PPAR-γ in adipocyte regulates insulin resistance in hepatic (HepG2) cells. • Aspirin improved insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and HepG2 co

  9. Tuneable graphene nanopores for single biomolecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Mohammed, Mahmood A; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Hossain, Faruque M; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-21

    Solid-state nanopores are promising candidates for next generation DNA and protein sequencing. However, once fabricated, such devices lack tuneability, which greatly restricts their biosensing capabilities. Here we propose a new class of solid-state graphene-based nanopore devices that exhibit a unique capability of self-tuneability, which is used to control their conductance, tuning it to levels comparable to the changes caused by the translocation of a single biomolecule, and hence, enabling high detection sensitivities. Our presented quantum simulation results suggest that the smallest amino acid, glycine, when present in water and in an aqueous saline solution can be detected with high sensitivity, up to a 90% change in conductance. Our results also suggest that passivating the device with nitrogen, making it an n-type device, greatly enhances its sensitivity, and makes it highly sensitive to not only the translocation of a single biomolecule, but more interestingly to intramolecular electrostatics within the biomolecule. Sensitive detection of the carboxyl group within the glycine molecule, which carries a charge equivalent to a single electron, is achieved with a conductance change that reaches as high as 99% when present in an aqueous saline solution. The presented findings suggest that tuneable graphene nanopores, with their capability of probing intramolecular electrostatics, could pave the way towards a new generation of single biomolecule detection devices.

  10. Highly hindered 2-(aryl-di-tert-butylsilyl)-N-methyl-imidazoles: a new tool for the aqueous 19F- and 18F-fluorination of biomolecule-based structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisseraud, Marion; Schulz, Jürgen; Vimont, Delphine; Berlande, Murielle; Fernandez, Philippe; Hermange, Philippe; Fouquet, Eric

    2018-05-01

    A new class of silicon-based fluoride acceptors with a C-linked heterocycle as the leaving group was synthesized in one step from commercial chemicals, and linked to biomolecules. The resulting conjugates were efficiently 19F-fluorinated in aqueous mixtures, and switching to 18F-labelling provided nucleoside- and peptide-based bioconjugates with excellent molar activities suitable for biological applications.

  11. Interactions of heavy ions with biomolecules: a dynamical microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengshou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    The status of studying biology system therapy with X-rays, γ-rays, neutron, proton, and heavy ions is reviewed. The depth dose profile, called Bragg profile, makes heavy ion an ideal tool for radiotherapy. The physical process of therapy with heavy ions is analyzed and a 3-step interaction processes of heavy ions with biomolecules is proposed, that is, nuclear fragmentation in nuclear interaction, electron excitation in Coulomb interaction, and the biomolecules relaxation in surroundings, finally leads to a new structure of biomolecule. Since this physical process is the base of the following chemical process and biological process, a dynamical microscopic approach is strongly demanded to be built. (authors)

  12. A source for microhydrated biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Förstel, M.; Hergenhahn, U., E-mail: uwe.hergenhahn@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Neustetter, M.; Denifl, S. [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Lelievre, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); University Paris-Sud 11, Faculté des Science d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the construction of an apparatus for the production of a molecular jet of microhydrated biomolecules. Our design uses a water reservoir producing water vapour, which then passes through a separate reservoir containing a vapour of a sublimated biomolecule. The mixture coexpands into a molecular beam apparatus through a conical nozzle. Mass spectra showing water-adenin and water-uracil complexes are shown as typical examples. Suitable expansion conditions are reached without the use of an inert carrier gas.

  13. Biomolecule labelling by 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, Valeria Viorica; Mihailescu, Gabriela; Dumitrescu, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and improve the existing radiolabelling techniques of peptides and monoclonal antibodies with 186 Re and 188 Re as potential agents for cancer targeted radiotherapy. We selected the following methods and techniques for direct labelling of peptides and monoclonal antibody: 1. Prereduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecule to sulfhydryls using reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The prereduction reactions are controlled by massic ratios of reduction agents/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation; 2. Reduction of 186 Re O 4 - stannous chloride in acid and alkaline pH; 3. Coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule controlled by the time and temperature of incubation, the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecules. The quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and elution gel chromatography) on labeled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography was spectrophotometricaly monitored at 280 nm. In the same time the radioactivity of samples was measured using a gamma counter. All the results confirm in vitro stability of labeled biomolecule. The biological evaluation studies regarding accumulation and biological affinity will be controlled by scintigraphy method. Biodistribution studies will be effected to Walker tumor bearing animals at 4 and 24 hours after injections. (authors)

  14. Biomolecule-assisted synthesis and gas-sensing properties of porous nanosheet-based corundum In2O3 microflowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenhui; Zhang Weide

    2012-01-01

    Porous nanosheet-based corundum In 2 O 3 microflowers were fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of D-fructose and In(NO 3 ) 3 mixture using urea as a precipitating agent followed by calcination. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of D-fructose and urea on the fabrication of nanosheet-based corundum In 2 O 3 microflowers were investigated and a possible mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical nanostructures. The gas sensor based on the In 2 O 3 microflowers exhibits excellent sensing properties for the detection of formaldehyde. - Graphical abstract: Nanosheets-based corundum In 2 O 3 microflowers were fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of D-fructose/In(NO 3 ) 3 mixture followed by calcination, which show high performance for formaldehyde sensing. Highlights: ► Preparation of porous nanosheet-based corundum In 2 O 3 microflowers. ► Morphology and phase control of In 2 O 3 . ► Gas sensor based on the In 2 O 3 microflowers exhibits excellent sensing properties for the detection of formaldehyde.

  15. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubala, Vladimir; Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O’Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Daniels, Stephen; Williams, David E.; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. ► Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. ► It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. ► The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. ► Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor ® ) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor ® substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor ® , and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and neutral, hydrogel-like film with polyethylene glycol (PEG) characteristics. This simple analytical approach adds to the fundamental understanding of the interaction forces in real

  16. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubala, Vladimir, E-mail: V.Gubala@kent.ac.uk [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, Central Avenue, Anson 120, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O' Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Daniels, Stephen [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David E. [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Ducree, Jens [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign} substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }, and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and

  17. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  18. Enzyme-assisted polymer film degradation-enabled biomolecule sensing with poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)-based optical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wei, Menglian; Carvalho, Wildemar S P; Serpe, Michael J

    2018-01-25

    A biosensor for mouse Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was generated from responsive polymer-based interference filters (etalons). To accomplish this, an excess amount of alkaline phosphatase-modified goat anti-mouse IgG (AP-GAM, F(ab') 2 fragment specific to mouse IgG) was added to mouse IgG, and allowed to react for some time. After a given reaction time, the bound AP-GAM could be isolated from the unbound, excess AP-GAM by addition of goat anti-mouse IgG (Fc fragment specific)-modified magnetic microspheres (GAM-M) that bind the mouse IgG bound to AP-GAM. After application of a magnetic field, the free, unbound AP-GAM was isolated from the mixture and exposed to an etalon that has its upper Au surface modified with phosphate-containing polymer that can be degraded by AP-GAM. By the phosphate-containing polymer being degraded by the excess AP-GAM, the cleaved phosphate groups can diffuse into the interference filter's active polymer layer that yields a change in the optical properties that can be related to the amount of IgG in the sample. This concept is extremely straightforward to implement, and can be modified to detect a variety of other analytes of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleo...

  20. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Henrique Nasi; Cruz, Guilherme Crispim Faria; Mayrink, Willian; Tasic, Ljubica

    2018-01-01

    Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange ( Citrus sinensis ) waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated), and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. AgNPs were synthesized using orange ( C. sinensis ) peel extract (Or-AgNPs) in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs) and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges) in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ( Xac ), the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of -19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm) and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (-28.2±1.0 mV) stabilization to the nanoparticles. Both AgNPs presented roughly the same activity against Xac , with the minimum inhibitory concentration range between 22 and 24 μg mL -1 . Despite the fact that different capping biomolecules on AgNPs had an influence on morphology, size, and stability of AgNPs, the antibacterial

  1. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Henrique Nasi; Cruz, Guilherme Crispim Faria; Mayrink, Willian; Tasic, Ljubica

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis) waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated), and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis) peel extract (Or-AgNPs) in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs) and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges) in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm) and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV) stabilization to the nanoparticles. Both AgNPs presented roughly the same activity against Xac, with the minimum inhibitory concentration range between 22 and 24 μg mL−1. Conclusion Despite the fact that different capping biomolecules on AgNPs had an influence on morphology, size, and stability

  2. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros CHN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Caio Henrique Nasi de Barros, Guilherme Crispim Faria Cruz, Willian Mayrink, Ljubica Tasic Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Department of Organic Chemistry, Instituto de Química da Universidade Estadual de Campinas–Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil Purpose: Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated, and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods: AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis peel extract (­Or-AgNPs in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac, the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results: Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV stabilization to the nanoparticles

  3. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando; Welker, Frido; Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Allentoft, Morten E; de Barros Damgaard, Peter; Gutenbrunner, Petra; Dunne, Julie; Hammann, Simon; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Ilardo, Melissa; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Wang, Yucheng; Sikora, Martin; Vinner, Lasse; Cox, Jürgen; Evershed, Richard P; Willerslev, Eske

    2018-04-25

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleotide and amino acid sequences, as well as lipid signatures, from progressively older samples, originating from geographic areas and depositional environments that, until recently, were regarded as hostile to long-term preservation of biomolecules. Sampling frequencies and the spatial and temporal scope of studies have also increased markedly, and with them the size and quality of the data sets generated. This progress has been made possible by continuous technical innovations in analytical methods, enhanced criteria for the selection of ancient samples, integrated experimental methods, and advanced computational approaches. Here, we discuss the history and current state of ancient biomolecule research, its applications to evolutionary inference, and future directions for this young and exciting field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 87 is June 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann's law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions.

  5. Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideko; Okano, Teruo

    2011-12-09

    Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules utilizing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and its copolymer-modified stationary phase is performed with an aqueous mobile phase without using organic solvent. The surface properties and function of the stationary phase are controlled by external temperature changes without changing the mobile-phase composition. This analytical system is based on nonspecific adsorption by the reversible transition of a hydrophilic-hydrophobic PNIPAAm-grafted surface. The driving force for retention is hydrophobic interaction between the solute molecules and the hydrophobized polymer chains on the stationary phase surface. The separation of the biomolecules, such as nucleotides and proteins was achieved by a dual temperature- and pH-responsive chromatography system. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could be modulated simultaneously with the temperature in an aqueous mobile phase, thus the separation system would have potential applications in the separation of biomolecules. Additionally, chromatographic matrices prepared by a surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) exhibit a strong interaction with analytes, because the polymerization procedure forms a densely packed polymer, called a polymer brush, on the surfaces. The copolymer brush grafted surfaces prepared by ATRP was an effective tool for separating basic biomolecules by modulating the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Applications of thermally responsive columns for the separations of biomolecules are reviewed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improved radioiodination of biomolecules using exhaustive Chloramine-T oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana M.; Balter, Henia S.; Oliver, Patricia; Welling, Mick M.; Pauwels, Ernest K.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve standardization in analytical reagents we investigated Chloramine-T radioiodination ( 125 I) of several biomolecules based on the use of a single amount of the oxidizing agent Chloramine-T as the limiting reagent being exhausted during the course of the reaction. Whenever the labeling yield resulted in less than one atom 125 I/molecule, a second amount of the oxidizing agent was added. Thereafter, the integrity of the various biomolecules was assessed using radioimmunoassays, radioreceptor binding assays, or radioimmunometric assays. Purification yields were done by gel permeation (56%±19%, n=230) or by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (59%±19%, n=230). Specific activity (117±61 MBq/nmol) and the degree of iodine incorporation (1.4±0.8 atoms of 125 I/molecule) were achieved after 300 sec of incubation. A second addition of Chloramine-T resulted in an increased labeling yield of all biomolecules tested by a mean factor of 1.8±0.9. After the second addition of Chloramine-T, we observed for some biomolecules a significant (p<0.001) decreased effect in biological performance. In conclusion, the use of Chloramine-T as a limiting reagent resulted in molecules with appropriate immunological and biological performance. In general, tracers were minimally damaged and assessment of the shelf life as well as storing conditions showed the usefulness of the standardization of biomolecule labeling

  7. 47 CFR 95.139 - Adding a small base station or a small control station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adding a small base station or a small control... base station or a small control station. (a) Except for a GMRS system licensed to a non-individual, one or more small base stations or a small control station may be added to a GMRS system at any point...

  8. Thermally modulated biomolecule transport through nanoconfined channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a nanofluidic device containing both a feed cell and a permeation cell linked by nanopore arrays has been fabricated, which is employed to investigate thermally controlled biomolecular transporting properties through confined nanochannels. The ionic currents modulated by the translocations of goat antibody to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) are recorded and analyzed. The results suggest that the modulation effect decreases with the electrolyte concentration increasing, while the effects generated by IgG translocation are more significant than that generated by BSA translocation. More importantly, there is a maximum decreasing value in each modulated current curve with biomolecule concentration increasing for thermally induced intermolecular collision. Furthermore, the turning point for the maximum shifts to lower biomolecule concentrations with the system temperature rising (from 4°C to 45°C), and it is mainly determined by the temperature in the feed cell if the temperature difference exists in the two separated cells. These findings are expected to be valuable for the future design of novel sensing device based on nanopore and/or nanopore arrays.

  9. SPM for functional identification of individual biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Robert; Schwesinger, Falk; Padeste, Celestino; Plueckthun, Andreas; Anselmetti, Dario; Guentherodt, Hans-Joachim; Tiefenauer, Louis

    1999-06-01

    The identification of specific binding molecules is of increasing interest in the context of drug development based on combinatorial libraries. Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is the method of choice to image and probe individual biomolecules on a surface. Functional identification of biomolecules is a first step towards screening on a single molecule level. As a model system we use recombinant single- chain Fv fragment (scFv) antibody molecules directed against the antigen fluorescein. The scFv's are covalently immobilized on a flat gold surface via the C-terminal cysteine, resulting in a high accessibility of the binding site. The antigen is immobilized covalently via a long hydrophilic spacer to the silicon nitride SPM-tip. This arrangement allows a direct measurement of binding forces. Thus, closely related antibody molecules differing in only one amino acid at their binding site could be distinguished. A novel SPM-software has been developed which combines imaging, force spectroscopic modes, and online analysis. This is a major prerequisite for future screening methods.

  10. Small organic molecule based flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskinson, Brian; Marshak, Michael; Aziz, Michael J.; Gordon, Roy G.; Betley, Theodore A.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Er, Suleyman; Suh, Changwon

    2018-05-08

    The invention provides an electrochemical cell based on a new chemistry for a flow battery for large scale, e.g., gridscale, electrical energy storage. Electrical energy is stored chemically at an electrochemical electrode by the protonation of small organic molecules called quinones to hydroquinones. The proton is provided by a complementary electrochemical reaction at the other electrode. These reactions are reversed to deliver electrical energy. A flow battery based on this concept can operate as a closed system. The flow battery architecture has scaling advantages over solid electrode batteries for large scale energy storage.

  11. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    an edge over the X-ray method as it can be used to study biomolecules ... currently as an Associate. Professor. ... Such a wealth of data is made available to the NMR ... important step towards structural characterization of a biomolecule. Box 1.

  12. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  13. Normal mode analysis based on an elastic network model for biomolecules in the Protein Data Bank, which uses dihedral angles as independent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a computer program, named PDBETA, that performs normal mode analysis (NMA) based on an elastic network model that uses dihedral angles as independent variables. Taking advantage of the relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to describe a molecular structure in dihedral angle space and a simple potential-energy function independent of atom types, we aimed to develop a program applicable to a full-atom system of any molecule in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The algorithm for NMA used in PDBETA is the same as the computer program FEDER/2, developed previously. Therefore, the main challenge in developing PDBETA was to find a method that can automatically convert PDB data into molecular structure information in dihedral angle space. Here, we illustrate the performance of PDBETA with a protein-DNA complex, a protein-tRNA complex, and some non-protein small molecules, and show that the atomic fluctuations calculated by PDBETA reproduce the temperature factor data of these molecules in the PDB. A comparison was also made with elastic-network-model based NMA in a Cartesian-coordinate system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. LIAD-fs: A novel method for studies of ultrafast processes in gas phase neutral biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, C R; Kelly, O; Duffy, M J; Belshaw, L; King, R B; Williams, I D; Greenwood, J B

    2012-01-01

    A new experimental technique for femtosecond (fs) pulse studies of gas phase biomolecules is reported. Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) to produce a plume of neutral molecules, a time-delayed fs pulse is employed for ionisation/fragmentation, with subsequent products extracted and mass analysed electrostatically. By varying critical laser pulse parameters, this technique can be used to implement control over molecular fragmentation for a range of small biomolecules, with specific studies of amino acids demonstrated.

  15. Biomolecule-recognition gating membrane using biomolecular cross-linking and polymer phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Ito, Taichi; Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-15

    We present for the first time a biomolecule-recognition gating system that responds to small signals of biomolecules by the cooperation of biorecognition cross-linking and polymer phase transition in nanosized pores. The biomolecule-recognition gating membrane immobilizes the stimuli-responsive polymer, including the biomolecule-recognition receptor, onto the pore surface of a porous membrane. The pore state (open/closed) of this gating membrane depends on the formation of specific biorecognition cross-linking in the pores: a specific biomolecule having multibinding sites can be recognized by several receptors and acts as the cross-linker of the grafted polymer, whereas a nonspecific molecule cannot. The pore state can be distinguished by a volume phase transition of the grafted polymer. In the present study, the principle of the proposed system is demonstrated using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as the stimuli-responsive polymer and avidin-biotin as a multibindable biomolecule-specific receptor. As a result of the selective response to the specific biomolecule, a clear permeability change of an order of magnitude was achieved. The principle is versatile and can be applied to many combinations of multibindable analyte-specific receptors, including antibody-antigen and lectin-sugar analogues. The new gating system can find wide application in the bioanalytical field and aid the design of novel biodevices.

  16. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  17. Small, microcomputer-based CAMAC controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juras, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    The beam buncher necessary to condition the beam from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory 25 MV tandem accelerator for post-acceleration by the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron is CAMAC-based and will be controlled via one of the serial highways of the accelerator control system. However, prior to integration into the accelerator system, the buncher requires testing, including runs on the model EN tandem at Oak Ridge. In order to facilitate testing and initial operation of the buncher, a microcomputer-based controller was assembled. The controller consists of a CAMAC crate, several CAMAC modules, a touch panel display, a controller box, and software. The controller box contains one shaft encoder and two switches. One of the switches is a coarse/fine selector. The other switch is assignable via the touch panel display and is used, for example, to turn devices on and off. Operation of the controller is described. It can be quickly assembled to control any small CAMAC-based system. 2 figures

  18. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  19. Analysis of nanoparticle biomolecule complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Stefán B; Bernfur, Katja; Mikkelsen, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles exposed to biological fluids adsorb biomolecules on their surface forming a biomolecular corona. This corona determines, on a molecular level, the interactions and impact the newly formed complex has on cells and organisms. The corona formation as well as the physiological and toxicological relevance are commonly investigated. However, an acknowledged but rarely addressed problem in many fields of nanobiotechnology is aggregation and broadened size distribution of nanoparticles following their interactions with the molecules of biological fluids. In blood serum, TiO 2 nanoparticles form complexes with a size distribution from 30 nm to more than 500 nm. In this study we have separated these complexes, with good resolution, using preparative centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. Two main apparent size populations were obtained, a fast sedimenting population of complexes that formed a pellet in the preparative centrifugation tube, and a slow sedimenting complex population still suspended in the gradient after centrifugation. Concentration and surface area dependent differences are found in the biomolecular corona between the slow and fast sedimenting fractions. There are more immunoglobulins, lipid binding proteins, and lipid-rich complexes at higher serum concentrations. Sedimentation rate and the biomolecular corona are important factors for evaluating any experiment including nanoparticle exposure. Our results show that traditional description of nanoparticles in biological fluids is an oversimplification and that more thorough characterisations are needed.

  20. [Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xiu-ping

    2015-09-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA) and proteins in the environment. These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules, which is significant for biology, biochemistry, nutrition, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, and environmental science. In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and their application for different metal species interaction with biomolecules such as DNA, HSA, and GSH. The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitively probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules, provides direct evidences for the formation of different metal species--biomolecule adducts. In addition, the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules, and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.

  1. 77 FR 39385 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    .... The NRC is increasing its receipts-based, small business size standard from $6.5 million to $7 million...-based, small business size standard increasing from $6.5 million to $7.0 million. This adjustment is to... regulatory programs. The NRC is increasing its receipts-based, small business size standard from $6.5 million...

  2. Surface plasmon resonance sensing: from purified biomolecules to intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Wen; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-12

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a well-recognized label-free technique for measuring the binding kinetics between biomolecules since the invention of the first SPR-based immunosensor in 1980s. The most popular and traditional format for SPR analysis is to monitor the real-time optical signals when a solution containing ligand molecules is flowing over a sensor substrate functionalized with purified receptor molecules. In recent years, rapid development of several kinds of SPR imaging techniques have allowed for mapping the dynamic distribution of local mass density within single living cells with high spatial and temporal resolutions and reliable sensitivity. Such capability immediately enabled one to investigate the interaction between important biomolecules and intact cells in a label-free, quantitative, and single cell manner, leading to an exciting new trend of cell-based SPR bioanalysis. In this Trend Article, we first describe the principle and technical features of two types of SPR imaging techniques based on prism and objective, respectively. Then we survey the intact cell-based applications in both fundamental cell biology and drug discovery. We conclude the article with comments and perspectives on the future developments. Graphical abstract Recent developments in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging techniques allow for label-free mapping the mass-distribution within single living cells, leading to great expansions in biomolecular interactions studies from homogeneous substrates functionalized with purified biomolecules to heterogeneous substrates containing individual living cells.

  3. From clusters to biomolecules: electric dipole, structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyer, M; Antoine, R; Compagnon, I; Rayane, D; Dugourd, P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated that the electric dipole of complex molecules or clusters can be measured by beam deviation in an inhomogeneous electric field. This measurement, associated to appropriate theoretical calculations and simulations, allows us to determine the geometry of these systems and their dynamical behaviour as a function of temperature. Selected examples for mixed clusters (metal-fullerene, metal-benzene, salt) and biomolecules (hydrogen bound amino acids and glycine based polypeptides) are discussed

  4. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  5. Small Computer Applications for Base Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    research on small computer utili- zation at bse level organizatins , This research effort studies whether small computers and commercial softure can assist...Doe has made !solid contributions to the full range of departmental activity. His demonstrated leadership skills and administrative ability warrent his...outstanding professionalism and leadership abilities were evidenced by his superb performance as unit key worker In the 1980 Combined Federal CauMign

  6. Recent advances in exploiting ionic liquids for biomolecules: Solubility, stability and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Magaret; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Goto, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The technological utility of biomolecules (e.g. proteins, enzymes and DNA) can be significantly enhanced by combining them with ionic liquids (ILs) - potentially attractive "green" and "designer" solvents - rather than using in conventional organic solvents or water. In recent years, ILs have been used as solvents, cosolvents, and reagents for biocatalysis, biotransformation, protein preservation and stabilization, DNA solubilization and stabilization, and other biomolecule-based applications. Using ILs can dramatically enhance the structural and chemical stability of proteins, DNA, and enzymes. This article reviews the recent technological developments of ILs in protein-, enzyme-, and DNA-based applications. We discuss the different routes to increase biomolecule stability and activity in ILs, and the design of biomolecule-friendly ILs that can dissolve biomolecules with minimum alteration to their structure. This information will be helpful to design IL-based processes in biotechnology and the biological sciences that can serve as novel and selective processes for enzymatic reactions, protein and DNA stability, and other biomolecule-based applications. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 77 FR 39442 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... RIN 3150-AJ14 [NRC-2012-0062] Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980, as amended. The NRC is proposing to increase its receipts-based, small business size standard from $6.5 million to $7 million to conform to the standard set by the Small Business...

  8. Multi-state modeling of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-state modeling of biomolecules refers to a series of techniques used to represent and compute the behavior of biological molecules or complexes that can adopt a large number of possible functional states. Biological signaling systems often rely on complexes of biological macromolecules that can undergo several functionally significant modifications that are mutually compatible. Thus, they can exist in a very large number of functionally different states. Modeling such multi-state systems poses two problems: the problem of how to describe and specify a multi-state system (the "specification problem" and the problem of how to use a computer to simulate the progress of the system over time (the "computation problem". To address the specification problem, modelers have in recent years moved away from explicit specification of all possible states and towards rule-based formalisms that allow for implicit model specification, including the κ-calculus, BioNetGen, the Allosteric Network Compiler, and others. To tackle the computation problem, they have turned to particle-based methods that have in many cases proved more computationally efficient than population-based methods based on ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Given current computing technology, particle-based methods are sometimes the only possible option. Particle-based simulators fall into two further categories: nonspatial simulators, such as StochSim, DYNSTOC, RuleMonkey, and the Network-Free Stochastic Simulator (NFSim, and spatial simulators, including Meredys, SRSim, and MCell. Modelers can thus choose from a variety of tools, the best choice depending on the particular problem. Development of faster and more powerful methods is ongoing, promising the ability to simulate ever more complex signaling processes in the future.

  9. Thermodynamic stability of biomolecules and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ashim K

    2017-08-01

    The thermodynamic stability of biomolecules in the perspective of evolution is a complex issue and needs discussion. Intra molecular bonds maintain the structure and the state of internal energy (E) of a biomolecule at "local minima". In this communication, possibility of loss in internal energy level of a biomolecule through the changes in the bonds has been discussed, that might earn more thermodynamic stability for the molecule. In the process variations in structure and functions of the molecule could occur. Thus, E of a biomolecule is likely to have energy stature for minimization. Such change in energy status is an intrinsic factor for evolving biomolecules buying more stability and generating variations in the structure and function of DNA molecules undergoing natural selection. Thus, the variations might very well contribute towards the process of evolution. A brief discussion on conserved sequence in the light of proposition in this communication has been made at the end. Extension of the idea may resolve certain standing problems in evolution, such as maintenance of conserved sequences in genome of diverse species, pre- versus post adaptive mutations, 'orthogenesis', etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, A.D.; Archimandritis, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  12. Low energy electron-driven damage in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanche, L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage induced by the impact of low energy electrons (LEE) on biomolecules is reviewed from a radiobiological perspective with emphasis on transient anion formation. The major type of experiments, which measure the yields of fragments produced as a function of incident electron energy (0.1 - 30 eV), are briefly described. Theoretical advances are also summarized. Several examples are presented from the results of recent experiments performed in the gas-phase and on bio-molecular films bombarded with LEE under ultra-high vacuum conditions. These include the results obtained from DNA films and those obtained from the fragmentation of elementary components of the DNA molecule (i.e., the bases, sugar and phosphate group analogs and oligonucleotides) and of proteins (e.g. amino acids). By comparing the results from different experiments and theory, it is possible to determine fundamental mechanisms that are involved in the dissociation of the biomolecules and the production of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. Below 15 eV, electron resonances (i.e., the formation of transient anions) play a dominant role in the fragmentation of all biomolecules investigated. These transient anions fragment molecules by decaying into dissociative electronically excited states or by dissociating into a stable anion and a neutral radical. These fragments can initiate further reactions within large biomolecules or with nearby molecules and thus cause more complex chemical damage. Dissociation of a transient anion within DNA may occur by direct electron attachment at the location of dissociation or by electron transfer from another subunit. Damage to DNA is dependent on the molecular environment, topology, type of counter ion, sequence context and chemical modifications. (author)

  13. Nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides: versatile biomolecules for generating functional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-21

    The incorporation of biomolecules into nanomaterials generates functional nanosystems with novel and advanced properties, presenting great potential for applications in various fields. Nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides, as building blocks of nucleic acids and biological coenzymes, constitute necessary components of the foundation of life. In recent years, as versatile biomolecules for the construction or regulation of functional nanomaterials, they have stimulated interest in researchers, due to their unique properties such as structural diversity, multiplex binding sites, self-assembly ability, stability, biocompatibility, and chirality. In this review, strategies for the synthesis of nanomaterials and the regulation of their morphologies and functions using nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides as building blocks, templates or modulators are summarized alongside selected applications. The diverse applications range from sensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery to mimicking light-harvesting antenna, the construction of logic gates, and beyond. Furthermore, some perspectives and challenges in this emerging field are proposed. This review is directed toward the broader scientific community interested in biomolecule-based functional nanomaterials.

  14. On the thermodynamics of biomolecule surface transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Maiolo, Daniele; Depero, Laura E; Colombo, Italo; Bergese, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    Biological surface science is receiving great and renewed attention owing the rising interest in applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology to biological systems, with horizons that range from nanomedicine and biomimetic photosynthesis to the unexpected effects of nanomaterials on health and environment. Biomolecule surface transformations are among the fundamental aspects of the field that remain elusive so far and urgently need to be understood to further the field. Our recent findings indicate that surface thermodynamics can give a substantial contribution toward this challenging goal. In the first part of the article, we show that biomolecule surface transformations can be framed by a general and simple thermodynamic model. Then, we explore its effectiveness by addressing some typical cases, including ligand-receptor surface binding, protein thin film machines, nanomechanical aspects of the biomolecule-nanoparticle interface and nanomechanical biosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyvalent Display of Biomolecules on Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Zhao, Nan; Lai, Jinping; Coyne, James; Gaddes, Erin R; Wang, Yong

    2018-06-04

    Surface display of biomolecules on live cells offers new opportunities to treat human diseases and perform basic studies. Existing methods are primarily focused on monovalent functionalization, that is, the display of single biomolecules across the cell surface. Here we show that the surface of live cells can be functionalized to display polyvalent biomolecular structures through two-step reactions under physiological conditions. This polyvalent functionalization enables the cell surface to recognize the microenvironment one order of magnitude more effectively than with monovalent functionalization. Thus, polyvalent display of biomolecules on live cells holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Evolved Minimal Frustration in Multifunctional Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2018-05-25

    Protein folding is often viewed in terms of a funnelled potential or free energy landscape. A variety of experiments now indicate the existence of multifunnel landscapes, associated with multifunctional biomolecules. Here, we present evidence that these systems have evolved to exhibit the minimal number of funnels required to fulfil their cellular functions, suggesting an extension to the principle of minimum frustration. We find that minimal disruptive mutations result in additional funnels, and the associated structural ensembles become more diverse. The same trends are observed in an atomic cluster. These observations suggest guidelines for rational design of engineered multifunctional biomolecules.

  18. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  19. Ohio-Based NREL Subcontractor Wins Major Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio-Based NREL Subcontractor Wins Major Small Business Award For more information contact: e:mail alternative fuel vehicles has won a major award from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. (ATL) of East Liberty, Ohio was named the SBA's Midwest Regional Small Business

  20. U.S. Small Business HUBZone Base Closure Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — HUBZone Qualitified Base Closure Areas - the lands within the boundaries of a military installation that was closed through a privatization process under the Federal...

  1. Generating multiplex gradients of biomolecules for controlling cellular adhesion in parallel microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2012-11-07

    Here we present a microfluidic platform to generate multiplex gradients of biomolecules within parallel microfluidic channels, in which a range of multiplex concentration gradients with different profile shapes are simultaneously produced. Nonlinear polynomial gradients were also generated using this device. The gradient generation principle is based on implementing parrallel channels with each providing a different hydrodynamic resistance. The generated biomolecule gradients were then covalently functionalized onto the microchannel surfaces. Surface gradients along the channel width were a result of covalent attachments of biomolecules to the surface, which remained functional under high shear stresses (50 dyn/cm(2)). An IgG antibody conjugated to three different fluorescence dyes (FITC, Cy5 and Cy3) was used to demonstrate the resulting multiplex concentration gradients of biomolecules. The device enabled generation of gradients with up to three different biomolecules in each channel with varying concentration profiles. We were also able to produce 2-dimensional gradients in which biomolecules were distributed along the length and width of the channel. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed design, three different multiplex concentration gradients of REDV and KRSR peptides were patterned along the width of three parallel channels and adhesion of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in each channel was subsequently investigated using a single chip.

  2. An integrated platform for biomolecule interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Chia-Ming; Tsai, Pei-I.; Chou, Shin-Ting; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new metrology platform which can detect real-time changes in both a phase-interrogation mode and intensity mode of a SPR (surface plasmon resonance). We integrated a SPR and ellipsometer to a biosensor chip platform to create a new biomolecular interaction measurement mechanism. We adopted a conductive ITO (indium-tinoxide) film to the bio-sensor platform chip to expand the dynamic range and improve measurement accuracy. The thickness of the conductive film and the suitable voltage constants were found to enhance performance. A circularly polarized ellipsometry configuration was incorporated into the newly developed platform to measure the label-free interactions of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) with immobilized biomolecule target monoclonal human CRP antibody at various concentrations. CRP was chosen as it is a cardiovascular risk biomarker and is an acute phase reactant as well as a specific prognostic indicator for inflammation. We found that the sensitivity of a phaseinterrogation SPR is predominantly dependent on the optimization of the sample incidence angle. The effect of the ITO layer effective index under DC and AC effects as well as an optimal modulation were experimentally performed and discussed. Our experimental results showed that the modulated dynamic range for phase detection was 10E-2 RIU based on a current effect and 10E-4 RIU based on a potential effect of which a 0.55 (°/RIU) measurement was found by angular-interrogation. The performance of our newly developed metrology platform was characterized to have a higher sensitivity and less dynamic range when compared to a traditional full-field measurement system.

  3. Nanofluidic technology for biomolecule applications: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napoli, M.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Pennathur, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we present nanofluidic phenomena, particularly as they relate to applications involving analysis of biomolecules within nanofabricated devices. The relevant length scales and physical phenomena that govern biomolecule transport and manipulation within nanofabricated nanofluidic

  4. Immobilizing Biomolecules Near the Diffraction Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di

    2009-01-01

    Our group has previously shown that biomolecules containing disulfide bridges in close proximity to aromatic residues can be immobilized, through covalent bonds, onto thiol derivatized surfaces upon UV excitation of the aromatic residue(s). We have also previously shown that our new technology ca...

  5. Biomolecule-Responsive Hydrogels in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Ghorbanali; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, namely, glucose-responsive hydrogels, protein-responsive hydrogels, and nucleic-acid-responsive hydrogels are highlighted. However, achieving the ultimate purpose of using biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in preclinical and clinical areas is still at the very early stage and calls for more novel designing concepts and advance ideas. On the way toward the real/clinical application of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, plenty of factors should be extensively studied and examined under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. For example, biocompatibility, biointegration, and toxicity of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels should be carefully evaluated. From the living body's point of view, biocompatibility is seriously depended on the interactions at the tissue/polymer interface. These interactions are influenced by physical nature, chemical structure, surface properties, and degradation of the materials. In addition, the developments of advanced hydrogels with tunable biological and mechanical properties which cause no/low side effects are of great importance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Country report: Vietnam. Setting Up of a 90Sr/90Y Generator System Based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) Technique and Radiolabeling of Eluted 90Y with Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thu; Duong Van Dong; Bui Van Cuong; Chu Van Khoa

    2010-01-01

    In the course of participating in the IAEA-CRP during the last two years, Vietnam has achieved the goal of setting up a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) technique and also radiolabeling of the eluted 90 Y with antibody, peptides and albumin. A two stage SLM based 90 Sr- 90 Y generator was set up in-house to generate carrier-free 90 Y at different activity levels viz. 5, 20, 50 mCi. The generator system was operated in sequential mode in which 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (PC88A) based SLM was used in the first stage for the transport 90 Y in 4.0 M nitric acid from source phase where 90 Sr- 90 Y equilibrium mixture is placed in nitric acid medium at pH to 1-2. In the second stage, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM was used for the transport of 90 Y selectively to 1.0 M acetic acid which is the best medium for radiolebeling. The eluted 90 Y from the generator was tested for the presence of any traces of 90 Sr using the Extraction Paper Chromatography (EPC) and was found suitable for radiolabeling. The generator system could be upgraded to 100 mCi level successfully due to an expert mission from India through IAEA. The 90 Y product obtained from the generator system was used for radiolabeling of antibody and peptides viz. Rituximab, DOTATATE and albumin particles under different experimental conditions. A new chromatography system could be developed for analyzing 90 Y labeled albumin using the TAE buffer as mobile phase in PC and ITLC

  7. Development of 90Sr/90Y Generator Systems Based on SLM Techniques for Radiolabelling of Therapeutic Biomolecules with 90Y. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thu, N.T.; Van Dong, D.; Van Cuong, B.; Van Khoa, C.; Cam Hoa, V.T.

    2015-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is one of the most useful radionuclides for radioimmunotherapeutic applications, especially for labelling peptides and antibodies. Studies were carried out to develop a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on the SLM technique. Two stages of 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator systems were developed at different activity levels of 5, 20, 50 and 100 mCi and operated with semiautomation in sequential mode. In the first stage of the system, PC88A based SLM was used, which transported 90 Y from a nitric acid medium containing 0.01–4M HNO 3 . In the second stage, the 90 Y from the first stage was transferred to the first compartment of the second stage using carbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM where 1M acetic acid was used as the receiving phase for 90 Y. Quality control was carried out for the products of 90 Y using EPC with paper chromatography and Tec control chromatography. Peptides and antibodies were labelled using the 90 Y product obtained from the generator developed in house. (author)

  8. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  9. Microcontact printing with aminosilanes: creating biomolecule micro- and nanoarrays for multiplexed microfluidic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Shivani; Ricoult, Sébastien G; Toda-Peters, Kazumi; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-05-21

    Microfluidic systems integrated with protein and DNA micro- and nanoarrays have been the most sought-after technologies to satisfy the growing demand for high-throughput disease diagnostics. As the sensitivity of these systems relies on the bio-functionalities of the patterned recognition biomolecules, the primary concern has been to develop simple technologies that enable biomolecule immobilization within microfluidic devices whilst preserving bio-functionalities. To address this concern, we introduce a two-step patterning approach to create micro- and nanoarrays of biomolecules within microfluidic devices. First, we introduce a simple aqueous based microcontact printing (μCP) method to pattern arrays of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on glass substrates, with feature sizes ranging from a few hundred microns down to 200 nm (for the first time). Next, these substrates are integrated with microfluidic channels to then covalently couple DNA aptamers and antibodies with the micro- and nanopatterned APTES. As these biomolecules are covalently tethered to the device substrates, the resulting bonds enable them to withstand the high shear stresses originating from the flow in these devices. We further demonstrated the flexibility of this technique, by immobilizing multiple proteins onto these APTES-patterned substrates using liquid-dispensing robots to create multiple microarrays. Next, to validate the functionalities of these microfluidic biomolecule microarrays, we perform (i) aptamer-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human interleukin 6 (IL6); and (ii) antibody-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human c-reactive protein (hCRP) with the limit of detection at 5 nM, a level below the range required for clinical screening. Lastly, the shelf-life potential of these ready-to-use microfluidic microarray devices is validated by effectively functionalizing the patterns with biomolecules up to 3 months post-printing. In summary, with a single printing step, this

  10. Label-Free and Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection Based on Aggregation Induced Emission Fluorogen via Target-Triggered Hemin/G-Quadruplex-Catalyzed Oxidation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyin; Chang, Jiafu; Gai, Panpan; Li, Feng

    2018-02-07

    Fluorescence biosensing strategy has drawn substantial attention due to their advantages of simplicity, convenience, sensitivity, and selectivity, but unsatisfactory structure stability, low fluorescence quantum yield, high cost of labeling, and strict reaction conditions associated with current fluorescence methods severely prohibit their potential application. To address these challenges, we herein propose an ultrasensitive label-free fluorescence biosensor by integrating hemin/G-quadruplex-catalyzed oxidation reaction with aggregation induced emission (AIE) fluorogen-based system. l-Cysteine/TPE-M, which is carefully and elaborately designed and developed, obviously contributes to strong fluorescence emission. In the presence of G-rich DNA along with K + and hemin, efficient destruction of l-cysteine occurs due to hemin/G-quadruplex-catalyzed oxidation reactions. As a result, highly sensitive fluorescence detection of G-rich DNA is readily realized, with a detection limit down to 33 pM. As a validation for the further development of the proposed strategy, we also successfully construct ultrasensitive platforms for microRNA by incorporating the l-cysteine/TPE-M system with target-triggered cyclic amplification reaction. Thus, this proposed strategy is anticipated to find use in basic biochemical research and clinical diagnosis.

  11. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  12. Monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Masaru; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-10-28

    The controlled and selective synthesis/clearance of biomolecules is critical for most cellular processes. In most high-throughput 'omics' studies, we measure the static quantities of only one class of biomolecules (e.g. DNA, mRNA, proteins or metabolites). It is, however, important to recognize that biological systems are highly dynamic in which biomolecules are continuously renewed and different classes of biomolecules interact and affect each other's production/clearance. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the turnover of diverse classes of biomolecules to understand the dynamic nature of biological systems. Herein, we explain why the kinetic analysis of a diverse range of biomolecules is important and how such an analysis can be done. We argue that heavy water ((2)H2O) could be a universal tracer for monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules on a global scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Natural Antioxidants: Fascinating or Mythical Biomolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the use, properties, characteristics and sources of antioxidants especially phenolic compounds, flavonoids, vitamins, synthetic chemicals and some micronutrients began in the late 18th century. Since then antioxidant research has received considerable attention and over a hundred thousand papers have been published on the subject. This has led to a rampant use of antioxidants in order to try to obtain and preserve optimal health. A number of nutraceuticals and food supplements are frequently fortified with synthetic or natural antioxidants. However, some research outcomes have led to the belief that antioxidants exist as mythical biomolecules. This review provides a critical evaluation of some common in vitro antioxidant capacity methods, and a discussion on the role and controversies surrounding non-enzymatic biomolecules, in particular phenolic compounds and non-phenolic compounds, in oxidative processes in an attempt of stemming the tidal wave that is threatening to swamp the concept of natural antioxidants.

  14. A new algorithm for construction of coarse-grained sites of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-05

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules remains a challenge in multiscale simulations, including a rigorous definition of CG representations for them. In this work, we proposed a new stepwise optimization imposed with the boundary-constraint (SOBC) algorithm to construct the CG sites of large biomolecules, based on the s cheme of essential dynamics CG. By means of SOBC, we can rigorously derive the CG representations of biomolecules with less computational cost. The SOBC is particularly efficient for the CG definition of large systems with thousands of residues. The resulted CG sites can be parameterized as a CG model using the normal mode analysis based fluctuation matching method. Through normal mode analysis, the obtained modes of CG model can accurately reflect the functionally related slow motions of biomolecules. The SOBC algorithm can be used for the construction of CG sites of large biomolecules such as F-actin and for the study of mechanical properties of biomaterials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fleet Protection Using a Small UAV Based IR Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buss, James R; Ax, Jr, George R

    2005-01-01

    A study was performed to define candidate electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) sensor configurations and assess their potential utility as small UAV-based sensors surveilling a perimeter around surface fleet assets...

  16. Biomolecule Sequencer: Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Technology for In-Flight Environmental Monitoring, Research, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Burton, Aaron; Castro-Wallace, Sarah; John, Kristen; Stahl, Sarah E.; Dworkin, Jason Peter; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    On the International Space Station (ISS), technologies capable of rapid microbial identification and disease diagnostics are not currently available. NASA still relies upon sample return for comprehensive, molecular-based sample characterization. Next-generation DNA sequencing is a powerful approach for identifying microorganisms in air, water, and surfaces onboard spacecraft. The Biomolecule Sequencer payload, manifested to SpaceX-9 and scheduled on the Increment 4748 research plan (June 2016), will assess the functionality of a commercially-available next-generation DNA sequencer in the microgravity environment of ISS. The MinION device from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (Oxford, UK) measures picoamp changes in electrical current dependent on nucleotide sequences of the DNA strand migrating through nanopores in the system. The hardware is exceptionally small (9.5 x 3.2 x 1.6 cm), lightweight (120 grams), and powered only by a USB connection. For the ISS technology demonstration, the Biomolecule Sequencer will be powered by a Microsoft Surface Pro3. Ground-prepared samples containing lambda bacteriophage, Escherichia coli, and mouse genomic DNA, will be launched and stored frozen on the ISS until experiment initiation. Immediately prior to sequencing, a crew member will collect and thaw frozen DNA samples, connect the sequencer to the Surface Pro3, inject thawed samples into a MinION flow cell, and initiate sequencing. At the completion of the sequencing run, data will be downlinked for ground analysis. Identical, synchronous ground controls will be used for data comparisons to determine sequencer functionality, run-time sequence, current dynamics, and overall accuracy. We will present our latest results from the ISS flight experiment the first time DNA has ever been sequenced in space and discuss the many potential applications of the Biomolecule Sequencer for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, higher fidelity and more adaptable Space Biology Human

  17. Light-triggerable formulations for the intracellular controlled release of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Miguel M; Ferreira, Lino

    2018-05-01

    New therapies based on the use of biomolecules [e.g., proteins, peptides, and non-coding (nc)RNAs] have emerged during the past few years. Given their instability, adverse effects, and limited ability to cross cell membranes, delivery systems are required to fully reveal their biological potential. Sophisticated nanoformulations responsive to light offer an excellent opportunity for the controlled release of these biomolecules, enabling the control of timing, duration, location, and dosage. In this review, we discuss the design principles for the delivery of biomolecules, in particular proteins and RNA-based therapeutics, by light-triggerable formulations. We further discuss the opportunities offered by these formulations in terms of endosomal escape, as well as their limitations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using Biomolecules to Separate Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolski, Jarrod

    Used nuclear fuel has traditionally been treated through chemical separations of the radionuclides for recycle or disposal. This research considers a biological approach to such separations based on a series of complex and interdependent interactions that occur naturally in the human body with plutonium. These biological interactions are mediated by the proteins serum transferrin and the transferrin receptor. Transferrin to plutonium in vivo and can deposit plutonium into cells after interacting with the transferrin receptor protein at the cell surface. Using cerium as a non-radioactive surrogate for plutonium, it was found that cerium(IV) required multiple synergistic anions to bind in the N-lobe of the bilobal transferrin protein, creating a conformation of the cerium-loaded protein that would be unable to interact with the transferrin receptor protein to achieve a separation. The behavior of cerium binding to transferrin has contributed to understanding how plutonium(IV)-transferrin interacts in vivo and in biological separations.

  19. Room temperature ionic liquids interacting with bio-molecules: an overview of experimental and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Ballone, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    We briefly review experimental and computational studies of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) interacting with important classes of biomolecules, including phospholipids, peptides and proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Most of these studies have been driven by the interest for RTILs applications as solvents. Thus, available experimental data cover primarily thermodynamic properties such as the reciprocal solubility of RTILs and bio-molecules, as well as phase boundaries. Less extensive data are also available on transport properties such as diffusion and viscosity of homogeneous binary (RTILs/biomolecules) and ternary (RTIL/biomolecules/water) solutions. Most of the structural information at the atomistic level, of interest especially for biochemical, pharmaceutical and nanotechnology applications, has been made available by molecular dynamics simulations. Major exceptions to this statement are represented by the results from NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, by selected neutron and X-ray scattering data, and by recent neutron reflectometry measurements on lipid bilayers on surfaces, hydrated by water-RTIL solutions. A final section of our paper summarizes new developments in the field of RTILs based on amino acids, that combine in themselves the two main aspects of our discussion, i.e. ionic liquids and bio-molecules.

  20. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  1. Innovation Environment in Small Technology-Based Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves Silveira Fiates, Gabriela; Azevedo Fiates, José Eduardo; Ribeiro Serra, Fernando A; Portugal Ferreira, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Innovation has been identified as a strategy to achieve competitive advantage, particularly in contexts of change and especially for technology-based companies – TBCs. Although the adoption of innovation strategies is not easy, small companies have an organizational environment more conducive to innovation. This article examines how managers and employees of small TBCs perceive aspects of the internal environment of innovation in the organization (culture, organizational structure, personnel ...

  2. Study of interactions between cells and microbubbles in high speed centrifugation field for biomolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecule delivery has a very wide range of applications in biology and medicine. In this study, a microbubble based delivery method was developed. In a high centrifugation field, cells deform and collide with microbubbles to induce intracellular pathways on cell membranes. As a result, biomaterials can then easily enter cells. Experimental results show that this delivery method can achieve high delivery efficiency. Simulation results showed that cells with more deformed structure experienced higher strain on cell membranes than cells with less deformed structure. The models can help explain how centrifugation affects cell membrane permeability. By controlling cell morphology and its mechanical properties, high biomolecule delivery efficiency can be achieved.

  3. The nanoparticle biomolecule corona: lessons learned - challenge accepted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, D; Westmeier, D; Markiewicz, M; Stolte, S; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2015-10-07

    Besides the wide use of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products, their applications are not only increasing in biotechnology and biomedicine, but also in the environmental field. While the physico-chemical properties and behaviour of NMs can be characterized accurately under idealized conditions, this is no longer the case in complex physiological or natural environments. Herein, proteins and other biomolecules rapidly bind to NMs, forming a protein/biomolecule corona that critically affects the NMs' (patho)biological and technical identities. As the corona impacts the in vitro and/or in vivo NM applications in humans and ecosystems, a mechanistic understanding of its relevance and of the biophysical forces regulating corona formation is mandatory. Based on recent insights, we here critically review and present an updated concept of corona formation and evolution. We comment on how corona signatures may be linked to effects at the nano-bio interface in physiological and environmental systems. In order to comprehensively analyse corona profiles and to mechanistically understand the coronas' biological/ecological impact, we present a tiered multidisciplinary approach. To stimulate progress in this field, we introduce the potential impact of the corona for NM-microbiome-(human)host interactions and the novel concept of 'nanologicals', i.e., the nanomaterial-specific targeting of molecular machines. We conclude by discussing the relevant challenges that still need to be resolved in this field.

  4. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. PMID:20887859

  5. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  6. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  7. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  8. Two possible improvements for mass spectrometry analysis of intact biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznikov, Valeriy V; Zelenov, Vladislav V; Aparina, Elena V; Pikhtelev, Alexander R; Sulimenkov, Ilia V; Raznikova, Marina O

    2017-08-01

    The goals of our study were to investigate abilities of two approaches to eliminate possible errors in electrospray mass spectrometry measurements of biomolecules. Passing of a relatively dense supersonic gas jet through ionization region followed by its hitting the spray of the analyzed solution in low vacuum may be effective to keep an initial biomolecule structure in solution. Provided that retention of charge carriers for some sites in the biomolecule cannot be changed noticeably in electrospray ion source, decomposition and separation of charge-state distributions of electrosprayed ions may give additional information about native structure of biomolecules in solution.

  9. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Vi-En; Choulis, Stelios; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Mathai, Mathew; So, Franky

    2010-03-16

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  10. Efficient optimization of electrostatic interactions between biomolecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, J. P.; Altman, M. D.; White, J. K.; Tidor, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; MIT

    2007-01-01

    We present a PDE-constrained approach to optimizing the electrostatic interactions between two biomolecules. These interactions play important roles in the determination of binding affinity and specificity, and are therefore of significant interest when designing a ligand molecule to bind tightly to a receptor. Using a popular continuum model and physically reasonable assumptions, the electrostatic component of the binding free energy is a convex, quadratic function of the ligand charge distribution. Traditional optimization methods require exhaustive pre-computation, and the expense has precluded a full exploration of the promise of electrostatic optimization in biomolecule analysis and design. In this paper we describe an approach in which the electrostatic simulations and optimization problem are solved simultaneously; unlike many PDE- constrained optimization frameworks, the proposed method does not incorporate the PDE as a set of equality constraints. This co-optimization approach can be used by itself to solve unconstrained problems or those with linear equality constraints, or in conjunction with primal-dual interior point methods to solve problems with inequality constraints. Model problems demonstrate that the co-optimization method is computationally efficient and can be used to solve realistic problems.

  11. Preparation of Biomolecule Microstructures and Microarrays by Thiol–ene Photoimmobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinrich, Dirk; Köhn, Maja; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Westerlind, Ulrika; Dehmelt, Leif; Engelkamp, Hans; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Maan, Jan C.; Nüsse, Dirk; Schröder, Hendrik; Wacker, Ron; Voges, Edgar; Breinbauer, Rolf; Kunz, Horst; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    A mild, fast and flexible method for photoimmobilization of biomolecules based on the light-initiated thiol–ene reaction has been developed. After investigation and optimization of various surface materials, surface chemistries and reaction parameters, microstructures and microarrays of biotin,

  12. Modification of biomolecules and combined actions by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, J. W.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, J. I.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Ryu, S. H.; Sung, N. Y.; Cha, M. K.; Nam, J. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Cho, E. R.; Ryu, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced Radiation Technology Institute is a government-supported institute for radiation research and application. It has focused on development of fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and on enhancement of biological effectiveness of radiation through theoretical approach to the combined actions of radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through modification of biomolecules resulted in creation of de novo materials of scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for combined action of radiation with another physico-chemical factor has been established. Conclusively the results of this study can provide scientific bases for maximizing the efficacy of ionizing radiation in relation to industrial applications

  13. Metal Stable Isotope Tagging: Renaissance of Radioimmunoassay for Multiplex and Absolute Quantification of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Shixi; Wei, Chao; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-05-17

    The unambiguous quantification of biomolecules is of great significance in fundamental biological research as well as practical clinical diagnosis. Due to the lack of a detectable moiety, the direct and highly sensitive quantification of biomolecules is often a "mission impossible". Consequently, tagging strategies to introduce detectable moieties for labeling target biomolecules were invented, which had a long and significant impact on studies of biomolecules in the past decades. For instance, immunoassays have been developed with radioisotope tagging by Yalow and Berson in the late 1950s. The later languishment of this technology can be almost exclusively ascribed to the use of radioactive isotopes, which led to the development of nonradioactive tagging strategy-based assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescent immunoassay, and chemiluminescent and electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Despite great success, these strategies suffered from drawbacks such as limited spectral window capacity for multiplex detection and inability to provide absolute quantification of biomolecules. After recalling the sequences of tagging strategies, an apparent question is why not use stable isotopes from the start? A reasonable explanation is the lack of reliable means for accurate and precise quantification of stable isotopes at that time. The situation has changed greatly at present, since several atomic mass spectrometric measures for metal stable isotopes have been developed. Among the newly developed techniques, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is an ideal technique to determine metal stable isotope-tagged biomolecules, for its high sensitivity, wide dynamic linear range, and more importantly multiplex and absolute quantification ability. Since the first published report by our group, metal stable isotope tagging has become a revolutionary technique and gained great success in biomolecule quantification. An exciting research highlight in this area

  14. Biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghorbani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation. The application of small scale hydrodynamic cavitation and its integration to a biomedical device prototype is offered as an important alternative to other techniques, such as ultrasound therapy, and thus constitutes a local, cheap, and energy-efficient solution, for urinary stone therapy and abnormal tissue ablation (e.g., benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. The destructive nature of bubbly, cavitating, flows was exploited, and the potential of the prototype was assessed and characterized. Bubbles generated in a small flow restrictive element (micro-orifice based on hydrodynamic cavitation were utilized for this purpose. The small bubbly, cavitating, flow generator (micro-orifice was fitted to a small flexible probe, which was actuated with a micromanipulator using fine control. This probe also houses an imaging device for visualization so that the emerging cavitating flow could be locally targeted to the desired spot. In this study, the feasibility of this alternative treatment method and its integration to a device prototype were successfully accomplished.

  15. Biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Sozer, Canberk; Alcan, Gokhan; Unel, Mustafa; Ekici, Sinan; Uvet, Huseyin; Koşar, Ali

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation. The application of small scale hydrodynamic cavitation and its integration to a biomedical device prototype is offered as an important alternative to other techniques, such as ultrasound therapy, and thus constitutes a local, cheap, and energy-efficient solution, for urinary stone therapy and abnormal tissue ablation (e.g., benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)). The destructive nature of bubbly, cavitating, flows was exploited, and the potential of the prototype was assessed and characterized. Bubbles generated in a small flow restrictive element (micro-orifice) based on hydrodynamic cavitation were utilized for this purpose. The small bubbly, cavitating, flow generator (micro-orifice) was fitted to a small flexible probe, which was actuated with a micromanipulator using fine control. This probe also houses an imaging device for visualization so that the emerging cavitating flow could be locally targeted to the desired spot. In this study, the feasibility of this alternative treatment method and its integration to a device prototype were successfully accomplished.

  16. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems includin...... molecular scale metal and semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and other nanostructures, e.g. nanotubes, “nanoflowers” etc.. The new structures offer both new electronic properties and highly confined novel charge transfer environments....

  17. Low, slow, small target recognition based on spatial vision network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhao; Guo, Pei; Qi, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Traditional photoelectric monitoring is monitored using a large number of identical cameras. In order to ensure the full coverage of the monitoring area, this monitoring method uses more cameras, which leads to more monitoring and repetition areas, and higher costs, resulting in more waste. In order to reduce the monitoring cost and solve the difficult problem of finding, identifying and tracking a low altitude, slow speed and small target, this paper presents spatial vision network for low-slow-small targets recognition. Based on camera imaging principle and monitoring model, spatial vision network is modeled and optimized. Simulation experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method has good performance.

  18. Preparation of supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids exhibiting biomolecule-responsive gel degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, Hajime; Fujisaku, Takahiro; Onogi, Shoji; Yoshii, Tatsuyuki; Ikeda, Masato; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogelators are small, self-assembling molecules that form supramolecular nanofiber networks that exhibit unique dynamic properties. Development of supramolecular hydrogels that degrade in response to various biomolecules could potentially be used for applications in areas such as drug delivery and diagnostics. Here we provide a synthetic procedure for preparing redox-responsive supramolecular hydrogelators that are used to create hydrogels that degrade in response to oxidizing or reducing conditions. The synthesis takes ∼2-4 d, and it can potentially be carried out in parallel to prepare multiple hydrogelator candidates. This described solid-phase peptide synthesis protocol can be used to produce previously described hydrogelators or to construct a focused molecular library to efficiently discover and optimize new hydrogelators. In addition, we describe the preparation of redox-responsive supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids that are created by mixing aqueous solutions of hydrogelators and enzymes, which requires 2 h for completion. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel-enzyme hybrids exhibit gel degradation in response to various biomolecules, and can be rationally designed by connecting the chemical reactions of the hydrogelators with enzymatic reactions. Gel degradation in response to biomolecules as triggers occurs within a few hours. We also describe the preparation of hydrogel-enzyme hybrids arrayed on flat glass slides, enabling high-throughput analysis of biomolecules such as glucose, uric acid, lactate and so on by gel degradation, which is detectable by the naked eye. The protocol requires ∼6 h to prepare the hydrogel-enzyme hybrid array and to complete the biomolecule assay.

  19. Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering using Plant Leaves as Natural Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of biomolecules is highly important for biomedical and other biological applications. Although several methods exist for the detection of biomolecules, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has a unique role in greatly enhancing the sensitivity. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of natural plant leaves as facile, low cost and eco-friendly SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of biomolecules. Specifically, we have investigated the influence of surface topography of five different plant leaf based substrates, deposited with Au, on the SERS performance by using L-cysteine as a model biomolecule. In addition, we have also compared the effect of sputter deposition of Au thin film with dropcast deposition of Au nanoparticles on the leaf substrates. Our results indicate that L-cysteine could be detected with high sensitivity using these plant leaf based substrates and the leaf possessing hierarchical micro/nanostructures on its surface shows higher SERS enhancement compared to a leaf having a nearplanar surface. Furthermore, leaves with drop-casted Au nanoparticle clusters performed better than the leaves sputter deposited with a thin Au film.

  20. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  2. Soft x-ray circular dichroism of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Tanaka, Makoto; Agui, Akane

    2005-01-01

    We succeeded to observe natural circular dichroism NCD for biomolecules in soft X-ray region for the first time. Evaporated films of amino acids, phenylalanine (phe) and serine (ser) were prepared in vacuum with the thickness of about 300 nm. Measurement was carried out at the soft X-ray undulator beamline BL23SU of the Spring-8, where left- and right-circularly polarized light (LCPL and RCPL) was available from an APPLE-2 undulator. Difference spectra DA(hν) was plotted as a function of photon energy hν of soft X-ray to be the difference between absorption coefficient A L for LCPL and absorption coefficient A R for RCPL, namely, DA(hν) ≡ A L (hν) - A R (hν). Values of A L and A R were determined by means of the photoelectric drain current measurement. In the DA(hν) spectra for L-phe films, negative peak was observed at 407 eV. On the contrary, for D-phe films, positive peak was observed at 407 eV with the same magnitude but opposite sign. Moreover, no signal was observed for racemic phenylalanine (DL-phe). In the wavelength region of visible to ultraviolet, there is well-known general law in which NCD signals for D- and L-enantiomers are the same magnitude but opposite sign and racemic compound does not show NCD spectra. Characteristic features in DA(hν) spectra of the L-phe, D-phe and DL-phe were of good agreement with this well-known general law. Based on this good agreement, we concluded that peaks at 407 eV in the DA(hν) spectra are true NCD peaks. For ser films, we assigned peaks at 540 eV and 548 eV to be NCD peaks in the same manner. We hope that our first observation of NCD for biomolecules at soft X-ray region will open new science and technologies such as basic science including elucidation of fundamental mechanism of NCD and application to manipulate biomolecules using circularly polarized soft X-ray beams. (author)

  3. Synthesis and structures of a pincer-type rhodium(iii) complex: reactivity toward biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Milan M; Bogojeski, Jovana V; Klisurić, Olivera; Scheurer, Andreas; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Bugarčić, Živadin D

    2016-10-04

    A novel rhodium(iii) complex [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] (1) (H 2 L tBu = 2,6-bis(5-tert-butyl-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine) containing a pincer type, tridentate nitrogen-donor chelate system was synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis revealed that 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbcn with a = 20.7982(6), b = 10.8952(4), c = 10.9832(4) Å, V = 2488.80(15) Å 3 , and eight molecules in the unit cell. The rhodium center in the complex [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] (1) is coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry by the tridentate N,N,N-donor and three chloro ligands, adopting a mer arrangement with an essentially planar ligand skeleton. Due to the tridentate coordination of the N,N,N-donor, the central nitrogen atom N1 is located closer to the Rh III center. The reactivity of the synthesized complex toward small biomolecules (l-methionine (l-Met), guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP), l-histidine (l-His) and glutathione (GSH)) and to a series of duplex DNAs and RNA was investigated. The order of reactivity of the studied small biomolecules is: 5'-GMP > GSH > l-Met > l-His. Duplex RNA reacts faster with the [Rh III (H 2 L tBu )Cl 3 ] complex than duplex DNA, while shorter duplex DNA (15mer GG) reacts faster compared with 22mer GG duplex DNA. In addition, a higher reactivity is achieved with a DNA duplex with a centrally located GG-sequence than with a 22GTG duplex DNA, in which the GG-sequence is separated by a T base. Furthermore, the interaction of this metal complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined by absorption (UV-Vis) and emission spectral studies (EthBr displacement studies). Overall, the studied complex exhibited good DNA and BSA interaction ability.

  4. In situ biomolecule production by bacteria; a synthetic biology approach to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Bueso, Yensi; Lehouritis, Panos; Tangney, Mark

    2018-04-10

    The ability to modify existing microbiota at different sites presents enormous potential for local or indirect management of various diseases. Because bacteria can be maintained for lengthy periods in various regions of the body, they represent a platform with enormous potential for targeted production of biomolecules, which offer tremendous promise for therapeutic and diagnostic approaches for various diseases. While biological medicines are currently limited in the clinic to patient administration of exogenously produced biomolecules from engineered cells, in situ production of biomolecules presents enormous scope in medicine and beyond. The slow pace and high expense of traditional research approaches has particularly hampered the development of biological medicines. It may be argued that bacterial-based medicine has been "waiting" for the advent of enabling technology. We propose that this technology is Synthetic Biology, and that the wait is over. Synthetic Biology facilitates a systematic approach to programming living entities and/or their products, using an approach to Research and Development (R&D) that facilitates rapid, cheap, accessible, yet sophisticated product development. Full engagement with the Synthetic Biology approach to R&D can unlock the potential for bacteria as medicines for cancer and other indications. In this review, we describe how by employing Synthetic Biology, designer bugs can be used as drugs, drug-production factories or diagnostic devices, using oncology as an exemplar for the concept of in situ biomolecule production in medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospects of biomolecule sequencing with the techniques of translocation through nanopores: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosik, V. L.; Rudakova, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the functional properties of biomolecules in native solutions (in particular, their interaction with membranes) constantly increases with accumulation of data on the macromolecular structure, obtained by X-ray diffraction (with synchrotron radiation sources), nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry; this interest is closely related to the development of new technologies of sequencing (i.e., determining the sequence of nucleotides in DNA biomolecule). One of the most promising “physical” approaches to sequencing is the application of methods based on the use of nanochannels or nanopores, through which biomolecules pass in ionic solutions under an electric field applied. A nanopore provides spatial localization of molecules and makes it possible to detect a signal (electric, fluorescent, etc.) from an individual nucleotide. In view of the development of new high-intensity pulsed X-ray sources, the popularity of fluorescence analysis constantly increases. The existing methods for simulating the motion of biomolecules and interpreting their structure, sequencing techniques, and the prospects of further development of investigations in this field are discussed

  6. A design approach for small vision-based autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Barrett B.; Fife, Wade S.; Archibald, James K.; Lee, Dah-Jye; Wilde, Doran K.

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the design of a small autonomous vehicle based on the Helios computing platform, a custom FPGA-based board capable of supporting on-board vision. Target applications for the Helios computing platform are those that require lightweight equipment and low power consumption. To demonstrate the capabilities of FPGAs in real-time control of autonomous vehicles, a 16 inch long R/C monster truck was outfitted with a Helios board. The platform provided by such a small vehicle is ideal for testing and development. The proof of concept application for this autonomous vehicle was a timed race through an environment with obstacles. Given the size restrictions of the vehicle and its operating environment, the only feasible on-board sensor is a small CMOS camera. The single video feed is therefore the only source of information from the surrounding environment. The image is then segmented and processed by custom logic in the FPGA that also controls direction and speed of the vehicle based on visual input.

  7. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  8. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other

  9. Three-dimensional structure determination protocol for noncrystalline biomolecules using x-ray free-electron laser diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-02-01

    Coherent and intense x-ray pulses generated by x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources are paving the way for structural determination of noncrystalline biomolecules. However, due to the small scattering cross section of electrons for x rays, the available incident x-ray intensity of XFEL sources, which is currently in the range of 10(12)-10(13) photons/μm(2)/pulse, is lower than that necessary to perform single-molecule diffraction experiments for noncrystalline biomolecules even with the molecular masses of megadalton and submicrometer dimensions. Here, we propose an experimental protocol and analysis method for visualizing the structure of those biomolecules by the combined application of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction methods. To compensate the small scattering cross section of biomolecules, in our protocol, a thin vitreous ice plate containing several hundred biomolecules/μm(2) is used as sample, a setup similar to that utilized by single-molecule cryoelectron microscopy. The scattering cross section of such an ice plate is far larger than that of a single particle. The images of biomolecules contained within irradiated areas are then retrieved from each diffraction pattern, and finally provide the three-dimensional electron density model. A realistic atomic simulation using large-scale computations proposed that the three-dimensional structure determination of the 50S ribosomal subunit embedded in a vitreous ice plate is possible at a resolution of 0.8 nm when an x-ray beam of 10(16) photons/500×500 nm(2)/pulse is available.

  10. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  11. Innovation Environment in Small Technology-Based Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gonçalves Silveira Fiates

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation has been identified as a strategy to achieve competitive advantage, particularly in contexts of change and especially for technology-based companies – TBCs. Although the adoption of innovation strategies is not easy, small companies have an organizational environment more conducive to innovation. This article examines how managers and employees of small TBCs perceive aspects of the internal environment of innovation in the organization (culture, organizational structure, personnel and infrastructure and their suitability for the innovation process. This is a qualitative research from a multicase study on five companies located in an incubator. Data were collected through open interviews, using a semi-structured script, with one of the managers and two employees from each company. Data were analyzed from preliminary content analysis. The results showed some discrepancies between the perceptions of managers and employees about the issues investigated and their suitability for the innovation system, as well as between reality and the theoretical basis used.

  12. Synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for small arid communities

    KAUST Repository

    Elnakar, H.

    2012-06-04

    A model was developed to predict synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for the small arid communities. The model predicts the flow hydrograph for random weekdays and weekends based on the specific socioeconomic characteristics of the community. The main socioeconomic characteristics are the composition of the community, the different user behaviours in using water appliances, and the unit discharges of such appliances. Use patterns of water appliances are assumed to vary for the various members of the community and the type of day. Each community is composed of several social categories such as the employee, working woman, stay home woman, stay home child, students etc. The use patterns account for the stochastic nature of use in terms of number of uses, duration of the use and times of use in the day. Randomly generated hydrographs are generated for weekdays and weekends along with synthetic hydrographs of non-exceedance. The model was verified for a small residential compound in Sharm El Shiekh - Egypt using 11 days of flow measurements performed in summer. The synthetic hydrographs based on assumed water use patterns of the various members of the community compared reasonably with the measured hydrographs. Synthetic hydrographs can be derived for a community under consideration to reflect its socioeconomic conditions and thus can be used to generate probability based peaking factors to be used in the design of sewerage systems pumping facilities, and treatment plants. © 201 WIT Press.

  13. Synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for small arid communities

    KAUST Repository

    Elnakar, H.; Imam, E.; Nassar, K.

    2012-01-01

    A model was developed to predict synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for the small arid communities. The model predicts the flow hydrograph for random weekdays and weekends based on the specific socioeconomic characteristics of the community. The main socioeconomic characteristics are the composition of the community, the different user behaviours in using water appliances, and the unit discharges of such appliances. Use patterns of water appliances are assumed to vary for the various members of the community and the type of day. Each community is composed of several social categories such as the employee, working woman, stay home woman, stay home child, students etc. The use patterns account for the stochastic nature of use in terms of number of uses, duration of the use and times of use in the day. Randomly generated hydrographs are generated for weekdays and weekends along with synthetic hydrographs of non-exceedance. The model was verified for a small residential compound in Sharm El Shiekh - Egypt using 11 days of flow measurements performed in summer. The synthetic hydrographs based on assumed water use patterns of the various members of the community compared reasonably with the measured hydrographs. Synthetic hydrographs can be derived for a community under consideration to reflect its socioeconomic conditions and thus can be used to generate probability based peaking factors to be used in the design of sewerage systems pumping facilities, and treatment plants. © 201 WIT Press.

  14. Self-organized pattern formation of biomolecules at silicon surfaces: Intended application of a dislocation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittler, M.; Yu, X.; Vyvenko, O.F.; Birkholz, M.; Seifert, W.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Arguirov, T.; Wolff, A.; Fritzsche, W.; Seibt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Defined placement of biomolecules at Si surfaces is a precondition for a successful combination of Si electronics with biological applications. We aim to realize this by Coulomb interaction of biomolecules with dislocations in Si. The dislocations form charged lines and they will be surrounded with a space charge region being connected with an electric field. The electric stray field in a solution of biomolecules, caused by dislocations located close to the Si surface, was estimated to yield values up to few kVcm -1 . A regular dislocation network can be formed by wafer direct bonding at the interface between the bonded wafers in case of misorientation. The adjustment of misorientation allows the variation of the distance between dislocations in a range from 10 nm to a few μm. This is appropriate for nanobiotechnology dealing with protein or DNA molecules with sizes in the nm and lower μm range. Actually, we achieved a distance between the dislocations of 10-20 nm. Also the existence of a distinct electric field formed by the dislocation network was demonstrated by the technique of the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC). Because of the relatively short range of the field, the dislocations have to be placed close to the surface. We positioned the dislocation network in an interface being 200 nm parallel to the Si surface by layer transfer techniques using hydrogen implantation and bonding. Based on EBIC and luminescence data we postulate a barrier of the dislocations at the as bonded interface < 100 meV. We plan to dope the dislocations with metal atoms to increase the electric field. We demonstrated that regular periodic dislocation networks close to the Si surface formed by bonding are realistic candidates for self-organized placing of biomolecules. Experiments are underway to test whether biomolecules decorate the pattern of the dislocation lines

  15. Automated Detection of Small Bodies by Space Based Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidstrup, P. R.; Grillmayer, G.; Andersen, A. C.; Haack, H.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    The number of known comets and asteroids is increasing every year. Up till now this number is including approximately 250,000 of the largest minor planets, as they are usually referred. These discoveries are due to the Earth-based observation which has intensified over the previous decades. Additionally larger telescopes and arrays of telescopes are being used for exploring our Solar System. It is believed that all near- Earth and Main-Belt asteroids of diameters above 10 to 30 km have been discovered, leaving these groups of objects as observationally complete. However, the cataloguing of smaller bodies is incomplete as only a very small fraction of the expected number has been discovered. It is estimated that approximately 1010 main belt asteroids in the size range 1 m to 1 km are too faint to be observed using Earth-based telescopes. In order to observe these small bodies, space-based search must be initiated to remove atmospheric disturbances and to minimize the distance to the asteroids and thereby minimising the requirement for long camera integration times. A new method of space-based detection of moving non-stellar objects is currently being developed utilising the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) built for spacecraft attitude determination by Ørsted, Danish Technical University. The ASC serves as a backbone technology in the project as it is capable of fully automated distinction of known and unknown celestial objects. By only processing objects of particular interest, i.e. moving objects, it will be possible to discover small bodies with a minimum of ground control, with the ultimate ambition of a fully automated space search probe. Currently, the ASC is being mounted on the Flying Laptop satellite of the Institute of Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart. It will, after a launch into a low Earth polar orbit in 2008, test the detection method with the ASC equipment that already had significant in-flight experience. A future use of the ASC based automated

  16. Computational simulation of biomolecules transport with multi-physics near microchannel surface for development of biomolecules-detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuma; Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics in nano/micro scale is demanded in order to optimize the design of microfluidics device for the biomolecules detection with high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis. This paper aimed to investigate the effectivity of the computational simulation using the numerical model of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics near a microchannel surface on the development of biomolecules-detection devices. The biomolecules transport with fluid drag force, electric double layer (EDL) force, and van der Waals force was modeled by Newtonian Equation of motion. The model validity was verified in the influence of ion strength and flow velocity on biomolecules distribution near the surface compared with experimental results of previous studies. The influence of acting forces on its distribution near the surface was investigated by the simulation. The trend of its distribution to ion strength and flow velocity was agreement with the experimental result by the combination of all acting forces. Furthermore, EDL force dominantly influenced its distribution near its surface compared with fluid drag force except for the case of high velocity and low ion strength. The knowledges from the simulation might be useful for the design of biomolecules-detection devices and the simulation can be expected to be applied on its development as the design tool for high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis in the future.

  17. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  18. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian O; Ma, Peter X

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell–material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. PMID:27877317

  19. Role of Carbamylated Biomolecules in Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Asim; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2018-04-01

    Carbamylation (or carbamoylation) is a non-enzymatic modification of biomolecules mediated by cyanate, a dissociation product of urea. Proteins are more sensitive to carbamylation. Two major sites of carbamylation reaction are: N α -amino moiety of a protein N-terminus and the N ɛ -amino moiety of proteins' lysine residues. In kidney diseases, urea accumulates and the burden of carbamylation increases. This may lead to alteration in the structure and function of many important proteins relevant in maintenance of homeostasis. Carbamylated proteins namely, carbamylated-haemoglobin and carbamylated-low density lipoprotein (LDL) have been implicated in hypoxia and atherosclerosis, respectively. Furthermore, carbamylation of insulin, oxytocin, and erythropoietin have caused changes in the action of these hormones vis-à-vis the metabolic pathways they control. In this short review, authors have compiled the data on role of carbamylated proteins, enzymes, hormones, LDL, and so on, in human diseases. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(4):267-275, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density...... content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates......Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than...

  1. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinlin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Li, Jie; Cui, Quanjun

    2014-01-01

    Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.

  2. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of curcumin against oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Sai Krishna; Mahendra, Jaideep; Gurumurthy, Prema; Jayamathi; Iqbal, Shabeer S; Mahendra, Little

    2014-10-01

    Among various reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radicals have the strongest chemical activity, which can damage a wide range of essential biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. The objective of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of curcumin on prevention of oxidative damage of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals generated in in vitro by a Fenton like reaction. We have incubated the serum, plasma and whole blood with H2O2/Cu2+/ Ascorbic acid system for 4 hours at 37 0C and observed the oxidation of biomolecules like albumin, lipids, proteins and DNA. Curcumin at the concentrations of 50,100 and 200 μmoles, prevented the formation of ischemia modified albumin, MDA, protein carbonyls, oxidized DNA and increased the total antioxidant levels and GSH significantly. These observations suggest the hydroxyl radical scavenging potentials of curcumin and protective actions to prevent the oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

  4. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  5. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the optical band gap energy is increased with aging time up to 1 day, whereas it decreases in 4 days aging ... researchers have used biomolecule substances such as oleic ..... ther investigation is needed to determine the changes of Se.

  6. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.asinari@polito.it

    2016-04-29

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid–liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid–liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics. - Highlights: • Properties of the water hydration layer are investigated. • New relation between extension of solid size and hydration layer established. • Possible impact on rational design of nanosuspensions.

  7. Natural Biomolecules and Protein Aggregation: Emerging Strategies against Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Sgarbossa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular self-assembly is a fundamental process in all organisms. As primary components of the life molecular machinery, proteins have a vast array of resources available to them for self-assembly in a functional structure. Protein self-assembly, however, can also occur in an aberrant way, giving rise to non-native aggregated structures responsible for severe, progressive human diseases that have a serious social impact. Different neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and spongiform encephalopathy diseases, have in common the presence of insoluble protein aggregates, generally termed “amyloid,” that share several physicochemical features: a fibrillar morphology, a predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, birefringence upon staining with the dye Congo red, insolubility in common solvents and detergents, and protease resistance. Conformational constrains, hydrophobic and stacking interactions can play a key role in the fibrillogenesis process and protein–protein and peptide–peptide interactions—resulting in self-assembly phenomena of peptides yielding fibrils—that can be modulated and influenced by natural biomolecules. Small organic molecules, which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties able to bind to peptide/protein molecules through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic and aromatic interactions, are potential candidates against amyloidogenesis. In this review some significant case examples will be critically discussed.

  8. Radiation physics and chemistry of biomolecules. Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    A chapter of the book ;Radiation chemistry. From basics to application in materials and life sciences (EDP Science, Paris, France, 2008); was devoted to the state-of-the-art in the research on ionizing radiation (IR) effects on biomolecules. An update, eight years later, seemed pertinent enough to the editors of this journal who accepted to dedicate a Special Issue to the latest developments in this area of high interest for cancer radiotherapy, nuclear workers' radioprotection and food radiosterilisation. We sincerely thank them and the authors who accepted to present reviews of their most recent work. Obviously, only a small part of the research in the fascinating domain of molecular radiobiology can be covered here. Some articles are presenting the contribution of biophysical models and computational techniques to the understanding of IR effects on molecules such as DNA and proteins, or on larger systems such as chromatin, chromosomes and even cells (Nikjoo et al., Štěpán & Davídková, Ballarini & Carante, and Nikitaki et al.). In these papers, as well as in many others, several qualities of IR are compared in order to explain the observed differences of effects. The damages induced by the low energy electrons and new techniques involved in their study are discussed in great detail (Sanche and Fromm & Boulanouar). The chemistry behind the IR induced damages (single or clustered), studied in many laboratories around the world is presented in several papers (Cadet & Wagner, Sevilla et al., Chatgilialoglu et al., and Greenberg). One of them addresses a very useful comparison between the effects of IR and UV exposure on DNA (Ravanat & Douki). The majority of the papers in this Special Issue is dealing with DNA and this reflects the real situation: damages of DNA are more studied than those of other biomolecules. This is due to the role of DNA as main support of hereditary information. Nevertheless, more and more studies are outlining the influence of epigenetic

  9. Possibility of single biomolecule imaging with coherent amplification of weak scattering x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2008-10-01

    The number of photons produced by coherent x-ray scattering from a single biomolecule is very small because of its extremely small elastic-scattering cross section and low damage threshold. Even with a high x-ray flux of 3 x 10;{12} photons per 100-nm -diameter spot and an ultrashort pulse of 10 fs driven by a future x-ray free electron laser (x-ray FEL), it has been predicted that only a few 100 photons will be produced from the scattering of a single lysozyme molecule. In observations of scattered x rays on a detector, the transfer of energy from wave to matter is accompanied by the quantization of the photon energy. Unfortunately, x rays have a high photon energy of 12 keV at wavelengths of 1A , which is required for atomic resolution imaging. Therefore, the number of photoionization events is small, which limits the resolution of imaging of a single biomolecule. In this paper, I propose a method: instead of directly observing the photons scattered from the sample, we amplify the scattered waves by superimposing an intense coherent reference pump wave on it and record the resulting interference pattern on a planar x-ray detector. Using a nanosized gold particle as a reference pump wave source, we can collect 10;{4}-10;{5} photons in single shot imaging where the signal from a single biomolecule is amplified and recorded as two-dimensional diffraction intensity data. An iterative phase retrieval technique can be used to recover the phase information and reconstruct the image of the single biomolecule and the gold particle at the same time. In order to precisely reconstruct a faint image of the single biomolecule in Angstrom resolution, whose intensity is much lower than that of the bright gold particle, I propose a technique that combines iterative phase retrieval on the reference pump wave and the digital Fourier transform holography on the sample. By using a large number of holography data, the three-dimensional electron density map can be assembled.

  10. NASA Operational Simulator for Small Satellites: Tools for Software Based Validation and Verification of Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Operational Simulator for Small Satellites (NOS3) is a suite of tools to aid in areas such as software development, integration test (IT), mission operations training, verification and validation (VV), and software systems check-out. NOS3 provides a software development environment, a multi-target build system, an operator interface-ground station, dynamics and environment simulations, and software-based hardware models. NOS3 enables the development of flight software (FSW) early in the project life cycle, when access to hardware is typically not available. For small satellites there are extensive lead times on many of the commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as limited funding for engineering test units (ETU). Considering the difficulty of providing a hardware test-bed to each developer tester, hardware models are modeled based upon characteristic data or manufacturers data sheets for each individual component. The fidelity of each hardware models is such that FSW executes unaware that physical hardware is not present. This allows binaries to be compiled for both the simulation environment, and the flight computer, without changing the FSW source code. For hardware models that provide data dependent on the environment, such as a GPS receiver or magnetometer, an open-source tool from NASA GSFC (42 Spacecraft Simulation) is used to provide the necessary data. The underlying infrastructure used to transfer messages between FSW and the hardware models can also be used to monitor, intercept, and inject messages, which has proven to be beneficial for VV of larger missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). As hardware is procured, drivers can be added to the environment to enable hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing. When strict time synchronization is not vital, any number of combinations of hardware components and software-based models can be tested. The open-source operator interface used in NOS3 is COSMOS from Ball Aerospace. For

  11. Small Area Model-Based Estimators Using Big Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The timely, accurate monitoring of social indicators, such as poverty or inequality, on a finegrained spatial and temporal scale is a crucial tool for understanding social phenomena and policymaking, but poses a great challenge to official statistics. This article argues that an interdisciplinary approach, combining the body of statistical research in small area estimation with the body of research in social data mining based on Big Data, can provide novel means to tackle this problem successfully. Big Data derived from the digital crumbs that humans leave behind in their daily activities are in fact providing ever more accurate proxies of social life. Social data mining from these data, coupled with advanced model-based techniques for fine-grained estimates, have the potential to provide a novel microscope through which to view and understand social complexity. This article suggests three ways to use Big Data together with small area estimation techniques, and shows how Big Data has the potential to mirror aspects of well-being and other socioeconomic phenomena.

  12. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  13. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  14. Liposome Disruption Assay to Examine Lytic Properties of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimah, John R; Schlesinger, Paul H; Tolia, Niraj H

    2017-08-05

    Proteins may have three dimensional structural or amino acid features that suggest a role in targeting and disrupting lipids within cell membranes. It is often necessary to experimentally investigate if these proteins and biomolecules are able to disrupt membranes in order to conclusively characterize the function of these biomolecules. Here, we describe an in vitro assay to evaluate the membrane lytic properties of proteins and biomolecules. Large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) containing carboxyfluorescein at fluorescence-quenching concentrations are treated with the biomolecule of interest. A resulting increase in fluorescence due to leakage of the dye from liposomes and subsequent dilution in the buffer demonstrates that the biomolecule is sufficient for disrupting liposomes and membranes. Additionally, since liposome disruption may occur via pore-formation or via general solubilization of lipids similar to detergents, we provide a method to distinguish between these two mechanisms. Pore-formation can be identified and evaluated by examining the blockade of carboxyfluorescein release with dextran molecules that fit the pore. The methods described here were used to determine that the malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS and proapoptotic Bax disrupt liposomes by pore formation (Saito et al. , 2000; Jimah et al. , 2016). Since membrane lipid binding by a biomolecule precedes membrane disruption, we recommend the companion protocol: Jimah et al. , 2017.

  15. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage. PMID:27759005

  16. Miniature Laboratory for Detecting Sparse Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A miniature laboratory system has been proposed for use in the field to detect sparsely distributed biomolecules. By emphasizing concentration and sorting of specimens prior to detection, the underlying system concept would make it possible to attain high detection sensitivities without the need to develop ever more sensitive biosensors. The original purpose of the proposal is to aid the search for signs of life on a remote planet by enabling the detection of specimens as sparse as a few molecules or microbes in a large amount of soil, dust, rocks, water/ice, or other raw sample material. Some version of the system could prove useful on Earth for remote sensing of biological contamination, including agents of biological warfare. Processing in this system would begin with dissolution of the raw sample material in a sample-separation vessel. The solution in the vessel would contain floating microscopic magnetic beads coated with substances that could engage in chemical reactions with various target functional groups that are parts of target molecules. The chemical reactions would cause the targeted molecules to be captured on the surfaces of the beads. By use of a controlled magnetic field, the beads would be concentrated in a specified location in the vessel. Once the beads were thus concentrated, the rest of the solution would be discarded. This procedure would obviate the filtration steps and thereby also eliminate the filter-clogging difficulties of typical prior sample-concentration schemes. For ferrous dust/soil samples, the dissolution would be done first in a separate vessel before the solution is transferred to the microbead-containing vessel.

  17. Active immobilization of biomolecules on a hybrid three-dimensional nanoelectrode by dielectrophoresis for single-biomolecule study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method of active immobilization for biomolecules on a three-dimensional nanometre-scale electrode (3D nanoelectrode) using dielectrophoresis to immobilize the biomolecules at predetermined locations for single-biomolecule study. We have developed a novel two-step fabrication process for obtaining a 3D nanoelectrode having a sharp top, which is necessary for immobilizing a single biomolecule at a single point. The first step is to fabricate the backbone structure, which is rigid and defines the shape of the 3D nanoelectrode. It was fabricated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) obtained using focused ion beam assisted chemical vapour deposition followed by post-plasma etching, which reshapes the DLC structure. The second step coats the DLC structure with a thin layer of aluminium, which supplies electrical conductivity to the DLC structure. By applying a high frequency (of the order of megahertz) and high intensity (greater than or equal to a few megavolts per metre) electric field using the 3D nanoelectrodes, the generated dielectrophoresis attracted and then immobilized target biomolecules onto the tops of 3D nanoelectrodes, as a demonstration of active immobilization of biomolecules

  18. Watching Conformations of Biomolecules: a Microwave Spectroscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    The combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets (LA-MB-FTMW) has made possible the gas-phase study of solid biomolecules with high melting points. In the experiment, solids are efficiently vaporized by a high-energy laser pulse, supersonically expanded into a evacuated Fabry-Perot cavity and characterised by their rotational spectra. Recent improvements such as the use of picosecond pulse lasers, new ablation nozzles and the extension of the range of the spectrometers to low frequecy have notably increased the sensitivity of our experimental setup. To date different α-, β- and γ-amino acids have been studied using this technique, making possible the characterization of their preferred conformations and gaining insight in the role of intramolecular interactions. Even in conformationally challenging systems the different rotamers of such biomolecules can be identified by rotational spectroscopy as can be illustrated by the assignment of six low-energy conformers in cysteine and aspartic acid, seven in serine and threonine,^a and nine in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). In all cases the low-energy conformers have been conclusive identified from their experimental rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants. The spectra of neurotransmitters and of the nucleic acid bases uracil, thymine, cytosine and guanine have also been studied and their preferred conformers or tautomeric forms determined. The complexes between amino acids and nucleic acid bases with water have also been investigated to obtain information on the possible changes induced in the conformational or tautomeric preferences by the addition of solvent molecules. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 617-627 (2009) and references therein M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 3573-3578 (2010) S. Blanco, J. C. López, S. Mata and J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9187

  19. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  20. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options

  1. Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Zhang, Yao; Grassi, Roberto; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Edel, Joshua B; Low, Tony; Koester, Steven J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2017-11-30

    The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO 2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.

  2. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  3. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  4. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ileri, N; Tringe, J; Letant, S; Palozoglu, A; Stroeve, P; Faller, R

    2008-06-13

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  5. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ileri, N.; Tringe, J.; Letant, S.; Palozoglu, A.; Stroeve, P.; Faller, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  6. Graphene-Templated Synthesis of Magnetic Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites for Selective Enrichment of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Denagamage, Sachira; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-04-27

    Successful control of homogeneous and complete coating of graphene or graphene-based composites with well-defined metal organic framework (MOF) layers is a great challenge. Herein, novel magnetic graphene MOF composites were constructed via a simple strategy for self-assembly of well-distributed, dense, and highly porous MOFs on both sides of graphene nanosheets. Graphene functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles and carboxylic groups on both sides was explored as the backbone and template to direct the controllable self-assembly of MOFs. The prepared composite materials have a relatively high specific surface area (345.4 m(2) g(-1)), and their average pore size is measured to be 3.2 nm. Their relatively high saturation magnetization (23.8 emu g(-1)) indicates their strong magnetism at room temperature. Moreover, the multifunctional composite was demonstrated to be a highly effective affinity material in selective extraction and separation of low-concentration biomolecules from biological samples, in virtue of the size-selection property of the unique porous structure and the excellent affinity of the composite materials. Besides providing a solution for the construction of well-defined functional graphene-based MOFs, this work could also contribute to selective extraction of biomolecules, in virtue of the universal affinity between immobilized metal ions and biomolecules.

  7. Strategies to balance covalent and non-covalent biomolecule attachment within collagen-GAG biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Jacquelyn C; Gonnerman, Emily A; Bailey, Ryan C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Strategies to integrate instructive biomolecular signals into a biomaterial are becoming increasingly complex and bioinspired. While a large majority of reports still use repeated treatments with soluble factors, this approach can be prohibitively costly and difficult to translate in vivo for applications where spatial control over signal presentation is necessary. Recent efforts have explored the use of covalent immobilization of biomolecules to the biomaterial, via both bulk (ubiquitous) as well as spatially-selective light-based crosslinking, as a means to both enhance stability and bioactivity. However, little is known about how processing conditions during immobilization impact the degree of unintended non-covalent interactions, or fouling, that takes place between the biomaterial and the biomolecule of interest. Here we demonstrate the impact of processing conditions for bulk carbodiimide (EDC) and photolithography-based benzophenone (BP) crosslinking on specific attachment vs. fouling of a model protein (Concanavalin A, ConA) within collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds. Collagen source significantly impacts the selectivity of biomolecule immobilization. EDC crosslinking intensity and ligand concentration significantly impacted selective immobilization. For benzophenone photoimmobilization we observed that increased UV exposure time leads to increased ConA immobilization. Immobilization efficiency for both EDC and BP strategies was maximal at physiological pH. Increasing ligand concentration during immobilization process led to enhanced immobilization for EDC chemistry, no impact on BP immobilization, but significant increases in non-specific fouling. Given recent efforts to covalently immobilize biomolecules to a biomaterial surface to enhance bioactivity, improved understanding of the impact of crosslinking conditions on selective attachment versus non-specific fouling will inform the design of instructive biomaterials for applications across tissue

  8. A small animal PET prototype based on Silicon Photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcatili, S; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A.; Collazuol, G.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Sportelli, G.; Marzocca, C.

    2011-01-01

    Next generation PET scanners should full fill very high requirements in terms of spatial, energy and timing resolution. Modern scanner performances are inherently limited by the use of standard photomultiplier tubes. The use of Silicon Photomultiplier (Si P M) matrices is proposed for the construction of a small animal PET system consisting of two detector heads based on Lyso continuos crystals. The use of large area multi-pixel Silicon Photomultiplier (Si P M) detectors requires the development of a multichannel Digital Acquisition system (DAQ) as well as of a dedicated front-end in order not to degrade the intrinsic detector capabilities. At the University of Pisa and INFN Pisa we developed a DAQ board for the read-out of 2 64-pixel Si P M matrices in time coincidence for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) applications. The proof of principles is based on 64-pixel detectors, but the whole system has been conceived to be easily scalable to a higher number of channels. Here we describe the Group-V INFN DASi P M 2 (Development and Application of Si P M) project and related results.

  9. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  10. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, Alexandra D.; Archimandritis, Spyridon C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  11. MPAI (mass probes aided ionization) method for total analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Aki; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Hifumi, Hiroki; Honma, Yuya; Tanji, Noriyuki; Iwasawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Suzuki, Koji

    2007-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized various mass probes, which enable us to effectively ionize various molecules to be detected with mass spectrometry. We call the ionization method using mass probes the "MPAI (mass probes aided ionization)" method. We aim at the sensitive detection of various biological molecules, and also the detection of bio-molecules by a single mass spectrometry serially without changing the mechanical settings. Here, we review mass probes for small molecules with various functional groups and mass probes for proteins. Further, we introduce newly developed mass probes for proteins for highly sensitive detection.

  12. Studies of metal-biomolecule systems in liquids with beta-detected NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Michal

    2017-01-01

    My internship took place within a small research team funded via the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant: Beta-Drop NMR) at ISOLDE. It was devoted to laser spin-polarization and beta-detected NMR techniques and their future applications in chemistry and biology. I was involved in the design and tests of the beta-NMR spectrometer which will be used in the upcoming experiments. In this way I have been exposed to many topics in physics (atomic and nuclear physics), experimental techniques (vacuum technology, lasers, beta detectors, electronics, DAQ software), as well as chemistry and biology (NMR on metal ions, metal ion binding to biomolecules, quantum chemistry calculations).

  13. Small Nuclear Co-generation Plants Based on Shipbuilding Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyukov, V. I.; Veshnyakov, K. B.; Goryunov, E. V.; Zalugin, V. I.; Panov, Yu. K.; Polunichev, V. I.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nuclear cogeneration plants and power desalination complexes of relatively small power, using proven shipbuilding technology, becomes more and more attractive for solving the power supply problems of remote districts of the Extreme North and the Far East with small and medium power grids and for removing the shortage of fresh water in different world regions. The idea of transportation of the power unit with high degree of readiness to the place of its location with minimum construction and mounting activities at the site is very attractive. Compactness typical of RP based on shipbuilding technology allows to develop floating or ground-based plants at minimum use of water area and territory. Small construction scope at the site under conditions of minimum anthropogenic loads and high ecological indices are important arguments in favor of floating nuclear cogeneration plant based on ship power units against the alternative fossil sources. At present, the activities on floating nuclear cogeneration plant design, which is developed on the basis of floating power unit with two KLT-40S reactor plant, which is a modified option of standard KLT-40-type ship plant for icebreaker fleet in Russia are the most advanced. To date, a detailed design of reactor plant has been developed and approved, design activities on floating power unit are in the stage of completion, the site for its location has been selected and licensing by GAN, Russia, is in progress. Besides OKBM has developed some designs of nuclear cogeneration plants of different power on the basis of integral reactor plants, using the experience of transport and stationary power plants designing. Nuclear cogeneration plant investment analysis showed acceptable social and economical efficiency of the design that creates conditions for commercial construction of floating power units with KLT-40S reactor plan. At the same time the reduction of the design recovering terms, increase of budget income and

  14. Designing the nanoparticle-biomolecule interface for "targeting and therapeutic delivery".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Eugene; Salvati, Anna; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2012-07-20

    The endogenous transport mechanisms which occur in living organisms have evolved to allow selective transport and processing operate on a scale of tens of nanometers. This presents the possibility of unprecedented access for engineered nanoscale materials to organs and sub-cellular locations, materials which may in principle be targeted to precise locations for diagnostic or therapeutic gain. For this reason, nano-architectures could represent a truly radical departure as delivery agents for drugs, genes and therapies to treat a host of diseases. Thus, for active targeting, unlike the case of small molecular drugs where molecular structure has evolved to promote higher physiochemical affinity to specific sites, one aims to exploit these energy dependant endogenous processes. Many active targeting strategies have been developed, but despite this truly remarkable potential, in applications they have met with mixed success to date. This situation may have more to do with our current understanding and integration of knowledge across disciplines, than any intrinsic limitation on the vision itself. In this review article we suggest that much more fundamental and detailed control of the nanoparticle-biomolecule interface is required for sustained and general success in this field. In the simplest manifestation, pristine nanoparticles in biological fluids act as a scaffold for biomolecules, which adsorb rapidly to the nanoparticles' surface, conferring a new biological identity to the nanoparticles. It is this nanoparticle-biomolecule interface that is 'read' and acted upon by the cellular machinery. Moreover, where targeting moieties are grafted onto nanoparticles, they may not retain their function as a result of poor orientation, and structural or conformational disruption. Further surface adsorption of biomolecules from the surrounding environment i.e. the formation of a biomolecule corona may also obscure specific surface recognition. To transfer the remarkable

  15. Determination of partition coefficients of biomolecules in a microfluidic aqueous two phase system platform using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D F C; Azevedo, A M; Fernandes, P; Chu, V; Conde, J P; Aires-Barros, M R

    2017-03-03

    Aqueous two phase systems (ATPS) offer great potential for selective separation of a wide range of biomolecules by exploring differences in molecular solubility in each of the two immiscible phases. However, ATPS use has been limited due to the difficulty in predicting the behavior of a given biomolecule in the partition environment together with the empirical and time-consuming techniques that are used for the determination of partition and extraction parameters. In this work, a fast and novel technique based on a microfluidic platform and using fluorescence microscopy was developed to determine the partition coefficients of biomolecules in different ATPS. This method consists of using a microfluidic device with a single microchannel and three inlets. In two of the inlets, solutions containing the ATPS forming components were loaded while the third inlet was fed with the FITC tagged biomolecule of interest prepared in milli-Q water. Using fluorescence microscopy, it was possible to follow the location of the FITC-tagged biomolecule and, by simply varying the pumping rates of the solutions, to quickly test a wide variety of ATPS compositions. The ATPS system is allowed 4min for stabilization and fluorescence micrographs are used to determine the partition coefficient.The partition coefficients obtained were shown to be consistent with results from macroscale ATPS partition. This process allows for faster screening of partition coefficients using only a few microliters of material for each ATPS composition and is amenable to automation. The partitioning behavior of several biomolecules with molecular weights (MW) ranging from 5.8 to 150kDa, and isoelectric points (pI) ranging from 4.7 to 6.4 was investigated, as well as the effect of the molecular weight of the polymer ATPS component. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microfluidic labeling of biomolecules with radiometals for use in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tobias D; Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V; Önal, Birce; Reichert, David E; Kenis, Paul J A

    2010-12-21

    Radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals, used as imaging and therapeutic agents in nuclear medicine, consist of a radiometal that is bound to a targeting biomolecule (BM) using a bifunctional chelator (BFC). Conventional, macroscale radiolabeling methods use an excess of the BFC-BM conjugate (ligand) to achieve high radiolabeling yields. Subsequently, to achieve maximal specific activity (minimal amount of unlabeled ligand), extensive chromatographic purification is required to remove unlabeled ligand, often resulting in longer synthesis times and loss of imaging sensitivity due to radioactive decay. Here we describe a microreactor that overcomes the above issues through integration of efficient mixing and heating strategies while working with small volumes of concentrated reagents. As a model reaction, we radiolabel 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated to the peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) with (64)Cu(2+). We show that the microreactor (made from polydimethylsiloxane and glass) can withstand 260 mCi of activity over 720 hours and retains only minimal amounts of (64)Cu(2+) (50 µM), yields of over 90% can be achieved in the microreactor when using a 1:1 stoichiometry of radiometal to BFC-BM. These high yields eliminate the need for use of excess amounts of often precious BM and obviate the need for a chromatographic purification process to remove unlabeled ligand. The results reported here demonstrate the potential of microreactor technology to improve the production of patient-tailored doses of radiometal-based radiopharmaceuticals in the clinic.

  17. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light

    KAUST Repository

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur

    2017-03-09

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  18. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur; Ray, Aniruddha; Gorocs, Zoltan; Xiong, Matthew; Malik, Ravinder; Bitan, Gal; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-09

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm 2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  19. Enzyme assisted extraction of biomolecules as an approach to novel extraction technology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadar, Shamraja S; Rao, Priyanka; Rathod, Virendra K

    2018-06-01

    An interest in the development of extraction techniques of biomolecules from various natural sources has increased in recent years due to their potential applications particularly for food and nutraceutical purposes. The presence of polysaccharides such as hemicelluloses, starch, pectin inside the cell wall, reduces the extraction efficiency of conventional extraction techniques. Conventional techniques also suffer from low extraction yields, time inefficiency and inferior extract quality due to traces of organic solvents present in them. Hence, there is a need of the green and novel extraction methods to recover biomolecules. The present review provides a holistic insight to various aspects related to enzyme aided extraction. Applications of enzymes in the recovery of various biomolecules such as polyphenols, oils, polysaccharides, flavours and colorants have been highlighted. Additionally, the employment of hyphenated extraction technologies can overcome some of the major drawbacks of enzyme based extraction such as longer extraction time and immoderate use of solvents. This review also includes hyphenated intensification techniques by coupling conventional methods with ultrasound, microwave, high pressure and supercritical carbon dioxide. The last section gives an insight on application of enzyme immobilization as a strategy for large scale extraction. Immobilization of enzymes on magnetic nanoparticles can be employed to enhance the operational performance of the system by multiple use of expensive enzymes making them industrially and economically feasible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Raman Microscopy: A Noninvasive Method to Visualize the Localizations of Biomolecules in the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Akiyama, Toshihiro; Segawa, Hiroki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    In vivo and in situ visualization of biomolecules without pretreatment will be important for diagnosis and treatment of ocular disorders in the future. Recently, multiphoton microscopy, based on the nonlinear interactions between molecules and photons, has been applied to reveal the localizations of various molecules in tissues. We aimed to use multimodal multiphoton microscopy to visualize the localizations of specific biomolecules in rat corneas. Multiphoton images of the corneas were obtained from nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, third-order sum frequency generation, and second-harmonic generation. The localizations of the adhesion complex-containing basement membrane and Bowman layer were clearly visible in the third-order sum frequency generation images. The fine structure of type I collagen was observed in the corneal stroma in the second-harmonic generation images. The localizations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) was obtained in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images. Imaging technologies have progressed significantly and been applied in medical fields. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy are widely used but do not provide information on the molecular structure of the cornea. By contrast, multiphoton microscopy provides information on the molecular structure of living tissues. Using this technique, we successfully visualized the localizations of various biomolecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in the cornea. We speculate that multiphoton microscopy will provide essential information on the physiological and pathological conditions of the cornea, as well as molecular localizations in tissues without pretreatment.

  1. Magnetic behavior of iron oxide nanoparticle-biomolecule assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyun; Reis, Lynn; Rajan, Krishna; Shima, Mutsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of 8-20 nm in size were investigated as an assembly with biomolecules synthesized in an aqueous solution. The magnetic behavior of the biomolecule-nanoparticles assembly depends sensitively on the morphology and hence the distribution of the nanoparticles, where the dipole coupling between the nanoparticles governs the overall magnetic behavior. In assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles with trypsin, we observe a formation of unusual self-alignment of nanoparticles within trypsin molecules. In such an assembly structure, the magnetic particles tend to exhibit a lower spin-glass transition temperature than as-synthesized bare iron oxide nanoparticles probably due to reduced interparticle couplings within the molecular matrix. The observed self-alignment of nanoparticles in biomolecules may be a useful approach for directed nanoparticles assembly

  2. A resource based view to small firms' sustainable competitive advantages: A case of Iranian small firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Babakhan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, the importance of small firms as one of the main economical parts in each country has been proved. Considering to the resources limitation in one hand, and the competitive global market in the other hand, it is very important that firms can obtain sustainable competitive advantages (SCAs to compete with other rivals. This paper, at the first step, tries to explore the potentially SCAs of Qom's small firms by using of Structural Equation Model (SEM. Then, the real current situation of firms in using these competitive advantages has been examined. The results tell that except firms' location, other potentially SCAs do not have acceptable condition.

  3. A relationship between solvent viscosity and biomolecule picosecond thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornicchi, E.; De Francesco, A.; Marconi, M.; Onori, G.; Paciaroni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Through elastic neutron scattering measurements, we investigated the picosecond dynamics of DNA in the hydrated powder state or embedded in glycerol glassy matrix from 20 K to 300 K. We calculated the relaxational contribution of the mean square displacements (MSD) of DNA hydrogen atoms. We found the existence of a linear relationship between the inverse of the biomolecule relaxational MSD and the logarithm of the bulk viscosity of the surrounding environment. From the comparison with the case of lysozyme in the same environments, for which the validity of the relationship was already verified, possible differences and analogies concerning the biomolecule-to-solvent dynamical coupling can be stressed

  4. Development of an acoustic wave based biosensor for vapor phase detection of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Desmond

    For centuries scientific ingenuity and innovation have been influenced by Mother Nature's perfect design. One of her more elusive designs is that of the sensory olfactory system, an array of highly sensitive receptors responsible for chemical vapor recognition. In the animal kingdom this ability is magnified among canines where ppt (parts per trillion) sensitivity values have been reported. Today, detection dogs are considered an essential part of the US drug and explosives detection schemes. However, growing concerns about their susceptibility to extraneous odors have inspired the development of highly sensitive analytical detection tools or biosensors known as "electronic noses". In general, biosensors are distinguished from chemical sensors in that they use an entity of biological origin (e.g. antibody, cell, enzyme) immobilized onto a surface as the chemically-sensitive film on the device. The colloquial view is that the term "biosensors" refers to devices which detect the presence of entities of biological origin, such as proteins or single-stranded DNA and that this detection must take place in a liquid. Our biosensor utilizes biomolecules, specifically IgG monoclonal antibodies, to achieve molecular recognition of relatively small molecules in the vapor phase.

  5. Pt/Ceria-based Catalysts for Small Alcohol Electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Mora, Christian L.

    High emissions of fossil-based energy sources have led to scientists around the world to develop new alternatives for the future. In this sense, fuel cells are a remarkable and promising energy option with less environmental impact. The most used fuels for this technology are hydrogen and small chain alcohols, which can be oxidized to transform their chemical energy into electrical power. To do this, fuel cells need catalysts that will act as an active surface where the oxidation can take place. The problem with platinum catalysts is its possible CO poisoning with intermediates that are produced before the complete oxidation of alcohol to CO2. Different approaches have been taken to try to resolve this issue. In this case, cerium oxide (ceria) was selected as a co-catalyst to mitigate the effect of CO poisoning of platinum. Ceria is a compound that has the ability to work as an "oxygen tank" and can donate oxygen to carbon monoxide that is strongly adsorbed at platinum surface to produce CO2 (carbon dioxide), regenerating the Pt surface for further alcohol oxidation. Therefore, enhancing the current density as well as the power output of a fuel cell. First, an occlusion deposition technique was used to prepare platinum/ceria composite electrodes and tested them towards small chain alcohol oxidation such as methanol oxidation reaction in acidic and alkaline media. The preliminary results demonstrated that the Pt/ceria electrodes were more efficient towards methanol electrooxidation when compared to Pt electrodes. This enhancement was attributed to the presence of ceria. A second preparation method was selected for the synthesis of ceria/Pt catalysts. In this case, a hydrothermal method was used and the catalysis were studied for the effect of MeOH, EtOH and n-BuOH oxidation. The observed effect was that electrodes made of Pt/Pt:CeO2-x showed better catalytic effect than Pt/ceria and platinum electrodes. Moreover, a comparison between ceria nanorods versus

  6. Small accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, Richard C.

    1997-09-01

    Small neutron sources could be used by individual researchers with the convenience of an adequate local facility. Although these sources would produce lower fluxes than the national facilities, for selected applications, the convenience and availability may overcome the limitations on source strength. Such sources might also be useful for preliminary testing of ideas before going to a larger facility. Recent developments in small, high-current pulsed accelerators makes possible such a local source for pulsed cold neutrons.

  7. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, R.K.; Monteillet, H.J.M.; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery
    of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments,

  9. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, Rupali K.; Monteillet, Hélène; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Kleijn, J. Mieke; Leermakers, Frans A.M.; Wijffels, Rene H.; Eppink, Michel H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments, discarding

  10. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  11. Photochemical Microscale Electrophoresis Allows Fast Quantification of Biomolecule Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Friederike M; Kieß, Michael; Braun, Dieter

    2016-04-27

    Intricate spatiotemporal patterns emerge when chemical reactions couple to physical transport. We induce electrophoretic transport by a confined photochemical reaction and use it to infer the binding strength of a second, biomolecular binding reaction under physiological conditions. To this end, we use the photoactive compound 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, which releases a proton upon 375 nm irradiation. The charged photoproducts locally perturb electroneutrality due to differential diffusion, giving rise to an electric potential Φ in the 100 μV range on the micrometer scale. Electrophoresis of biomolecules in this field is counterbalanced by back-diffusion within seconds. The biomolecule concentration is measured by fluorescence and settles proportionally to exp(-μ/D Φ). Typically, binding alters either the diffusion coefficient D or the electrophoretic mobility μ. Hence, the local biomolecule fluorescence directly reflects the binding state. A fit to the law of mass action reveals the dissociation constant of the binding reaction. We apply this approach to quantify the binding of the aptamer TBA15 to its protein target human-α-thrombin and to probe the hybridization of DNA. Dissociation constants in the nanomolar regime were determined and match both results in literature and in control experiments using microscale thermophoresis. As our approach is all-optical, isothermal and requires only nanoliter volumes at nanomolar concentrations, it will allow for the fast screening of biomolecule binding in low volume multiwell formats.

  12. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Recovery of biomolecules from food wastes--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiano, Antonietta

    2014-09-17

    Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial), the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  14. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xinlin Yang,1 Ali Ebrahimi,1 Jie Li,1,2 Quanjun Cui11Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2School of Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.Keywords: fullerene, amino acid, peptide, oligonucleotide, sugar, ester

  15. Recovery of Biomolecules from Food Wastes — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Baiano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial, the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  16. Security region-based small signal stability analysis of power systems with FSIG based wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Zeng, Yuan; Yang, Yang; Cui, Xiaodan; Xu, Xialing; Li, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Based on the Security Region approach, the impact of fixed-speed induction generator based wind farm on the small signal stability of power systems is analyzed. Firstly, the key factors of wind farm on the small signal stability of power systems are analyzed and the parameter space for small signal stability region is formed. Secondly, the small signal stability region of power systems with wind power is established. Thirdly, the corresponding relation between the boundary of SSSR and the dominant oscillation mode is further studied. Results show that the integration of fixed-speed induction generator based wind farm will cause the low frequency oscillation stability of the power system deteriorate. When the output of wind power is high, the oscillation stability of the power system is mainly concerned with the inter-area oscillation mode caused by the integration of the wind farm. Both the active power output and the capacity of reactive power compensation of the wind farm have a significant influence on the SSSR. To improve the oscillation stability of power systems with wind power, it is suggested to reasonably set the reactive power compensation capacity for the wind farm through SSSR.

  17. 77 FR 53769 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... Flexibility Act of 1980, as amended. The NRC is increasing its receipts-based, small business size standard from $6.5 million to $7 million to conform to the standard set by the Small Business Administration...-Based, Small Business Size Standard; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...

  18. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  19. Patterning Multi-Nanostructured Poly(l-lactic acid) Fibrous Matrices to Manipulate Biomolecule Distribution and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenwu; Li, Qingtao; He, Huimin; Li, Wenxiu; Cao, Xiaodong; Dong, Hua

    2018-03-14

    Precise manipulation of biomolecule distribution and functions via biomolecule-matrix interaction is very important and challenging for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. As a well-known biomimetic matrix, electrospun fibers often lack the unique spatial complexity compared to their natural counterparts in vivo and thus cannot deliver fully the regulatory cues to biomolecules. In this paper, we report a facile and reliable method to fabricate micro- and nanostructured poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibrous matrices with spatial complexity by a combination of advanced electrospinning and agarose hydrogel stamp-based micropatterning. Specifically, advanced electrospinning is used to construct multi-nanostructures of fibrous matrices while solvent-loaded agarose hydrogel stamps are used to create microstructures. Compared with other methods, our method shows extreme simplicity and flexibility originated from the mono-/multi-spinneret conversion and limitless micropatterns of agarose hydrogel stamps. Three types of PLLA fibrous matrices including patterned nano-Ag/PLLA hybrid fibers, patterned bicompartment polyethylene terephthalate/PLLA fibers, and patterned hollow PLLA fibers are fabricated and their capability to manipulate biomolecule distribution and functions, that is, bacterial distribution and antibacterial performance, cell patterning and adhesion/spreading behaviors, and protein adsorption and delivery, is demonstrated in detail. The method described in our paper provides a powerful tool to restore spatial complexity in biomimetic matrices and would have promising applications in the field of biomedical engineering.

  20. A novel type of matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometric detection of biomolecules using metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chien-Ping; Lirio, Stephen; Liu, Wan-Ling; Lin, Chia-Her; Huang, Hsi-Ya

    2015-08-12

    A 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) nanomaterial as matrix for surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of complex biomolecules. Unlike other nanoparticle matrices, this MOF nanomaterial does not need chemical modification prior to use. An exceptional signal reproducibility as well as very low background interferences in analyzing mono-/di-saccharides, peptides and complex starch digests demonstrate its high potential for biomolecule assays, especially for small molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer Risk Factors and Screening Behaviors - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    These model-based estimates use two surveys, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The two surveys are combined using novel statistical methodology.

  2. Discovering the enzyme mimetic activity of metal-organic framework (MOF) for label-free and colorimetric sensing of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Yingjing; Binyam, Atsebeha; Liu, Misha; Wu, Yinan; Li, Fengting

    2016-12-15

    A label-free sensing strategy based on the enzyme-mimicking activity of MOF was demonstrated for colorimetric detection of biomolecules. Firstly obvious blue color was observed due to the high efficiency of peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Fe-MIL-88A (an ion-based MOF material) toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). Then in the presence of target biomolecule and corresponding aptamer, the mimetic activity of Fe-MIL-88A can be strongly inhibited and used directly to realize the colorimetric detection. On the basis of the interesting findings, we designed a straightforward, label-free and sensitive colorimetric method for biomolecule detection by using the enzyme mimetic property of MOF coupling with molecular recognition element. Compared with the existed publications, our work breaks the routine way by setting up an inorganic-organic MOF-aptamer hybrid platform for colorimetric determination of biomolecules, expanding the targets scope from H2O2 or glucose to biomolecules. As a proof of concept, thrombin and thrombin aptamer was used as a model analyte. The limit of detection of 10nM can be achieved with naked eyes and ultrahigh selectivity of thrombin toward numerous interfering substances with 10-fold concentration was demonstrated significantly. Of note, the method was further applied for the detection of thrombin in human serum samples, showing the results in agreement with those values obtained in an immobilization buffer by the colorimetric method. This inorganic-organic MOF-aptamer sensing strategy may in principle be universally applicable for the detection of a range of environmental or biomedical molecules of interests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pain syndromes, and has been shown to be a causative factor in two out of three cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Symptoms improve with antimicrobial treatment, but recurrence is common. Many providers may not be aware of SIBO. This narrative review highlights a clinical case and the most recent literature regarding SIBO, including history, clinical presentation, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, treatment and prevention. Integrative medicine approaches, including diet, supplements and manual therapies, are also reviewed. SIBO can be a challenging condition and requires an integrative, patient-centered approach. Further studies are needed to guide clinicians in the workup and treatment of SIBO.

  4. Thiol-ene and photo-cleavage chemistry for controlled presentation of biomolecules in hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Joseph C; Marozas, Ian A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-12-10

    Hydrogels have emerged as promising scaffolds in regenerative medicine for the delivery of biomolecules to promote healing. However, increasing evidence suggests that the context that biomolecules are presented to cells (e.g., as soluble verses tethered signals) can influence their bioactivity. A common approach to deliver biomolecules in hydrogels involves physically entrapping them within the network, such that they diffuse out over time to the surrounding tissues. While simple and versatile, the release profiles in such system are highly dependent on the molecular weight of the entrapped molecule relative to the network structure, and it can be difficult to control the release of two different signals at independent rates. In some cases, supraphysiologically high loadings are used to achieve therapeutic local concentrations, but uncontrolled release can then cause deleterious off-target side effects. In vivo, many growth factors and cytokines are stored in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and released on demand as needed during development, growth, and wound healing. Thus, emerging strategies in biomaterial chemistry have focused on ways to tether or sequester biological signals and engineer these bioactive scaffolds to signal to delivered cells or endogenous cells. While many strategies exist to achieve tethering of peptides, protein, and small molecules, this review focuses on photochemical methods, and their usefulness as a mild reaction that proceeds with fast kinetics in aqueous solutions and at physiological conditions. Photo-click and photo-caging methods are particularly useful because one can direct light to specific regions of the hydrogel to achieve spatial patterning. Recent methods have even demonstrated reversible introduction of biomolecules to mimic the dynamic changes of native ECM, enabling researchers to explore how the spatial and dynamic context of biomolecular signals influences important cell functions. This review will highlight how two

  5. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays for Cell Immobilization Using Automated Microcontact Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncy, Julie; Estève, Aurore; Degache, Amélie; Colin, Camille; Cau, Jean Christophe; Malaquin, Laurent; Vieu, Christophe; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are generally produced by conventional microarrayer, i.e., by contact or inkjet printing. Microcontact printing represents an alternative way of deposition of biomolecules on solid supports but even if various biomolecules have been successfully microcontact printed, the production of biomolecule microarrays in routine by microcontact printing remains a challenging task and needs an effective, fast, robust, and low-cost automation process. Here, we describe the production of biomolecule microarrays composed of extracellular matrix protein for the fabrication of cell microarrays by using an automated microcontact printing device. Large scale cell microarrays can be reproducibly obtained by this method.

  6. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  7. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements. PMID:25071950

  8. A Computer Based Moire Technique To Measure Very Small Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Amadshahi, Mansour A.; Subbaraman, B.

    1987-02-01

    The accuracy that can be achieved in the measurement of very small displacements in techniques such as moire, holography and speckle is limited by the noise inherent to the utilized optical devices. To reduce the noise to signal ratio, the moire method can be utilized. Two system of carrier fringes are introduced, an initial system before the load is applied and a final system when the load is applied. The moire pattern of these two systems contains the sought displacement information and the noise common to the two patterns is eliminated. The whole process is performed by a computer on digitized versions of the patterns. Examples of application are given.

  9. A novel stable 3D luminescent uranyl complex for highly efficient and sensitive recognition of Ru3+ and biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong-Hong; Chen, Liang-Ting; Zhang, Rong-Lan; Zhao, Jian-She; Liu, Chi-Yang; Weng, Ng Seik

    2018-02-01

    A novel highly stable 3D luminescent uranyl coordination polymer, namely {[UO2(L)]·DMA}n (1), was assembled with uranyl salt and a glycine-derivative ligand [6-(carboxymethyl-amino)-4-oxo-4,5-dihydro-[1,3,5]triazin-2-ylamino]-acetic acid (H2L) under solvothermal reaction. Besides, It was found that complex 1 possesses excellent luminescent properties, particularly the efficient selectivity and sensitivity in the recognition of Ru3+, biomacromolecule bovine serum albumin (BSA), biological small molecules dopamine (DA), ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) in the water solution based on a "turn-off" mechanism. Accordingly, the luminescent explorations also demonstrated that complex 1 could be acted as an efficient luminescent probe with high quenching efficiency and low detection limit for selectively detecting Ru3+ and biomolecules (DA, AA, UA and BSA). It was noted that the framework structure of complex 1 still remains highly stable after quenching, which was verified by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD).

  10. [INVITED] Surface plasmon cavities on optical fiber end-facets for biomolecule and ultrasound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; He, Xiaolong; Zhou, Xin; Lei, Zeyu; Wang, Yalin; Yang, Jie; Cai, De; Chen, Sung-Liang; Wang, Xueding

    2018-05-01

    Integrating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices upon single-mode fiber (SMF) end facets renders label-free sensing systems that have a simple dip-and-read configuration, a small form factor, high compatibility with fiber-optic techniques, and invasive testing capability. Such devices are not only low cost replacement of current equipments in centralized laboratories, but also highly desirable for opening paths to new applications of label-free optical sensing technologies, such as point-of-care immunological tests and intravascular ultrasound imaging. In this paper, we explain the requirements and challenges for such devices from the perspectives of biomolecule and ultrasound detection applications. In such a context, we review our recent work on SMF end-facet SPR cavities. This include a glue-and-strip fabrication method to transfer a nano-patterned thin gold film to the SMF end-facet with high yield, high quality and high alignment precision, the designs of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and distributed feedback (DFB) SPR cavities that couple efficiently with the SMF guided mode and reach quality factors of over 100, and the preliminary results for biomolecule interaction sensing and ultrasound detection. The particular advantages and potential values of these devices have been discussed, in terms of sensitivity, data reliability, reproducibility, bandwidth, etc.

  11. Carbon-14 labelling of biomolecules induced by 14CO ionized gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lier, J.E. van; Sanche, L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionized 14 CO gas provides a rapid method for producing 14 C-labelled biomolecules. The apparatus consists of a high vacuum system in which a small amount of 14 CO is ionized by electron impact. The resulting species drift towards a target where they interact with the molecule of interest to produce 14 C-labelled compounds. Since the reaction time is only 2 minutes, the method is particularly promising for producing tracer biomolecules with short-lived 11 C at high specific activities. The applicability of the method to various classes of compounds of biological importance, including steroids, alkaloids, prostaglandins, nucleosides, amino acids and proteins has been studied. All compounds treated gave rise to 14 C addition and degradation products. Furthermore, for some compounds, chromatographic analysis in multiple systems followed by derivatization and crystallization to constant specific activity, indicated that carbon exchange may occur to produce the labelled, but otherwise unaltered substrate in yields of the order of 10-100 mCi/mol. More conclusive proof of radiochemical identity must await production of larger quantities of material and rigorous purification including at least two different chromatographic techniques. (author)

  12. In Situ Hot-Spot Assembly as a General Strategy for Probing Single Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiqiao; Li, Qiang; Li, Mingmin; Ma, Sisi; Liu, Dingbin

    2017-05-02

    Single-molecule detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has attracted increasing attention in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it remains a major challenge to probe single biomolecules by means of SERS hot spots owing to the small volume of hot spots and their random distribution on substrates. We here report an in situ hot-spot assembly method as a general strategy for probing single biomolecules. As a proof-of-concept, this proposed strategy was successfully used for the detection of single microRNA-21 (miRNA-21, a potential cancer biomarker) at the single-cell level, showing great capability in differentiating the expression of miRNA-21 in single cancer cells from normal cells. This approach was further extended to single-protein detection. The versatility of the strategy opens an exciting avenue for single-molecule detection of biomarkers of interest and thus holds great promise in a variety of biological and biomedical applications.

  13. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al 18 F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[ 18 F]fluoride ({Al 18 F} 2+ ) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al 18 F} 2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al 18 F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al 18 F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[ 18 F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [ 18 F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers.

  14. Al18F-Labeling Of Heat-Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Ahamed, Muneer; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Caveliers, Vicky; McQuade, Paul; Rubins, Daniel J; Li, Wenping; Verbruggen, Alfons; Xavier, Catarina; Bormans, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using radiolabeled biomolecules is a translational molecular imaging technology that is increasingly used in support of drug development. Current methods for radiolabeling biomolecules with fluorine-18 are laborious and require multistep procedures with moderate labeling yields. The Al18F-labeling strategy involves chelation in aqueous medium of aluminum mono[18F]fluoride ({Al18F}2+) by a suitable chelator conjugated to a biomolecule. However, the need for elevated temperatures (100-120 °C) required for the chelation reaction limits its widespread use. Therefore, we designed a new restrained complexing agent (RESCA) for application of the AlF strategy at room temperature. Methods. The new chelator RESCA was conjugated to three relevant biologicals and the constructs were labeled with {Al18F}2+ to evaluate the generic applicability of the one-step Al18F-RESCA-method. Results. We successfully labeled human serum albumin with excellent radiochemical yields in less than 30 minutes and confirmed in vivo stability of the Al18F-labeled protein in rats. In addition, we efficiently labeled nanobodies targeting the Kupffer cell marker CRIg, and performed µPET studies in healthy and CRIg deficient mice to demonstrate that the proposed radiolabeling method does not affect the functional integrity of the protein. Finally, an affibody targeting HER2 (PEP04314) was labeled site-specifically, and the distribution profile of (±)-[18F]AlF(RESCA)-PEP04314 in a rhesus monkey was compared with that of [18F]AlF(NOTA)-PEP04314 using whole-body PET/CT. Conclusion. This generic radiolabeling method has the potential to be a kit-based fluorine-18 labeling strategy, and could have a large impact on PET radiochemical space, potentially enabling the development of many new fluorine-18 labeled protein-based radiotracers. PMID:28824726

  15. Physical Analysis of the Biomolecules Causing Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jehun; Lee, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Chai Rin

    Periodontitis caused by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, is an inflammatory diseases causing gum infection. The disease damages the soft tissues that surround and support the teeth and destroys the bone that supports teeth and finally causes tooth loss. An increased risk of stroke and heart attack problems are related to the periodontitis as well. Most bacteria or pathogens attach to gum surface where they form a biofilm. Bacterial cells in biofilms are well protected against antibiotics. The mechanisms of action are still unknown, and it is difficult to control pathogens with antibiotics in biofilm infections and thus the study on the antibiotics is needed. In this research, a number of natural water soluble, small-sized antibiotics molecules and their derivatives are studied. Molecular editing programs such as Gamess, Chemcraft and Avogadro, with an auto-optimization feature that determines the theoretical values of the structure's atomic properties are used to build virtually any molecule with the optimized geometry according to various force field options. The UFF (Universal Force Field) is used for optimizing most molecules.

  16. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Biomolecules up to 110 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Ermilova, Elena; Pannwitz, Daniel; Gibbons, Jessica; Hölzel, Ralph; Bier, Frank F.

    2018-03-01

    Radio-frequency fields in the GHz range are increasingly applied in biotechnology and medicine. In order to fully exploit both their potential and their risks detailed information about the dielectric properties of biological material is needed. For this purpose a measuring system is presented that allows the acquisition of complex dielectric spectra over 4 frequency decade up to 110 GHz. Routines for calibration and for data evaluation according to physicochemical interaction models have been developed. The frequency dependent permittivity and dielectric loss of some proteins and nucleic acids, the main classes of biomolecules, and of their sub-units have been determined. Dielectric spectra are presented for the amino acid alanine, the proteins lysozyme and haemoglobin, the nucleotides AMP and ATP, and for the plasmid pET-21, which has been produced by bacterial culture. Characterisation of a variety of biomolecules is envisaged, as is the application to studies on protein structure and function.

  17. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  18. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  19. Electronic sputtering of biomolecules and its application in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.U.R.

    1989-01-01

    In 1974 Macfarlane discovered that fast heavy ions from a 252-Cf source can desorb and ionize molecules from a solid surface. The mass of the molecules was determined by time-of-flight technique. It has been shown that the desorption mechanism is associated with the electron part of the stopping power of the primary ion and the name 'electron sputtering' has been adopted for the phenomenon to distinguish it from the well-known sputtering process with ions of KeV energy. A review of electronic sputtering of biomolecules will be given as well as recent measurements on Langmuir-Blodgett films. One important application of electronic sputtering is in the field of mass spectrometry. With this technique large and nonvolatile molecules can be studied. Particularly adsorption of biomolecules to a nitrocellulose backing has proven to be very useful. Examples will be given of mass spectra from peptides with a molecular weight above 20,000 u. (author)

  20. Hierarchically Ordered Nanopatterns for Spatial Control of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The development and study of a benchtop, high-throughput, and inexpensive fabrication strategy to obtain hierarchical patterns of biomolecules with sub-50 nm resolution is presented. A diblock copolymer of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide), PS-b-PEO, is synthesized with biotin capping the PEO block and 4-bromostyrene copolymerized within the polystyrene block at 5 wt %. These two handles allow thin films of the block copolymer to be postfunctionalized with biotinylated biomolecules of interest and to obtain micropatterns of nanoscale-ordered films via photolithography. The design of this single polymer further allows access to two distinct superficial nanopatterns (lines and dots), where the PEO cylinders are oriented parallel or perpendicular to the substrate. Moreover, we present a strategy to obtain hierarchical mixed morphologies: a thin-film coating of cylinders both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate can be obtained by tuning the solvent annealing and irradiation conditions. PMID:25363506

  1. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  2. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  3. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  4. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.; Verdera, S.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this project is the labelling and quality control of biomolecules with radionuclides beta emitters with high purity and stability. Techniques and methodology for labelling with 188 Re, 153 Sm, and 125 I as well as quality controls were done according the recommendations of the first research coordination meeting of this CRP. Also some useful chelators reported in the literature were synthesized in our laboratory

  5. Models and algorithms for biomolecules and molecular networks

    CERN Document Server

    DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    By providing expositions to modeling principles, theories, computational solutions, and open problems, this reference presents a full scope on relevant biological phenomena, modeling frameworks, technical challenges, and algorithms. * Up-to-date developments of structures of biomolecules, systems biology, advanced models, and algorithms * Sampling techniques for estimating evolutionary rates and generating molecular structures * Accurate computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks, solving discrete chemical master equations * End-of-chapter exercises

  6. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan Shehata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5 and WLAN (5.2 bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  7. Immobilization of biomolecules to plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Luis; Menges, Bernhard; Borros, Salvador; Förch, Renate

    2010-10-11

    Thin films of plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (pp-PFM) offer highly reactive ester groups throughout the structure of the film that allow for subsequent reactions with different aminated reagents and biological molecules. The present paper follows on from previous work on the plasma deposition of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFM) for optimum functional group retention (Francesch, L.; Borros, S.; Knoll, W.; Foerch, R. Langmuir 2007, 23, 3927) and reactivity in aqueous solution (Duque, L.; Queralto, N.; Francesch, L.; Bumbu, G. G.; Borros, S.; Berger, R.; Förch, R. Plasma Process. Polym. 2010, accepted for publication) to investigate the binding of a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (IKVAV) and of biochemically active proteins such as BSA and fibrinogen. Analyses of the films and of the immobilization of the biomolecules were carried out using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The attachment of the biomolecules on pulsed plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate was monitored using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). SPR analysis confirmed the presence of immobilized biomolecules on the plasma polymer and was used to determine the mass coverage of the peptide and proteins adsorbed onto the films. The combined analysis of the surfaces suggests the covalent binding of the peptide and proteins to the surface of the pp-PFM.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Biomolecule Interactions Influence Oral Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-11-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in various industrial fields, such as electronics, packaging, food, and cosmetics. Accordingly, concerns about the potential toxicity of TiO₂ NPs have increased. In order to comprehend their in vivo behavior and potential toxicity, we must evaluate the interactions between TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, which can alter the physicochemical properties and the fate of NPs under physiological conditions. In the present study, in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of food grade TiO₂ (f-TiO₂) NPs were evaluated following a single-dose oral administration to rats and were compared to those of general grade TiO₂ (g-TiO₂) NPs. The effect of the interactions between the TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, such as glucose and albumin, on oral absorption was also investigated, with the aim of determining the surface interactions between them. The intestinal transport pathway was also assessed using 3-dimensional culture systems. The results demonstrate that slightly higher oral absorption of f-TiO₂ NPs compared to g-TiO₂ NPs could be related to their intestinal transport mechanism by microfold (M) cells, however, most of the NPs were eliminated through the feces. Moreover, the biokinetics of f-TiO₂ NPs was highly dependent on their interaction with biomolecules, and the dispersibility was affected by modified surface chemistry.

  9. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  10. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Ishiyama, Y.; Penmatsa, V.; Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m

  11. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  12. Effect of water and ionic liquids on biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debasis; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2018-02-08

    The remarkable progress in the field of ionic liquids (ILs) in the last two decades has involved investigations on different aspects of ILs in various conditions. The nontoxic and biocompatible nature of ILs makes them a suitable substance for the storage and application of biomolecules. In this regard, the aqueous IL solutions have attracted a large number of studies to comprehend the role of water in modulating various properties of biomolecules. Here, we review some of the recent studies on aqueous ILs that concern the role of water in altering the behavior of ILs in general and in case of biomolecules solvated in ILs. The different structural and dynamic effects caused by water have been highlighted. We discuss the different modes of IL interaction that are responsible for stabilization and destabilization of proteins and enzymes followed by examples of water effect on this. The role of water in the case of nucleic acid storage in ILs, an area which has mostly been underrated, also has been emphasized. Our discussions highlight the fact that the effects of water on IL behavior are not general and are highly dependent on the nature of the IL under consideration. Overall, we aim to draw attention to the significance of water dynamics in the aqueous IL solutions, a better understanding of which can help in developing superior storage materials for application purposes.

  13. Functionalization of titanium dioxide nanotubes with biomolecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Weslley F; Arruda, Isabel R S; Silva, Germana M M; Machado, Giovanna; Coelho, Luana C B B; Correia, Maria T S

    2017-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are extensively used in the manufacture of implants because they have biocompatibility. The production of a nanostructured surface can be achieved by means of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) which can have dimensions equivalent to the nanometric components of human bone, in addition to increasing the efficiency of such implants. The search is ongoing for ways to improve the performance of these TNTs in terms of their functionalization through coating these nanotubular matrices with biomolecules. The biocompatibility of the functionalized TNTs can be improved by promoting rapid osseointegration, by preventing the adhesion of bacteria on such surfaces and/or by promoting a more sustained local release of drugs that are loaded into such TNTs. In addition to the implants, these nanotubular matrices have been used in the manufacture of high-performance biosensors capable of immobilizing principally enzymes on their surfaces, which has possible use in disease diagnosis. The objective of this review is to show the main techniques of immobilization of biomolecules in TNTs, evidencing the most recent applications of bioactive molecules that have been functionalized in the nanotubular matrices for use in implants and biosensors. This surveillance also proposes a new class of biomolecules that can be used to functionalize these nanostructured surfaces, lectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Laursen, Bo W

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes. (paper)

  15. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just Sørensen, Thomas; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-06-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20-200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes.

  16. Azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA+): A long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy have great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is in the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatics dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecules assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immuniglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time by more than 75 %, and a change in the steady-state anisotropy increase of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay for detecting binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with the other red emitting organic dyes. PMID:24058730

  17. Injectable, Biomolecule-Responsive Polypeptide Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation and Facile Cell Recovery through Triggered Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghua; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Kaixuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-11-16

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely investigated in biomedical applications, and increasing demand has been proposed to achieve dynamic regulation of physiological properties of hydrogels. Herein, a new type of injectable and biomolecule-responsive hydrogel based on poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLG) grafted with disulfide bond-modified phloretic acid (denoted as PLG-g-CPA) was developed. The hydrogels formed in situ via enzymatic cross-linking under physiological conditions in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The physiochemical properties of the hydrogels, including gelation time and the rheological property, were measured. Particularly, the triggered degradation of the hydrogel in response to a reductive biomolecule, glutathione (GSH), was investigated in detail. The mechanical strength and inner porous structure of the hydrogel were influenced by the addition of GSH. The polypeptide hydrogel was used as a three-dimensional (3D) platform for cell encapsulation, which could release the cells through triggered disruption of the hydrogel in response to the addition of GSH. The cells released from the hydrogel were found to maintain high viability. Moreover, after subcutaneous injection into rats, the PLG-g-CPA hydrogels with disulfide-containing cross-links exhibited a markedly faster degradation behavior in vivo compared to that of the PLG hydrogels without disulfide cross-links, implying an interesting accelerated degradation process of the disulfide-containing polypeptide hydrogels in the physiological environment in vivo. Overall, the injectable and biomolecule-responsive polypeptide hydrogels may serve as a potential platform for 3D cell culture and easy cell collection.

  18. The polygonal model: A simple representation of biomolecules as a tool for teaching metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceição; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2018-01-01

    Metabolism involves numerous reactions and organic compounds that the student must master to understand adequately the processes involved. Part of biochemical learning should include some knowledge of the structure of biomolecules, although the acquisition of such knowledge can be time-consuming and may require significant effort from the student. In this report, we describe the "polygonal model" as a new means of graphically representing biomolecules. This model is based on the use of geometric figures such as open triangles, squares, and circles to represent hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl groups, respectively. The usefulness of the polygonal model was assessed by undergraduate students in a classroom activity that consisted of "transforming" molecules from Fischer models to polygonal models and vice and versa. The survey was applied to 135 undergraduate Biology and Nursing students. Students found the model easy to use and we noted that it allowed identification of students' misconceptions in basic concepts of organic chemistry, such as in stereochemistry and organic groups that could then be corrected. The students considered the polygonal model easier and faster for representing molecules than Fischer representations, without loss of information. These findings indicate that the polygonal model can facilitate the teaching of metabolism when the structures of biomolecules are discussed. Overall, the polygonal model promoted contact with chemical structures, e.g. through drawing activities, and encouraged student-student dialog, thereby facilitating biochemical learning. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):66-75, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Country report: Vietnam. Setting Up of a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y Generator System Based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) Technique and Radiolabeling of Eluted {sup 90}Y with Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thu, Nguyen Thi; Dong, Duong Van; Cuong, Bui Van; Khoa, Chu Van [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC), Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2010-07-01

    In the course of participating in the IAEA-CRP during the last two years, Vietnam has achieved the goal of setting up a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator system based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) technique and also radiolabeling of the eluted {sup 90}Y with antibody, peptides and albumin. A two stage SLM based {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y generator was set up in-house to generate carrier-free {sup 90}Y at different activity levels viz. 5, 20, 50 mCi. The generator system was operated in sequential mode in which 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (PC88A) based SLM was used in the first stage for the transport {sup 90}Y in 4.0 M nitric acid from source phase where {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y equilibrium mixture is placed in nitric acid medium at pH to 1-2. In the second stage, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM was used for the transport of {sup 90}Y selectively to 1.0 M acetic acid which is the best medium for radiolebeling. The eluted {sup 90}Y from the generator was tested for the presence of any traces of {sup 90}Sr using the Extraction Paper Chromatography (EPC) and was found suitable for radiolabeling. The generator system could be upgraded to 100 mCi level successfully due to an expert mission from India through IAEA. The {sup 90}Y product obtained from the generator system was used for radiolabeling of antibody and peptides viz. Rituximab, DOTATATE and albumin particles under different experimental conditions. A new chromatography system could be developed for analyzing {sup 90}Y labeled albumin using the TAE buffer as mobile phase in PC and ITLC.

  20. Enhancement of small signal stability of a DFIG-based wind power ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... logic controllers for enhancing the small signal stability of DFIG-based wind integrated power system. ... state space model, eigenvalue analysis, fuzzy logic based tuning circuits ...

  1. MTS-MD of Biomolecules Steered with 3D-RISM-KH Mean Solvation Forces Accelerated with Generalized Solvation Force Extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-14

    We developed a generalized solvation force extrapolation (GSFE) approach to speed up multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of biomolecules steered with mean solvation forces obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure). GSFE is based on a set of techniques including the non-Eckart-like transformation of coordinate space separately for each solute atom, extension of the force-coordinate pair basis set followed by selection of the best subset, balancing the normal equations by modified least-squares minimization of deviations, and incremental increase of outer time step in motion integration. Mean solvation forces acting on the biomolecule atoms in conformations at successive inner time steps are extrapolated using a relatively small number of best (closest) solute atomic coordinates and corresponding mean solvation forces obtained at previous outer time steps by converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations. The MTS-MD evolution steered with GSFE of 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces is efficiently stabilized with our optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) thermostat. We validated the hybrid MTS-MD/OIN/GSFE/3D-RISM-KH integrator on solvated organic and biomolecules of different stiffness and complexity: asphaltene dimer in toluene solvent, hydrated alanine dipeptide, miniprotein 1L2Y, and protein G. The GSFE accuracy and the OIN efficiency allowed us to enlarge outer time steps up to huge values of 1-4 ps while accurately reproducing conformational properties. Quasidynamics steered with 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces achieves time scale compression of conformational changes coupled with solvent exchange, resulting in further significant acceleration of protein conformational sampling with respect to real time dynamics. Overall, this provided a 50- to 1000-fold effective speedup of conformational sampling for these systems, compared to conventional MD

  2. Structure, dynamics, and function of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.; Berendzen, J.R.; Garcia, A.; Gupta, G.; Olah, G.A.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Trewhella, J.; Wood, C.C.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors enhanced Los Alamos' core competency in Bioscience and Biotechnology by building on present strengths in experimental techniques, theory, high-performance computing, modeling, and simulation applied to biomolecular structure, dynamics, and function. Specifically, the authors strengthened their capabilities in neutron/x-ray scattering, x-ray crystallography, NMR, laser, and optical spectroscopies. Initially they focused on supporting the Los alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the design and implementation of new neutron scattering instrumentation, they developed new methods for analysis of scattering data, and they developed new projects to study the structures of biomolecular complexes. The authors have also worked to strengthen interactions between theory and experiment, and between the biological and physical sciences. They sponsored regular meetings of members from all interested LANL technical divisions, and supported two lecture series: ''Biology for Physicists'' and ''Issues in Modern Biology''. They also supported the formation of interdisciplinary/inter-divisional teams to develop projects in science-based bioremediation and an integrated structural biology resource. Finally, they successfully worked with a multidisciplinary team to put forward the Laboratory's Genome and Beyond tactical goal

  3. Free locally convex spaces with a small base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gabriyelyan, S.; Kąkol, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2017), s. 575-585 ISSN 1578-7303 R&D Projects: GA ČR GF16-34860L Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compact resolution * free locally convex space * G-base Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.690, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13398-016-0315-1

  4. Effect of the sulphur atom on geometry and spectra of the biomolecule 2-thiouracil and in the WC base pair 2-thiouridine-adenosine. Influence of water in the first hydration shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea Palafox, M; Rastogi, V K; Singh, S P

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the sulphur atom on 2-thiouracil (2TU) and 2-thiouridine molecules, as compared with uracil and uridine molecules, respectively, was carried out in several environments. The predicted IR spectrum of 2TU in the isolated state was compared with that obtained for uracil molecule and with those reported experimentally in matrix isolation. Its crystal unit cell in the solid state was simulated through a tetramer form using DFT methods for the first time. The calculated Raman spectrum was compared to the experimental ones in the solid state. A linear scaling procedure was used for this task. The first hydration shell was simulated by explicit number of water molecules surrounding 2TU up to 30 and was compared with that obtained in uracil molecule. Water molecules 'distributed' around 2TU was preferred over that 'clustering', because it can better reproduce the hydration and their effects on different parameters of the molecular structure of 2TU and uracil. The total atomic charges and several calculated thermodynamic parameters were discussed. The effect of the sulphur atom on the Watson-Crick (WC) and reverse WC base pair uridine-adenosine was estimated, and the CP corrected interaction energies were calculated. 2-thiouridine has a weaker WC pair than that with uridine, although its slight higher dipole moment (μ) facilitates the interaction with the water molecules. Several helical parameters were determined.

  5. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Based on Small Positive Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengwei; Chan, Keith C C; Hu, Yanxing

    2018-01-01

    A basic task in drug discovery is to find new medication in the form of candidate compounds that act on a target protein. In other words, a drug has to interact with a target and such drug-target interaction (DTI) is not expected to be random. Significant and interesting patterns are expected to be hidden in them. If these patterns can be discovered, new drugs are expected to be more easily discoverable. Currently, a number of computational methods have been proposed to predict DTIs based on their similarity. However, such as approach does not allow biochemical features to be directly considered. As a result, some methods have been proposed to try to discover patterns in physicochemical interactions. Since the number of potential negative DTIs are very high both in absolute terms and in comparison to that of the known ones, these methods are rather computationally expensive and they can only rely on subsets, rather than the full set, of negative DTIs for training and validation. As there is always a relatively high chance for negative DTIs to be falsely identified and as only partial subset of such DTIs is considered, existing approaches can be further improved to better predict DTIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called ODT (one class drug target interaction prediction), for such purpose. One main task of ODT is to discover association patterns between interacting drugs and proteins from the chemical structure of the former and the protein sequence network of the latter. ODT does so in two phases. First, the DTI-network is transformed to a representation by structural properties. Second, it applies a oneclass classification algorithm to build a prediction model based only on known positive interactions. We compared the best AUROC scores of the ODT with several state-of-art approaches on Gold standard data. The prediction accuracy of the ODT is superior in comparison with all the other methods at GPCRs dataset and Ion channels dataset. Performance

  6. A small Unix-based data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engberg, D.; Glanzman, T.

    1993-06-01

    The proposed SLAC B Factory detector plans to use Unix-based machines for all aspects of computing, including real-time data acquisition and experimental control. An R ampersand D program has been established to investigate the use of Unix in the various aspects of experimental computation. Earlier R ampersand D work investigated the basic real-time aspects of the IBM RS/6000 workstation running AIX. The next step in this R ampersand D is the construction of prototype data acquisition system which attempts to exercise many of the features needed in the final on-line system in a realistic situation. For this project, we have combined efforts with a team studying the use of novel cell designs and gas mixtures in a new prototype drift chamber

  7. Efficient organic tandem solar cells based on small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riede, Moritz; Widmer, Johannes; Timmreck, Ronny; Wynands, David; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, George-Baehr-Str. 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Uhrich, Christian; Schwartz, Gregor; Gnehr, Wolf-Michael; Hildebrandt, Dirk; Weiss, Andre; Pfeiffer, Martin [Heliatek GmbH, Treidlerstr. 3, 01139 Dresden (Germany); Hwang, Jaehyung; Sundarraj, Sudhakar; Erk, Peter [BASF SE, GVC/E-J542, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2011-08-23

    In this paper, two vacuum processed single heterojunction organic solar cells with complementary absorption are described and the construction and optimization of tandem solar cells based on the combination of these heterojunctions demonstrated. The red-absorbing heterojunction consists of C{sub 60} and a fluorinated zinc phthalocyanine derivative (F4-ZnPc) that leads to a 0.1-0.15 V higher open circuit voltage V{sub oc} than the commonly used ZnPc. The second heterojunction incorporates C{sub 60} and a dicyanovinyl-capped sexithiophene derivative (DCV6T) that mainly absorbs in the green. The combination of both heterojunctions into one tandem solar cell leads to an absorption over the whole visible range of the sun spectrum. Thickness variations of the transparent p-doped optical spacer between both subcells in the tandem solar cell is shown to lead to a significant change in short circuit current density j{sub sc} due to optical interference effects, whereas V{sub oc} and fill factor are hardly affected. The maximum efficiency {eta} of about 5.6% is found for a spacer thickness of 150-165 nm. Based on the optimized 165nm thick spacer, effects of intensity and angle of illumination, and temperature on a tandem device are investigated. Variations in illumination intensity lead to a linear change in j{sub sc} over three orders of magnitude and a nearly constant {eta} in the range of 30 to 310 mW cm{sup -2}. Despite the stacked heterojunctions, the performance of the tandem device is robust against different illumination angles: j{sub sc} and {eta} closely follow a cosine behavior between 0 and 70 . Investigations of the temperature behavior of the tandem device show an increase in {eta} of 0.016 percentage points per Kelvin between -20 C and 25 C followed by a plateau up to 50 C. Finally, further optimization of the tandem stack results in a certified {eta} of (6.07 {+-} 0.24)% on (1.9893 {+-} 0.0060)cm{sup 2} (Fraunhofer ISE), i.e., areas large enough to be of

  8. Novel Apigenin Based Small Molecule that Targets Snake Venom Metalloproteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusha, Sebastian; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Chandra Nayaka, Siddaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Basappa; Girish, Kesturu S.; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2014-01-01

    The classical antivenom therapy has appreciably reduced snakebite mortality rate and thus is the only savior drug available. Unfortunately, it considerably fails to shield the viper bite complications like hemorrhage, local tissue degradation and necrosis responsible for severe morbidity. Moreover, the therapy is also tagged with limitations including anaphylaxis, serum sickness and poor availability. Over the last decade, snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are reported to be the primary component responsible for hemorrhage and tissue degradation at bitten site. Thus, antivenom inability to offset viper venom-induced local toxicity has been a basis for an insistent search for SVMP inhibitors. Here we report the inhibitory effect of compound 5d, an apigenin based molecule against SVMPs both in silico and in vivo. Several apigenin analogues are synthesized using multicomponent Ugi reactions. Among them, compound 5d effectively abrogated Echis carinatus (EC) venom-induced local hemorrhage, tissue necrosis and myotoxicity in a dose dependant fashion. The histopathological study further conferred effective inhibition of basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of EC venom inoculation. The compound also protected EC venom-induced fibrin and fibrinogen degradation. The molecular docking of compound 5d and bothropasin demonstrated the direct interaction of hydroxyl group of compound with Glu146 present in hydrophobic pocket of active site and does not chelate Zn2+. Hence, it is concluded that compound 5d could be a potent agent in viper bite management. PMID:25184206

  9. Design of a synthetic luminescent probe from a biomolecule binding domain: selective detection of AU-rich mRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaut, Laurent; Vasseur, William; Shimberg, Geoffrey D; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Michel, Sarah L J; Sénèque, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    We report the design of a luminescent sensor based upon the zinc finger (ZF) protein TIS11d, that allows for the selective time-resolved detection of the UUAUUUAUU sequence of the 3'-untranslated region of messenger RNA. This sensor is composed of the tandem ZF RNA binding domain of TIS11d functionalized with a luminescent Tb 3+ complex on one of the ZFs and a sensitizing antenna on the other. This work provides the proof of principle that an RNA binding protein can be re-engineered as an RNA sensor and, more generally, that tunable synthetic luminescent probes for biomolecules can be obtained by modifying biomolecule-binding domains.

  10. Modification by cystamine of radiation-induced free radical damages to biomolecules in tissues of mouse organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svistunenko, D.A.; Gudtsova, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    The method of low-temperature ESR-spectroscopy was used to study a modifying effect of cystamine on the yield of radiation-induced free radicals in different biomolecules of liver and spleen tissues of mice. Intraperitoneal administration of cystamine (150 mg/kg) 15 min before isolation and freezing of the tissues was shown to reduce by 11 per cent the yield of radicals of H-adducts of thymine DNA bases, to decrease by 23 per cent the yield of radicals of triacyglycerol and phospholipid radiolysis, and to increase by 24 per cent the yield of radicals of lipid fatty acid residues in splenic tissues. According to the criterion used, cystamine has no modyfying action on the yield of free-radical damages to liver biomolecules

  11. Simplified TiO2 force fields for studies of its interaction with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    Engineered TiO2 nanoparticles have been routinely applied in nanotechnology, as well as in cosmetics and food industries. Despite active experimental studies intended to clarify TiO2's biological effects, including potential toxicity, the relation between experimentally inferred nanotoxicity and industry standards for safely applying nanoparticles remains somewhat ambiguous with justified concerns. Supplemental to experiments, molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be efficacious in investigating the molecular mechanism of a biological process occurring at nanoscale. In this article, to facilitate the nanotoxicity and nanomedicine research related to this important metal oxide, we provide a simplified force field, based on the original Matsui-Akaogi force field but compatible to the Lennard-Jones potentials normally used in modeling biomolecules, for simulating TiO2 nanoparticles interacting with biomolecules. The force field parameters were tested in simulating the bulk structure of TiO2, TiO2 nanoparticle-water interaction, as well as the adsorption of proteins on the TiO2 nanoparticle. We demonstrate that these simulation results are consistent with experimental data/observations. We expect that simulations will help to better understand the interaction between TiO2 and molecules.

  12. Precise fabrication of a 5 nm graphene nanopore with a helium ion microscope for biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yunsheng; Huang, Qimeng; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Daming; Ying, Cuifeng; Wang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    We report a scalable method to fabricate high-quality graphene nanopores for biomolecule detection using a helium ion microscope (HIM). HIM milling shows promising capabilities for precisely controlling the size and shape, and may allow for the potential production of nanopores at wafer scale. Nanopores could be fabricated at different sizes ranging from 5 to 30 nm in diameter in few minutes. Compared with the current solid-state nanopore fabrication techniques, e.g. transmission electron microscopy, HIM is fast. Furthermore, we investigated the exposure-time dependence of graphene nanopore formation: the rate of pore expansion did not follow a simple linear relationship with exposure time, but a fast expansion rate at short exposure time and a slow rate at long exposure time. In addition, we performed biomolecule detection with our patterned graphene nanopore. The ionic current signals induced by 20-base single-stranded DNA homopolymers could be used as a basis for homopolymer differentiation. However, the charge interaction of homopolymer chains with graphene nanopores, and the conformations of homopolymer chains need to be further considered to improve the accuracy of discrimination.

  13. Biomolecule-embedded metal-organic frameworks as an innovative sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempahanumakkagari, Sureshkumar; Kumar, Vanish; Samaddar, Pallabi; Kumar, Pawan; Ramakrishnappa, Thippeswamy; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    Technological advancements combined with materials research have led to the generation of enormous types of novel substrates and materials for use in various biological/medical, energy, and environmental applications. Lately, the embedding of biomolecules in novel and/or advanced materials (e.g., metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), nanoparticles, hydrogels, graphene, and their hybrid composites) has become a vital research area in the construction of an innovative platform for various applications including sensors (or biosensors), biofuel cells, and bioelectronic devices. Due to the intriguing properties of MOFs (e.g., framework architecture, topology, and optical properties), they have contributed considerably to recent progresses in enzymatic catalysis, antibody-antigen interactions, or many other related approaches. Here, we aim to describe the different strategies for the design and synthesis of diverse biomolecule-embedded MOFs for various sensing (e.g., optical, electrochemical, biological, and miscellaneous) techniques. Additionally, the benefits and future prospective of MOFs-based biomolecular immobilization as an innovative sensing platform are discussed along with the evaluation on their performance to seek for further development in this emerging research area. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The Importance of Phytoplankton Biomolecule Availability for Secondary Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina T. Peltomaa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth and reproduction of animals is affected by their access to resources. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of essential biomolecules for filter-feeding zooplankton depends greatly on phytoplankton. Here, we analyzed the biochemical composition, i.e., the fatty acid, sterol and amino acid profiles and concentrations as well as protein, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus content of 17 phytoplankton monocultures representing the seven most abundant phytoplankton classes in boreal and sub-arctic lakes. To examine how the differences in the biochemical composition between phytoplankton classes affect their nutritional quality for consumers, we assessed the performance of Daphnia, on these diets. Furthermore, we defined the most important biomolecules regulating the somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia, expecting that higher concentrations of certain biomolecules are needed for reproduction than for growth. Finally, we combined these results with phytoplankton field data from over 900 boreal and sub-arctic lakes in order to estimate whether the somatic growth of Daphnia is sterol-limited when the natural phytoplankton communities are cyanobacteria-dominated. Our analysis shows that Daphnia grows best with phytoplankton rich in sterols, ω-3 fatty acids, protein, and amino acids. Their reproduction follows food sterol and ω-3 concentration as well as C:P-ratio being two times higher in Daphnia feeding on cryptophytes than any other diet. Interestingly, we found that a high dietary ω-6 fatty acid concentration decreases both somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia. When combined with phytoplankton community composition field data, our results indicate that zooplankton is constantly limited by sterols in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria (≥40% of total phytoplankton biomass, and that the absence of cryptophytes can severely hinder zooplankton production in nature.

  15. A Mo-anode-based in-house source for small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetzel, Linda K.; Fischer, Stefan; Salditt, Annalena; Sedlak, Steffen M.; Nickel, Bert; Lipfert, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Lipfert@lmu.de [Department of Physics, Nanosystems Initiative Munich, and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich, Germany and Geschwister-Scholl Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of a molybdenum-anode-based in-house small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) setup to study biological macromolecules in solution. Our system consists of a microfocus X-ray tube delivering a highly collimated flux of 2.5 × 10{sup 6} photons/s at a beam size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm{sup 2} at the collimation path exit and a maximum beam divergence of 0.16 mrad. The resulting observable scattering vectors q are in the range of 0.38 Å{sup −1} down to 0.009 Å{sup −1} in SAXS configuration and of 0.26 Å{sup −1} up to 5.7 Å{sup −1} in wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) mode. To determine the capabilities of the instrument, we collected SAXS data on weakly scattering biological macromolecules including proteins and a nucleic acid sample with molecular weights varying from ∼12 to 69 kDa and concentrations of 1.5–24 mg/ml. The measured scattering data display a high signal-to-noise ratio up to q-values of ∼0.2 Å{sup −1} allowing for an accurate structural characterization of the samples. Moreover, the in-house source data are of sufficient quality to perform ab initio 3D structure reconstructions that are in excellent agreement with the available crystallographic structures. In addition, measurements for the detergent decyl-maltoside show that the setup can be used to determine the size, shape, and interactions (as characterized by the second virial coefficient) of detergent micelles. This demonstrates that the use of a Mo-anode based in-house source is sufficient to determine basic geometric parameters and 3D shapes of biomolecules and presents a viable alternative to valuable beam time at third generation synchrotron sources.

  16. Linkage of biomolecules to solid phases for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Topics covered by this lecture include a brief review of the principal methods of linkage of biomolecules to solid phase matrices. Copies of the key self explanatory slides are presented as figures together with reprints of two publications by the author dealing with a preferred chemistry for the covalent linkage of antibodies to hydroxyl and amino functional groups and the effects of changes in solid phase matrix and antibody coupling chemistry on the performance of a typical excess reagent immunoassay for thyroid stimulating hormone

  17. Biomolecule-Functionalized Smart Polydiacetylene for Biomedical and Environmental Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2018-01-04

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) has attracted interest for use as a sensing platform in biomedical, environmental, and chemical engineering applications owing to its capacity for colorimetric and fluorescent transition in response to external stimuli. Many researchers have attempted to develop a tailor-made PDA sensor via conjugation of chemical or biological substances to PDA. Here, we review smart bio-conjugates of PDA with various biomolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. In addition, materialization and signal amplification strategies to improve handling and sensitivity are described.

  18. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  19. A Service-Learning Initiative within a Community-Based Small Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simola, Sheldene

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to extend previous scholarly writing on community service-learning (SL) initiatives by looking beyond their use in the not-for-profit sector to their potential use in community-based small businesses. Design/methodology/approach: A rationale for the appropriateness of using SL projects in small businesses is…

  20. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I.; Jorge-Villar, S. E.; van Wesemael, B.; Lázaro, R.

    2017-01-01

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). ;Species; was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed.

  1. Detection algorithm of infrared small target based on improved SUSAN operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmiao; Wang, Shicheng; Zhao, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The methods of detecting small moving targets in infrared image sequences that contain moving nuisance objects and background noise is analyzed in this paper. A novel infrared small target detection algorithm based on improved SUSAN operator is put forward. The algorithm selects double templates for the infrared small target detection: one size is greater than the small target point size and another size is equal to the small target point size. First, the algorithm uses the big template to calculate the USAN of each pixel in the image and detect the small target, the edge of the image and isolated noise pixels; Then the algorithm uses the another template to calculate the USAN of pixels detected in the first step and improves the principles of SUSAN algorithm based on the characteristics of the small target so that the algorithm can only detect small targets and don't sensitive to the edge pixels of the image and isolated noise pixels. So the interference of the edge of the image and isolate noise points are removed and the candidate target points can be identified; At last, the target is detected by utilizing the continuity and consistency of target movement. The experimental results indicate that the improved SUSAN detection algorithm can quickly and effectively detect the infrared small targets.

  2. Chasing Small Exoplanets with Ground-Based Near-Infrared Transit Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, K. D.; Barentsen, G.; Vinicius, Z.; Vanderburg, A.; Coughlin, J.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Barclay, T.; Quintana, E.

    2017-11-01

    I will present results from a ground-based survey to measure the infrared radius and other properties of small K2 exoplanets and candidates. The survey is preparation for upcoming discoveries from TESS and characterization with JWST.

  3. Identification of Biomolecular Building Blocks by Recognition Tunneling: Stride towards Nanopore Sequencing of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Suman

    DNA, RNA and Protein are three pivotal biomolecules in human and other organisms, playing decisive roles in functionality, appearance, diseases development and other physiological phenomena. Hence, sequencing of these biomolecules acquires the prime interest in the scientific community. Single molecular identification of their building blocks can be done by a technique called Recognition Tunneling (RT) based on Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). A single layer of specially designed recognition molecule is attached to the STM electrodes, which trap the targeted molecules (DNA nucleoside monophosphates, RNA nucleoside monophosphates or amino acids) inside the STM nanogap. Depending on their different binding interactions with the recognition molecules, the analyte molecules generate stochastic signal trains accommodating their "electronic fingerprints". Signal features are used to detect the molecules using a machine learning algorithm and different molecules can be identified with significantly high accuracy. This, in turn, paves the way for rapid, economical nanopore sequencing platform, overcoming the drawbacks of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques. To read DNA nucleotides with high accuracy in an STM tunnel junction a series of nitrogen-based heterocycles were designed and examined to check their capabilities to interact with naturally occurring DNA nucleotides by hydrogen bonding in the tunnel junction. These recognition molecules are Benzimidazole, Imidazole, Triazole and Pyrrole. Benzimidazole proved to be best among them showing DNA nucleotide classification accuracy close to 99%. Also, Imidazole reader can read an abasic monophosphate (AP), a product from depurination or depyrimidination that occurs 10,000 times per human cell per day. In another study, I have investigated a new universal reader, 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)pyrene (Pyrene reader) based on stacking interactions, which should be more specific to the canonical DNA nucleosides. In addition

  4. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-03-18

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and "green" products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  5. Polymeric Nanomaterials as Nanomembrane Entities for Biomolecule and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisa, Airama; Espanol, Laura; Prieto, Martin; Sebastian, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Bio-nanomaterials assembled into nanomembrane entities are actively studied to circumvent the uncontrollable list of shortcomings of conventional delivery systems: low water solubility, unfavorable stability, short circulation time in plasma, rapid clearance from the human body, poor bioavailability, non-specific toxicity against normal tissue and cells, low cellular uptake and susceptibility to enzyme degradation. Basically, these nanoentities enable to exploit the therapeutic value of many promising biomolecules and drugs (B&D), controlling the mass transport of B&D at a certain rate or even on demand if a stimulus is applied. The large surface-to-volume ratio of bio-nanomaterials as well as their tunable properties enable to increase the biocompatibility, bioavailability, solubility and permeability of many unique B&D which are otherwise difficult to deliver. This review paper will focus on the last advances of bio-nanomaterials applied as nanomembranes in biomolecule and drug delivery, as well as their more remarkable properties and applications in biomedicine. New advances have been drastically established in the production of smart nanomembranes that alter their own structure and function in response to the environment. These new insights have been used for the production of smart drug delivery nanomembranes. These nanomembranes entities have the potential to revolutionize the biomedicine but there are still some shortcomings to address in order to translate the laboratory production to the clinic. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Autonomous Magnetic Microrobots by Navigating Gates for Multiple Biomolecules Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinghao; Lim, Byeonghwa; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Ding, Junjia; Novosad, Valentine; Im, Mi-Young; Reddy, Venu; Kim, Kunwoo; Jung, Eunjoo; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Eunjoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2018-05-08

    The precise delivery of biofunctionalized matters is of great interest from the fundamental and applied viewpoints. In spite of significant progress achieved during the last decade, a parallel and automated isolation and manipulation of rare analyte, and their simultaneous on-chip separation and trapping, still remain challenging. Here, a universal micromagnet junction for self-navigating gates of microrobotic particles to deliver the biomolecules to specific sites using a remote magnetic field is described. In the proposed concept, the nonmagnetic gap between the lithographically defined donor and acceptor micromagnets creates a crucial energy barrier to restrict particle gating. It is shown that by carefully designing the geometry of the junctions, it becomes possible to deliver multiple protein-functionalized carriers in high resolution, as well as MCF-7 and THP-1 cells from the mixture, with high fidelity and trap them in individual apartments. Integration of such junctions with magnetophoretic circuitry elements could lead to novel platforms without retrieving for the synchronous digital manipulation of particles/biomolecules in microfluidic multiplex arrays for next-generation biochips. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Khadydja F. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and “green” products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  8. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule Against Trichomonas Gallinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Pourseyed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae.Methods: The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations including 125, 250, 500 and 1250 μg ml-1 against T. gallinae trophozoites cultured in trypticase-yeast extract-maltose medium supplemented with heat-inactivated cold horse serum was evaluated in vitro. Samples containing medium without chitosan were also assayed as controls.Results: The mortality rates at 0, 3 and 6 h post treatment with all concentrations were significantly different from control group (P<0.05. Treated trophozoites showed more susceptibility to the highest concentration reaching mortality rate of 100% at 3h post inoculation. However, at this time, results for 125, 250 and 500 μg ml-1 were 93%, 95% and 96.7%, respectively.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the application of chitosan biomolecule is a promising option for treatment of trichomoniasis in pigeons.

  9. Sequestration of carbon dioxide and production of biomolecules using cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upendar, Ganta; Singh, Sunita; Chakrabarty, Jitamanyu; Chandra Ghanta, Kartik; Dutta, Susmita; Dutta, Abhishek

    2018-07-15

    A cyanobacterial strain, Synechococcus sp. NIT18, has been applied to sequester CO 2 using sodium carbonate as inorganic carbon source due to its efficiency of CO 2 bioconversion and high biomass production. The biomass obtained is used for the extraction of biomolecules - protein, carbohydrate and lipid. The main objective of the study is to maximize the biomass and biomolecules production with CO 2 sequestration using cyanobacterial strain cultivated under different concentrations of CO 2 (5-20%), pH (7-11) and inoculum size (5-12.5%) within a statistical framework. Maximum sequestration of CO 2 and maximum productivities of protein, carbohydrate and lipid are 71.02%, 4.9 mg/L/day, 6.7 mg/L/day and 1.6 mg/L/day respectively, at initial CO 2 concentration: 10%, pH: 9 and inoculum size: 12.5%. Since flue gas contains 10-15% CO 2 and the present strain is able to sequester CO 2 in this range, the strain could be considered as a useful tool for CO 2 mitigation for greener world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Study of Application System for Small and Medium CTI Based on Voice Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of computer telecommunications integration (CTI technology, the development of application system for small and medium CTI are updated constantly, but the study of application system for small and medium CTI, we are lack of a stability and unified model. In this paper, the author analyzes the unified structure platform of application system for small and medium CTI based on voice card. Meanwhile, the author introduces a suitable software architecture model and general procedural framework for application system for small and medium CTI based on voice card by using the idea of hierarchical design, which shows the versatility of the architecture. It provided an efficient channel for the development of small and medium CTI.

  11. A trial of team-based versus small-group learning for second-year medical students: does the size of the small group make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Laura Rees; Rosevear, G Craig; Kim, Sarang

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning is a large-group instructional modality intended to provide active learning with modest faculty resources. The goal is to determine if team-based learning could be substituted for small-group learning in case sessions without compromising test performance or satisfaction. One hundred and sixty-seven students were assigned to team-based or small-group learning for 6 case discussion sessions. Examination scores and student satisfaction were compared. Instruction modality had no meaningful effect on examination score, 81.7% team based versus 79.7% small-group, p=.56 after multivariate adjustment. Student satisfaction was lower with team-based learning, 2.45 versus 3.74 on a 5-point scale, pgroups influenced the preference for small-group learning. Team-based learning does not adversely affect examination performance. However, student satisfaction may be inferior, especially if compared to instruction in very small groups of 10 or fewer students.

  12. Thermo-optical Characterization of Photothermal Optical Phase Shift Detection in Extended-Nano Channels and UV Detection of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hisashi; Miyawaki, Naoya; Asano, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2017-06-06

    The expansion of microfluidics research to nanofluidics requires absolutely sensitive and universal detection methods. Photothermal detection, which utilizes optical absorption and nonradiative relaxation, is promising for the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules in nanofluidic channels. We have previously developed a photothermal optical phase shift (POPS) detection method to detect nonfluorescent molecules sensitively, while a rapid decrease of the sensitivity in nanochannels and the introduction of an ultraviolet (UV) excitation system were issues to be addressed. In the present study, our primary aim is to characterize the POPS signal in terms of the thermo-optical properties and quantitatively evaluate the causes for the decrease in sensitivity. The UV excitation system is then introduced into the POPS detector to realize the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules. The UV-POPS detection system is designed and constructed from scratch based on a symmetric microscope. The results of simulations and experiments reveal that the sensitivity decreases due to a reduction of the detection volume, dissipation of the heat, and cancellation of the changes in the refractive indices. Finally, determination of the concentration of a nonlabeled protein (bovine serum albumin) is performed in a very thin 900 nm deep nanochannel. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) is 2.3 μM (600 molecules in the 440 attoliter detection volume), which is as low as that previously obtained for our visible POPS detector. UV-POPS detection is thus expected be a powerful technique for the study of biomolecules, including DNAs and proteins confined in nanofluidic channels.

  13. Research on the attitude of small UAV based on MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojie; Lu, Libin; Jin, Guodong; Tan, Lining

    2017-05-01

    This paper mainly introduces the research principle and implementation method of the small UAV navigation attitude system based on MEMS devices. The Gauss - Newton method based on least squares is used to calibrate the MEMS accelerometer and gyroscope for calibration. Improve the accuracy of the attitude by using the modified complementary filtering to correct the attitude angle error. The experimental data show that the design of the attitude and attitude system in this paper to meet the requirements of small UAV attitude accuracy to achieve a small, low cost.

  14. Simple and universal model for electron-impact ionization of complex biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong Qi; Mi, Zhaohong; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a simple and universal approach to calculate the total ionization cross section (TICS) for electron impact ionization in DNA bases and other biomaterials in the condensed phase. Evaluating the electron impact TICS plays a vital role in ion-beam radiobiology simulation at the cellular level, as secondary electrons are the main cause of DNA damage in particle cancer therapy. Our method is based on extending the dielectric formalism. The calculated results agree well with experimental data and show a good comparison with other theoretical calculations. This method only requires information of the chemical composition and density and an estimate of the mean binding energy to produce reasonably accurate TICS of complex biomolecules. Because of its simplicity and great predictive effectiveness, this method could be helpful in situations where the experimental TICS data are absent or scarce, such as in particle cancer therapy.

  15. The Impact of Repeated Freeze-Thaw Cycles on the Quality of Biomolecules in Four Different Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoli; Wang, Min; Li, Lingling; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yanyang; Li, Qian; Zhou, Junmei

    2017-10-01

    High-quality biosamples are valuable resources for biomedical research. However, some tissues are stored without being sectioned into small aliquots and have to undergo repeated freeze-thaw cycles throughout prolonged experimentation. Little is known regarding the effects of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on the quality of biomolecules in tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated freeze-thaw (at room temperature or on ice) cycles on biomolecules and gene expression in four different types of tissues. Each fresh tissue was sectioned into seven aliquots and snap-frozen before undergoing repeated freeze-thaw cycles at room temperature or on ice. Biomolecules were extracted and analyzed. Both relative and absolute quantification were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The results indicated that the impact of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on RNA integrity varied by tissue type. Gene expression, including the housekeeping gene, was affected in RNA-degraded samples according to absolute quantification rather than relative quantification. Furthermore, our results suggest that thawing on ice could protect RNA integrity compared with thawing at room temperature. No obvious degradation of protein or DNA was observed with repeated freeze-thaw cycles either at room temperature or on ice. This research provides ample evidence for the necessity of sectioning fresh tissues into small aliquots before snap-freezing, thus avoiding degradation of RNA and alteration of gene expression resulting from repeated freeze-thaw cycles. For frozen tissue samples that were already in storage and had to be used repeatedly during their lifecycle, thawing on ice or sectioned at ultralow temperature is recommended.

  16. Neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells in 3-D cultures for studying biomolecule-directed differential cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanwei; Bejoy, Julie; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2016-09-15

    Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells/tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capacity of signaling factors that regulate 3-D neural tissue patterning in vitro and differential responses of the resulting neural populations to various biomolecules have not yet been fully understood. By tuning neural patterning of hiPSCs with small molecules targeting sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, this study generated different 3-D neuronal cultures that were mainly comprised of either cortical glutamatergic neurons or motor neurons. Abundant glutamatergic neurons were observed following the treatment with an antagonist of SHH signaling, cyclopamine, while Islet-1 and HB9-expressing motor neurons were enriched by an SHH agonist, purmorphamine. In neurons derived with different neural patterning factors, whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed similar voltage-gated Na(+)/K(+) currents, depolarization-evoked action potentials and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. Moreover, these different neuronal populations exhibited differential responses to three classes of biomolecules, including (1) matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors that affect extracellular matrix remodeling; (2) N-methyl-d-aspartate that induces general neurotoxicity; and (3) amyloid β (1-42) oligomers that cause neuronal subtype-specific neurotoxicity. This study should advance our understanding of hiPSC self-organization and neural tissue development and provide a transformative approach to establish 3-D models for neurological disease modeling and drug discovery. Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells, tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capability of sonic hedgehog-related small molecules to tune

  17. Production, Isolation and Radiolabeling Methods for 211AT- Labeling of Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hamlin, D.K.; Chyan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy with 211 At-labeled compounds holds great promise for treatment of cancer, particularly compartmentalized cancer (e.g. ovarian cancer), minimal residual cancer after surgery and metastatic disease. Unfortunately, 211 At has limited availability and, due to its unique nature, has the potential to be readily dissociated from the cancer-targeting agents used in vivo. Finding methods to circumvent these two problems has occupied a large amount of our efforts over the past few years. 211 At is produced at the University of Washington on a Scanditronix MC-50 using a 28 MeV alpha beam. Our initial preclinical studies were conducted using a small target assembly with irradiations of a 10 □ A alpha beam, but our desire to ultimately conduct clinical studies led to the design and installation of a new target assembly that had much larger irradiation surface and would withstand beam energies of 50 □A or more. Prior to this upgrade, 211 At was efficiently isolated (60-80%) from the irradiated aluminum-backed bismuth targets by dry distillation at 650 o C. However, the dry distillation method gave low recovery yields (e.g. 10-40%) when the much larger new targets were used. After some attempts to improve the distillation yields, we have more recently conducted a wet chemistry approach to the 211 At isolation. While this method still needs to be optimized, it has provided good recovery (60-90%) of the 211 At. Our radiolabeling methods have undergone a similar transition in the past few years. Until recently our 211 At studies were limited to the use of intact monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled using conjugates containing aryl-astatine derivatives due to the deastatination of more rapidly metabolized targeting biomolecules. This limitation made it all but impossible to label important biomolecules such as MAb fragments, engineered proteins, peptides and small molecules. This critical shortcoming of labeling methods for 211 At led to our investigating

  18. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-08-21

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of "inorganic molecular wrapping" of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as "armour-plated" enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  19. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of ``inorganic molecular wrapping'' of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as ``armour-plated'' enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  20. Electromagnetic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of plasmonic-biomolecule: An interaction between nanodimer and single biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gyanendra Krishna; Pathak, Nilesh Kumar; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-04-01

    In this article we have investigated the electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of single biomolecule adsorbed at the surface of spherical nanodimer. The SERS mechanism has been studied using first principle approach for spherical nanodimer geometry. The coupling of plasmonic concept to biomolecule results the broadband tunable enhancement in Raman gain factor. In this observation the enhancement factor was observed around ≈ 1015. The plasmonic properties of metal nanodimer are analysed in terms of surface plasmon resonances, extinction efficiency and polarisability that have been derived under quasistatic approximation. In this paper, various facets like interdipole separation, molecule distance and size of the plasmonic nanogeometry are taken into account to analyse the Raman gain factor. We also observe that the frequency range expands sufficiently which increases the broad detectability range of the molecule which generates signal even in the outside of Raman range i.e. in between IR to UV region. Lastly, the extinction spectra and electric field profile have been evaluated at resonance wavelength 364 nm. The comparison between electrostatic approach and numerical approach (using DDA) has also been done in terms of extinction spectra.

  1. Biomolecule-nanoparticle interactions: Elucidation of the thermodynamics by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Lau, Boris L T

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are often exposed to a broad range of biomolecules of different abundances. Biomolecule sorption driven by various interfacial forces determines the surface structure and composition of NMs, subsequently governs their functionality and the reactivity of the adsorbed biomolecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a nondestructive technique that quantifies thermodynamic parameters through in-situ measurement of the heat absorption or release associated with an interaction. This review highlights the recent applications of ITC in understanding the thermodynamics of interactions between various nanoparticles (NPs) and biomolecules. Different aspects of a typical ITC experiment that are crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful data, as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of ITC applications to NP research were discussed. ITC reveals the driving forces behind biomolecule-NP interactions and the effects of the physicochemical properties of both NPs and biomolecules by quantifying the crucial thermodynamics parameters (e.g., binding stoichiometry, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG). Complimentary techniques would strengthen the interpretation of ITC results for a more holistic understanding of biomolecule-NP interactions. The thermodynamic information revealed by ITC and its complimentary characterizations is important for understanding biomolecule-NP interactions that are fundamental to the biomedical and environmental applications of NMs and their toxicological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiao; Zhang Bai-Hai; Cui Ling-Guo; Fan Zhun; Vasilakos Athanasios, V.

    2012-01-01

    The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization, are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world when the spatial-temporal dynamics of the epidemic are considered. The oscillations come from the small-world structure and the temporary immunization. Mathematical analyses on the small world of the Cayley tree are presented to reveal the epidemic dynamics with the two immunization strategies. (general)

  3. An infrared small target detection method based on multiscale local homogeneity measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jinyan; Qu, Shaocheng; Wei, Yantao; Zhang, Liming; Deng, Lizhen

    2018-05-01

    Infrared (IR) small target detection plays an important role in the field of image detection area owing to its intrinsic characteristics. This paper presents a multiscale local homogeneity measure (MLHM) for infrared small target detection, which can enhance the performance of IR small target detection system. Firstly, intra-patch homogeneity of the target itself and the inter-patch heterogeneity between target and the local background regions are integrated to enhance the significant of small target. Secondly, a multiscale measure based on local regions is proposed to obtain the most appropriate response. Finally, an adaptive threshold method is applied to small target segmentation. Experimental results on three different scenarios indicate that the MLHM has good performance under the interference of strong noise.

  4. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  5. Sustained delivery of biomolecules from gelatin carriers for applications in bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiankang; Leeuwenburgh, Sander Cg

    2014-08-01

    Local delivery of therapeutic biomolecules to stimulate bone regeneration has matured considerably during the past decades, but control over the release of these biomolecules still remains a major challenge. To this end, suitable carriers that allow for tunable spatial and temporal delivery of biomolecules need to be developed. Gelatin is one of the most widely used natural polymers for the controlled and sustained delivery of biomolecules because of its biodegradability, biocompatibility, biosafety and cost-effectiveness. The current study reviews the applications of gelatin as carriers in form of bulk hydrogels, microspheres, nanospheres, colloidal gels and composites for the programmed delivery of commonly used biomolecules for applications in bone regeneration with a specific focus on the relationship between carrier properties and delivery characteristics.

  6. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  7. Unlocking the Potential of Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing for Small Logistics Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somapa, S.; Cools, M.; Dullaert, W.E.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) model in a small-sized road transport and logistics company. Activity-based costing (ABC) leads to increased accuracy benefiting decision-making, but the costs of implementation can be high. TDABC tries to overcome

  8. Structural Change of Biomolecules and Application of Synergistic Interaction by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, J. H.; Yang, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    It is expected that motivation and basic technologies for the future R and D plans can be provided from the results of this study. This study has been done to develop fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and to establish technical basis for enhancing efficacy of radiation utilization by studying the simultaneous application of ionizing radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through structural changes of biomolecules will exert a favorable influence on the creation of de novo scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor can make it possible to predict a prior the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions for it. Furthermore, the results of this study give a clues for establishment of fundamental theories associated with positive efficacy of radiation applications

  9. Structural Change of Biomolecules and Application of Synergistic Interaction by Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, J. H.; Yang, J. S.

    2008-12-15

    It is expected that motivation and basic technologies for the future R and D plans can be provided from the results of this study. This study has been done to develop fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and to establish technical basis for enhancing efficacy of radiation utilization by studying the simultaneous application of ionizing radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through structural changes of biomolecules will exert a favorable influence on the creation of de novo scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor can make it possible to predict a prior the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions for it. Furthermore, the results of this study give a clues for establishment of fundamental theories associated with positive efficacy of radiation applications

  10. Inductive fault current limiter based on multiple superconducting rings of small diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, M R; Cabo, L; Veira, J A; Vidal, F

    2004-01-01

    We present a fault current limiter prototype based on the use of a secondary comprised of an array of magnetic cores of small sections, each one of them with several superconducting rings. The main advantage of this configuration is that it is easier to make small diameter superconducting rings which, in addition, are more homogeneous and allow better refrigeration. We then present detailed measurements that show that, in addition to these advantages, this prototype offers the same limitation performances than when using a unique core and a superconducting ring with an equivalent area as the array of small section cores

  11. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Zhang, Bai-Hai; Cui, Ling-Guo

    2012-01-01

    , are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world......The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization...

  12. A printed electronic platform for the specific detection of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumbia, A.; Webb, M.; Turner, M. L.; Behrendt, J. M.; Wilson, R.

    2017-08-01

    The rapid detection of disease specific biomarkers in a clinically relevant range using a low-cost sensor can facilitate the development of individual treatment plans for a given patient, known as precision, personalized or genomic medicine. In the recent decade Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field Effect Transistors (EGOFETs), a subtype of OFETs where the dielectric is replaced by an electrolyte, have attracted a great deal of attention for sensing applications. This is due to their capacity to operate at low voltage (market are not yet achieved. In this contribution, we describe the development of a stable and reproducible EGOFET sensor that is able to detect biomolecules selectively in real-time. Facile and scalable techniques are used to prepare arrays of these devices. The selectivity of individual EGOFETs is investigated by immobilization of specific ligands to the target molecule of interest on the gate electrode within a microfluidic flow cell.

  13. Integrated nanoparticle-biomolecule systems for biosensing and bioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Baron, Ronan; Willner, Bilha

    2007-04-15

    The similar dimensions of biomolecules such as enzymes, antibodies or DNA, and metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) enable the synthesis of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems where the unique electronic, photonic and catalytic properties of NPs are combined with the specific recognition and biocatalytic properties of biomolecules. The unique functions of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems are discussed with several examples: (i) the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes is the basis for the development of enzymatic electrodes for amperometric biosensors or biofuel cell elements. The reconstitution of the apo-glucose oxidase or apo-glucose dehydrogenase on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, or on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, respectively, yields electrically contacted enzyme electrodes. The aligned, reconstituted enzymes on the electrode surfaces reveal effective electrical contacting, and the glucose oxidase and glucose dehydrogenase reveal turnover rates of 5000 and 11,800 s(-1), respectively. (ii) The photoexcitation of semiconductor nanoparticles yields fluorescence with a wavelength controlled by the size of the NPs. The fluorescence functions of semiconductor NPs are used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay for nucleic acids, and specifically, for analyzing telomerase activity in cancer cells. CdSe-ZnS NPs are functionalized by a primer recognized by telomerase, and this is elongated by telomerase extracted from HeLa cancer cells in the presence of dNTPs and Texas-red-functionalized dUTP. The dye integrated into the telomers allows the FRET process that is intensified as telomerization proceeds. Also, the photoexcited electron-hole pair generated in semiconductor NPs is used to generate photocurrents in a CdS-DNA hybrid system associated with an electrode. A redox-active intercalator, methylene blue

  14. Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Thomas; Hardt, Steffen [Center of Smart Interfaces, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Muenchow, Goetz, E-mail: hardt@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 18-20, D-55129 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    The mass transfer resistance of a liquid-liquid interface in an aqueous two-phase system composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran is investigated. Different types of proteins and DNA stained with fluorescent dyes serve as probes to study the transport processes close to the interface. A microfluidic device is employed to enable the electrophoretic transport of biomolecules from one phase to another. The results obtained for proteins can be explained solely via the different electrophoretic mobilities and different affinities of the molecules to the two phases, without any indications of a significant mass transfer resistance of the liquid-liquid interface. By contrast, DNA molecules adsorb to the interface and only desorb under an increased electric field strength. The desorption process carries the signature of a thermally activated escape from a metastable state, as reflected in the exponential decay of the fluorescence intensity at the interface as a function of time.

  15. Manipulation of Biomolecule-Modified Liquid-Metal Blobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Miyako, Eijiro

    2017-10-23

    Soft and deformable liquid metals (LMs) are building components in various systems related to uncertain and dynamic task environments. Herein we describe the development of a biomolecule-triggered external-manipulation method involving LM conjugates for the construction of future innovative soft robotics operating in physiological environments. Functional soft hybrids composed of a liquid-metal droplet, a thiolated ligand, and proteins were synthesized for the expression of diverse macroscopic commands, such as attachment to cells, binary fusion, and self-propelled movement through molecular recognition and enzymatic reactions. Our technology could be used to create new state-of-the-art soft robots for chemical and biomedical engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  17. Interactions of model biomolecules. Benchmark CC calculations within MOLCAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Miroslav [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Institute of Materials Science, Bottova 25, SK-917 24 Trnava, Slovakia and Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Scie (Slovakia); Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Dedíková, Pavlína [Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hobza, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Complex Molecular Systems and biomolecules, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-22

    We present results using the OVOS approach (Optimized Virtual Orbitals Space) aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the Coupled Cluster calculations. This approach allows to reduce the total computer time required for large-scale CCSD(T) calculations about ten times when the original full virtual space is reduced to about 50% of its original size without affecting the accuracy. The method is implemented in the MOLCAS computer program. When combined with the Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals and suitable parallelization it allows calculations which were formerly prohibitively too demanding. We focused ourselves to accurate calculations of the hydrogen bonded and the stacking interactions of the model biomolecules. Interaction energies of the formaldehyde, formamide, benzene, and uracil dimers and the three-body contributions in the cytosine – guanine tetramer are presented. Other applications, as the electron affinity of the uracil affected by solvation are also shortly mentioned.

  18. The development of internet based ship design support system for small and medium sized shipyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Chul; Lee, Soon-Sup; Kang, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Kyung-Ho

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a prototype of ship basic planning system is implemented for the small and medium sized shipyards based on the internet technology and concurrent engineering concept. The system is designed from the user requirements. Consequently, standardized development environment and tools are selected. These tools are used for the system development to define and evaluate core application technologies. The system will contribute to increasing competitiveness of small and medium sized shipyards in the 21st century industrial en-vironment.

  19. The concept of development of management of small business based on institutional reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Umarhodjayeva M.

    2018-01-01

    The development of small business management on the basis of theories based on theories of old institutionalism and new institutionalism, its theoretical and methodological analysis and its institutional framework for modern management. From the point of view of contemporary management, the concept of the impact of institutional factors on the development of small business on the issues of organizational business structures, the impact of economic infrastructures on the basis of evolution...

  20. New Chelators for Low Temperature Al(18)F-Labeling of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Frederik; Lecina, Joan; Billaud, Emilie M F; Ahamed, Muneer; Verbruggen, Alfons; Bormans, Guy M

    2016-03-16

    The Al(18)F labeling method is a relatively new approach that allows radiofluorination of biomolecules such as peptides and proteins in a one-step procedure and in aqueous solution. However, the chelation of the {Al(18)F}(2+) core with the macrocyclic chelators NOTA or NODA requires heating to 100-120 °C. Therefore, we have developed new polydentate ligands for the complexation of {Al(18)F}(2+) with good radiochemical yields at a temperature of 40 °C. The stability of the new Al(18)F-complexes was tested in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 and in rat serum. The stability of the Al(18)F-L3 complex was found to be comparable to that of the previously reported Al(18)F-NODA complex up to 60 min in rat serum. Moreover, the biodistribution of Al(18)F-L3 in healthy mice showed the absence of in vivo defluorination since no significant bone uptake was observed, whereas the major fraction of activity at 60 min p.i. was observed in liver and intestines, indicating hepatobiliary clearance of the radiolabeled ligand. The acyclic chelator H3L3 proved to be a good lead candidate for labeling of heat-sensitive biomolecules with fluorine-18. In order to obtain a better understanding of the different factors influencing the formation and stability of the complex, we carried out more in-depth experiments with ligand H3L3. As a proof of concept, we successfully conjugated the new AlF-chelator with the urea-based PSMA inhibitor Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys to form Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys(Ahx)L3, and a biodistribution study in healthy mice was performed with the Al(18)F-labeled construct. This new class of AlF-chelators may have a great impact on PET radiochemical space as it will stimulate the rapid development of new fluorine-18 labeled peptides and other heat-sensitive biomolecules.

  1. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  2. Nicking endonuclease-assisted signal amplification of a split molecular aptamer beacon for biomolecule detection using graphene oxide as a sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Ding, Xuelian; Fan, Jing

    2015-12-07

    Sensitive and selective detection of ultralow concentrations of specific biomolecules is important in early clinical diagnoses and biomedical applications. Many types of aptasensors have been developed for the detection of various biomolecules, but usually suffer from false positive signals and high background signals. In this work, we have developed an amplified fluorescence aptasensor platform for ultrasensitive biomolecule detection based on enzyme-assisted target-recycling signal amplification and graphene oxide. By using a split molecular aptamer beacon and a nicking enzyme, the typical problem of false positive signals can be effectively resolved. Only in the presence of a target biomolecule, the sensor system is able to generate a positive signal, which significantly improves the selectivity of the aptasensor. Moreover, using graphene oxide as a super-quencher can effectively reduce the high background signal of a sensing platform. We select vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as model analytes in the current proof-of-concept experiments. It is shown that under optimized conditions, our strategy exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the quantification of VEGF and ATP with a low detection limit (1 pM and 4 nM, respectively). In addition, this biosensor has been successfully utilized in the analysis of real biological samples.

  3. Blu-ray based optomagnetic aptasensor for detection of small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Pinto, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an aptamer-based optomagnetic biosensor for detection of a small molecule based on target binding-induced inhibition of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clustering. For the detection of a target small molecule, two mutually exclusive binding reactions (aptamer-target binding...... the hydrodynamic size distribution of MNPs and their clusters. A commercial Blu-ray optical pickup unit is used for optical signal acquisition, which enables the establishment of a low-cost and miniaturized biosensing platform. Experimental results show that the degree of MNP clustering correlates well...

  4. Consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems based on sampled data with a small sampling delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Na; Wu Zhi-Hai; Peng Li

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, consensus problems of heterogeneous multi-agent systems based on sampled data with a small sampling delay are considered. First, a consensus protocol based on sampled data with a small sampling delay for heterogeneous multi-agent systems is proposed. Then, the algebra graph theory, the matrix method, the stability theory of linear systems, and some other techniques are employed to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing heterogeneous multi-agent systems to asymptotically achieve the stationary consensus. Finally, simulations are performed to demonstrate the correctness of the theoretical results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  5. UPAR targeted molecular imaging of cancers with small molecule-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Chen, Seng; Zhang, Wanshu; Tu, Yufeng; Sun, Yao

    2017-10-15

    Molecular imaging can allow the non-invasive characterization and measurement of biological and biochemical processes at the molecular and cellular levels in living subjects. The imaging of specific molecular targets that are associated with cancers could allow for the earlier diagnosis and better treatment of diseases. Small molecule-based probes play prominent roles in biomedical research and have high clinical translation ability. Here, with an emphasis on small molecule-based probes, we review some recent developments in biomarkers, imaging techniques and multimodal imaging in molecular imaging and highlight the successful applications for molecular imaging of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. IL 7: Theoretical investigation of the ultrafast dissociation of ionized biomolecules immersed in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuilleumier, R.; Herve du Penhoat, M.A.; Politis, M.F.; Gaigeot, M.P.; Lopez-Tarifa, P.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Tavernelli, I.

    2010-01-01

    We apply time-dependent density functional theory and Ehrenfest dynamics to investigate, at a molecular level, direct and indirect effects of ionising radiations in DNA, in the particular case of irradiation by swift heavy ions such as those used in hadron therapy. Molecular double ionisation arising from irradiation by swift heavy ions (about 10% of ionisation events by ions whose velocity is about the third of speed of light), as a primary event, though maybe less probable than other events resulting from the electronic cascading (for instance, electronic excitations, electron attachments), may be systematically more damageable (and more lethal), as supported by studies of damages created by K holes in DNA. In the past recent years, we have developed the modeling at the microscopic level of the early stages of the Coulomb explosion of DNA molecules immersed in liquid water that follows the irradiation by swift heavy ions. To that end, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory molecular dynamics simulations (TD-DFT MD) have been developed where localised Wannier orbitals are propagated. This latter enables to separate molecular orbitals of each water molecule from the molecular orbitals of the biomolecule. We find that the double ionisation of one molecule of the liquid sample, either one water molecule from the solvent or the biomolecule, may both be responsible for the formation of an atomic oxygen as a direct consequence of the molecule Coulomb explosion. The chemical reactivity of the produced atomic oxygen with other radicals present in the medium will ultimately lead to chemical products that are harmful to DNA. We will review our theoretical methodology and results on the production of atomic oxygen as a result of the double ionisation of water or as a result of the double ionisation of the Uracil RNA base will be presented. (authors)

  7. Small-size pedestrian detection in large scene based on fast R-CNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengke; Yang, Na; Duan, Lianghua; Liu, Lu; Dong, Junyu

    2018-04-01

    Pedestrian detection is a canonical sub-problem of object detection with high demand during recent years. Although recent deep learning object detectors such as Fast/Faster R-CNN have shown excellent performance for general object detection, they have limited success for small size pedestrian detection in large-view scene. We study that the insufficient resolution of feature maps lead to the unsatisfactory accuracy when handling small instances. In this paper, we investigate issues involving Fast R-CNN for pedestrian detection. Driven by the observations, we propose a very simple but effective baseline for pedestrian detection based on Fast R-CNN, employing the DPM detector to generate proposals for accuracy, and training a fast R-CNN style network to jointly optimize small size pedestrian detection with skip connection concatenating feature from different layers to solving coarseness of feature maps. And the accuracy is improved in our research for small size pedestrian detection in the real large scene.

  8. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsunori, E-mail: honda.mitsunori@jaea.go.jp; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-04-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds.

  9. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  10. Comprehensive spectroscopic studies on the interaction of biomolecules with surfactant detached multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of ten diverse biomolecules with surfactant detached Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) using multiple spectroscopic methods. Declining fluorescence intensity of biomolecules in combination with the hyperchromic effect in UV-Visible spectra confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation. Quenching mechanism remains static and non-fluorescent. 3D spectral data of biomolecules suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues arising out of CNTs interaction. Amide band Shifts corresponding to the secondary structure of biomolecules were observed in the of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. In addition, there exists an increased Raman intensity of tryptophan residues of biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Hence, the binding of the aromatic structures of CNTs with the aromatic amino acid residues, in a particular, tryptophan was evidenced. Far UV Circular spectra have showed the loss of alpha-helical contents in biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Near UV CD spectra confirmed the alterations in the tryptophan positions of the peptide backbone. Hence, our results have demonstrated that the interaction of biomolecules with OH-MWCNTs would involve binding cum structural changes and alteration to their aromatic micro-environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subkhi, M. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2014-01-01

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higher conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of 233 U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation

  12. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, A R [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, S J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hall, C J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rogers, K D [Department of Materials and Medical Sciences, Cranfield University, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Glatter, O [Department of Chemistry, University of Graz (Austria); Wess, T [School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3NB, Wales (United Kingdom); Ellis, I O [Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-07

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  13. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, A R; Wilkinson, S J; Hall, C J; Rogers, K D; Glatter, O; Wess, T; Ellis, I O

    2005-01-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique

  14. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  15. Comparative study of anti-angiogenic activities of luteolin, lectin and lupeol biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambasta, Rashmi K; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj; Sharma, Renu; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Kumar, Pravir

    2015-09-18

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark feature in the initiation, progression and growth of tumour. There are various factors for promotion of angiogenesis on one hand and on the other hand, biomolecules have been reported to inhibit cancer through anti-angiogenesis mechanism. Biomolecules, for instance, luteolin, lectin and lupeol are known to suppress cancer. This study aims to compare and evaluate the biomolecule(s) like luteolin, lupeol and lectin on CAM assay and HT-29 cell culture to understand the efficacy of these drugs. The biomolecules have been administered on CAM assay, HT-29 cell culture, cell migration assay. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis of the identified targets of these biomolecules have been performed. Luteolin has been found to be better in inhibiting angiogenesis on CAM assay in comparison to lupeol and lectin. In line with this study when biomolecules was administered on cell migration assay via scratch assay method. We provided evidence that Luteolin was again found to be better in inhibiting HT-29 cell migration. In order to identify the target sites of luteolin for inhibition, we used software analysis for identifying the best molecular targets of luteolin. Using software analysis best target protein molecule of these biomolecules have been identified. VEGF was found to be one of the target of luteolin. Studies have found several critical point mutation in VEGF A, B and C. Hence docking analysis of all biomolecules with VEGFR have been performed. Multiple allignment result have shown that the receptors are conserved at the docking site. Therefore, it can be concluded that luteolin is not only comparatively better in inhibiting blood vessel in CAM assay, HT-29 cell proliferation and cell migration assay rather the domain of VEGFR is conserved to be targeted by luteolin, lupeol and lectin.

  16. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I; Jorge-Villar, S E; van Wesemael, B; Lázaro, R

    2017-01-15

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). "Species" was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Advances in the synthesis of nitroxide radicals for use in biomolecule spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Marius M; Lovett, Janet E; Anderson, Edward A

    2018-02-05

    EPR spectroscopy is an increasingly useful analytical tool to probe biomolecule structure, dynamic behaviour, and interactions. Nitroxide radicals are the most commonly used radical probe in EPR experiments, and many methods have been developed for their synthesis, as well as incorporation into biomolecules using site-directed spin labelling. In this Tutorial Review, we discuss the most practical methods for the synthesis of nitroxides, focusing on the tunability of their structures, the manipulation of their sidechains into spin labelling handles, and their installation into biomolecules.

  18. 18 F-Labeling of Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hema S; Ma, Longle; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2017-11-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study of fluorine-18 labeled biomolecules is an emerging and rapidly growing area for preclinical and clinical research. The present review focuses on recent advances in radiochemical methods for incorporating fluorine-18 into biomolecules via "direct" or "indirect" bioconjugation. Recently developed prosthetic groups and pre-targeting strategies, as well as representative examples in 18 F-labeling of biomolecules in PET imaging research studies are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Strong Teens: A School-Based Small Group Experience for African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan J.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the school-based, small group adaptation of the existing Strong Teens Curriculum (STC) for African American male adolescents in high schools. The STC was created to equip adolescents with skills that promote more effective social interaction and enhance personal emotional and psychological wellness. The authors present a…

  20. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that

  1. Private investment for building a small hydropower plant at Zetea dam base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Florica; Paraschivescu, Adina; Vladescu, Aurelia; Popa, Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Zetea lake grading project comprises an earthen dam, made out of local materials, having as main purposes water supply, flood control and protection against flooding. The paper analyzes the possibility of building a small hydropower plant at the base of the dam, using private investment resources, in order to put to good use the water flow evacuated from the storage lake. (authors)

  2. Structure of unilamellar vesicles: Numerical analysis based on small-angle neutron scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Kiselev, M. A.; Zbytovska, J.; Almasy, L.; Aswal, V. K.; Strunz, P.; Wartewig, S.; Neubert, R.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of polydispersed populations of unilamellar vesicles is studied by small-angle neutron scattering for three types of lipid systems, namely, single-, two-and four-component vesicular systems. Results of the numerical analysis based on the separated-form-factor model are reported

  3. Small and Home-Based Businesses: Measures of Success and the Contribution of Local Development Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lara; Whitacre, Brian; Shideler, Dave; Muske, Glenn; Woods, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Small and home-based businesses have long been identified by Extension educators as an important component of economic development, particularly in rural areas. The services available to these businesses can take many forms, including management training, accessibility of local funding, providing incubation facilities, or setting up mentoring…

  4. Small-molecule azomethines : Organic photovoltaics via Schiff base condensation chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus, M.L.; Bouwer, R.K.M.; Lafont, U.; Athanasopoulos, S.; Greenham, N.C.; Dingemans, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated small-molecule azomethines for photovoltaic applications were prepared via Schiff base condensation chemistry. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices exhibit efficiencies of 1.2% with MoOx as the hole-transporting layer. The versatility and simplicity of the chemistry is illustrated by

  5. Small-molecule azomethines: Organic photovoltaics via Schiff base condensation chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Petrus, M.L.; Bouwer, R.K.M.; Lafont, U.; Athanasopoulos, S.; Greenham, N.C.; Dingemans, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated small-molecule azomethines for photovoltaic applications were prepared via Schiff base condensation chemistry. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices exhibit efficiencies of 1.2% with MoOx as the hole-transporting layer. The versatility and simplicity of the chemistry is illustrated by preparing a photovoltaic device directly from the reaction mixture without any form of workup.

  6. An Active Damping Technique for Small DC-Link Capacitor Based Drive System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2013-01-01

    A small dc-link capacitor based drive system shows instability when it is operated with large input line inductance at operating points with high power. This paper presents a simple, new active damping technique that can stabilize effectively the drive system at unstable operating points, offering...

  7. Active damping technique for small DC-link capacitor based drive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Henriksen, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    A detailed model of Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD) is discussed, which yield a general rule for active damping in a small DC link based drive. A desired value of input LC resonance damping coefficient can be achieved by changing gain parameters. The modified state space matrix due to active damping...

  8. 123I and 13I purification for biomolecules labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catanoso, Marcela Forli

    2011-01-01

    The 123 I and 131 I are iodine radioisotopes widely used in Nuclear Medicine. The radioisotope 123 I is used in diagnosis through the SPECT technique and is routinely produced at IPEN in cyclotron through the reaction: '1 24 Xe (p, 2n) '1 23 Cs -> 123 Xe -> 123 I. The radioisotope 131 I is used both in diagnosis and therapy due to its physical characteristics of decay by β - and its γ-ray emissions that are softened with the use of specific collimators for diagnosis. It is routinely produced at IPEN using the nuclear reactor through the indirect reaction: 130 Te (n, γ) -> 131 Te -> 131 I, irradiating compounds containing Te. The radiopharmaceuticals prepared with these radioisotopes go through rigorous quality control tests and the chemical purity of the primary radioisotopes 123 I and 131 I are within the permissible limits currently defined. However, the presence of some chemical contaminants can prejudice the biomolecules labeling (monoclonal antibodies and peptides), that will produce radiopharmaceuticals of first generation to the oncology area. The aim of this work was to obtain a new purification method of these radioisotopes, allowing the labeling of biomolecules and also to established a process control on those radioisotopes. The methodology was separated on 3 steps: Evaluation of '1 23 I e 131 I radionuclidic purity using a hyper pure germanium detector, chemical purity using ICP-OES and the retention and elution study of 131 I in several absorbers to choose the most appropriate for the purification tests analyzing the behavior of the possible contaminants. The radionuclidic analyses showed the presence of Te and Co on 131 I samples and Te, Tc e Co on 123 I samples. The chemical purity analyses showed the presence of Al and Mo in 123 I, coming from the window material of the target holder and the presence of Al and Te in 131 I samples, coming from the target holder and the target, respectively. The retention and elution study selected the most

  9. Higher biomolecules yield in phytoplankton under copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jaqueline Carmo; Echeveste, Pedro; Lombardi, Ana Teresa

    2018-05-30

    Copper is an important metal for industry, and its toxic threshold in natural ecosystems has increased since the industrial revolution. As an essential nutrient, it is required in minute amounts, being toxic in slightly increased concentrations, causing great biochemical transformation in microalgae. This study aimed at investigating the physiology of Scenedesmus quadricauda, a cosmopolitan species, exposed to copper concentrations including those that trigger intracellular biochemical modifications. The Cu exposure concentrations tested ranged from 0.1 to 25 µM, thus including environmentally important levels. Microalgae cultures were kept under controlled environmental conditions and monitored daily for cell density, in vivo chlorophyll a, and photosynthetic quantum yield (Φ M ). After 24 h growth, free Cu 2+ ions were determined, and after 96 h, cellular Cu concentration, total carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and cell volume were determined. The results showed that both free Cu 2+ ions and cellular Cu increased with Cu increase in culture medium. Microalgae cell abundance and in vivo chlorophyll a were mostly affected at 2.5 µM Cu exposure (3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ) and above. Approximately 31% decrease of photosynthetic quantum yield was obtained at the highest Cu exposure concentration (25 µM; 25 pg Cu cell -1 ) in comparison with the control. However, at environmentally relevant copper concentrations (0.5 µM Cu; 0.4 pg Cu cell -1 ) cell volume increased in comparison with the control. Considering biomolecules accumulation per unit cell volume, the highest carbohydrates and proteins yield was obtained at 1.0 µM Cu (1.1 pg Cu cell -1 ), while for lipids higher Cu was necessary (2.5 µM Cu; 3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ). This study is a contribution to the understanding of the effects of environmentally significant copper concentrations in the physiology of S. quadricauda, as well as to biotechnological approach to increase biomolecule yield in

  10. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Barbara; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-06-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection.

  11. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Barbara; D’Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection. PMID:27246267

  12. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area...

  13. Fiducialization of the small-aperture quadrupoles based on the vibrating wire method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baichuan, E-mail: wangbaichuan@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect (Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology), Xi' an 710024 (China); Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zheng, Shuxin, E-mail: zhengsx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Lin; Du, Changtong; Xing, Qingzi [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhongming; Qiu, Mengtong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect (Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology), Xi' an 710024 (China); Wang, Xuewu [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-03-11

    A fiducialization method based on vibrating wire is described dedicated to the problem of locating the magnetic center relative to external fiducials for the small-aperture quadrupoles. The advantage of this method is that the measurement of the wire position, which may be the main error source, is no longer needed. The position of the magnetic center can be directly obtained by measuring the position shift of the magnet fiducials. This method has been validated on small Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs). Experiments have confirmed its feasibility of measuring PMQs with good repeatability of about 10 μm, and shown its high sensitivity as well as convenience.

  14. Small-displacement sensing system based on multiple total internal reflections in heterodyne interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinn-Fwu; Chiu, Ming-Hung; Chen, Wei-Wu; Kao, Fu-Hsi; Chang, Rong-Seng

    2009-05-01

    A small-displacement sensing system based on multiple total internal reflections in heterodyne interferometry is proposed. In this paper, a small displacement can be obtained only by measuring the variation in phase difference between s- and p-polarization states for the total internal reflection effect. In order to improve the sensitivity, we increase the number of total internal reflections by using a parallelogram prism. The theoretical resolution of the method is better than 0.417 nm. The method has some merits, e.g., high resolution, high sensitivity, and real-time measurement. Also, its feasibility is demonstrated.

  15. Experimental and rendering-based investigation of laser radar cross sections of small unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Bacher, Emmanuel; Christnacher, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Laser imaging systems are prominent candidates for detection and tracking of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in current and future security scenarios. Laser reflection characteristics for laser imaging (e.g., laser gated viewing) of small UAVs are investigated to determine their laser radar cross section (LRCS) by analyzing the intensity distribution of laser reflection in high resolution images. For the first time, LRCSs are determined in a combined experimental and computational approaches by high resolution laser gated viewing and three-dimensional rendering. An optimized simple surface model is calculated taking into account diffuse and specular reflectance properties based on the Oren-Nayar and the Cook-Torrance reflectance models, respectively.

  16. Complex Behavior in a Selective Aging Neuron Model Based on Small World Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guiqing; Chen Tianlun

    2008-01-01

    Complex behavior in a selective aging simple neuron model based on small world networks is investigated. The basic elements of the model are endowed with the main features of a neuron function. The structure of the selective aging neuron model is discussed. We also give some properties of the new network and find that the neuron model displays a power-law behavior. If the brain network is small world-like network, the mean avalanche size is almost the same unless the aging parameter is big enough.

  17. D2D-Enabled Small Cell Network Control Scheme Based on the Dynamic Stackelberg Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwook Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For current and future cellular networks, small cell structure with licensed and unlicensed bandwidth, caching content provisioning, and device-to-device (D2D communications is seen as a necessary architecture. Recently, a series of control methods have been developed to address a myriad of challenges in next-generation small cell networks. In this study, we focus on the design of novel D2D-enabled small cell network control scheme by allowing caching and unlicensed D2D communications. Motivated by game theory and learning algorithm, the proposed scheme adaptively selects caching contents and splits the available bandwidth for licensed and unlicensed communications. Under dynamically changing network environments, we capture the dynamics of the network system and design a new dynamic Stackelberg game model. Based on a hierarchical and feedback based control manner, small base stations and users can be leaders or followers dynamically while improving 5G network performance. Simulations and performance analysis verify the efficiency of the proposed scheme, showing that our approach can outperform existing schemes by about 5%~15% in terms of bandwidth utilization, cache hit ratio, and system throughput.

  18. Acoustic cavity transducers for the manipulation of cells and biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Armando; Patel, Maulik; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-02-01

    A novel fluidic actuator that is simple to fabricate, integrate, and operate is demonstrated for use within microfluidic systems. The actuator is designed around the use of trapped air bubbles in lateral cavities and the resultant acoustic streaming generated from an outside acoustic energy source. The orientation of the lateral cavities to the main microchannel is used to control the bulk fluid motion within the device. The first order flow generated by the oscillating bubble is used to develop a pumping platform that is capable of driving fluid within a chip. This pump is integrated into a recirculation immunoassay device for enhanced biomolecule binding through fluid flow for convection limited transport. The recirculation system showed an increase in binding site concentration when compared with traditional passive and flow-through methods. The acoustic cavity transducer has also been demonstrated for application in particle switching. Bursts of acoustic energy are used to generate a second order streaming pattern near the cavity interface to drive particles away or towards the cavity. The use of this switching mechanism is being extended to the application of sorting cells and other particles within a microfluidic system.

  19. Hybrid carbon nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of different biomolecules in vivo is a promising path towards in situ monitoring of human body and its functions. However, there are several major obstacles, such as sensitivity, selectivity and biocompatiblity, which must be tackled in order to achieve reliably and safely operating sensor devices. Here we show that by utilizing hybrid carbon materials as electrodes to detect two types of neurotransmitters, dopamine and glutamate, several advantages over commonly used electrode materials can be achieved. In particular, we will demonstrate here that it is possible to combine the properties of different carbon allotropes to obtain hybrid materials with greatly improved electrochemical performance. Three following examples of the approach are given: (i) diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film electrodes with different layer thicknesses, (ii) multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on top of DLC and (iii) carbon nanofibres synthesized on top of DLC thin films. Detailed structural and electrochemical characterization is carried out to rationalize the reasons behind the observed behvior. In addition, results from the atomistic simulations are utilized to obtain more information about the properties of the amorphous carbon thin films. (paper)

  20. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eBertelshofer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and in particular also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may guide also the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE. Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and thus need to be carefully considered e.g. in design studies on membrane proteins.

  1. Direct patterning of nanoparticles and biomolecules by liquid nanodispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabié, Laure; Agostini, Pierre; Stopel, Martijn; Blum, Christian; Lassagne, Benjamin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2015-03-14

    We report on the localized deposition of nanoparticles and proteins, nano-objects commonly used in many nanodevices, by the liquid nanodispensing (NADIS) technique which consists in depositing droplets of a solution through a nanochannel drilled at the apex of an AFM tip. We demonstrate that the size of spots can be adjusted from microns down to sub-50 nm by tuning the channel diameter, independently of the chemical nature of the solute. In the case of nanoparticles, we demonstrated the ultimate limit of the method and showed that large arrays of single (or pairs of) nanoparticles can be reproducibly deposited. We further explored the possibility to deposit different visible fluorescent proteins using NADIS without loss of protein function. The intrinsic fluorescence of these proteins is characteristic of their structural integrity; the retention of fluorescence after NADIS deposition demonstrates that the proteins are intact and functional. This study demonstrates that NADIS can be a viable alternative to other scanning probe lithography techniques since it combines high resolution direct writing of nanoparticles or biomolecules with the versatility of liquid lithography techniques.

  2. Modeling and simulation of grid connected permanent magnet generator based small wind energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arifujjaman, Md.

    2011-07-01

    In order to recover the maximum energy from small scale wind turbine systems many parameters have to be controlled. The aim of this paper is to propose a control strategy for the grid connected PMG-based small wind turbine systems. A mathematical model of small wind turbine systems was developed and the system simulated. Results show demonstrated that the control strategy is highly efficient. Sure enough it reduces the dependence on system variables, diminishes the system complexity, its furling and maximum power point controllers are efficient and it provides a stable operation for multiple wind speeds. This study developed a modeling and control strategy which was proved to be feasible by simulation results.

  3. A RESOURCE-BASED VIEW OF SMALL EXPORT FIRMS' SOCIAL CAPITAL IN A SOUTHEAST ASIAN COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doren Chadee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically examines the social capital that facilitates the flow of export knowledge, thereby supporting the entrepreneurial stance of small export firms. By applying the VRIO (value, rarity, inimitability and organisation of firm resources framework to the resource-based view (RBV of the firm, this study suggests that superior performance is a function of resources that are valuable, rare, inimitable and sufficiently organised to develop and sustain the firm's competitive advantage. This study argues that small, resource-constrained export firms in a developing economy are able to adopt entrepreneurial tactics and reap positive rates of return by exploiting their relational capital to acquire export knowledge. A survey of 175 small export firms in the Philippines was conducted, and the data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The results suggest positive relationships between the firm's social capital and export knowledge. Export knowledge is associated with entrepreneurial orientation, which then correlates with export performance.

  4. Detection of small surface defects using DCT based enhancement approach in machine vision systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuqiang; Wang, Wen; Chen, Zichen

    2005-12-01

    Utilizing DCT based enhancement approach, an improved small defect detection algorithm for real-time leather surface inspection was developed. A two-stage decomposition procedure was proposed to extract an odd-odd frequency matrix after a digital image has been transformed to DCT domain. Then, the reverse cumulative sum algorithm was proposed to detect the transition points of the gentle curves plotted from the odd-odd frequency matrix. The best radius of the cutting sector was computed in terms of the transition points and the high-pass filtering operation was implemented. The filtered image was then inversed and transformed back to the spatial domain. Finally, the restored image was segmented by an entropy method and some defect features are calculated. Experimental results show the proposed small defect detection method can reach the small defect detection rate by 94%.

  5. Hard X-ray-induced optical luminescence via biomolecule-directed metal clusters†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratx, Guillem; Sun, Conroy; Sakamoto, Masanori; Ahmad, Moiz; Volotskova, Olga; Ong, Qunxiang; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Harada, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that biomolecule-directed metal clusters are applicable in the study of hard X-ray excited optical luminescence, promising a new direction in the development of novel X-ray-activated imaging probes. PMID:24463467

  6. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  7. Single-Molecule Flow Platform for the Quantification of Biomolecules Attached to Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Han, Rui; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Yifei; Fujimoto, Bryant S; Yu, Jiangbo; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Rong, Yu; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Chiu, Daniel T

    2018-05-15

    We describe here a flow platform for quantifying the number of biomolecules on individual fluorescent nanoparticles. The platform combines line-confocal fluorescence detection with near nanoscale channels (1-2 μm in width and height) to achieve high single-molecule detection sensitivity and throughput. The number of biomolecules present on each nanoparticle was determined by deconvolving the fluorescence intensity distribution of single-nanoparticle-biomolecule complexes with the intensity distribution of single biomolecules. We demonstrate this approach by quantifying the number of streptavidins on individual semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots); streptavidin was rendered fluorescent using biotin-Alexa647. This flow platform has high-throughput (hundreds to thousands of nanoparticles detected per second) and requires minute amounts of sample (∼5 μL at a dilute concentration of 10 pM). This measurement method is an additional tool for characterizing synthetic or biological nanoparticles.

  8. Chaos characteristics and least squares support vector machines based online pipeline small leakages detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jinhai; Su, Hanguang; Ma, Yanjuan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Small leakages are severe threats to the long distance pipeline transportation. An online small leakage detection method based on chaos characteristics and Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVMs) is proposed in this paper. For the first time, the relationship between the chaos characteristics of pipeline inner pressures and the small leakages is investigated and applied in the pipeline detection method. Firstly, chaos in the pipeline inner pressure is found. Relevant chaos characteristics are estimated by the nonlinear time series analysis package (TISEAN). Then LS-SVM with a hybrid kernel is built and named as hybrid kernel LS-SVM (HKLS-SVM). It is applied to analyze the chaos characteristics and distinguish the negative pressure waves (NPWs) caused by small leaks. A new leak location method is also expounded. Finally, data of the chaotic Logistic-Map system is used in the simulation. A comparison between HKLS-SVM and other methods, in terms of the identification accuracy and computing efficiency, is made. The simulation result shows that HKLS-SVM gets the best performance and is effective in error analysis of chaotic systems. When real pipeline data is used in the test, the ultimate identification accuracy of HKLS-SVM reaches 97.38% and the position accuracy is 99.28%, indicating that the method proposed in this paper has good performance in detecting and locating small pipeline leaks.

  9. Inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies on soft matter and biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    Some characteristic features of soft matter and biomolecules in the inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (INS and QENS) studies are described. In order to clarify the current situation of the studies the research history on soft matter and biomolecules by INS and QENS are described. As examples of the studies of slow dynamics of soft matter, neutron spin echo studies on breathing mode of polymer micelle and static and dynamics fluctuations in polymer gels. (author)

  10. Polymer nanoparticles for drug and small silencing RNA delivery to treat cancers of different phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided powerful and efficient tools in development of cancer diagnosis and therapy. There are numerous nanocarriers that are currently approved for clinical use in cancer therapy. In recent years, biodegradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a considerable attention for their ability to function as a possible carrier for target-specific delivery of various drugs, genes, proteins, peptides, vaccines, and other biomolecules in humans without much toxicity. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances in polymer-based nanocarriers for various drugs and small silencing RNA’s loading and delivery to treat different types of cancer. PMID:23996830

  11. Distinguishing pathological from constitutional small for gestational age births in population-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Cande V; Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2009-10-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) can occur following a pathological process or may represent constitutionally small fetuses. However, distinguishing these processes is often difficult, especially in large studies, where the term SGA is often used as a proxy for restricted fetal growth. Since biologic variation in fetal size is largely a third trimester phenomenon, we hypothesized that the definition of SGA at term may include a sizeable proportion of constitutionally small fetuses. In contrast, since biologic variation in fetal size is not fully expressed in (early) preterm gestations, it is plausible that SGA in early preterm gestations would comprise a large proportion of growth restricted fetuses. We compared mortality and morbidity rates between SGA and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) babies. A population-based study of over 19million non-malformed, singleton births (1995-04) in the United States was performed. Gestational age (24-44weeks) was based on a clinical estimate. SGA and AGA were defined as sex-specific birthweight constitutionally small.

  12. MiRNA-TF-gene network analysis through ranking of biomolecules for multi-informative uterine leiomyoma dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Maulik, Ujjwal

    2015-10-01

    Gene ranking is an important problem in bioinformatics. Here, we propose a new framework for ranking biomolecules (viz., miRNAs, transcription-factors/TFs and genes) in a multi-informative uterine leiomyoma dataset having both gene expression and methylation data using (statistical) eigenvector centrality based approach. At first, genes that are both differentially expressed and methylated, are identified using Limma statistical test. A network, comprising these genes, corresponding TFs from TRANSFAC and ITFP databases, and targeter miRNAs from miRWalk database, is then built. The biomolecules are then ranked based on eigenvector centrality. Our proposed method provides better average accuracy in hub gene and non-hub gene classifications than other methods. Furthermore, pre-ranked Gene set enrichment analysis is applied on the pathway database as well as GO-term databases of Molecular Signatures Database with providing a pre-ranked gene-list based on different centrality values for comparing among the ranking methods. Finally, top novel potential gene-markers for the uterine leiomyoma are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction of electrons with biomolecules and development of a helium cluster source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denifl, S.

    2004-07-01

    In the main part of the present work electron interaction (attachment/ionization) with molecules of biological relevance has been studied in the electron energy range from about 0 to 70 eV. For these measurements a crossed neutral / high resolution electron beams apparatus in conjunction with a quadrupole mass spectrometer has been used. The present work should evaluate the description of the damage induced by high energy radiation since low secondary electrons with energies below 20 eV are created in a large amount in the interaction of the primary radiation with cell compounds. Thus dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and electron impact ionization near the threshold of biomulecules has been studied below 20 eV under isolated conditions. DEA to the DNA/RNA molecules thymine, cytosine and uracil has been carried out. As for most of the recently studied simple biomolecules (like isolated DNA bases, amino acids and sugars) no parent ion has been observed. It turned out that the most abundant fragment ions for DNA/RNA bases are the dehydrogenated bases. In addition to DNA/RNA bases also electron interaction with 6-Chlorouracil has been studied. Another part of this thesis is the construction of a He cluster source. Helium clusters are most difficult to produce as temperatures of about 10 K have to be reached in the stagnation chamber at the stagnation pressure of about 20 bar. The newly developed source allows achieving stagnation conditions for a helium cluster production. (author)

  14. Cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue repair and regeneration in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Tam, Roger; Sefton, Michael V; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-09-28

    Tissue engineering frequently involves cells and scaffolds to replace damaged or diseased tissue. It originated, in part, as a means of effecting the delivery of biomolecules such as insulin or neurotrophic factors, given that cells are constitutive producers of such therapeutic agents. Thus cell delivery is intrinsic to tissue engineering. Controlled release of biomolecules is also an important tool for enabling cell delivery since the biomolecules can enable cell engraftment, modulate inflammatory response or otherwise benefit the behavior of the delivered cells. We describe advances in cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration, with emphasis on the central nervous system (CNS). In the first section, the focus is on encapsulated cell therapy. In the second section, the focus is on biomolecule delivery in polymeric nano/microspheres and hydrogels for the nerve regeneration and endogenous cell stimulation. In the third section, the focus is on combination strategies of neural stem/progenitor cell or mesenchymal stem cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration and repair. In each section, the challenges and potential solutions associated with delivery to the CNS are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bio-NCs--the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-11-21

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  16. Bio-NCs - the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  17. Elucidating the Small Regulatory RNA Repertoire of the Sea Anemone Anemonia viridis Based on Whole Genome and Small RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbarova, Ilona; Patel, Hardip; Forêt, Sylvain; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Jørgensen, Tor Erik; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Johansen, Steinar D

    2018-02-01

    Cnidarians harbor a variety of small regulatory RNAs that include microRNAs (miRNAs) and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), but detailed information is limited. Here, we report the identification and expression of novel miRNAs and putative piRNAs, as well as their genomic loci, in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. We generated a draft assembly of the A. viridis genome with putative size of 313 Mb that appeared to be composed of about 36% repeats, including known transposable elements. We detected approximately equal fractions of DNA transposons and retrotransposons. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries constructed from A. viridis adults sampled at a natural CO2 gradient off Vulcano Island, Italy, identified 70 distinct miRNAs. Eight were homologous to previously reported miRNAs in cnidarians, whereas 62 appeared novel. Nine miRNAs were recognized as differentially expressed along the natural seawater pH gradient. We found a highly abundant and diverse population of piRNAs, with a substantial fraction showing ping-pong signatures. We identified nearly 22% putative piRNAs potentially targeting transposable elements within the A. viridis genome. The A. viridis genome appeared similar in size to that of other hexacorals with a very high divergence of transposable elements resembling that of the sea anemone genus Exaiptasia. The genome encodes and expresses a high number of small regulatory RNAs, which include novel miRNAs and piRNAs. Differentially expressed small RNAs along the seawater pH gradient indicated regulatory gene responses to environmental stressors. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Cation effect on small phosphonium based ionic liquid electrolytes with high concentrations of lithium salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Kerr, Robert; Forsyth, Maria

    2018-05-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes with high alkali salt concentrations have displayed some excellent electrochemical properties, thus opening up the field for further improvements to liquid electrolytes for lithium or sodium batteries. Fundamental computational investigations into these high concentration systems are required in order to gain a better understanding of these systems, yet they remain lacking. Small phosphonium-based ionic liquids with high concentrations of alkali metal ions have recently shown many promising results in experimental studies, thereby prompting us to conduct further theoretical exploration of these materials. Here, we conducted a molecular dynamics simulation on four small phosphonium-based ionic liquids with 50 mol. % LiFSI salt, focusing on the effect of cation structure on local structuring and ion diffusional and rotational dynamics—which are closely related to the electrochemical properties of these materials.

  19. Infrared dim small target segmentation method based on ALI-PCNN model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shangnan; Song, Yong; Zhao, Yufei; Li, Yun; Li, Xu; Jiang, Yurong; Li, Lin

    2017-10-01

    Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) is improved by Adaptive Lateral Inhibition (ALI), while a method of infrared (IR) dim small target segmentation based on ALI-PCNN model is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the feeding input signal is modulated by lateral inhibition network to suppress background. Then, the linking input is modulated by ALI, and linking weight matrix is generated adaptively by calculating ALI coefficient of each pixel. Finally, the binary image is generated through the nonlinear modulation and the pulse generator in PCNN. The experimental results show that the segmentation effect as well as the values of contrast across region and uniformity across region of the proposed method are better than the OTSU method, maximum entropy method, the methods based on conventional PCNN and visual attention, and the proposed method has excellent performance in extracting IR dim small target from complex background.

  20. Qualification of academic facilities for small-scale automated manufacture of autologous cell-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, Paul; Chandra, Amit; Alvey, David; Ginty, Patrick; McCall, Mark; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth; Rayment, Erin; Williams, David J

    2014-01-01

    Academic centers, hospitals and small companies, as typical development settings for UK regenerative medicine assets, are significant contributors to the development of autologous cell-based therapies. Often lacking the appropriate funding, quality assurance heritage or specialist regulatory expertise, qualifying aseptic cell processing facilities for GMP compliance is a significant challenge. The qualification of a new Cell Therapy Manufacturing Facility with automated processing capability, the first of its kind in a UK academic setting, provides a unique demonstrator for the qualification of small-scale, automated facilities for GMP-compliant manufacture of autologous cell-based products in these settings. This paper shares our experiences in qualifying the Cell Therapy Manufacturing Facility, focusing on our approach to streamlining the qualification effort, the challenges, project delays and inefficiencies we encountered, and the subsequent lessons learned.

  1. Background suppression of infrared small target image based on inter-frame registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiubo; Xue, Bindang

    2018-04-01

    We propose a multi-frame background suppression method for remote infrared small target detection. Inter-frame information is necessary when the heavy background clutters make it difficult to distinguish real targets and false alarms. A registration procedure based on points matching in image patches is used to compensate the local deformation of background. Then the target can be separated by background subtraction. Experiments show our method serves as an effective preliminary of target detection.

  2. Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Asp, Sven; Ivarsen, Anders

    Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia. Jesper Hjortdal, Sven Asp, Anders Ivarsen, Anders Vestergaard Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark Purpose: ReLEx® smile is a new keratorefractive procedure whereby a stromal lent....... Refractive predictability, safety and patient satisfaction at 3 months seems equal to ReLEx flex and FS-LASIK. Optimizing laser energy settings and surgeon experience is important to minimize initial inferior results....

  3. Complex Behavior in an Integrate-and-Fire Neuron Model Based on Small World Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Min; Chen Tianlun

    2005-01-01

    Based on our previously pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neuron model in small world networks, we investigate the complex behavior of electroencephalographic (EEG)-like activities produced by such a model. We find EEG-like activities have obvious chaotic characteristics. We also analyze the complex behaviors of EEG-like signals, such as spectral analysis, reconstruction of the phase space, the correlation dimension, and so on.

  4. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Wensing, Michel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of d...

  5. Management control systems in small business transfers : a resource-based view

    OpenAIRE

    Länsiluoto, Aapo; Varamäki, Elina; Laitinen, Erkki K.; Viljamaa, Anmari; Tall, Juha

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether post-business transfer MCS development (PBTMCSD) is associated with post-business transfer success (PBTS) in small firms. The data for the study was collected in January 2012 as a web-based survey. The target group consisted of acquirers (both external buyers and family business successors) who had implemented a business transfer during 2006-2011 in Finland. A total of 178 questionnaires were sent out, and 67 responses were received. Regression analysis is used...

  6. Base substitutions, frameshifts, and small deletions constitute ionizing radiation-induced point mutations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; de Boer, J.G.; de Jong, P.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; Glickman, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The relative role of point mutations and large genomic rearrangements in ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis has been an issue of long-standing interest. Recent studies using Southern blotting analysis permit the partitioning of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells into detectable deletions and major genomic rearrangements and into point mutations. The molecular nature of these point mutations has been left unresolved; they may include base substitutions as well as small deletions, insertions, and frame-shifts below the level of resolution of Southern blotting analysis. In this investigation, we have characterized a collection of ionizing radiation-induced point mutations at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary cells at the DNA sequence level. Base substitutions represented approximately equal to 2/3 of the point mutations analyzed. Although the collection of mutants is relatively small, every possible type of base substitution event has been recovered. These mutations are well distributed throughout the coding sequence with only one multiple occurrence. Small deletions represented the remainder of characterized mutants; no insertions have been observed. Sequence-directed mechanisms mediated by direct repeats could account for some of the observed deletions, while others appear to be directly attributable to radiation-induced strand breakage

  7. Firm performance model in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) based on learning orientation and innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, E. R.; Ardianti, F. L.; Rachmawati, L.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between learning orientation, innovation, and firm performance. A conceptual model and hypothesis were empirically examined using structural equation modelling. The study involved a questionnaire-based survey of owners of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating in Batu City, Indonesia. The results showed that both variables of learning orientation and innovation effect positively on firm performance. Additionally, learning orientation has positive effect innovation. This study has implication for SMEs aiming at increasing their firm performance based on learning orientation and innovation capability.

  8. Financial analysis and forecasting of the results of small businesses performance based on regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana O. Musienko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the economicmathematical model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies. Methods using comparative analysis the article studies the existing approaches to the construction of the company management models. Applying the regression analysis and the least squares method which is widely used for financial management of enterprises in Russia and abroad the author builds a model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies which can be used in the financial analysis and prediction of small enterprisesrsquo performance. Results the article states the need to identify factors affecting the financial management efficiency. The author analyzed scientific research and revealed the lack of comprehensive studies on the methodology for assessing the small enterprisesrsquo management while the methods used for large companies are not always suitable for the task. The systematized approaches of various authors to the formation of regression models describe the influence of certain factors on the company activity. It is revealed that the resulting indicators in the studies were revenue profit or the company relative profitability. The main drawback of most models is the mathematical not economic approach to the definition of the dependent and independent variables. Basing on the analysis it was determined that the most correct is the model of dependence between revenues and total assets of the company using the decimal logarithm. The model was built using data on the activities of the 507 small businesses operating in three spheres of economic activity. Using the presented model it was proved that there is direct dependence between the sales proceeds and the main items of the asset balance as well as differences in the degree of this effect depending on the economic activity of small

  9. A Hybrid Metaheuristic-Based Approach for the Aerodynamic Optimization of Small Hybrid Wind Turbine Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Herbert-Acero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel framework for the aerodynamic design and optimization of blades for small horizontal axis wind turbines (WT. The framework is based on a state-of-the-art blade element momentum model, which is complemented with the XFOIL 6.96 software in order to provide an estimate of the sectional blade aerodynamics. The framework considers an innovative nested-hybrid solution procedure based on two metaheuristics, the virtual gene genetic algorithm and the simulated annealing algorithm, to provide a near-optimal solution to the problem. The objective of the study is to maximize the aerodynamic efficiency of small WT (SWT rotors for a wide range of operational conditions. The design variables are (1 the airfoil shape at the different blade span positions and the radial variation of the geometrical variables of (2 chord length, (3 twist angle, and (4 thickness along the blade span. A wind tunnel validation study of optimized rotors based on the NACA 4-digit airfoil series is presented. Based on the experimental data, improvements in terms of the aerodynamic efficiency, the cut-in wind speed, and the amount of material used during the manufacturing process were achieved. Recommendations for the aerodynamic design of SWT rotors are provided based on field experience.

  10. Intracellular delivery of nanomaterials for sub-cellular imaging and tracking of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medepalli, Krishna Kiran

    . Confocal microscopy and flow cytometric studies are performed to characterize the interactions. Results from this acute immune response study demonstrate the biocompatibility of SWCNTs in whole blood and also confirm the cellular delivery of single stranded DNA. The second part of the research is on colloidal quantum dots (QDs): nanometer sized semiconductor crystals typically between 1 nm to 20 nm in diameter. In addition to being size comparable with many biological systems, and having large surface area for multiple biomolecules attachment, they possess high resistance to chemical and photo degradation, tunable emission based on size and composition which makes them excellent candidates for cellular delivery and imaging. The main objectives of this research was to demonstrate the use of QDs for cellular imaging as well as targeted biomolecule delivery by conjugating the QDs with an antibody to a functional protein and delivery into live cells. Conventional techniques deliver QDs as aggregates, however, a major challenge in the use of QDs for cellular imaging and biomolecule delivery is achieving freely dispersed QDs inside the cells. In this research, a new technique to deliver monodispersed QDs inside live cells was developed. The approach combines osmosis driven fluid transport into cells achieved by creating hypotonic environment and reversible permeabilization using low concentrations of cell permeabilization agents like Saponin. The results confirm that highly efficient endocytosis-free intracellular delivery of QDs can be accomplished using this method. Confocal microscopy is used to image the QDs inside the cells and flow cytometry is used for quantifying the fluorescence. To demonstrate targeted delivery, QDs are conjugated to the antibody of a protein: the nuclear transcriptional factor, NFkB (Nuclear Factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells) using EDC/sulfo NHS chemistry methods. NFkB is a family of proteins with 5 different subunits and is

  11. Controller for a small induction-generator based wind-turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahshan, R.; Iqbal, M.T.; Mann, George K.I. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    Design of a low-cost micro-controller for a small induction-generator based grid-connected wind-turbine is presented in this paper. The controller senses the parameters of the wind-turbine generator and the grid, and makes decisions about grid connection and disconnection. Low-cost instrumentation circuitry has been developed to measure the generator and grid parameters. Based on the measurement of voltage and frequency of the wind-turbine generator and the grid side, a control decision is taken to connect the system to the grid. The controller makes decision to disconnect the system from the grid based on the power flow measurement between the wind turbine and the grid. The power flow between wind turbine and the grid depends upon the availability of the wind. The prototype controller has been developed based on a micro-controller PIC16F877 and has been tested in the laboratory. (author)

  12. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  14. Color Image Evaluation for Small Space Based on FA and GEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem that color image is difficult to quantify, this paper proposes an evaluation method of color image for small space based on factor analysis (FA and gene expression programming (GEP and constructs a correlation model between color image factors and comprehensive color image. The basic color samples of small space and color images are evaluated by semantic differential method (SD method, color image factors are selected via dimension reduction in FA, factor score function is established, and by combining the entropy weight method to determine each factor weights then the comprehensive color image score is calculated finally. The best fitting function between color image factors and comprehensive color image is obtained by GEP algorithm, which can predict the users’ color image values. A color image evaluation system for small space is developed based on this model. The color evaluation of a control room on AC frequency conversion rig is taken as an example, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. It also can assist the designers in other color designs and provide a fast evaluation tool for testing users’ color image.

  15. Solution-processed white organic light-emitting devices based on small-molecule materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongdong; Wu Zhaoxin; Zhang Xinwen; Wang Dawei; Hou Xun

    2010-01-01

    We investigated solution-processed films of 4,4'-bis(2,2-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-bibenyl (DPVBi) and its blends with N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM result shows that the solution-processed films are pin-free and their morphology is smooth enough to be used in OLEDs. We have developed a solution-processed white organic light-emitting device (WOLEDs) based on small-molecules, in which the light-emitting layer (EML) was formed by spin-coating the solution of small-molecules on top of the solution-processed hole-transporting layer. This WOLEDs, in which the EML consists of co-host (DPVBi and TPD), the blue dopant (4,4'-bis[2-(4-(N,N-diphenylamino)phenyl)vinyl]biphenyl) and the yellow dye (5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphtacene), has a current efficiency of 6.0 cd/A at a practical luminance of 1000 cd/m 2 , a maximum luminance of 22500 cd/m 2 , and its color coordinates are quite stable. Our research shows a possible approach to achieve efficient and low-cost small-molecule-based WOLEDs, which avoids the complexities of the co-evaporation process of multiple dopants and host materials in vacuum depositions.

  16. Studies on mass deposition effect and energy effect of biomolecules implanted by N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1994-05-01

    By analyzing some spectrum of tyrosine sample implanted by N + ion beam, it is deduced that the implantation N + could react with the tyrosine molecule and substitute =C 5 H- group of benzene ring to produce a N-heterocyclic compound. This compound would notably affect the residual activity of the sample. Moreover, the percentage of the product molecules to the damaged tyrosine molecules is larger than the reciprocal of the proportion of their extinction coefficients. On the other hand, by comparing the release of inorganic phosphate, it is found that the radiation sensibility for four basic nucleotides is 5'-dTMP>5'-CMP>5'-GMP>5'-AMP. to implanted nucleotides, alkali treatment and heat treatment could increase the amount of inorganic phosphate. The amount of inorganic phosphate in the nucleotide samples directly implanted by ions beam is about 60% of the total amount of inorganic phosphate that could be released from the implanted samples heated at 90 degree C for 1.75 hours. Alkali treatment could damage and split the free bases released from the implanted nucleotides, but heat treatment might repair those damaged bases. Above results prove that ions implantation to biomolecules has the mass deposition effects and energy effects

  17. A molecular dynamics study on the transport of a charged biomolecule in a polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto a charged ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, E; Wang, J-C; Liapis, A I

    2010-08-28

    The transport of a charged adsorbate biomolecule in a porous polymeric adsorbent medium and its adsorption onto the covalently immobilized ligands have been modeled and investigated using molecular dynamics modeling and simulations as the third part of a novel fundamental methodology developed for studying ion-exchange chromatography based bioseparations. To overcome computational challenges, a novel simulation approach is devised where appropriate atomistic and coarse grain models are employed simultaneously and the transport of the adsorbate is characterized through a number of locations representative of the progress of the transport process. The adsorbate biomolecule for the system studied in this work changes shape, orientation, and lateral position in order to proceed toward the site where adsorption occurs and exhibits decreased mass transport coefficients as it approaches closer to the immobilized ligand. Furthermore, because the ligands are surrounded by counterions carrying the same type of charge as the adsorbate biomolecule, it takes the biomolecule repeated attempts to approach toward a ligand in order to displace the counterions in the proximity of the ligand and to finally become adsorbed. The formed adsorbate-ligand complex interacts with the counterions and polymeric molecules and is found to evolve slowly and continuously from one-site (monovalent) interaction to multisite (multivalent) interactions. Such a transition of the nature of adsorption reduces the overall adsorption capacity of the ligands in the adsorbent medium and results in a type of surface exclusion effect. Also, the adsorption of the biomolecule also presents certain volume exclusion effects by not only directly reducing the pore volume and the availability of the ligands in the adjacent regions, but also causing the polymeric molecules to change to more compact structures that could further shield certain ligands from being accessible to subsequent adsorbate molecules. These

  18. Radiographic diagnosis of mechanical obstruction in dogs based on relative small intestinal external diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Cyrielle; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Alexander, Kate; Specchi, Swan; Beauchamp, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical obstruction is a frequent cause of acute vomiting in dogs requiring prompt diagnosis to improve patient management and prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare small intestinal radiographic characteristics in dogs with versus without mechanical intestinal obstruction. Fifty dogs with gastrointestinal clinical signs and abdominal radiographs were recruited from hospital record archives and assigned to groups (group 1, obstructive, n = 25; group 2, nonobstructive n = 25). Abdominal radiographs were randomized and independently interpreted by three examiners who were unaware of group status. Intestinal dilation was subjectively scored based on distribution (segmental, regional or diffuse), and severity (absent, mild, moderate or severe). Small intestinal maximal diameter (SImax), L5 vertebral body height, small intestinal minimal diameter (SImin), and an estimated average of small intestinal diameters (SIave) were measured and three ratios were calculated: SImax/L5, SImax/SImin, and SImax/SIave. Segmental dilation was more prevalent in obstructed dogs for all examiners (P ≤ 0.03) and most nonobstructed dogs had no dilation (P ≤ 0.05). All ratios were higher in obstructed dogs (P dogs with SImax/L5 ≤ 1.4, SImax/SImin ≤ 2, and SImax/SIave ≤ 1.3 values are very unlikely to be mechanically obstructed; dogs with SImax/L5 ≥ 2.4, SImax/SImin ≥ 3.4 and SImax/SIave ≥ 1.9 are very likely obstructed, particularly if segmental dilation (less than 25% of the small intestine) is present. Dogs with ratios falling between these thresholds may need further testing unless other signs justify surgical exploration or endoscopy. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. An object-based approach for detecting small brain lesions: application to Virchow-Robin spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descombes, Xavier; Kruggel, Frithjof; Wollny, Gert; Gertz, Hermann Josef

    2004-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the detection of multiple small brain lesions from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. A model based on the marked point process framework is designed to detect Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs). These tubular shaped spaces are due to retraction of the brain parenchyma from its supplying arteries. VRS are described by simple geometrical objects that are introduced as small tubular structures. Their radiometric properties are embedded in a data term. A prior model includes interactions describing the clustering property of VRS. A Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (RJMCMC) optimizes the proposed model, obtained by multiplying the prior and the data model. Example results are shown on T1-weighted MRI datasets of elderly subjects.

  20. Design assumptions and bases for small D-T-fueled Sperical Tokamak (ST) fusion core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Galambos, J.D.; Fogarty, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent progress in defining the assumptions and clarifying the bases for a small D-T-fueled ST fusion core are presented. The paper covers several issues in the physics of ST plasmas, the technology of neutral beam injection, the engineering design configuration, and the center leg material under intense neutron irradiation. This progress was driven by the exciting data from pioneering ST experiments, a heightened interest in proof-of-principle experiments at the MA level in plasma current, and the initiation of the first conceptual design study of the small ST fusion core. The needs recently identified for a restructured fusion energy sciences program have provided a timely impetus for examining the subject of this paper. Our results, though preliminary in nature, strengthen the case for the potential realism and attractiveness of the ST approach

  1. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook; Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study

  2. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study.

  3. Acoustic Source Localization via Subspace Based Method Using Small Aperture MEMS Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small aperture microphone arrays provide many advantages for portable devices and hearing aid equipment. In this paper, a subspace based localization method is proposed for acoustic source using small aperture arrays. The effects of array aperture on localization are analyzed by using array response (array manifold. Besides array aperture, the frequency of acoustic source and the variance of signal power are simulated to demonstrate how to optimize localization performance, which is carried out by introducing frequency error with the proposed method. The proposed method for 5 mm array aperture is validated by simulations and experiments with MEMS microphone arrays. Different types of acoustic sources can be localized with the highest precision of 6 degrees even in the presence of wind noise and other noises. Furthermore, the proposed method reduces the computational complexity compared with other methods.

  4. Teams in Small Technology-Based Firms: The Roles of Diversity and Conflict Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Enrique Carozzo-Todaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of diversity and conflict management on the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes of small technology-based firms. To study the relationship between those variables, a quantitative research was conducted. The results of the survey involving 107 small Brazilian high-tech firms show that diversity and conflict management positively moderate the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes. So that, at higher levels of diversity and conflict management, best organizational outcomes. At the same time, it has been verified that conflict management is important regardless the level of diversity within teams. This research sheds new light on the factors that should be considered to become teamwork more effective in this specific context.

  5. Selective chromogenic detection of thiol-containing biomolecules using carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles as carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Zhou; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2011-04-26

    Thiol-containing biomolecules show strong affinity with noble metal nanostructures and could not only stably protect them but also control the self-assembly process of these special nanostructures. A highly selective and sensitive chromogenic detection method has been designed for the low and high molecular weight thiol-containing biomolecules, including cysteine, glutathione, dithiothreitol, and bovine serum albumin, using a new type of carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as carrier. This strategy relies upon the place-exchange process between the reporter dyes on the surface of Ag NPs and the thiol groups of thiol-containing biomolecules. The concentration of biomolecules can be determined by monitoring with the fluorescence intensity of reporter dyes dispersed in solution. This new chromogenic assay method could selectively detect these biomolecules in the presence of various other amino acids and monosaccharides and even sensitively detect the thiol-containing biomolecules with different molecular weight, even including proteins.

  6. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model-based

  7. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model-based

  8. Stable and selective self-assembly of α-lipoic acid on Ge(001) for biomolecule immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, M.; Flesch, J.; Mitzloff, J.; Capellini, G.; Klesse, W. M.; Skibitzki, O.; You, C.; Bettenhausen, M.; Witzigmann, B.; Piehler, J.; Schroeder, T.; Guha, S.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for the stable and selective surface functionalization of germanium (Ge) embedded in silicon dioxide. The Ge(001) surface is functionalized using α-lipoic acid (ALA), which can potentially be utilized for the immobilization of a wide range of biomolecules. We present a detailed pH-dependence study to establish the effect of the incubation pH value on the adsorption layer of the ALA molecules. A threshold pH value for functionalization is identified, dividing the examined pH range into two regions. Below a pH value of 7, the formation of a disordered ALA multilayer is observed, whereas a stable well-ordered ALA mono- to bi-layer on Ge(001) is achieved at higher pH values. Furthermore, we analyze the stability of the ALA layer under ambient conditions, revealing the most stable functionalized Ge(001) surface to effectively resist oxidation for up to one week. Our established functionalization method paves the way towards the successful immobilization of biomolecules in future Ge-based biosensors.

  9. Collaborative Research: Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Biomaterial Surface Interactions - Bridging Understanding of APP Sources to Rational Modification of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-11-24

    The overriding objective of this work is to bridge the gap between understanding of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) sources and predictive chemical modifications of biomolecules. A key aspect of this problem is to understand what oxidizing species are created in water adjacent to APP jets that would ultimately affect aqueous biomolecules. We report the production of highly oxidative species in solutions exposed to a self-pulsed corona discharge in air. We examine how the properties of the target solution (pH, conductivity) and the discharge power affect the discharge stability and the production of H2O2. Indigo carmine, a common organic dye, is used as an indicator of oxidative strength and in particular, hydroxyl radical (OH•) production. The observed rate of indigo oxidation in contact with the discharge far exceeds that predicted from reactions based on concentrations of species measured in the bulk solution. The generation of H2O2 and the oxidation of indigo carmine indicate a high concentration of highly oxidizing species such as OH• at the plasma-liquid interface. These results indicate that reactions at the air plasma-liquid interface play a dominant role in species oxidation during direct non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NE-APP) treatment.

  10. 76 FR 33333 - Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR-5525-N-01] Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX Metropolitan Area AGENCY: Office of the Assistant... Small Area Fair Market Rents (SAFMRs) for Project-Based Vouchers (PBVs) located in the Dallas, TX...

  11. Data Sources for the Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer Risk Factors and Screening Behaviors - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The model-based estimates of important cancer risk factors and screening behaviors are obtained by combining the responses to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

  12. Data Sources for the Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer-Related Knowledge - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The model-based estimates of important cancer risk factors and screening behaviors are obtained by combining the responses to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

  13. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, H.; Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D.; Ulbricht, M.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the membranes before and after modification. ► We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. ► All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. ► All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  14. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  15. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanto, H., E-mail: heru.susanto@undip.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Ulbricht, M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Germany, Universitaetstr. 5, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    fouling ultrafiltration (UF) membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized the membranes before and after modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  16. Multivariable Super Twisting Based Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for Small Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a highly robust trajectory tracking controller for small unmanned helicopter with model uncertainties and external disturbances. First, a simplified dynamic model is developed, where the model uncertainties and external disturbances are treated as compounded disturbances. Then the system is divided into three interconnected subsystems: altitude subsystem, yaw subsystem, and horizontal subsystem. Second, a disturbance observer based controller (DOBC is designed based upon backstepping and multivariable super twisting control algorithm to obtain robust trajectory tracking property. A sliding mode observer works as an estimator of the compounded disturbances. In order to lessen calculative burden, a first-order exact differentiator is employed to estimate the time derivative of the virtual control. Moreover, proof of the stability of the closed-loop system based on Lyapunov method is given. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed flight control scheme.

  17. Carbon nanotubes-based chemiresistive immunosensor for small molecules: detection of nitroaromatic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miso; Cella, Lakshmi N; Chen, Wilfred; Myung, Nosang V; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2010-12-15

    In recent years, there has been a growing focus on use of one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires, as transducer elements for label-free chemiresistive/field-effect transistor biosensors as they provide label-free and high sensitivity detection. While research to-date has elucidated the power of carbon nanotubes- and other 1-D nanostructure-based field effect transistors immunosensors for large charged macromolecules such as proteins and viruses, their application to small uncharged or charged molecules has not been demonstrated. In this paper we report a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-based chemiresistive immunosensor for label-free, rapid, sensitive and selective detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), a small molecule. The newly developed immunosensor employed a displacement mode/format in which SWNTs network forming conduction channel of the sensor was first modified with trinitrophenyl (TNP), an analog of TNT, and then ligated with the anti-TNP single chain antibody. Upon exposure to TNT or its derivatives the bound antibodies were displaced producing a large change, several folds higher than the noise, in the resistance/conductance of SWNTs giving excellent limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor detected between 0.5 ppb and 5000 ppb TNT with good selectivity to other nitroaromatic explosives and demonstrated good accuracy for monitoring TNT in untreated environmental water matrix. We believe this new displacement format can be easily generalized to other one-dimensional nanostructure-based chemiresistive immuno/affinity-sensors for detecting small and/or uncharged molecules of interest in environmental monitoring and health care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s tests for high-dimensional small sample size data

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Kai

    2015-09-16

    DNA sequencing techniques bring novel tools and also statistical challenges to genetic research. In addition to detecting differentially expressed genes, testing the significance of gene sets or pathway analysis has been recognized as an equally important problem. Owing to the “large pp small nn” paradigm, the traditional Hotelling’s T2T2 test suffers from the singularity problem and therefore is not valid in this setting. In this paper, we propose a shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test for both one-sample and two-sample cases. We also suggest several different ways to derive the approximate null distribution under different scenarios of pp and nn for our proposed shrinkage-based test. Simulation studies show that the proposed method performs comparably to existing competitors when nn is moderate or large, but it is better when nn is small. In addition, we analyze four gene expression data sets and they demonstrate the advantage of our proposed shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test.

  19. A series of dithienobenzodithiophene based small molecules for highly efficient organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanran Feng; Miaomiao Li; Wang Ni; Bin Kan; Yunchuang Wang; Yamin Zhang; Hongtao Zhang; Xiangjian Wan; Yongsheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Three acceptor-donor-acceptor(A-D-A) small molecules DCAODTBDT,DRDTBDT and DTBDTBDT using dithieno[2,3-d:2’,3’-d’]benzo[l,2-b:4,5-b’]dithiophene as the central building block,octyl cyanoacetate,3-octylrhodanine and thiobarbituric acid as the end groups were designed and synthesized as donor materials in solution-processed photovoltaic cells(OPVs).The impacts of these different electron withdrawing end groups on the photophysical properties,energy levels,charge carrier mobility,morphologies of blend films,and their photovoltaic properties have been systematically investigated.OPVs device based on DRDTBDT gave the best power conversion efficiency(PCE) of 8.34%,which was significantly higher than that based on DCAODTBDT(4.83%) or DTBDTBDT(3.39%).These results indicate that rather dedicated and balanced consideration of absorption,energy levels,morphology,mobility,etc.for the design of small-molecule-based OPVs(SM-OPVs)and systematic investigations are highly needed to achieve high performance for SM-OPVs.

  20. A series of dithienobenzodithiophene based small molecules for highly efficient organic solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanran Feng; Miaomiao Li; Wang Ni; Bin Kan; Yunchuang Wang; Yamin Zhang; Hongtao Zhang; Xiangjian Wan; Yongsheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Three acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) small molecules DCAODTBDT,DRDTBDT and DTBDTBDT using dithieno[2,3-d∶2',3'-d']benzo[1,2-b∶4,5-b']dithiophene as the central building block,octyl cyanoacetate,3-octylrhodanine and thiobarbituric acid as the end groups were designed and synthesized as donor materials in solution-processed photovoltaic cells (OPVs).The impacts of these different electron withdrawing end groups on the photophysical properties,energy levels,charge carrier mobility,morphologies of blend films,and their photovoltaic properties have been systematically investigated.OPVs device based on DRDTBDT gave the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.34%,which was significantly higher than that based on DCAODTBDT (4.83%) or DTBDTBDT (3.39%).These results indicate that rather dedicated and balanced consideration of absorption,energy levels,morphology,mobility,etc.for the design of small-molecule-based OPVs (SM-OPVs) and systematic investigations are highly needed to achieve high performance for SM-OPVs.

  1. Shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s tests for high-dimensional small sample size data

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Kai; Pang, Herbert; Tong, Tiejun; Genton, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing techniques bring novel tools and also statistical challenges to genetic research. In addition to detecting differentially expressed genes, testing the significance of gene sets or pathway analysis has been recognized as an equally important problem. Owing to the “large pp small nn” paradigm, the traditional Hotelling’s T2T2 test suffers from the singularity problem and therefore is not valid in this setting. In this paper, we propose a shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test for both one-sample and two-sample cases. We also suggest several different ways to derive the approximate null distribution under different scenarios of pp and nn for our proposed shrinkage-based test. Simulation studies show that the proposed method performs comparably to existing competitors when nn is moderate or large, but it is better when nn is small. In addition, we analyze four gene expression data sets and they demonstrate the advantage of our proposed shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test.

  2. Data gaps in evidence-based research on small water enterprises in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opryszko, Melissa C; Huang, Haiou; Soderlund, Kurt; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2009-12-01

    Small water enterprises (SWEs) are water delivery operations that predominantly provide water at the community level. SWEs operate beyond the reach of piped water systems, selling water to households throughout the world. Their ubiquity in the developing world and access to vulnerable populations suggests that these small-scale water vendors may prove valuable in improving potable water availability. This paper assesses the current literature on SWEs to evaluate previous studies and determine gaps in the evidence base. Piped systems and point-of-use products were not included in this assessment. Results indicate that SWES are active in urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Benefits of SWEs include: no upfront connection fees; demand-driven and flexible to local conditions; and service to large populations without high costs of utility infrastructure. Disadvantages of SWEs include: higher charges for water per unit of volume compared with infrastructure-based utilities; lack of regulation; operation often outside legal structures; no water quality monitoring; increased potential for conflict with local utilities; and potential for extortion by local officials. No rigorous, evidence-based, peer-reviewed scientific studies that control for confounders examining the effectiveness of SWEs in providing potable water were identified.

  3. Conditions to minimize soft single biomolecule deformation when imaging with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godon, Christian; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Odorico, Michael; Basset, Christian; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    A recurrent interrogation when imaging soft biomolecules using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the putative deformation of molecules leading to a bias in recording true topographical surfaces. Deformation of biomolecules comes from three sources: sample instability, adsorption to the imaging substrate, and crushing under tip pressure. To disentangle these causes, we measured the maximum height of a well-known biomolecule, the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), under eight different experimental conditions positing that the maximum height value is a specific indicator of sample deformations. Six basic AFM experimental factors were tested: imaging in air (AIR) versus in liquid (LIQ), imaging with flat minerals (MICA) versus flat organic surfaces (self-assembled monolayers, SAM), and imaging forces with oscillating tapping mode (TAP) versus PeakForce tapping (PFT). The results show that the most critical parameter in accurately measuring the height of TMV in air is the substrate. In a liquid environment, regardless of the substrate, the most critical parameter is the imaging mode. Most importantly, the expected TMV height values were obtained with both imaging with the PeakForce tapping mode either in liquid or in air at the condition of using self-assembled monolayers as substrate. This study unambiguously explains previous poor results of imaging biomolecules on mica in air and suggests alternative methodologies for depositing soft biomolecules on well organized self-assembled monolayers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of PAMAM-OH dendrimers against the fibrillation pathway of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Florance, Ida; Sivakumar, A; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    The binding behavior of nanoparticle with proteins determines its biocompatibility. This study reports the interaction of ten different biomolecules (proteins-BSA, HSA, haemoglobin, gamma globulin, transferrin and enzymes-hog and bacillus amylase, lysozyme from chicken and human and laccases from Tramates versicolor) with a surface group hydroxylated Poly AMido AMide dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 5. The study has utilized various spectroscopic methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence emission, Synchronous, 3-D spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism to detect the binding induced structural changes in biomolecules that occur upon interaction with mounting concentration of the dendrimers. Aggregation of proteins results in the formation of amyloid fibrils causing several human diseases. In this study, fibrillar samples of all ten biomolecules formed in the absence and the presence of dendrimers were investigated with Congo Red absorbance and ThT Assay to detect fibril formation, Trp Emission and 3-D scan to evaluate the effect of fibrillation on aromatic environment of biomolecules, and CD spectroscopy to measure the conformational changes in a quantitative manner. These assays have generated useful information on the role of dendrimers in amyloid fibril formation of biomolecules. The outcomes of the study remain valuable in evaluating the biological safety of PAMAM-OH dendrimers for their biomedical application in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Constructing Optimal Coarse-Grained Sites of Huge Biomolecules by Fluctuation Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-12

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are valuable tools for the study of functions of large biomolecules on large length and time scales. The definition of CG representations for huge biomolecules is always a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new method called fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG) to construct the CG sites of biomolecules. The defined residual in FM-CG converges to a maximal value as the number of CG sites increases, allowing an optimal CG model to be rigorously defined on the basis of the maximum. More importantly, we developed a robust algorithm called stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) to accelerate the process of coarse-graining large biomolecules. By means of the efficient SLIO algorithm, the computational cost of coarse-graining large biomolecules is reduced to within the time scale of seconds, which is far lower than that of conventional simulated annealing. The coarse-graining of two huge systems, chaperonin GroEL and lengsin, indicates that our new methods can coarse-grain huge biomolecular systems with up to 10,000 residues within the time scale of minutes. The further parametrization of CG sites derived from FM-CG allows us to construct the corresponding CG models for studies of the functions of huge biomolecular systems.

  6. Immobilization of biomolecules on cysteamine-modified polyaniline film for highly sensitive biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Xue, Jian; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-03-01

    We present a new cysteamine (CS)-modified polyaniline (PANI) film for highly efficient immobilization of biomolecules in biosensing technology. This electrochemical deposited PANI film treated with CS and glutaraldehyde could be employed as an excellent substrate for biomolecules immobilization. The parameters of PANI growth were optimized to obtain suitable surface morphology of films for biomolecules combination with the help of electron and atomic force microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was utilized to illustrate the different electrochemical activities of each modified electrode. Due to the existence of sulfydryl group and amino group in CS, surface modification with CS was proven to reduce oxidized units on PANI film remarkably, as evidenced by both ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy characterizations. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to investigate the immobilization efficiency of biomolecules on the PANI film, comparative study using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed that BSA immobilized on CS-modified PANI could be increased by at least 20% than that without CS-modified PANI in BSA solution with the concentration of 0.1-1mg/mL. The CS-modified PANI film would be significant for the immobilization and detection of biomolecules and especially promising in the application of immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Fabrication of biomolecules self-assembled on Au nanodot array for bioelectronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Kumar, Ajay Yagati; Yoo, Si-Youl; Jung, Mi; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, an nano-platform composed of Au nanodot arrays on which biomolecules could be self-assembled was developed and investigated for a stable bioelectronic device platform. Au nanodot pattern was fabricated using a nanoporous alumina template. Two different biomolecules, a cytochrome c and a single strand DNA (ssDNA), were immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays. Cytochorme c and single stranded DNA could be immobilized on the Au nanodot using the chemical linker 11-MUA and thiol-modification by covalent bonding, respectively. The atomic structure of the fabricated nano-platform device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of biomolecules immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays was confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). To investigate the activity of biomolecule-immobilized Au-nano dot array, the cyclic voltammetry was carried out. This proposed nano-platform device, which is composed of biomolecules, can be used for the construction of a novel bioelectronic device.

  8. STATUS OF SMALL PELAGIC FISHERY IN THE MAKASSAR STRAIT BASED AT THE NORTHERN PART OF JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Turni Hartati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The coastal of Makassar Strait is one of main fishing grounds for purse seine vessels from northern part of Java which based at the following landing sites, i.e. Pekalongan, Tegal and Juwana. The purse seine fishery predominantly targets small pelagic fish. This paper attempts to present the current condition of small pelagic fishery in the Makassar Strait. Catch and effort (trip data between 2004 and 2011 from the three landing sites were used to estimate Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY using Schaefer & Fox models. The results showed a decreasing trend in the catch rate, from 30.83 tons/trip in 2004 to 12.27 tons/trip in 2011. The estimated MSY is at the range of 34,705- 37,930 tons with optimum efforts for 2,234-2,500 purse seine trips. Thus the level of purse seine fishing effort in 2011, i.e. 3,078 trips, was exceeding the optimum effort. The decreasing trend in the catch rate may indicate overfishing is occurring between 2004 and 2011. For management of the small pelagic fisheries in the waters of Makassar Strait, important action recommended is fishing effort restrictions. The effort allowed would be only in the range of 2,234-2,500 purse seine trips, and the fishing capacity needs to be controled.

  9. HEp-2 cell image classification method based on very deep convolutional networks with small datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mengchi; Gao, Long; Guo, Xifeng; Liu, Qiang; Yin, Jianping

    2017-07-01

    Human Epithelial-2 (HEp-2) cell images staining patterns classification have been widely used to identify autoimmune diseases by the anti-Nuclear antibodies (ANA) test in the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) protocol. Because manual test is time consuming, subjective and labor intensive, image-based Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems for HEp-2 cell classification are developing. However, methods proposed recently are mostly manual features extraction with low accuracy. Besides, the scale of available benchmark datasets is small, which does not exactly suitable for using deep learning methods. This issue will influence the accuracy of cell classification directly even after data augmentation. To address these issues, this paper presents a high accuracy automatic HEp-2 cell classification method with small datasets, by utilizing very deep convolutional networks (VGGNet). Specifically, the proposed method consists of three main phases, namely image preprocessing, feature extraction and classification. Moreover, an improved VGGNet is presented to address the challenges of small-scale datasets. Experimental results over two benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed method achieves superior performance in terms of accuracy compared with existing methods.

  10. Design and implement of infrared small target real-time detection system based on pipeline technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihui; Wang, Yongzhong; He, Yongqiang

    2007-01-01

    The detection for motive small target in infrared image sequence has become a hot topic nowadays. Background suppress algorithm based on minim gradient median filter and temporal recursion target detection algorithm are introduced. On the basis of contents previously mentioned, a four stages pipeline structure infrared small target detection process system, which aims at characters of algorithm complexity, large amounts of data to process, high frame frequency and exigent real-time character in this kind of application, is designed and implemented. The logical structure of the system was introduced and the function and signals flows are programmed. The system is composed of two FPGA chips and two DSP chips of TI. According to the function of each part, the system is divided into image preprocess stage, target detection stage, track relation stage and image output stage. The experiment of running algorithms on the system presented in this paper proved that the system could meet acquisition and process of 50Hz 240x320 digital image and the system could real time detect small target with a signal-noise ratio more than 3 reliably. The system achieves the characters of large amount of memory, high real-time processing, excellent extension and favorable interactive interface.

  11. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, S.H.; Bentley, P.M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N.L.; Al-Shammary, H.A.O.; Wood, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q -4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100 A scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth

  12. Measurement of the time resolution of small SiPM-based scintillation counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. A.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this research, we evaluated the timing resolution of SiPM-based scintillation detector on a 1-GeV electron beam "extracted" from VEPP-4M. We tested small scintillation crystals of pure CsI, YAP, LYSO, and LFS-3 with HAMAMATSU S10362-33-025C and S13360-3050CS. The CsI scintillator together with HAMAMATSU S13360-3050CS demonstrated the best results. Nevertheless, the achieved time resolution of ~80 ps (RMS) relates mainly to the photodetector itself. It makes the silicon photomultiplier an attractive candidate to replace other devices in applications where sub-nanosecond accuracy is required.

  13. Optimization of biodiesel supply chains based on small farmers: A case study in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Raphael; Hamacher, Silvio

    2010-09-15

    The strategy adopted by the Brazilian Biodiesel Program is to base its fuel production on oilseeds acquired from small, family-owned farms in the poorest regions of the country, thereby fostering social inclusion and transfer of income. The success of the program depends on the development of a robust supply chain logistic structure, appropriate distribution of crop production, and investments in new oilseed crushing units. This article presents the development of a mathematical model for optimizing the production arrangements for the supply of a biodiesel plant sourced from family farms, taking into account agricultural, logistic, industrial and social aspects.

  14. Model Reference Sliding Mode Control of Small Helicopter X.R.B based on Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents autonomous control for indoor small helicopter X.R.B. In case of natural disaster like earthquake, a MAV (Micro Air Vehicle which can fly autonomously will be very effective for surveying the site and environment in dangerous area or narrow space, where human cannot access safely. In addition, it will be helpful to prevent secondary disaster. This paper describes vision based autonomous hovering control, guidance control for X.R.B by model reference sliding mode control.

  15. Methodology for the Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer Risk Factors and Screening Behaviors - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This model-based approach uses data from both the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to produce estimates of the prevalence rates of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors at the state, health service area, and county levels.

  16. Effect of pore size on performance of monolithic tube chromatography of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Ales; Hamachi, Masataka; Isakari, Yu; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    Effect of pore size on the performance of ion-exchange monolith tube chromatography of large biomolecules was investigated. Radial flow 1 mL polymer based monolith tubes of different pore sizes (1.5, 2, and 6 μm) were tested with model samples such as 20 mer poly T-DNA, basic proteins, and acidic proteins (molecular weight 14 000-670 000). Pressure drop, pH transient, the number of binding site, dynamic binding capacity, and peak width were examined. Pressure drop-flow rate curves and dynamic binding capacity values were well correlated with the nominal pore size. While duration of the pH transient curves depends on the pore size, it was found that pH duration normalized on estimated surface area was constant, indicating that the ligand density is the same. This was also confirmed by the constant number of binding site values being independent of pore size. The peak width values were similar to those for axial flow monolith chromatography. These results showed that it is easy to scale up axial flow monolith chromatography to radial flow monolith tube chromatography by choosing the right pore size in terms of the pressure drop and capacity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP) often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP), and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors.

  18. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the isolation and detection of biotin and biotinylated biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Aissa, A; Herrera-Chacon, A; Pupin, R R; Sotomayor, M D P T; Pividori, M I

    2017-02-15

    Magnetic separation based on biologically-modified magnetic particles is a preconcentration procedure commonly integrated in magneto actuated platforms for the detection of a huge range of targets. However, the main drawback of this material is the low stability and high cost. In this work, a novel hybrid molecularly-imprinted polymer with magnetic properties is presented with affinity towards biotin and biotinylated biomolecules. During the synthesis of the magneto core-shell particles, biotin was used as a template. The characterization of this material by microscopy techniques including SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy is presented. The application of the magnetic-MIPs for the detection of biotin and biotinylated DNA in magneto-actuated platforms is also described for the first time. The magnetic-MIP showed a significant immobilization capacity of biotinylated molecules, giving rise to a cheaper and a robust method (it is not required to be stored at 4°C) with high binding capacity for the separation and purification under magnetic actuation of a wide range of biotinylated molecules, and their downstream application including determination of their specific targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Unconstrained Enhanced Sampling for Free Energy Calculations of Biomolecules: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are central to understanding the structure, dynamics and function of biomolecules. Yet insufficient sampling of biomolecular configurations is often regarded as one of the main sources of error. Many enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to address this issue. Notably, enhanced sampling methods based on biasing collective variables (CVs), including the widely used umbrella sampling, adaptive biasing force and metadynamics, have been discussed in a recent excellent review (Abrams and Bussi, Entropy, 2014). Here, we aim to review enhanced sampling methods that do not require predefined system-dependent CVs for biomolecular simulations and as such do not suffer from the hidden energy barrier problem as encountered in the CV-biasing methods. These methods include, but are not limited to, replica exchange/parallel tempering, self-guided molecular/Langevin dynamics, essential energy space random walk and accelerated molecular dynamics. While it is overwhelming to describe all details of each method, we provide a summary of the methods along with the applications and offer our perspectives. We conclude with challenges and prospects of the unconstrained enhanced sampling methods for accurate biomolecular free energy calculations. PMID:27453631

  20. A Universal Method for Fishing Target Proteins from Mixtures of Biomolecules using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Sun, Q; Kini, R; Sivaraman, J

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging tasks in biology include the identification of (1) the orphan receptor for a ligand, (2) the ligand for an orphan receptor protein, and (3) the target protein(s) for a given drug or a lead compound that are critical for the pharmacological or side effects. At present, several approaches are available, including cell- or animal-based assays, affinity labeling, solid-phase binding assays, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most of these techniques are not easy to apply when the target protein is unknown and the compound is not amenable to labeling, chemical modification, or immobilization. Here we demonstrate a new universal method for fishing orphan target proteins from a complex mixture of biomolecules using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tracking tool. We took snake venom, a crude mixture of several hundred proteins/peptides, as a model to demonstrate our proposed ITC method in tracking the isolation and purification of two distinct target proteins, a major component and a minor component. Identities of fished out target proteins were confirmed by amino acid sequencing and inhibition assays. This method has the potential to make a significant advancement in the area of identifying orphan target proteins and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and characterization.

  1. Domain Independent Vocabulary Generation and Its Use in Category-based Small Footprint Language Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIM, K.-H.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The work in this paper pertains to domain independent vocabulary generation and its use in category-based small footprint Language Model (LM. Two major constraints of the conventional LMs in the embedded environment are memory capacity limitation and data sparsity for the domain-specific application. This data sparsity adversely affects vocabulary coverage and LM performance. To overcome these constraints, we define a set of domain independent categories using a Part-Of-Speech (POS tagged corpus. Also, we generate a domain independent vocabulary based on this set using the corpus and knowledge base. Then, we propose a mathematical framework for a category-based LM using this set. In this LM, one word can be assigned assign multiple categories. In order to reduce its memory requirements, we propose a tree-based data structure. In addition, we determine the history length of a category n-gram, and the independent assumption applying to a category history generation. The proposed vocabulary generation method illustrates at least 13.68% relative improvement in coverage for a SMS text corpus, where data are sparse due to the difficulties in data collection. The proposed category-based LM requires only 215KB which is 55% and 13% compared to the conventional category-based LM and the word-based LM, respectively. It successively improves the performance, achieving 54.9% and 60.6% perplexity reduction compared to the conventional category-based LM and the word-based LM in terms of normalized perplexity.

  2. A Study of Biomolecules as Growth Modifiers of Calcium Oxalate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Junha John

    Crystallization processes are ubiquitous in nature, science, and technology. Controlling crystal growth is pivotal in many industries as material properties and functions can be tailored by tuning crystal habits (e.g. size, shape, phase). In biomineralization, organisms exert excellent control over bottom-up synthesis and assembly of inorganic-organic structures (e.g. bones, teeth, exoskeletons). This is made possible by growth modifiers that range from small molecules to macromolecules, such as proteins. Molecular recognition of the mineral phase allows proteins to function as nucleation templates, matrices, and growth inhibitors or promoters. We are interested in taking a biomimetic approach to control crystallization via biomolecular growth modifiers. We investigated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), found in plants and kidney stones, as a model system of crystallization. We studied the effects of four common proteins on COM crystallization: bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lactoferrin, and lysozyme. Through kinetic studies of COM crystallization, we classified BSA and lysozyme as COM growth inhibitor and promoter respectively. Their inhibition and promotion effects were also evident in the macroscopic crystal habit. Through adsorption and microscopy experiments, we showed that BSA exhibits binding specificity for the apical surfaces of macroscopic COM crystals. Lysozyme, on the other, functions via a non-binding mechanism at the surface to accelerate the growth of the apical surfaces. We also synthesized and studied peptides derived from the protein primary sequences to identify putative domains responsible for these inhibition and promotion effects. Collectively, our study of physiologically relevant biomolecules suggests potential roles of COM modifiers in pathological crystallization and helps to develop guidelines for rational design of biomolecular growth modifiers for applications in crystal engineering.

  3. High-Precision Dispensing of Nanoliter Biofluids on Glass Pedestal Arrays for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yang; Xu, QianFeng; Zhu, Jing; Poget, Sébastien F; Lyons, Alan M

    2016-05-04

    Precise dispensing of nanoliter droplets is necessary for the development of sensitive and accurate assays, especially when the availability of the source solution is limited. Conventional approaches are limited by imprecise positioning, large shear forces, surface tension effects, and high costs. To address the need for precise and economical dispensing of nanoliter volumes, we developed a new approach where the dispensed volume is dependent on the size and shape of defined surface features, thus freeing the dispensing process from pumps and fine-gauge needles requiring accurate positioning. The surface we fabricated, called a nanoliter droplet virtual well microplate (nVWP), achieves high-precision dispensing (better than ±0.5 nL or ±1.6% at 32 nL) of 20-40 nL droplets using a small source drop (3-10 μL) on isolated hydrophilic glass pedestals (500 μm on a side) bonded to arrays of polydimethylsiloxane conical posts. The sharp 90° edge of the glass pedestal pins the solid-liquid-vapor triple contact line (TCL), averting the wetting of the glass sidewalls while the fluid is prevented from receding from the edge. This edge creates a sufficiently large energy barrier such that microliter water droplets can be poised on the glass pedestals, exhibiting contact angles greater >150°. This approach relieves the stringent mechanical alignment tolerances required for conventional dispensing techniques, shifting the control of dispensed volume to the area circumscribed by the glass edge. The effects of glass surface chemistry and dispense velocity on droplet volume were studied using optical microscopy and high-speed video. Functionalization of the glass pedestal surface enabled the selective adsorption of specific peptides and proteins from synthetic and natural biomolecule mixtures, such as venom. We further demonstrate how the nVWP dispensing platform can be used for a variety of assays, including sensitive detection of proteins and peptides by fluorescence

  4. Consolidating duodenal and small bowel toxicity data via isoeffective dose calculations based on compiled clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phillip; Tai, An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-01-01

    To consolidate duodenum and small bowel toxicity data from clinical studies with different dose fractionation schedules using the modified linear quadratic (MLQ) model. A methodology of adjusting the dose-volume (D,v) parameters to different levels of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was presented. A set of NTCP model parameters for duodenum toxicity were estimated by the χ(2) fitting method using literature-based tolerance dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) data. These model parameters were then used to convert (D,v) data into the isoeffective dose in 2 Gy per fraction, (D(MLQED2),v) and convert these parameters to an isoeffective dose at another NTCP (D(MLQED2'),v). The literature search yielded 5 reports useful in making estimates of duodenum and small bowel toxicity. The NTCP model parameters were found to be TD50(1)(model) = 60.9 ± 7.9 Gy, m = 0.21 ± 0.05, and δ = 0.09 ± 0.03 Gy(-1). Isoeffective dose calculations and toxicity rates associated with hypofractionated radiation therapy reports were found to be consistent with clinical data having different fractionation schedules. Values of (D(MLQED2'),v) between different NTCP levels remain consistent over a range of 5%-20%. MLQ-based isoeffective calculations of dose-response data corresponding to grade ≥2 duodenum toxicity were found to be consistent with one another within the calculation uncertainty. The (D(MLQED2),v) data could be used to determine duodenum and small bowel dose-volume constraints for new dose escalation strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolution of project-based learning in small groups in environmental engineering courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Requies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the assessment of the development and evolution of an active methodology (Project-Based Learning –PBL- implemented on the course “Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering”, within the bachelor’s degree in Environmental Engineering, with the purpose of decreasing the dropout rate in this course. After the initial design and implementation of this methodology during the first academic year (12/13, different modifications were adopted in the following ones (13-14, 14-15 & 15-16 in order to optimize the student’s and professor’s work load as well as correct some malfunctions observed in the initial design of the PBL. This active methodology seeks to make students the main architects of their own learning processes. Accordingly, they have to identify their learning needs, which is a highly motivating approach both for their curricular development and for attaining the required learning outcomes in this field of knowledge. The results obtained show that working in small teams (cooperative work enhances each group member’s self–learning capabilities. Moreover, academic marks improve when compared to traditional learning methodologies. Nevertheless, the implementation of more active methodologies, such as project-based learning, in small groups has certain specific characteristics. In this case it has been implemented simultaneously in two different groups of 10 students each one. Such small groups are more heterogeneoussince the presence of two highly motivated students or not can vary or affect the whole group’s attitude and academic results.

  6. Adaptive, Small-Rotation-Based, Corotational Technique for Analysis of 2D Nonlinear Elastic Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroon Rungamornrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient and accurate numerical technique for analysis of two-dimensional frames accounted for both geometric nonlinearity and nonlinear elastic material behavior. An adaptive remeshing scheme is utilized to optimally discretize a structure into a set of elements where the total displacement can be decomposed into the rigid body movement and one possessing small rotations. This, therefore, allows the force-deformation relationship for the latter part to be established based on small-rotation-based kinematics. Nonlinear elastic material model is integrated into such relation via the prescribed nonlinear moment-curvature relationship. The global force-displacement relation for each element can be derived subsequently using corotational formulations. A final system of nonlinear algebraic equations along with its associated gradient matrix for the whole structure is obtained by a standard assembly procedure and then solved numerically by Newton-Raphson algorithm. A selected set of results is then reported to demonstrate and discuss the computational performance including the accuracy and convergence of the proposed technique.

  7. Toward topology-based characterization of small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Sawan; Girimaji, Sharath

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent mixing rate at small scales of motion (molecular mixing) is governed by the steepness of the scalar-gradient field which in turn is dependent upon the prevailing velocity gradients. Thus motivated, we propose a velocity-gradient topology-based approach for characterizing small-scale mixing in compressible turbulence. We define a mixing efficiency metric that is dependent upon the topology of the solenoidal and dilatational deformation rates of a fluid element. The mixing characteristics of solenoidal and dilatational velocity fluctuations are clearly delineated. We validate this new approach by employing mixing data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of compressible decaying turbulence with passive scalar. For each velocity-gradient topology, we compare the mixing efficiency predicted by the topology-based model with the corresponding conditional scalar variance obtained from DNS. The new mixing metric accurately distinguishes good and poor mixing topologies and indeed reasonably captures the numerical values. The results clearly demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach for characterizing and predicting mixing in compressible flows.

  8. Development of a PC-based ground support system for a small satellite instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschambault, Robert L.; Gregory, Philip R.; Spenler, Stephen; Whalen, Brian A.

    1993-11-01

    The importance of effective ground support for the remote control and data retrieval of a satellite instrument cannot be understated. Problems with ground support may include the need to base personnel at a ground tracking station for extended periods, and the delay between the instrument observation and the processing of the data by the science team. Flexible solutions to such problems in the case of small satellite systems are provided by using low-cost, powerful personal computers and off-the-shelf software for data acquisition and processing, and by using Internet as a communication pathway to enable scientists to view and manipulate satellite data in real time at any ground location. The personal computer based ground support system is illustrated for the case of the cold plasma analyzer flown on the Freja satellite. Commercial software was used as building blocks for writing the ground support equipment software. Several levels of hardware support, including unit tests and development, functional tests, and integration were provided by portable and desktop personal computers. Satellite stations in Saskatchewan and Sweden were linked to the science team via phone lines and Internet, which provided remote control through a central point. These successful strategies will be used on future small satellite space programs.

  9. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanye; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo; Ren, Qiushi

    2014-01-01

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development

  10. Small Imaging Depth LIDAR and DCNN-Based Localization for Automated Guided Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Seigo; Hiratsuka, Shigeyoshi; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masaru

    2018-01-10

    We present our third prototype sensor and a localization method for Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs), for which small imaging LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and fusion-based localization are fundamentally important. Our small imaging LIDAR, named the Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) LIDAR, uses a time-of-flight method and SPAD arrays. A SPAD is a highly sensitive photodetector capable of detecting at the single-photon level, and the SPAD LIDAR has two SPAD arrays on the same chip for detection of laser light and environmental light. Therefore, the SPAD LIDAR simultaneously outputs range image data and monocular image data with the same coordinate system and does not require external calibration among outputs. As AGVs travel both indoors and outdoors with vibration, this calibration-less structure is particularly useful for AGV applications. We also introduce a fusion-based localization method, named SPAD DCNN, which uses the SPAD LIDAR and employs a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN). SPAD DCNN can fuse the outputs of the SPAD LIDAR: range image data, monocular image data and peak intensity image data. The SPAD DCNN has two outputs: the regression result of the position of the SPAD LIDAR and the classification result of the existence of a target to be approached. Our third prototype sensor and the localization method are evaluated in an indoor environment by assuming various AGV trajectories. The results show that the sensor and localization method improve the localization accuracy.

  11. Competitive intelligence information management and innovation in small technology-based companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    In this article we examine how (i) company type and (ii) the competitive intelligence information used by small technology-based companies affect their innovation performance. The focus is on the specific information types used and not on the information sources. Information topics are classified in four groups - customers (10), company (9), competitor (11) and industry (12). The sample consists of 45 small new technology-based companies, specialized suppliers, and service companies from a variety of sectors - software, photonics, telecommunications, biomedical engineering and biotech, traditional manufacturing etc. The results suggest that the total number of intelligence information topics companies use to make decisions about innovation is not associated with the number of their new products, processes, services and patents. Therefore the companies in our sample do not seem to have the resources, processes or value systems required to use different competitive intelligence information when making decisions on innovation or may rely more on their own internal logic than on external information. Companies are classified using a Pavitt-like taxonomy. Service companies are considered as a separate company type. This allows for explicitly studying both, the innovative role of new services in product driven companies, and the role of new product development in service companies.

  12. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  13. Propagation Characterization Based on Geographic Location Variation for 5G Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Jin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Developments in next-generation wireless transmission technology and efficient frequency-use research are based on understanding the characteristics of the exact radio channel. With regard to developments in next-generation mobile communication systems, performance verification of the development system is essential, for which it is necessary to estimate the exact wireless-space channel. This paper presents results of the analysis of radio propagation characteristics based on location variation in outdoor environments for small-cell 5th generation (5G mobile systems. Changes due to variation in location were measured using a channel sounder in a microcell environment with a 0.5 km radius in Korea. In order to analyze the propagation characteristics, the best distribution model reflecting the characteristics of the locations was derived. A comparison between actual measurements and three-dimensional ray-tracing simulation results confirmed the validity of the measurement result.

  14. Shape memory alloy-based small crawling robots inspired by C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Honggu; Jo, Sungho, E-mail: shjo@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: j_shin@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Computer Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Inspired by its simple musculature, actuation and motion mechanisms, we have developed a small crawling robot that closely mimics the model organism of our choice: Caenorhabditis elegans. A thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) was selected as an actuator due to the similarities of its properties to C. elegans muscles. Based on the anatomy of C. elegans, a 12-unit robot was designed to generate a sinusoidal undulating motion. Each body unit consisting of a pair of SMA actuators is serially connected by rigid links with an embedded motion control circuit. A simple binary operation-based motion control mechanism was implemented using a microcontroller. The assembled robot can execute C. elegans-like motion with a 0.17 Hz undulation frequency. Its motion is comparable to that of a real worm.

  15. Hot spot-based design of small-molecule inhibitors for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenxing; Wisniewski, John A; Ji, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are important targets for the development of chemical probes and therapeutic agents. From the initial discovery of the existence of hot spots at PPI interfaces, it has been proposed that hot spots might provide the key for developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors. However, there has been no review on the ways in which the knowledge of hot spots can be used to achieve inhibitor design, nor critical examination of successful examples. This Digest discusses the characteristics of hot spots and the identification of druggable hot spot pockets. An analysis of four examples of hot spot-based design reveals the importance of this strategy in discovering potent and selective PPI inhibitors. A general procedure for hot spot-based design of PPI inhibitors is outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomass-derived functional porous carbons as novel electrode material for the practical detection of biomolecules in human serum and snail hemolymph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, Vediyappan; Madhu, Rajesh; Chen, Shen-Ming; Lou, Bih-Show; Palanisamy, Jayabal; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy

    2015-05-01

    The biomass-derived activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared with high surface areas up to 793 m2 g-1 is by ZnCl2 activation at three different temperatures, viz. AC700, AC800, and AC900. The AC samples were characterized by a variety of analytical and spectroscopy techniques. The as-synthesized ACs were adopted for the simultaneous electrochemical detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). For comparison, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was employed for the proposed sensor. The high surface area, modulated pore size and the presence of oxygen surface functional groups like heteroatoms (83.427% C, 1.085% N, 0.383% S, and 0.861% H) in the biomass-derived AC is found to be responsible for the excellent catalytic activities of biomolecules. Fascinatingly, the facile sensor further used to detect biomolecules levels in the snail hemolymph and human blood serum. Notably, the obtained analytical parameters for the biomolecules detection over the AC modified GCE, outperforming several carbon-based modified electrodes in literatures.

  17. Radical Reactions in the Gas Phase: Recent Development and Application in Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent literature describing the use of gas phase radical reactions for structural characterization of complex biomolecules other than peptides. Specifically, chemical derivatization, in-source chemical reaction, and gas phase ion/ion reactions have been demonstrated as effective ways to generate radical precursor ions that yield structural informative fragments complementary to those from conventional collision-induced dissociation (CID. Radical driven dissociation has been applied to a variety of biomolecules including peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids. The majority of the molecules discussed in this review see limited fragmentation from conventional CID, and the gas phase radical reactions open up completely new dissociation channels for these molecules and therefore yield high fidelity confirmation of the structures of the target molecules. Due to the extensively studied peptide fragmentation, this review focuses only on nonpeptide biomolecules such as nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and phospholipids.

  18. The origin of methane and biomolecules from a CO2 cycle on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Knížek, Antonín; Ivanek, Ondřej; Kubelík, Petr; Zukalová, Markéta; Kavan, Ladislav; Ferus, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the chemical evolution of newly formed terrestrial planets involves uncertainties in atmospheric chemical composition and assessing the plausibility of biomolecule synthesis. In this study, an original scenario for the origin of methane on Mars and terrestrial planets is suggested. Carbon dioxide in Martian and other planetary atmospheres can be abiotically converted into a mixture of methane and carbon monoxide by `methanogenesis' on porous mineral photoactive surfaces under soft ultraviolet irradiation. On young planets exposed to heavy bombardment by interplanetary matter, this process can be followed by biomolecule synthesis through the reprocessing of reactive reducing atmospheres by impact-induced shock waves. The proposed mechanism of methanogenesis may help to answer the question concerning the formation of methane and carbon monoxide by photochemical processes, the formation of biomolecules on early Earth and other terrestrial planets, and the source and seasonal variation of methane concentrations on Mars.

  19. Recoil halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenault, L.J.; Blotcky, A.J.; Firouzbakht, M.L.; Rack, E.P.; Nebraska Univ., Omaha

    1982-01-01

    Reactions of recoil 38 Cl, 80 Br and 128 I have been studied in crystalline systems of 5-halouracil, 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-halouridine as well as liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of these halogenated biomolecules. In all systems expect crystalline 5-iuodouracil the major product was the radio-labelled halide ion. There was no evidence for other halogen inorganic species. The major labelled organic product was the parent molecule. A recoil atom tracer technique was developed to acquire site information of the biomolecule solutes in the liquid and frozen aqueous systems. For all liquid and frozen aqueous systems, the halogenated biomolecules tended to aggregate. For liquid systems, the tendency for aggregation diminished as the solute concentration approached zero, where the probable state of the solute approached a monomolecular dispersion. Unlike the liquid state, the frozen ice lattice demonstated a ''caging effect'' for the solute aggregates which resulted in constant product yields over the whole concentration range. (orig.)

  20. Could comets be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules from interstellar space?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Gonzales, R.; Khanna, R.K.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that the synchrotron circularly polarized ultraviolet light produced off-angle to the orbit of neutron star remnants of supernova explosions interacted with interstellar grains from the presolar nebula producing chiral molecules. Furthermore, it has also been suggested that comets were the carriers of such extraterrestrial sources of homochirality from interstellar space to the primitive Earth. We present here a computer model calculation of the effect of ionizing radiation on cometary material. The external (cosmic rays) and internal (embedded radionuclides) contributions were considered to determine the degree of destruction of possible homochiral biomolecules present such as amino acids and carboxylic acids. Our results suggest that an insignificant degree of destruction (2-12%) of the homochiral biomolecules could be expected. Therefore, comets could be carriers of intact homochiral biomolecules. (author)