WorldWideScience

Sample records for based small biomolecules

  1. Biomolecule-based nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Willner, Bilha

    2010-10-13

    Biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotube) hybrid systems provide new materials that combine the unique optical, electronic, or catalytic properties of the nanoelements with the recognition or biocatalytic functions of biomolecules. This article summarizes recent applications of biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotubes) hybrid systems for sensing, synthesis of nanostructures, and for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. The use of metallic nanoparticles for the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes, and as catalytic labels for the development of electrochemical biosensors is discussed. Similarly, biomolecule-quantum dot hybrid systems are implemented for optical biosensing, and for monitoring intracellular metabolic processes. Also, the self-assembly of biomolecule-metal nanoparticle hybrids into nanostructures and functional nanodevices is presented. The future perspectives of the field are addressed by discussing future challenges and highlighting different potential applications.

  2. Understanding small biomolecule-biomaterial interactions: a review of fundamental theoretical and experimental approaches for biomolecule interactions with inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dominique; Garrain, Pierre-Alain; Baaden, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between biomolecules and inorganic surfaces play an important role in natural environments and in industry, including a wide variety of conditions: marine environment, ship hulls (fouling), water treatment, heat exchange, membrane separation, soils, mineral particles at the earth's surface, hospitals (hygiene), art and buildings (degradation and biocorrosion), paper industry (fouling) and more. To better control the first steps leading to adsorption of a biomolecule on an inorganic surface, it is mandatory to understand the adsorption mechanisms of biomolecules of several sizes at the atomic scale, that is, the nature of the chemical interaction between the biomolecule and the surface and the resulting biomolecule conformations once adsorbed at the surface. This remains a challenging and unsolved problem. Here, we review the state of art in experimental and theoretical approaches. We focus on metallic biomaterial surfaces such as TiO(2) and stainless steel, mentioning some remarkable results on hydroxyapatite. Experimental techniques include atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, sum frequency generation and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Theoretical models range from detailed quantum mechanical representations to classical forcefield-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Computational solvation analysis of biomolecules in aqueous ionic liquid mixtures : From large flexible proteins to small rigid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeindlhofer, Veronika; Schröder, Christian

    2018-04-23

    Based on their tunable properties, ionic liquids attracted significant interest to replace conventional, organic solvents in biomolecular applications. Following a Gartner cycle, the expectations on this new class of solvents dropped after the initial hype due to the high viscosity, hydrolysis, and toxicity problems as well as their high cost. Since not all possible combinations of cations and anions can be tested experimentally, fundamental knowledge on the interaction of the ionic liquid ions with water and with biomolecules is mandatory to optimize the solvation behavior, the biodegradability, and the costs of the ionic liquid. Here, we report on current computational approaches to characterize the impact of the ionic liquid ions on the structure and dynamics of the biomolecule and its solvation layer to explore the full potential of ionic liquids.

  4. Synchrotron and small bio-molecules in gas phase and liquid environment: new opportunities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naves de Brito, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Two techniques are critically related to the photoelectric law, namely: photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. Both are strongly used now a day within synchrotron laboratories. Our group is employing both to investigate fragmentation of bio-molecules in gas phase such as amino acids and DNA basis using V UV and soft x-ray photons. In the near future lager scale instruments developed in Brazil will allow unique opportunities to apply these two spectroscopic methods to molecules immersed in liquids such as water. We will present details from this advanced x-ray source and experimental stations with capabilities not present in other places in the world. Experiments connected to the molecular origin of live will be shown. Among them an experiment where we mimic the atmosphere at Titan moon producing bio- molecules will discussed. Another experiment will be presented where we test the Panspermia viability using special bacteria. We will also present experiments where frozen simple molecules connected to pre-biotic mate- rial are bombardment by UV photons and energetic particles showing interesting trends. Spectroscopic studies of gas phase photo-fragmentation of bio-molecules may be critical to understand in the future these molecules immersed in liquids. We plan to spend some time showing our recent results in this area. (author)

  5. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill, E-mail: jventon@virginia.edu

    2015-08-05

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. - Highlights: • We review the types of carbon nanomaterials used in electrochemical sensors. • Different materials and sensor designs are compared for classes of biomolecules. • Future challenges of better sensor design and implementation are assessed.

  6. ID-SERS Based Reference Method for Quantification of Large Biomolecules on a Single Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghobian, Fatemeh; Stosch, Rainer; Henrion, André; Güttler, Bernd

    2010-08-01

    Accuracy and precision of quantitative SERS results have been significantly increased by applying a method based on the so-called isotope-dilution (ID) principle. In this ID-SERS approach, an isotopically labeled analogue of the target molecule (isotopologue) is spiked to the sample at a known concentration. Due to the slight difference in their molar masses, some Raman bands of the heavier isotopologue are red-shifted with respect to the same signals resulting from the unlabelled compound. As a result, spectra evaluation is reduced to the determination of intensity ratios rather than absolute intensities, and the unknown quantity of the analyte can be calculated from the known quantity of the standard. This procedure is of particular interest in the development of highly accurate reference procedures for metrology in chemistry. Because the sample is spiked prior to any further treatment, potential loss of material or matrix effects would equally affect both isotopologues, without influencing the final result. The method has been successfully applied for quantifying small diagnostic marker molecules like creatinine at their relevant serum concentration levels using silver colloids as SERS substrates. Now, the ID-SERS approach has been realized as a "one-chip" approach using "Bio-chips" made of intrinsically grown spherical silver nanoparticles with gaps less than 10 nm in between (Fig. 1). In addition, the scope of the method has been extended to larger biomolecules like peptides which will be shown using the example of the human growth-hormone (hGH) peptide T12 at physiologically relevant serum concentration levels (Fig. 2). Further developments towards the quantification of full proteins will also be reported.

  7. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T; Balatsky, Alexander V; Rehr, John J; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology. (paper)

  8. Correlation dynamics and enhanced signals for the identification of serial biomolecules and DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Rehr, John J.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Schuller, Ivan; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2014-03-01

    Nanopore-based sequencing has demonstrated a significant potential for the development of fast, accurate, and cost-efficient fingerprinting techniques for next generation molecular detection and sequencing. We propose a specific multilayered graphene-based nanopore device architecture for the recognition of single biomolecules. Molecular detection and analysis can be accomplished through the detection of transverse currents as the molecule or DNA base translocates through the nanopore. To increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy, we implement a new ‘multi-point cross-correlation’ technique for identification of DNA bases or other molecules on the single molecular level. We demonstrate that the cross-correlations between each nanopore will greatly enhance the transverse current signal for each molecule. We implement first-principles transport calculations for DNA bases surveyed across a multilayered graphene nanopore system to illustrate the advantages of the proposed geometry. A time-series analysis of the cross-correlation functions illustrates the potential of this method for enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio. This work constitutes a significant step forward in facilitating fingerprinting of single biomolecules using solid state technology.

  9. Electrolyte gated TFT biosensors based on the Donnan's capacitance of anchored biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Kyriaki; Palazzo, Gerardo; Macchia, Eleonora; Tiwari, Amber; Di Franco, Cinzia; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Favia, Pietro; Mallardi, Antonia; Torsi, Luisa

    2017-08-01

    Biodetection using electrolyte gated field effect transistors has been mainly correlated to charge modulated transduction. Therefore, such platforms are designed and studied for limited applications involving relatively small charged species and much care is taken in the operating conditions particularly pH and salt concentration (ionic strength). However, there are several reports suggesting that the device conductance can also be very sensitive towards variations in the capacitance coupling. Understanding the sensing mechanism is important for further exploitation of these promising sensors in broader range of applications. In this paper, we present a thorough and in depth study of a multilayer protein system coupled to an electrolyte gated transistor. It is demonstrated that detection associated to a binding event taking place at a distance of 30 nm far from the organic semiconductor-electrolyte interface is possible and the device conductance is dominated by Donnan's capacitance of anchored biomolecules.

  10. Recent trends in carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for biomolecules: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Denno, Madelaine E.; Pyakurel, Poojan; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous for electrochemical sensors because they increase the electroactive surface area, enhance electron transfer, and promote adsorption of molecules. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into electrochemical sensors for biomolecules and strategies have included the traditional dip coating and drop casting methods, direct growth of CNTs on electrodes and the use of CNT fibers and yarns made exclusively of CNTs. Recent research has also focused on utilizing many new types of carbon nanomaterials beyond CNTs. Forms of graphene are now increasingly popular for sensors including reduced graphene oxide, carbon nanohorns, graphene nanofoams, graphene nanorods, and graphene nanoflowers. In this review, we compare different carbon nanomaterial strategies for creating electrochemical sensors for biomolecules. Analytes covered include neurotransmitters and neurochemicals, such as dopamine, ascorbic acid, and serotonin; hydrogen peroxide; proteins, such as biomarkers; and DNA. The review also addresses enzyme-based electrodes that are used to detect non-electroactive species such as glucose, alcohols, and proteins. Finally, we analyze some of the future directions for the field, pointing out gaps in fundamental understanding of electron transfer to carbon nanomaterials and the need for more practical implementation of sensors. PMID:26320782

  11. Capillary electrochromatography using knitted aromatic polymer as the stationary phase for the separation of small biomolecules and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pingxiu; Chen, Zilin

    2018-02-01

    Hypercrosslinked polymers (HCPs) are currently receiving great attention due to their unique characteristics and potential uses in diverse areas. However, the field of HCPs for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) separations has not been explored. Here, a knitted aromatic polymer (KAP) was in-situ grown on the inner wall of the capillary column for OT-CEC for the first time. The silylating reagent containing phenyl was served as monomer, immobilized on the inner wall of the capillary column, and then KAPs-modified capillary column was prepared through in-situ hypercrosslinking reaction. The surface structure and morphology of KAPs-modified capillary column was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared capillary columns showed good separation performance for neutral compounds, small biomolecules, such as nucleosides, amino acids, small peptides, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sulfa drugs. In addition, the KAPs-modified capillaries showed good reproducibility, with relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column runs less than 1.59%, 2.55%, and 5.19% respectively. The strategy of in-situ immobilization of KAPs provides a new approach for the application of the material in the analytical fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomolecule Analogues 2-Hydroxypyridine and 2-Pyridone Base Pairing on Ice Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rubovič, Peter; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Nachtigallová, Dana; Fárník, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 27 (2016), s. 4720-4730 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-14082S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : doped nanoparticles * argon * biomolecules Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  13. DNA-based Nanoconstructs for the Detection of Ions and Biomolecules with Related Raman/SERS Signature Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Kimber L.

    The utilization of DNA aptamers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for the detection of ions and biomolecules was investigated. In recent years, there have been many studies based on the use of DNA and RNA aptamers, which are single stranded oligonucleotides capable of binding to biomolecules, other molecules, and ions. In many of these cases, the conformational changes of these DNA and RNA aptamers are suitable to use fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) or nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) techniques to detect such analytes. Coupled with this growth in such uses of aptamers, there has been an expanded use of semiconductor quantum dots as brighter, longer-lasting alternatives to fluorescent dyes in labeling and detection techniques of interest in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) and a zinc aptamer were used to detect mercury, lead, zinc, and cadmium. These probes were tested in a liquid assay as well as on a filter paper coupon. Biomolecules were also studied and detected using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), including DNA aptamers and C-reactive protein (CRP). Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for sensor development, label-free detection, and has the potential for remote sensing. Raman spectra provide information on the vibrational modes or phonons, between and within molecules. Therefore, unique spectral fingerprints for single molecules can be obtained. SERS is accomplished through the use of substrates with nanometer scale geometries made of metals with many free electrons, such as silver, gold, or copper. In this research silver SERS substrates were used to study the SERS signature of biomolecules that typically produce very weak Raman signals.

  14. Composite system based on biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube and ionic liquid: Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of tryptophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Bu Caihong; Zhang Yijun; Du Jie; Lu Xiaoquan; Liu Xiuhui

    2011-01-01

    The combination of biomolecules-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) and ionic liquid (IL) yields nanostructured biointerfaces, formed a novel kind of structurally uniform and bioelectrocatalytic activity material. Rutin was chosen as a model biomolecules to investigate the composite system. The MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film was characterized by different methods including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), UV–vis spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). A pair of well-defined quasi reversible redox peaks of rutin was obtained at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by direct electron transfer between the rutin and the GCE electrode. Dramatically enhanced biocatalytic and electrocatalytic activity was exemplified at the MWNTs–Rutin–IL/GCE electrode by the oxidized of tryptophane. The oxidation peak currents of tryptophane in such modified electrode increased linearly with the concentrations of tryptophane in the range from 8 × 10 −8 to 2 × 10 −5 mol L −1 with a detection limit of 3.0 × 10 −8 mol L −1 . The unique composite material based on biomolecules-functionalized carbon nanotube and ionic liquid have wide potential applications in direct electrochemistry, biosensors, and biocatalysis.

  15. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  16. 2017 publication guidelines for structural modelling of small-angle scattering data from biomolecules in solution: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewhella, Jill; Duff, Anthony P; Durand, Dominique; Gabel, Frank; Guss, J Mitchell; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Hura, Greg L; Jacques, David A; Kirby, Nigel M; Kwan, Ann H; Pérez, Javier; Pollack, Lois; Ryan, Timothy M; Sali, Andrej; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Schwede, Torsten; Svergun, Dmitri I; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Tainer, John A; Vachette, Patrice; Westbrook, John; Whitten, Andrew E

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, preliminary guidelines were published addressing sample quality, data acquisition and reduction, presentation of scattering data and validation, and modelling for biomolecular small-angle scattering (SAS) experiments. Biomolecular SAS has since continued to grow and authors have increasingly adopted the preliminary guidelines. In parallel, integrative/hybrid determination of biomolecular structures is a rapidly growing field that is expanding the scope of structural biology. For SAS to contribute maximally to this field, it is essential to ensure open access to the information required for evaluation of the quality of SAS samples and data, as well as the validity of SAS-based structural models. To this end, the preliminary guidelines for data presentation in a publication are reviewed and updated, and the deposition of data and associated models in a public archive is recommended. These guidelines and recommendations have been prepared in consultation with the members of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) Small-Angle Scattering and Journals Commissions, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) Small-Angle Scattering Validation Task Force and additional experts in the field.

  17. Hydrogels Based on Ag+ -Modulated Assembly of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate for Enriching Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Dong; Wu, Yang; Lin, Nangui; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-11-07

    Supramolecular hydrogels obtained by combining 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with Ag + were fabricated in this work. Their gelation capability was enhanced by increasing the concentration of Ag + or decreasing the pH. The gels are very sensitive to light, which endows them with potential applications as visible-light photosensitive materials. Coordination between the nucleobase of AMP and Ag + , as well as π-π stacking of nucleobases, are considered to be the main driving forces for self-assembly. The hydrogels successfully achieved the encapsulation and enrichment of biomolecules. Hydrogen bonding between the amino group of guest molecules and silver nanoparticles along the nanofibers drives the enrichment and is considered to be a crucial interaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. On-chip micro-electromagnets for magnetic-based bio-molecules separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, Qasem; Samper, Victor; Poenar, Daniel; Yu Chen

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive theoretical, finite element and measurement analysis of different designs of planar micro-electromagnets for bio-molecular manipulation. The magnetic field due to current flowing in complex shapes of current-carrying conductors have been calculated analytically, simulated using finite-element analysis (FEA), and measured using the superconducting quantum interference device technique (SQUID). A comparison of the theoretical and measured magnetic field strength and patterns is presented. The planar electromagnets have been fabricated using patterned Al 2 μm thick. The aim of the study is to explore and optimize the geometrical and structural parameters of planar electromagnets that give rise to the highest magnetic fields and forces for magnetic micro-beads manipulation. Magnetic beads are often used in biochemical assays for separation of bio-molecules. Typical beads are 0.2-10 μm in diameter and have superparamagnetic properties. Increasing the intensity of the magnetic field generated by a coil by injection a larger current is not the most suitable solution as the maximum current is limited by Joule heating. Consequently, in order to maximize the field for a given current, one should optimize the geometry of the coil, as this is an extremely significant factor in determining the magnetic field intensity in 2D planar designs. The theoretical and measured results of this work show that the meander micro-electromagnet with mesh-shaped winding profile produces the strongest magnetic field (about 2.7 μT for a current intensity of 6 mA) compared with other meander designs, such as the serpentine and rosette-shaped ones. The magnetic fields of these three types of meander-shaped micro-electromagnets were compared theoretically with that produced by a spiral micro-electromagnet whose technological realization is more complicated and costly due to the fact that it requires an additional insulation layer with a contact window and a

  19. Light-induced immobilisation of biomolecules as an attractive alternative to microdroplet dispensing-based arraying technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crookshanks, Meg; Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves

    2007-01-01

    The present work shows how UV ‘light-induced molecular immobilisation' (LIMI) of biomolecules onto thiol reactive surfaces can be used to make biosensors, without the need for traditional microdispensing technologies. Using ‘LIMI,' arrays of biomolecules can be created with a high degree of repro...

  20. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Lin

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination. PMID:29309403

  1. Representability of algebraic topology for biomolecules in machine learning based scoring and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cang, Zixuan; Mu, Lin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-01-01

    This work introduces a number of algebraic topology approaches, including multi-component persistent homology, multi-level persistent homology, and electrostatic persistence for the representation, characterization, and description of small molecules and biomolecular complexes. In contrast to the conventional persistent homology, multi-component persistent homology retains critical chemical and biological information during the topological simplification of biomolecular geometric complexity. Multi-level persistent homology enables a tailored topological description of inter- and/or intra-molecular interactions of interest. Electrostatic persistence incorporates partial charge information into topological invariants. These topological methods are paired with Wasserstein distance to characterize similarities between molecules and are further integrated with a variety of machine learning algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, ensemble of trees, and deep convolutional neural networks, to manifest their descriptive and predictive powers for protein-ligand binding analysis and virtual screening of small molecules. Extensive numerical experiments involving 4,414 protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database and 128,374 ligand-target and decoy-target pairs in the DUD database are performed to test respectively the scoring power and the discriminatory power of the proposed topological learning strategies. It is demonstrated that the present topological learning outperforms other existing methods in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and ligand-decoy discrimination.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic-based Laboratories on a Chip for Analysis of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A laboratory-on-a-chip design based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) microfluidics and integrated microelectrochemical detection is proposed. The proposed device is...

  3. Synthesis of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO nanocapsules: encapsulation of small biomolecules for drugs and 'SiOZO-plex' for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad (India); Annamanedi, Madhavi [School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Department of Animal Sciences (India); Prashad, Muvva Durga [University of Hyderabad, Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (India); Arunasree, Kalle M. [School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Department of Animal Sciences (India); Mastai, Yitzhak; Gedanken, Aharon, E-mail: gedanken@mail.biu.ac.il [Bar-Ilan University, Department of Chemistry, Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (Israel); Paik, Pradip, E-mail: ppse@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad (India)

    2013-09-15

    This work presents a new synthesis of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO composite nanocapsules with sizes of 90-150 nm and represents their applications in encapsulation of small biomolecules (fluorescent molecules, drugs, and DNA) for uses in medical biotechnology (e.g., drug and gene delivery) for the first time. The nanocapsule size and morphology have been confirmed through the HRSEM and HRTEM. The mesoporous structure of the novel materials has been confirmed through both BET and HRTEM, and the pore diameter observed to be ca. 2-8 nm with an average diameter of 5.1 nm. The BET surface area of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO was found to be {approx}230 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. Three different types of pores were detected through HRTEM: type-I, normal pores in silica matrix, pore with ZnO nanoparticles at the boundary (type-II) and type-III, the pores with tiny ZnO nanoparticles ({approx}5-7 nm) inside them. To demonstrate the biocompatibility and cell viability of the nanocapsules, normal and cancerous lymphocyte cells have been chosen and investigated in a systematic way. Fluorescent dye (Rhodamine 6G), anticancer drug e.g., Doxorubicin (DOX) were loaded in all types of pores, and EtBr-labeled DNA molecules were loaded efficiently into the mesopores of second and third types of the composite nanocapsules to manifest the characteristic of mesoporous, and to find out its loading efficacy. The release kinetics of Rhodamine 6G and DOX were studied. The results highlight the potential of novel functional mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO nanoparticles for using as the carrier of drugs and formation of 'SiOZO-plex', a complex of mesoporous SiO{sub 2}-ZnO with DNA for gene delivery applications.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Synthesis of mesoporous SiO2–ZnO nanocapsules: encapsulation of small biomolecules for drugs and “SiOZO-plex” for gene delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay Bhooshan; Annamanedi, Madhavi; Prashad, Muvva Durga; Arunasree, Kalle M.; Mastai, Yitzhak; Gedanken, Aharon; Paik, Pradip

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new synthesis of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO composite nanocapsules with sizes of 90–150 nm and represents their applications in encapsulation of small biomolecules (fluorescent molecules, drugs, and DNA) for uses in medical biotechnology (e.g., drug and gene delivery) for the first time. The nanocapsule size and morphology have been confirmed through the HRSEM and HRTEM. The mesoporous structure of the novel materials has been confirmed through both BET and HRTEM, and the pore diameter observed to be ca. 2–8 nm with an average diameter of 5.1 nm. The BET surface area of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO was found to be ∼230 m 2 g −1 . Three different types of pores were detected through HRTEM: type-I, normal pores in silica matrix, pore with ZnO nanoparticles at the boundary (type-II) and type-III, the pores with tiny ZnO nanoparticles (∼5–7 nm) inside them. To demonstrate the biocompatibility and cell viability of the nanocapsules, normal and cancerous lymphocyte cells have been chosen and investigated in a systematic way. Fluorescent dye (Rhodamine 6G), anticancer drug e.g., Doxorubicin (DOX) were loaded in all types of pores, and EtBr-labeled DNA molecules were loaded efficiently into the mesopores of second and third types of the composite nanocapsules to manifest the characteristic of mesoporous, and to find out its loading efficacy. The release kinetics of Rhodamine 6G and DOX were studied. The results highlight the potential of novel functional mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO nanoparticles for using as the carrier of drugs and formation of “SiOZO-plex”, a complex of mesoporous SiO 2 –ZnO with DNA for gene delivery applications.Graphical Abstract

  5. Quantification of pH Gradients and Implications in Insulator-Based Dielectrophoresis of Biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gencoglu, Aytug; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Nguyen, Vi Thanh; Nakano, Asuka; Ros, Alexandra; Minerick, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Direct current (DC) insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) microdevices have the potential to replace traditional alternating current (AC) dielectrophoretic devices for many cellular and biomolecular separation applications. The use of large DC fields suggest that electrode reactions and ion transport mechanisms can become important and impact ion distributions in the nanoliters of fluid in iDEP microchannels. This work tracked natural pH gradient formation in a 100 μm wide, 1 cm long micro...

  6. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Anna; Czaja, Malgorzata; Chmurzynski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K a , anionic, K AHA - , and cationic, K BHB + , homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K BHA , constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K AHA - values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK BHA reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK a values

  7. Adsorption detection for polylysine biomolecules based on high-Q silica capillary whispering gallery mode microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jixuan; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Song, Binbin

    2017-11-01

    A silica-capillary-based whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonator has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the real-time monitoring of the polylysine adsorption process. The spectral characteristics of the WGM resonance dips with high quality factor and good wavelength selectivity have been investigated to evaluate the dynamic process for the binding of polylysine with a capillary surface. The WGM transmission spectrum shows a regular shift with increments of observation time, which could be exploited for the analysis of the polylysine adsorption process. The proposed WGM microresonator system possesses desirable qualities such as high sensitivity, fast response, label-free method, high detection resolution and compactness, which could find promising applications in histology and related bioengineering areas.

  8. Quantification of pH gradients and implications in insulator-based dielectrophoresis of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencoglu, Aytug; Camacho-Alanis, Fernanda; Nguyen, Vi Thanh; Nakano, Asuka; Ros, Alexandra; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2011-09-01

    Direct current (DC) insulator-based dielectrophoretic (iDEP) microdevices have the potential to replace traditional alternating current dielectrophoretic devices for many cellular and biomolecular separation applications. The use of large DC fields suggest that electrode reactions and ion transport mechanisms can become important and impact ion distributions in the nanoliters of fluid in iDEP microchannels. This work tracked natural pH gradient formation in a 100 μm wide, 1 cm-long microchannel under applicable iDEP protein manipulation conditions. Using fluorescence microscopy with the pH-sensitive dye FITC Isomer I and the pH-insensitive dye TRITC as a reference, pH was observed to drop drastically in the microchannels within 1 min in a 3000 V/cm electric field; pH drops were observed in the range of 6-10 min within a 100 V/cm electric field and varied based on the buffer conductivity. To address concerns of dye transport impacting intensity data, electrokinetic mobilities of FITC were carefully examined and found to be (i) toward the anode and (ii) 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than H⁺ transport which is responsible for pH drops from the anode toward the cathode. COMSOL simulations of ion transport showed qualitative agreement with experimental results. The results indicate that pH changes are severe enough and rapid enough to influence the net charge of a protein or cause aggregation during iDEP experiments. The results also elucidate reasonable time periods over which the phosphate buffering capacity can counter increases in H⁺ and OH⁻ for unperturbed iDEP manipulations. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in systems modelling interactions occurring in biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Anna [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Czaja, Malgorzata [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, Lech [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-05-15

    By using the potentiometric microtitration method, acidity constants, K{sub a}, anionic, K{sub AHA{sup -}}, and cationic, K{sub BHB{sup +}}, homoconjugation constants, as well as molecular heteroconjugation, K{sub BHA}, constants have been determined in (acid+base) systems formed by the following compounds: acetic acid, phenol, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole. These compounds constitute fragments of the side chains of amino acids capable of proton exchange in active sites of enzymes. The (acid+base) equilibria were studied in five polar solvents of different properties, namely in aprotic protophobic acetonitrile, acetone and propylene carbonate, in aprotic protophilic dimethyl sulfoxide and in amphiprotic methanol. The lowest values of the acidity constants of the molecular and cationic acids have been found in aprotic protophobic polar solvents - acetonitrile, propylene carbonate and acetone. Their acid strength have been found to depend on solvent basicity expressed as donor numbers, DN. These media, in particular acetonitrile and acetone, are also favourable for establishing molecular homo- and heteroconjugation equilibria. The most stable homocomplexes are formed in the case of acetic acid (K{sub AHA{sup -}} values range from 2.26 to 3.56 in these media, being more than an order of magnitude higher than those for the remaining compounds). The magnitudes of lgK{sub BHA} reveal that the most stable heterocomplexes are formed by n-butylamine and acetic acid that are characterized by the smallest differences in pK{sub a} values.

  10. Biomolecules Detection Using a Silver-Enhanced Gold Nanoparticle-Based Biochip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Deng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silver-enhanced labeling method has been employed in immunochromatographic assays for improving the sensitivity of detecting pathogens. In this paper, we apply the silver enhancement technique for biomolecular signal amplification in a gold nanoparticle-based conductimetric biochip. We show that the response of the silver-enhanced biochip comprises two distinct regions namely: (a a sub-threshold region where conduction occurs due to electron hopping between silver islands and the electrolyte and (b an above-threshold region where the conduction is due to a direct flow of electrons. These two regions are characterized by different conduction slopes, and we show that combining the information from both these regions can improve the sensitivity of the biochip. Results from fabricated prototypes show a dynamic range of more than 40 dB and with a detection limit less than 240 pg/mL. The fabrication of the biochip is compatible with standard complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS processes making it ideal for integration in next-generation CMOS biosensors.

  11. Immobilizing Biomolecules Near the Diffraction Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di

    2009-01-01

    be used to print arrays of biomolecules and to immobilize biomolecules according to any specific pattern on a planar substrates with micrometer scale resolution. In this paper we show that we can immobilize proteins according to diffraction patterns of UV light. We also show that the feature size...... of the immobilized patterns can be as small as the diffraction limit for the excitation light, and that the immobilized patterns correspond to the diffraction pattern used to generate it. The flexibility of this new technology will in principle make it possible to create any pattern of biomolecules onto a substrate......, which can be generated by a UV diffraction pattern. Such patterns can have sub-micron feature sizes and could therefore be of great relevance for present and future nanotechnological applications....

  12. Frustration in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and especially how biomolecular structure connects to function by means of localized frustration. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. In this review, we also emphasize that frustration, far from being always a bad thing, is an essential feature

  13. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  14. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Frustration in Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with a finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and how biomolecular structure connects to function. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how a large part of the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. We hope to illustrate how Frustration is a fundamental concept in relating function to structural biology. PMID:25225856

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a pyridine containing Schiff base: Hirshfeld analysis of crystal structure, interaction with biomolecules and cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithiraikumar, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A pyridine containing Schiff base (E)-2-methoxy-6-(((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)imino)methyl) phenol (L) was isolated in single crystals. The molecular structure of L was studied by FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis techniques, single crystal XRD analysis and computationally by DFT method. L prefers enol form in the solid state. Electronic spectrum of L was recorded in different organic solvents to investigate the dependence of tautomerism on solvent types. The polar solvents facilitate the proton transfer by decreasing the activation energy needed for transition state. Potential energy curve for the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state is generated in gas and solution phases. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated. The percentages of various interactions were analyzed by fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surface. The interaction of L with CT DNA was investigated under physiological conditions using UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking methods. Molecular docking studies reveal that binding of L to the groove of B-DNA is through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The in vitro cytotoxicity of L was carried out in two different human tumor cell lines, MCF 7 and MIA-Pa-Ca-2 exhibits moderate activity.

  17. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubala, Vladimir, E-mail: V.Gubala@kent.ac.uk [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, Central Avenue, Anson 120, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O' Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Daniels, Stephen [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David E. [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Ducree, Jens [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign} substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }, and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and

  18. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros CHN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Caio Henrique Nasi de Barros, Guilherme Crispim Faria Cruz, Willian Mayrink, Ljubica Tasic Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Department of Organic Chemistry, Instituto de Química da Universidade Estadual de Campinas–Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil Purpose: Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated, and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods: AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis peel extract (­Or-AgNPs in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac, the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results: Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV stabilization to the nanoparticles

  19. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Henrique Nasi; Cruz, Guilherme Crispim Faria; Mayrink, Willian; Tasic, Ljubica

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis) waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated), and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis) peel extract (Or-AgNPs) in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs) and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges) in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm) and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV) stabilization to the nanoparticles. Both AgNPs presented roughly the same activity against Xac, with the minimum inhibitory concentration range between 22 and 24 μg mL−1. Conclusion Despite the fact that different capping biomolecules on AgNPs had an influence on morphology, size, and stability

  20. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Dill, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann’s law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions

  1. Normal mode analysis based on an elastic network model for biomolecules in the Protein Data Bank, which uses dihedral angles as independent variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a computer program, named PDBETA, that performs normal mode analysis (NMA) based on an elastic network model that uses dihedral angles as independent variables. Taking advantage of the relatively small number of degrees of freedom required to describe a molecular structure in dihedral angle space and a simple potential-energy function independent of atom types, we aimed to develop a program applicable to a full-atom system of any molecule in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The algorithm for NMA used in PDBETA is the same as the computer program FEDER/2, developed previously. Therefore, the main challenge in developing PDBETA was to find a method that can automatically convert PDB data into molecular structure information in dihedral angle space. Here, we illustrate the performance of PDBETA with a protein-DNA complex, a protein-tRNA complex, and some non-protein small molecules, and show that the atomic fluctuations calculated by PDBETA reproduce the temperature factor data of these molecules in the PDB. A comparison was also made with elastic-network-model based NMA in a Cartesian-coordinate system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  3. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  4. Small, microcomputer-based CAMAC controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juras, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    The beam buncher necessary to condition the beam from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory 25 MV tandem accelerator for post-acceleration by the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron is CAMAC-based and will be controlled via one of the serial highways of the accelerator control system. However, prior to integration into the accelerator system, the buncher requires testing, including runs on the model EN tandem at Oak Ridge. In order to facilitate testing and initial operation of the buncher, a microcomputer-based controller was assembled. The controller consists of a CAMAC crate, several CAMAC modules, a touch panel display, a controller box, and software. The controller box contains one shaft encoder and two switches. One of the switches is a coarse/fine selector. The other switch is assignable via the touch panel display and is used, for example, to turn devices on and off. Operation of the controller is described. It can be quickly assembled to control any small CAMAC-based system. 2 figures

  5. Multi-state modeling of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-state modeling of biomolecules refers to a series of techniques used to represent and compute the behavior of biological molecules or complexes that can adopt a large number of possible functional states. Biological signaling systems often rely on complexes of biological macromolecules that can undergo several functionally significant modifications that are mutually compatible. Thus, they can exist in a very large number of functionally different states. Modeling such multi-state systems poses two problems: the problem of how to describe and specify a multi-state system (the "specification problem" and the problem of how to use a computer to simulate the progress of the system over time (the "computation problem". To address the specification problem, modelers have in recent years moved away from explicit specification of all possible states and towards rule-based formalisms that allow for implicit model specification, including the κ-calculus, BioNetGen, the Allosteric Network Compiler, and others. To tackle the computation problem, they have turned to particle-based methods that have in many cases proved more computationally efficient than population-based methods based on ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Given current computing technology, particle-based methods are sometimes the only possible option. Particle-based simulators fall into two further categories: nonspatial simulators, such as StochSim, DYNSTOC, RuleMonkey, and the Network-Free Stochastic Simulator (NFSim, and spatial simulators, including Meredys, SRSim, and MCell. Modelers can thus choose from a variety of tools, the best choice depending on the particular problem. Development of faster and more powerful methods is ongoing, promising the ability to simulate ever more complex signaling processes in the future.

  6. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Thermodynamic stability of biomolecules and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ashim K

    2017-08-01

    The thermodynamic stability of biomolecules in the perspective of evolution is a complex issue and needs discussion. Intra molecular bonds maintain the structure and the state of internal energy (E) of a biomolecule at "local minima". In this communication, possibility of loss in internal energy level of a biomolecule through the changes in the bonds has been discussed, that might earn more thermodynamic stability for the molecule. In the process variations in structure and functions of the molecule could occur. Thus, E of a biomolecule is likely to have energy stature for minimization. Such change in energy status is an intrinsic factor for evolving biomolecules buying more stability and generating variations in the structure and function of DNA molecules undergoing natural selection. Thus, the variations might very well contribute towards the process of evolution. A brief discussion on conserved sequence in the light of proposition in this communication has been made at the end. Extension of the idea may resolve certain standing problems in evolution, such as maintenance of conserved sequences in genome of diverse species, pre- versus post adaptive mutations, 'orthogenesis', etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, A.D.; Archimandritis, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  9. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, Henrik; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Andersen, Henrik J

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2......)-activated immobilized horseradish peroxidase (im-HRP). Subsequently, each of the three different biomolecules was separately added to the BSA radicals, after removal of im-HRP by centrifugation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy showed that all three biomolecules quenched the BSA radicals....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  10. An integrated platform for biomolecule interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Chia-Ming; Tsai, Pei-I.; Chou, Shin-Ting; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new metrology platform which can detect real-time changes in both a phase-interrogation mode and intensity mode of a SPR (surface plasmon resonance). We integrated a SPR and ellipsometer to a biosensor chip platform to create a new biomolecular interaction measurement mechanism. We adopted a conductive ITO (indium-tinoxide) film to the bio-sensor platform chip to expand the dynamic range and improve measurement accuracy. The thickness of the conductive film and the suitable voltage constants were found to enhance performance. A circularly polarized ellipsometry configuration was incorporated into the newly developed platform to measure the label-free interactions of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) with immobilized biomolecule target monoclonal human CRP antibody at various concentrations. CRP was chosen as it is a cardiovascular risk biomarker and is an acute phase reactant as well as a specific prognostic indicator for inflammation. We found that the sensitivity of a phaseinterrogation SPR is predominantly dependent on the optimization of the sample incidence angle. The effect of the ITO layer effective index under DC and AC effects as well as an optimal modulation were experimentally performed and discussed. Our experimental results showed that the modulated dynamic range for phase detection was 10E-2 RIU based on a current effect and 10E-4 RIU based on a potential effect of which a 0.55 (°/RIU) measurement was found by angular-interrogation. The performance of our newly developed metrology platform was characterized to have a higher sensitivity and less dynamic range when compared to a traditional full-field measurement system.

  11. Development of 90Sr/90Y Generator Systems Based on SLM Techniques for Radiolabelling of Therapeutic Biomolecules with 90Y. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thu, N.T.; Van Dong, D.; Van Cuong, B.; Van Khoa, C.; Cam Hoa, V.T.

    2015-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is one of the most useful radionuclides for radioimmunotherapeutic applications, especially for labelling peptides and antibodies. Studies were carried out to develop a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on the SLM technique. Two stages of 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator systems were developed at different activity levels of 5, 20, 50 and 100 mCi and operated with semiautomation in sequential mode. In the first stage of the system, PC88A based SLM was used, which transported 90 Y from a nitric acid medium containing 0.01–4M HNO 3 . In the second stage, the 90 Y from the first stage was transferred to the first compartment of the second stage using carbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM where 1M acetic acid was used as the receiving phase for 90 Y. Quality control was carried out for the products of 90 Y using EPC with paper chromatography and Tec control chromatography. Peptides and antibodies were labelled using the 90 Y product obtained from the generator developed in house. (author)

  12. The minimum amount of "matrix " needed for matrix-assisted pulsed laser deposition of biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabetah, Marshall; Matei, Andreea; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are performed for a model lysozyme-water system, where the water serves the role of volatile "matrix" that drives the ejection of the biomolecules. The simulations reveal a remarkable ability of a small (5-10 wt %) amount of matrix to cause the ejection...

  13. Electrochemistry of single molecules and biomolecules, molecular scale nanostructures, and low-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2018-01-01

    Electrochemistry at ultra-small scales, where even the single molecule or biomolecule can be characterized and manipulated, is on the way to a consolidated status. At the same time molecular electrochemistry is expanding into other areas of sophisticated nano- and molecular scale systems including...

  14. Quantum dots and their interaction with biomolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Stanisavljević, Maja

    2015-01-01

    In this study CdTe QDs were synthetized via microwave irradiation method. Further they have been modified for purposes of their interaction with biomolecules using different conjugation approaches. Applied conjugation chemistries were non-specific interaction, streptavidin-biotin affinity. Glutathione modified CdTe QDs of 2 nm size were capable of non-specific interaction with major groove of DNA, while streptavidin modified CdTe QDs served as specific linker for biotinylated oligonucleotides...

  15. Preparation of 1D nanostructures using biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana; Kacso, Irina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tudoran, Lucian Barbu [Babes-Bolyai University, Electron Microscopy Center, 1 Mihail Kogalniceanu, 400006 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Al-Said, Said A Farha; Hassanien, Reda; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R, E-mail: stela.pruneanu@itim-cj.r [School of Chemistry, Bedson Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we have shown that one-dimensional (1D) particle arrays can be obtained using biomolecules, like DNA or amino-acids. Nano-arrays of silver and gold were prepared in a single-step synthesis, by exploiting the binding abilities of {lambda}-DNA and L-Arginine. The morphology and optical properties of these nanostructures were investigated using AFM, TEM and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy.

  16. U.S. Small Business HUBZone Base Closure Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — HUBZone Qualitified Base Closure Areas - the lands within the boundaries of a military installation that was closed through a privatization process under the Federal...

  17. A new algorithm for construction of coarse-grained sites of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-05

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules remains a challenge in multiscale simulations, including a rigorous definition of CG representations for them. In this work, we proposed a new stepwise optimization imposed with the boundary-constraint (SOBC) algorithm to construct the CG sites of large biomolecules, based on the s cheme of essential dynamics CG. By means of SOBC, we can rigorously derive the CG representations of biomolecules with less computational cost. The SOBC is particularly efficient for the CG definition of large systems with thousands of residues. The resulted CG sites can be parameterized as a CG model using the normal mode analysis based fluctuation matching method. Through normal mode analysis, the obtained modes of CG model can accurately reflect the functionally related slow motions of biomolecules. The SOBC algorithm can be used for the construction of CG sites of large biomolecules such as F-actin and for the study of mechanical properties of biomaterials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Biomolecule Sequencer: Next-Generation DNA Sequencing Technology for In-Flight Environmental Monitoring, Research, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J.; Burton, Aaron; Castro-Wallace, Sarah; John, Kristen; Stahl, Sarah E.; Dworkin, Jason Peter; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    On the International Space Station (ISS), technologies capable of rapid microbial identification and disease diagnostics are not currently available. NASA still relies upon sample return for comprehensive, molecular-based sample characterization. Next-generation DNA sequencing is a powerful approach for identifying microorganisms in air, water, and surfaces onboard spacecraft. The Biomolecule Sequencer payload, manifested to SpaceX-9 and scheduled on the Increment 4748 research plan (June 2016), will assess the functionality of a commercially-available next-generation DNA sequencer in the microgravity environment of ISS. The MinION device from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (Oxford, UK) measures picoamp changes in electrical current dependent on nucleotide sequences of the DNA strand migrating through nanopores in the system. The hardware is exceptionally small (9.5 x 3.2 x 1.6 cm), lightweight (120 grams), and powered only by a USB connection. For the ISS technology demonstration, the Biomolecule Sequencer will be powered by a Microsoft Surface Pro3. Ground-prepared samples containing lambda bacteriophage, Escherichia coli, and mouse genomic DNA, will be launched and stored frozen on the ISS until experiment initiation. Immediately prior to sequencing, a crew member will collect and thaw frozen DNA samples, connect the sequencer to the Surface Pro3, inject thawed samples into a MinION flow cell, and initiate sequencing. At the completion of the sequencing run, data will be downlinked for ground analysis. Identical, synchronous ground controls will be used for data comparisons to determine sequencer functionality, run-time sequence, current dynamics, and overall accuracy. We will present our latest results from the ISS flight experiment the first time DNA has ever been sequenced in space and discuss the many potential applications of the Biomolecule Sequencer for environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, higher fidelity and more adaptable Space Biology Human

  19. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid-liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid-liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics.

  20. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, Henrik; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Andersen, Henrik J

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  1. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  2. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubala, Vladimir; Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O'Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Daniels, Stephen; Williams, David E; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-14

    Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor(®)) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor(®) substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor(®), and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and neutral, hydrogel-like film with polyethylene glycol (PEG) characteristics. This simple analytical approach adds to the fundamental understanding of the interaction forces in real, microfluidic systems. This method provides a straightforward and rapid way to screen surface compositions and chemistry, and relate these to their effects on the sensitivity and resistance to non-specific binding of bioassays using them. In an additional set of experiments, the surface area of the channels in this universal microfluidic chip was increased by precision milling of microscale

  3. Fleet Protection Using a Small UAV Based IR Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buss, James R; Ax, Jr, George R

    2005-01-01

    A study was performed to define candidate electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) sensor configurations and assess their potential utility as small UAV-based sensors surveilling a perimeter around surface fleet assets...

  4. Modification of biomolecules and combined actions by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, J. W.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, J. I.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Ryu, S. H.; Sung, N. Y.; Cha, M. K.; Nam, J. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Cho, E. R.; Ryu, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced Radiation Technology Institute is a government-supported institute for radiation research and application. It has focused on development of fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and on enhancement of biological effectiveness of radiation through theoretical approach to the combined actions of radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through modification of biomolecules resulted in creation of de novo materials of scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for combined action of radiation with another physico-chemical factor has been established. Conclusively the results of this study can provide scientific bases for maximizing the efficacy of ionizing radiation in relation to industrial applications

  5. Modification of Biomolecules and Combined Actions by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Yang, J. S.; Lee, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Basic knowledge necessary for the future R and D plans can be derived from the results of this study. This study has focused on development of fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and on enhancement of biological effectiveness of radiation through theoretical approach to the combined actions of radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through modification of biomolecules will lead to creation of de novo scientific and industrial values. A mathematical model for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor has been established. Prediction and optimization of the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions for it are possible by means of the established model. Conclusively the results of this study can provide scientific bases for enhancing the biological efficacy of ionizing radiation in relation to industrial applications

  6. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  9. Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering using Plant Leaves as Natural Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vipul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of biomolecules is highly important for biomedical and other biological applications. Although several methods exist for the detection of biomolecules, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has a unique role in greatly enhancing the sensitivity. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of natural plant leaves as facile, low cost and eco-friendly SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of biomolecules. Specifically, we have investigated the influence of surface topography of five different plant leaf based substrates, deposited with Au, on the SERS performance by using L-cysteine as a model biomolecule. In addition, we have also compared the effect of sputter deposition of Au thin film with dropcast deposition of Au nanoparticles on the leaf substrates. Our results indicate that L-cysteine could be detected with high sensitivity using these plant leaf based substrates and the leaf possessing hierarchical micro/nanostructures on its surface shows higher SERS enhancement compared to a leaf having a nearplanar surface. Furthermore, leaves with drop-casted Au nanoparticle clusters performed better than the leaves sputter deposited with a thin Au film.

  10. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Vi-En; Choulis, Stelios; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Mathai, Mathew; So, Franky

    2010-03-16

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  11. Assembly and actuation of nanomaterials using active biomolecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Thayer, Gayle Echo; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Liu, Jun; Corwin, Alex David; Gaudioso, Jennifer Marie; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Boal, Andrew Kiskadden; Bachand, George David; Trent, Amanda M.; Bachand, Marlene; Rivera, Susan B.; Koch, Steven John

    2005-11-01

    The formation and functions of living materials and organisms are fundamentally different from those of synthetic materials and devices. Synthetic materials tend to have static structures, and are not capable of adapting to the functional needs of changing environments. In contrast, living systems utilize energy to create, heal, reconfigure, and dismantle materials in a dynamic, non-equilibrium fashion. The overall goal of the project was to organize and reconfigure functional assemblies of nanoparticles using strategies that mimic those found in living systems. Active assembly of nanostructures was studied using active biomolecules to drive the organization and assembly of nanocomposite materials. In this system, kinesin motor proteins and microtubules were used to direct the transport and interactions of nanoparticles at synthetic interfaces. In addition, the kinesin/microtubule transport system was used to actively assemble nanocomposite materials capable of storing significant elastic energy. Novel biophysical measurement tools were also developed for measuring the collective force generated by kinesin motor proteins, which will provide insight on the mechanical constraints of active assembly processes. Responsive reconfiguration of nanostructures was studied in terms of using active biomolecules to mediate the optical properties of quantum dot (QD) arrays through modulation of inter-particle spacing and associated energy transfer interaction. Design rules for kinesin-based transport of a wide range of nanoscale cargo (e.g., nanocrystal quantum dots, micron-sized polymer spheres) were developed. Three-dimensional microtubule organizing centers were assembled in which the polar orientation of the microtubules was controlled by a multi-staged assembly process. Overall, a number of enabling technologies were developed over the course of this project, and will drive the exploitation of energy-driven processes to regulate the assembly, disassembly, and dynamic

  12. In situ biomolecule production by bacteria; a synthetic biology approach to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Bueso, Yensi; Lehouritis, Panos; Tangney, Mark

    2018-04-10

    The ability to modify existing microbiota at different sites presents enormous potential for local or indirect management of various diseases. Because bacteria can be maintained for lengthy periods in various regions of the body, they represent a platform with enormous potential for targeted production of biomolecules, which offer tremendous promise for therapeutic and diagnostic approaches for various diseases. While biological medicines are currently limited in the clinic to patient administration of exogenously produced biomolecules from engineered cells, in situ production of biomolecules presents enormous scope in medicine and beyond. The slow pace and high expense of traditional research approaches has particularly hampered the development of biological medicines. It may be argued that bacterial-based medicine has been "waiting" for the advent of enabling technology. We propose that this technology is Synthetic Biology, and that the wait is over. Synthetic Biology facilitates a systematic approach to programming living entities and/or their products, using an approach to Research and Development (R&D) that facilitates rapid, cheap, accessible, yet sophisticated product development. Full engagement with the Synthetic Biology approach to R&D can unlock the potential for bacteria as medicines for cancer and other indications. In this review, we describe how by employing Synthetic Biology, designer bugs can be used as drugs, drug-production factories or diagnostic devices, using oncology as an exemplar for the concept of in situ biomolecule production in medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  14. Vertical silicon nanowires as a universal platform for delivering biomolecules into living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalek, Alex K.; Robinson, Jacob T.; Karp, Ethan S.; Lee, Jin Seok; Ahn, Dae-Ro; Yoon, Myung-Han; Sutton, Amy; Jorgolli, Marsela; Gertner, Rona S.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; MacBeath, Gavin; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Park, Hongkun

    2010-01-01

    A generalized platform for introducing a diverse range of biomolecules into living cells in high-throughput could transform how complex cellular processes are probed and analyzed. Here, we demonstrate spatially localized, efficient, and universal delivery of biomolecules into immortalized and primary mammalian cells using surface-modified vertical silicon nanowires. The method relies on the ability of the silicon nanowires to penetrate a cell’s membrane and subsequently release surface-bound molecules directly into the cell’s cytosol, thus allowing highly efficient delivery of biomolecules without chemical modification or viral packaging. This modality enables one to assess the phenotypic consequences of introducing a broad range of biological effectors (DNAs, RNAs, peptides, proteins, and small molecules) into almost any cell type. We show that this platform can be used to guide neuronal progenitor growth with small molecules, knock down transcript levels by delivering siRNAs, inhibit apoptosis using peptides, and introduce targeted proteins to specific organelles. We further demonstrate codelivery of siRNAs and proteins on a single substrate in a microarray format, highlighting this technology’s potential as a robust, monolithic platform for high-throughput, miniaturized bioassays. PMID:20080678

  15. 77 FR 39385 - Receipts-Based, Small Business Size Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... Business Size Standard AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is amending the size standard that it uses to.... The NRC is increasing its receipts-based, small business size standard from $6.5 million to $7 million...

  16. Topology Optimization of Metamaterial-Based Electrically Small Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erentok, Aycan; Sigmund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    A topology optimized metamaterial-based electrically small antenna configuration that is independent of a specific spherical and/or cylindrical metamaterial shell design is demonstrated. Topology optimization is shown to provide the optimal value and placement of a given ideal metamaterial in space...

  17. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ian O; Ma, Peter X, E-mail: mapx@umich.ed [Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell-material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. (topical review)

  18. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, Clair; Brittain, Andrew; Zelko, Michael

    1983-03-01

    We report the long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts. These reactions occur in mixtures of water, calcium carbonate, formaldehyde and hydrazine. Our data demonstrate that under several sets of conditions biomolecules can be formed in variety and abundance from reduced compounds (formaldehyde and hydrazine) derived from anoxic dinitrogen/carbon dioxide environments. The formaldehyde concentrations were varied from 10 mM to 0.005 mM, and the hydrazine concentrations were varied from 1 mM to 0.01 mM. The highest of these reactant concentrations were 500 and 6 times greater than those reported for earlier experiments upon the synthesis of these precursors from CO2 or N2, while the lowest of reactant concentrations employed here were 0.5 (formaldehyde) and 0.006 (hydrazine). Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was 1, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydrazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions. Hence these various reactions would seem to have prebiotic relevance. The UV 254 nm photon flux employed was 100 times higher than unattenuated solar flux. Durations of UV exposure were 24 hrs and 72 hrs. No experiments have been addressed to the possibility of UV flux dependency.

  19. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  20. Biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghorbani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation. The application of small scale hydrodynamic cavitation and its integration to a biomedical device prototype is offered as an important alternative to other techniques, such as ultrasound therapy, and thus constitutes a local, cheap, and energy-efficient solution, for urinary stone therapy and abnormal tissue ablation (e.g., benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. The destructive nature of bubbly, cavitating, flows was exploited, and the potential of the prototype was assessed and characterized. Bubbles generated in a small flow restrictive element (micro-orifice based on hydrodynamic cavitation were utilized for this purpose. The small bubbly, cavitating, flow generator (micro-orifice was fitted to a small flexible probe, which was actuated with a micromanipulator using fine control. This probe also houses an imaging device for visualization so that the emerging cavitating flow could be locally targeted to the desired spot. In this study, the feasibility of this alternative treatment method and its integration to a device prototype were successfully accomplished.

  1. Self-organized pattern formation of biomolecules at silicon surfaces: Intended application of a dislocation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittler, M. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)]. E-mail: kittler@ihp-microelectronics.com; Yu, X. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Vyvenko, O.F. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Birkholz, M. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Seifert, W. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Reiche, M. [MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Wilhelm, T. [MPI fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Arguirov, T. [BTU Cottbus, Experimental-Physik II, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Wolff, A. [IPHT, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, W. [IPHT, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Seibt, M. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Defined placement of biomolecules at Si surfaces is a precondition for a successful combination of Si electronics with biological applications. We aim to realize this by Coulomb interaction of biomolecules with dislocations in Si. The dislocations form charged lines and they will be surrounded with a space charge region being connected with an electric field. The electric stray field in a solution of biomolecules, caused by dislocations located close to the Si surface, was estimated to yield values up to few kVcm{sup -1}. A regular dislocation network can be formed by wafer direct bonding at the interface between the bonded wafers in case of misorientation. The adjustment of misorientation allows the variation of the distance between dislocations in a range from 10 nm to a few {mu}m. This is appropriate for nanobiotechnology dealing with protein or DNA molecules with sizes in the nm and lower {mu}m range. Actually, we achieved a distance between the dislocations of 10-20 nm. Also the existence of a distinct electric field formed by the dislocation network was demonstrated by the technique of the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC). Because of the relatively short range of the field, the dislocations have to be placed close to the surface. We positioned the dislocation network in an interface being 200 nm parallel to the Si surface by layer transfer techniques using hydrogen implantation and bonding. Based on EBIC and luminescence data we postulate a barrier of the dislocations at the as bonded interface < 100 meV. We plan to dope the dislocations with metal atoms to increase the electric field. We demonstrated that regular periodic dislocation networks close to the Si surface formed by bonding are realistic candidates for self-organized placing of biomolecules. Experiments are underway to test whether biomolecules decorate the pattern of the dislocation lines.

  2. Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-Based SmallSat Computer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMeres, Brock J.; Crum, Gary A.; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-based SmallSat Computer System (RadSat) computing platform exploits a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) with real-time partial reconfiguration to provide increased performance, power efficiency and radiation tolerance at a fraction of the cost of existing radiation hardened computing solutions. This technology is ideal for small spacecraft that require state-of-the-art on-board processing in harsh radiation environments but where using radiation hardened processors is cost prohibitive.

  3. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than...... the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density...... content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates...

  4. Natural Biomolecules and Protein Aggregation: Emerging Strategies against Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Sgarbossa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular self-assembly is a fundamental process in all organisms. As primary components of the life molecular machinery, proteins have a vast array of resources available to them for self-assembly in a functional structure. Protein self-assembly, however, can also occur in an aberrant way, giving rise to non-native aggregated structures responsible for severe, progressive human diseases that have a serious social impact. Different neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and spongiform encephalopathy diseases, have in common the presence of insoluble protein aggregates, generally termed “amyloid,” that share several physicochemical features: a fibrillar morphology, a predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, birefringence upon staining with the dye Congo red, insolubility in common solvents and detergents, and protease resistance. Conformational constrains, hydrophobic and stacking interactions can play a key role in the fibrillogenesis process and protein–protein and peptide–peptide interactions—resulting in self-assembly phenomena of peptides yielding fibrils—that can be modulated and influenced by natural biomolecules. Small organic molecules, which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties able to bind to peptide/protein molecules through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic and aromatic interactions, are potential candidates against amyloidogenesis. In this review some significant case examples will be critically discussed.

  5. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.asinari@polito.it

    2016-04-29

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid–liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid–liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics. - Highlights: • Properties of the water hydration layer are investigated. • New relation between extension of solid size and hydration layer established. • Possible impact on rational design of nanosuspensions.

  6. {sup 13}C DNP of biomolecules dissolved in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollmann, Bjoern C.; Gruss, Konstantin; Jagschies, Lasse; Spiess, Hans W.; Hinderberger, Dariush; Muennemann, Kerstin [Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, Laura M. [Section of Medical Physics, Mainz University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and related techniques have become indispensable tools with innumerable applications in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. One of the main obstacles in NMR is its notorious lack of sensitivity, which is due to the low equilibrium polarization of nuclear spins at ambient temperature. This disadvantage becomes obvious if low {gamma} nuclei are employed for NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging or when small sample volumes should be investigated. However, this obstacle could be overcome by in vitro hyperpolarization of molecules via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). One major issue of this approach is the limited lifetime of the hyperpolarized state, which restricts the application and detection of the hyperpolarized molecules to roughly three times T{sub 1}. Therefore a lot of effort is put into the hyperpolarization of biomolecules with long spin lattice relaxation times. In this work, we present direct Overhauser-type DNP enhancement of {sup 13}C in solution at ambient temperatures. For a 5 {mu} l sample of 10 M {sup 13}C-enriched urea with 40 mM TEMPOL dissolved in water we measured a {sup 13}C signal enhancement of -335 in a commercial X-band electromagnet.

  7. Radiation physics and chemistry of biomolecules. Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    A chapter of the book ;Radiation chemistry. From basics to application in materials and life sciences (EDP Science, Paris, France, 2008); was devoted to the state-of-the-art in the research on ionizing radiation (IR) effects on biomolecules. An update, eight years later, seemed pertinent enough to the editors of this journal who accepted to dedicate a Special Issue to the latest developments in this area of high interest for cancer radiotherapy, nuclear workers' radioprotection and food radiosterilisation. We sincerely thank them and the authors who accepted to present reviews of their most recent work. Obviously, only a small part of the research in the fascinating domain of molecular radiobiology can be covered here. Some articles are presenting the contribution of biophysical models and computational techniques to the understanding of IR effects on molecules such as DNA and proteins, or on larger systems such as chromatin, chromosomes and even cells (Nikjoo et al., Štěpán & Davídková, Ballarini & Carante, and Nikitaki et al.). In these papers, as well as in many others, several qualities of IR are compared in order to explain the observed differences of effects. The damages induced by the low energy electrons and new techniques involved in their study are discussed in great detail (Sanche and Fromm & Boulanouar). The chemistry behind the IR induced damages (single or clustered), studied in many laboratories around the world is presented in several papers (Cadet & Wagner, Sevilla et al., Chatgilialoglu et al., and Greenberg). One of them addresses a very useful comparison between the effects of IR and UV exposure on DNA (Ravanat & Douki). The majority of the papers in this Special Issue is dealing with DNA and this reflects the real situation: damages of DNA are more studied than those of other biomolecules. This is due to the role of DNA as main support of hereditary information. Nevertheless, more and more studies are outlining the influence of epigenetic

  8. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density centrifugation. Amino acids, amino sugars, muramic acid, and intact polar lipids were analyzed in both whole sediment and cell extract, and cell separation was optimized and evaluated in terms of purity, separation efficiency, taxonomic resemblance, and compatibility to high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for biomolecule analyses. Because cell extracts from density centrifugation still contained considerable amounts of detrital particles and non-cellular biomolecules, we further purified cells from two samples by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Cells from these highly purified cell extracts had an average content of amino acids and lipids of 23-28 fg cell-1 and 2.3 fg cell-1, respectively, with an estimated carbon content of 19-24 fg cell-1. In the sediment, the amount of biomolecules associated with vegetative cells was up to 70-fold lower than the total biomolecule content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates of microbial biomass.

  9. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  10. Guidelines to develop interactive tutorials on 3D biomolecules: the case of DNA repair by photolyase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Assis Barony Valadares Fonseca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This work presents the following guidelines for developing interactive learning objects on the 3D biomolecules: i- identify a relevant educational need; ii-select an appropriate subject; iii- employ interactive 3D molecular structures; iv- simultaneously display animation with related textual information or 2D diagrams; v- integrating different modes of representation of chemical phenomena. Based on these, was constructed the "Photolyase Tutorial". Photolyase is an enzyme that repairs DNA. It recognizes the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion (CPD caused by exposure to ultraviolet light. Understanding the repair mechanism requires understanding the structure-activity relationships of the molecules involved. Therefore, this topic is a convenient subject for teaching key aspects of the structure of protein and nucleic acids. There are few interactive 3D DNA repair tutorials available and most of these are in english, therefore not acessible for students that do not domain this language. Besides, these tutorials generally focus only on displaying structural features without make foster correlations between the structure and chemical aspects of repair mechanisms. OBJECTIVES: In order to construct a interactive tutorial that fills these gaps, the 3D structures of a DNA molecule, a DNA with CPD lesion and the photolyase enzyme were manipulated focusing on structural and chemical explanation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: These structures were obtained from PDB (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/home/home.do and manipulated to show biochemical and chemical concepts by using the resources from the LABIQ Platform (http://labiq.is.usp.br. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Several concepts are covered, i.e., H-bonding, active site, co-factors etc. The tutorial is organized in small conceptual blocks presenting, in a stepwise fashion, how the enzyme recognizes the DNA lesion and proceeds to repair. Each block comprises a trigger button that controls the interactive

  11. Watching Conformations of Biomolecules: a Microwave Spectroscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    The combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets (LA-MB-FTMW) has made possible the gas-phase study of solid biomolecules with high melting points. In the experiment, solids are efficiently vaporized by a high-energy laser pulse, supersonically expanded into a evacuated Fabry-Perot cavity and characterised by their rotational spectra. Recent improvements such as the use of picosecond pulse lasers, new ablation nozzles and the extension of the range of the spectrometers to low frequecy have notably increased the sensitivity of our experimental setup. To date different α-, β- and γ-amino acids have been studied using this technique, making possible the characterization of their preferred conformations and gaining insight in the role of intramolecular interactions. Even in conformationally challenging systems the different rotamers of such biomolecules can be identified by rotational spectroscopy as can be illustrated by the assignment of six low-energy conformers in cysteine and aspartic acid, seven in serine and threonine,^a and nine in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). In all cases the low-energy conformers have been conclusive identified from their experimental rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants. The spectra of neurotransmitters and of the nucleic acid bases uracil, thymine, cytosine and guanine have also been studied and their preferred conformers or tautomeric forms determined. The complexes between amino acids and nucleic acid bases with water have also been investigated to obtain information on the possible changes induced in the conformational or tautomeric preferences by the addition of solvent molecules. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 617-627 (2009) and references therein M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 3573-3578 (2010) S. Blanco, J. C. López, S. Mata and J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9187

  12. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  13. Infrared small target enhancement based on variance difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Mahdi; Chehresa, Saeed

    2017-05-01

    In surveillance and early warning systems, the enhancement of targets is a very important stage for the high reliability detection and tracking in Infrared images with complex backgrounds. In order to enhance small targets in an Infrared image and suppress the background clutter, consequently increasing the contrast between them, this paper proposes a method using a model for the target area with a three-layer patch-image model and based on the difference between the variance of the layers in the neighboring areas of the investigated pixel. Results of the experiments indicate that the proposed method is quite effective on the enhancement of small targets as well as suppression of the background clutter in IR images with a minimum false alarm rate. This is realized while the runtime of the proposed method is minimal compared to other commonly used methods, which makes it effective to be used in real time applications.

  14. Innovation Environment in Small Technology-Based Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Gonçalves Silveira Fiates

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Innovation has been identified as a strategy to achieve competitive advantage, particularly in contexts of change and especially for technology-based companies – TBCs. Although the adoption of innovation strategies is not easy, small companies have an organizational environment more conducive to innovation. This article examines how managers and employees of small TBCs perceive aspects of the internal environment of innovation in the organization (culture, organizational structure, personnel and infrastructure and their suitability for the innovation process. This is a qualitative research from a multicase study on five companies located in an incubator. Data were collected through open interviews, using a semi-structured script, with one of the managers and two employees from each company. Data were analyzed from preliminary content analysis. The results showed some discrepancies between the perceptions of managers and employees about the issues investigated and their suitability for the innovation system, as well as between reality and the theoretical basis used.

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma sterilization: from bacteria to biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Although ionized gases have been known to have biological effects for more than 100 years, their impact on the practice in healthcare service became very significant only recently. Today, plasma-based surgical tools are used for tissue reduction and blood coagulation as surgical procedures. Most significant however is the speed at which low-temperature gas plasmas are finding new applications in medicine and biology, including plasma sterilization, wound healing, and cancer therapies just to name a few. In the terminology of biotechnology, the ``pipeline'' is long and exciting. This presentation reviews the current status of the field with a particular emphasis on plasma inactivation of microorganisms and biomolecules, for which comprehensive scientific evidence has been obtained. Some of the early speculations of biocidal plasma species are now being confirmed through a combination of optical emission spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence, mass spectrometry, fluid simulation and biological sensing with mutated bacteria. Similarly, fundamental studies are being performed to examine cell components targeted by gas plasmas, from membrane, through lipid and membrane proteins, to DNA. Scientific challenge is significant, as the usual complexity of plasma dynamics and plasma chemistry is compounded by the added complication that cells are live and constantly evolving. Nevertheless, the current understanding of plasma inactivation currently provides strong momentum for plasma decontamination technologies to be realized in healthcare. We will discuss the issue of protein and tissue contaminations of surgical instruments and how cold atmospheric plasmas may be used to degrade and reduce their surface load. In the context of plasma interaction with biomolecules, we will consider recent data of plasma degradation of adhesion proteins of melanoma cells. These adhesion proteins are important for cancer cell migration and spread. If low-temperature plasmas could be used to

  16. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ileri, N; Tringe, J; Letant, S; Palozoglu, A; Stroeve, P; Faller, R

    2008-06-13

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  17. Synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for small arid communities

    KAUST Repository

    Elnakar, H.

    2012-06-04

    A model was developed to predict synthetic socioeconomic based domestic wastewater hydrographs for the small arid communities. The model predicts the flow hydrograph for random weekdays and weekends based on the specific socioeconomic characteristics of the community. The main socioeconomic characteristics are the composition of the community, the different user behaviours in using water appliances, and the unit discharges of such appliances. Use patterns of water appliances are assumed to vary for the various members of the community and the type of day. Each community is composed of several social categories such as the employee, working woman, stay home woman, stay home child, students etc. The use patterns account for the stochastic nature of use in terms of number of uses, duration of the use and times of use in the day. Randomly generated hydrographs are generated for weekdays and weekends along with synthetic hydrographs of non-exceedance. The model was verified for a small residential compound in Sharm El Shiekh - Egypt using 11 days of flow measurements performed in summer. The synthetic hydrographs based on assumed water use patterns of the various members of the community compared reasonably with the measured hydrographs. Synthetic hydrographs can be derived for a community under consideration to reflect its socioeconomic conditions and thus can be used to generate probability based peaking factors to be used in the design of sewerage systems pumping facilities, and treatment plants. © 201 WIT Press.

  18. Automated Detection of Small Bodies by Space Based Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidstrup, P. R.; Grillmayer, G.; Andersen, A. C.; Haack, H.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    The number of known comets and asteroids is increasing every year. Up till now this number is including approximately 250,000 of the largest minor planets, as they are usually referred. These discoveries are due to the Earth-based observation which has intensified over the previous decades. Additionally larger telescopes and arrays of telescopes are being used for exploring our Solar System. It is believed that all near- Earth and Main-Belt asteroids of diameters above 10 to 30 km have been discovered, leaving these groups of objects as observationally complete. However, the cataloguing of smaller bodies is incomplete as only a very small fraction of the expected number has been discovered. It is estimated that approximately 1010 main belt asteroids in the size range 1 m to 1 km are too faint to be observed using Earth-based telescopes. In order to observe these small bodies, space-based search must be initiated to remove atmospheric disturbances and to minimize the distance to the asteroids and thereby minimising the requirement for long camera integration times. A new method of space-based detection of moving non-stellar objects is currently being developed utilising the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) built for spacecraft attitude determination by Ørsted, Danish Technical University. The ASC serves as a backbone technology in the project as it is capable of fully automated distinction of known and unknown celestial objects. By only processing objects of particular interest, i.e. moving objects, it will be possible to discover small bodies with a minimum of ground control, with the ultimate ambition of a fully automated space search probe. Currently, the ASC is being mounted on the Flying Laptop satellite of the Institute of Space Systems, Universität Stuttgart. It will, after a launch into a low Earth polar orbit in 2008, test the detection method with the ASC equipment that already had significant in-flight experience. A future use of the ASC based automated

  19. Controlling plasmon coupling in biomolecule-linked metal nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba, David S.

    Molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in biomolecule-linked nanoparticle assemblies in two-particle, small cluster, and extended network formats. The relationship between structure and optical properties is explored through comparison of measured spectra with simulated spectra calculated using structural models based upon measured structural parameters. A variety of techniques are used to characterize nanoparticle assemblies, including ensemble extinction and elastic scattering spectroscopy, single-assembly scattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Initially, molecular control of plasmon coupling is investigated in ˜100 nm assemblies composed of 13 nm gold "satellite" particles tethered by duplex DNA to a 50 nm gold "core" particle. Comparison of core-satellite assemblies formed with duplex DNA tethers of varying length demonstrates that, while core-satellite separation is controlled by the number of base pairs in the DNA tether, structural properties such as core:satellite ratio and yield are independent of DNA tether length. Thus, plasmon coupling within these assemblies is determined by the number of base pairs in the duplex DNA tether; compact assemblies in which tethers are composed of fewer base pairs exhibit plasmon bands that are red-shifted relative to the bands of extended assemblies, indicating increased plasmon coupling in the compact assemblies. Subsequently, core-satellite assemblies are formed with reconfigurable DNA nanostructure tethers that modulate interparticle separation in response to a molecular stimulus. Assembly reconfiguration from a compact to an extended state results in blue-shifting of the assembly plasmon resonance, indicating reduced interparticle coupling and lengthening of the core-satellite tether. Comparison between measured and simulated spectra revealed a close correspondence and provided validation of the structural models that link assembly plasmonic properties

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  1. Entirely renewable energy-based electricity supply system (small scale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahedi, A. [Monash Univ., Caulfield (Australia). Div. of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a system comprising of a renewable source of energy and an energy storage device to smooth the power fluctuations. In order to investigate the performance of the system, an exact mathematical model for the system has been developed. Because of non-linearity of the mathematical model a computational method is used for performance investigation of the system. The objective of the paper is to present an entirely renewable energy based electricity supply system (small scale), to suggest the mathematical model of the system and computational method to analyze the performance of the system.

  2. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy. Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, Alexandra D.; Archimandritis, Spyridon C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  3. Studies of metal-biomolecule systems in liquids with beta-detected NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Michal

    2017-01-01

    My internship took place within a small research team funded via the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant: Beta-Drop NMR) at ISOLDE. It was devoted to laser spin-polarization and beta-detected NMR techniques and their future applications in chemistry and biology. I was involved in the design and tests of the beta-NMR spectrometer which will be used in the upcoming experiments. In this way I have been exposed to many topics in physics (atomic and nuclear physics), experimental techniques (vacuum technology, lasers, beta detectors, electronics, DAQ software), as well as chemistry and biology (NMR on metal ions, metal ion binding to biomolecules, quantum chemistry calculations).

  4. Small Area Model-Based Estimators Using Big Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The timely, accurate monitoring of social indicators, such as poverty or inequality, on a finegrained spatial and temporal scale is a crucial tool for understanding social phenomena and policymaking, but poses a great challenge to official statistics. This article argues that an interdisciplinary approach, combining the body of statistical research in small area estimation with the body of research in social data mining based on Big Data, can provide novel means to tackle this problem successfully. Big Data derived from the digital crumbs that humans leave behind in their daily activities are in fact providing ever more accurate proxies of social life. Social data mining from these data, coupled with advanced model-based techniques for fine-grained estimates, have the potential to provide a novel microscope through which to view and understand social complexity. This article suggests three ways to use Big Data together with small area estimation techniques, and shows how Big Data has the potential to mirror aspects of well-being and other socioeconomic phenomena.

  5. NASA Operational Simulator for Small Satellites: Tools for Software Based Validation and Verification of Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Operational Simulator for Small Satellites (NOS3) is a suite of tools to aid in areas such as software development, integration test (IT), mission operations training, verification and validation (VV), and software systems check-out. NOS3 provides a software development environment, a multi-target build system, an operator interface-ground station, dynamics and environment simulations, and software-based hardware models. NOS3 enables the development of flight software (FSW) early in the project life cycle, when access to hardware is typically not available. For small satellites there are extensive lead times on many of the commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as limited funding for engineering test units (ETU). Considering the difficulty of providing a hardware test-bed to each developer tester, hardware models are modeled based upon characteristic data or manufacturers data sheets for each individual component. The fidelity of each hardware models is such that FSW executes unaware that physical hardware is not present. This allows binaries to be compiled for both the simulation environment, and the flight computer, without changing the FSW source code. For hardware models that provide data dependent on the environment, such as a GPS receiver or magnetometer, an open-source tool from NASA GSFC (42 Spacecraft Simulation) is used to provide the necessary data. The underlying infrastructure used to transfer messages between FSW and the hardware models can also be used to monitor, intercept, and inject messages, which has proven to be beneficial for VV of larger missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). As hardware is procured, drivers can be added to the environment to enable hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing. When strict time synchronization is not vital, any number of combinations of hardware components and software-based models can be tested. The open-source operator interface used in NOS3 is COSMOS from Ball Aerospace. For

  6. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations of the adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wu; Li, Xin; Bian, Wen-Wen; Fan, Xiu-Juan; Qi, Jing-Yao

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing attention in the unique biological and medical properties of graphene, and it is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. Despite the importance of biomolecules-graphene interactions, a detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanism and features of biomolecules onto the surfaces of graphene is lacking. To address this, we have performed density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods exploring the adsorption geometries, adsorption energies, electronic band structures, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption dynamics of l-leucine (model biomolecule)/graphene composite system. DFT calculations confirmed the energetic stability of adsorption model and revealed that electronic structure of graphene can be controlled by the adsorption direction of l-leucine. MD simulations further investigate the potential energy and van der Waals energy for the interaction processes of l-leucine/graphene system at different temperatures and pressures. We find that the van der Waals interaction between the l-leucine and the graphene play a dominant role in the adsorption process under a certain range of temperature and pressure, and the l-leucine molecule could be adsorbed onto graphene spontaneously in aqueous solution.

  7. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur; Ray, Aniruddha; Gorocs, Zoltan; Xiong, Matthew; Malik, Ravinder; Bitan, Gal; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  8. Computational On-Chip Imaging of Nanoparticles and Biomolecules using Ultraviolet Light

    KAUST Repository

    Daloglu, Mustafa Ugur

    2017-03-09

    Significant progress in characterization of nanoparticles and biomolecules was enabled by the development of advanced imaging equipment with extreme spatial-resolution and sensitivity. To perform some of these analyses outside of well-resourced laboratories, it is necessary to create robust and cost-effective alternatives to existing high-end laboratory-bound imaging and sensing equipment. Towards this aim, we have designed a holographic on-chip microscope operating at an ultraviolet illumination wavelength (UV) of 266 nm. The increased forward scattering from nanoscale objects at this short wavelength has enabled us to detect individual sub-30 nm nanoparticles over a large field-of-view of >16 mm2 using an on-chip imaging platform, where the sample is placed at ≤0.5 mm away from the active area of an opto-electronic sensor-array, without any lenses in between. The strong absorption of this UV wavelength by biomolecules including nucleic acids and proteins has further enabled high-contrast imaging of nanoscopic aggregates of biomolecules, e.g., of enzyme Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, abnormal aggregation of which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - a fatal neurodegenerative disease. This UV-based wide-field computational imaging platform could be valuable for numerous applications in biomedical sciences and environmental monitoring, including disease diagnostics, viral load measurements as well as air- and water-quality assessment.

  9. Raman Microscopy: A Noninvasive Method to Visualize the Localizations of Biomolecules in the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Akiyama, Toshihiro; Segawa, Hiroki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    In vivo and in situ visualization of biomolecules without pretreatment will be important for diagnosis and treatment of ocular disorders in the future. Recently, multiphoton microscopy, based on the nonlinear interactions between molecules and photons, has been applied to reveal the localizations of various molecules in tissues. We aimed to use multimodal multiphoton microscopy to visualize the localizations of specific biomolecules in rat corneas. Multiphoton images of the corneas were obtained from nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, third-order sum frequency generation, and second-harmonic generation. The localizations of the adhesion complex-containing basement membrane and Bowman layer were clearly visible in the third-order sum frequency generation images. The fine structure of type I collagen was observed in the corneal stroma in the second-harmonic generation images. The localizations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) was obtained in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images. Imaging technologies have progressed significantly and been applied in medical fields. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy are widely used but do not provide information on the molecular structure of the cornea. By contrast, multiphoton microscopy provides information on the molecular structure of living tissues. Using this technique, we successfully visualized the localizations of various biomolecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in the cornea. We speculate that multiphoton microscopy will provide essential information on the physiological and pathological conditions of the cornea, as well as molecular localizations in tissues without pretreatment.

  10. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  11. Aequorin as a bioluminescent indicator for use in the determination of biomolecules in single cells. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sylvia Daunert

    2000-02-17

    During this funding period, the laboratories of Drs. Anderson and Daunert have performed a considerable amount of work toward addressing the issues associated with small volume analysis necessary for single cell studies. In that respect, their research has been focused on (1) developing new assays that can be miniaturized and are suitable for small volume and single cell analysis; (2) fabricating pL-vials that simulate the volume of single cells and setting up instrumentation capable of low-volume detection; (3) developing reproducible and reliable microinjection techniques; (4) developing methods of analysis for biomolecules in the pL-vials and employing these assays in the detection of biomolecules in single cells. The accomplishments attained in all these areas are described below. A total of 24 publications and 35 presentations have resulted from this work.

  12. Tetrahydroquinoxaline Based Small Molecule: PCBM Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S. S.; Sharma, G. D.; Subodh,; Sharma, Sarla; Vijay, Y. K.

    2011-01-01

    We have fabricated solution processed bulk heterojuction (BHJ) solar cell from small molecule (SM) as donor blended with PCBM as an acceptor. The BHJ showed power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 2.80%. The PCE has been further improved up to 3.80 % after thermal annealing of the SM: PCBM layer. The higher PCE of the photovoltaic devices based on the thermal annealed SM: PCBM blend as compared to SM: PCBM blend is attributed to the increase in the crystalline nature of the blend and hole mobility. The thermal annealing allows not only a broad absorption but also tuning of the inter energy level leading to a higher short circuit current (Jsc) and open circuit voltage (Voc).

  13. A Collective Detection Based GPS Receiver for Small Satellites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To solve the problem of autonomous navigation on small satellite platforms less than 20 kg, we propose to develop an onboard orbit determination receiver for small...

  14. Recovery of Biomolecules from Food Wastes — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Baiano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial, the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  15. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Nanorods of one-dimensional (1D) trigonal selenium (t-Se) are synthesized using biomolecule substances for five different aging times (1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 1 day and 4 days) by precipitation method. XRD analysis indicates a shift of the (1 0 1) plane towards higher diffraction angle for 1 day aging time. It is observed that ...

  16. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xinlin Yang,1 Ali Ebrahimi,1 Jie Li,1,2 Quanjun Cui11Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2School of Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.Keywords: fullerene, amino acid, peptide, oligonucleotide, sugar, ester

  17. Practice-based small group learning in GP specialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselgreaves, Hannah; MacVicar, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Practice-based small group learning (PBSGL) is an approach to continuing professional development (CPD) for general practitioners (GPs) that originated in Canada. It involves small groups of GPs who work through clinical modules. PBSGL is now an established method of learning in Scotland, found to be effective in GP, practice nurse and multi-professional cohorts. However, the effectiveness of PBSGL has not been examined in GP specialty training, where it is becoming widely employed. This research aimed to explore GP Specialty Trainees' (GPSTs') perspectives of the impact of PBSGL on curriculum needs, preparation for independent practice, and facilitator learning. To avoid the risk of extrapolating assumptions from others who have used PBSGL as a learning strategy, this study adopted a qualitative approach, and conducted one-to-one interviews with 16 GPSTs from a range of Scottish deaneries and stages in training. Data took the form of verbatim transcripts, and the constant comparative technique from grounded theory was used to analyse the data, through the establishment of codes and categories. Findings were arranged in four main areas: • learning as a group was appreciated at this career stage, and group membership should consist of trainees at a similar career stage, as this supports psychological safety • PBSGL helped in locating a 'one best way' for future care planning, but was also used to find alternatives to trainees' current approaches • discussion during PBSGL helped GPSTs devise plans for how they would handle patients in the future • some facilitators moderated their involvement for the perceived benefit of the group. Learning is experienced in a very unique way for GPSTs, and the views of the cohort are formed on the basis of the delicate stage in their career. Aiding the transition from structured education into independent practice is a more immediate need for GPSTs than curriculum needs.

  18. High sensitivity surface plasmon resonance biosensor for detection of microRNA and small molecule based on graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Qing; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Zhang, Hua; Nie, Wenyan

    2017-11-01

    A versatile and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on two layers of graphene oxide-gold nanoparticles (GO-AuNPs) composites was designed for the detection of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecule adenosine. The bottom layer, which acted as a functionalized substrate on the sensor chip, provided a high specific surface area convenient for the immobilization of capture DNA molecules. The upper layer served as a signal-amplification element. By employing these two layers of GO-AuNPs composites, the dual amplification strategy was achieved so that a measurement of miRNA-141 with a detection limit of 0.1fM was obtained. Moreover, the developed SPR biosensor showed decent selectivity toward miRNA-200 family members. Especially, the SPR biosensor demonstrated its applicability for the detection of miRNA-141 in cancer cell extractions, and the results obtained were consistent with those obtained by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, small molecule adenosine could also be detected using this SPR biosensor in combination with a split aptamer. Considering the superior sensitivity, selectivity and generality, this work promised much potential for the detection of various biomolecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Small Nuclear Co-generation Plants Based on Shipbuilding Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyukov, V. I.; Veshnyakov, K. B.; Goryunov, E. V.; Zalugin, V. I.; Panov, Yu. K.; Polunichev, V. I.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nuclear cogeneration plants and power desalination complexes of relatively small power, using proven shipbuilding technology, becomes more and more attractive for solving the power supply problems of remote districts of the Extreme North and the Far East with small and medium power grids and for removing the shortage of fresh water in different world regions. The idea of transportation of the power unit with high degree of readiness to the place of its location with minimum construction and mounting activities at the site is very attractive. Compactness typical of RP based on shipbuilding technology allows to develop floating or ground-based plants at minimum use of water area and territory. Small construction scope at the site under conditions of minimum anthropogenic loads and high ecological indices are important arguments in favor of floating nuclear cogeneration plant based on ship power units against the alternative fossil sources. At present, the activities on floating nuclear cogeneration plant design, which is developed on the basis of floating power unit with two KLT-40S reactor plant, which is a modified option of standard KLT-40-type ship plant for icebreaker fleet in Russia are the most advanced. To date, a detailed design of reactor plant has been developed and approved, design activities on floating power unit are in the stage of completion, the site for its location has been selected and licensing by GAN, Russia, is in progress. Besides OKBM has developed some designs of nuclear cogeneration plants of different power on the basis of integral reactor plants, using the experience of transport and stationary power plants designing. Nuclear cogeneration plant investment analysis showed acceptable social and economical efficiency of the design that creates conditions for commercial construction of floating power units with KLT-40S reactor plan. At the same time the reduction of the design recovering terms, increase of budget income and

  20. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  1. FM-CW Based Miniature SAR System for Small UAVs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Wit, J.J.M. de; Meta, A.; Figueras, J.

    2005-01-01

    In some earth observation applications there is a requirement for low cost, high performance imaging radar systems small enough to be operated from small, even unmanned, aircraft. The existing pulse radars are non-cost effective complex systems. Therefore they are not suited for these applications.

  2. Physical Analysis of the Biomolecules Causing Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jehun; Lee, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Chai Rin

    Periodontitis caused by microorganisms that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, is an inflammatory diseases causing gum infection. The disease damages the soft tissues that surround and support the teeth and destroys the bone that supports teeth and finally causes tooth loss. An increased risk of stroke and heart attack problems are related to the periodontitis as well. Most bacteria or pathogens attach to gum surface where they form a biofilm. Bacterial cells in biofilms are well protected against antibiotics. The mechanisms of action are still unknown, and it is difficult to control pathogens with antibiotics in biofilm infections and thus the study on the antibiotics is needed. In this research, a number of natural water soluble, small-sized antibiotics molecules and their derivatives are studied. Molecular editing programs such as Gamess, Chemcraft and Avogadro, with an auto-optimization feature that determines the theoretical values of the structure's atomic properties are used to build virtually any molecule with the optimized geometry according to various force field options. The UFF (Universal Force Field) is used for optimizing most molecules.

  3. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL | ARTICLE integral part of NMR-based structural biology research. A num- ber of computational tools are being developed which utilize such information from BMRB and PDB at various stages of the structure determination process. 2. An Overview of the Structure Determination Process. A flowchart of the different ...

  4. Pt/Ceria-based Catalysts for Small Alcohol Electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Mora, Christian L.

    High emissions of fossil-based energy sources have led to scientists around the world to develop new alternatives for the future. In this sense, fuel cells are a remarkable and promising energy option with less environmental impact. The most used fuels for this technology are hydrogen and small chain alcohols, which can be oxidized to transform their chemical energy into electrical power. To do this, fuel cells need catalysts that will act as an active surface where the oxidation can take place. The problem with platinum catalysts is its possible CO poisoning with intermediates that are produced before the complete oxidation of alcohol to CO2. Different approaches have been taken to try to resolve this issue. In this case, cerium oxide (ceria) was selected as a co-catalyst to mitigate the effect of CO poisoning of platinum. Ceria is a compound that has the ability to work as an "oxygen tank" and can donate oxygen to carbon monoxide that is strongly adsorbed at platinum surface to produce CO2 (carbon dioxide), regenerating the Pt surface for further alcohol oxidation. Therefore, enhancing the current density as well as the power output of a fuel cell. First, an occlusion deposition technique was used to prepare platinum/ceria composite electrodes and tested them towards small chain alcohol oxidation such as methanol oxidation reaction in acidic and alkaline media. The preliminary results demonstrated that the Pt/ceria electrodes were more efficient towards methanol electrooxidation when compared to Pt electrodes. This enhancement was attributed to the presence of ceria. A second preparation method was selected for the synthesis of ceria/Pt catalysts. In this case, a hydrothermal method was used and the catalysis were studied for the effect of MeOH, EtOH and n-BuOH oxidation. The observed effect was that electrodes made of Pt/Pt:CeO2-x showed better catalytic effect than Pt/ceria and platinum electrodes. Moreover, a comparison between ceria nanorods versus

  5. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  6. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  7. Mass spectrometry in structural biology and biophysics architecture, dynamics, and interaction of biomolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltashov, Igor A; Desiderio, Dominic M; Nibbering, Nico M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive guide to mass spectrometry techniques in biology and biophysics The use of mass spectrometry (MS) to study the architecture and dynamics of proteins is increasingly common within the biophysical community, and Mass Spectrometry in Structural Biology and Biophysics: Architecture, Dynamics, and Interaction of Biomolecules, Second Edition provides readers with detailed, systematic coverage of the current state of the art. Offering an unrivalled overview of modern MS-based armamentarium that can be used to solve the most challenging problems in biophysics, structural biol

  8. Models and algorithms for biomolecules and molecular networks

    CERN Document Server

    DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    By providing expositions to modeling principles, theories, computational solutions, and open problems, this reference presents a full scope on relevant biological phenomena, modeling frameworks, technical challenges, and algorithms. * Up-to-date developments of structures of biomolecules, systems biology, advanced models, and algorithms * Sampling techniques for estimating evolutionary rates and generating molecular structures * Accurate computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks, solving discrete chemical master equations * End-of-chapter exercises

  9. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule against Trichomonas gallinae

    OpenAIRE

    Tavassoli, M; Imani, A; Tajik, H; Moradi, M; Pourseyed, SH

    2012-01-01

    Background: Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae.Methods: The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations incl...

  10. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hölzel Ralph

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that

  11. Transport phenomena of polar biomolecules and colloids : perspectives through simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Terämä, Emma

    2007-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the transport of polar biomolecules and colloid particles studied through atomistic and coarse-grained simulation techniques. The thesis is comprised of two themes complementing one another. First we concentrate on the structural and dynamical aspects of alcohol molecules in lipid bilayers with varying degree of unsaturation. Second, the thesis employs dielectrophoresis to elucidate the non-equilibrium transport phenomena of nano-sized colloidal particles. The former is ...

  12. [INVITED] Surface plasmon cavities on optical fiber end-facets for biomolecule and ultrasound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; He, Xiaolong; Zhou, Xin; Lei, Zeyu; Wang, Yalin; Yang, Jie; Cai, De; Chen, Sung-Liang; Wang, Xueding

    2018-05-01

    Integrating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices upon single-mode fiber (SMF) end facets renders label-free sensing systems that have a simple dip-and-read configuration, a small form factor, high compatibility with fiber-optic techniques, and invasive testing capability. Such devices are not only low cost replacement of current equipments in centralized laboratories, but also highly desirable for opening paths to new applications of label-free optical sensing technologies, such as point-of-care immunological tests and intravascular ultrasound imaging. In this paper, we explain the requirements and challenges for such devices from the perspectives of biomolecule and ultrasound detection applications. In such a context, we review our recent work on SMF end-facet SPR cavities. This include a glue-and-strip fabrication method to transfer a nano-patterned thin gold film to the SMF end-facet with high yield, high quality and high alignment precision, the designs of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and distributed feedback (DFB) SPR cavities that couple efficiently with the SMF guided mode and reach quality factors of over 100, and the preliminary results for biomolecule interaction sensing and ultrasound detection. The particular advantages and potential values of these devices have been discussed, in terms of sensitivity, data reliability, reproducibility, bandwidth, etc.

  13. Small accelerator-based pulsed cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, Richard C.

    1997-09-01

    Small neutron sources could be used by individual researchers with the convenience of an adequate local facility. Although these sources would produce lower fluxes than the national facilities, for selected applications, the convenience and availability may overcome the limitations on source strength. Such sources might also be useful for preliminary testing of ideas before going to a larger facility. Recent developments in small, high-current pulsed accelerators makes possible such a local source for pulsed cold neutrons.

  14. Functionalization of titanium dioxide nanotubes with biomolecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Weslley F; Arruda, Isabel R S; Silva, Germana M M; Machado, Giovanna; Coelho, Luana C B B; Correia, Maria T S

    2017-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are extensively used in the manufacture of implants because they have biocompatibility. The production of a nanostructured surface can be achieved by means of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) which can have dimensions equivalent to the nanometric components of human bone, in addition to increasing the efficiency of such implants. The search is ongoing for ways to improve the performance of these TNTs in terms of their functionalization through coating these nanotubular matrices with biomolecules. The biocompatibility of the functionalized TNTs can be improved by promoting rapid osseointegration, by preventing the adhesion of bacteria on such surfaces and/or by promoting a more sustained local release of drugs that are loaded into such TNTs. In addition to the implants, these nanotubular matrices have been used in the manufacture of high-performance biosensors capable of immobilizing principally enzymes on their surfaces, which has possible use in disease diagnosis. The objective of this review is to show the main techniques of immobilization of biomolecules in TNTs, evidencing the most recent applications of bioactive molecules that have been functionalized in the nanotubular matrices for use in implants and biosensors. This surveillance also proposes a new class of biomolecules that can be used to functionalize these nanostructured surfaces, lectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  16. Structure, dynamics, and function of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.; Berendzen, J.R.; Garcia, A.; Gupta, G.; Olah, G.A.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Trewhella, J.; Wood, C.C.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors enhanced Los Alamos' core competency in Bioscience and Biotechnology by building on present strengths in experimental techniques, theory, high-performance computing, modeling, and simulation applied to biomolecular structure, dynamics, and function. Specifically, the authors strengthened their capabilities in neutron/x-ray scattering, x-ray crystallography, NMR, laser, and optical spectroscopies. Initially they focused on supporting the Los alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the design and implementation of new neutron scattering instrumentation, they developed new methods for analysis of scattering data, and they developed new projects to study the structures of biomolecular complexes. The authors have also worked to strengthen interactions between theory and experiment, and between the biological and physical sciences. They sponsored regular meetings of members from all interested LANL technical divisions, and supported two lecture series: ''Biology for Physicists'' and ''Issues in Modern Biology''. They also supported the formation of interdisciplinary/inter-divisional teams to develop projects in science-based bioremediation and an integrated structural biology resource. Finally, they successfully worked with a multidisciplinary team to put forward the Laboratory's Genome and Beyond tactical goal

  17. Laser direct writing of biomolecule microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, P.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Berthet, F. X.; Colina, M.; Elvira, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    Protein-based biosensors are highly efficient tools for protein detection and identification. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of protein solutions in conditions preserving their biological properties. In this work, laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) was used for spotting an array of a purified bacterial antigen in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of protein microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength, 10 ns pulse duration) was used to transfer droplets of a solution containing the Treponema pallidum 17 kDa protein antigen on a glass slide. Optical microscopy showed that a regular array of micrometric droplets could be precisely and uniformly spotted onto a solid substrate. Subsequently, it was proved that LIFT deposition of a T. pallidum 17 kDa antigen onto nylon-coated glass slides preserves its antigenic reactivity and diagnostic properties. These results support that LIFT is suitable for the production of protein microarrays and pave the way for future diagnostics applications.

  18. The polygonal model: A simple representation of biomolecules as a tool for teaching metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceição; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2018-01-01

    Metabolism involves numerous reactions and organic compounds that the student must master to understand adequately the processes involved. Part of biochemical learning should include some knowledge of the structure of biomolecules, although the acquisition of such knowledge can be time-consuming and may require significant effort from the student. In this report, we describe the "polygonal model" as a new means of graphically representing biomolecules. This model is based on the use of geometric figures such as open triangles, squares, and circles to represent hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl groups, respectively. The usefulness of the polygonal model was assessed by undergraduate students in a classroom activity that consisted of "transforming" molecules from Fischer models to polygonal models and vice and versa. The survey was applied to 135 undergraduate Biology and Nursing students. Students found the model easy to use and we noted that it allowed identification of students' misconceptions in basic concepts of organic chemistry, such as in stereochemistry and organic groups that could then be corrected. The students considered the polygonal model easier and faster for representing molecules than Fischer representations, without loss of information. These findings indicate that the polygonal model can facilitate the teaching of metabolism when the structures of biomolecules are discussed. Overall, the polygonal model promoted contact with chemical structures, e.g. through drawing activities, and encouraged student-student dialog, thereby facilitating biochemical learning. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):66-75, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Effect of the sulphur atom on geometry and spectra of the biomolecule 2-thiouracil and in the WC base pair 2-thiouridine-adenosine. Influence of water in the first hydration shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea Palafox, M; Rastogi, V K; Singh, S P

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the sulphur atom on 2-thiouracil (2TU) and 2-thiouridine molecules, as compared with uracil and uridine molecules, respectively, was carried out in several environments. The predicted IR spectrum of 2TU in the isolated state was compared with that obtained for uracil molecule and with those reported experimentally in matrix isolation. Its crystal unit cell in the solid state was simulated through a tetramer form using DFT methods for the first time. The calculated Raman spectrum was compared to the experimental ones in the solid state. A linear scaling procedure was used for this task. The first hydration shell was simulated by explicit number of water molecules surrounding 2TU up to 30 and was compared with that obtained in uracil molecule. Water molecules 'distributed' around 2TU was preferred over that 'clustering', because it can better reproduce the hydration and their effects on different parameters of the molecular structure of 2TU and uracil. The total atomic charges and several calculated thermodynamic parameters were discussed. The effect of the sulphur atom on the Watson-Crick (WC) and reverse WC base pair uridine-adenosine was estimated, and the CP corrected interaction energies were calculated. 2-thiouridine has a weaker WC pair than that with uridine, although its slight higher dipole moment (μ) facilitates the interaction with the water molecules. Several helical parameters were determined.

  20. MR-based keyhole SPECT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keum Sil; Roeck, Werner W; Nalcioglu, Orhan [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Gullberg, Grant T, E-mail: keumsill@uci.edu [Department of Radiotracer Development and Imaging Technology, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-02-07

    The rationale for multi-modality imaging is to integrate the strengths of different imaging technologies while reducing the shortcomings of an individual modality. The work presented here proposes a limited-field-of-view (LFOV) SPECT reconstruction technique that can be implemented on a multi-modality MR/SPECT system that can be used to obtain simultaneous MRI and SPECT images for small animal imaging. The reason for using a combined MR/SPECT system in this work is to eliminate any possible misregistration between the two sets of images when MR images are used as a priori information for SPECT. In nuclear imaging the target area is usually smaller than the entire object; thus, focusing the detector on the LFOV results in various advantages including the use of a smaller nuclear detector (less cost), smaller reconstruction region (faster reconstruction) and higher spatial resolution when used in conjunction with pinhole collimators with magnification. The MR/SPECT system can be used to choose a region of interest (ROI) for SPECT. A priori information obtained by the full field-of-view (FOV) MRI combined with the preliminary SPECT image can be used to reduce the dimensions of the SPECT reconstruction by limiting the computation to the smaller FOV while reducing artifacts resulting from the truncated data. Since the technique is based on SPECT imaging within the LFOV it will be called the keyhole SPECT (K-SPECT) method. At first MRI images of the entire object using a larger FOV are obtained to determine the location of the ROI covering the target organ. Once the ROI is determined, the animal is moved inside the radiofrequency (rf) coil to bring the target area inside the LFOV and then simultaneous MRI and SPECT are performed. The spatial resolution of the SPECT image is improved by employing a pinhole collimator with magnification >1 by having carefully calculated acceptance angles for each pinhole to avoid multiplexing. In our design all the pinholes are focused to

  1. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pain syndromes, and has been shown to be a causative factor in two out of three cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Symptoms improve with antimicrobial treatment, but recurrence is common. Many providers may not be aware of SIBO. This narrative review highlights a clinical case and the most recent literature regarding SIBO, including history, clinical presentation, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, treatment and prevention. Integrative medicine approaches, including diet, supplements and manual therapies, are also reviewed. SIBO can be a challenging condition and requires an integrative, patient-centered approach. Further studies are needed to guide clinicians in the workup and treatment of SIBO.

  2. The Importance of Phytoplankton Biomolecule Availability for Secondary Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina T. Peltomaa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth and reproduction of animals is affected by their access to resources. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of essential biomolecules for filter-feeding zooplankton depends greatly on phytoplankton. Here, we analyzed the biochemical composition, i.e., the fatty acid, sterol and amino acid profiles and concentrations as well as protein, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus content of 17 phytoplankton monocultures representing the seven most abundant phytoplankton classes in boreal and sub-arctic lakes. To examine how the differences in the biochemical composition between phytoplankton classes affect their nutritional quality for consumers, we assessed the performance of Daphnia, on these diets. Furthermore, we defined the most important biomolecules regulating the somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia, expecting that higher concentrations of certain biomolecules are needed for reproduction than for growth. Finally, we combined these results with phytoplankton field data from over 900 boreal and sub-arctic lakes in order to estimate whether the somatic growth of Daphnia is sterol-limited when the natural phytoplankton communities are cyanobacteria-dominated. Our analysis shows that Daphnia grows best with phytoplankton rich in sterols, ω-3 fatty acids, protein, and amino acids. Their reproduction follows food sterol and ω-3 concentration as well as C:P-ratio being two times higher in Daphnia feeding on cryptophytes than any other diet. Interestingly, we found that a high dietary ω-6 fatty acid concentration decreases both somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia. When combined with phytoplankton community composition field data, our results indicate that zooplankton is constantly limited by sterols in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria (≥40% of total phytoplankton biomass, and that the absence of cryptophytes can severely hinder zooplankton production in nature.

  3. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  4. Arduino-Based Small Scale Electric Brewing System

    OpenAIRE

    Farineau, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this project is to create a small-scale, low cost, electric home brewing system that allows a user to more easily brew large (5 gallon) batches of beer in an enclosed space. This is accomplished by using an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a Yun WiFi shield to host a local website which allows a user to enter a temperature into the system via their phone, tablet, or computer. This data is then passed from a website running on the Yun shield to the Arduino sketch which r...

  5. Design of photocontrolled biomolecules based on azobenzene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, T. S.; Abrosimova, L. A.; Monakhova, M. V.; Thi Hien, Le; Pingoud, A.; Kubareva, E. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2013-10-01

    This review focuses on methods of designing photocontrolled proteins and nucleic acids. Data on preparation and modification of proteins and nucleic acids with azobenzene derivatives are summarized. Examples of using photoswitchable proteins, their substrates, inhibitors and ligands containing azobenzene, as well as azobenzene derivatives of nucleic acids, for design of nanomachines are considered. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  6. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  7. Simplified TiO2 force fields for studies of its interaction with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    Engineered TiO2 nanoparticles have been routinely applied in nanotechnology, as well as in cosmetics and food industries. Despite active experimental studies intended to clarify TiO2's biological effects, including potential toxicity, the relation between experimentally inferred nanotoxicity and industry standards for safely applying nanoparticles remains somewhat ambiguous with justified concerns. Supplemental to experiments, molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be efficacious in investigating the molecular mechanism of a biological process occurring at nanoscale. In this article, to facilitate the nanotoxicity and nanomedicine research related to this important metal oxide, we provide a simplified force field, based on the original Matsui-Akaogi force field but compatible to the Lennard-Jones potentials normally used in modeling biomolecules, for simulating TiO2 nanoparticles interacting with biomolecules. The force field parameters were tested in simulating the bulk structure of TiO2, TiO2 nanoparticle-water interaction, as well as the adsorption of proteins on the TiO2 nanoparticle. We demonstrate that these simulation results are consistent with experimental data/observations. We expect that simulations will help to better understand the interaction between TiO2 and molecules.

  8. Small scale motor tests of ADN/GAP based propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Gettwert, Volker; Fischer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Different ADN/GAP based propellants were evaluated as a potential replacement of the smoky AP based composite propellant and low signature double base propellants. The paper focuses on burning tests of propellants in a combustion chamber. The experimental results of an ADN/GAP, ADN/FOX12/GAP and Al/ADN/GAP propellant were compared with a standard Al/AP/HTPB propellant. In all cases the obtained experimental gravimetric specific impulse of the ADN/GAP based propellants were higher compared to ...

  9. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I.; Jorge-Villar, S. E.; van Wesemael, B.; Lázaro, R.

    2017-01-01

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). ;Species; was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed.

  10. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule against Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, M; Imani, A; Tajik, H; Moradi, M; Pourseyed, Sh

    2012-01-01

    Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae. The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations including 125, 250, 500 and 1250 µg ml(-1) against T. gallinae trophozoites cultured in trypticase-yeast extract-maltose medium supplemented with heat-inactivated cold horse serum was evaluated in vitro. Samples containing medium without chitosan were also assayed as controls. The mortality rates at 0, 3 and 6 h post treatment with all concentrations were significantly different from control group (P<0.05). Treated trophozoites showed more susceptibility to the highest concentration reaching mortality rate of 100% at 3h post inoculation. However, at this time, results for 125, 250 and 500 µg ml(-1) were 93%, 95% and 96.7%, respectively. The results demonstrate that the application of chitosan biomolecule is a promising option for treatment of trichomoniasis in pigeons.

  11. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-03-18

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and "green" products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  12. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule Against Trichomonas Gallinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Pourseyed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae.Methods: The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations including 125, 250, 500 and 1250 μg ml-1 against T. gallinae trophozoites cultured in trypticase-yeast extract-maltose medium supplemented with heat-inactivated cold horse serum was evaluated in vitro. Samples containing medium without chitosan were also assayed as controls.Results: The mortality rates at 0, 3 and 6 h post treatment with all concentrations were significantly different from control group (P<0.05. Treated trophozoites showed more susceptibility to the highest concentration reaching mortality rate of 100% at 3h post inoculation. However, at this time, results for 125, 250 and 500 μg ml-1 were 93%, 95% and 96.7%, respectively.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the application of chitosan biomolecule is a promising option for treatment of trichomoniasis in pigeons.

  13. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Khadydja F. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and “green” products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  14. Human friendly architectural design for a small Martian base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozicki, J.; Kozicka, J.

    2011-12-01

    The manned mission to Mars is expected to last almost three years. A human factor must be taken seriously into account in such a long-term mission. A big comfortable habitat can help to overcome sociopsychological problems, that occur in ICEs (Isolated and Confined Environments). Authors have come forward to this issue and have developed a Martian base design as a human friendly habitat. The project is based on researches of extreme conditions on Mars, architecture in ICEs and contemporary building technologies. The base consists of five modules: a Central Module (CM), an Agriculture Dome (AD), a Residential Dome (RD), a Laboratory Dome (LD) and a Garage (G). Each element has its own functional purpose. The CM is a metal capsule similar to the Reference Mission module (RM, NASA, 1997). Domes are inflatable multilayer structures, which interiors are "open planned". Interiors can be arranged and divided into rooms by using modular partition walls designed by authors.

  15. Identification of Biomolecular Building Blocks by Recognition Tunneling: Stride towards Nanopore Sequencing of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Suman

    DNA, RNA and Protein are three pivotal biomolecules in human and other organisms, playing decisive roles in functionality, appearance, diseases development and other physiological phenomena. Hence, sequencing of these biomolecules acquires the prime interest in the scientific community. Single molecular identification of their building blocks can be done by a technique called Recognition Tunneling (RT) based on Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). A single layer of specially designed recognition molecule is attached to the STM electrodes, which trap the targeted molecules (DNA nucleoside monophosphates, RNA nucleoside monophosphates or amino acids) inside the STM nanogap. Depending on their different binding interactions with the recognition molecules, the analyte molecules generate stochastic signal trains accommodating their "electronic fingerprints". Signal features are used to detect the molecules using a machine learning algorithm and different molecules can be identified with significantly high accuracy. This, in turn, paves the way for rapid, economical nanopore sequencing platform, overcoming the drawbacks of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques. To read DNA nucleotides with high accuracy in an STM tunnel junction a series of nitrogen-based heterocycles were designed and examined to check their capabilities to interact with naturally occurring DNA nucleotides by hydrogen bonding in the tunnel junction. These recognition molecules are Benzimidazole, Imidazole, Triazole and Pyrrole. Benzimidazole proved to be best among them showing DNA nucleotide classification accuracy close to 99%. Also, Imidazole reader can read an abasic monophosphate (AP), a product from depurination or depyrimidination that occurs 10,000 times per human cell per day. In another study, I have investigated a new universal reader, 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)pyrene (Pyrene reader) based on stacking interactions, which should be more specific to the canonical DNA nucleosides. In addition

  16. Unraveling low-resolution structural data of large biomolecules by constructing atomic models with experiment-targeted parallel cascade selection simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Junhui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-07-05

    Various low-resolution experimental techniques have gained more and more popularity in obtaining structural information of large biomolecules. In order to interpret the low-resolution structural data properly, one may need to construct an atomic model of the biomolecule by fitting the data using computer simulations. Here we develop, to our knowledge, a new computational tool for such integrative modeling by taking the advantage of an efficient sampling technique called parallel cascade selection (PaCS) simulation. For given low-resolution structural data, this PaCS-Fit method converts it into a scoring function. After an initial simulation starting from a known structure of the biomolecule, the scoring function is used to pick conformations for next cycle of multiple independent simulations. By this iterative screening-after-sampling strategy, the biomolecule may be driven towards a conformation that fits well with the low-resolution data. Our method has been validated using three proteins with small-angle X-ray scattering data and two proteins with electron microscopy data. In all benchmark tests, high-quality atomic models, with generally 1-3 Å from the target structures, are obtained. Since our tool does not need to add any biasing potential in the simulations to deform the structure, any type of low-resolution data can be implemented conveniently.

  17. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-08-21

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of "inorganic molecular wrapping" of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as "armour-plated" enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  18. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of ``inorganic molecular wrapping'' of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as ``armour-plated'' enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  19. Nanostructured raspberry-like gelatin microspheres for local delivery of multiple biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Mani; Pape, Bram; Klymov, Alexey; Zhang, Yang; Song, Jiankang; Löwik, Dennis W P M; Seyednejad, Hajar; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2017-08-01

    Multicompartment particles, which are particles composed of smaller building units, have gained considerable interest during the past decade to facilitate simultaneous and differential delivery of several biomolecules in various applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) processing is an industrial technology widely used for large-scale synthesis and processing of materials. However, the application of this technology for production of multicompartment particles from colloidal particles has not yet been explored. Here, we report the formation of raspberry-like gelatin (RLG) microparticles composed of gelatin nanoparticles as colloidal building blocks through supercritical CO 2 processing. We show that these RLG microparticles exhibit a high stability upon dispersion in aqueous media without requiring chemical cross-linking. We further demonstrate that these microparticles are cytocompatible and facilitate differential release of two different model compounds. The strategy presented here can be utilized as a cost-effective route for production of various types of multicompartment particles using colloidal particles with suitable interparticle interactions. Multicompartment particles have gained considerable interest during the past decade to facilitate simultaneous and differential delivery of multiple biomolecules in various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, common methods employed for the production of such particles are often complex and only offer small-scale production. Here, we report the formation of raspberry-like gelatin (RLG) microparticles composed of gelatin nanoparticles as colloidal building blocks through supercritical CO 2 processing. We show that these microparticles are cytocompatible and facilitate differential release of two model compounds with different molecular sizes, promising successful applications in various biomedical areas. Summarizing, this paper presents a novel strategy that can be utilized as a cost-effective route for

  20. Charge-selective gate of arrayed MWCNTs for ultra high-efficient biomolecule enrichment by nano-electrostatic sieving (NES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Wu, Yi-Shiuan; Yang, Chung-Shi; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-05-15

    We report a rapid and highly-efficient biomolecule preconcentrating device based on nano-electrostatic sieving (NES) mechanism that is facilitated by multi-nanofluidic channels operated in parallel. The opening of these nanochannels is regulated by tunable charges that are generated on arrayed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) gate. The NES device is fabricated by standard photolithography and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques, followed by subsequent deposition of parylene (poly(p-xylylene))-C on vertically grown MWCNTs in order to obtain arrayed multi-nanochannels with mean pore sizes that are comparable to the thickness of an electrical double layer (EDL). The enrichment efficiency for charged analytes is dependent on electrostatic repulsion, which is regulated by the distribution of the local electric field on the MWCNTs gate. The NES device exhibits polarity selectivity on the analytes and performs efficient collection and separation of biomolecules by probing the surface charge density dependence on the applied gate field. A tunable gate of the parylene-MWCNT nanochannels was used as size sieving devices for nano-scale biomolecules. The experimental results for the collection of FITC-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.033nM) were as high as nearly 10(6) fold after only 45min. These data are attributed to the in-parallel molecule sieving process as conducted by the many nanochannels formed among the MWCNTs. This device allows uncharged polar molecules, such as water, to rapidly pass through thus enable highly efficient bio-molecule concentration for the application to ultra-high sensitive biosensing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simple and universal model for electron-impact ionization of complex biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong Qi; Mi, Zhaohong; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    2018-03-01

    We present a simple and universal approach to calculate the total ionization cross section (TICS) for electron impact ionization in DNA bases and other biomaterials in the condensed phase. Evaluating the electron impact TICS plays a vital role in ion-beam radiobiology simulation at the cellular level, as secondary electrons are the main cause of DNA damage in particle cancer therapy. Our method is based on extending the dielectric formalism. The calculated results agree well with experimental data and show a good comparison with other theoretical calculations. This method only requires information of the chemical composition and density and an estimate of the mean binding energy to produce reasonably accurate TICS of complex biomolecules. Because of its simplicity and great predictive effectiveness, this method could be helpful in situations where the experimental TICS data are absent or scarce, such as in particle cancer therapy.

  2. Free locally convex spaces with a small base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gabriyelyan, S.; Kąkol, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2017), s. 575-585 ISSN 1578-7303 R&D Projects: GA ČR GF16-34860L Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compact resolution * free locally convex space * G-base Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.690, year: 2016 http://link. springer .com/article/10.1007%2Fs13398-016-0315-1

  3. Free locally convex spaces with a small base

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gabriyelyan, S.; Kąkol, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 2 (2017), s. 575-585 ISSN 1578-7303 R&D Projects: GA ČR GF16-34860L Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compact resolution * free locally convex space * G-base Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.690, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13398-016-0315-1

  4. Small-scale biodiesel production based on a heterogenous technology

    OpenAIRE

    Omberg, Kristian Sørby

    2015-01-01

    In a world where the growing concern for global warming and the problems concerning planet earth is confirmed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) . Thesearch for alternatives to replace the use of finite fossil fuels and cut green house gas (GHG)emission has commenced. Biodiesel, a biofuel derived from fat and vegetable oil based feedstock is one such alternative. However, a large enough biodiesel production to supply the demand for fuel is beinglimited by cost in...

  5. Separation of biomolecules by micro-high-performance anion-exchange chromatography using a tentacle-like stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Nicola Dawn; Smith, Norman William

    2005-05-01

    A variety of biomolecules and their variants, which have previously been problematic to separate, have been analysed using a novel anion-exchange resin based on a non-porous polystyrene polymeric support with a hydrophilic coating and grafted tentacular quaternary ammonium functional groups. The hydrophilic coating results in minimal interaction between the support and the biomolecule, while the highly flexible tentacular-like anion-exchange groups increase the ionic interaction potential and act as an umbrella to hold the proteins away from the surface. Because of the removal of silanophilic interactions, minimisation of hydrophobic interactions, and the highly flexible nature of the tentacle-like ion exchangers, ionic interactions can therefore dominate the separation. As such this phase is highly suited to the separation of highly charged biomolecules and their variants. This polymeric strong anion-exchange (SAX) support was packed into a fused-silica capillary column and, using a salt concentration gradient, various recombinant proteins were analysed by micro-HPLC resulting in baseline resolution.

  6. A small Unix-based data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engberg, D.; Glanzman, T.

    1993-06-01

    The proposed SLAC B Factory detector plans to use Unix-based machines for all aspects of computing, including real-time data acquisition and experimental control. An R ampersand D program has been established to investigate the use of Unix in the various aspects of experimental computation. Earlier R ampersand D work investigated the basic real-time aspects of the IBM RS/6000 workstation running AIX. The next step in this R ampersand D is the construction of prototype data acquisition system which attempts to exercise many of the features needed in the final on-line system in a realistic situation. For this project, we have combined efforts with a team studying the use of novel cell designs and gas mixtures in a new prototype drift chamber

  7. Features of risk-based approach to the management of small and medium-sized businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdenezhnykh V. M.; Protasov K. A.

    2016-01-01

    the article observes the notion of risk-based approach, proves its relevance in small and medium-sized businesses management, which is especially important in a current difficult situation in the country. The author gives a definition of the risk-based approach, describes its application in business management, and describes the major risks of doing business in the Russian market. Moreover, the paper explains the role and the necessity of applying risk-based approach to small and medium-sized...

  8. A printed electronic platform for the specific detection of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumbia, A.; Webb, M.; Turner, M. L.; Behrendt, J. M.; Wilson, R.

    2017-08-01

    The rapid detection of disease specific biomarkers in a clinically relevant range using a low-cost sensor can facilitate the development of individual treatment plans for a given patient, known as precision, personalized or genomic medicine. In the recent decade Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field Effect Transistors (EGOFETs), a subtype of OFETs where the dielectric is replaced by an electrolyte, have attracted a great deal of attention for sensing applications. This is due to their capacity to operate at low voltage (market are not yet achieved. In this contribution, we describe the development of a stable and reproducible EGOFET sensor that is able to detect biomolecules selectively in real-time. Facile and scalable techniques are used to prepare arrays of these devices. The selectivity of individual EGOFETs is investigated by immobilization of specific ligands to the target molecule of interest on the gate electrode within a microfluidic flow cell.

  9. Novel Apigenin Based Small Molecule that Targets Snake Venom Metalloproteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusha, Sebastian; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Chandra Nayaka, Siddaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Basappa; Girish, Kesturu S.; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2014-01-01

    The classical antivenom therapy has appreciably reduced snakebite mortality rate and thus is the only savior drug available. Unfortunately, it considerably fails to shield the viper bite complications like hemorrhage, local tissue degradation and necrosis responsible for severe morbidity. Moreover, the therapy is also tagged with limitations including anaphylaxis, serum sickness and poor availability. Over the last decade, snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are reported to be the primary component responsible for hemorrhage and tissue degradation at bitten site. Thus, antivenom inability to offset viper venom-induced local toxicity has been a basis for an insistent search for SVMP inhibitors. Here we report the inhibitory effect of compound 5d, an apigenin based molecule against SVMPs both in silico and in vivo. Several apigenin analogues are synthesized using multicomponent Ugi reactions. Among them, compound 5d effectively abrogated Echis carinatus (EC) venom-induced local hemorrhage, tissue necrosis and myotoxicity in a dose dependant fashion. The histopathological study further conferred effective inhibition of basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of EC venom inoculation. The compound also protected EC venom-induced fibrin and fibrinogen degradation. The molecular docking of compound 5d and bothropasin demonstrated the direct interaction of hydroxyl group of compound with Glu146 present in hydrophobic pocket of active site and does not chelate Zn2+. Hence, it is concluded that compound 5d could be a potent agent in viper bite management. PMID:25184206

  10. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of small molecules through cooperative base metal catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Julian G; Huang, David; Sorensen, Erik J

    2015-12-11

    The dehydrogenation of unactivated alkanes is an important transformation both in industrial and biological systems. Recent efforts towards this reaction have revolved around high temperature, organometallic C-H activation by noble metal catalysts that produce alkenes and hydrogen gas as the sole products. Conversely, natural desaturase systems proceed through stepwise hydrogen atom transfer at physiological temperature; however, these transformations require a terminal oxidant. Here we show combining tetra-n-butylammonium decatungstate (TBADT) and cobaloxime pyridine chloride (COPC) can catalytically dehydrogenate unactivated alkanes and alcohols under near-UV irradiation at room temperature with hydrogen as the sole by-product. This noble metal-free process follows a nature-inspired pathway of high- and low-energy hydrogen atom abstractions. The hydrogen evolution ability of cobaloximes is leveraged to render the system catalytic, with cooperative turnover numbers up to 48 and yields up to 83%. Our results demonstrate how cooperative base metal catalysis can achieve transformations previously restricted to precious metal catalysts.

  11. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  12. A Mo-anode-based in-house source for small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetzel, Linda K.; Fischer, Stefan; Salditt, Annalena; Sedlak, Steffen M.; Nickel, Bert; Lipfert, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Lipfert@lmu.de [Department of Physics, Nanosystems Initiative Munich, and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich, Germany and Geschwister-Scholl Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of a molybdenum-anode-based in-house small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) setup to study biological macromolecules in solution. Our system consists of a microfocus X-ray tube delivering a highly collimated flux of 2.5 × 10{sup 6} photons/s at a beam size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm{sup 2} at the collimation path exit and a maximum beam divergence of 0.16 mrad. The resulting observable scattering vectors q are in the range of 0.38 Å{sup −1} down to 0.009 Å{sup −1} in SAXS configuration and of 0.26 Å{sup −1} up to 5.7 Å{sup −1} in wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) mode. To determine the capabilities of the instrument, we collected SAXS data on weakly scattering biological macromolecules including proteins and a nucleic acid sample with molecular weights varying from ∼12 to 69 kDa and concentrations of 1.5–24 mg/ml. The measured scattering data display a high signal-to-noise ratio up to q-values of ∼0.2 Å{sup −1} allowing for an accurate structural characterization of the samples. Moreover, the in-house source data are of sufficient quality to perform ab initio 3D structure reconstructions that are in excellent agreement with the available crystallographic structures. In addition, measurements for the detergent decyl-maltoside show that the setup can be used to determine the size, shape, and interactions (as characterized by the second virial coefficient) of detergent micelles. This demonstrates that the use of a Mo-anode based in-house source is sufficient to determine basic geometric parameters and 3D shapes of biomolecules and presents a viable alternative to valuable beam time at third generation synchrotron sources.

  13. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  14. Structural Change of Biomolecules and Application of Synergistic Interaction by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, J. H.; Yang, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    It is expected that motivation and basic technologies for the future R and D plans can be provided from the results of this study. This study has been done to develop fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and to establish technical basis for enhancing efficacy of radiation utilization by studying the simultaneous application of ionizing radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through structural changes of biomolecules will exert a favorable influence on the creation of de novo scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor can make it possible to predict a prior the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions for it. Furthermore, the results of this study give a clues for establishment of fundamental theories associated with positive efficacy of radiation applications

  15. Evaluating gaze-based interface tools to facilitate point-and-select tasks with small targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. <12 × 12 pixels) point-a...

  16. Tailoring Bond Cleavage in Gas-Phase Biomolecules by Low Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-10-01

    The high energy quanta of impinging radiation can generate a large number (about 5x104) of secondary electrons per 1 MeV of energy deposited. When ejected in condensed phase water, the kinetic energy distribution of these free or quasi-free electrons is peaked below 10 eV. Low energy electrons also dominate in the secondary emission from biomolecular targets exposed to different energies of primary radiation. Due to the complexity of the radiation-induced processes in the condensed-phase environment, mechanisms of secondary electrons induced damage in biomolecules (BM) still need to be investigated. However, based on results from theory and different experiments accumulated within the last decade, it is now possible to determine the fundamental mechanisms that are involved in many chemical reactions induced in isolated gas-phase biomolecules by low energy electrons. The central finding of earlier research was the discovery of the bond- and site- selectivity in the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process to biomolecules. It has been demonstrated that by tuning the energy of the incoming electron we can gain control over the location of the bond cleavage. These studies showed the selectivity in single bond cleavage reactions leading to the formation of the dehydrogenated closed shell anion (BM-H)- or the complementary reaction leading to H-. The loss of a hydrogen atom or an anion is fast compared with ring cleavage and the excision of heavier fragments and, hence, this reaction can compete efficiently with autodetachment. Moreover, site selectivity has been also observed in the metastable anion formation via the DEA process. Such delayed fragmentation was studied recently for the dehydrogenated closed-shell anion conversion into NCO- upon DEA proceeded a few μ sec after electron attachment, indicating a rather slow unimolecular decomposition. Interestingly, site selectivity was observed in the prompt as well as the metastable NCO- formation in DEA. The

  17. Capillary methacrylate-based monoliths by grafting from/to γ-ray polymerization on a tentacle-type reactive surface for the liquid chromatographic separations of small molecules and intact proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Patrizia; Pierri, Giuseppe; Capitani, Donatella; Ciogli, Alessia; Angelini, Giancarlo; Ursini, Ornella; Gentile, Gennaro; Cavazzini, Alberto; Villani, Claudio; Gasparrini, Francesco

    2017-05-19

    Capillary methacrylate-based monoliths were prepared for the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of both small molecules and large biomolecules. An efficient grafting from/to synthetic approach was adopted introducing a network of activated sites in the inner wall surface using the new silanization agent (N-trimethoxysilylpropyl)-polyethylenimine. Copolymerization of lauryl methacrylate monomer and 1,6-hexanediol dimethacrylate cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents was obtained under continuous γ-ray exposure with high conversion yield. The morphology and porous structure of the resulting monoliths have been investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and 1 H NMR cryoporosimetry. By chromatographic investigation, the new capillary columns attested high kinetic performance (with efficiency larger than 100,000 theoretical plate/m for small molecules at optimum mobile phase linear velocity of about 0.5mm/s) and also excellent mechanical stability and repeatability. The new methacrylate-based monolithic capillary columns have been successfully employed for efficient reversed-phase separation of intact proteins and peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Chasing Small Exoplanets with Ground-Based Near-Infrared Transit Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, K. D.; Barentsen, G.; Vinicius, Z.; Vanderburg, A.; Coughlin, J.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Barclay, T.; Quintana, E.

    2017-11-01

    I will present results from a ground-based survey to measure the infrared radius and other properties of small K2 exoplanets and candidates. The survey is preparation for upcoming discoveries from TESS and characterization with JWST.

  19. Detection algorithm of infrared small target based on improved SUSAN operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingmiao; Wang, Shicheng; Zhao, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The methods of detecting small moving targets in infrared image sequences that contain moving nuisance objects and background noise is analyzed in this paper. A novel infrared small target detection algorithm based on improved SUSAN operator is put forward. The algorithm selects double templates for the infrared small target detection: one size is greater than the small target point size and another size is equal to the small target point size. First, the algorithm uses the big template to calculate the USAN of each pixel in the image and detect the small target, the edge of the image and isolated noise pixels; Then the algorithm uses the another template to calculate the USAN of pixels detected in the first step and improves the principles of SUSAN algorithm based on the characteristics of the small target so that the algorithm can only detect small targets and don't sensitive to the edge pixels of the image and isolated noise pixels. So the interference of the edge of the image and isolate noise points are removed and the candidate target points can be identified; At last, the target is detected by utilizing the continuity and consistency of target movement. The experimental results indicate that the improved SUSAN detection algorithm can quickly and effectively detect the infrared small targets.

  20. The Study of Application System for Small and Medium CTI Based on Voice Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of computer telecommunications integration (CTI technology, the development of application system for small and medium CTI are updated constantly, but the study of application system for small and medium CTI, we are lack of a stability and unified model. In this paper, the author analyzes the unified structure platform of application system for small and medium CTI based on voice card. Meanwhile, the author introduces a suitable software architecture model and general procedural framework for application system for small and medium CTI based on voice card by using the idea of hierarchical design, which shows the versatility of the architecture. It provided an efficient channel for the development of small and medium CTI.

  1. Small Signal Model for VSC-HVDC Connected DFIG-Based Offshore Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale offshore wind farms are integrated with onshore ac grids through the voltage source converter based high voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC transmission system. The impact on the stability of the ac grids will be significant. The small signal model of a wind farm connected with voltage source converter based dc transmission system is studied in this paper. A suitable model for small signal stability analysis is presented. The control system of wind generator and the HVDC system has also been modeled in this model for small signal stability analysis. The impact of the control parameters on the network stability is investigated.

  2. IL 7: Theoretical investigation of the ultrafast dissociation of ionized biomolecules immersed in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuilleumier, R.; Herve du Penhoat, M.A.; Politis, M.F.; Gaigeot, M.P.; Lopez-Tarifa, P.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Tavernelli, I.

    2010-01-01

    We apply time-dependent density functional theory and Ehrenfest dynamics to investigate, at a molecular level, direct and indirect effects of ionising radiations in DNA, in the particular case of irradiation by swift heavy ions such as those used in hadron therapy. Molecular double ionisation arising from irradiation by swift heavy ions (about 10% of ionisation events by ions whose velocity is about the third of speed of light), as a primary event, though maybe less probable than other events resulting from the electronic cascading (for instance, electronic excitations, electron attachments), may be systematically more damageable (and more lethal), as supported by studies of damages created by K holes in DNA. In the past recent years, we have developed the modeling at the microscopic level of the early stages of the Coulomb explosion of DNA molecules immersed in liquid water that follows the irradiation by swift heavy ions. To that end, Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory molecular dynamics simulations (TD-DFT MD) have been developed where localised Wannier orbitals are propagated. This latter enables to separate molecular orbitals of each water molecule from the molecular orbitals of the biomolecule. We find that the double ionisation of one molecule of the liquid sample, either one water molecule from the solvent or the biomolecule, may both be responsible for the formation of an atomic oxygen as a direct consequence of the molecule Coulomb explosion. The chemical reactivity of the produced atomic oxygen with other radicals present in the medium will ultimately lead to chemical products that are harmful to DNA. We will review our theoretical methodology and results on the production of atomic oxygen as a result of the double ionisation of water or as a result of the double ionisation of the Uracil RNA base will be presented. (authors)

  3. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  4. 123I and 13I purification for biomolecules labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catanoso, Marcela Forli

    2011-01-01

    The 123 I and 131 I are iodine radioisotopes widely used in Nuclear Medicine. The radioisotope 123 I is used in diagnosis through the SPECT technique and is routinely produced at IPEN in cyclotron through the reaction: '1 24 Xe (p, 2n) '1 23 Cs -> 123 Xe -> 123 I. The radioisotope 131 I is used both in diagnosis and therapy due to its physical characteristics of decay by β - and its γ-ray emissions that are softened with the use of specific collimators for diagnosis. It is routinely produced at IPEN using the nuclear reactor through the indirect reaction: 130 Te (n, γ) -> 131 Te -> 131 I, irradiating compounds containing Te. The radiopharmaceuticals prepared with these radioisotopes go through rigorous quality control tests and the chemical purity of the primary radioisotopes 123 I and 131 I are within the permissible limits currently defined. However, the presence of some chemical contaminants can prejudice the biomolecules labeling (monoclonal antibodies and peptides), that will produce radiopharmaceuticals of first generation to the oncology area. The aim of this work was to obtain a new purification method of these radioisotopes, allowing the labeling of biomolecules and also to established a process control on those radioisotopes. The methodology was separated on 3 steps: Evaluation of '1 23 I e 131 I radionuclidic purity using a hyper pure germanium detector, chemical purity using ICP-OES and the retention and elution study of 131 I in several absorbers to choose the most appropriate for the purification tests analyzing the behavior of the possible contaminants. The radionuclidic analyses showed the presence of Te and Co on 131 I samples and Te, Tc e Co on 123 I samples. The chemical purity analyses showed the presence of Al and Mo in 123 I, coming from the window material of the target holder and the presence of Al and Te in 131 I samples, coming from the target holder and the target, respectively. The retention and elution study selected the most

  5. Novel functionalized fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles for immobilization of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Jackeray, Richa; Abid, C. K. V. Zainul; Singh, Harpal

    2013-07-01

    Novel, size controlled fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNP) were synthesized having acetoacetoxy functionality on the surface for immobilization of biomolecules which can be utilized as biomarkers and labels in fluoroimmunoassays. Core-shell nanoparticles of poly(styrene, St-methyl methacrylate, MMA-acetoacetoxy ethyl methacrylate, AAEM), stabilized by various concentrations of surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), were obtained by facile miniemulsion co-polymerization encapsulated with pyrene molecules in their hydrophobic core. Analytical, spectroscopic and imaging characterization techniques revealed the formation of stable, monodisperse, spherical nano sized particles exhibiting high luminescence properties. Particles with 1% SLS (S1) showed good dispersion stability and fluorescence intensity and were chosen as ideal candidates for further immobilization studies. Steady state fluorescence studies showed 10 times higher fluorescence intensity of S1 nanoparticles than that of pyrene solution in solvent-toluene at the same concentration. Environmental factors such as pH, ionic strength and time were found to have no effect on fluorescence intensity of FPNPs. Surface β-di-ketone groups were utilized for the covalent immobilization of enzyme conjugated antibodies without any activation or pre-treatment of nanoparticles.Novel, size controlled fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNP) were synthesized having acetoacetoxy functionality on the surface for immobilization of biomolecules which can be utilized as biomarkers and labels in fluoroimmunoassays. Core-shell nanoparticles of poly(styrene, St-methyl methacrylate, MMA-acetoacetoxy ethyl methacrylate, AAEM), stabilized by various concentrations of surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), were obtained by facile miniemulsion co-polymerization encapsulated with pyrene molecules in their hydrophobic core. Analytical, spectroscopic and imaging characterization techniques revealed the formation of stable

  6. Antenatal small-class education versus auditorium-based lectures to promote positive transitioning to parenthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koushede, Vibeke; Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2017-01-01

    trial, we examined the effect of antenatal education in small classes versus auditorium-based lectures on perceived stress, parenting stress, and parenting alliance. A total of 1,766 pregnant women were randomised to receive: antenatal education in small classes three times in pregnancy and one time......Prospective parents widely use education to gain information about, e.g., labour and parenting skills. It is unknown if antenatal education in small classes is more beneficial for parenting stress and parenting alliance compared with other types of antenatal education. In the present randomised...... alliance six months postpartum was examined using the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Antenatal education in small classes had a small beneficial main effect on global feelings of stress six months postpartum and a statistically significant interaction between time and group favoring antenatal...

  7. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiao; Zhang Bai-Hai; Cui Ling-Guo; Fan Zhun; Vasilakos Athanasios, V.

    2012-01-01

    The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization, are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world when the spatial-temporal dynamics of the epidemic are considered. The oscillations come from the small-world structure and the temporary immunization. Mathematical analyses on the small world of the Cayley tree are presented to reveal the epidemic dynamics with the two immunization strategies. (general)

  8. Microbial Diversity in Extreme Marine Habitats and Their Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Annarita; Finore, Ilaria; Romano, Ida; Gioiello, Alessia; Lama, Licia; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2017-05-16

    Extreme marine environments have been the subject of many studies and scientific publications. For many years, these environmental niches, which are characterized by high or low temperatures, high-pressure, low pH, high salt concentrations and also two or more extreme parameters in combination, have been thought to be incompatible to any life forms. Thanks to new technologies such as metagenomics, it is now possible to detect life in most extreme environments. Starting from the discovery of deep sea hydrothermal vents up to the study of marine biodiversity, new microorganisms have been identified, and their potential uses in several applied fields have been outlined. Thermophile, halophile, alkalophile, psychrophile, piezophile and polyextremophile microorganisms have been isolated from these marine environments; they proliferate thanks to adaptation strategies involving diverse cellular metabolic mechanisms. Therefore, a vast number of new biomolecules such as enzymes, polymers and osmolytes from the inhabitant microbial community of the sea have been studied, and there is a growing interest in the potential returns of several industrial production processes concerning the pharmaceutical, medical, environmental and food fields.

  9. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eBertelshofer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and in particular also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may guide also the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE. Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and thus need to be carefully considered e.g. in design studies on membrane proteins.

  10. Hybrid carbon nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of different biomolecules in vivo is a promising path towards in situ monitoring of human body and its functions. However, there are several major obstacles, such as sensitivity, selectivity and biocompatiblity, which must be tackled in order to achieve reliably and safely operating sensor devices. Here we show that by utilizing hybrid carbon materials as electrodes to detect two types of neurotransmitters, dopamine and glutamate, several advantages over commonly used electrode materials can be achieved. In particular, we will demonstrate here that it is possible to combine the properties of different carbon allotropes to obtain hybrid materials with greatly improved electrochemical performance. Three following examples of the approach are given: (i) diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film electrodes with different layer thicknesses, (ii) multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on top of DLC and (iii) carbon nanofibres synthesized on top of DLC thin films. Detailed structural and electrochemical characterization is carried out to rationalize the reasons behind the observed behvior. In addition, results from the atomistic simulations are utilized to obtain more information about the properties of the amorphous carbon thin films. (paper)

  11. Atomic level analysis of biomolecules by the scanning atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro; Ikai, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the unique features of the scanning atom probe (SAP) the binding states of the biomolecules, leucine and methionine, are investigated at atomic level. The molecules are mass analyzed by detecting a single atom and/or clustering atoms field evaporated from a specimen surface. Since the field evaporation is a static process, the evaporated clustering atoms are closely related with the binding between atoms forming the molecules. For example, many thiophene radicals are detected when polythiophene is mass analyzed by the SAP. In the present study the specimens are prepared by immersing a micro cotton ball of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in the leucine or methionine solution. The mass spectra obtained by analyzing the cotton balls exhibit singly and doubly ionized carbon ions of SWCNT and the characteristic fragments of the molecules, CH 3 , CHCH 3 , C 4 H 7 , CHNH 2 and COOH for leucine and CH 3 , SCH 3 , C 2 H 4 , C 4 H 7 , CHNH 2 and COOH for methionine.

  12. Direct patterning of nanoparticles and biomolecules by liquid nanodispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabié, Laure; Agostini, Pierre; Stopel, Martijn; Blum, Christian; Lassagne, Benjamin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2015-03-14

    We report on the localized deposition of nanoparticles and proteins, nano-objects commonly used in many nanodevices, by the liquid nanodispensing (NADIS) technique which consists in depositing droplets of a solution through a nanochannel drilled at the apex of an AFM tip. We demonstrate that the size of spots can be adjusted from microns down to sub-50 nm by tuning the channel diameter, independently of the chemical nature of the solute. In the case of nanoparticles, we demonstrated the ultimate limit of the method and showed that large arrays of single (or pairs of) nanoparticles can be reproducibly deposited. We further explored the possibility to deposit different visible fluorescent proteins using NADIS without loss of protein function. The intrinsic fluorescence of these proteins is characteristic of their structural integrity; the retention of fluorescence after NADIS deposition demonstrates that the proteins are intact and functional. This study demonstrates that NADIS can be a viable alternative to other scanning probe lithography techniques since it combines high resolution direct writing of nanoparticles or biomolecules with the versatility of liquid lithography techniques.

  13. Features of risk-based approach to the management of small and medium-sized businesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezdenezhnykh V. M.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the article observes the notion of risk-based approach, proves its relevance in small and medium-sized businesses management, which is especially important in a current difficult situation in the country. The author gives a definition of the risk-based approach, describes its application in business management, and describes the major risks of doing business in the Russian market. Moreover, the paper explains the role and the necessity of applying risk-based approach to small and medium-sized businesses management.

  14. Closed Loop Control of Active Damped Small DC-link Capacitor Based Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2010-01-01

    A new method of active damping for small DC-link capacitor based drive system is implemented in stator flux oriented control for an induction machine. The active damping technique is based on a detailed model of the drive system which leads to a very simple implementation. The active damping can...

  15. Unlocking the Potential of Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing for Small Logistics Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somapa, S.; Cools, M.; Dullaert, W.E.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) model in a small-sized road transport and logistics company. Activity-based costing (ABC) leads to increased accuracy benefiting decision-making, but the costs of implementation can be high. TDABC tries to overcome

  16. Reproductive history and risk of small bowel cancer by histologic type: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunxia; Lambe, Mats; Martling, Anna; Lagergren, Jesper

    2012-12-01

    The male predominance of the two main histologic malignancies of the small bowel cancer may reflect a role of sex hormones which will be examined in this study. This was a nationwide population-based nested case-control study, based on a cohort of subjects born between 1932 and 2008, as identified in the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. For each case of small bowel cancer, 10 age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected. Number of children and age at having the first child were analyzed in relation to the risk of small bowel cancer using conditional logistic regression, providing odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 632 female cases and 894 male cases of small bowel cancer were included. No overall increased risk of small bowel cancer was found in parous compared to non-parous women (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.67-1.54). There was no association between age at first birth and small bowel cancer (>30 years of age vs bowel. No distinct risk patterns were discerned in men compared to women. Reproductive history does not seem to be associated with the risk of small bowel cancer, independent of histologic type.

  17. Inductive fault current limiter based on multiple superconducting rings of small diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, M R; Cabo, L; Veira, J A; Vidal, F

    2004-01-01

    We present a fault current limiter prototype based on the use of a secondary comprised of an array of magnetic cores of small sections, each one of them with several superconducting rings. The main advantage of this configuration is that it is easier to make small diameter superconducting rings which, in addition, are more homogeneous and allow better refrigeration. We then present detailed measurements that show that, in addition to these advantages, this prototype offers the same limitation performances than when using a unique core and a superconducting ring with an equivalent area as the array of small section cores

  18. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Zhang, Bai-Hai; Cui, Ling-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization......, are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world...

  19. Laser Raman and infra-red spectra of biomolecule: 5-aminouracil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1–4] on substituted biomolecules. These molecules do not occur freely in natural bi- ological metabolism. The understanding of the vibrational spectra of free molecules might be helpful in understanding specific biological processes and in the ...

  20. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  1. Nanostructured raspberry-like gelatin microspheres for local delivery of multiple biomolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diba, M.; Pape, B.; Klymov, A.; Zhang, Y.; Song, J.; Lowik, D.; Seyednejad, H.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2017-01-01

    Multicompartment particles, which are particles composed of smaller building units, have gained considerable interest during the past decade to facilitate simultaneous and differential delivery of several biomolecules in various applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) processing is an

  2. Final year veterinary students' attitudes towards small animal dentistry: a questionnaire-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the attitudes of final year veterinary students towards small animal dentistry and to examine the teaching received in this subject, both at university and during extra-mural studies. A cross-sectional study of all UK final year veterinary students in 2012 was designed and used by a self-administered Internet-based questionnaire. Six of seven universities participated with 188 student responses. All students felt that it was important or very important for a small animal practitioner to have a broad understanding of dentistry, and that orodental problems were common or very common in small animals. Almost all (99 · 5%) students perceived small animal dentistry as an important or very important subject. Less than 40% of students felt that the teaching had prepared them for entering practice. Over 50% reported that they neither felt confident in discussing orodental problems with clients nor in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity. Dental problems are perceived by students as frequently encountered in small animal practice. The veterinary surgeon should be adequately trained to detect, diagnose and treat dental disease in small animals and many students feel that their current teaching is inadequate. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Development of bioMEMS device and package for a spatially programmable biomolecule assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jin

    We report facile in situ biomolecule assembly at readily addressable sites in microfluidic channels after complete fabrication and packaging of the microfluidic device. Aminopolysaccharide chitosan's pH responsive and chemically reactive properties allow electric signal-guided biomolecule assembly onto conductive inorganic surfaces from the aqueous environment, preserving the activity of the biomolecules. Photoimageable SU8 is used on a Pyrex bottom substrate to create microfluidic channels and a PDMS layer is sealed to the SU8 microchannel by compression of their respective substrates between additional top and bottom Plexiglas plates at the package level. Transparent and non-permanently packaged device allows consistently leak-free sealing, simple in situ and ex situ examination of the assembly procedures, fluidic input/outputs for transport of aqueous solutions, and electrical ports to guide the assembly onto the patterned gold electrode sites within the channel. Facile post-fabrication in-situ biomolecule assembly of internal electrodes is demonstrated using electrodeposition of a chitosan film on a patterned gold electrode. Both in situ fluorescence and ex situ profilometer results confirm chitosan-mediated in situ biomolecule assembly, demonstrating a simple approach to direct the assembly of biological components into a completely fabricated device. We believe that this strategy holds significant potential as a simple and generic biomolecule assembly approach for future applications in complex biomolecular or biosensing analyses as well as in sophisticated microfluidic networks as anticipated for future lab-on-a chip.

  4. Bio-NCs - the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  5. UPAR targeted molecular imaging of cancers with small molecule-based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Chen, Seng; Zhang, Wanshu; Tu, Yufeng; Sun, Yao

    2017-10-15

    Molecular imaging can allow the non-invasive characterization and measurement of biological and biochemical processes at the molecular and cellular levels in living subjects. The imaging of specific molecular targets that are associated with cancers could allow for the earlier diagnosis and better treatment of diseases. Small molecule-based probes play prominent roles in biomedical research and have high clinical translation ability. Here, with an emphasis on small molecule-based probes, we review some recent developments in biomarkers, imaging techniques and multimodal imaging in molecular imaging and highlight the successful applications for molecular imaging of cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems based on sampled data with a small sampling delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Na; Wu Zhi-Hai; Peng Li

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, consensus problems of heterogeneous multi-agent systems based on sampled data with a small sampling delay are considered. First, a consensus protocol based on sampled data with a small sampling delay for heterogeneous multi-agent systems is proposed. Then, the algebra graph theory, the matrix method, the stability theory of linear systems, and some other techniques are employed to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions guaranteeing heterogeneous multi-agent systems to asymptotically achieve the stationary consensus. Finally, simulations are performed to demonstrate the correctness of the theoretical results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Round, A R; Wilkinson, S J; Hall, C J; Rogers, K D; Glatter, O; Wess, T; Ellis, I O

    2005-01-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique

  8. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A. R.; Wilkinson, S. J.; Hall, C. J.; Rogers, K. D.; Glatter, O.; Wess, T.; Ellis, I. O.

    2005-09-01

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  9. A preliminary study of breast cancer diagnosis using laboratory based small angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, A R [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, S J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hall, C J [Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rogers, K D [Department of Materials and Medical Sciences, Cranfield University, Swindon, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom); Glatter, O [Department of Chemistry, University of Graz (Austria); Wess, T [School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3NB, Wales (United Kingdom); Ellis, I O [Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-07

    Breast tissue collected from tumour samples and normal tissue from bi-lateral mastectomy procedures were examined using small angle x-ray scattering. Previous work has indicated that breast tissue disease diagnosis could be performed using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from a synchrotron radiation source. The technique would be more useful to health services if it could be made to work using a conventional x-ray source. Consistent and reliable differences in x-ray scatter distributions were observed between samples from normal and tumour tissue samples using the laboratory based 'SAXSess' system. Albeit from a small number of samples, a sensitivity of 100% was obtained. This result encourages us to pursue the implementation of SAXS as a laboratory based diagnosis technique.

  10. Market dimensionality and the proliferation of small-scale firms : An agent-based modeling simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Diaz, Cesar; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    We build an agent-based computational model to study how the changing number of active product variants in a two-dimensional product space affects the performance of different firm types (i.e. large-scale and small-scale enterprises). We use an alternative approach to measure product space

  11. Private investment for building a small hydropower plant at Zetea dam base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Florica; Paraschivescu, Adina; Vladescu, Aurelia; Popa, Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    Zetea lake grading project comprises an earthen dam, made out of local materials, having as main purposes water supply, flood control and protection against flooding. The paper analyzes the possibility of building a small hydropower plant at the base of the dam, using private investment resources, in order to put to good use the water flow evacuated from the storage lake. (authors)

  12. MISAT : Designing a Series of Powerful Small Satellites Based upon Micro Systems Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.; Monna, G.L.E.; Scherpen, J.M.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    MISAT is a research and development cluster which will create a small satellite platform based on Micro Systems Technology (MST) aiming at innovative space as well as terrestrial applications. MISAT is part of the Dutch MicroNed program which has established a microsystems infrastructure to fully

  13. A compentence-based approach for small and medium-sized enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germano Brancatisano; Robert Verburg; Jan Jurriëns

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of empirical research, a competence-based model of the internationalization process of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) is developed. The model focuses on so-called International Market-Entry Core Competencies (IMECC), which are global management competences considered crucial

  14. Strong Teens: A School-Based Small Group Experience for African American Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nathan J.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the school-based, small group adaptation of the existing Strong Teens Curriculum (STC) for African American male adolescents in high schools. The STC was created to equip adolescents with skills that promote more effective social interaction and enhance personal emotional and psychological wellness. The authors present a…

  15. Efficacy of rights-based management of small pelagic fish within an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of rights-based management of small pelagic fish within an ecosystems approach to fisheries in South Africa. ... African Journal of Marine Science ... Within EAF itself, there are still underlying mismatches between the two top objectives, 'human wellbeing' and 'ecological wellbeing', in effect requiring a better ...

  16. Net Based Examination: Small Group Tutoring, Home Assignments, and Large Group Automatic and Peer Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Karlsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with net based examination,tutoring and scaffolding of groups of different sizes: Firstfor very small groups, then for normal sized groups around100 students and finally for very large groups. The threedifferent methods can be applied to internationally basedcourses. Methods which support deep learning throughtutoring, scaffolding, project work and peer learning arealso mentioned.

  17. Computational study of a terphenyl-based Eu3+ complex: effect of small amounts of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Oude Wolbers, M.P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    The shielding properties of the terphenyl-based complex L·Eu3+ in methanol solution have been studied by computer simulations with an emphasis on the influence of small amounts of water on the shielding properties. The theoretical studies were carried out in explicit solvent models by molecular

  18. Intracellular delivery of nanomaterials for sub-cellular imaging and tracking of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medepalli, Krishna Kiran

    . Confocal microscopy and flow cytometric studies are performed to characterize the interactions. Results from this acute immune response study demonstrate the biocompatibility of SWCNTs in whole blood and also confirm the cellular delivery of single stranded DNA. The second part of the research is on colloidal quantum dots (QDs): nanometer sized semiconductor crystals typically between 1 nm to 20 nm in diameter. In addition to being size comparable with many biological systems, and having large surface area for multiple biomolecules attachment, they possess high resistance to chemical and photo degradation, tunable emission based on size and composition which makes them excellent candidates for cellular delivery and imaging. The main objectives of this research was to demonstrate the use of QDs for cellular imaging as well as targeted biomolecule delivery by conjugating the QDs with an antibody to a functional protein and delivery into live cells. Conventional techniques deliver QDs as aggregates, however, a major challenge in the use of QDs for cellular imaging and biomolecule delivery is achieving freely dispersed QDs inside the cells. In this research, a new technique to deliver monodispersed QDs inside live cells was developed. The approach combines osmosis driven fluid transport into cells achieved by creating hypotonic environment and reversible permeabilization using low concentrations of cell permeabilization agents like Saponin. The results confirm that highly efficient endocytosis-free intracellular delivery of QDs can be accomplished using this method. Confocal microscopy is used to image the QDs inside the cells and flow cytometry is used for quantifying the fluorescence. To demonstrate targeted delivery, QDs are conjugated to the antibody of a protein: the nuclear transcriptional factor, NFkB (Nuclear Factor kappa-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells) using EDC/sulfo NHS chemistry methods. NFkB is a family of proteins with 5 different subunits and is

  19. Small-angle neutron scattering by water-based ferrofluid mixed with polyethylene glycol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktystov, A.V.; Avdeev, M.V.; Feoktystov, A.V.; Garamus, V.M.; Feoktystov, A.V.; Bulavin, L.A.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.; Koneracka, M.; Zavisova, V.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach in the contrast variation experiments (small-angle neutron scattering) is demonstrated with a complex water-based magnetic fluid, where magnetite nanoparticles (size about 10 nm) coated with sodium oleate are mixed with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. The contrast variations is performed basing on the substitution of hydrogen with deuterium in the liquid carrier (water). Modified basic functions defined for the polydisperse multicomponent superparamagnetic system are analyzed

  20. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, H.; Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D.; Ulbricht, M.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the membranes before and after modification. ► We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. ► All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. ► All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  1. MDVRY: a polarizable classical molecular dynamics package for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souaille, M.; Loirat, H.; Borgis, D.; Gaigeot, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    The MDVRY classical molecular dynamics package is presented for the study of biomolecules in the gas and liquid phase. Electrostatic polarization has been implemented in the formalism of point induced dipoles following the model of Thole. Two schemes have been implemented for the calculation of induced dipoles, i.e. resolution of the self-consistent equations and a 'Car-Parrinello' dynamical approach. In this latter, the induced dipoles are calculated at each time step of the dynamics through the dynamics of additional degrees of freedom associated with the dipoles. This method saves computer time and allows to study polarized solvated proteins at a very low CPU cost. The program is written in C-language and runs on LINUX machines. A detailed manual of the code is given. The main features of the package are illustrated taking on examples of proteins in the gas phase or immersed in liquid water. Program summaryProgram title: MDVRY Catalogue identifier: AEBY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39 156 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 277 197 Distribution format: tar.bz2 Programming language: C Computer: Linux machines with FFTW Fourier Transform package installed Operating system: Linux machines, SUSE & RedHat distributions Classification: 3, 16.13, 23 External routines: FFTW ( http://www.fftw.org/) Nature of problem: Molecular Dynamics Software package. Solution method: Velocity Verlet algorithm. The implemented force field is composed of intra-molecular interactions and inter-molecular interactions (electrostatics, polarization, van der Waals). Polarization is accounted through induced point dipoles at each atomic site. Supplementary degrees of freedom are

  2. Optimization of biomolecule separation by combining microscale filtration and design-of-experiment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amir S; Kawka, Karina; Latulippe, David R

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable interest in developing microscale (i.e., high-throughput) methods that enable multiple filtration experiments to be run in parallel with smaller sample amounts and thus reduce the overall required time and associated cost to run the filtration tests. Previous studies to date have focused on simply evaluating the filtration capacity, not the separation performance. In this work, the stirred-well filtration (SWF) method was used in combination with design-of-experiment (DOE) methods to optimize the separation performance for three binary mixtures of bio-molecules: protein-protein, protein-polysaccharide, and protein-DNA. Using the parallel based format of the SWF method, eight constant-flux ultrafiltration experiments were conducted at once to study the effects of stirring conditions, permeate flux, and/or solution conditions (pH, ionic strength). Four separate filtration tests were conducted for each combination of process variables; in total, over 100 separate tests were conducted. The sieving coefficient and selectivity results are presented to match the DOE design format and enable a greater understanding of the effects of the different process variables that were studied. The method described herein can be used to rapidly determine the optimal combination of process factors that give the best separation performance for a range of membrane-based separations applications and thus obviate the need to run a large number of traditional lab-scale tests. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2131-2139. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Studies on mass deposition effect and energy effect of biomolecules implanted by N+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Chunlin; Yu Zengliang

    1994-05-01

    By analyzing some spectrum of tyrosine sample implanted by N + ion beam, it is deduced that the implantation N + could react with the tyrosine molecule and substitute =C 5 H- group of benzene ring to produce a N-heterocyclic compound. This compound would notably affect the residual activity of the sample. Moreover, the percentage of the product molecules to the damaged tyrosine molecules is larger than the reciprocal of the proportion of their extinction coefficients. On the other hand, by comparing the release of inorganic phosphate, it is found that the radiation sensibility for four basic nucleotides is 5'-dTMP>5'-CMP>5'-GMP>5'-AMP. to implanted nucleotides, alkali treatment and heat treatment could increase the amount of inorganic phosphate. The amount of inorganic phosphate in the nucleotide samples directly implanted by ions beam is about 60% of the total amount of inorganic phosphate that could be released from the implanted samples heated at 90 degree C for 1.75 hours. Alkali treatment could damage and split the free bases released from the implanted nucleotides, but heat treatment might repair those damaged bases. Above results prove that ions implantation to biomolecules has the mass deposition effects and energy effects

  4. UP-scaling of inverted small molecule based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Bhushan Ramesh; Madsen, Morten

    Organic solar cells (OSC), in spite of being a promising technology, still face challenges regarding large-scale fabrication. Although efficiencies of up to 12 % has been reached for small molecule OSC, their performance, both in terms of device efficiency and stability, is significantly reduced...... during up-scaling processes. The work presented here is focused on an approach towards up-scaling of small molecule based OSC with inverted device configuration. Bilayer OSC from Tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (DBP) and Fullerenes (C70), as electron donor and acceptor respectively, with cell area...

  5. Experimental and rendering-based investigation of laser radar cross sections of small unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Bacher, Emmanuel; Christnacher, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Laser imaging systems are prominent candidates for detection and tracking of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in current and future security scenarios. Laser reflection characteristics for laser imaging (e.g., laser gated viewing) of small UAVs are investigated to determine their laser radar cross section (LRCS) by analyzing the intensity distribution of laser reflection in high resolution images. For the first time, LRCSs are determined in a combined experimental and computational approaches by high resolution laser gated viewing and three-dimensional rendering. An optimized simple surface model is calculated taking into account diffuse and specular reflectance properties based on the Oren-Nayar and the Cook-Torrance reflectance models, respectively.

  6. Active damping technique for small DC-link capacitor based drive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Henriksen, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    A detailed model of Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD) is discussed, which yield a general rule for active damping in a small DC link based drive. A desired value of input LC resonance damping coefficient can be achieved by changing gain parameters. The modified state space matrix due to active damping...... terms is also presented. The performance of the active damping is evaluated based on experimental results. A simple model is presented which can be used to measure the damping factor provided by the system parameters only.......A detailed model of Adjustable Speed Drive (ASD) is discussed, which yield a general rule for active damping in a small DC link based drive. A desired value of input LC resonance damping coefficient can be achieved by changing gain parameters. The modified state space matrix due to active damping...

  7. Student satisfaction and perceptions of small group process in case-based interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R; Sharpe, Dennis; Forristall, Jennifer; Flynn, Kate

    2008-01-01

    The small group, case-based learning approach is believed to be a useful strategy for facilitating interprofessional learning and interaction factors are said to have a significant effect on student interest, learning and satisfaction with such approaches. The purpose of our study was twofold: assess students' satisfaction with a blended approach to interprofessional learning which combined computer-mediated and face-to-face, case-based learning; and examine the relationship between student satisfaction and perceptions of the collaborative learning process. We introduced six interprofessional learning modules to approximately 520 undergraduate health professional students from medicine (61), nursing (351), pharmacy (20), and social work (89). All students were invited to complete an evaluation survey which assessed student satisfaction with the interprofessional learning experience and students' perceptions of the small group learning process. Students' satisfaction with interprofessional education was related to professional background. Students from across professions reported greater satisfaction with face-to-face, case-based learning when compared with other learning methods. A more positive perception of face-to-face, case-based learning was related to greater satisfaction with interprofessional learning. The findings support the case-based method in facilitating interprofessional learning and highlight the importance of effective facilitation of small-group collaborative learning to enhance student satisfaction with interprofessional learning experiences.

  8. Collaborative Research: Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Biomaterial Surface Interactions - Bridging Understanding of APP Sources to Rational Modification of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-11-24

    The overriding objective of this work is to bridge the gap between understanding of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) sources and predictive chemical modifications of biomolecules. A key aspect of this problem is to understand what oxidizing species are created in water adjacent to APP jets that would ultimately affect aqueous biomolecules. We report the production of highly oxidative species in solutions exposed to a self-pulsed corona discharge in air. We examine how the properties of the target solution (pH, conductivity) and the discharge power affect the discharge stability and the production of H2O2. Indigo carmine, a common organic dye, is used as an indicator of oxidative strength and in particular, hydroxyl radical (OH•) production. The observed rate of indigo oxidation in contact with the discharge far exceeds that predicted from reactions based on concentrations of species measured in the bulk solution. The generation of H2O2 and the oxidation of indigo carmine indicate a high concentration of highly oxidizing species such as OH• at the plasma-liquid interface. These results indicate that reactions at the air plasma-liquid interface play a dominant role in species oxidation during direct non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NE-APP) treatment.

  9. Infrared small target detection based on local intensity and gradient properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Ding; Chen, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Infrared small target detection is a challenging task for computer vision due to the factors such as scale variations of the targets and strong clutters. Inspired by the Gaussian-like shape of the small target, we characterize two local properties of the small target from the perspective of intensity and gradient to address this problem. The two properties are that the intensity value of the target pixels is greater than the value of its locally neighboring pixels, and the gradients towards the target center often distribute regularly around the target. First, based on the two properties, the local intensity and gradient (LIG) map is calculated from the original infrared image in order to enhance the targets and suppress clutters. Next, we can obtain the targets conveniently via segmentation from the LIG map. Extensive evaluations on real data demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has satisfactory results in terms of clutter suppression and robustness.

  10. Systems-based Discovery of Tomatidine as a Natural Small Molecule Inhibitor of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyle, Michael C.; Ebert, Scott M.; Cook, Daniel P.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Fox, Daniel K.; Bongers, Kale S.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:24719321

  11. Entirely renewable energy-based electricity supply system (small scale and large scale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahedi, A. [Monash University, Caulfield (Australia). Division of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering

    1996-09-01

    Our future energy needs will be supplied by a combination of many different sources ranging from small wind turbine to provide power for a single house to central power stations that provide power in very large scale fed into the national grid. Computer control systems will integrate the performance of all these systems to make sure that as much power as possible comes from environmentally friendlier sources. As alternative sources becomes more widely available, small scale systems meeting local needs may start to replace current large scale central power stations. The author is investigating the feasibility of an entirely renewable energy-based electricity supply system. The developed system find so many applications as it can be used as small scale power system for Remote Area Power Supply, wind energy/battery or solar energy/battery, as well as large scale for interconnection with national grid. (Author)

  12. Chaos characteristics and least squares support vector machines based online pipeline small leakages detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jinhai; Su, Hanguang; Ma, Yanjuan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Small leakages are severe threats to the long distance pipeline transportation. An online small leakage detection method based on chaos characteristics and Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVMs) is proposed in this paper. For the first time, the relationship between the chaos characteristics of pipeline inner pressures and the small leakages is investigated and applied in the pipeline detection method. Firstly, chaos in the pipeline inner pressure is found. Relevant chaos characteristics are estimated by the nonlinear time series analysis package (TISEAN). Then LS-SVM with a hybrid kernel is built and named as hybrid kernel LS-SVM (HKLS-SVM). It is applied to analyze the chaos characteristics and distinguish the negative pressure waves (NPWs) caused by small leaks. A new leak location method is also expounded. Finally, data of the chaotic Logistic-Map system is used in the simulation. A comparison between HKLS-SVM and other methods, in terms of the identification accuracy and computing efficiency, is made. The simulation result shows that HKLS-SVM gets the best performance and is effective in error analysis of chaotic systems. When real pipeline data is used in the test, the ultimate identification accuracy of HKLS-SVM reaches 97.38% and the position accuracy is 99.28%, indicating that the method proposed in this paper has good performance in detecting and locating small pipeline leaks.

  13. Polymer nanoparticles for drug and small silencing RNA delivery to treat cancers of different phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided powerful and efficient tools in development of cancer diagnosis and therapy. There are numerous nanocarriers that are currently approved for clinical use in cancer therapy. In recent years, biodegradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a considerable attention for their ability to function as a possible carrier for target-specific delivery of various drugs, genes, proteins, peptides, vaccines, and other biomolecules in humans without much toxicity. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances in polymer-based nanocarriers for various drugs and small silencing RNA’s loading and delivery to treat different types of cancer. PMID:23996830

  14. Chitosan-mediated in situ biomolecule assembly in completely packaged microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jin; Luo, Xiaolong; Yi, Hyunmin; Valentine, Theresa M; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary W

    2006-10-01

    We report facile in situ biomolecule assembly at readily addressable sites in microfluidic channels after complete fabrication and packaging of the microfluidic device. Aminopolysaccharide chitosan's pH responsive and chemically reactive properties allow electric signal-guided biomolecule assembly onto conductive inorganic surfaces from the aqueous environment, preserving the activity of the biomolecules. A transparent and nonpermanently packaged device allows consistently leak-free sealing, simple in situ and ex situ examination of the assembly procedures, fluidic input/outputs for transport of aqueous solutions, and electrical ports to guide the assembly onto the patterned gold electrode sites within the channel. Both in situ fluorescence and ex situ profilometer results confirm chitosan-mediated in situ biomolecule assembly, demonstrating a simple approach to direct the assembly of biological components into a completely fabricated device. We believe that this strategy holds significant potential as a simple and generic biomolecule assembly approach for future applications in complex biomolecular or biosensing analyses as well as in sophisticated microfluidic networks as anticipated for future lab-on-a-chip devices.

  15. Biotin-Streptavidin Competition Mediates Sensitive Detection of Biomolecules in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) is the gold standard assay for detecting and identifying biomolecules using antibodies as the probe. Improving ELISA is crucial for detecting disease-causing agents and facilitating diagnosis at the early stages of disease. Biotinylated antibody and streptavidin-conjugated horse radish peroxide (streptavidin-HRP) often are used with ELISA to enhance the detection of various kinds of targets. In the present study, we used a competition-based strategy in which we pre-mixed free biotin with streptavidin-HRP to generate high-performance system, as free biotin occupies some of the biotin binding sites on streptavidin, thereby providing more chances for streptavidin-HRP to bind with biotinylated antibody. ESAT-6, which is a protein secreted early during tuberculosis infection, was used as the model target. We found that 8 fM of free biotin mixed with streptavidin-HRP anchored the higher detection level of ESAT-6 by four-fold compared with detection without free biotin (only streptavidin-HRP), and the limit of detection of the new method was 250 pM. These results suggest that biotin-streptavidin competition can be used to improve the diagnosis of analytes in other types of sensors.

  16. A Universal Method for Fishing Target Proteins from Mixtures of Biomolecules using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Sun, Q; Kini, R; Sivaraman, J

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging tasks in biology include the identification of (1) the orphan receptor for a ligand, (2) the ligand for an orphan receptor protein, and (3) the target protein(s) for a given drug or a lead compound that are critical for the pharmacological or side effects. At present, several approaches are available, including cell- or animal-based assays, affinity labeling, solid-phase binding assays, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most of these techniques are not easy to apply when the target protein is unknown and the compound is not amenable to labeling, chemical modification, or immobilization. Here we demonstrate a new universal method for fishing orphan target proteins from a complex mixture of biomolecules using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tracking tool. We took snake venom, a crude mixture of several hundred proteins/peptides, as a model to demonstrate our proposed ITC method in tracking the isolation and purification of two distinct target proteins, a major component and a minor component. Identities of fished out target proteins were confirmed by amino acid sequencing and inhibition assays. This method has the potential to make a significant advancement in the area of identifying orphan target proteins and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and characterization.

  17. Effect of pore size on performance of monolithic tube chromatography of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornik, Ales; Hamachi, Masataka; Isakari, Yu; Yoshimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2017-11-01

    Effect of pore size on the performance of ion-exchange monolith tube chromatography of large biomolecules was investigated. Radial flow 1 mL polymer based monolith tubes of different pore sizes (1.5, 2, and 6 μm) were tested with model samples such as 20 mer poly T-DNA, basic proteins, and acidic proteins (molecular weight 14 000-670 000). Pressure drop, pH transient, the number of binding site, dynamic binding capacity, and peak width were examined. Pressure drop-flow rate curves and dynamic binding capacity values were well correlated with the nominal pore size. While duration of the pH transient curves depends on the pore size, it was found that pH duration normalized on estimated surface area was constant, indicating that the ligand density is the same. This was also confirmed by the constant number of binding site values being independent of pore size. The peak width values were similar to those for axial flow monolith chromatography. These results showed that it is easy to scale up axial flow monolith chromatography to radial flow monolith tube chromatography by choosing the right pore size in terms of the pressure drop and capacity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Infrared small target tracking based on sample constrained particle filtering and sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Ren, Kan; Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian

    2017-12-01

    Infrared search and track technology for small target plays an important role in infrared warning and guidance. In view of the tacking randomness and uncertainty caused by background clutter and noise interference, a robust tracking method for infrared small target based on sample constrained particle filtering and sparse representation is proposed in this paper. Firstly, to distinguish the normal region and interference region in target sub-blocks, we introduce a binary support vector, and combine it with the target sparse representation model, after which a particle filtering observation model based on sparse reconstruction error differences between sample targets is developed. Secondly, we utilize saliency extraction to obtain the high frequency area in infrared image, and make it as a priori knowledge of the transition probability model to limit the particle filtering sampling process. Lastly, the tracking result is brought about via target state estimation and the Bayesian posteriori probability calculation. Theoretical analyses and experimental results show that our method can enhance the state estimation ability of stochastic particles, improve the sparse representation adaptabilities for infrared small targets, and optimize the tracking accuracy for infrared small moving targets.

  19. Diurnal and Seasonal Cloud Base Patterns Highlight Small-Mountain Tropical Cloud Forest Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beusekom, A.; Gonzalez, G.; Scholl, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods and the amount these clouds are affected by urban areas is not well understood, as cloud base is rarely quantified near mountains. We found that a healthy small-mountain TMCF in Puerto Rico had lowest cloud base during the mid-summer dry season. In addition, we observed that cloud bases were lower than the mountaintops as often in the winter dry season as in the wet seasons, based on 2.5 years of direct and 16 years of indirect observations. The low clouds during dry season appear to be explained by proximity to the oceanic cloud system where lower clouds are seasonally invariant in altitude and cover; along with orographic lifting and trade-wind control over cloud formation. These results suggest that climate change impacts on small-mountain TMCFs may not be limited to the dry season; changes in regional-scale patterns that cause drought periods during the wet seasons will likely have higher cloud base, and thus may threaten cloud water support to sensitive mountain ecosystems. Strong El Niño's can cause drought in Puerto Rico; we will report results from the summer of 2015 that examined El Niño effects on cloud base altitudes. Looking at regionally collected airport cloud data, we see indicators that diurnal urban effects may already be raising the low cloud bases.

  20. Application of earned value based metrics on small-scale construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslav Avlijaš

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of earned value based metrics in Serbia lags significantly behind other developed economies, regardless of the fact that is has proven to be a very useful and flexible tool for prediction of total cost and time of construction projects. This paper aims to contribute to the wider use of earned value management (EVM as a practical metrics that can be used to track performance of small-scale construction projects. Literature review reveals how the method evolved as a fundamental tool for construction projects monitoring and refers to specific issues concerning its implementation. In order to enable practitioners to realize all advantages of earned value based performance monitoring of small-scale construction projects, the applicability of such methodology is demonstrated through a case study.

  1. Blu-ray based optomagnetic aptasensor for detection of small molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Pinto, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    the hydrodynamic size distribution of MNPs and their clusters. A commercial Blu-ray optical pickup unit is used for optical signal acquisition, which enables the establishment of a low-cost and miniaturized biosensing platform. Experimental results show that the degree of MNP clustering correlates well......This paper describes an aptamer-based optomagnetic biosensor for detection of a small molecule based on target binding-induced inhibition of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clustering. For the detection of a target small molecule, two mutually exclusive binding reactions (aptamer-target binding...... and aptamer-DNA linker hybridization) are designed. An aptamer specific to the target and a DNA linker complementary to a part of the aptamer sequence are immobilized onto separate MNPs. Hybridization of the DNA linker and the aptamer induces formation of MNP clusters. The target-to-aptamer binding on MNPs...

  2. Qualification of academic facilities for small-scale automated manufacture of autologous cell-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, Paul; Chandra, Amit; Alvey, David; Ginty, Patrick; McCall, Mark; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth; Rayment, Erin; Williams, David J

    2014-01-01

    Academic centers, hospitals and small companies, as typical development settings for UK regenerative medicine assets, are significant contributors to the development of autologous cell-based therapies. Often lacking the appropriate funding, quality assurance heritage or specialist regulatory expertise, qualifying aseptic cell processing facilities for GMP compliance is a significant challenge. The qualification of a new Cell Therapy Manufacturing Facility with automated processing capability, the first of its kind in a UK academic setting, provides a unique demonstrator for the qualification of small-scale, automated facilities for GMP-compliant manufacture of autologous cell-based products in these settings. This paper shares our experiences in qualifying the Cell Therapy Manufacturing Facility, focusing on our approach to streamlining the qualification effort, the challenges, project delays and inefficiencies we encountered, and the subsequent lessons learned.

  3. A Study of Biomolecules as Growth Modifiers of Calcium Oxalate Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Junha John

    Crystallization processes are ubiquitous in nature, science, and technology. Controlling crystal growth is pivotal in many industries as material properties and functions can be tailored by tuning crystal habits (e.g. size, shape, phase). In biomineralization, organisms exert excellent control over bottom-up synthesis and assembly of inorganic-organic structures (e.g. bones, teeth, exoskeletons). This is made possible by growth modifiers that range from small molecules to macromolecules, such as proteins. Molecular recognition of the mineral phase allows proteins to function as nucleation templates, matrices, and growth inhibitors or promoters. We are interested in taking a biomimetic approach to control crystallization via biomolecular growth modifiers. We investigated calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), found in plants and kidney stones, as a model system of crystallization. We studied the effects of four common proteins on COM crystallization: bovine serum albumin (BSA), transferrin, lactoferrin, and lysozyme. Through kinetic studies of COM crystallization, we classified BSA and lysozyme as COM growth inhibitor and promoter respectively. Their inhibition and promotion effects were also evident in the macroscopic crystal habit. Through adsorption and microscopy experiments, we showed that BSA exhibits binding specificity for the apical surfaces of macroscopic COM crystals. Lysozyme, on the other, functions via a non-binding mechanism at the surface to accelerate the growth of the apical surfaces. We also synthesized and studied peptides derived from the protein primary sequences to identify putative domains responsible for these inhibition and promotion effects. Collectively, our study of physiologically relevant biomolecules suggests potential roles of COM modifiers in pathological crystallization and helps to develop guidelines for rational design of biomolecular growth modifiers for applications in crystal engineering.

  4. A philicity based analysis of adsorption of small molecules in zeolites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A philicity based analysis of adsorption of small molecules in zeolites. 545. Table 1. Pertinent geometrical parameters of 3T cluster calculated using. DFT method at BLYP/DNP level of theory. Parameter. 3T cluster-1(*). 3T cluster2 (*). 3T (**). Bond lengths (Å). O4–H8. 0⋅975. 0⋅973. 0⋅973. Si–O4. 1⋅740. 1⋅746. 1⋅745.

  5. Application of earned value based metrics on small-scale construction projects

    OpenAIRE

    Radoslav Avlijaš; Goran Avlijaš; Milenko Heleta

    2015-01-01

    The application of earned value based metrics in Serbia lags significantly behind other developed economies, regardless of the fact that is has proven to be a very useful and flexible tool for prediction of total cost and time of construction projects. This paper aims to contribute to the wider use of earned value management (EVM) as a practical metrics that can be used to track performance of small-scale construction projects. Literature review reveals how the method evolved as a fundamental...

  6. Object-Based Image Analysis for Identifying Small Scale Elements During Large Scale Public Events

    OpenAIRE

    Römer, Hannes; Fourie, Christoffel Ettienne; Stolle, Amelie; Gullotta, Giulio; Schöpfer, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Major public events such as open-air festivals are characterized by large concentrations of people in relatively small areas. These events represent challenging situations for public authorities concerned with organization, traffic and security and for festival organizers. In the research project VABENE++* an end-to-end monitoring system has been developed in order to provide situational and traffic related information in near real-time based on terrestrial and airborne platforms. In the p...

  7. Population-based study of esophageal and small intestinal atresia/stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daijiro; Hiroma, Takehiko; Takamizawa, Shigeru; Nakamura, Tomohiko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal atresia/stenosis and small intestinal atresia/stenosis in Nagano, Japan, together with associated anomalies, prenatal diagnosis and survival. A population-based cohort study of the prevalence of esophageal atresia/stenosis and small intestinal atresia/stenosis was conducted in Nagano in January 1993-December 2011. The Mann-Whitney test, χ(2) test and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare variables. P atresia/stenosis and 87 cases of small intestinal atresia/stenosis (31 duodenal, 56 jejuno-ileal) were identified. Prevalences were 1.97 for esophageal atresia/stenosis and 2.23 for small intestinal atresia/stenosis (0.83 for duodenal atresia/stenosis and 1.49 for jejuno-ileal atresia/stenosis) per 10,000 births, respectively. The prevalence of esophageal atresia/stenosis increased significantly from 1993-2001 to 2002-2011 (relative risk [RR], 1.6), as did the prevalences of duodenal atresia/stenosis (RR, 2.2) and jejuno-ileal atresia/stenosis (RR, 3.1). Chromosomal anomalies, particularly trisomy 21, were seen significantly more often in association with duodenal atresia/stenosis (55%) than with esophageal atresia/stenosis (28%, P atresia/stenosis (2%, P atresia/stenosis group. The prevalence of esophageal and small intestinal atresia/stenosis increased significantly from 1993-2001 to 2002-2011. Prenatally diagnosed esophageal atresia/stenosis is associated with multiple anomalies, particularly chromosomal anomalies, compared to other small intestine atresia/stenosis. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Base substitutions, frameshifts, and small deletions constitute ionizing radiation-induced point mutations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; de Boer, J.G.; de Jong, P.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; Glickman, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    The relative role of point mutations and large genomic rearrangements in ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis has been an issue of long-standing interest. Recent studies using Southern blotting analysis permit the partitioning of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in mammalian cells into detectable deletions and major genomic rearrangements and into point mutations. The molecular nature of these point mutations has been left unresolved; they may include base substitutions as well as small deletions, insertions, and frame-shifts below the level of resolution of Southern blotting analysis. In this investigation, we have characterized a collection of ionizing radiation-induced point mutations at the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary cells at the DNA sequence level. Base substitutions represented approximately equal to 2/3 of the point mutations analyzed. Although the collection of mutants is relatively small, every possible type of base substitution event has been recovered. These mutations are well distributed throughout the coding sequence with only one multiple occurrence. Small deletions represented the remainder of characterized mutants; no insertions have been observed. Sequence-directed mechanisms mediated by direct repeats could account for some of the observed deletions, while others appear to be directly attributable to radiation-induced strand breakage

  9. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc) and thallium-201 ( 201 Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99m Tc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201 Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99m Tc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138–145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201 Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64–85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for

  10. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT-based

  11. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su-Jin [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, A. Ram [Laboratory animal center, OSONG Medical Innovation Foundation, Chunguk 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul 133-792 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Young [Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul 133-792 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyeong Min [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-11

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m ({sup 99m}Tc) and thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for {sup 99m}Tc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for {sup 201}Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For {sup 99m}Tc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138–145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For {sup 201}Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64–85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the

  12. Composite Scaffold of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) and Interfacial Polyelectrolyte Complexation Fibers for Controlled Biomolecule Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutiongco, Marie Francene A.; Choo, Royden K. T.; Shen, Nathaniel J. X.; Chua, Bryan M. X.; Sju, Ervi; Choo, Amanda W. L.; Le Visage, Catherine; Yim, Evelyn K. F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC) fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor, and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA). Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA–IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA–IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA–IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA–IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release, and bioinertness, PVA–IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft tissue

  13. Composite scaffold of poly(vinyl alcohol and interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation fibers for controlled biomolecule delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Francene Arnobit Cutiongco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlled delivery of hydrophilic proteins is an important therapeutic strategy. However, widely used methods for protein delivery suffer from low incorporation efficiency and loss of bioactivity. The versatile interfacial polyelectrolyte complexation (IPC fibers have the capacity for precise spatiotemporal release and protection of protein, growth factor and cell bioactivity. Yet its weak mechanical properties limit its application and translation into a viable clinical solution. To overcome this limitation, IPC fibers can be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds such as the biocompatible poly(vinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA. Therefore, we explored the use of a composite scaffold of PVA and IPC fibers for controlled biomolecule release. We first observed that the permeability of biomolecules through PVA films were dependent on molecular weight, with lysozyme showing near-linear release for 1 month. Next, IPC fibers were incorporated in between layers of PVA to produce PVA-IPC composite scaffolds with different IPC fiber orientation. The composite scaffold demonstrated excellent mechanical properties and efficient biomolecule incorporation. The rate of biomolecule release from PVA-IPC composite grafts exhibited dependence on molecular weight. Angiogenic factors were also incorporated into the PVA-IPC grafts, as a potential biomedical application of the composite graft. While vascular endothelial growth factor only showed a maximum cumulative release of 3%, the smaller PEGylated-QK peptide showed maximum release of 33%. Notably, the released angiogenic biomolecules induced endothelial cell metabolic activity thus indicating retention of bioactivity. We also observed lack of significant macrophage response against PVA-IPC grafts in a rabbit model. Showing permeability, mechanical strength, precise temporal growth factor release and bioinertness, PVA-IPC fibers composite scaffolds are excellent scaffolds for controlled biomolecule delivery in soft

  14. An Active Damping Technique for Small DC-Link Capacitor Based Drive System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2013-01-01

    A small dc-link capacitor based drive system shows instability when it is operated with large input line inductance at operating points with high power. This paper presents a simple, new active damping technique that can stabilize effectively the drive system at unstable operating points, offering...... points. The stabilizing effect of the active damping terms is demonstrated for an induction machine based drive system. The effects of the added damping terms on the machine current and dc-link voltage are analyzed in detail. A design recommendation for the proposed active damping terms is given...

  15. Firm performance model in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) based on learning orientation and innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, E. R.; Ardianti, F. L.; Rachmawati, L.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between learning orientation, innovation, and firm performance. A conceptual model and hypothesis were empirically examined using structural equation modelling. The study involved a questionnaire-based survey of owners of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) operating in Batu City, Indonesia. The results showed that both variables of learning orientation and innovation effect positively on firm performance. Additionally, learning orientation has positive effect innovation. This study has implication for SMEs aiming at increasing their firm performance based on learning orientation and innovation capability.

  16. Mn-based hard magnets with small saturation magnetization and low spin relaxation for spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizukami, S.; Sakuma, A.; Sugihara, A.; Suzuki, K.Z.; Ranjbar, R.

    2016-01-01

    The pursuit of high saturation magnetization is an important area of hard magnetic materials research. However, spintronics requires hard magnets exhibiting small saturation magnetization and low spin relaxation. Mn-based alloys that are composed of Mn and light group III and/or group IV elements exhibit such properties and may belong to a new category of magnetic materials. In this article, we review the magnetic properties of Mn-based hard magnet films. In particular, we focus on low spin relaxation as a new viewpoint for hard magnets, and we discuss the origin of their extraordinary magnetism in terms of their unique electronic structures.

  17. Financial analysis and forecasting of the results of small businesses performance based on regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana O. Musienko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the economicmathematical model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies. Methods using comparative analysis the article studies the existing approaches to the construction of the company management models. Applying the regression analysis and the least squares method which is widely used for financial management of enterprises in Russia and abroad the author builds a model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies which can be used in the financial analysis and prediction of small enterprisesrsquo performance. Results the article states the need to identify factors affecting the financial management efficiency. The author analyzed scientific research and revealed the lack of comprehensive studies on the methodology for assessing the small enterprisesrsquo management while the methods used for large companies are not always suitable for the task. The systematized approaches of various authors to the formation of regression models describe the influence of certain factors on the company activity. It is revealed that the resulting indicators in the studies were revenue profit or the company relative profitability. The main drawback of most models is the mathematical not economic approach to the definition of the dependent and independent variables. Basing on the analysis it was determined that the most correct is the model of dependence between revenues and total assets of the company using the decimal logarithm. The model was built using data on the activities of the 507 small businesses operating in three spheres of economic activity. Using the presented model it was proved that there is direct dependence between the sales proceeds and the main items of the asset balance as well as differences in the degree of this effect depending on the economic activity of small

  18. Longitudinal parameter identification of a small unmanned aerial vehicle based on modified particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tieying

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a longitudinal parameter identification procedure for a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV through modified particle swam optimization (PSO. The procedure is demonstrated using a small UAV equipped with only an micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS inertial measuring element and a global positioning system (GPS receiver to provide test information. A small UAV longitudinal parameter mathematical model is derived and the modified method is proposed based on PSO with selective particle regeneration (SRPSO. Once modified PSO is applied to the mathematical model, the simulation results show that the mathematical model is correct, and aerodynamic parameters and coefficients of the propeller can be identified accurately. Results are compared with those of PSO and SRPSO and the comparison shows that the proposed method is more robust and faster than the other methods for the longitudinal parameter identification of the small UAV. Some parameter identification results are affected slightly by noise, but the identification results are very good overall. Eventually, experimental validation is employed to test the proposed method, which demonstrates the usefulness of this method.

  19. Photopatterning of self assembled monolayers on oxide surfaces for the selective attachment of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Pompi; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Petersson, Linn; Wingren, Christer; Turner, Michael L

    2014-03-15

    The immobilization of functional biomolecules to surfaces is a critical process for the development of biosensors for disease diagnostics. In this work we report the patterned attachment of single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies to the surface of metal oxides by the photodeprotection of self-assembled monolayers, using near-UV light. The photodeprotection step alters the functionality at the surface; revealing amino groups that are utilized to bind biomolecules in the exposed regions of the substrate only. The patterned antibodies are used for the detection of specific disease biomarker proteins in buffer and in complex samples such as human serum. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Hybrid Metaheuristic-Based Approach for the Aerodynamic Optimization of Small Hybrid Wind Turbine Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Herbert-Acero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel framework for the aerodynamic design and optimization of blades for small horizontal axis wind turbines (WT. The framework is based on a state-of-the-art blade element momentum model, which is complemented with the XFOIL 6.96 software in order to provide an estimate of the sectional blade aerodynamics. The framework considers an innovative nested-hybrid solution procedure based on two metaheuristics, the virtual gene genetic algorithm and the simulated annealing algorithm, to provide a near-optimal solution to the problem. The objective of the study is to maximize the aerodynamic efficiency of small WT (SWT rotors for a wide range of operational conditions. The design variables are (1 the airfoil shape at the different blade span positions and the radial variation of the geometrical variables of (2 chord length, (3 twist angle, and (4 thickness along the blade span. A wind tunnel validation study of optimized rotors based on the NACA 4-digit airfoil series is presented. Based on the experimental data, improvements in terms of the aerodynamic efficiency, the cut-in wind speed, and the amount of material used during the manufacturing process were achieved. Recommendations for the aerodynamic design of SWT rotors are provided based on field experience.

  1. Computational methods to study the structure and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes from bioinformatics to molecular quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Since the second half of the 20th century machine computations have played a critical role in science and engineering. Computer-based techniques have become especially important in molecular biology, since they often represent the only viable way to gain insights into the behavior of a biological system as a whole. The complexity of biological systems, which usually needs to be analyzed on different time- and size-scales and with different levels of accuracy, requires the application of different approaches, ranging from comparative analysis of sequences and structural databases, to the analysis of networks of interdependence between cell components and processes, through coarse-grained modeling to atomically detailed simulations, and finally to molecular quantum mechanics. This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern computer-based techniques for computing the structure, properties and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes. The twenty-two chapters, written by scientists from all over t...

  2. Biomass-derived functional porous carbons as novel electrode material for the practical detection of biomolecules in human serum and snail hemolymph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, Vediyappan; Madhu, Rajesh; Chen, Shen-Ming; Lou, Bih-Show; Palanisamy, Jayabal; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy

    2015-05-01

    The biomass-derived activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared with high surface areas up to 793 m2 g-1 is by ZnCl2 activation at three different temperatures, viz. AC700, AC800, and AC900. The AC samples were characterized by a variety of analytical and spectroscopy techniques. The as-synthesized ACs were adopted for the simultaneous electrochemical detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). For comparison, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was employed for the proposed sensor. The high surface area, modulated pore size and the presence of oxygen surface functional groups like heteroatoms (83.427% C, 1.085% N, 0.383% S, and 0.861% H) in the biomass-derived AC is found to be responsible for the excellent catalytic activities of biomolecules. Fascinatingly, the facile sensor further used to detect biomolecules levels in the snail hemolymph and human blood serum. Notably, the obtained analytical parameters for the biomolecules detection over the AC modified GCE, outperforming several carbon-based modified electrodes in literatures.

  3. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and application of a surface modification designed for QCM-D studies of biotinylated biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilebäck, Erik; Feuz, Laurent; Uddenberg, Hans; Valiokas, Ramūnas; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-10-15

    The rapid development of surface sensitive biosensor technologies, especially towards nanoscale devices, requires increasing control of surface chemistry to provide reliable and reproducible results, but also to take full advantage of the sensing opportunities. Here, we present a surface modification strategy to allow biotinylated biomolecules to be immobilized to gold coated sensor crystals for quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) sensing. The unique feature of QCM-D is its sensitivity to nanomechanical (viscoelastic) properties at the sensing interface. The surface modification was based on mixed monolayers of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) disulfides, with terminal -OH or biotin groups, on gold. Mixtures containing 1% of the biotin disulfide were concluded to be the most appropriate based on the performance when streptavidin was immobilized to biotinylated sensors and the subsequent biotinylated bovine serum albumin (BSA) interaction was studied. The OEG background kept the unspecific protein binding to a minimum, even when subjected to serum solutions with a high protein concentration. Based on characterization by contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and infrared spectroscopy, the monolayers were shown to be well-ordered, with the OEG chains predominantly adopting a helical conformation but also partly an amorphous structure. Storage stability was concluded to depend mainly on light exposure while almost all streptavidin binding activity was retained when storing the sensors cold and dark for 8 weeks. The surface modification was also tested for repeated antibody-antigen interactions between BSA and anti-BSA (immobilized to biotinylated protein A) in QCM-D measurements lasting for >10h with intermediate basic regeneration. This proved an excellent stability of the coating and good reproducibility was obtained for 5 interaction cycles. With this kind of generic surface modification QCM-D can be used in a variety of biosensing

  5. A small azide-modified thiazole-based reporter molecule for fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular probes are widely used tools in chemical biology that allow tracing of bioactive metabolites and selective labeling of proteins and other biomacromolecules. A common structural motif for such probes consists of a reporter that can be attached by copper(I-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole formation between terminal alkynes and azides to a reactive headgroup. Here we introduce the synthesis and application of the new thiazole-based, azide-tagged reporter 4-(3-azidopropoxy-5-(4-bromophenyl-2-(pyridin-2-ylthiazole for fluorescence, UV and mass spectrometry (MS detection. This small fluorescent reporter bears a bromine functionalization facilitating the automated data mining of electrospray ionization MS runs by monitoring for its characteristic isotope signature. We demonstrate the universal utility of the reporter for the detection of an alkyne-modified small molecule by LC–MS and for the visualization of a model protein by in-gel fluorescence. The novel probe advantageously compares with commercially available azide-modified fluorophores and a brominated one. The ease of synthesis, small size, stability, and the universal detection possibilities make it an ideal reporter for activity-based protein profiling and functional metabolic profiling.

  6. Color Image Evaluation for Small Space Based on FA and GEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem that color image is difficult to quantify, this paper proposes an evaluation method of color image for small space based on factor analysis (FA and gene expression programming (GEP and constructs a correlation model between color image factors and comprehensive color image. The basic color samples of small space and color images are evaluated by semantic differential method (SD method, color image factors are selected via dimension reduction in FA, factor score function is established, and by combining the entropy weight method to determine each factor weights then the comprehensive color image score is calculated finally. The best fitting function between color image factors and comprehensive color image is obtained by GEP algorithm, which can predict the users’ color image values. A color image evaluation system for small space is developed based on this model. The color evaluation of a control room on AC frequency conversion rig is taken as an example, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. It also can assist the designers in other color designs and provide a fast evaluation tool for testing users’ color image.

  7. Radiographic diagnosis of mechanical obstruction in dogs based on relative small intestinal external diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Cyrielle; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Alexander, Kate; Specchi, Swan; Beauchamp, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical obstruction is a frequent cause of acute vomiting in dogs requiring prompt diagnosis to improve patient management and prognosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare small intestinal radiographic characteristics in dogs with versus without mechanical intestinal obstruction. Fifty dogs with gastrointestinal clinical signs and abdominal radiographs were recruited from hospital record archives and assigned to groups (group 1, obstructive, n = 25; group 2, nonobstructive n = 25). Abdominal radiographs were randomized and independently interpreted by three examiners who were unaware of group status. Intestinal dilation was subjectively scored based on distribution (segmental, regional or diffuse), and severity (absent, mild, moderate or severe). Small intestinal maximal diameter (SImax), L5 vertebral body height, small intestinal minimal diameter (SImin), and an estimated average of small intestinal diameters (SIave) were measured and three ratios were calculated: SImax/L5, SImax/SImin, and SImax/SIave. Segmental dilation was more prevalent in obstructed dogs for all examiners (P ≤ 0.03) and most nonobstructed dogs had no dilation (P ≤ 0.05). All ratios were higher in obstructed dogs (P dogs with SImax/L5 ≤ 1.4, SImax/SImin ≤ 2, and SImax/SIave ≤ 1.3 values are very unlikely to be mechanically obstructed; dogs with SImax/L5 ≥ 2.4, SImax/SImin ≥ 3.4 and SImax/SIave ≥ 1.9 are very likely obstructed, particularly if segmental dilation (less than 25% of the small intestine) is present. Dogs with ratios falling between these thresholds may need further testing unless other signs justify surgical exploration or endoscopy. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Small target detection based on human visual system utilizing distance information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linna; An, Wei; Lin, Zaiping; Li, Andong; Ye, Jundu

    2015-10-01

    Small target detection is an importance part of infrared technology. Human visual system properties can improve signal to noise rate and detection rate, etc. In this paper, a small target detection algorithm based on human visual system utilizing distance information is proposed. First, surrounding regions is calculated by weighed sum of each pixel in surrounding regions. The weight is related to distance information between each surrounding pixel and center pixel. Then, the contrast value of center pixel blocks and surrounding regions is calculated. Finally, the contrast value is weighted to the center pixel to get a saliency map. Experiment shows that the proposed has good performance on improving the signal to noise rate and detection rate.

  9. Design studies of innovatively small fusion reactor based on biomass-fusion hybrid concept: GNOME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibano, K., E-mail: kibano@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji-shi, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Utoh, H.; Tobita, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Yamamoto, Y.; Konishi, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji-shi, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Conceptual design of an innovatively small tokamak reactor 'GNOME' based on a non-fission biomass-fusion hybrid concept is proposed. This fusion plant concept intends to use high-temperature heat from the blanket to generate hydrogen or synthetic fuels out of waste biomass. Since energy multiplication is expected by utilizing chemical energy of biomass, the requirement for the fusion plasma for net plant energy output is reduced to Q {>=} 5. As a result, the GNOME reactor has been designed to produce 320 MW fusion power with a 5.2 m major radius, 3.1 normalized beta and 11 T maximum field. This relatively small maximum field can be achieved by using Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnets. Besides, this reactor allows 3.0 m diameter space for its center solenoid coil and requires 60 MW of the input power. These features require minimal technical extensions from ITER.

  10. An infrared small target detection method based on nonnegative matrix factorization and compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwei; Wang, Yiming

    2017-07-01

    According to the low rank property of the background and the sparse features of the target in infrared image, a novel infrared small target detection method based on the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and compressed sensing technology was presented in this paper. This method trained background model through NMF, and then sampled the infrared image sequences directly using the block compressed sensing technology. Through the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), the infrared small target was extracted and the background was recovered from the image. At the same time, the background was updated by the update algorithm, to adapt to the changes in the background. The simulation results show that the proposed method can detect the infrared target precisely and efficiently.

  11. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook; Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study

  12. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study.

  13. Teams in Small Technology-Based Firms: The Roles of Diversity and Conflict Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Enrique Carozzo-Todaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of diversity and conflict management on the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes of small technology-based firms. To study the relationship between those variables, a quantitative research was conducted. The results of the survey involving 107 small Brazilian high-tech firms show that diversity and conflict management positively moderate the relationship between teamwork and organizational outcomes. So that, at higher levels of diversity and conflict management, best organizational outcomes. At the same time, it has been verified that conflict management is important regardless the level of diversity within teams. This research sheds new light on the factors that should be considered to become teamwork more effective in this specific context.

  14. Acoustic Source Localization via Subspace Based Method Using Small Aperture MEMS Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small aperture microphone arrays provide many advantages for portable devices and hearing aid equipment. In this paper, a subspace based localization method is proposed for acoustic source using small aperture arrays. The effects of array aperture on localization are analyzed by using array response (array manifold. Besides array aperture, the frequency of acoustic source and the variance of signal power are simulated to demonstrate how to optimize localization performance, which is carried out by introducing frequency error with the proposed method. The proposed method for 5 mm array aperture is validated by simulations and experiments with MEMS microphone arrays. Different types of acoustic sources can be localized with the highest precision of 6 degrees even in the presence of wind noise and other noises. Furthermore, the proposed method reduces the computational complexity compared with other methods.

  15. Detection of small genomic imbalances using microarray-based multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalis, Philippos C; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Männik, Katrin; Sismani, Carolina; Zilina, Olga; Parkel, Sven; Puusepp, Helen; Tõnisson, Neeme; Palta, Priit; Remm, Maido; Kurg, Ants

    2007-02-01

    Array-based genome-wide screening methods were recently introduced to clinical practice in order to detect small genomic imbalances that may cause severe genetic disorders. The continuous advancement of such methods plays an extremely important role in diagnostic genetics and medical genomics. We have modified and adapted the original multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH) to a novel microarray format providing an important new diagnostic tool for detection of small size copy-number changes in any locus of human genome. Here, we describe the new array-MAPH diagnostic method and show proof of concept through fabrication, interrogation and validation of a human chromosome X-specific array. We have developed new bioinformatic tools and methodology for designing and producing amplifiable hybridization probes (200-600 bp) for array-MAPH. We designed 558 chromosome X-specific probes with median spacing 238 kb and 107 autosomal probes, which were spotted onto microarrays. DNA samples from normal individuals and patients with known and unknown chromosome X aberrations were analyzed for validation. Array-MAPH detected exactly the same deletions and duplications in blind studies, as well as other unknown small size deletions showing its accuracy and sensitivity. All results were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and probe-specific PCR. Array-MAPH is a new microarray-based diagnostic tool for the detection of small-scale copy-number changes in complex genomes, which may be useful for genotype-phenotype correlations, identification of new genes, studying genetic variation and provision of genetic services.

  16. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model-based

  17. Data Sources for the Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer-Related Knowledge - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The model-based estimates of important cancer risk factors and screening behaviors are obtained by combining the responses to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

  18. Multivariable Super Twisting Based Robust Trajectory Tracking Control for Small Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a highly robust trajectory tracking controller for small unmanned helicopter with model uncertainties and external disturbances. First, a simplified dynamic model is developed, where the model uncertainties and external disturbances are treated as compounded disturbances. Then the system is divided into three interconnected subsystems: altitude subsystem, yaw subsystem, and horizontal subsystem. Second, a disturbance observer based controller (DOBC is designed based upon backstepping and multivariable super twisting control algorithm to obtain robust trajectory tracking property. A sliding mode observer works as an estimator of the compounded disturbances. In order to lessen calculative burden, a first-order exact differentiator is employed to estimate the time derivative of the virtual control. Moreover, proof of the stability of the closed-loop system based on Lyapunov method is given. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed flight control scheme.

  19. Data gaps in evidence-based research on small water enterprises in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opryszko, Melissa C; Huang, Haiou; Soderlund, Kurt; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2009-12-01

    Small water enterprises (SWEs) are water delivery operations that predominantly provide water at the community level. SWEs operate beyond the reach of piped water systems, selling water to households throughout the world. Their ubiquity in the developing world and access to vulnerable populations suggests that these small-scale water vendors may prove valuable in improving potable water availability. This paper assesses the current literature on SWEs to evaluate previous studies and determine gaps in the evidence base. Piped systems and point-of-use products were not included in this assessment. Results indicate that SWES are active in urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Benefits of SWEs include: no upfront connection fees; demand-driven and flexible to local conditions; and service to large populations without high costs of utility infrastructure. Disadvantages of SWEs include: higher charges for water per unit of volume compared with infrastructure-based utilities; lack of regulation; operation often outside legal structures; no water quality monitoring; increased potential for conflict with local utilities; and potential for extortion by local officials. No rigorous, evidence-based, peer-reviewed scientific studies that control for confounders examining the effectiveness of SWEs in providing potable water were identified.

  20. Agent-Based Modeling of Harvest Decisions by Small Scale Forest Landowners in Maine, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Leahy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale forests are an excellent example of coupled social-ecological systems, which involve human and biophysical subsystems with complex two-way feedback interactions. The multifaceted nature of landowner decisions drives a significant need to better understand decision-making processes, reactions to policy, and combined impacts on ecosystems in a comprehensive manner. Small-scale forests require an integrated approach to modeling the social and biophysical components comprehensively. Agent-based modeling involves modeling individualistic behavior and interpreting patterns that emerge. The interaction between agents and their environments makes this a valuable tool to assess repeated decisions of individual landowners responding to changing environmental conditions. Agent-based models can be used to determine potential ecological, economic, and social outcomes of landowner decisions and reactions to changing conditions. A forest landowner agent-based model experiment was developed to model timber harvesting in Maine, USA. We present baseline simulation results and compare the effect of a social change (an increased tax rate and a biophysical change (a pest outbreak resulting in increased tree mortality on the system. These three scenarios were analyzed using ANOVA and MANOVA tests on harvested hectares and landowner goal scores to assess landowner behavior and priorities by action. We conclude by reviewing implications for future modeling efforts.

  1. Shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s tests for high-dimensional small sample size data

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Kai

    2015-09-16

    DNA sequencing techniques bring novel tools and also statistical challenges to genetic research. In addition to detecting differentially expressed genes, testing the significance of gene sets or pathway analysis has been recognized as an equally important problem. Owing to the “large pp small nn” paradigm, the traditional Hotelling’s T2T2 test suffers from the singularity problem and therefore is not valid in this setting. In this paper, we propose a shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test for both one-sample and two-sample cases. We also suggest several different ways to derive the approximate null distribution under different scenarios of pp and nn for our proposed shrinkage-based test. Simulation studies show that the proposed method performs comparably to existing competitors when nn is moderate or large, but it is better when nn is small. In addition, we analyze four gene expression data sets and they demonstrate the advantage of our proposed shrinkage-based diagonal Hotelling’s test.

  2. The Polygonal Model: A Simple Representation of Biomolecules as a Tool for Teaching Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceição; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo

    2018-01-01

    Metabolism involves numerous reactions and organic compounds that the student must master to understand adequately the processes involved. Part of biochemical learning should include some knowledge of the structure of biomolecules, although the acquisition of such knowledge can be time-consuming and may require significant effort from the student.…

  3. Tapered Optical Fiber Sensor for Label-Free Detection of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fast, highly sensitive and low-cost tapered optical fiber biosensor that enables the label-free detection of biomolecules. The sensor takes advantage of the interference effect between the fiber’s first two propagation modes along the taper waist region. The biomolecules bonded on the taper surface were determined by demodulating the transmission spectrum phase shift. Because of the sharp spectrum fringe signals, as well as a relatively long biomolecule testing region, the sensor displayed a fast response and was highly sensitive. To better understand the influence of various biomolecules on the sensor, a numerical simulation that varied biolayer parameters such as thickness and refractive index was performed. The results showed that the spectrum fringe shift was obvious to be measured even when the biolayer was only nanometers thick. A microchannel chip was designed and fabricated for the protection of the sensor and biotesting. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS fabrication techniques were used to precisely control the profile and depth of the microchannel on the silicon chip with an accuracy of 2 μm. A tapered optical fiber biosensor was fabricated and evaluated with an Immune globulin G (IgG antibody-antigen pair.

  4. Cellular Viscosity in Prokaryotes and Thermal Stability of Low Molecular Weight Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuecas, Alba; Cruces, Jorge; Galisteo-López, Juan F; Peng, Xiaojun; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2016-08-23

    Some low molecular weight biomolecules, i.e., NAD(P)H, are unstable at high temperatures. The use of these biomolecules by thermophilic microorganisms has been scarcely analyzed. Herein, NADH stability has been studied at different temperatures and viscosities. NADH decay increased at increasing temperatures. At increasing viscosities, NADH decay rates decreased. Thus, maintaining relatively high cellular viscosity in cells could result in increased stability of low molecular weight biomolecules (i.e., NADH) at high temperatures, unlike what was previously deduced from studies in diluted water solutions. Cellular viscosity was determined using a fluorescent molecular rotor in various prokaryotes covering the range from 10 to 100°C. Some mesophiles showed the capability of changing cellular viscosity depending on growth temperature. Thermophiles and extreme thermophiles presented a relatively high cellular viscosity, suggesting this strategy as a reasonable mechanism to thrive under these high temperatures. Results substantiate the capability of thermophiles and extreme thermophiles (growth range 50-80°C) to stabilize and use generally considered unstable, universal low molecular weight biomolecules. In addition, this study represents a first report, to our knowledge, on cellular viscosity measurements in prokaryotes and it shows the dependency of prokaryotic cellular viscosity on species and growth temperature. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Detection of Biomolecules Using Gold Nanoparticles, Matrix, and the Coffee Ring Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsico, Alyssa L M; Duncan, Bradley; Landis, Ryan F; Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2017-03-07

    Nanomaterials have been extensively used as alternate matrices to minimize the low molecular weight interferences observed in typical MALDI but such nanomaterials typically do not improve the spot-to-spot variability that is commonly seen. In this work, we demonstrate that nanoparticles and low matrix concentrations (ring by taking advantage of the "coffee ring" effect. Concentration of the samples in this way leads to enhanced signals when compared to conventional MALDI, with higher m/z analytes being enhanced to the greatest extent. Moreover, the ionization suppression often observed in samples with high salt concentrations can be overcome by preparing samples in this way. The ring that is formed is readily visible, allowing the laser to be focused only on spots that contain analyte. The coffee-ring effect represents a new mode by which nanomaterials can be used to enhance the MALDI-based detection of biomolecules.

  6. Shape-controlled synthesis and properties of manganese sulfide microcrystals via a biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jinghui; Yu Runnan; Zhu Jianyu; Yi Ran; Qiu Guanzhou [School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); He Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu Xiaohe, E-mail: liuxh@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2009-06-15

    An effective biomolecule-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare {gamma}-manganese sulfide (MnS) microtubes under hydrothermal conditions. In the synthetic system, soluble hydrated manganese chloride was employed to supply Mn source and L-cysteine was used as precipitator and complexing reagent. Sea urchin-like {gamma}-MnS and octahedron-like {alpha}-MnS microcrystals could also be selectively obtained by adjusting the process parameters such as hydrothermal temperature and reaction time. The phase structures, morphologies and properties of the as-prepared products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), and photoluminescence spectra (PL). The photoluminescence studies exhibited the correlations between the morphology, size, and shape structure of MnS microcrystals and its optical properties. The formation mechanisms of manganese sulfide microcrystals were discussed based on the experimental results.

  7. Systems-based discovery of tomatidine as a natural small molecule inhibitor of skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyle, Michael C; Ebert, Scott M; Cook, Daniel P; Kunkel, Steven D; Fox, Daniel K; Bongers, Kale S; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-05-23

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that lacks an effective therapy. To address this problem, we used a systems-based discovery strategy to search for a small molecule whose mRNA expression signature negatively correlates to mRNA expression signatures of human skeletal muscle atrophy. This strategy identified a natural small molecule from tomato plants, tomatidine. Using cultured skeletal myotubes from both humans and mice, we found that tomatidine stimulated mTORC1 signaling and anabolism, leading to accumulation of protein and mitochondria, and ultimately, cell growth. Furthermore, in mice, tomatidine increased skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling, reduced skeletal muscle atrophy, enhanced recovery from skeletal muscle atrophy, stimulated skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and increased strength and exercise capacity. Collectively, these results identify tomatidine as a novel small molecule inhibitor of muscle atrophy. Tomatidine may have utility as a therapeutic agent or lead compound for skeletal muscle atrophy. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Towards a high sensitivity small animal PET system based on CZT detectors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Levin, Craig

    2017-03-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) is a biological imaging technology that allows non-invasive interrogation of internal molecular and cellular processes and mechanisms of disease. New PET molecular probes with high specificity are under development to target, detect, visualize, and quantify subtle molecular and cellular processes associated with cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, the limited uptake of these targeted probes leads to significant reduction in signal. There is a need to advance the performance of small animal PET system technology to reach its full potential for molecular imaging. Our goal is to assemble a small animal PET system based on CZT detectors and to explore methods to enhance its photon sensitivity. In this work, we reconstruct an image from a phantom using a two-panel subsystem consisting of six CZT crystals in each panel. For image reconstruction, coincidence events with energy between 450 and 570 keV were included. We are developing an algorithm to improve sensitivity of the system by including multiple interaction events.

  9. HEp-2 cell image classification method based on very deep convolutional networks with small datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mengchi; Gao, Long; Guo, Xifeng; Liu, Qiang; Yin, Jianping

    2017-07-01

    Human Epithelial-2 (HEp-2) cell images staining patterns classification have been widely used to identify autoimmune diseases by the anti-Nuclear antibodies (ANA) test in the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) protocol. Because manual test is time consuming, subjective and labor intensive, image-based Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems for HEp-2 cell classification are developing. However, methods proposed recently are mostly manual features extraction with low accuracy. Besides, the scale of available benchmark datasets is small, which does not exactly suitable for using deep learning methods. This issue will influence the accuracy of cell classification directly even after data augmentation. To address these issues, this paper presents a high accuracy automatic HEp-2 cell classification method with small datasets, by utilizing very deep convolutional networks (VGGNet). Specifically, the proposed method consists of three main phases, namely image preprocessing, feature extraction and classification. Moreover, an improved VGGNet is presented to address the challenges of small-scale datasets. Experimental results over two benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed method achieves superior performance in terms of accuracy compared with existing methods.

  10. Design and implement of infrared small target real-time detection system based on pipeline technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihui; Wang, Yongzhong; He, Yongqiang

    2007-01-01

    The detection for motive small target in infrared image sequence has become a hot topic nowadays. Background suppress algorithm based on minim gradient median filter and temporal recursion target detection algorithm are introduced. On the basis of contents previously mentioned, a four stages pipeline structure infrared small target detection process system, which aims at characters of algorithm complexity, large amounts of data to process, high frame frequency and exigent real-time character in this kind of application, is designed and implemented. The logical structure of the system was introduced and the function and signals flows are programmed. The system is composed of two FPGA chips and two DSP chips of TI. According to the function of each part, the system is divided into image preprocess stage, target detection stage, track relation stage and image output stage. The experiment of running algorithms on the system presented in this paper proved that the system could meet acquisition and process of 50Hz 240x320 digital image and the system could real time detect small target with a signal-noise ratio more than 3 reliably. The system achieves the characters of large amount of memory, high real-time processing, excellent extension and favorable interactive interface.

  11. High performance solution-processable tetrathienoacene (TTAR) based small molecules for organic field effect transistors (OFETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegiraju, Sureshraju; Huang, Deng-Yi; Priyanka, Pragya; Li, Yo-Shan; Luo, Xian-Lun; Hong, Shao-Huan; Ni, Jen-Shyang; Tung, Shih-Huang; Wang, Chien-Lung; Lien, Wei-Chieh; Yau, Shueh Lin; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Chen, Ming-Chou

    2017-05-30

    Three new organic semiconductors with alkyl chain-substituted tetrathienoacene (TTAR) as the central core and both ends capped with thiophene (DT-TTAR), thienothiophene (DTT-TTAR) and dithienothiophene (DDTT-TTAR) have been synthesized and characterized for organic field effect transistor (OFET) applications. A hole mobility of 0.81 cm 2 V -1 s -1 was achieved for the DDTT-TTAR film, which represents the highest mobility yet found for a solution-processable p-type TTAR-based small molecular semiconductors.

  12. Low-cost mobile video-based iris recognition for small databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N. Luke; Du, Yingzi; Muttineni, Sriharsha; Mang, Shing; Sran, Dylan

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a low-cost method for providing biometric verification for applications that do not require large database sizes. Existing portable iris recognition systems are typically self-contained and expensive. For some applications, low cost is more important than extremely discerning matching ability. In these instances, the proposed system could be implemented at low cost, with adequate matching performance for verification. Additionally, the proposed system could be used in conjunction with any image based biometric identification system. A prototype system was developed and tested on a small database, with promising preliminary results.

  13. Optimization of biodiesel supply chains based on small farmers: A case study in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Raphael; Hamacher, Silvio

    2010-09-15

    The strategy adopted by the Brazilian Biodiesel Program is to base its fuel production on oilseeds acquired from small, family-owned farms in the poorest regions of the country, thereby fostering social inclusion and transfer of income. The success of the program depends on the development of a robust supply chain logistic structure, appropriate distribution of crop production, and investments in new oilseed crushing units. This article presents the development of a mathematical model for optimizing the production arrangements for the supply of a biodiesel plant sourced from family farms, taking into account agricultural, logistic, industrial and social aspects.

  14. Measurement of the time resolution of small SiPM-based scintillation counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. A.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this research, we evaluated the timing resolution of SiPM-based scintillation detector on a 1-GeV electron beam "extracted" from VEPP-4M. We tested small scintillation crystals of pure CsI, YAP, LYSO, and LFS-3 with HAMAMATSU S10362-33-025C and S13360-3050CS. The CsI scintillator together with HAMAMATSU S13360-3050CS demonstrated the best results. Nevertheless, the achieved time resolution of ~80 ps (RMS) relates mainly to the photodetector itself. It makes the silicon photomultiplier an attractive candidate to replace other devices in applications where sub-nanosecond accuracy is required.

  15. Nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for in vitro detection of small molecule metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites secreted by pathological processes can act as molecular biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. In vitro detection of the metabolites such as glucose and reactive oxygen species is of great significance for precise screening, monitoring and prognosis of metabolic disorders and relevant diseases such as cancer, and has been under intense research and development in clinical chemistry and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize recent developments in nanomaterial based electrochemical (bio)sensors for in vitro detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species and the progress in utilizing lightweight and flexible electrodes and micro/nanoscale electrodes for flexible and miniaturized sensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Methodology for the Model-based Small Area Estimates of Cancer Risk Factors and Screening Behaviors - Small Area Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This model-based approach uses data from both the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to produce estimates of the prevalence rates of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors at the state, health service area, and county levels.

  17. Development of an ultrahigh resolution Si-PM based PET system for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Since a high resolution PET system is needed for small animal imaging, especially for mouse studies, we developed a new small animal PET system that decreased the size of the scintillators to less than 1 mm. Our developed PET system used 0.5 × 0.7 × 5 mm3 LYSO pixels arranged in an 11 × 13 matrix to form a block with a 0.1 mm BaSO4 reflector between the pixels. Two LYSO blocks were optically coupled to two optical fiber based angled image guides. These LYSO blocks and image guides were coupled to a Si-PM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) to form a block detector. Eight block detectors (16 LYSO blocks) were arranged in a 34 mm inner diameter ring to form a small animal PET system. The block detector showed good separation for the 22 × 13 LYSO pixels in the two-dimensional position histogram. The energy resolution was 20% full-with at half-maximum (FWHM) for 511 keV gamma photons. The transaxial resolution reconstructed by filtered backprojection was 0.71 to 0.75 mm FWHM and the axial resolution was 0.70 mm. The point source sensitivity was 0.24% at the central axial field-of-view. High resolution mouse images were obtained using our PET system. The developed ultrahigh resolution PET system showed attractive images for small animal studies and has a potential to provide new findings in molecular imaging researches.

  18. Development of an ultrahigh resolution Si-PM based PET system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kato, Katsuhiko; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Since a high resolution PET system is needed for small animal imaging, especially for mouse studies, we developed a new small animal PET system that decreased the size of the scintillators to less than 1 mm. Our developed PET system used 0.5 × 0.7 × 5 mm 3 LYSO pixels arranged in an 11 × 13 matrix to form a block with a 0.1 mm BaSO 4 reflector between the pixels. Two LYSO blocks were optically coupled to two optical fiber based angled image guides. These LYSO blocks and image guides were coupled to a Si-PM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064–050P) to form a block detector. Eight block detectors (16 LYSO blocks) were arranged in a 34 mm inner diameter ring to form a small animal PET system. The block detector showed good separation for the 22 × 13 LYSO pixels in the two-dimensional position histogram. The energy resolution was 20% full-with at half-maximum (FWHM) for 511 keV gamma photons. The transaxial resolution reconstructed by filtered backprojection was 0.71 to 0.75 mm FWHM and the axial resolution was 0.70 mm. The point source sensitivity was 0.24% at the central axial field-of-view. High resolution mouse images were obtained using our PET system. The developed ultrahigh resolution PET system showed attractive images for small animal studies and has a potential to provide new findings in molecular imaging researches. (paper)

  19. Thermochemical Fragment Energy Method for Biomolecules: Application to a Collagen Model Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2009-06-09

    Herein, we first review different methodologies that have been proposed for computing the quantum mechanical (QM) energy and other molecular properties of large systems through a linear combination of subsystem (fragment) energies, which can be computed using conventional QM packages. Particularly, we emphasize the similarities among the different methods that can be considered as variants of the multibody expansion technique. Nevertheless, on the basis of thermochemical arguments, we propose yet another variant of the fragment energy methods, which could be useful for, and readily applicable to, biomolecules using either QM or hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics methods. The proposed computational scheme is applied to investigate the stability of a triple-helical collagen model peptide. To better address the actual applicability of the fragment QM method and to properly compare with experimental data, we compute average energies by carrying out single-point fragment QM calculations on structures generated by a classical molecular dynamics simulation. The QM calculations are done using a density functional level of theory combined with an implicit solvent model. Other free-energy terms such as attractive dispersion interactions or thermal contributions are included using molecular mechanics. The importance of correcting both the intermolecular and intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the QM calculations is also discussed in detail. On the basis of the favorable comparison of our fragment-based energies with experimental data and former theoretical results, we conclude that the fragment QM energy strategy could be an interesting addition to the multimethod toolbox for biomolecular simulations in order to investigate those situations (e.g., interactions with metal clusters) that are beyond the range of applicability of common molecular mechanics methods.

  20. Cytoplasmic electric fields and electroosmosis: possible solution for the paradoxes of the intracellular transport of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor P Andreev

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to show that electroosmotic flow might play an important role in the intracellular transport of biomolecules. The paper presents two mathematical models describing the role of electroosmosis in the transport of the negatively charged messenger proteins to the negatively charged nucleus and in the recovery of the fluorescence after photobleaching. The parameters of the models were derived from the extensive review of the literature data. Computer simulations were performed within the COMSOL 4.2a software environment. The first model demonstrated that the presence of electroosmosis might intensify the flux of messenger proteins to the nucleus and allow the efficient transport of the negatively charged phosphorylated messenger proteins against the electrostatic repulsion of the negatively charged nucleus. The second model revealed that the presence of the electroosmotic flow made the time of fluorescence recovery dependent on the position of the bleaching spot relative to cellular membrane. The magnitude of the electroosmotic flow effect was shown to be quite substantial, i.e. increasing the flux of the messengers onto the nucleus up to 4-fold relative to pure diffusion and resulting in the up to 3-fold change in the values of fluorescence recovery time, and therefore the apparent diffusion coefficient determined from the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Based on the results of the modeling and on the universal nature of the electroosmotic flow, the potential wider implications of electroosmotic flow in the intracellular and extracellular biological processes are discussed. Both models are available for download at ModelDB.

  1. Evolution of project-based learning in small groups in environmental engineering courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Requies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the assessment of the development and evolution of an active methodology (Project-Based Learning –PBL- implemented on the course “Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering”, within the bachelor’s degree in Environmental Engineering, with the purpose of decreasing the dropout rate in this course. After the initial design and implementation of this methodology during the first academic year (12/13, different modifications were adopted in the following ones (13-14, 14-15 & 15-16 in order to optimize the student’s and professor’s work load as well as correct some malfunctions observed in the initial design of the PBL. This active methodology seeks to make students the main architects of their own learning processes. Accordingly, they have to identify their learning needs, which is a highly motivating approach both for their curricular development and for attaining the required learning outcomes in this field of knowledge. The results obtained show that working in small teams (cooperative work enhances each group member’s self–learning capabilities. Moreover, academic marks improve when compared to traditional learning methodologies. Nevertheless, the implementation of more active methodologies, such as project-based learning, in small groups has certain specific characteristics. In this case it has been implemented simultaneously in two different groups of 10 students each one. Such small groups are more heterogeneoussince the presence of two highly motivated students or not can vary or affect the whole group’s attitude and academic results.

  2. Consolidating duodenal and small bowel toxicity data via isoeffective dose calculations based on compiled clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Phillip; Tai, An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2014-01-01

    To consolidate duodenum and small bowel toxicity data from clinical studies with different dose fractionation schedules using the modified linear quadratic (MLQ) model. A methodology of adjusting the dose-volume (D,v) parameters to different levels of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was presented. A set of NTCP model parameters for duodenum toxicity were estimated by the χ(2) fitting method using literature-based tolerance dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) data. These model parameters were then used to convert (D,v) data into the isoeffective dose in 2 Gy per fraction, (D(MLQED2),v) and convert these parameters to an isoeffective dose at another NTCP (D(MLQED2'),v). The literature search yielded 5 reports useful in making estimates of duodenum and small bowel toxicity. The NTCP model parameters were found to be TD50(1)(model) = 60.9 ± 7.9 Gy, m = 0.21 ± 0.05, and δ = 0.09 ± 0.03 Gy(-1). Isoeffective dose calculations and toxicity rates associated with hypofractionated radiation therapy reports were found to be consistent with clinical data having different fractionation schedules. Values of (D(MLQED2'),v) between different NTCP levels remain consistent over a range of 5%-20%. MLQ-based isoeffective calculations of dose-response data corresponding to grade ≥2 duodenum toxicity were found to be consistent with one another within the calculation uncertainty. The (D(MLQED2),v) data could be used to determine duodenum and small bowel dose-volume constraints for new dose escalation strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanye; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo; Ren, Qiushi

    2014-01-01

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development

  4. Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Based on Secreted, Species-Specific, Bacterial Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shih-Jung; Tapley, Asa; Adamson, John; Little, Tessa; Urbanowski, Michael; Cohen, Keira; Pym, Alexander; Almeida, Deepak; Dorasamy, Afton; Layre, Emilie; Young, David C; Singh, Ravesh; Patel, Vinod B; Wallengren, Kristina; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Moody, D Branch; Bishai, William

    2015-12-01

    Improved biomarkers are needed for tuberculosis. To develop tests based on products secreted by tubercle bacilli that are strictly associated with viability, we evaluated 3 bacterial-derived, species-specific, small molecules as biomarkers: 2 mycobactin siderophores and tuberculosinyladenosine. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrated the presence of 1 or both mycobactins and/or tuberculosinyladenosine in serum and whole lung tissues from infected mice and sputum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or lymph nodes from infected patients but not uninfected controls. Detection of the target molecules distinguished host infection status in 100% of mice with both serum and lung as the target sample. In human subjects, we evaluated detection of the bacterial small molecules (BSMs) in multiple body compartments in 3 patient cohorts corresponding to different forms of tuberculosis. We detected at least 1 of the 3 molecules in 90%, 71%, and 40% of tuberculosis patients' sputum, CSF, and lymph node samples, respectively. In paucibacillary forms of human tuberculosis, which are difficult to diagnose even with culture, detection of 1 or more BSM was rapid and compared favorably to polymerase chain reaction-based detection. Secreted BSMs, detectable in serum, warrant further investigation as a means for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with tuberculosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Radiomics-based Prognosis Analysis for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yucheng; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Wong, Alexander; Haider, Masoom A.; Khalvati, Farzad

    2017-04-01

    Radiomics characterizes tumor phenotypes by extracting large numbers of quantitative features from radiological images. Radiomic features have been shown to provide prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes in several studies. However, several challenges including feature redundancy, unbalanced data, and small sample sizes have led to relatively low predictive accuracy. In this study, we explore different strategies for overcoming these challenges and improving predictive performance of radiomics-based prognosis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CT images of 112 patients (mean age 75 years) with NSCLC who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy were used to predict recurrence, death, and recurrence-free survival using a comprehensive radiomics analysis. Different feature selection and predictive modeling techniques were used to determine the optimal configuration of prognosis analysis. To address feature redundancy, comprehensive analysis indicated that Random Forest models and Principal Component Analysis were optimum predictive modeling and feature selection methods, respectively, for achieving high prognosis performance. To address unbalanced data, Synthetic Minority Over-sampling technique was found to significantly increase predictive accuracy. A full analysis of variance showed that data endpoints, feature selection techniques, and classifiers were significant factors in affecting predictive accuracy, suggesting that these factors must be investigated when building radiomics-based predictive models for cancer prognosis.

  6. Wavelet transform-based fault diagnosis and line selection method of small current grounding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ni; Zhang, Shuqing; Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Kexin; Sun, Lingyun

    2008-12-01

    Small current grounding system is the system that the neutral point doesn't ground or grounds across the arc suppressing coils, which has been applied commonly in distribution system of many countries. As the grounding fault occurs, current is the one caused by capacity of circuit to ground only and it is rather small. The status of fault is complexity, e.g., the electromagnet interferes together with the amplified impact of zero-order loops to high-order singularity waves and various temporary variables. All these result in the lower ratio of the fault element signal to noise caused by zero-order current. In this paper, the position of signal singularity and the magnitude of the singularity degree are analyzed based on the variable focus character of wavelet, and the time fault occurs is then determined. The series db wavelet with close sustain is adopted, and the line selection is according to the zero-order voltage of the generatrix and the current of various outlet line. It is proved by the experiment that the fault circuit diagnosis method based on wavelet analysis to the character of temporary status of single-phase grounding fault plays an important role to a finer line selection.

  7. Small Imaging Depth LIDAR and DCNN-Based Localization for Automated Guided Vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Seigo; Hiratsuka, Shigeyoshi; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masaru

    2018-01-10

    We present our third prototype sensor and a localization method for Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs), for which small imaging LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and fusion-based localization are fundamentally important. Our small imaging LIDAR, named the Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) LIDAR, uses a time-of-flight method and SPAD arrays. A SPAD is a highly sensitive photodetector capable of detecting at the single-photon level, and the SPAD LIDAR has two SPAD arrays on the same chip for detection of laser light and environmental light. Therefore, the SPAD LIDAR simultaneously outputs range image data and monocular image data with the same coordinate system and does not require external calibration among outputs. As AGVs travel both indoors and outdoors with vibration, this calibration-less structure is particularly useful for AGV applications. We also introduce a fusion-based localization method, named SPAD DCNN, which uses the SPAD LIDAR and employs a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN). SPAD DCNN can fuse the outputs of the SPAD LIDAR: range image data, monocular image data and peak intensity image data. The SPAD DCNN has two outputs: the regression result of the position of the SPAD LIDAR and the classification result of the existence of a target to be approached. Our third prototype sensor and the localization method are evaluated in an indoor environment by assuming various AGV trajectories. The results show that the sensor and localization method improve the localization accuracy.

  8. Small Imaging Depth LIDAR and DCNN-Based Localization for Automated Guided Vehicle †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Seigo; Hiratsuka, Shigeyoshi; Ohta, Mitsuhiko; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    We present our third prototype sensor and a localization method for Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs), for which small imaging LIght Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and fusion-based localization are fundamentally important. Our small imaging LIDAR, named the Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) LIDAR, uses a time-of-flight method and SPAD arrays. A SPAD is a highly sensitive photodetector capable of detecting at the single-photon level, and the SPAD LIDAR has two SPAD arrays on the same chip for detection of laser light and environmental light. Therefore, the SPAD LIDAR simultaneously outputs range image data and monocular image data with the same coordinate system and does not require external calibration among outputs. As AGVs travel both indoors and outdoors with vibration, this calibration-less structure is particularly useful for AGV applications. We also introduce a fusion-based localization method, named SPAD DCNN, which uses the SPAD LIDAR and employs a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN). SPAD DCNN can fuse the outputs of the SPAD LIDAR: range image data, monocular image data and peak intensity image data. The SPAD DCNN has two outputs: the regression result of the position of the SPAD LIDAR and the classification result of the existence of a target to be approached. Our third prototype sensor and the localization method are evaluated in an indoor environment by assuming various AGV trajectories. The results show that the sensor and localization method improve the localization accuracy. PMID:29320434

  9. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  10. Adaptive, Small-Rotation-Based, Corotational Technique for Analysis of 2D Nonlinear Elastic Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroon Rungamornrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient and accurate numerical technique for analysis of two-dimensional frames accounted for both geometric nonlinearity and nonlinear elastic material behavior. An adaptive remeshing scheme is utilized to optimally discretize a structure into a set of elements where the total displacement can be decomposed into the rigid body movement and one possessing small rotations. This, therefore, allows the force-deformation relationship for the latter part to be established based on small-rotation-based kinematics. Nonlinear elastic material model is integrated into such relation via the prescribed nonlinear moment-curvature relationship. The global force-displacement relation for each element can be derived subsequently using corotational formulations. A final system of nonlinear algebraic equations along with its associated gradient matrix for the whole structure is obtained by a standard assembly procedure and then solved numerically by Newton-Raphson algorithm. A selected set of results is then reported to demonstrate and discuss the computational performance including the accuracy and convergence of the proposed technique.

  11. Optimization of small long-life PWR based on thorium fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subkhi, Moh Nurul; Suud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-01

    A conceptual design of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium fuel has been investigated in neutronic aspect. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.2, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in three-dimension X-Y-Z geometry of core by COREBN. The excess reactivity of thorium nitride with ZIRLO cladding is considered during 5 years of burnup without refueling. Optimization of 350 MWe long life PWR based on 5% 233U & 2.8% 231Pa, 6% 233U & 2.8% 231Pa and 7% 233U & 6% 231Pa give low excess reactivity.

  12. Shape memory alloy-based small crawling robots inspired by C. elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Honggu; Jo, Sungho, E-mail: shjo@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: j_shin@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Computer Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Inspired by its simple musculature, actuation and motion mechanisms, we have developed a small crawling robot that closely mimics the model organism of our choice: Caenorhabditis elegans. A thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) was selected as an actuator due to the similarities of its properties to C. elegans muscles. Based on the anatomy of C. elegans, a 12-unit robot was designed to generate a sinusoidal undulating motion. Each body unit consisting of a pair of SMA actuators is serially connected by rigid links with an embedded motion control circuit. A simple binary operation-based motion control mechanism was implemented using a microcontroller. The assembled robot can execute C. elegans-like motion with a 0.17 Hz undulation frequency. Its motion is comparable to that of a real worm.

  13. Infrared small target detection method based on local threshold attenuation of constant false alarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ke-feng; Shi, Zhi-guang; Lu, Xin-ping

    2016-03-01

    In the infrared small target detection system, CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate) is a commonly used technology, but in the traditional single frame detection method, detection rate is requested to be improved while the false alarm rate is increasing. This paper proposes a threshold attenuation CFAR detection method based on Gauss distribution. After the preprocessing of infrared images, we came into the designing of CFAR detector based on Gauss distribution. According to the previous frame target location and attenuation of local threshold, the detection rate of the target neighbourhood can be improved to obtain the current target location. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively control the threshold, and under the precondition that the background clutter was suppressed by the global low false alarm rate, it can improve the local detection rate and reduce the probability of target loss.

  14. Guided waves based diagnostic imaging of circumferential cracks in small-diameter pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kehai; Wu, Zhanjun; Jiang, Youqiang; Wang, Yishou; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Yingpu

    2016-02-01

    To improve the safety and reliability of pipeline structures, much work has been done using ultrasonic guided waves methods for pipe inspection. Though good for evaluating the defects in the pipes, most of the methods lack the capability to precisely identify the defects in the pipe features like welds or supports. Therefore, a novel guided wave based cross-sectional diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed to improve the ability of circumferential cracks identification in the pipe features. To ensure the accuracy of the imaging, an angular profile-based frequency selection method is presented. As validation, the approach was employed to identify the presence and location of a small circumferential crack with 1.13% cross sectional area (CSA) in the welding zone of a 48 mm diameter type 304 stainless steel pipe. Accurate identification results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed approach. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Structural evolution of photocrosslinked silk fibroin and silk fibroin-based hybrid hydrogels: A small angle and ultra-small angle scattering investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jasmin L; Balu, Rajkamal; Knott, Robert; de Campo, Liliana; Mata, Jitendra P; Rehm, Christine; Hill, Anita J; Dutta, Naba K; Roy Choudhury, Namita

    2018-03-12

    Regenerated Bombyx mori silk fibroin (RSF) is a widely recognized protein for biomedical applications; however, its hierarchical gel structure is poorly understood. In this paper, the hierarchical structure of photocrosslinked RSF and RSF-based hybrid hydrogel systems: (i) RSF/Rec1-resilin and (ii) RSF/poly(N-vinylcaprolactam (PVCL) is reported for the first time using small-angle scattering (SAS) techniques. The structure of RSF in dilute to concentrated solution to fabricated hydrogels were characterized using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques. The RSF hydrogel exhibited three distinctive structural characteristics: (i) a Porod region in the length scale of 2 to 3nm due to hydrophobic domains (containing β-sheets) which exhibits sharp interfaces with the amorphous matrix of the hydrogel and the solvent, (ii) a Guinier region in the length scale of 4 to 20nm due to hydrophilic domains (containing turns and random coil), and (iii) a Porod-like region in the length scale of few micrometers due to water pores/channels exhibiting fractal-like characteristics. Addition of Rec1-resilin or PVCL to RSF and subsequent crosslinking systematically increased the nanoscale size of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains, whereas decreased the homogeneity of pore size distribution in the microscale. The presented results have implications on the fundamental understanding of the structure-property relationship of RSF-based hydrogels. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Polystyrene nanoparticles facilitate the internalization of impermeable biomolecules in non-tumour and tumour cells from colon epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabeza, Laura [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Rodríguez, María J. [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Vélez, Celia; Melguizo, Consolación, E-mail: melguizo@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain); Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M., E-mail: rmsanchez@ugr.es [University of Granada, Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (Spain); Prados, Jose [University of Granada, Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER) (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced colon cancer has a poor prognosis due to the limited effectiveness of current chemotherapies. Treatment failures may be avoided by the utilization of nanoparticles, which can enhance the effects of antitumor drugs, reduce their side effects and increase their directionality. Polystyrene nanoparticles have shown high biocompatibility and appropriate physicochemical properties and may represent a novel and more effective approach against colon cancer. In the present study, polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized and fluorescently labelled, analyzing their cell internalization, intracellular localization and capacity to release transported molecules in tumour and non-tumour human colon cell lines (T84 and CCD-18). Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that polystyrene nanoparticles are an effective vehicle for the intracellular delivery of small molecules into colon epithelium cells. The percentage cell uptake was around 100 % in both T84 and CCD-18 cell lines after only 24 h of exposure and was cell confluence-independent. The polystyrene nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity in either colon cell line. It was found that small molecules can be efficiently delivered into colon cells by using a disulphide bridge as release strategy. Analysis of the influence of the functionalization of the polystyrene nanoparticles surface on the internalization efficiency revealed some morphological changes in these cells. These results demonstrate that polystyrene nanoparticles may improve the transport of biomolecules into colon cells which could have a potential application in chemotherapeutic treatment against colon cancer.

  17. Development of methods for the purification of 67Ga and 68Ga for biomolecules labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Renata Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    For more than fifty years, the long-lived 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators have been in development, obtaining 68 Ga without the need of having in house cyclotron, which is a considerable convenience for PET centers that have no nearby cyclotrons. 68 Ga decays 89% by positron emission and low photon emission (1077 keV) and the physical half life of 67.7 minutes is compatible with the pharmacokinetics of low biomolecular weight substances like peptides and antibody fragments. Moreover, its established metallic chemistry allows it to be stably bound to the carrier peptide sequence via a suitable bifunctional chelator, such as DOTA. All these reasons together with the technology of PET/CT allowed advances in molecular imaging, in particular in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine diseases. However, the eluate from the commercial 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators still contains high levels of long lived 68 Ge, besides other metallic impurities, which competes with 68 Ga with a consequent reduction of the labeling yield of biomolecules, such as Fe 3+ and Zn 2+ . Thus, the lower the amount of impurities in the eluate, the competition between the radiolabeled and unlabeled peptide by the receptor will be smaller and the quality of imaging will be better, a subsequent purification step is needed after the generator elution. The aim of this work is to evaluate different purifications methods of 68 Ga to label biomolecules, with emphasis on the study of the chemical impurities contained in the eluate and to develop a new purification method. Several purification methods were studied. Many cationic resin were tested simulating the commercial process. 68 Ga is adsorbed in cationic resin, which is not commercial available and eluted in acid/acetone solution. The use of minor particles of cationic resin AG50W-X4 (200-400 mesh) showed the best results. An innovate method was the extraction chromatography, which is based on the absorption of diisopropyl ether in XAD 16 and 68 Ga recovery in deionized

  18. Porphyrin-based Photocatalytic Nanolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P; Stone, G; Dugan, L C; Dasher, B E; Stockton, C; Conway, J W; Kuenzler, T; Hubbell, J A

    2009-06-08

    Nanoarray fabrication is a multidisciplinary endeavor encompassing materials science, chemical engineering and biology. We form nanoarrays via a new technique, porphyrin-based photocatalytic nanolithography (PCNL). The nanoarrays, with controlled features as small as 200 nm, exhibit regularly ordered patterns and may be appropriate for (a) rapid and parallel proteomic screening of immobilized biomolecules, (b) protein-protein interactions and/or (c) biophysical and molecular biology studies involving spatially dictated ligand placement. We demonstrate protein immobilization utilizing nanoarrays fabricated via PCNL on silicon substrates, where the immobilized proteins are surrounded by a non-fouling polymer background.

  19. Nanoparticle-based delivery of small interfering RNA: challenges for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miele E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Evelina Miele,1,* Gian Paolo Spinelli,2,* Ermanno Miele,3 Enzo Di Fabrizio,3,6 Elisabetta Ferretti,4 Silverio Tomao,2 Alberto Gulino,1,5 1Department of Molecular Medicine, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 3Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego, 30, 16163 Genova, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 5Center for Life Nanoscience, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, Italy, 6BIONEM lab, University of Magna Graecia, Campus S. Venuta, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: During recent decades there have been remarkable advances and profound changes in cancer therapy. Many therapeutic strategies learned at the bench, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have been used at the bedside, leading to important successes. One of the most important advances in biology has been the discovery that small interfering RNA (siRNA is able to regulate the expression of genes, by a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi. RNAi is one of the most rapidly growing fields of research in biology and therapeutics. Much research effort has gone into the application of this new discovery in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. However, even though these molecules may have potential and strong utility, some limitations make their clinical application difficult, including delivery problems, side effects due to off-target actions, disturbance of physiological functions of the cellular machinery involved in gene silencing, and induction of the innate immune response. Many researchers have attempted to overcome these limitations and to improve the safety of potential RNAi-based therapeutics. Nanoparticles, which are nanostructured entities with tunable size, shape, and surface, as well as biological behavior, provide an ideal opportunity to modify current

  20. Secondary structure-based analysis of mouse brain small RNA sequences obtained by using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Okumura, Akio; Okui, Saya; Ushida, Chisato; Kawai, Gota

    2015-08-01

    In order to find novel structured small RNAs, next-generation sequencing was applied to small RNA fractions with lengths ranging from 40 to 140 nt and secondary structure-based clustering was performed. Sequences of structured RNAs were effectively clustered and analyzed by secondary structure. Although more than 99% of the obtained sequences were known RNAs, 16 candidate mouse structured small non-coding RNAs (MsncRs) were isolated. Based on these results, the merits of secondary structure-based analysis are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GROWTH AND VENTURE CAPITAL INVESTMENT IN TECHNOLOGY-BASED SMALL FIRMS THE CASE OF HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becsky Nagy Patricia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Venture capital backed enterprises represent a low proportion of companies, even of innovative ones. The research question was, whether these companies have an important role in innovation and economic growth in Hungary compared to other countries. In the first part of the article I present the theoretical background of technology-based small firms, highlighting the most important models and theories of the economic impact and the special development of innovative technology-oriented small firms. In the second part of the article I present the status of the most important indicators of innovation in connection with entrepreneurship, than I elaborate on the measures of start-ups, mainly the high-tech ones with high-growth potential. I describe the current position of venture capital industry, detailing the venture capital investments, with particular emphasis on classical venture capital investments that points out the number and the amount of venture capital investments financing early stage firms with high-growth potential. At the end I summarize the status of Hungarian technology-based small firms and their possibilities to get financial sources form venture capital investors, with regards to the status and the prospects of the JEREMIE program. In Hungary the number of internationally competitive firms, ready and willing to obtain venture capital, is much lower than in the US or Western European countries. Hungary could take advantage of its competitive edges in some special fields of innovation. The efficiency of information flow would reduce the information gap between the demand and the supply side of the venture capital market and more Hungarian firms could be internationally successful through venture capital financing. The recent years’ policy and special programs like JEREMIE generated more transactions, that helped to inform the entrepreneurs about venture capital and helped to co-invest public resources with private equity more

  2. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  3. A clinical gamma camera-based pinhole collimated system for high resolution small animal SPECT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, J.; Galvis-Alonso, O.Y., E-mail: mejia_famerp@yahoo.com.b [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular; Castro, A.A. de; Simoes, M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Leite, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Neurociencias e Ciencias do Comportamento; Braga, J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Astrofisica

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of the present study was to upgrade a clinical gamma camera to obtain high resolution tomographic images of small animal organs. The system is based on a clinical gamma camera to which we have adapted a special-purpose pinhole collimator and a device for positioning and rotating the target based on a computer-controlled step motor. We developed a software tool to reconstruct the target's three-dimensional distribution of emission from a set of planar projections, based on the maximum likelihood algorithm. We present details on the hardware and software implementation. We imaged phantoms and heart and kidneys of rats. When using pinhole collimators, the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the imaging system depend on parameters such as the detector-to-collimator and detector-to-target distances and pinhole diameter. In this study, we reached an object voxel size of 0.6 mm and spatial resolution better than 2.4 and 1.7 mm full width at half maximum when 1.5- and 1.0-mm diameter pinholes were used, respectively. Appropriate sensitivity to study the target of interest was attained in both cases. Additionally, we show that as few as 12 projections are sufficient to attain good quality reconstructions, a result that implies a significant reduction of acquisition time and opens the possibility for radiotracer dynamic studies. In conclusion, a high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system was developed using a commercial clinical gamma camera, allowing the acquisition of detailed volumetric images of small animal organs. This type of system has important implications for research areas such as Cardiology, Neurology or Oncology. (author)

  4. Road network selection for small-scale maps using an improved centrality-based algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Weiss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The road network is one of the key feature classes in topographic maps and databases. In the task of deriving road networks for products at smaller scales, road network selection forms a prerequisite for all other generalization operators, and is thus a fundamental operation in the overall process of topographic map and database production. The objective of this work was to develop an algorithm for automated road network selection from a large-scale (1:10,000 to a small-scale database (1:200,000. The project was pursued in collaboration with swisstopo, the national mapping agency of Switzerland, with generic mapping requirements in mind. Preliminary experiments suggested that a selection algorithm based on betweenness centrality performed best for this purpose, yet also exposed problems. The main contribution of this paper thus consists of four extensions that address deficiencies of the basic centrality-based algorithm and lead to a significant improvement of the results. The first two extensions improve the formation of strokes concatenating the road segments, which is crucial since strokes provide the foundation upon which the network centrality measure is computed. Thus, the first extension ensures that roundabouts are detected and collapsed, thus avoiding interruptions of strokes by roundabouts, while the second introduces additional semantics in the process of stroke formation, allowing longer and more plausible strokes to built. The third extension detects areas of high road density (i.e., urban areas using density-based clustering and then locally increases the threshold of the centrality measure used to select road segments, such that more thinning takes place in those areas. Finally, since the basic algorithm tends to create dead-ends—which however are not tolerated in small-scale maps—the fourth extension reconnects these dead-ends to the main network, searching for the best path in the main heading of the dead-end.

  5. SQUEEZEPOSENET: IMAGE BASED POSE REGRESSION WITH SMALL CONVOLUTIONAL NEURAL NETWORKS FOR REAL TIME UAS NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Müller

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs is increasing since low-cost airborne systems are available for a wide range of users. The outdoor navigation of such vehicles is mostly based on global navigation satellite system (GNSS methods to gain the vehicles trajectory. The drawback of satellite-based navigation are failures caused by occlusions and multi-path interferences. Beside this, local image-based solutions like Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM and Visual Odometry (VO can e.g. be used to support the GNSS solution by closing trajectory gaps but are computationally expensive. However, if the trajectory estimation is interrupted or not available a re-localization is mandatory. In this paper we will provide a novel method for a GNSS-free and fast image-based pose regression in a known area by utilizing a small convolutional neural network (CNN. With on-board processing in mind, we employ a lightweight CNN called SqueezeNet and use transfer learning to adapt the network to pose regression. Our experiments show promising results for GNSS-free and fast localization.

  6. Squeezeposenet: Image Based Pose Regression with Small Convolutional Neural Networks for Real Time Uas Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M. S.; Urban, S.; Jutzi, B.

    2017-08-01

    The number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is increasing since low-cost airborne systems are available for a wide range of users. The outdoor navigation of such vehicles is mostly based on global navigation satellite system (GNSS) methods to gain the vehicles trajectory. The drawback of satellite-based navigation are failures caused by occlusions and multi-path interferences. Beside this, local image-based solutions like Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) and Visual Odometry (VO) can e.g. be used to support the GNSS solution by closing trajectory gaps but are computationally expensive. However, if the trajectory estimation is interrupted or not available a re-localization is mandatory. In this paper we will provide a novel method for a GNSS-free and fast image-based pose regression in a known area by utilizing a small convolutional neural network (CNN). With on-board processing in mind, we employ a lightweight CNN called SqueezeNet and use transfer learning to adapt the network to pose regression. Our experiments show promising results for GNSS-free and fast localization.

  7. Effect of biomolecules adsorption on oxide layers developed on metallic materials used in cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Bautista, Blanca-Estela

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was carried out in the frame of the BIOCOR ITN European project, in collaboration with the industrial partner RSE S.p.A. (Italy). Metallic materials commonly used in cooling systems of power plants may be affected by bio-corrosion induced by biofilm formation. The objective of this work was to study the influence of biomolecules adsorption, which is the initial stage of biofilm formation, on the electrochemical behaviour and the surface chemical composition of three metallic materials (70Cu-30Ni alloy, 304L stainless steel and titanium) in seawater environments. In a first step, the interactions between a model protein, the bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the surface of these materials were investigated. Secondly, tightly bound (TB) and loosely bound (LB) extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), that play a fundamental role in the different stages of biofilm formation, maturation and maintenance, were extracted from Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021 marine strain, and their effects on oxide layers were also evaluated. For that purpose, electrochemical measurements (corrosion potential E(corr) vs time, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) performed during the very first steps of oxide layers formation (1 h immersion time) were combined to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ions mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Compared to 70Cu-30Ni alloy in static artificial seawater (ASW) without biomolecules, for which a thick duplex oxide layer (outer redeposited Cu 2 O layer and inner oxidized nickel layer) is shown, the presence of BSA, TB EPS and LB EPS leads to a mixed oxide layer (oxidized copper and nickel) with a lower thickness. In the biomolecules-containing solutions, this oxide layer is covered by an adsorbed organic layer, mainly composed of proteins. A model is proposed to analyse impedance data obtained at E(corr). The results show a slow-down of the anodic reaction in the presence

  8. Aptamer/quantum dot-based simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Haixia [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang Bingying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400040 (China); Xiang Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zhang Yuyong; Chai Yaqin [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-03-04

    A novel strategy for 'signal on' and sensitive one-spot simultaneous detection of multiple small molecular analytes based on electrochemically encoded barcode quantum dot (QD) tags is described. The target analytes, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cocaine, respectively, are sandwiched between the corresponding set of surface-immobilized primary binding aptamers and the secondary binding aptamer/QD bioconjugates. The captured QDs yield distinct electrochemical signatures after acid dissolution, whose position and size reflect the identity and level, respectively, of the corresponding target analytes. Due to the inherent amplification feature of the QD labels and the 'signal on' detection scheme, as well as the sensitive monitoring of the metal ions released upon acid dissolution of the QD labels, low detection limits of 30 nM and 50 nM were obtained for ATP and cocaine, respectively, in our assays. Our multi-analyte sensing system also shows high specificity to target analytes and promising applicability to complex sample matrix, which makes the proposed assay protocol an attractive route for screening of small molecules in clinical diagnosis.

  9. Creation of a RFID based real time tracking (R-RTT) system for small healthcare clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph C; Collins, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    A well-managed healthcare system improves the quality of the patient experience. However, many small healthcare clinics have suboptimal systems for scheduling and locating patients and medical staff, delaying the relay of information and creating poor resource and room utilization. This paper proposes a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based Real-Time Tracking (R-RTT) System for optimizing small healthcare facility operations, enabling further optimization of throughput time, room utilization, and patient flow. In the proposed scenario, RFID readers were equipped in strategic locations throughout the facility. Patients and medical staff were issued personalized RFID tags. When they pass through the reader's interrogation zone, it reads their RFID tag and sends the information to a central computer equipped with software capable of filtering the RFID data into useable information. A Visual Basic Application (VBA) program uses the information received from the ID tags to display the location of the patients and staff as they move throughout the facility. This increases their visibility within the facility by allowing medical staff to determine where their colleagues and patients are at all times. The VBA program was also able to record the data in order to track the time each stage of the appointment process takes to complete. The recorded time data can be broken into processes, making it easier to determine if it adds value. This data can then be transformed into a value stream map for further analysis and improvement.

  10. The method for detecting small lesions in medical image based on sliding window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guilai; Jiao, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    At present, the research on computer-aided diagnosis includes the sample image segmentation, extracting visual features, generating the classification model by learning, and according to the model generated to classify and judge the inspected images. However, this method has a large scale of calculation and speed is slow. And because medical images are usually low contrast, when the traditional image segmentation method is applied to the medical image, there is a complete failure. As soon as possible to find the region of interest, improve detection speed, this topic attempts to introduce the current popular visual attention model into small lesions detection. However, Itti model is mainly for natural images. But the effect is not ideal when it is used to medical images which usually are gray images. Especially in the early stages of some cancers, the focus of a disease in the whole image is not the most significant region and sometimes is very difficult to be found. But these lesions are prominent in the local areas. This paper proposes a visual attention mechanism based on sliding window, and use sliding window to calculate the significance of a local area. Combined with the characteristics of the lesion, select the features of gray, entropy, corner and edge to generate a saliency map. Then the significant region is segmented and distinguished. This method reduces the difficulty of image segmentation, and improves the detection accuracy of small lesions, and it has great significance to early discovery, early diagnosis and treatment of cancers.

  11. A medium resolution double crystal based small-angle neutron scattering at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, S.; Sen, D.; Saravanan, T.; Vijayaraghavan, P.R.

    2000-10-01

    A double crystal based moderate resolution small-angle neutron scattering instrument has been built and commissioned at the guide tube laboratory of Dhruva reactor, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, India. The instrument consists of a non-dispersive (1, -1) setting of 111 reflections of silicon single crystals with sample between the two crystals. The used neutron wavelength is 0.312 nm. The analyser crystal rotates with smallest step size of 0.0012 deg. At 65 MW of reactor power, the peak count rate of the blank rocking curve is about 55 counts per second at the detector position and the signal to noise ratio is 450 for a typical experiment with sintered alumina. Experiments with sintered alumina specimens reveal that the accessible range of wave vector transfer q is 0.003-0.173 nm -1 . A typical measurement time is about three days. The instrument is calibrated with respect to new high resolution ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument S18 at the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenhole, France. (author)

  12. A medium resolution double crystal based small-angle neutron scattering instrument at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, S.; Sen, D.; Saravanan, T.; Vijayaraghavan, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    A double crystal-based moderate resolution small-angle neutron scattering instrument has been built and commissioned at the guide laboratory of Dhruva reactor, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, India. The instrument consists of a non-dispersive (1,-1) setting of 111 reflections of silicon single crystals with the sample between the two crystals. The neutron wavelength used is 0.312 nm. At 65 MW of reactor power, the peak count rate of the blank rocking curve is about 55 counts per second at the detector position and the ratio of integrated signal to integrated noise is ∼450 for a typical experiment with sintered aluminia. The accessible range of wave vector transfer q is found to be 0.003-0.173 nm -1 , which corresponds to a range of resolvable real-space dimension of 2000-40 nm, for these specimens. The instrument is calibrated with respect to the high resolution ultra small-angle neutron scattering instrument S18 at the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. (author)

  13. Small drinking water systems under spatiotemporal water quality variability: a risk-based performance benchmarking framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereskie, Ty; Haider, Husnain; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, Rehan

    2017-08-23

    Traditional approaches for benchmarking drinking water systems are binary, based solely on the compliance and/or non-compliance of one or more water quality performance indicators against defined regulatory guidelines/standards. The consequence of water quality failure is dependent on location within a water supply system as well as time of the year (i.e., season) with varying levels of water consumption. Conventional approaches used for water quality comparison purposes fail to incorporate spatiotemporal variability and degrees of compliance and/or non-compliance. This can lead to misleading or inaccurate performance assessment data used in the performance benchmarking process. In this research, a hierarchical risk-based water quality performance benchmarking framework is proposed to evaluate small drinking water systems (SDWSs) through cross-comparison amongst similar systems. The proposed framework (R WQI framework) is designed to quantify consequence associated with seasonal and location-specific water quality issues in a given drinking water supply system to facilitate more efficient decision-making for SDWSs striving for continuous performance improvement. Fuzzy rule-based modelling is used to address imprecision associated with measuring performance based on singular water quality guidelines/standards and the uncertainties present in SDWS operations and monitoring. This proposed R WQI framework has been demonstrated using data collected from 16 SDWSs in Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec, Canada, and compared to the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment WQI, a traditional, guidelines/standard-based approach. The study found that the R WQI framework provides an in-depth state of water quality and benchmarks SDWSs more rationally based on the frequency of occurrence and consequence of failure events.

  14. Deriving Structural Information from Experimentally Measured Data on Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Allison, Jane R; Daura, Xavier; Dolenc, Jožica; Hansen, Niels; Mark, Alan E; Oostenbrink, Chris; Rusu, Victor H; Smith, Lorna J

    2016-12-23

    During the past half century, the number and accuracy of experimental techniques that can deliver values of observables for biomolecular systems have been steadily increasing. The conversion of a measured value Q exp of an observable quantity Q into structural information is, however, a task beset with theoretical and practical problems: 1) insufficient or inaccurate values of Q exp , 2) inaccuracies in the function Q(r→) used to relate the quantity Q to structure r→ , 3) how to account for the averaging inherent in the measurement of Q exp , 4) how to handle the possible multiple-valuedness of the inverse r→(Q) of the function Q(r→) , to mention a few. These apply to a variety of observable quantities Q and measurement techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, free-electron laser imaging, cryo-electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism, Förster resonance energy transfer, atomic force microscopy and ion-mobility mass spectrometry. The process of deriving structural information from measured data is reviewed with an eye to non-experts and newcomers in the field using examples from the literature of the effect of the various choices and approximations involved in the process. A list of choices to be avoided is provided. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a biomolecule delivery vehicle in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Hashmath I., E-mail: hashmath.i@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences (Australia); Yi, Zhifeng [Deakin University, Institute for Frontier Materials (Australia); Rookes, James E. [Deakin University, Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences (Australia); Kong, Lingxue X. [Deakin University, Institute for Frontier Materials (Australia); Cahill, David M. [Deakin University, Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    We report the uptake by wheat, lupin and Arabidopsis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalised with amine cross-linked fluorescein isothiocyanate (MSN-APTES-FITC). The preparation of these particles at room temperature enabled the synthesis of 20 nm particles that contained a network of interconnected pores around 2 nm in diameter. The uptake and distribution of these nanoparticles were examined during seed germination, in roots of plants grown in a hydroponic system and in whole leaves and roots of plants via vacuum infiltration. The nanoparticles did not affect seed germination in lupin and there was no phytotoxicity. Following germination of wheat and lupin grown in a nutrient solution containing nanoparticles, they were found within cells and cell walls of the emerging root and in the vascular transport elements, the xylem, and in other associated cells. In leaves and roots of Arabidopsis the nanoparticles were found, following vacuum infiltration of whole seedlings, to be taken up by the entire leaf and they were principally found in the intercellular spaces of the mesophyll but also throughout much of the root system. We propose that MSNs could be used as a novel delivery system for small molecules in plants.

  16. Comparison of small-group training with self-directed internet-based training in inhaler techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumas, Mariam; Basheti, Iman A; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia Z

    2009-08-28

    To compare the effectiveness of small-group training in correct inhaler technique with self-directed Internet-based training. Pharmacy students were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups: small-group training (n = 123) or self-directed Internet-based training (n = 113). Prior to intervention delivery, all participants were given a placebo Turbuhaler and product information leaflet and received inhaler technique training based on their group. Technique was assessed following training and predictors of correct inhaler technique were examined. There was a significant improvement in the number of participants demonstrating correct technique in both groups (small group training, 12% to 63%; p training, 9% to 59%; p groups in the percent change (n = 234, p > 0.05). Increased student confidence following the intervention was a predictor for correct inhaler technique. Self-directed Internet-based training is as effective as small-group training in improving students' inhaler technique.

  17. Development and Implementation of New Control Law for Vision Based Target Tracking System Onboard Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chong, Tay B

    2006-01-01

    ...) system onboard a small unmanned aerial vehicle (SUAV). The new control law allows for coordinated SUAV guidance and vision-based target tracking of stationary and moving targets in the presence of atmospheric disturbances and measurements noise...

  18. Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Asp, Sven; Ivarsen, Anders

    Femtosecond laser based small incision lenticule extraction for moderate and high myopia. Jesper Hjortdal, Sven Asp, Anders Ivarsen, Anders Vestergaard Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark Purpose: ReLEx® smile is a new keratorefractive procedure whereby a stromal...... lenticule is cut by a femtosecond laser and manually extracted through a peripheral corneal tunnel. The purpose of the prospective quality study is to present our initial clinical experience with ReLEx smile for treatment of moderate and high myopia. Methods: 379 eyes (198 patients) were treated for myopia...... (spherical equivalent (SE) ranging from -13.13 to -1.63 D, mean -7.28 D) with ReLEx smile and followed for 3 months. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), spherical equivalent (SE), proportion of eyes within ± 0.5/1.0 D, loss/gain of lines of CDVA, patient...

  19. Hybrid Particle-based Full-band Analysis of Ultra-small MOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Wigger

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the 2D and 3D modeling of ultra-small MOS structures using a newly developed full-band device simulator. The simulation tool is based on a novel approach, featuring a hybrid Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC-Cellular Automata (CA simulation engine. In this hybrid approach charge transport is simulated using the CA in regions of momentum space where most scattering events occur and the EMC elsewhere, thus optimizing the trade-off between the fast, but memory consuming CA method and the slower EMC method. To account for the spatial distribution of the electric field and charge concentration, the hybrid EMC/CA simulator is self-consistently coupled with a 2D and 3D multi-grid Poisson solver. The solver is then used to simulate the performance of a 40 nm gate length n-MOSFET structure.

  20. Development of small, fast reactor core designs using lead-based coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Hill, R. N.; Khalil, H. S.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of small (100 MWe) fast reactor core designs are developed, these include compact configurations, long-lived (15-year fuel lifetime) cores, and derated, natural circulation designs. Trade studies are described which identify key core design issues for lead-based coolant systems. Performance parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients are compared for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and sodium-cooled cores of consistent design. The results of these studies indicate that the superior neutron reflection capability of lead alloys reduces the enrichment and burnup swing compared to conventional sodium-cooled systems; however, the discharge fluence is significantly increased. The size requirement for long-lived systems is constrained by reactivity loss considerations, not fuel burnup or fluence limits. The derated lead-alloy cooled natural circulation cores require a core volume roughly eight times greater than conventional compact systems. In general, reactivity coefficients important for passive safety performance are less favorable for the larger, derated configurations

  1. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issaenko, Olga A.; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27Kip1 and p16Ink4A. These changes are associated with arrest in S-G2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:22510564

  2. Robust Nonlinear Control Based on Disturbance Observer for a Small-Scale Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Razzaghian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A robust nonlinear controller based on disturbance observer for the trajectory tracking control of a small-scale unmanned helicopter with nonlinear structure under external disturbances and parameter uncertainties is designed. The control objective is to let the helicopter track a predefined trajectory. The proposed robust nonlinear controller is based on the backstepping sliding mode control technique which combines both the capabilities of backstepping control and sliding mode control. The control performance developed based on a time-varying disturbance observer. In order to obtain an efficient control law design, the nonlinear model of the helicopter is reformulated as an affine nonlinear system. The mathematical proof using Lyapunov stability theorem shows that the closed loop system is asymptotically stable in the presence of this controller. To verify the robustness and stability of the proposed controller, it is compared with conventional sliding mode controller. The chattering phenomenon is attenuated significantly and the tracking error is also alleviated. The simulation results confirm the desirable performance of proposed robust nonlinear controller.

  3. A simple cellulose acetate membrane-based small lanes technique for protein electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Na; Liu, Tingting; Yang, Xiaojun; Sun, Binjie; Ouyang, Jenny; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-08-01

    Combining electrophoresis with a cellulose acetate membrane-based technique, we developed a simple and low-cost method, named cellulose acetate membrane-based small lanes (CASL), for protein electrophoresis. A home-made capillary plotter controlled by a 3D moving stage was used to create milli-to-micro channels by printing poly(dimethylsiloxane) on to a hydrophilic cellulose acetate membrane. In the hydrophilic channels, 5 nL protein mixture was separated on the basis of electro-migration under an electric field. Compared with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), CASL resulted in higher protein signal intensity for separation of mixtures containing the same mass of protein. The platform was easily fabricated at low cost (approx. $0.005 for each 1-mm-wide channel), and separation of three protein mixtures was completed in 15 min. Both electrophoresis time and potential affected the separation. Rather than chromatographic separation, this method accomplished application of microchannel techniques for cellulose acetate membrane-based protein electrophoresis. It has potential in proteomic analysis, especially for rapid, low-cost, and low-volume sample analysis in clinical diagnosis.

  4. Stabilization of Multiple Unstable Modes for Small-Scale Inverter-Based Power Systems with Impedance-Based Stability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Changwoo; Wang, Xiongfei; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the harmonic stability of small-scale inverter-based power systems. A holistic procedure to assess the contribution of each inverter to the system stability is proposed by means of using the impedancebased stability criterion. Multiple unstable modes can be identified step......-by-step coming from the interactions among inverters and passive networks. Compared to the conventional system stability analysis, the approach is easy to implement and avoids the effect of potential unstable system dynamics on the impedance ratio derived for the stability analysis. PSCAD/ EMTDC simulations...... of a Cigre LV network Benchmark system with multiple renewable energy sources are carried out. The results confirm the validity of the proposed approach....

  5. Studying the molecular mechanisms of radiation damage : low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules and medically relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzer, K.

    2015-01-01

    were developed to enhance the radiation damage in these tumor sites, however, the molecular mechanism at which radiosensitizers operate is still unknown to this date. Investigating radiosensitizers with low-energy electrons might enlighten the mystery of their working mechanism. We performed an extensive DEA study to the proposed radiosensitizer 4-nitroimidazole (4NI) and two methylated nitroimidazoles, and found quite unexpected results. While 4NI is very sensitive towards electrons, which trigger a rich chemistry in the molecule, leading to the formation of a variety of reactive radical species at very low energies below 2 eV, these reactions are completely blocked in the methylated compounds. This means, that only small changes in the structure of this molecule can have immense effects on its radiosensitizing properties, which is an important aspect to take into consideration when searching for new radiosensitizers. Chemotherapy is also among the most efficient treatment methods for cancer and it has been shown, that the concomitant administration of chemo- and radiotherapy can have a superadditive benefit. However, also in this case the exact molecular processes responsible for this effect are not known, making further investigations necessary. In this thesis I present the study of platinum(II) bromide as a model molecule for platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs and metal halides, that have shown good radiosensitizing abilities. It was found that the most effective reaction upon low-electron interaction is the formation of the fragment anion Br– , that is most probably coupled with ion pair formation. (author) [de

  6. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoern Petersen, Steffen; Kold di Gennaro, Ane; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Skovsen, Esben; Parracino, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demonstrate that, by shaping the pattern of the UV light used to induce molecular immobilization, one can control the pattern of immobilized molecules onto the surface. Using a single-aperture spatial mask, combined with the Fourier transforming property of a focusing lens, we show that submicrometer (0.7 μm) resolved patterns of immobilized prostate-specific antigen biomolecules can be created. If a dual-aperture spatial mask is used, the results differ from the expected Fourier transform pattern of the mask. It appears as a superposition of two diffraction patterns produced by the two apertures, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed.

  7. Recent advances in chemical functionalization of nanoparticles with biomolecules for analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ju-Hwan; Park, Do Hyun; Joo, Jang Ho; Lee, Jae-Seung

    2015-11-01

    The recent synthetic development of a variety of nanoparticles has led to their widespread application in diagnostics and therapeutics. In particular, the controlled size and shape of nanoparticles precisely determine their unique chemical and physical properties, which is highly attractive for accurate analysis of given systems. In addition to efforts toward controlling the synthesis and properties of nanoparticles, the surface functionalization of nanoparticles with biomolecules has been intensively investigated since the mid-1990s. The complicated yet programmable properties of biomolecules have proved to substantially enhance and enrich the novel functions of nanoparticles to achieve "smart" nanoparticle materials. In this review, the advances in chemical functionalization of four types of representative nanoparticle with DNA and protein molecules in the past five years are critically reviewed, and their future trends are predicted.

  8. Analysis of gate underlap channel double gate MOS transistor for electrical detection of bio-molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay; Narang, Rakhi; Saxena, Manoj; Gupta, Mridula

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for gate drain underlap channel Double-Gate Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (DG-MOSFET) for label free electrical detection of biomolecules has been proposed. The conformal mapping technique has been used to derive the expressions for surface potential, lateral electric field, energy bands (i.e. conduction and valence band) and threshold voltage (Vth). Subsequently a full drain current model to analyze the sensitivity of the biosensor has been developed. The shift in the threshold voltage and drain current (after the biomolecules interaction with the gate underlap channel region of the MOS transistor) has been used as a sensing metric. All the characteristic trends have been verified through ATLAS (SILVACO) device simulation results.

  9. High-density nanopore array for selective biomolecule transport.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2011-11-01

    Development of sophisticated tools capable of manipulating molecules at their own length scale enables new methods for chemical synthesis and detection. Although nanoscale devices have been developed to perform individual tasks, little work has been done on developing a truly scalable platform: a system that combines multiple components for sequential processing, as well as simultaneously processing and identifying the millions of potential species that may be present in a biological sample. The development of a scalable micro-nanofluidic device is limited in part by the ability to combine different materials (polymers, metals, semiconductors) onto a single chip, and the challenges with locally controlling the chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties within a micro or nanochannel. We have developed a unique construct known as a molecular gate: a multilayered polymer based device that combines microscale fluid channels with nanofluidic interconnects. Molecular gates have been demonstrated to selectively transport molecules between channels based on size or charge. In order to fully utilize these structures, we need to develop methods to actively control transport and identify species inside a nanopore. While previous work has been limited to creating electrical connections off-channel or metallizing the entire nanopore wall, we now have the ability to create multiple, separate conductive connections at the interior surface of a nanopore. These interior electrodes will be used for direct sensing of biological molecules, probing the electrical potential and charge distribution at the surface, and to actively turn on and off electrically driven transport of molecules through nanopores.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of citrate-based fluorescent small molecules and biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiwei; Kim, Jimin P; Cai, Qing; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Jinshan; Dhami, Ranjodh S; Li, Li; Kong, Bin; Su, Yixue; Schug, Kevin A; Yang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Novel citric acid based photoluminescent dyes and biodegradable polymers are synthesized via a facile "one-pot" reaction. A comprehensive understanding of the fluorescence mechanisms of the resulting citric acid-based fluorophores is reported. Two distinct types of fluorophores are identified: a thiozolopyridine family with high quantum yield, long lifetime, and exceptional photostability, and a dioxopyridine family with relatively lower quantum yield, multiple lifetimes, and solvent-dependent band shifting behavior. Applications in molecular labeling and cell imaging were demonstrated. The above discoveries contribute to the field of fluorescence chemistry and have laid a solid foundation for further development of new fluorophores and materials that show promise in a diversity of fluorescence-based applications. Photoluminescent materials are pivotal for fluorescence based imaging, labeling and sensing applications. Understanding their fluorescence mechanism is challenging and imperative. We develop a new class of citric acid-derived fluorescent materials in forms of polymers and small molecular dyes by a one-step solvent free reaction. We discovered two different classes of citric acid-derived fluorophores. A two-ring thiozolopyridine structure demonstrates strong fluorescence and exceptional resistance to photo-bleaching. A one-ring dioxopyridine exhibits relative weak fluorescence but with intriguing excitation and solvent-dependent emission wavelength shifting. Our methodology of synthesizing citric acid-derived fluorophores and the understanding on their luminescence are instrumental to the design and production of a large number of new photoluminescent materials for biological and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Small-mammal density estimation: A field comparison of grid-based vs. web-based density estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, R.R.; Yates, Terry L.; Anderson, D.R.; Burnham, K.P.; Dunnum, J.L.; Franklin, A.B.; Friggens, M.T.; Lubow, B.C.; Miller, M.; Olson, G.S.; Parmenter, Cheryl A.; Pollard, J.; Rexstad, E.; Shenk, T.M.; Stanley, T.R.; White, Gary C.

    2003-01-01

    blind” test allowed us to evaluate the influence of expertise and experience in calculating density estimates in comparison to simply using default values in programs CAPTURE and DISTANCE. While the rodent sample sizes were considerably smaller than the recommended minimum for good model results, we found that several models performed well empirically, including the web-based uniform and half-normal models in program DISTANCE, and the grid-based models Mb and Mbh in program CAPTURE (with AÌ‚ adjusted by species-specific full mean maximum distance moved (MMDM) values). These models produced accurate DÌ‚ values (with 95% confidence intervals that included the true D values) and exhibited acceptable bias but poor precision. However, in linear regression analyses comparing each model's DÌ‚ values to the true D values over the range of observed test densities, only the web-based uniform model exhibited a regression slope near 1.0; all other models showed substantial slope deviations, indicating biased estimates at higher or lower density values. In addition, the grid-based DÌ‚ analyses using full MMDM values for WÌ‚ area adjustments required a number of theoretical assumptions of uncertain validity, and we therefore viewed their empirical successes with caution. Finally, density estimates from the independent analysts were highly variable, but estimates from web-based approaches had smaller mean square errors and better achieved confidence-interval coverage of D than did grid-based approaches. Our results support the contention that web-based approaches for density estimation of small-mammal populations are both theoretically and empirically superior to grid-based approaches, even when sample size is far less than often recommended. In view of the increasing need for standardized environmental measures for comparisons among ecosystems and through time, analytical models based on distance sampling appear to offer accurate density estimation approaches for research

  12. Structure-Based Drug Design of Small Molecule Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human peptide deformylase (HsPDF is an important target for anticancer drug discovery. In view of the limited HsPDF, inhibitors were reported, and high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS studies based on HsPDF for developing new PDF inhibitors remain to be reported. We reported here on diverse small molecule inhibitors with excellent anticancer activities designed based on HTVS and molecular docking studies using the crystal structure of HsPDF. The compound M7594_0037 exhibited potent anticancer activities against HeLa, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50s of 35.26, 29.63 and 24.63 μM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggested that M7594_0037 and its three derivatives could interact with HsPDF by several conserved hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties of M7594_0037 and its derivatives were predicted using the OSIRIS property explorer. Thus, M7594_0037 and its derivatives might represent a promising scaffold for the further development of novel anticancer drugs.

  13. SwissDock, a protein-small molecule docking web service based on EADock DSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosdidier, Aurélien; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    Most life science processes involve, at the atomic scale, recognition between two molecules. The prediction of such interactions at the molecular level, by so-called docking software, is a non-trivial task. Docking programs have a wide range of applications ranging from protein engineering to drug design. This article presents SwissDock, a web server dedicated to the docking of small molecules on target proteins. It is based on the EADock DSS engine, combined with setup scripts for curating common problems and for preparing both the target protein and the ligand input files. An efficient Ajax/HTML interface was designed and implemented so that scientists can easily submit dockings and retrieve the predicted complexes. For automated docking tasks, a programmatic SOAP interface has been set up and template programs can be downloaded in Perl, Python and PHP. The web site also provides an access to a database of manually curated complexes, based on the Ligand Protein Database. A wiki and a forum are available to the community to promote interactions between users. The SwissDock web site is available online at http://www.swissdock.ch. We believe it constitutes a step toward generalizing the use of docking tools beyond the traditional molecular modeling community.

  14. Development of a Si-PM-based high-resolution PET system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu

    2010-01-01

    A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET, especially for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, because it has high gain and is less sensitive to a static magnetic field. We developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET system for small animals. Hamamatsu 4 x 4 Si-PM arrays (S11065-025P) were used for its detector blocks. Two types of LGSO scintillator of 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼45 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 5 mm) and 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: ∼31 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 6 mm) were optically coupled in the DOI direction to form a DOI detector, arranged in a 11 x 9 matrix, and optically coupled to the Si-PM array. Pulse shape analysis was used for the DOI detection of these two types of LGSOs. Sixteen detector blocks were arranged in a 68 mm diameter ring to form the PET system. Spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM and sensitivity was 0.6% at the center of the field of view. High-resolution mouse and rat images were successfully obtained using the PET system. We confirmed that the developed Si-PM-based PET system is promising for molecular imaging research.

  15. Development of a Si-PM-based high-resolution PET system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe (Japan); Imaizumi, Masao; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu, E-mail: s-yama@kobe-kosen.ac.j [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2010-10-07

    A Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for PET, especially for use in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, because it has high gain and is less sensitive to a static magnetic field. We developed a Si-PM-based depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET system for small animals. Hamamatsu 4 x 4 Si-PM arrays (S11065-025P) were used for its detector blocks. Two types of LGSO scintillator of 0.75 mol% Ce (decay time: {approx}45 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 5 mm) and 0.025 mol% Ce (decay time: {approx}31 ns; 1.1 mm x 1.2 mm x 6 mm) were optically coupled in the DOI direction to form a DOI detector, arranged in a 11 x 9 matrix, and optically coupled to the Si-PM array. Pulse shape analysis was used for the DOI detection of these two types of LGSOs. Sixteen detector blocks were arranged in a 68 mm diameter ring to form the PET system. Spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM and sensitivity was 0.6% at the center of the field of view. High-resolution mouse and rat images were successfully obtained using the PET system. We confirmed that the developed Si-PM-based PET system is promising for molecular imaging research.

  16. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Michael [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ruhl, Robert [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  17. Improved Traceability of a Small Satellite Mission Concept to Requirements Using Model Based System Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) has recently been gaining significant support as a means to improve the "traditional" document-based systems engineering (DBSE) approach to engineering complex systems. In the spacecraft design domain, there are many perceived and propose benefits of an MBSE approach, but little analysis has been presented to determine the tangible benefits of such an approach (e.g. time and cost saved, increased product quality). This paper presents direct examples of how developing a small satellite system model can improve traceability of the mission concept to its requirements. A comparison of the processes and approaches for MBSE and DBSE is made using the NASA Ames Research Center SporeSat CubeSat mission as a case study. A model of the SporeSat mission is built using the Systems Modeling Language standard and No Magic's MagicDraw modeling tool. The model incorporates mission concept and requirement information from the mission's original DBSE design efforts. Active dependency relationships are modeled to demonstrate the completeness and consistency of the requirements to the mission concept. Anecdotal information and process-duration metrics are presented for both the MBSE and original DBSE design efforts of SporeSat.

  18. A microeconomic analysis of decentralized small scale biomass based CHP plants—The case of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, Nadine; Yildiz, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    Alternative energy sources, such as biomass CHP plants, have recently gained significantly in importance and action is due both on the large scale corporate level and on the small scale. Hence, making the scope and economic outline of such projects easily intelligible without losing relevant details seems a key factor to further promote the necessary developments. The model setup presented in this paper may therefore serve as a starting point for generating numerical results based on real life cases or scenarios. Its focus lies on the economic analysis of decentralized biomass CHP plants. It presents a new approach to analyzing the economic aspects of biomass CHP plants implementing a formal microeconomic approach. As Germany claims a leading role in the market for renewable energy production, the paper also takes a closer look on the effects of German energy policy with respect to biomass CHP plants. - Highlights: • A formal microeconomic model is used to analyse a decentralized biomass CHP plant. • Model setup is used to generate numerical results based on real life scenarios. • Nested CES production function is a new approach to model economics of biomass CHP. • Analysis presents insight into microeconomics and cost drivers of biomass CHP. • Evaluation of energy policy design with respect to environmental policy goals

  19. Small molecule inhibitors of mesotrypsin from a structure-based docking screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayode, Olumide; Huang, Zunnan; Soares, Alexei S; Caulfield, Thomas R; Dong, Zigang; Bode, Ann M; Radisky, Evette S

    2017-01-01

    PRSS3/mesotrypsin is an atypical isoform of trypsin, the upregulation of which has been implicated in promoting tumor progression. To date there are no mesotrypsin-selective pharmacological inhibitors which could serve as tools for deciphering the pathological role of this enzyme, and could potentially form the basis for novel therapeutic strategies targeting mesotrypsin. A virtual screen of the Natural Product Database (NPD) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Drug Database was conducted by high-throughput molecular docking utilizing crystal structures of mesotrypsin. Twelve high-scoring compounds were selected for testing based on lowest free energy docking scores, interaction with key mesotrypsin active site residues, and commercial availability. Diminazene (CID22956468), along with two similar compounds presenting the bis-benzamidine substructure, was validated as a competitive inhibitor of mesotrypsin and other human trypsin isoforms. Diminazene is the most potent small molecule inhibitor of mesotrypsin reported to date with an inhibitory constant (Ki) of 3.6±0.3 μM. Diminazene was subsequently co-crystalized with mesotrypsin and the crystal structure was solved and refined to 1.25 Å resolution. This high resolution crystal structure can now offer a foundation for structure-guided efforts to develop novel and potentially more selective mesotrypsin inhibitors based on similar molecular substructures.

  20. Agent-based algorithm for fault detection and recovery of gyroscope's drift in small satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Godinez, Johan; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-10-01

    Failure detection, isolation, and recovery is an essential requirement of any space mission design. Several spacecraft components, especially sensors, are prone to performance deviation due to intrinsic physical effects. For that reason, innovative approaches for the treatment of faults in onboard sensors are necessary. This work introduces the concept of agent-based fault detection and recovery for sensors used in satellite attitude determination and control. Its focuses on the implementation of an algorithm for addressing linear drift bias in gyroscopes. The algorithm was implemented using an agent-based architecture that can be integrated into the satellite's onboard software. Numerical simulations were carried out to show the effectiveness of this scheme in satellite's operations. The proposed algorithm showed a reduction of up to 50% in the stabilization time for the detumbling maneuver, and also an improvement in the pointing accuracy of up to 20% when it was applied in precise payload pointing procedures. The relevance of this contribution is its added value for optimizing the launch and early operation of small satellite missions, as well as, an enabler for innovative satellite functions, for instance, optical downlink communication.

  1. Modification of Biomolecules and Combined Actions by Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu

    2014-01-01

    KAERI, ARTI has been doing a pivotal role for research and development in radiation technologies. Strong motivation and RT-based biotechnologies necessary for the future R and D plans can be provided form the results of this research. An advanced analytical method was suggested for the combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor. Using the method, it is possible to predict in advance the maximum value of synergistic interaction and the conditions to achieve the maximum. The results of this study give a clues for establishment of important technology associated with enhancing positive efficacy of radiation applications. By elaborating the present research results, new technologies will be established for analysing the combined effects of radiation with another factor and radiosensitivity of organisms. In the long run, de novo biodosimetry techniques will be developed and it can play an important role for ARTI to be an internationally recognized radiation biology and biodosimetry laboratory

  2. A SPECT Scanner for Rodent Imaging Based on Small-Area Gamma Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Eduardo; Villena, José L.; Tapias, Gustavo; Martinez, Naira P.; Soto-Montenegro, Maria L.; Abella, Mónica; Sisniega, Alejandro; Pino, Francisco; Ros, Domènec; Pavia, Javier; Desco, Manuel; Vaquero, Juan J.

    2010-10-01

    We developed a cost-effective SPECT scanner prototype (rSPECT) for in vivo imaging of rodents based on small-area gamma cameras. Each detector consists of a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT) coupled to a 30 x 30 Nal(Tl) scintillator array and electronics attached to the PS-PMT sockets for adapting the detector signals to an in-house developed data acquisition system. The detector components are enclosed in a lead-shielded case with a receptacle to insert the collimators. System performance was assessed using 99mTc for a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator, and for a 0.75-mm pinhole collimator with a 60° aperture angle and a 42-mm collimator length. The energy resolution is about 10.7% of the photopeak energy. The overall system sensitivity is about 3 cps/μCi/detector and planar spatial resolution ranges from 2.4 mm at 1 cm source-to-collimator distance to 4.1 mm at 4.5 cm with parallel-hole collimators. With pinhole collimators planar spatial resolution ranges from 1.2 mm at 1 cm source-to-collimator distance to 2.4 mm at 4.5 cm; sensitivity at these distances ranges from 2.8 to 0.5 cps/μCi/detector. Tomographic hot-rod phantom images are presented together with images of bone, myocardium and brain of living rodents to demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with the rSPECT.

  3. A new method of small target detection based on neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Hu, Yongli; Lu, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    The detection and tracking of moving dim target in infrared image have been an research hotspot for many years. The target in each frame of images only occupies several pixels without any shape and structure information. Moreover, infrared small target is often submerged in complicated background with low signal-to-clutter ratio, making the detection very difficult. Different backgrounds exhibit different statistical properties, making it becomes extremely complex to detect the target. If the threshold segmentation is not reasonable, there may be more noise points in the final detection, which is unfavorable for the detection of the trajectory of the target. Single-frame target detection may not be able to obtain the desired target and cause high false alarm rate. We believe the combination of suspicious target detection spatially in each frame and temporal association for target tracking will increase reliability of tracking dim target. The detection of dim target is mainly divided into two parts, In the first part, we adopt bilateral filtering method in background suppression, after the threshold segmentation, the suspicious target in each frame are extracted, then we use LSTM(long short term memory) neural network to predict coordinates of target of the next frame. It is a brand-new method base on the movement characteristic of the target in sequence images which could respond to the changes in the relationship between past and future values of the values. Simulation results demonstrate proposed algorithm can effectively predict the trajectory of the moving small target and work efficiently and robustly with low false alarm.

  4. NEW APPROACHES TO CUSTOMER BASE SEGMENTATION FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meleancă Raluca-Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to explore current praxis and theory related to customer segmentation and to offer an approach which is best suited for small and medium sized enterprises. The proposed solution is the result of an exploratory research aiming to recognize the main variables which influence the practice of segmenting the customer base and to study the most applied alternatives available for all types of enterprises. The research has been performed by studying a large set of secondary data, scientific literature and case studies regarding smaller companies from the European Union. The result of the research consists in an original approach to customer base segmentation, which combines aspects belonging to different well spread practices and applies them to the specific needs of a small or medium company, which typically has limited marketing resources in general and targeted marketing resources in particular. The significance of the proposed customer base segmentation approach lies in the fact that, even though smaller enterprises are in most economies the greatest in number compared to large companies, most of the literature on targeting practices has focused primarily on big companies dealing with a very large clientele, while the case of the smaller companies has been to some extent unfairly neglected. Targeted marketing is becoming more and more important for all types of companies nowadays, as a result of technology advances which make targeted communication easier and less expensive than in the past and also due to the fact that broad-based media have decreased their impact over the years. For a very large proportion of smaller companies, directing their marketing budgets towards targeted campaigns is a clever initiative, as broad based approaches are in many cases less effective and much more expensive. Targeted marketing stratagems are generally related to high tech domains such as artificial intelligence, data mining

  5. PKU-PET-II: A novel SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Zhou, Kun; Vuletic, Ivan; Meng, Xiangxi; Zhu, Sihao; Xu, Huan; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Zhang, Jinming; Ren, Qiushi

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce, describe, and validate the performance of a novel preclinical silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based PET system (PKU-PET-II). Briefly, the detector assembly consisted of cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, with dimensions of 2 ×2 ×15 mm3, that offered a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and 32 mm axial FOV, respectively. The compact front-end electronics readout and digital controller implemented architecture in the FPGA were noteworthy improvements in PKU-PET-II over its predecessor (PKU-PET-I). Based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 04-2008 standards, the design of the PKU-PET-II system was validated by a phantom experiment. The results presented spatial resolution (evaluated as full width at half maximum) with a system range from 1.68 ±0.07 to 2.31 ±0.03 mm at the FOV center and from 1.43 ±0.02 to 2.10 ±0.10 mm at the 1/4th axial FOV, respectively. The system's absolute sensitivity at the center position was 1.35% with the coincidence window of 6 ns and energy window of 300-700 keV. In addition, the NEMA image quality phantom and an animal study results validated the system imaging performance in preclinical imaging application. In conclusion, this SiPM-based, small-animal PET system (PKU-PET-II) provided higher-resolution, adequate sensitivity, and excellent image quality and has potential as a useful tool for real-time imaging of disease progression and development in vivo.

  6. Yeast based small molecule screen for inhibitors of SARS-CoV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Frieman

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory coronavirus (SARS-CoV emerged in 2002, resulting in roughly 8000 cases worldwide and 10% mortality. The animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV precursors still exist and the likelihood of future outbreaks in the human population is high. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLP is an attractive target for pharmaceutical development because it is essential for virus replication and is conserved among human coronaviruses. A yeast-based assay was established for PLP activity that relies on the ability of PLP to induce a pronounced slow-growth phenotype when expressed in S. cerevisiae. Induction of the slow-growth phenotype was shown to take place over a 60-hour time course, providing the basis for conducting a screen for small molecules that restore growth by inhibiting the function of PLP. Five chemical suppressors of the slow-growth phenotype were identified from the 2000 member NIH Diversity Set library. One of these, NSC158362, potently inhibited SARS-CoV replication in cell culture without toxic effects on cells, and it specifically inhibited SARS-CoV replication but not influenza virus replication. The effect of NSC158362 on PLP protease, deubiquitinase and anti-interferon activities was investigated but the compound did not alter these activities. Another suppressor, NSC158011, demonstrated the ability to inhibit PLP protease activity in a cell-based assay. The identification of these inhibitors demonstrated a strong functional connection between the PLP-based yeast assay, the inhibitory compounds, and SARS-CoV biology. Furthermore the data with NSC158362 suggest a novel mechanism for inhibition of SARS-CoV replication that may involve an unknown activity of PLP, or alternatively a direct effect on a cellular target that modifies or bypasses PLP function in yeast and mammalian cells.

  7. Time over threshold readout method of SiPM based small animal PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valastyan, I.; Gal, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Kalinka, G.; Nagy, F.; Kiraly, B.; Imrek, J.; Molnar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the work was to design a readout concept for silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) sensor array used in small animal PET scanner. The detector module consist of LYSO 35x35 scintillation crystals, 324 SiPM sensors (arranged in 2x2 blocks and those quads in a 9x9 configuration) and FPGA based readout electronics. The dimensions of the SiPM matrix are area: 48x48 mm 2 and the size of one SiPM sensor is 1.95x2.2 mm 2 . Due to the high dark current of the SiPM, conventional Anger based readout method does not provide sufficient crystal position maps. Digitizing the 324 SiPM channels is a straightforward way to obtain proper crystal position maps. However handling hundreds of analogue input channels and the required DSP resources cause large racks of data acquisition electronics. Therefore coding of the readout channels is required. Proposed readout method: The coding of the 324 SiPMs consists two steps: Step 1) Reduction of the channels from 324 to 36: Row column readout, SiPMs are connected to each other in column by column and row-by row, thus the required channels are 36. The dark current of 18 connected SiPMs is small in off for identifying pulses coming from scintillating events. Step 2) Reduction of the 18 rows and columns to 4 channels: Comparators were connected to each rows and columns, and the level was set above the level of dark noise. Therefore only few comparators are active when scintillation light enters in the tile. The output of the comparator rows and columns are divided to two parts using resistor chains. Then the outputs of the resistor chains are digitized by a 4 channel ADC. However instead of the Anger method, time over threshold (ToT) was used. Figure 1 shows the readout concept of the SiPM matrix. In order to validate the new method and optimize the front-end electronics of the detector, the analogue signals were digitized before the comparators using a CAEN DT5740 32 channel digitizer, then the

  8. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marije; Dijkstra, Rob; Wensing, Michel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard

    2008-08-21

    Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory) and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework), and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (beta = -0.04; p = 0.04), whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (beta = 5.97; p = 0.03). No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea that aspects of redesigning care such as teamwork and culture

  9. Organizational culture, team climate and diabetes care in small office-based practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weijden Trudy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redesigning care has been proposed as a lever for improving chronic illness care. Within primary care, diabetes care is the most widespread example of restructured integrated care. Our goal was to assess to what extent important aspects of restructured care such as multidisciplinary teamwork and different types of organizational culture are associated with high quality diabetes care in small office-based general practices. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of data from 83 health care professionals involved in diabetes care from 30 primary care practices in the Netherlands, with a total of 752 diabetes mellitus type II patients participating in an improvement study. We used self-reported measures of team climate (Team Climate Inventory and organizational culture (Competing Values Framework, and measures of quality of diabetes care and clinical patient characteristics from medical records and self-report. We conducted multivariate analyses of the relationship between culture, climate and HbA1c, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and a sum score on process indicators for the quality of diabetes care, adjusting for potential patient- and practice level confounders and practice-level clustering. Results A strong group culture was negatively associated to the quality of diabetes care provided to patients (β = -0.04; p = 0.04, whereas a more 'balanced culture' was positively associated to diabetes care quality (β = 5.97; p = 0.03. No associations were found between organizational culture, team climate and clinical patient outcomes. Conclusion Although some significant associations were found between high quality diabetes care in general practice and different organizational cultures, relations were rather marginal. Variation in clinical patient outcomes could not be attributed to organizational culture or teamwork. This study therefore contributes to the discussion about the legitimacy of the widespread idea

  10. Real-time monitoring and manipulation of single bio-molecules in free solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hung-Wing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The observation and manipulation of single biomolecules allow their dynamic behaviors to be studied to provide insight into molecular genetics, biochip assembly, biosensor design, DNA biophysics. In a PDMS/glass microchannel, a nonuniform electroosmotic flow (EOF) was created. By using a scanning confocal fluorescence microscope and total internal-reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), we demonstrated that negatively charged DNA molecules were focused by the nonuniform EOF into a thin layer at the glass surface. This phenomenon was applied to selectively detect target DNA molecules without requiring the separation of excessive probes and can be applied continuously to achieve high throughput. A variable-angle-TIRFM was constructed for imaging single DNA molecule dynamics at a solid/liquid interface. Implications we have are that the measured intensities cannot be used directly to determine the distances of molecules from the surface and the experimental counting results depict the distance-dependent dynamics of molecules near the surface; Molecules at low ionic strengths experience electrostatic repulsion at distances much further away from the surface than the calculated thickness of the electrical double layer. {delta}-DNA was employed as a nanoprobe for different functionalized surfaces to elucidate adsorption in chromatography. The 12-base unpaired ends of this DNA provide exposed purine and pyrimidine groups for adsorption. Patterns of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and patterns of metal oxides are generated. By recording the real-time dynamic motion of DNA molecules at the SAMs/aqueous interface, the various parameters governing the retention of an analyte during chromatographic separation can be studied. Even subtle differences among adsorptive forces can be revealed. Dynamic conformational changes of the prosthetic group, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), in flavoprotein NADH peroxidase, in thioredoxin reductase, and in free solution were monitored

  11. Intuitive representation of surface properties of biomolecules using BioBlender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Raluca Mihaela; Callieri, Marco; Zini, Maria Francesca; Loni, Tiziana; Maraziti, Giuseppe; Pan, Mike Chen; Zoppè, Monica

    2012-03-28

    In living cells, proteins are in continuous motion and interaction with the surrounding medium and/or other proteins and ligands. These interactions are mediated by protein features such as electrostatic and lipophilic potentials. The availability of protein structures enables the study of their surfaces and surface characteristics, based on atomic contribution. Traditionally, these properties are calculated by physico-chemical programs and visualized as range of colors that vary according to the tool used and imposes the necessity of a legend to decrypt it. The use of color to encode both characteristics makes the simultaneous visualization almost impossible, requiring these features to be visualized in different images. In this work, we describe a novel and intuitive code for the simultaneous visualization of these properties. Recent advances in 3D animation and rendering software have not yet been exploited for the representation of biomolecules in an intuitive, animated form. For our purpose we use Blender, an open-source, free, cross-platform application used professionally for 3D work. On the basis Blender, we developed BioBlender, dedicated to biological work: elaboration of protein motion with simultaneous visualization of their chemical and physical features. Electrostatic and lipophilic potentials are calculated using physico-chemical software and scripts, organized and accessed through BioBlender interface. A new visual code is introduced for molecular lipophilic potential: a range of optical features going from smooth-shiny for hydrophobic regions to rough-dull for hydrophilic ones. Electrostatic potential is represented as animated line particles that flow along field lines, proportional to the total charge of the protein. Our system permits visualization of molecular features and, in the case of moving proteins, their continuous perception, calculated for each conformation during motion. Using real world tactile/sight feelings, the nanoscale world of

  12. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols – fluorescent biomolecules and potential interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pöhlker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP are an important subset of air particulate matter with a substantial contribution to the organic aerosol fraction and potentially strong effects on public health and climate. Recent progress has been made in PBAP quantification by utilizing real-time bioaerosol detectors based on the principle that specific organic molecules of biological origin such as proteins, coenzymes, cell wall compounds and pigments exhibit intrinsic fluorescence. The properties of many fluorophores have been well documented, but it is unclear which are most relevant for detection of atmospheric PBAP. The present study provides a systematic synthesis of literature data on potentially relevant biological fluorophores. We analyze and discuss their relative importance for the detection of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP by online instrumentation for atmospheric measurements such as the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS or the wide issue bioaerosol sensor (WIBS.

    In addition, we provide new laboratory measurement data for selected compounds using bench-top fluorescence spectroscopy. Relevant biological materials were chosen for comparison with existing literature data and to fill in gaps of understanding. The excitation-emission matrices (EEM exhibit pronounced peaks at excitation wavelengths of ~280 nm and ~360 nm, confirming the suitability of light sources used for online detection of FBAP. They also show, however, that valuable information is missed by instruments that do not record full emission spectra at multiple wavelengths of excitation, and co-occurrence of multiple fluorophores within a detected sample will likely confound detailed molecular analysis. Selected non-biological materials were also analyzed to assess their possible influence on FBAP detection and generally exhibit only low levels of background-corrected fluorescent emission. This study strengthens the hypothesis that ambient

  13. Development Mode of Mid-small Cities in Northern Jiangsu Based on the Growth Pole Theory

    OpenAIRE

    He, Wei; Tang, Bu-long

    2012-01-01

    The development mode of mid-small cities in northern Jiangsu is analyzed on the Growth Pole theory. Depending on scales, endowment of resources, geographical positions, and industrial advantages of mil-small cities, we can divide the development mode of those mid-small cities within this context into five types: development through integration into big cities; independent development; resource-dependent development; single industry development; and mixed industry development.

  14. Fociss-R(etail): developing a system based sustainable strategy model for small food retail

    OpenAIRE

    Venselaar, Jan; Hendriksen, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Small retail entrepreneurs in the Netherlands are confronted with declining turnover and ROI. A decrease and even disappearance of small retail in town centres, suburbs and villages is not just a loss of income for the people involved. It constitutes also a loss of attractiveness and economic viability for town centres and villages. Besides for specific groups of people, for instance the less mobile ones, it leads to erosion their social surrounding. Small and local retail can be seen as esse...

  15. BioM2MetDisease: a manually curated database for associations between microRNAs, metabolites, small molecules and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Haixiu; Wu, Tan; Dong, Qun; Sun, Zeguo; Shang, Desi; Li, Feng; Xu, Yingqi; Su, Fei; Liu, Siyao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    BioM2MetDisease is a manually curated database that aims to provide a comprehensive and experimentally supported resource of associations between metabolic diseases and various biomolecules. Recently, metabolic diseases such as diabetes have become one of the leading threats to people’s health. Metabolic disease associated with alterations of multiple types of biomolecules such as miRNAs and metabolites. An integrated and high-quality data source that collection of metabolic disease associated biomolecules is essential for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms and discovering novel therapeutics. Here, we developed the BioM2MetDisease database, which currently documents 2681 entries of relationships between 1147 biomolecules (miRNAs, metabolites and small molecules/drugs) and 78 metabolic diseases across 14 species. Each entry includes biomolecule category, species, biomolecule name, disease name, dysregulation pattern, experimental technique, a brief description of metabolic disease-biomolecule relationships, the reference, additional annotation information etc. BioM2MetDisease provides a user-friendly interface to explore and retrieve all data conveniently. A submission page was also offered for researchers to submit new associations between biomolecules and metabolic diseases. BioM2MetDisease provides a comprehensive resource for studying biology molecules act in metabolic diseases, and it is helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms and developing novel therapeutics for metabolic diseases. http://www.bio-bigdata.com/BioM2MetDisease/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. High-Performance Near-Infrared Phototransistor Based on n-Type Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Feng

    2016-12-13

    A solution-processed near-infrared (NIR) organic phototransistor (OPT) based on n-type organic small molecular material BODIPY-BF2 has been successfully fabricated. Its unprecedented performance, as well as its easy fabrication and good stability, mark this BODIPY-BF2 based OPT device as a very promising candidate for optoelectronic applications in the NIR regime.

  17. Platinum based doublet cross over therapy for advanced stage non small cell lung cancer? A better survival option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum based doublet chemotherapy namely the cisplatin/carboplatin based etopiside or gemcitabine therapy forms the therapy of choice, for patients with advanced non small cell carcinoma of the lung. Here we report two cases were unusual cross over was done from gemcitabine-to cisplatin-doublet chemotherapy resulting in unexpectedly better clinical and radiological response.

  18. Problem-based learning: facilitating multiple small teams in a large group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Jennifer H; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is often described as resource demanding due to the high staff-to-student ratio required in a traditional PBL tutorial class where there is commonly one facilitator to every 5-16 students. The veterinary science program at Charles Sturt University, Australia, has developed a method of group facilitation which readily allows one or two staff members to facilitate up to 30 students at any one time while maintaining the benefits of a small PBL team of six students. Multi-team facilitation affords obvious financial and logistic advantages, but there are also important pedagogical benefits derived from uniform facilitation across multiple groups, enhanced discussion and debate between groups, and the development of self-facilitation skills in students. There are few disadvantages to the roaming facilitator model, provided that several requirements are addressed. These requirements include a suitable venue, large whiteboards, a structured approach to support student engagement with each disclosure, a detailed facilitator guide, and an open, collaborative, and communicative environment.

  19. Implementation of a Small Type DC Microgrid Based on Fuzzy Control and Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsing Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A DC microgrid (DC-MG is a novel power system that uses DC distribution in order to provide high quality power. The study system is made by a photovoltaic array (PV, a wind generator (WG, a fuel cell (FC, and an energy storage system (ESS to establish a small type DC microgrid, with the bus being established by DC/DC converters with fuzzy controllers. An overall power dispatch was designed for the proposed system to distribute the power flows among the different energy sources and the storage unit in the system in order to satisfy the load requirements throughout an entire 24-h period. The structure of a power supervisor based on an optimal power dispatch algorithm is here proposed. Optimization was performed using dynamic programming (DP. In this paper, a system configuration of a DC microgrid is analyzed in different scenarios to show the efficacy of the control for all devices for the variable weather conditions with different DC loads. Thus, the voltage level and the power flow of the system are shown for different load conditions.

  20. Small Microbial Three-Electrode Cell Based Biosensor for Online Detection of Acute Water Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Liu, Changyu; Zhang, Xueping; Bai, Lu; Wang, Yizhe; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-11-22

    The monitoring of toxicity of water is very important to estimate the safety of drinking water and the level of water pollution. Herein, a small microbial three-electrode cell (M3C) biosensor filled with polystyrene particles was proposed for online monitoring of the acute water toxicity. The peak current of the biosensor related with the performance of the bioanode was regarded as the toxicity indicator, and thus the acute water toxicity could be determined in terms of inhibition ratio by comparing the peak current obtained with water sample to that obtained with nontoxic standard water. The incorporation of polystyrene particles in the electrochemical cell not only reduced the volume of the samples used, but also improved the sensitivity of the biosensor. Experimental conditions including washing time with PBS and the concentration of sodium acetate solution were optimized. The stability of the M3C biosensor under optimal conditions was also investigated. The M3C biosensor was further examined by formaldehyde at the concentration of 0.01%, 0.03%, and 0.05% (v/v), and the corresponding inhibition ratios were 14.6%, 21.6%, and 36.4%, respectively. This work provides a new insight into the development of an online toxicity detector based on M3C biosensor.

  1. Limits in multi-point forming based on a small scaled flexible 9-point die device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Petra; Ruback, Christian; Rümmler, Paul; Schellhorn, Harry

    2017-10-01

    Being more flexible in the shaping of the work-piece, multi-point forming based on flexible multi-point dies is gaining interest as a manufacturing technique for 3D sheet metal. The shapes of the dies can be changed according to requirements and the punches are composed of a pair of reconfigurable dies. In this study, a small scale flexible 9-point die device at a laboratory scale is used for experiments. Only the middle punch can be controlled. The other dies fix the sheet metal, either all 8 or only the 4 corner ones. The forming limit is defined when wrinkling or dimpling is observed. Force-displacement curves are monitored and give information about the amount of spring back. Curve characteristics give information about the amount of wrinkling. In agreement with the literature the springback effect decreases with increasing plastic deformation. Optical 3D surface measurements are used to compare target to actual deformation. A second focus in this study is the pressure distribution of the contact area of the punch head and work piece. Hardness measurements are used to determine the amount of strain hardening and the size of hardened area around the controlled middle die as well as the fixing dies. These values are compared to the contact force evaluated using FEM, which also gives information about the force in dependence on the sheet thickness and deformation degree.

  2. The emerging roles of NGS-based liquid biopsy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chen Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The treatment paradigm of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has evolved into oncogene-directed precision medicine. Identifying actionable genomic alterations is the initial step towards precision medicine. An important scientific progress in molecular profiling of NSCLC over the past decade is the shift from the traditional piecemeal fashion to massively parallel sequencing with the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS. Another technical advance is the development of liquid biopsy with great potential in providing a dynamic and comprehensive genomic profiling of NSCLC in a minimally invasive manner. The integration of NGS with liquid biopsy has been demonstrated to play emerging roles in genomic profiling of NSCLC by increasing evidences. This review summarized the potential applications of NGS-based liquid biopsy in the diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC including identifying actionable genomic alterations, tracking spatiotemporal tumor evolution, dynamically monitoring response and resistance to targeted therapies, and diagnostic value in early-stage NSCLC, and discussed emerging challenges to overcome in order to facilitate clinical translation in future.

  3. Small-molecule-based inhibition of histone demethylation in cells assessed by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeen, Mukram M; Kramer, Holger B; Chang, Kai-Hsuan; Coleman, Matthew L; Hopkinson, Richard J; Schofield, Christopher J; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2010-08-06

    Post-translational modifications on histones are an important mechanism for the regulation of gene expression and are involved in all aspects of cell growth and differentiation, as well as pathological processes including neurodegeneration, autoimmunity, and cancer. A major challenge within the chromatin field is to develop methods for the quantitative analysis of histone modifications. Here we report a mass spectrometry (MS) approach based on ultraperformance liquid chromatography high/low collision switching (UPLC-MS(E)) to monitor histone modifications in cells. This approach is exemplified by the analysis of trimethylated lysine-9 levels in histone H3, following a simple chemical derivatization procedure with d(6)-acetic anhydride. This method was used to study the inhibition of histone demethylases with pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) derivatives in cells. Our results show that the PDCA-dimethyl ester inhibits JMJD2A catalyzed demethylation of lysine-9 on histone H3 in human HEK 293T cells. Demethylase inhibition, as observed by MS analyses, was supported by immunoblotting with modification-specific antibodies. The results demonstrate that PDCA derived small molecules are cell permeable demethylase inhibitors and reveal that quantitative MS is a useful tool for measuring post-translational histone modifications in cells.

  4. Tangible AR interaction based on fingertip touch using small-sized nonsquare markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungjun Park

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although big-sized markers are good for accurate marker recognition and tracking, they are easily occluded by other objects and deteriorate natural visualization and level of immersion during user interaction in AR environments. In this paper, we propose an approach to exploiting the use of rectangular markers to support tangible AR interaction based on fingertip touch using small-sized markers. It basically adjusts the length, width, and interior area of rectangular markers to make them more suitably fit to longish objects like fingers. It also utilizes convex polygons to resolve the partial occlusion of a marker and properly enlarges the pattern area of a marker while adjusting its size without deteriorating the quality of marker detection. We obtained encouraging results from users that the approach can provide better natural visualization and higher level of immersion, and be accurate and tangible enough to support a pseudo feeling of touching virtual products with human hands or fingertips during design evaluation of digital handheld products.

  5. Steam generation unit in a simple version of biomass based small cogeneration unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sornek Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic Rankine cycle (ORC is a very promising process for the conversion of low or medium temperature heat to electricity in small and micro scale biomass powered systems. Classic ORC is analogous to Clausius–Rankine cycle in a steam power plant, but instead of water it uses low boiling, organic working fluids. Seeking energy and economical optimization of biomass-based ORC systems, we have proposed some modifications e.g. in low boiling fluid circuit construction. Due to the fact that the operation of a micro steam turbine is rather inefficient from the technical and economic point of view, a specially modified air compressor can be used as a steam piston engine. Such engine should be designed to work at low pressure of the working medium. Studies regarding the first version of the prototype installation were focused on the confirmation of applicability of a straw boiler in the prototype ORC power system. The results of the previous studies and the studies described in the paper (on the new cogeneration unit confirmed the high potential of the developed solution. Of course, many further studies have to be carried out.

  6. Carbon Reduction Strategies Based on an NW Small-World Network with a Progressive Carbon Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasingly urgent need to reduce carbon emissions. Devising effective carbon tax policies has become an important research topic. It is necessary to explore carbon reduction strategies based on the design of carbon tax elements. In this study, we explore the effect of a progressive carbon tax policy on carbon emission reductions using the logical deduction method. We apply experience-weighted attraction learning theory to construct an evolutionary game model for enterprises with different levels of energy consumption in an NW small-world network, and study their strategy choices when faced with a progressive carbon tax policy. The findings suggest that enterprises that adopt other energy consumption strategies gradually transform to a low energy consumption strategy, and that this trend eventually spreads to the entire system. With other conditions unchanged, the rate at which enterprises change to a low energy consumption strategy becomes faster as the discount coefficient, the network externality, and the expected adjustment factor increase. Conversely, the rate of change slows as the cost of converting to a low energy consumption strategy increases.

  7. Rational Design of Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Small Moleculesas Donating Materials for Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifa Jin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small molecules have been designed toexplore their optical, electronic, and charge transport properties as organic solar cell(OSCs materials. The calculation results showed that the designed molecules can lowerthe band gap and extend the absorption spectrum towards longer wavelengths.The designed molecules own the large longest wavelength of absorption spectra,the oscillator strength, and absorption region values. The optical, electronic, and chargetransport properties of the designed molecules are affected by the introduction of differentπ-bridges and end groups. We have also predicted the mobility of the designed moleculewith the lowest total energies. Our results reveal that the designed molecules are expectedto be promising candidates for OSC materials. Additionally, the designed molecules areexpected to be promising candidates for electron and/or hole transport materials. On thebasis of our results, we suggest that molecules under investigation are suitable donors for[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM and its derivatives as acceptors of OSCs.

  8. Simulated performance of a small-animal PET scanner based on monolithic scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, D.J. van der; Maas, M.C.; Jong, H.W.A.M. de; Schaart, D.R.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Lemaitre, C.; Eijk, C.W.E. van

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner based on monolithic scintillation detectors read-out by avalanche photo-diode arrays has been investigated by simulation. By minimizing dead space, both within and between the modules, these detectors offer increased detection efficiency compared to pixellated detectors. The spatial resolution of the scanner was investigated in 2-D by simulating a point source at various radial distances from the center. To model the detector response, measured detector line-spread functions were used. An optimum value of approximately 1 mm FWHM was found at 10 mm radial distance from the scanner central axis. Point-source sensitivity profiles in the radial and axial directions were simulated at 1 MBq activity using the Monte-Carlo code GATE. They indicated that monolithic designs increase the sensitivity roughly by a factor of two compared to pixellated designs. NECR curves simulated for these scanner designs show no significant degradation of the performance for activities up to 40 MBq

  9. Evaluation of groundwater discharge into small lakes based on the temporal distribution of radon-222

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, N.T.; Burnett, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    In order to evaluate groundwater discharge into small lakes we constructed a model that is based on the budget of 222Rn (radon t1/2 5 3.8 d) as a tracer. The main assumptions in our model are that the lake's waters are wellmixed horizontally and vertically; the only significant 222Rn source is via groundwater discharge; and the only losses are due to decay and atmospheric evasion. In order to evaluate the groundwater-derived 222Rn flux, we monitored the 222Rn concentration in lake water over periods long enough (usually 1-3 d) to observe changes likely caused by variations in atmospheric exchange (primarily a function of wind speed and temperature). We then attempt to reproduce the observed record by accounting for decay and atmospheric losses and by estimating the total 222Rn input flux using an iterative approach. Our methodology was tested in two lakes in central Florida: one of which is thought to have significant groundwater inputs (Lake Haines) and another that is known not to have any groundwater inflows but requires daily groundwater augmentation from a deep aquifer (Round Lake). Model results were consistent with independent seepage meter data at both Lake Haines (positive seepage of ??? 1.6 ?? 104 m3 d-1 in Mar 2008) and at Round Lake (no net groundwater seepage). ?? 2011, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  10. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  11. Terminal moiety-driven electrical performance of asymmetric small-molecule-based organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Jianhua; Zhang, Shanlin; jiang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    With respect to the successes from symmetric small molecules, asymmetric ones have recently emerged as an alternative choice. In this paper, we present the synthesis and photovoltaic properties of four asymmetric small molecule donors. The benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT) end in the asymmetri...

  12. A Survey of Control Issues in PMSG-Based Small Wind-Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando, Natalia Angela; Liserre, Marco; Mastromauro, Rosa Anna

    2013-01-01

    In the field of wind energy generation particular interest has been focused in recent years on distributed generation through small wind-turbines (power unit 200 kW) because of their limited size and lower environmental impact. The field of small generation was dominated by the use of asynchronous...

  13. Fociss-R(etail): developing a system based sustainable strategy model for small food retail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar; Jack Hendriksen

    2014-01-01

    Small retail entrepreneurs in the Netherlands are confronted with declining turnover and ROI. A decrease and even disappearance of small retail in town centres, suburbs and villages is not just a loss of income for the people involved. It constitutes also a loss of attractiveness and economic

  14. The Small Explorer Data System - A data system based on standard interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian S.; Hengemihle, Jerome

    1990-01-01

    The Small Explorer Data System was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center using a 'standard interfaces' approach. Standard interfaces make it adaptable to a wide variety of missions. The paper describes the Small Explorer Data System with particular emphasis on the standard interfaces incorporated in both the hardware and software.

  15. The biophysical effects of deuterium oxide on biomolecules and living cells through open notebook science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvagno, Anthony L.

    This dissertation explores various effects of deuterium oxide (D2O also known as heavy water) in nature. Water is everywhere and interacts with just about everything. As such, it would be quite a daunting task to characterize every effect that water exhibits on everything in the universe. This research is a small piece of the puzzle, and provides some fundamental understanding of how water interacts with other molecules. This is done from two viewpoints: (1) the effects of heavy water on living cells and (2) the effects of heavy water on molecules. Varying concentrations of deuterium oxide were used as the growing solvent for four different organisms: S. cerevisiae, E. coli, A. thaliana, and N. tabacum. In each case growth rates and morphology was assessed and compared to the wild type. Organisms were surveyed for potential phenotypes exhibited in the presence of extremely low and high concentrations of D2O. In every organism, growth is increasingly inhibited in higher concentrations of D2O compared to lower concentrations of D2O. In the case of tobacco, a root hair phenotype was exhibited in the presence of deuterium depleted water (plant in 10% D2O is identical to that of natural water, and potentially healthier. Meanwhile, plants grown in 60% D2O exhibit slower growth and leaf discoloration. Tests on E. coli reveal inconsistent growth rates, but exhibit increased growth in DDW when adapted to D2O. Cellular and colonial morphology is also very distinguished from the wt. Cells appear to remain joined after cellular fission, while colonies exhibit brainy structures. Yeast morphology is quite different. Yeast cells remain joined after mitosis in 99% D2O, causing large cellular aggregates, while colonies become slightly asymmetric. Adaptation of yeast to D2O was not possible. Molecular effects were examined using a variety of tools including: dynamic light spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and optical tweezers. Heat

  16. Sequence-independent characterization of viruses based on the pattern of viral small RNAs produced by the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Eric Roberto Guimarães Rocha; Olmo, Roenick Proveti; Paro, Simona; Ferreira, Flavia Viana; de Faria, Isaque João da Silva; Todjro, Yaovi Mathias Honore; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Meignin, Carine; Gatherer, Derek; Imler, Jean-Luc; Marques, João Trindade

    2015-07-27

    Virus surveillance in vector insects is potentially of great benefit to public health. Large-scale sequencing of small and long RNAs has previously been used to detect viruses, but without any formal comparison of different strategies. Furthermore, the identification of viral sequences largely depends on similarity searches against reference databases. Here, we developed a sequence-independent strategy based on virus-derived small RNAs produced by the host response, such as the RNA interference pathway. In insects, we compared sequences of small and long RNAs, demonstrating that viral sequences are enriched in the small RNA fraction. We also noted that the small RNA size profile is a unique signature for each virus and can be used to identify novel viral sequences without known relatives in reference databases. Using this strategy, we characterized six novel viruses in the viromes of laboratory fruit flies and wild populations of two insect vectors: mosquitoes and sandflies. We also show that the small RNA profile could be used to infer viral tropism for ovaries among other aspects of virus biology. Additionally, our results suggest that virus detection utilizing small RNAs can also be applied to vertebrates, although not as efficiently as to plants and insects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Wave propagation through random media: A local method of small perturbations based on the Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ralf

    1990-01-01

    Propagation of sound through the turbulent atmosphere is a statistical problem. The randomness of the refractive index field causes sound pressure fluctuations. Although no general theory to predict sound pressure statistics from given refractive index statistics exists, there are several approximate solutions to the problem. The most common approximation is the parabolic equation method. Results obtained by this method are restricted to small refractive index fluctuations and to small wave lengths. While the first condition is generally met in the atmosphere, it is desirable to overcome the second. A generalization of the parabolic equation method with respect to the small wave length restriction is presented.

  18. Evaluation of roundness error using a new method based on a small displacement screw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouira, Hichem; Bourdet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In relation to industrial need and the progress of technology, LNE would like to improve the measurement of its primary pressure, spherical and flick standards. The spherical and flick standards are respectively used to calibrate the spindle motion error and the probe which equips commercial conventional cylindricity measuring machines. The primary pressure standards are obtained using pressure balances equipped with rotary pistons with an uncertainty of 5 nm for a piston diameter of 10 mm. Conventional machines are not able to reach such an uncertainty level. That is why the development of a new machine is necessary. To ensure such a level of uncertainty, both stability and performance of the machine are not sufficient, and the data processing should also be done with accuracy less than a nanometre. In this paper, a new method based on the small displacement screw (SDS) model is proposed. A first validation of this method is proposed on a theoretical dataset published by the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) in report no 3327. Then, an experiment is prepared in order to validate the new method on real datasets. Specific environment conditions are taken into account and many precautions are considered. The new method is applied to analyse the least-squares circle, minimum zone circle, maximum inscribed circle and minimum circumscribed circle. The results are compared to those done by the reference Chebyshev best-fit method and reveal perfect agreement. The sensibilities of the SDS and Chebyshev methodologies are investigated, and it is revealed that results remain unchanged when the value of the diameter exceeds 700 times the form error. (paper)

  19. Impacts of Intelligent Automated Quality Control on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Arpin, Louis; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2016-10-01

    Stable system performance is mandatory to warrant the accuracy and reliability of biological results relying on small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. This simple requirement sets the ground for imposing routine quality control (QC) procedures to keep PET scanners at a reliable optimal performance level. However, such procedures can become burdensome to implement for scanner operators, especially taking into account the increasing number of data acquisition channels in newer generation PET scanners. In systems using pixel detectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the QC workload rapidly increases to unmanageable levels due to the number of independent channels involved. An artificial intelligence based QC system, referred to as Scanner Intelligent Diagnosis for Optimal Performance (SIDOP), was proposed to help reducing the QC workload by performing automatic channel fault detection and diagnosis. SIDOP consists of four high-level modules that employ machine learning methods to perform their tasks: Parameter Extraction, Channel Fault Detection, Fault Prioritization, and Fault Diagnosis. Ultimately, SIDOP submits a prioritized faulty channel list to the operator and proposes actions to correct them. To validate that SIDOP can perform QC procedures adequately, it was deployed on a LabPET™ scanner and multiple performance metrics were extracted. After multiple corrections on sub-optimal scanner settings, a 8.5% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [7.6, 9.3]) improvement in the CNR, a 17.0% (CI: [15.3, 18.7]) decrease of the uniformity percentage standard deviation, and a 6.8% gain in global sensitivity were observed. These results confirm that SIDOP can indeed be of assistance in performing QC procedures and restore performance to optimal figures.

  20. Small UAS-Based Wind Feature Identification System Part 1: Integration and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Salazar, Leopoldo; Cobano, Jose A; Ollero, Anibal

    2016-12-23

    This paper presents a system for identification of wind features, such as gusts and wind shear. These are of particular interest in the context of energy-efficient navigation of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The proposed system generates real-time wind vector estimates and a novel algorithm to generate wind field predictions. Estimations are based on the integration of an off-the-shelf navigation system and airspeed readings in a so-called direct approach. Wind predictions use atmospheric models to characterize the wind field with different statistical analyses. During the prediction stage, the system is able to incorporate, in a big-data approach, wind measurements from previous flights in order to enhance the approximations. Wind estimates are classified and fitted into a Weibull probability density function. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is utilized to determine the shaping and scale parameters of the distribution, which are employed to determine the most probable wind speed at a certain position. The system uses this information to characterize a wind shear or a discrete gust and also utilizes a Gaussian Process regression to characterize continuous gusts. The knowledge of the wind features is crucial for computing energy-efficient trajectories with low cost and payload. Therefore, the system provides a solution that does not require any additional sensors. The system architecture presents a modular decentralized approach, in which the main parts of the system are separated in modules and the exchange of information is managed by a communication handler to enhance upgradeability and maintainability. Validation is done providing preliminary results of both simulations and Software-In-The-Loop testing. Telemetry data collected from real flights, performed in the Seville Metropolitan Area in Andalusia (Spain), was used for testing. Results show that wind estimation and predictions can be calculated at 1 Hz and a wind map can be updated at 0.4 Hz . Predictions

  1. Attenuation correction for freely moving small animal brain PET studies based on a virtual scanner geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G I; Kyme, A Z; Ryder, W J; Fulton, R R; Meikle, S R

    2014-01-01

    Attenuation correction in positron emission tomography brain imaging of freely moving animals is a very challenging problem since the torso of the animal is often within the field of view and introduces a non negligible attenuating factor that can degrade the quantitative accuracy of the reconstructed images. In the context of unrestrained small animal imaging, estimation of the attenuation correction factors without the need for a transmission scan is highly desirable. An attractive approach that avoids the need for a transmission scan involves the generation of the hull of the animal’s head based on the reconstructed motion corrected emission images. However, this approach ignores the attenuation introduced by the animal’s torso. In this work, we propose a virtual scanner geometry which moves in synchrony with the animal’s head and discriminates between those events that traversed only the animal’s head (and therefore can be accurately compensated for attenuation) and those that might have also traversed the animal’s torso. For each recorded pose of the animal’s head a new virtual scanner geometry is defined and therefore a new system matrix must be calculated leading to a time-varying system matrix. This new approach was evaluated on phantom data acquired on the microPET Focus 220 scanner using a custom-made phantom and step-wise motion. Results showed that when the animal’s torso is within the FOV and not appropriately accounted for during attenuation correction it can lead to bias of up to 10% . Attenuation correction was more accurate when the virtual scanner was employed leading to improved quantitative estimates (bias < 2%), without the need to account for the attenuation introduced by the extraneous compartment. Although the proposed method requires increased computational resources, it can provide a reliable approach towards quantitatively accurate attenuation correction for freely moving animal studies. (paper)

  2. Small UAS-Based Wind Feature Identification System Part 1: Integration and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Rodriguez Salazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system for identification of wind features, such as gusts and wind shear. These are of particular interest in the context of energy-efficient navigation of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS. The proposed system generates real-time wind vector estimates and a novel algorithm to generate wind field predictions. Estimations are based on the integration of an off-the-shelf navigation system and airspeed readings in a so-called direct approach. Wind predictions use atmospheric models to characterize the wind field with different statistical analyses. During the prediction stage, the system is able to incorporate, in a big-data approach, wind measurements from previous flights in order to enhance the approximations. Wind estimates are classified and fitted into a Weibull probability density function. A Genetic Algorithm (GA is utilized to determine the shaping and scale parameters of the distribution, which are employed to determine the most probable wind speed at a certain position. The system uses this information to characterize a wind shear or a discrete gust and also utilizes a Gaussian Process regression to characterize continuous gusts. The knowledge of the wind features is crucial for computing energy-efficient trajectories with low cost and payload. Therefore, the system provides a solution that does not require any additional sensors. The system architecture presents a modular decentralized approach, in which the main parts of the system are separated in modules and the exchange of information is managed by a communication handler to enhance upgradeability and maintainability. Validation is done providing preliminary results of both simulations and Software-In-The-Loop testing. Telemetry data collected from real flights, performed in the Seville Metropolitan Area in Andalusia (Spain, was used for testing. Results show that wind estimation and predictions can be calculated at 1 Hz and a wind map can be updated at 0.4 Hz

  3. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  4. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Best, Kate E

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.

  5. Immune-based Therapies for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafei, Hind; El-Bahesh, Ehab; Finianos, Antoine; Nassereddine, Samah; Tabbara, Imad

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer has evolved tremendously over the past decade. Specifically, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become an increasingly interesting target of pharmacological blockade. These immune inhibitors have shown promising results in front-line therapy and after failure of multiple lines, as well as in monotherapy and combination with other therapies. Vaccination in non-small cell lung cancer is also an emerging field of research that holds promising results for the future of immunotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer. This review presents a concise update on the most recent data regarding the role of checkpoint inhibitors as well as vaccination in non-small cell lung cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. The Distribution of Capture Fisheries Based Small Pelagic - Mackerel Fish Species In Balikpapan Waters, East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Abdusysyahid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE In the utilization of common property resource, long term balance in aquaculture is difficult to maintain as people trying to maximize their profit leading to considerable extensification. The objective of this research was to analyze the number of stock, production, and effort of Mackerel fish (Scomberomorus commersonii resource based on bio-economic approach. Primary data was collected based on purposive sampling method where the respondents in this research were Small Pelagic fishers which determined deliberately due to specific consideration. Secondary data used in this research was obtained from several sources. Data production and effort (input or effort was arranged in a time sequence according to the type of fishing gears and their targets of fishery resource being studied and then determined the value of CPUE (catch per unit effort. Mathematically, the input gear to be standardized is calculated from fishing power index multiplies with input (effort of standardized gear. The result shows that the renewable capacity begins to decrease leading to a condition of biologically over fishing. Aside from that, the Mackerel fish resource in this area also experiences economically over fishing condition which indicated by higher economic calculation value and lower capture yield. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New

  7. Precise Image-Based Motion Estimation for Autonomous Small Body Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew Edie; Matthies, Larry H.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed and tested a software algorithm that enables onboard autonomous motion estimation near small bodies using descent camera imagery and laser altimetry. Through simulation and testing, we have shown that visual feature tracking can decrease uncertainty in spacecraft motion to a level that makes landing on small, irregularly shaped, bodies feasible. Possible future work will include qualification of the algorithm as a flight experiment for the Deep Space 4/Champollion comet lander mission currently under study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Study on the preparation and stability of 188Re biomolecules via EHDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro-Flores, G.; Garcia-Salinas, L.; Paredes-Gutierrez, L.; Hashimoto, K.; Melendez-Alafort, L.; Murphy, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    A direct labelling technique via ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonic acid (EHDP) as a weak competing ligand was developed for the preparation of several biomolecules: 188 Re-monoclonal antibody ior cea1 against carcinoembryonic antigen ( 188 Re-MoAb), biotinylated 188 Re-MoAb ( 188 Re-MoAb-biotin), 188 Re-polyclonal IgG ( 188 Re-IgG), 188 Re-peptide (somatostatine analogue peptide b-(2-naphtyl)-D-Ala-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Val-Cys-Thr-amide), 188 Re-MoAb fragments ( 188 Re-F(ab') 2 ) and biotinylated 188 Re-F(ab') 2 ( 188 Re-F(ab') 2 -biotin). The reaction conditions such as pH, temperature, weak ligand concentration and stannous chloride concentration were optimized during the radiolabelling of each biomolecule. Before the labelling procedure, disulphide bridge groups of the biomolecules were reduced with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). To obtain 188 Re labelled antibodies and peptides in high radiochemical yields (>90%) via EHDP, it was necessary to use acidic conditions and a high concentration of stannous chloride to allow the redox reaction Re +7 →Re +5 :Re +4 . The labelling of MoAb and F(ab') 2 with 188 Re via EHDP was also evaluated employing a pretargeted technique by avidin-biotin strategy in normal mice, demonstrating that the 188 Re-labelled biotinylated antibodies are stable complexes in vivo. The 188 Re-peptide complex prepared by this method, was stable for 24 h and no radiolytic degradation was observed. (author)

  9. Microfossils, biomolecules and biominerals in carbonaceous meteorites: implications to the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2012-11-01

    Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and FESEM) investigations have shown that a wide variety of carbonaceous meteorites contain the remains of large filaments embedded within freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorite rock matrix. The filaments occur singly or in dense assemblages and mats and are often encased within carbon-rich, electron transparent sheaths. Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spot analysis and 2D X-Ray maps indicate the filaments rarely have detectable nitrogen levels and exhibit elemental compositions consistent with that interpretation that of the meteorite rock matrix. Many of the meteorite filaments are exceptionally well-preserved and show evidence of cells, cell-wall constrictions and specialized cells and processes for reproduction, nitrogen fixation, attachment and motility. Morphological and morphometric analyses permit many of the filaments to be associated with morphotypes of known genera and species of known filamentous trichomic prokaryotes (cyanobacteria and sulfur bacteria). The presence in carbonaceous meteorites of diagenetic breakdown products of chlorophyll (pristane and phytane) along with indigenous and extraterrestrial chiral protein amino acids, nucleobases and other life-critical biomolecules provides strong support to the hypothesis that these filaments represent the remains of cyanobacteria and other microorganisms that grew on the meteorite parent body. The absence of other life-critical biomolecules in the meteorites and the lack of detectable levels of nitrogen indicate the filaments died long ago and can not possibly represent modern microbial contaminants that entered the stones after they arrived on Earth. This paper presents new evidence for microfossils, biomolecules and biominerals in carbonaceous meteorites and considers the implications to some of the major hypotheses for the Origin of Life.

  10. Staffing requirements for future small and medium reactors based on projections in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovsky, G.M.; Kodochigov, N.G.; Kurachenkov, A.V.; Novikov, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental Design Bureau of Mechanical Engineering (OKBM) specializes in the development of small and medium power reactors having different purposes. They include reactor plants for NPHPP, nuclear district heating power plants and propulsion plants. Small and medium power plants have simpler processes of electricity and heat production, less systems, simpler control algorithms and considerably enhanced inherent safety properties. These plants are mainly equipped with passive safety systems. These properties are especially characteristic for reactor plants of nuclear district heating power plants and HTG reactor plants. The designs of small and medium power plants actually provide a high degree of control automation which considerably reduces workload on the personnel in both normal and abnormal operation conditions. All this allows the reduction in personnel for small and medium power reactors if compared to high capacity reactor plants. But due to objective reasons the specific number of personnel (man/MW) for average and especially small capacity reactors considerably exceeds the value for high capacity reactor plants. At the same time one can propose a set of organization - technical measures allowing the increase in this value in future. Safety requirements imposed for small and average capacity reactors are the same or more strict than those for high capacity reactors. That's why the requirements to the training of personnel for such reactor plants are not allowed to be lowered if compared to the requirements imposed to the personnel of high capacity reactors. (author)

  11. Recovery of biomolecules from marinated herring (Clupea harengus) brine using ultrafiltration through ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gringer, Nina; Hosseini, Seyed Vali; Svendsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Marinated herring processing brines, which are usually discarded, are rich in salt, protein, non-protein nitrogen, iron, fatty acids, antioxidant and even possess enzymatic activity. This study investigated the performance of ceramic ultrafiltration of two herring spice brines with a major focus...... on recovery of high value biomolecules such as proteins, fatty acids, minerals, and phenolic compounds. Chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD, BOD5) as well as total suspended solids (TSS) were also measured to follow the performance of the ultrafiltration. The retentates contained 75-82% (95% TSS...

  12. Plastic Trash goes Biohybrid"-Rapid and Selective Functionalization of Inert Plastic Surfaces with Biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiller, Stefan M; Kambhampati, Dev; Stengel, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    The covalent functionalization of "inert" polymers such as polypropylene with biomolecules for biocompatible or biosensor surfaces is challenging. Here we present a powerful approach to covalently modify "inert" macromolecular surfaces with biomacromolecules reusing old plastic material. A special...... emphasis was placed on easily accessible materials and a process which is easy, fast, efficient, cheap, and reliable. "Plastic trash" (lids from Eppendorf® pipet tip containers) was used as a polymer substrate to demonstrate the use/reuse of commercial packing material to covalently modify this material...

  13. The origin of methane and biomolecules from a CO2 cycle on terrestrial planets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Knížek, Antonín; Ivanek, Ondřej; Kubelík, Petr; Zukalová, Markéta; Kavan, Ladislav; Ferus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 10 (2017), s. 721-726 E-ISSN 2397-3366 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-05076S; GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401721; Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401521 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : biomolecules * CO2 cycle on terrestrial planets * Mars Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  14. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We...... demonstrate that, by shaping the pattern of the UV light used to induce molecular immobilization, one can control the pattern of immobilized molecules onto the surface. Using a single-aperture spatial mask, combined with the Fourier transforming property of a focusing lens, we show that submicrometer (0.7 mu...

  15. From Phosphorous to Arsenic: Changing the Classic Paradigm for the Structure of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Brown

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecules are composed primarily of the elements carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus. The structured assembly of these elements forms the basis for proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. However, the recent discovery of a new bacterium, strain GFAJ-1 of the Halomonadaceae, has shaken the classic paradigms for the architecture of life. Mounting evidence supports the claim that these bacteria substitute arsenic for phosphorus in macromolecules. Herein, we provide a brief commentary and fuel the debate related to what may be a most unusual organism.

  16. Micro-photonic cylindrical waveguide based protein biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padigi, Sudhaprasanna Kumar; Asante, Kofi; Kovvuri, Vijay Sekhar Reddy; Reddy, Ravi Kiran Kondama; Rosa, Andres La; Prasad, Shalini

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a rapidly prototyped optical cylindrical micro-waveguide based biosensor. This device works on the principle of variation to the light intensity and path of coupled input light due to the binding of protein bio-molecules onto the micro-waveguide surface as a method of physical transduction. The variation to the coupled light intensity and path is dependent on the nature of the bio-molecule and the density of the bio-molecules. This technique has been used to identify protein biomarkers for inflammation and thrombosis, namely myeloperoxidase (MPO) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The detection limit that has been demonstrated is pg ml -1 . The detection speed is of the order of seconds from the time of injection of the bio-molecule. The optical signature that is obtained to identify a protein bio-molecule is entirely dependent on the nature of adsorption of the bio-molecule on to the cylindrical cavity surfaces. This in turn is dependent on the protein conformation and the surface charge of the bio-molecules. Hence a specific protein bio-molecule generates a unique optical identifier based on the nature of binding/adsorption to the cavity surface. This physical phenomenon is exploited to identify individual proteins. This technique is a demonstration of detection of nano-scale protein bio-molecules using the optical biosensor technique with unprecedented sensitivity

  17. Maskless localized patterning of biomolecules on carbon nanotube microarray functionalized by ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet using biotin-avidin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzairi, Tomy; Okada, Mitsuru; Purnamaningsih, Retno Wigajatri; Poespawati, Nji Raden; Iwata, Futoshi; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafine plasma jet is a promising technology with great potential for nano- or micro-scale surface modification. In this letter, we demonstrated the use of ultrafine atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) for patterning bio-immobilization on vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) microarray platform without a physical mask. The biotin-avidin system was utilized to demonstrate localized biomolecule patterning on the biosensor devices. Using ±7.5 kV square-wave pulses, the optimum condition of plasma jet with He/NH3 gas mixture and 2.5 s treatment period has been obtained to functionalize CNTs. The functionalized CNTs were covalently linked to biotin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and avidin-(fluorescein isothiocyanate) FITC, sequentially. BSA was necessary as a blocking agent to protect the untreated CNTs from avidin adsorption. The localized patterning results have been evaluated from avidin-FITC fluorescence signals analyzed using a fluorescence microscope. The patterning of biomolecules on the CNT microarray platform using ultrafine APPJ provides a means for potential application of microarray biosensors based on CNTs.

  18. Monte Carlo-based diode design for correction-less small field dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, P H; Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Knight, R T; Hill, B; Kenny, J; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2013-07-07

    Due to their small collecting volume, diodes are commonly used in small field dosimetry. However, the relative sensitivity of a diode increases with decreasing small field size. Conversely, small air gaps have been shown to cause a significant decrease in the sensitivity of a detector as the field size is decreased. Therefore, this study uses Monte Carlo simulations to look at introducing air upstream to diodes such that they measure with a constant sensitivity across all field sizes in small field dosimetry. Varying thicknesses of air were introduced onto the upstream end of two commercial diodes (PTW 60016 photon diode and PTW 60017 electron diode), as well as a theoretical unenclosed silicon chip using field sizes as small as 5 mm × 5 mm. The metric D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) used in this study represents the ratio of the dose to a point of water to the dose to the diode active volume, for a particular field size and location. The optimal thickness of air required to provide a constant sensitivity across all small field sizes was found by plotting D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) as a function of introduced air gap size for various field sizes, and finding the intersection point of these plots. That is, the point at which D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) was constant for all field sizes was found. The optimal thickness of air was calculated to be 3.3, 1.15 and 0.10 mm for the photon diode, electron diode and unenclosed silicon chip, respectively. The variation in these results was due to the different design of each detector. When calculated with the new diode design incorporating the upstream air gap, k(f(clin),f(msr))(Q(clin),Q(msr)) was equal to unity to within statistical uncertainty (0.5%) for all three diodes. Cross-axis profile measurements were also improved with the new detector design. The upstream air gap could be implanted on the commercial diodes via a cap consisting of the air cavity surrounded by water equivalent material. The results for the unclosed silicon chip show that an ideal small

  19. Prediction of small molecule binding property of protein domains with Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulashevska, Alla; Stein, Martin; Jackson, David; Eils, Roland

    2009-12-01

    Accurate computational methods that can help to predict biological function of a protein from its sequence are of great interest to research biologists and pharmaceutical companies. One approach to assume the function of proteins is to predict the interactions between proteins and other molecules. In this work, we propose a machine learning method that uses a primary sequence of a domain to predict its propensity for interaction with small molecules. By curating the Pfam database with respect to the small molecule binding ability of its component domains, we have constructed a dataset of small molecule binding and non-binding domains. This dataset was then used as training set to learn a Bayesian classifier, which should distinguish members of each class. The domain sequences of both classes are modelled with Markov chains. In a Jack-knife test, our classification procedure achieved the predictive accuracies of 77.2% and 66.7% for binding and non-binding classes respectively. We demonstrate the applicability of our classifier by using it to identify previously unknown small molecule binding domains. Our predictions are available as supplementary material and can provide very useful information to drug discovery specialists. Given the ubiquitous and essential role small molecules play in biological processes, our method is important for identifying pharmaceutically relevant components of complete proteomes. The software is available from the author upon request.

  20. Performance analysis of active damped small DC-link capacitor based drive for unbalanced input voltage supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ram Krishan; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    A small DC-link capacitor based drive is presented in this paper. The drive shows negative impedance instability at operating points with high power load. A phase portrait is presented for input filter states which exhibit a limit cycle. When the drive is operated with unbalanced input supply...

  1. A Model of Small-Group Problem-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education: Teaching in the Clinical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsikiew, Jeerisuda; Donsamak, Sisira; Saeteaw, Manit

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) is an alternate method of instruction that incorporates basic elements of cognitive learning theory. Colleges of pharmacy use PBL to aid anticipated learning outcomes and practice competencies for pharmacy student. The purpose of this study were to implement and evaluate a model of small group PBL for 5th year pharmacy…

  2. Six versus fewer planned cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Antonio; Chiodini, Paolo; Sun, Jong-Mu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the optimum number of treatment cycles remains controversial. Therefore, we did a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data to compare ...

  3. Small Core, Big Network: A Comprehensive Approach to GIS Teaching Practice Based on Digital Three-Dimensional Campus Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Jiechen; Li, Manchun; Zhong, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    Geographic information science (GIS) features a wide range of disciplines and has broad applicability. Challenges associated with rapidly developing GIS technology and the currently limited teaching and practice materials hinder universities from cultivating highly skilled GIS graduates. Based on the idea of "small core, big network," a…

  4. Proteasome-based mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wilt, Leonie H. A. M.; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Chan, Elena T.; Kirk, Christopher J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, registered for Multiple Myeloma treatment, is currently explored for activity in solid tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we studied the proteasome-based mechanisms underlying intrinsic and acquired bortezomib resistance in NSCLC cells.

  5. Two Persons with Multiple Disabilities Use Camera-Based Microswitch Technology to Control Stimulation with Small Mouth and Eyelid Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lang, Russell

    2012-01-01

    Background: A camera-based microswitch technology was recently developed to monitor small facial responses of persons with multiple disabilities and allow those responses to control environmental stimulation. This study assessed such a technology with 2 new participants using slight variations of previous responses. Method: The technology involved…

  6. Feasibility study of a small, thorium-based fission power system for space and terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Michael Jason

    One of the current challenges facing space exploration is the creation of a power source capable of providing useful energy for the entire duration of a mission. Historically, radioisotope batteries have been used to provide load power, but this conventional system may not be capable of sustaining continuous power for longer duration missions. To remedy this, many forays into nuclear powered spacecraft have been investigated, but no robust system for long-term power generation has been found. In this study, a novel spin on the traditional fission power system that represents a potential optimum solution is presented. By utilizing mature High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technology in conjunction with the capabilities of the thorium fuel cycle, we have created a light-weight, long-term power source capable of a continuous electric power output of up to 70kW for over 15 years. This system relies upon a combination of fissile, highly-enriched uranium dioxide and fertile thorium carbide Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in a hexagonal beryllium oxide matrix. As the primary fissile material is consumed, the fertile material breeds new fissile material leading to more steady fuel loading over the lifetime of the core. Reactor control is achieved through an innovative approach to the conventional boron carbide neutron absorber by utilizing sections of borated aluminum placed in rotating control drums within the reflector. Borated aluminum allows for much smaller boron concentrations, thus eliminating the potential for 10B(n,alpha)6Li heating issues that are common in boron carbide systems. A wide range of other reactivity control systems are also investigated, such as a radially-split rotating reflector. Lastly, an extension of the design to a terrestrial based system is investigated. In this system, uranium enrichment is dropped to 20 percent in order to meet current regulations, a solid uranium-zirconium hydride fissile driver replaces the

  7. Small animal PET based on 16x16 TSV-MPPCs and monolithic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguilar, Albert Talens; Conde, Pablo; Hernadez, Liczandro Hernadez; Vidal San Sebastian, Luis Fernando [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Salbador, Carlos Correcher; Solsona, Cesar Molinos [Oncovision, Valencia (Spain); Junge, Sven; Lankes, Konrad [Bruker BioSpin (Germany); Benlloch, Jose Maria [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging, i3M-CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    In this work we present the design of a small animal PET based on 8 high-density arrays of MPPCs and monolithic scintillators. The MPPCs arrays are composed of 16x16 TSV-type (3x3 mm{sup 2}) elements covering a rough active area of 5x5 cm{sup 2}. A single LYSO block with a thickness of 10mm has been mounted on each detector. Black paint has been applied to the entrance and lateral faces of the crystal to preserve the scintillation light distribution. The axial and transaxial FOVs of one ring are 48 mm and 80 mm, respectively. Each MPPC array has been directly attached to a resistive readout circuit that provides outputs for each row and column of the array. These 32 signals are read with flexible boards 30 cm apart from the PET detector without any additional connectors in between. The PET-system is intended for in-line acquisition in front of MR scanners and as PET-insert inside the sensitive MRI volume. For this purpose, it is necessary to avoid magnetic sensible materials, such as nickel, and to prevent eddy currents in metallic structures induced by the MRI gradients. All detectors are air cooled and kept at temperatures of approximately 20{sup o}C with a variation below 0.05{sup o}C. The intrinsic resolution is 2.2 mm at the crystal center (averaged over all 2.6 mm) when Center of Gravity methods are used to resolve the impact position. This value is about a factor 1.5 better than results obtained with the H8500 PSPMT (64 PADs) and similar scintillators. With an improved collimator with holes with only 0.8mm diameter and a length of 70 mm, an intrinsic detector resolution of 1.1mm was reached. The energy resolutions of ROIs of 1x1 cm{sup 2} showed FWHM values in the range of 14%.

  8. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  9. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  10. Significance of life table estimates for small populations: Simulation-based study of estimation errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Scherbov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We study bias, standard errors, and distributions of characteristics of life tables for small populations. Theoretical considerations and simulations show that statistical efficiency of different methods is, above all, affected by the population size. Yet it is also significantly affected by the life table construction method and by a population's age composition. Study results are presented in the form of ready-to-use tables and relations, which may be useful in assessing the significance of estimates and differences in life expectancy across time and space for the territories with a small population size, when standard errors of life expectancy estimates may be high.

  11. Fuzzy Logic Based MPPT Controller for a Small Wind Turbine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrila, Diana; Blaabjerg, Frede; Muntean, Nicolae

    2012-01-01

    /Δω. The change of reference generator current (ΔI*) is the output variable. For small power applications, when the turbine inertia is relatively small, and the wind speed changes continuously, it is important to consider the transients in order to develop an accurate theoretical model and to attain optimal...... operation. Therefore, the mechanical power (Pm) is composed of the generator mechanical (input) power (Pg) plus the dynamic power, resulting in the dynamic power versus rotating speed curve. The controller is able to track the maximum power point for changing wind conditions, and is robust with respect...

  12. 25th anniversary article: isoindigo-based polymers and small molecules for bulk heterojunction solar cells and field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ergang; Mammo, Wendimagegn; Andersson, Mats R

    2014-03-26

    Driven by the potential advantages and promising applications of organic solar cells, donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have been intensively investigated in the past years. One of the strong electron-withdrawing groups that were widely used as acceptors for the construction of D-A polymers for applications in polymer solar cells and FETs is isoindigo. The isoindigo-based polymer solar cells have reached efficiencies up to ∼7% and hole mobilities as high as 3.62 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been realized by FETs based on isoindigo polymers. Over one hundred isoindigo-based small molecules and polymers have been developed in only three years. This review is an attempt to summarize the structures and properties of the isoindigo-based polymers and small molecules that have been reported in the literature since their inception in 2010. Focus has been given only to the syntheses and device performances of those polymers and small molecules that were designed for use in solar cells and FETs. Attempt has been made to deduce structure-property relationships that would guide the design of isoindigo-based materials. It is expected that this review will present useful guidelines for the design of efficient isoindigo-based materials for applications in solar cells and FETs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Chinese Herbal Decoction Based on Syndrome Differentiation as Maintenance Therapy in Patients with Extensive-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Exploratory and Small Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the treatment effect and treatment length of Chinese herbal decoction (CHD as maintenance therapy on patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC and to reflect the real syndrome differentiation (Bian Zheng practices of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Patients and Methods. Different CHDs were prescribed for each patient based on syndrome differentiation. The length of CHD treatment was divided into two phases for analyzing progression-free survival (PFS and postprogression survival (PPS. Results. Three hundred and fifty-seven CHDs were prescribed based on syndrome differentiation during the study period. Median PFS was significantly longer in patients who received CHD >3 months than patients who received CHD ≤3 months in the first phase (8.7 months versus 4.5 months; hazard ratio (HR, 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.41–0.99; P=0.0009. Median PPS was significantly longer in patients who received CHD >7 months than patients who received CHD ≤7 months in the second phase (11.7 months versus 5.1 months; HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.90–2.74; P=0.002. Conclusion. CHD could improve PFS and PPS, which are closely related to treatment time and deepness of response of first-line therapy. In addition, CHD could improve body function and keep patients in a relatively stable state.

  14. Biomolecules in the treatment of lichen planus refractory to corticosteroid therapy: Clinical and histopathological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñas, Laura; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo; Anitua, Eduardo

    2018-03-01

    Local deficit of several biomolecules have been described in oral lichen planus (OLP). Such a deficit impairs cellular functions and cell-matrix communication. Assess the efficacy of the local application of autologous biomolecules in the treatment of erosive OLP. In this study, the use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) as a source of blood-derived and autologous growth factors and proteins were tested in erosive oral lichen planus refractory to corticosteroids. Histopathological features of the disease were also analysed at the time of diagnosis. Clinical data were the number of recurrences and achievement of pain reduction and complete healing of the lesions. A total of 10 patients with erosive OLP refractory to treatment by corticosteroids were included in the study. All patients were females with a mean age of 48±12years. A complete remission of the disease was achieved after one infiltration of PRGF in 8 patients. Only 2 patients required a total of 2 infiltrations to heal. Hydropic degeneration of the epithelium basal layer, band-like subepithelial lymphocytic infiltration and fibrin deposits in the epithelium were observed in all patients. Interestingly plasma cells were present in 2 patients. All patients presenting plasma cells healed after only one PRGF infiltration. However, 2 patients out of 6 (no plasma cells) required 2 infiltrations. The local administration of autologous local factors could overcome the deficit of biomolecular clues and thus improve cell functions and restore cell-matrix communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential Biomolecules and Current Treatment Technologies for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: an Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashim, Zenith; Samuel, Shila; Duraisamy, Nallusamy; Krishnan, Kathiravan

    2017-05-18

    Diabetic foot ulceration remains a major challenge and is one of the most expensive and leading causes of major and minor amputations among patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Hence the purpose of this review is to emphasize on potential molecular markers involved in diabetic foot ulcer physiology, the efficacy of different types of dressing materials, adjunct therapy and newer therapeutic approach like nanoparticles for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. We conducted a systematic literature review search by using Pubmed and other web searches. The quality evidence of diabetic foot ulcer biomolecules and treatments was collected, summarized and compared with other studies. The present investigation suggested that impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is an influence of several factors. All the advanced therapies and foot ulcer dressing materials are not suitable for all types of diabetic foot ulcers, however more prospective follow ups and in vivo and in vitro studies are needed to draw certain conclusion. Several critical wound biomolecules have been identified and are in need to be investigated in diabetic foot ulcers. The application of biocompatible nanoparticles holds a promising approach for designing dressing materials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcer. Understanding the cellular and molecular events and identifying the appropriate treatment strategies for different foot ulcer grades will reduce recurrence of foot ulcer and lower limb amputation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. DPPH and oxygen free radicals as pro-oxidant of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letelier, María Eugenia; Molina-Berríos, Alfredo; Cortés-Troncoso, Juan; Jara-Sandoval, José; Holst, Marianne; Palma, Karina; Montoya, Margarita; Miranda, Dante; González-Lira, Víctor

    2008-03-01

    Numerous investigations exist about the alterations that oxygen free radicals can provoke on biomolecules; these modifications can be prevented and/or reversed by different antioxidants agents. On the other hand, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), a stable nitrogen synthetic radical, is used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of medicinal herbal products; however, the structural changes that this radical provoke on the herbal active principles are not clear yet. In this work, we compared the redox reactivity of oxygen free radicals and DPPH radical on phospholipids and protein thiol groups present in rat liver microsomes. Cu2+/ascorbate was used as generator system of oxygen free radical and as antioxidant, an extract of Buddleja globosa's leaves. Cu2+/ascorbate provoked microsomal lipid peroxidation, microsomal thiols oxidation and oxygen consumption; all of these phenomena were inhibited by B. globosa extract. On the other hand, DPPH was bleached in different extension by the herbal extract and phosphatidyl choline; beside, DPPH decreased microsomal thiols content, but this phenomenon were not prevented by the herbal extract. Furthermore, DPPH did not induce oxygen consumption and neither modified the oxygen consumption induced by Cu2+/ascorbate. Distinct redox mechanisms may explain the differences between the reactivity of DPPH and oxygen free radicals on biomolecules, which is discussed.

  17. Generic Learning-Based Ensemble Framework for Small Sample Size Face Recognition in Multi-Camera Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-camera networks have gained great interest in video-based surveillance systems for security monitoring, access control, etc. Person re-identification is an essential and challenging task in multi-camera networks, which aims to determine if a given individual has already appeared over the camera network. Individual recognition often uses faces as a trial and requires a large number of samples during the training phrase. This is difficult to fulfill due to the limitation of the camera hardware system and the unconstrained image capturing conditions. Conventional face recognition algorithms often encounter the “small sample size” (SSS problem arising from the small number of training samples compared to the high dimensionality of the sample space. To overcome this problem, interest in the combination of multiple base classifiers has sparked research efforts in ensemble methods. However, existing ensemble methods still open two questions: (1 how to define diverse base classifiers from the small data; (2 how to avoid the diversity/accuracy dilemma occurring during ensemble. To address these problems, this paper proposes a novel generic learning-based ensemble framework, which augments the small data by generating new samples based on a generic distribution and introduces a tailored 0–1 knapsack algorithm to alleviate the diversity/accuracy dilemma. More diverse base classifiers can be generated from the expanded face space, and more appropriate base classifiers are selected for ensemble. Extensive experimental results on four benchmarks demonstrate the higher ability of our system to cope with the SSS problem compared to the state-of-the-art system.

  18. Low cost venom extractor based on Arduino(®) board for electrical venom extraction from arthropods and other small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Thomas; Debayle, Delphine; Diochot, Sylvie; Salinas, Miguel; Lingueglia, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Extracting venom from small species is usually challenging. We describe here an affordable and versatile electrical venom extractor based on the Arduino(®) Mega 2560 Board, which is designed to extract venom from arthropods and other small animals. The device includes fine tuning of stimulation time and voltage. It was used to collect venom without apparent deleterious effects, and characterized for the first time the venom of Zoropsis spinimana, a common spider in French Mediterranean regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Values-Based Supply Chains as a Strategy for Supporting Small and Mid-Scale Producers in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gail Feenstra; Shermain Hardesty

    2016-01-01

    Consumers are increasingly interested in the “values” associated with the food they eat and are often willing to pay more for food for which there is a “story” that links farm to fork. The “values” associated with these foods may be that they are locally produced, by small or mid-scale farms, or use production practices that enhance the environment. Wholesale channels that provide marketing options for small and mid-scale producers and support these values are referred to as “values-based sup...

  20. Automated family-based naming of small RNAs for next generation sequencing data using a modified MD5-digest algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhihua; Lin, Yuefeng; John, Bino

    2012-01-01

    We developed NameMyGene, a web tool and a stand alone program to easily generate putative family-based names for small RNA sequences so that laboratories can easily organize, analyze, and observe patterns from, the massive amount of data generated by next-generation sequencers. NameMyGene, also applicable to other emerging methods such as RNA-Seq, and Chip-Seq, solely uses the input small RNA sequence and does not require any additional data such as other sequence data sets. The web server an...

  1. A Hybrid Metaheuristic-Based Approach for the Aerodynamic Optimization of Small Hybrid Wind Turbine Rotors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Acero, José F.; Martínez-Lauranchet, Jaime; Probst, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    the aerodynamic efficiency of small WT (SWT) rotors for a wide range of operational conditions. The design variables are (1) the airfoil shape at the different blade span positions and the radial variation of the geometrical variables of (2) chord length, (3) twist angle, and (4) thickness along the blade span...

  2. Prolonged persistence of bovine herpesvirus in small cattle herds: a model-based analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, E.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Boven, van R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Herpesviruses can remain dormant in once-infected hosts and, upon reactivation, cause such hosts to become infectious. This phenomenon of latency and reactivation may enable herpesviruses to persist for a long time in small host populations. To quantify the effect of reactivation on persistence, the

  3. Fracture-based correlation of uniaxial and small punch creep data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Ferdinand; Dymáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 86, DEC (2016), s. 34-38 ISSN 0167-8442 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Creep * Small punch test * Chromium steel Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  4. Knowledge-based network ties in early rapidly internationalising small firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masango, Shingairai Grace; Marinova, Svetla Trifonova

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to establish the sources of the relationships underpinning Early Rapidly Internationalising Small Firm (ERISF) cross border activities, the main characteristics and specific functions of these relationships, and their process of development. Using interview data from ten South...

  5. Towards systematic planning of small-scale hydrological intervention-based research (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pramana, K.E.R.; Ertsen, M.W.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Many small-scale water development initiatives are accompanied by hydrological research to study either the shape of the intervention or its impacts. Humans influence both, and thus one needs to take human agency into account. This paper focuses on the effects of human actions in the intervention

  6. A philicity based analysis of adsorption of small molecules in zeolites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Adsorption of small molecules like CH4, CO and NH3 into the acid sites of zeolites is ana- lysed as an interaction between an electrophile and a nucleophile. Global reactivity descriptors like soft- ness and electrophilicity, and local reactivity descriptors like the Fukui function, local softness and local philicity are ...

  7. A Distributed Taxation Based Rank Adaptation Scheme for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catania, Davide; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2015-01-01

    The further densification of small cells impose high and undesirable levels of inter-cell interference. Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) systems along with advanced receiver techniques provide us with extra degrees of freedom to combat such a problem. With such tools, rank adaptation algorit...

  8. Evaluating the Acceptance of Cloud-Based Productivity Computer Solutions in Small and Medium Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing has emerged as a new paradigm for on-demand delivery and consumption of shared IT resources over the Internet. Research has predicted that small and medium organizations (SMEs) would be among the earliest adopters of cloud solutions; however, this projection has not materialized. This study set out to investigate if behavior…

  9. Small satellite attitude determination based on GPS/IMU data fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovan, Andrey [Navigation and Control Laboratory, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, GSP-1, Leninskie Gory, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cepe, Ali [Department of Applied Mechanics and Control, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, we present the mathematical models and algorithms that describe the problem of attitude determination for a small satellite using measurements from three angular rate sensors (ARS) and aiding measurements from multiple GPS receivers/antennas rigidly attached to the platform of the satellite.

  10. Trait-based prediction of extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, R Keller; Shaw, Casey; Humphries, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Small body size is generally correlated with r-selected life-history traits, including early maturation, short-generation times, and rapid growth rates, that result in high population turnover and a reduced risk of extinction. Unlike other classes of vertebrates, however, small freshwater fishes appear to have an equal or greater risk of extinction than large fishes. We explored whether particular traits explain the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List conservation status of small-bodied freshwater fishes from 4 temperate river basins: Murray-Darling, Australia; Danube, Europe; Mississippi-Missouri, North America; and the Rio Grande, North America. Twenty-three ecological and life-history traits were collated for all 171 freshwater fishes of ≤120 mm total length. We used generalized linear mixed-effects models to assess which combination of the 23 traits best explained whether a species was threatened or not threatened. We used the best models to predict the probability of 29 unclassified species being listed as threatened. With and without controlling for phylogeny at the family level, small body size-among small-bodied species-was the most influential trait correlated with threatened species listings. The k-folds cross-validation demonstrated that body size and a random effect structure that included family predicted the threat status with an accuracy of 78% (SE 0.5). We identified 10 species likely to be threatened that are not listed as such on the IUCN Red List. Small body size is not a trait that provides universal resistance to extinction, particularly for vertebrates inhabiting environments affected by extreme habitat loss and fragmentation. We hypothesize that this is because small-bodied species have smaller home ranges, lower dispersal capabilities, and heightened ecological specialization relative to larger vertebrates. Trait data and further model development are needed to predict the IUCN conservation status of the over 11

  11. Toward performance-diverse small-molecule libraries for cell-based phenotypic screening using multiplexed high-dimensional profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawer, Mathias J.; Li, Kejie; Gustafsdottir, Sigrun M.; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Marton, Melissa A.; Sokolnicki, Katherine L.; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Kemp, Melissa M.; Winchester, Ellen; Taylor, Bradley; Grant, George B.; Hon, C. Suk-Yee; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Wilson, J. Anthony; Bittker, Joshua A.; Dančík, Vlado; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Winckler, Wendy; Golub, Todd R.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Clemons, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening has become a mainstay of small-molecule probe and early drug discovery. The question of how to build and evolve efficient screening collections systematically for cell-based and biochemical screening is still unresolved. It is often assumed that chemical structure diversity leads to diverse biological performance of a library. Here, we confirm earlier results showing that this inference is not always valid and suggest instead using biological measurement diversity derived from multiplexed profiling in the construction of libraries with diverse assay performance patterns for cell-based screens. Rather than using results from tens or hundreds of completed assays, which is resource intensive and not easily extensible, we use high-dimensional image-based cell morphology and gene expression profiles. We piloted this approach using over 30,000 compounds. We show that small-molecule profiling can be used to select compound sets with high rates of activity and diverse biological performance. PMID:25024206

  12. Effect of placement of droop based generators in distribution network on small signal stability margin and network loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dheer, D.K.; Doolla, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2017-01-01

    loss and stability margin is further investigated by identifying the Pareto fronts for modified IEEE 13 bus, IEEE 33 and practical 22-bus radial distribution network with application of Reference point based Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (R-NSGA). Results were validated by time domain......For a utility-connected system, issues related to small signal stability with Distributed Generators (DGs) are insignificant due to the presence of a very strong grid. Optimally placed sources in utility connected microgrid system may not be optimal/stable in islanded condition. Among others issues......, small signal stability margin is on the fore. The present research studied the effect of location of droop-controlled DGs on small signal stability margin and network loss on a modified IEEE 13 bus system, an IEEE 33-bus distribution system and a practical 22-bus radial distribution network. A complete...

  13. A magnetic nanoparticle-clustering biosensor for blu-ray based optical detection of small-molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins

    2014-01-01

    -cost instruments limit the advancement of MNP-based assays. We report here a novel MNP-clustering small-molecule assay on an optical readout platform to overcome the limitations aforementioned with the following improvements. First, a facile MNP-clustering assay applicable to diverse small-molecules was realized......In magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-clustering assays, a target molecule is bound to multiple receptors tethered onto MNPs, triggering MNP-clustering and leading to changes in the size of clusters. However, sandwich-type clustering requires multiple binding-sites on a target molecule, which is often...... unavailable for small-molecules. Furthermore, measuring magnetic properties as signals is not intrinsically selective regarding MNP-cluster size. Thus, the detection of few MNP-clusters is readily interfered by background signals from predominantly-existing single MNPs. Additionally, bulky and high...

  14. Antenatal small-class education versus auditorium-based lectures to promote positive transitioning to parenthood - A randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Koushede

    Full Text Available Prospective parents widely use education to gain information about, e.g., labour and parenting skills. It is unknown if antenatal education in small classes is more beneficial for parenting stress and parenting alliance compared with other types of antenatal education. In the present randomised trial, we examined the effect of antenatal education in small classes versus auditorium-based lectures on perceived stress, parenting stress, and parenting alliance. A total of 1,766 pregnant women were randomised to receive: antenatal education in small classes three times in pregnancy and one time after delivery, each session lasted 2.5 hours, versus standard care consisting of two times two hours auditorium-based lectures. Previous analysis of the primary outcome showed no difference between intervention and control group. Here we conduct an exploratory analysis of three secondary outcomes. Effects of the interventions on parents' global feelings of stress at 37 weeks gestation and nine weeks and six months postpartum and parenting stress nine weeks and six months postpartum were examined using linear regression analyses and mixed models with repeated measurements. The effect on parenting alliance six months postpartum was examined using the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Antenatal education in small classes had a small beneficial main effect on global feelings of stress six months postpartum and a statistically significant interaction between time and group favoring antenatal education in small classes. The P values of intervention effects on parenting stress and parenting alliance were all larger than the threshold value (0.05.

  15. Quantum-mechanical parameters for the risk assessment of multi-walled carbon-nanotubes: A study using adsorption of probe compounds and its application to biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayawan; Vikas

    2016-11-01

    This work forwards new insights into the risk-assessment of multi-walled carbon-nanotubes (MWCNTs) while analysing the role of quantum-mechanical interactions between the electrons in the adsorption of probe compounds and biomolecules by MWCNTs. For this, the quantitative models are developed using quantum-chemical descriptors and their electron-correlation contribution. The major quantum-chemical factors contributing to the adsorption are found to be mean polarizability, electron-correlation energy, and electron-correlation contribution to the absolute electronegativity and LUMO energy. The proposed models, based on only three quantum-chemical factors, are found to be even more robust and predictive than the previously known five or four factors based linear free-energy and solvation-energy relationships. The proposed models are employed to predict the adsorption of biomolecules including steroid hormones and DNA bases. The steroid hormones are predicted to be strongly adsorbed by the MWCNTs, with the order: hydrocortisone > aldosterone > progesterone > ethinyl-oestradiol > testosterone > oestradiol, whereas the DNA bases are found to be relatively less adsorbed but follow the order as: guanine > adenine > thymine > cytosine > uracil. Besides these, the developed electron-correlation based models predict several insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, plasticizers and antimicrobial agents in cosmetics, to be strongly adsorbed by the carbon-nanotubes. The present study proposes that the instantaneous inter-electronic interactions may be quite significant in various physico-chemical processes involving MWCNTs, and can be used as a reliable predictor for their risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Upgrading Wood-Based Industries: Harnessing the Social Network of Small-Scale Furniture Producers and Their Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melati ,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Furniture is a major export commodity in Indonesia with a total value of USD 1.96 million in 2007.  Jepara District is one of the key location for wood furniture production with 15,271 furniture related business units employing 176,469 workers.  However, inefficiencies and power imbalances throughout the furniture value chain have resulted in overharvesting and uneven distribution of gains among the industry’s actors.  In contrast to price-setting international furniture retailers, small-scale producers enjoy the least value from their products.  In order to increase added value and competitiveness, small-scale furniture producers have made efforts to upgrade by harnessing their social network and institutions.  This paper describes small-scale furniture producers’ efforts to upgrade by utilising their social network and institutions in Jepara.  Data was collected through in-depth interviews with members of the small-scale furniture producers’ association.  The research provides insight into the nature of social networks and information flow and develops future scenarios to upgrade.  The scenarios will not only benefit the furniture industry in Jepara, but may also be adopted for similar industries throughout Indonesia and the world, and potentially improve many people’s economies and livelihoods.Keywords: wood-based industry, furniture, small-scale, social network, institution

  17. Initial Market Assessment for Small-Scale Biomass-Based CHP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E.; Mann, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to reexamine the energy generation market opportunities for biomass CHP applications smaller than 20 MW. This paper provides an overview of the benefits of and challenges for biomass CHP in terms of policy, including a discussion of the drivers behind, and constraints on, the biomass CHP market. The report provides a summary discussion of the available biomass supply types and technologies that could be used to feed the market. Two primary markets are outlined--rural/agricultural and urban--for small-scale biomass CHP, and illustrate the primary intersections of supply and demand for those markets. The paper concludes by summarizing the potential markets and suggests next steps for identifying and utilizing small-scale biomass.

  18. Nonlocal strain gradient theory calibration using molecular dynamics simulation based on small scale vibration of nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh [Mechanical Engineering Department, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tadi Beni, Yaghoub, E-mail: tadi@eng.sku.ac.ir [Faculty of Engineering, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi Zeverdejani, Mehran [Mechanical Engineering Department, Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    Featured by two small length scale parameters, nonlocal strain gradient theory is utilized to investigate the free vibration of nanotubes. A new size-dependent shell model formulation is developed by using the first order shear deformation theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained using Hamilton's principle and solved for simply supported boundary condition. As main purpose of this study, since the values of two small length scale parameters are still unknown, they are calibrated by the means of molecular dynamics simulations (MDs). Then, the influences of different parameters such as nonlocal parameter, scale factor, length and thickness on vibration characteristics of nanotubes are studied. It is also shown that increase in thickness and decrease in length parameters intensify the effect of nonlocal parameter and scale factor.

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of t...

  20. How do small rural food-processing firms compete?A resource-based approach to competitive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. FORSMAN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was concerned with the competitive strategies of small food-processing firms in rural Finland and their ability to achieve and maintain a competitively advantaged position in relation to larger food companies in the dynamic and mature food market. Competitive strategies were approached from the resource-based view (RBV that emphasises internal firm factors as sources of competitive advantage and long-term success. As strategic choices, differentiation was specifically considered. The main objective was to explain the relationships between resources, competitive advantage and firm success. To understand the ambiguous nature of the resources in the small-scale food production context, the study introduced a distinction between strategic resources and basic resources and the strategic relationship between them. The empirical part of the study was based on quantitative analyses of the survey data collected from 238 small (less than 20 persons, food-processing firms in rural Finland. The sample firms represented different branches of the food industry and 39% of them operated in connection with a farm. The linkage between resources, competitive advantage and firm success was investigated by means of cluster analysis, mean comparisons and LISREL modelling. The results demonstrated that there are some typical features relating to small-scale food production in Finland. The results also revealed that small-scale, rural food processing firms do not constitute a homogenous group of their own, but that different strategies among small firms can be identified as well. The analyses proved that a linkage between resources, competitive advantage and firm success can be identified, which is consistent with resource-based logic. However, according to the findings, following a particular strategy does not automatically ensure that a firm will achieve success. The analysis also showed that strategic resources and basic resources are strongly interlinked

  1. A fluoroscopy-based computed tomography scanner for small specimen research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Alexander, G M; Seibert, J A

    1993-06-01

    A small-laboratory computed tomography (CT) system using a fluoroscopic system and a personal computer was fabricated and tested. The motivation for building this specimen scanner was to provide medical researchers with the capability of using CT as a practical tool in their research, as well as to provide an opportunity for hands-on CT instruction. The CT system was constructed using mostly off-the-shelf items; however, the CT stage itself was custom fabricated and software development was necessary. In addition, a personal computer and a standard fluoroscopy system were used. The spatial resolution was found to match the 228-microns sampling limitation, yielding approximately 2 line pairs per mm. Iodine contrast sensitivity studies showed that 1% solution of 370 mg/ml iodine solution was easily detected (P = .05). A small CT scanner for specimen research can be economically constructed, and is capable of good performance. The authors found substantial interest on the part of small animal researchers involved in a wide variety of medical research.

  2. Hybridization-based reconstruction of small non-coding RNA transcripts from deep sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Chikako; Mowry, Bryan J; Bauer, Denis C

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq) enables comprehensive profiling of RNAs by producing millions of short sequence reads from size-fractionated RNA libraries. Although conventional tools for detecting and distinguishing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) from reference-genome data can be applied to sequence data, ncRNA detection can be improved by harnessing the full information content provided by this new technology. Here we present NorahDesk, the first unbiased and universally applicable method for small ncRNAs detection from RNA-Seq data. NorahDesk utilizes the coverage-distribution of small RNA sequence data as well as thermodynamic assessments of secondary structure to reliably predict and annotate ncRNA classes. Using publicly available mouse sequence data from brain, skeletal muscle, testis and ovary, we evaluated our method with an emphasis on the performance for microRNAs (miRNAs) and piwi-interacting small RNA (piRNA). We compared our method with Dario and mirDeep2 and found that NorahDesk produces longer transcripts with higher read coverage. This feature makes it the first method particularly suitable for the prediction of both known and novel piRNAs.

  3. Morphometric analysis of Russian Plain's small lakes on the base of accurate digital bathymetric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Mikhail; Guzivaty, Vadim; Sapelko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    Lake morphometry refers to physical factors (shape, size, structure, etc) that determine the lake depression. Morphology has a great influence on lake ecological characteristics especially on water thermal conditions and mixing depth. Depth analyses, including sediment measurement at various depths, volumes of strata and shoreline characteristics are often critical to the investigation of biological, chemical and physical properties of fresh waters as well as theoretical retention time. Management techniques such as loading capacity for effluents and selective removal of undesirable components of the biota are also dependent on detailed knowledge of the morphometry and flow characteristics. During the recent years a lake bathymetric surveys were carried out by using echo sounder with a high bottom depth resolution and GPS coordinate determination. Few digital bathymetric models have been created with 10*10 m spatial grid for some small lakes of Russian Plain which the areas not exceed 1-2 sq. km. The statistical characteristics of the depth and slopes distribution of these lakes calculated on an equidistant grid. It will provide the level-surface-volume variations of small lakes and reservoirs, calculated through combination of various satellite images. We discuss the methodological aspects of creating of morphometric models of depths and slopes of small lakes as well as the advantages of digital models over traditional methods.

  4. A new algorithm for small object tracking based on super-resolution technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Yabunayya; Sulistyaningrum, Dwi Ratna; Setiyono, Budi

    2017-08-01

    Object tracking in a video is a problem of estimating the trajectory of an object in the image plane as it moves around a scene. In general, object tracking is a quite complicated problem. Difficulties in object tracking occur due to some constraints or conditions such as object motion, changing appearance patterns, non-rigid object structures, occlusions, and camera motion. Level of problems would be higher if the object tracking has relatively small. If it happens, an object will be difficult to identify and tracking becomes less precision because small object has little information. In order to overcome these problem, the tracking will be integrated with super-resolution where a high-resolution image will be built from several low-resolution image. In this research, tracking of moving object using adaptive particle filter which adaptive motion model is applied to get better proposal distribution approach. The simulation shows that tracking integration with super-resolution significantly increase the accuracy of small object tracking.

  5. Quantification of biomolecules in herring (Clupea harengus) industry processing waters and their recovery using electroflocculation and ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osman, Ali; Gringer, Nina; Svendsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Four types of herring industry processing waters; refrigerated sea water (RSW), storage water (SW), processing water from cutting (PW) and pre-salting brines (SB) were subjected to chemical characterization and biomolecule recovery using electroflocculation (EF) and ultrafiltration (UF...... and magnesium were the dominating trace elements. EF plus UF in series recovered up to 80% proteins and fatty acids from SB's and reduced chemical oxygen demand by 70%. Foaming and emulsifying properties of biomolecules were improved or unaffected by EF/UF treatment. To conclude, large amounts of biomass...

  6. Three-dimensional graphene-like carbon frameworks as a new electrode material for electrochemical determination of small biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wenfang; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2016-11-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-like carbon frameworks (3DGLCFs) were facilely prepared via copyrolysis of polyaniline and nickel nitrate powder, followed by acid etching. The as-prepared 3DGLCFs possess graphene-like network structure, high specific surface area, and high content nitrogen dopant. Because these features enable large electrochemically active surface area, rapid electron transfer, and fast transport of analytes to electrode surface, the 3DGLCFs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) shows current response much higher than commercial graphene (CG) modified GCE towards the oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). The anodic peak separations at 3DGLCFs/GCE are 0.23V between AA and DA, 0.13V between DA and UA, and 0.36V between AA and UA. For the simultaneous electrochemical determination of AA, DA and UA using differential pulse voltammetry, the 3DGLCFs/GCE shows linear response ranges of 1.25×10(-5)-4×10(-4)M for AA, 5×10(-8)-1.0×10(-5)M for DA, and 5×10(-8)-1.5×10(-5)M for UA, with low detection limits of 2×10(-6)M for AA, 1×10(-8)M for DA, and 1×10(-8)M for UA. The 3DGLCFs/GCE was also applied for the measurement of human serum, exhibiting satisfactory recoveries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The top-scoring ‘N’ algorithm: a generalized relative expression classification method from small numbers of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Relative expression algorithms such as the top-scoring pair (TSP) and the top-scoring triplet (TST) have several strengths that distinguish them from other classification methods, including resistance to overfitting, invariance to most data normalization methods, and biological interpretability. The top-scoring ‘N’ (TSN) algorithm is a generalized form of other relative expression algorithms which uses generic permutations and a dynamic classifier size to control both the permutation and combination space available for classification. Results TSN was tested on nine cancer datasets, showing statistically significant differences in classification accuracy between different classifier sizes (choices of N). TSN also performed competitively against a wide variety of different classification methods, including artificial neural networks, classification trees, discriminant analysis, k-Nearest neighbor, naïve Bayes, and support vector machines, when tested on the Microarray Quality Control II datasets. Furthermore, TSN exhibits low levels of overfitting on training data compared to other methods, giving confidence that results obtained during cross validation will be more generally applicable to external validation sets. Conclusions TSN preserves the strengths of other relative expression algorithms while allowing a much larger permutation and combination space to be explored, potentially improving classification accuracies when fewer numbers of measured features are available. PMID:22966958

  8. The top-scoring 'N' algorithm: a generalized relative expression classification method from small numbers of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, Andrew T; Price, Nathan D

    2012-09-11

    Relative expression algorithms such as the top-scoring pair (TSP) and the top-scoring triplet (TST) have several strengths that distinguish them from other classification methods, including resistance to overfitting, invariance to most data normalization methods, and biological interpretability. The top-scoring 'N' (TSN) algorithm is a generalized form of other relative expression algorithms which uses generic permutations and a dynamic classifier size to control both the permutation and combination space available for classification. TSN was tested on nine cancer datasets, showing statistically significant differences in classification accuracy between different classifier sizes (choices of N). TSN also performed competitively against a wide variety of different classification methods, including artificial neural networks, classification trees, discriminant analysis, k-Nearest neighbor, naïve Bayes, and support vector machines, when tested on the Microarray Quality Control II datasets. Furthermore, TSN exhibits low levels of overfitting on training data compared to other methods, giving confidence that results obtained during cross validation will be more generally applicable to external validation sets. TSN preserves the strengths of other relative expression algorithms while allowing a much larger permutation and combination space to be explored, potentially improving classification accuracies when fewer numbers of measured features are available.

  9. The top-scoring ‘N’ algorithm: a generalized relative expression classification method from small numbers of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magis Andrew T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relative expression algorithms such as the top-scoring pair (TSP and the top-scoring triplet (TST have several strengths that distinguish them from other classification methods, including resistance to overfitting, invariance to most data normalization methods, and biological interpretability. The top-scoring ‘N’ (TSN algorithm is a generalized form of other relative expression algorithms which uses generic permutations and a dynamic classifier size to control both the permutation and combination space available for classification. Results TSN was tested on nine cancer datasets, showing statistically significant differences in classification accuracy between different classifier sizes (choices of N. TSN also performed competitively against a wide variety of different classification methods, including artificial neural networks, classification trees, discriminant analysis, k-Nearest neighbor, naïve Bayes, and support vector machines, when tested on the Microarray Quality Control II datasets. Furthermore, TSN exhibits low levels of overfitting on training data compared to other methods, giving confidence that results obtained during cross validation will be more generally applicable to external validation sets. Conclusions TSN preserves the strengths of other relative expression algorithms while allowing a much larger permutation and combination space to be explored, potentially improving classification accuracies when fewer numbers of measured features are available.

  10. An alternative origin for extraterrestrial biomolecules from the hot and ionized photosphere of the protosolar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Derenne, S.; Tissandier, L.; Marrocchi, Y.; Anquetil, C.; Marty, B.

    2017-12-01

    Organic matter (OM) synthesized from plasma experiments (so-called Nebulotron) can provide an insight into the processes of organosynthesis within the ionized gas phase of the protosolar nebula (PSN). Organic materials recovered from Nebulotron experiments have a record of success in reproducing key features of chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM), including the aromatic/aliphatic and soluble/insoluble ratios [1], the occurrence of D/H hot and cold spots [2], spectral features as well as elementary and isotopic patterns observed in trapped noble gases [3]. However, up until now little attention has been paid to the soluble fraction of the recovered OM (SOM). In this study, a high-vacuum plasma setting was designed to produce organic condensates from a CO-N2-H2 gas mixture reminiscent of the PSN. The chemical diversity of the synthetized SOM has been investigated by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Our results show that a large range of biomolecules detected in meteorites and comets could have been directly synthetized from the gas phase of the PSN under high ionization rates and temperatures > 800 K. Among other molecules, urea, formamide, glycerol, hydantoin, carboxylic acids, as well as amino acid and nucleobase derivatives are reported. While photochemical processing of interstellar icy grains or asteroidal aqueous alteration are often advocated for the origin of biomolecules in extraterrestrial samples, our results suggest that biomolecule production was also effective in the hot and ionized photosphere of the PSN. Interestingly, solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra of the Nebulotron IOM, indicates that they are very low in aromatics relative to extraterrestrial samples. Given that aromatic units in meteoritic IOM likely result from the cyclization/aromatization of aliphatic chains in the gas [1], Nebulotron-like aliphatic materials could represent the initial precursors of meteoritic OM [4]. These materials would be widespread in the

  11. Performance evaluation of family-based dispatching in small manufacturing cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, J. A. C.; Nomden, G.; Slomp, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many practical instances, the choice of whether to apply family-based dispatching or not can be decided per machine. The present paper explores the impact of the location of family-based dispatching, load variations between machines and routing of jobs on the flow time effect of family-based

  12. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn

    2016-01-01

    . However, further investigation and agreement are needed to develop recommendations for landscape attributes such as size, structure, and crop rotation to define appropriate regulatory risk assessment scenarios. Overall, the application of IBMs provides multiple advantages to higher tier ecological risk......This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used...... and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite...

  13. Patients with ROS1 rearrangement?positive non?small?cell lung cancer benefit from pemetrexed?based chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zhengbo; Su, Haiyan; Zhang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ROS1 gene?rearrangement in non?small?cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients has recently been identified as a driver gene and benefited from crizotinib treatment. However, no data are available for ROS1?positive NSCLC about chemotherapeutic options and prognostic data. We investigated pemetrexed?based treatment efficacy in ROS1 translocation NSCLC patients and determined the expression of thymidylate synthetase (TS) to provide a rationale for the efficacy results. We determined the ROS1 s...

  14. Environmental Impact Statement. Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Program. Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    was useful but not totally germane to the impact analysis in Chapter 4.0. At the same time, new material has been added to Chapter 3.0 in some areas...4.1.2-2 Military-Civilian Composition of Program Inmigration .............. 4-34 1990-2000 4.1.2-3 Great Falls Public Schools Projected Program...Proposed Action and Alternatives 1, 2, and 3 4.1.3-2 1990-2000 Small ICBM Population Inmigration for the ............... 4-63 Proposed Action and

  15. Design description of a microprocessor based Engine Monitoring and Control unit (EMAC) for small turboshaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    Research programs have demonstrated that digital electronic controls are more suitable for advanced aircraft/rotorcraft turbine engine systems than hydromechanical controls. Commercially available microprocessors are believed to have the speed and computational capability required for implementing advanced digital control algorithms. Thus, it is desirable to demonstrate that off-the-shelf microprocessors are indeed capable of performing real time control of advanced gas turbine engines. The engine monitoring and control (EMAC) unit was designed and fabricated specifically to meet the requirements of an advanced gas turbine engine control system. The EMAC unit is fully operational in the Army/NASA small turboshaft engine digital research program.

  16. Activity Based Costing knowledge: empirical study on small and mediumsize enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Cardoso Vieira Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the percentage rate of use and knowledge of activitybased costing (ABC in small and medium-sized Portuguese enterprises and at the same time searching for the existence of any factors that might explain why this method is not is used among most companies. The collected data allow us to conclude that none of these enterprises uses the ABC and that the majority of respondents did not have any knowledge on the subject. Hierarchical level, age and academic qualifications are the reasons why the knowledge of the ABC is associated to the individual characteristics of people responsible for management accounting.

  17. Phase sensitive small angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brok, Erik; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Krycka, Kathryn

    It is a well-known problem that information about the scattered wave is lost in scattering experiments because the measured quantity is the modulus squared of the complex wave function. This ''phase problem'' leads to ambiguity in determining the physical properties of the scattering sample. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a useful technique for determining the structure of biomolecules, in particular proteins that cannot be crystallized and studied with x-ray crystallography. However, because the biomolecules are usually suspended in a liquid the observed scattering is an average of all possible orientations, making it difficult to obtain three dimensional structural information. In a proposed method polarized SANS and magnetic nanoparticle references attached to the sample molecules is used to obtain phase sensitive structural information and simultaneously circumvent the problem of orientational averaging (Majkrzak et al. J. Appl. Cryst. 47, 2014) If realized and perfected the technique is very promising for unambiguous determination of the three dimensional structure of biomolecules. We demonstrate the principles of our method and show the first experimental data obtained on a simple test system consisting of core shell magnetic nanoparticles.

  18. Structures and stabilities of small DNA dumbbells with Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaja, Nuria; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Rico, Manuel; Pedroso, Enrique; González, Carlos

    2003-07-07

    The structures and stabilities of cyclic DNA octamers of different sequences have been studied by NMR and CD spectroscopy and by restrained molecular dynamics. At low oligonucleotide concentrations, some of these molecules form stable monomeric structures consisting of a short stem of two base pairs connected by two mini-loops of two residues. To our knowledge, these dumbbell-like structures are the smallest observed to date. The relative stabilities of these cyclic dumbbells have been established by studying their melting transitions. Dumbbells made up purely of GC stems are more stable than those consisting purely of AT base pairs. The order of the base pairs closing the loops also has an important effect on the stabilities of these structures. The NMR data indicate that there are significant differences between the solution structures of dumbbells with G-C base pairs in the stem compared to those with A-T base pairs. In the case of dumbbells with G-C base pairs, the residues in the stem form a short segment of a BDNA helix stabilized by two Watson-Crick base pairs. In contrast, in the case of d, the stem is formed by two A-T base pairs with the glycosidic angles of the adenine bases in a syn conformation, most probably forming Hoogsteen base pairs. Although the conformations of the loop residues are not very well defined, the thymine residues at the first position of the loop are observed to fold back into the minor groove of the stem.

  19. A small microprocessor based CAMAC module for testing and monitoring purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Bouquet, B; Nguyen-Ngoc, Hoan

    1981-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. A small microcomputer, using a Motorola 6800, has been developed. Two printed-board versions have been operating since 1979 in the NA3 experiment, and about 30 other are used for test and small experiments in various laboratories. The computer consists of a 2/25 or 3/25 CAMAC unit, which can be crate controller or branch driver. In normal use, it is connected to SA400 floppy disks and a terminal. Optionally, interfaces to a cassette unit, PROM programmer and three analog outputs can be operated on the same boards. Total memory size is 11 kbytes PROM (22 kbytes with 2716 memories) and 8 kbit RAM. Software on PROM consists of an input-output monitor, with disassembling facility, editor and local assembler, a fast and easy-to-use floppy disk monitor, and an histogram package, in 7 kbytes PROM. Some macro instructions are recognised in the assembler: message printing, CAMAC functions, initialisations and are then very easily performed. (0 refs).

  20. Staffing requirements for future small and medium reactors (SMRs) based on operating experience and projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At the time of this study there were about 160 small and medium sized nuclear power reactors (referred to as SMRs) in operation worldwide, and about 25 more under construction. Operation and maintenance costs for operating SMRs represent a substantial portion of the cost of electricity produced. Of these costs, the direct and indirect cost of staff represents the major cost component. In recent years, particularly since 1990, there has been increased interest in SMRs by many developing countries wishing to take advantage of nuclear power and several small and medium reactor designs are in various stages of development. To enhance the economic competitive position of SMRs relative to alternative methods of electricity generation, it is essential to ensure that new SMRs can be operated reliably and efficiently using the optimum number of staff. This publication reviews the lessons learned from the reactor operation, and the insights gained through the design of new SMRs, with a view to optimizing staffing in order to improve overall plant economics without compromising safety.This publication is intended to evaluate the estimated staffing size of various SMRs, the staff qualification and training required for the operation of future SMRs. and the key issues which impact the staffing requirements that should be considered in the development and deployment of future SMRs

  1. The Development of Novel Nanodiamond Based MALDI Matrices for the Analysis of Small Organic Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitanda, Jackson M.; Zhang, Haixia; Pahl, Erica; Purves, Randy W.; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-10-01

    The utility of novel functionalized nanodiamonds (NDs) as matrices for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is described herein. MALDI-MS analysis of small organic compounds (<1000 Da) is typically complex because of interferences from numerous cluster ions formed when using conventional matrices. To expand the use of MALDI for the analysis of small molecules, novel matrices were designed by covalently linking conventional matrices (or a lysine moiety) to detonated NDs. Four new functionalized NDs were evaluated for their ionization capabilities using five pharmaceuticals with varying molecular structures. Two ND matrices were able to ionize all tested pharmaceuticals in the negative ion mode, producing the deprotonated ions [M - H]-. Ion intensity for target analytes was generally strong with enhanced signal-to-noise ratios compared with conventional matrices. The negative ion mode is of great importance for biological samples as interference from endogenous compounds is inherently minimized in the negative ion mode. Since the molecular structures of the tested pharmaceuticals did not suggest that negative ion mode would be preferable, this result magnifies the importance of these findings. On the other hand, conventional matrices primarily facilitated the ionization as expected in the positive ion mode, producing either the protonated molecules [M + H]+ or cationic adducts (typically producing complex spectra with numerous adduct peaks). The data presented in this study suggests that these matrices may offer advantages for the analysis of low molecular weight pharmaceuticals/metabolites.

  2. The interplay of biomolecules and water at the origin of the active behavior of living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, E.; Stefanini, P.; Tedeschi, A.; Vitiello, G.

    2011-12-01

    It is shown that the main component of living matter, namely liquid water, is not an ensemble of independent molecules but an ensemble of phase correlated molecules kept in tune by an electromagnetic (e.m) field trapped in the ensemble. This field and the correlated potential govern the interaction among biomolecules suspended in water and are in turn affected by the chemical interactions of molecules. In particular, the phase of the coherent fields appears to play an important role in this dynamics. Recent experiments reported by the Montagnier group seem to corroborate this theory. Some features of the dynamics of human organisms, as reported by psychotherapy, holistic medicine and Eastern traditions, are analyzed in this frame and could find a rationale in this context.

  3. Automated astatination of biomolecules - a stepping stone towards multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Albertsson, Per; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate multicentre clinical studies on targeted alpha therapy, it is necessary to develop an automated, on-site procedure for conjugating rare, short-lived, alpha-emitting radionuclides to biomolecules. Astatine-211 is one of the few alpha-emitting nuclides with appropriate chemical...... and physical properties for use in targeted therapies for cancer. Due to the very short range of the emitted α-particles, this therapy is particularly suited to treating occult, disseminated cancers. Astatine is not intrinsically tumour-specific; therefore, it requires an appropriate tumour-specific targeting...... vector, which can guide the radiation to the cancer cells. Consequently, an appropriate method is required for coupling the nuclide to the vector. To increase the availability of astatine-211 radiopharmaceuticals for targeted alpha therapy, their production should be automated. Here, we present a method...

  4. BioVEC: a program for biomolecule visualization with ellipsoidal coarse-graining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Erik; Plotkin, Steven S

    2009-09-01

    Biomolecule Visualization with Ellipsoidal Coarse-graining (BioVEC) is a tool for visualizing molecular dynamics simulation data while allowing coarse-grained residues to be rendered as ellipsoids. BioVEC reads in configuration files, which may be output from molecular dynamics simulations that include orientation output in either quaternion or ANISOU format, and can render frames of the trajectory in several common image formats for subsequent concatenation into a movie file. The BioVEC program is written in C++, uses the OpenGL API for rendering, and is open source. It is lightweight, allows for user-defined settings for and texture, and runs on either Windows or Linux platforms.

  5. Recent results for electron scattering from biomolecules and molecules formed due to plasma treatment of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We have been concentrating our recent experimental studies, for determining absolute cross sections, on both biomolecules (e.g. pyrimidine and benzoquinone) and molecules that result when biomass undergoes treatment by plasmas (e.g. phenol and furfural). All this work was supported and informed by computations from the Brazilian SMC groups and the Madrid IAM-SCAR group. A major rationale for these investigations was to provide cross section data for relevant modelling studies, and in this talk I will also present some results from those modelling studies. Possible further investigations will be canvassed in this presentation. Work done in conjunction with: D. B. Jones, L. Campbell, R. D. White, S. J. Buckman, M. A. P. Lima, M. C. A. Lopes, M. H. F. Bettega, M. T. do N. Varella, R. F. da Costa, G. García, P. Limão-Vieira, D. H. Madison, O. Ingólfsson and many other friends and colleagues.

  6. Ancient biomolecules: their origins, fossilization, and role in revealing the history of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Derek E G; Summons, Roger E

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of traces of a blood meal in the abdomen of a 50-million-year-old mosquito reminds us of the insights that the chemistry of fossils can provide. Ancient DNA is the best known fossil molecule. It is less well known that new fossil targets and a growing database of ancient gene sequences are paralleled by discoveries on other classes of organic molecules. New analytical tools, such as the synchrotron, reveal traces of the original composition of arthropod cuticles that are more than 400 my old. Pigments such as melanin are readily fossilized, surviving virtually unaltered for ∼200 my. Other biomarkers provide evidence of microbial processes in ancient sediments, and have been used to reveal the presence of demosponges, for example, more than 635 mya, long before their spicules appear in the fossil record. Ancient biomolecules are a powerful complement to fossil remains in revealing the history of life. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. High-frequency AC electrospray ionization source for mass spectrometry of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetwani, Nishant; Cassou, Catherine A; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2010-11-01

    A novel high-frequency alternating current (AC) electrospray ionization (ESI) source has been developed for applications in mass spectrometry. The AC ESI source operates in a conical meniscus mode, analogous to the cone-jet mode of direct current (DC) electrosprays but with significant physical and mechanistic differences. In this stable conical-meniscus mode at frequencies greater than 50 kHz, the low mobility ions, which can either be cations or anions, are entrained within the liquid cone and ejected as droplets that eventually form molecular ions, thus making AC ESI a viable tool for both negative and positive mode mass spectrometry. The performance of the AC ESI source is qualitatively shown to be frequency-dependent and, for larger bio-molecules, the AC ESI source produced an ion signal intensity that is an order of magnitude higher than its DC counterpart. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained.

  9. Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jin

    1999-01-01

    A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained

  10. The interplay of biomolecules and water at the origin of the active behavior of living organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Giudice, E; Stefanini, P; Tedeschi, A; Vitiello, G

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the main component of living matter, namely liquid water, is not an ensemble of independent molecules but an ensemble of phase correlated molecules kept in tune by an electromagnetic (e.m) field trapped in the ensemble. This field and the correlated potential govern the interaction among biomolecules suspended in water and are in turn affected by the chemical interactions of molecules. In particular, the phase of the coherent fields appears to play an important role in this dynamics. Recent experiments reported by the Montagnier group seem to corroborate this theory. Some features of the dynamics of human organisms, as reported by psychotherapy, holistic medicine and Eastern traditions, are analyzed in this frame and could find a rationale in this context.

  11. Synthesis of the copper chelator TGTA and evaluation of its ability to protect biomolecules from copper induced degradation during copper catalyzed azide-alkyne bioconjugation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekholm, F S; Pynnönen, H; Vilkman, A; Koponen, J; Helin, J; Satomaa, T

    2016-01-21

    One of the most successful bioconjugation strategies to date is the copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), however, the typically applied reaction conditions have been found to degrade sensitive biomolecules. Herein, we present a water soluble copper chelator which can be utilized to protect biomolecules from copper induced degradation.

  12. Small ICBM Area Narrowing Report. Volume 1. Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement Basing Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    housing, base exchange, commissary, health care facilities, I and administrative support activities. Identificaticn of Candidate Main Operating Bases...Also, a larger base population would be an indicator of a full complement of housing, morale, welfare, recreation, health , and education services...likelihood of induced inmigration . This is especially true of the critical induced demand for construction labor, which can lead to rapid fluctuations in

  13. Fire resistant behaviour of cellulosic textile functionalized with wastage plant bio-molecules: A comparative scientific report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Santanu; Wazed Ali, S

    2018-03-21

    Three different wastage plant based bio-molecules named banana peel powder (Musa acuminata) (BPP), coconut shell (Cocos nucifera) extract (CSE) and pomegranate rind (Punica granatum) extract (PRE) have been explored as fire resistant material on the cellulosic polymer (cotton fabric). To this end, extracts have been applied to the cotton fabric in different concentration at elevated temperature for specific time period. Treated cotton fabric showed 6 (BPP), 8.5 (CSE) and 12 (PRE) times lower vertical burning rate compared to the control cotton fabric. Thermo-gravimetry (TG) curves and the limiting oxygen index (LOI) value revealed that the PRE extract (LOI: 32) treated fabric encompassed more thermal stability compared to the BPP (LOI:26) and the CSE (LOI: 27) treated fabric as it showed higher oxygen index and more weight retention (40%) at higher temperature 450°C. Moreover, the carbonaceous samples remained after the burning of the extracts and the treated fabrics showed structural integration and more carbon content [65.6 (PRE extract) and 76.3% (PRE treated cotton)] compared to the fragile, net like char of the control cotton fabric, having less carbon content (49.8%). Gas Chromatography Mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) of the different extracts (CSE, PRE, BPP) used for the study showed the presence of high molecular weight aromatic phenolic compounds, tannin based compound and the nitrogen containing alkaloids, responsible for fire resistant effect of the different extract treated fabric. Besides fire retardancy, all the treated fabric showed attractive natural colour (measured by colour strength values) and there has been no adverse effect on the tensile strength property of the fabric after the treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Shielding biomolecules from effects of radiation by Mars analogue minerals and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ertem, M. C.; McKay, C. P.; Hazen, R. M.

    2017-07-01

    Organic compounds have been delivered over time to Mars via meteorites, comets and interplanetary dust particles. The fate of organic material on the surface of Mars must be affected by the Martian environment, in particular by ultraviolet (UV) and other ionizing radiation. Penetration depth of UV radiation into soils is in the sub-millimetre to millimetre range and depends on the properties of the soil. The aim of this research is to study the possible protective role of Martian analogue minerals and soils for survivability of biomolecules against UV radiation and to compare their decomposition rates within a 1 mm-thick portion of the surface. Results demonstrated that minerals offer significant protection to biomolecules purine, pyrimidine and uracil against UV photolysis. In the absence of these minerals, organic compounds are completely degraded when subjected directly to UV photolysis equivalent to only 5 Martian day's exposure. However, similar UV exposure of organics dried from solution onto powdered calcium carbonate (calcite; CaCO3), calcium sulphate (anhydrite; CaSO4), clay-bearing Atacama dessert soil and 7 Å clay mineral kaolinite [Al2Si2O5(OH)4] results in only 1-2% loss of organics. Mixtures of purine and uracil with calcium carbonate exposed to gamma radiation of 3 Gy (3 Gray), which corresponds to approximately 15 000 days on Mars, results in up to 10% loss of organics. By contrast, these organic compounds completely decomposed upon mixing with iron oxide (Fe2O3) before UV irradiation. As the search for extinct or extant life on Mars has been identified as a goal of top priority in NASA's Mars Exploration Program and continues with several missions planned to the red planet by both NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) in the next few decades, our findings may play a useful role in identifying optimal target sites on the Martian surface for future missions.

  15. Creating "living" polymer surfaces to pattern biomolecules and cells on common plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Glidle, Andrew; Yuan, Xiaofei; Hu, Zhixiong; Pulleine, Ellie; Cooper, Jon; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Huabing

    2013-05-13

    Creating patterns of biomolecules and cells has been applied widely in many fields associated with the life sciences, including diagnostics. In these applications it has become increasingly apparent that the spatiotemporal arrangement of biological molecules in vitro is important for the investigation of the cellular functions found in vivo. However, the cell patterning techniques often used are limited to creating 2D functional surfaces on glass and silicon. In addition, in general, these procedures are not easy to implement in conventional biological laboratories. Here, we show the formation of a living poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layer that can be patterned with visible light on plastic surfaces. This new and simple method can be expanded to pattern multiple types of biomolecule on either a previously formed PEG layer or a plastic substrate. Using common plastic wares (i.e., polyethylene films and polystyrene cell culture Petri-dishes), we demonstrate that these PEG-modified surfaces have a high resistance to protein adsorption and cell adhesion, while at the same time, being capable of undergoing further molecular grafting with bioactive motifs. With a photomask and a fluid delivery system, we illustrate a flexible way to immobilize biological functions with a high degree of 2D and 3D spatial control. We anticipate that our method can be easily implemented in a typical life science laboratory (without the need for specialized lithography equipment) offering the prospect of imparting desirable properties to plastic products, for example, the creation of functional microenvironments in biological studies or reducing biological adhesion to surfaces.

  16. [A meta-analysis of the curative effects of carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens on advance non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing-wei; Liang, Xiao-hua; Zhou, Xin-li; Huang, Ruo-fan

    2006-10-10

    To evaluate whether there is a difference in the curative effect of carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens on advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The databases PudMed, CENTRAL, and Chinese biomedical database were retrieved by using the key words "non-small cell lung cancer" or "carcinoma, non-small cell lung" so as to search the materials about the randomized controlled clinical trials that had compared the curative effects of carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens on advance NSCLC. A meta-analysis was conducted. Eighteen documents about randomized controlled clinical trials, including 6478 patients, from the retrieved 3531 documents accorded to the demand of enrollment. The overall response rates of the carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic groups were both 27% (RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.86 approximately 1.01, P = 0.10). Neither funnel plot nor rank correlation test regarding response rate indicated the existence of publication bias (chi(2) = 18.63, P = 0.63). The 0ne-year survival rate of the carboplatin-based regimen group was 36%, not significantly different from that of the cisplatin-based regimen group (35%, RR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93 - 1.17, P = 0.5). Sensitive analysis confirmed the non-existence of differences in the overall response rate and one-year survival rate between these 2 groups. The curative effects of the carboplatin-based and cisplatin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are similar. The choice of carboplatin or cisplatin depends on the toxicity of the drugs and the patients' tolerance.

  17. Planimetric Features Generalization for the Production of Small-Scale Map by Using Base Maps and the Existing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modiri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartographic maps are representations of the Earth upon a flat surface in the smaller scale than it’s true. Large scale maps cover relatively small regions in great detail and small scale maps cover large regions such as nations, continents and the whole globe. Logical connection between the features and scale map must be maintained by changing the scale and it is important to recognize that even the most accurate maps sacrifice a certain amount of accuracy in scale to deliver a greater visual usefulness to its user. Cartographic generalization, or map generalization, is the method whereby information is selected and represented on a map in a way that adapts to the scale of the display medium of the map, not necessarily preserving all intricate geographical or other cartographic details. Due to the problems facing small-scale map production process and the need to spend time and money for surveying, today’s generalization is used as executive approach. The software is proposed in this paper that converted various data and information to certain Data Model. This software can produce generalization map according to base map using the existing algorithm. Planimetric generalization algorithms and roles are described in this article. Finally small-scale maps with 1:100,000, 1:250,000 and 1:500,000 scale are produced automatically and they are shown at the end.

  18. Making Small Towns Visible in Europe: The Case of Cittaslow Network – The Strategy Based on Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja K. ZAWADZKA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to identify strategies for the development and promotion of small towns based on the implementation of the principles of sustainable development, using both endogenous social capital, unique material values of cultural heritage as well as values of the natural environment. The strategy described in this article is a derivative of the benefi ts of membership in the Cittaslow global network, the peripheral location of small towns to metropolises as well as other alternative values of small towns not accessible to large cities. It has been shown that Cittaslow can be both an indicator of sustainable development, an activator of sustainable tourism as well as an instrument for raising awareness of the endogenous capital of small towns. The background to the considerations on potential implications of accession to Cittaslow is the analysis of contemporary international networks of cities whose priority or one of the key objectives is to act in accordance with the principles of sustainable development.

  19. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  20. A New Approach to Space Situational Awareness using Small Ground-Based Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Cliff S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report discusses a new SSA approach evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that may lead to highly scalable, small telescope observing stations designed to help manage the growing space surveillance burden. Using the methods and observing tools described in this report, the team was able to acquire and track very faint satellites (near Pluto’s apparent brightness). Photometric data was collected and used to correlate object orbital position as a function of atomic clock-derived time. Object apparent brightness was estimated by image analysis and nearby star calibration. The measurement performance was only limited by weather conditions, object brightness, and the sky glow at the observation site. In the future, these new SSA technologies and techniques may be utilized to protect satellite assets, detect and monitor orbiting debris fields, and support Outer Space Treaty monitoring and transparency.