WorldWideScience

Sample records for based proteomic technology

  1. Advancement of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to explore triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Banks, Charles A S; Adams, Mark K; Florens, Laurence; Lukong, Kiven E; Washburn, Michael P

    2016-12-20

    Understanding the complexity of cancer biology requires extensive information about the cancer proteome over the course of the disease. The recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have led to the accumulation of an incredible amount of such proteomic information. This information allows us to identify protein signatures or protein biomarkers, which can be used to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. For example, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used in breast cancer research for over two decades to elucidate protein function. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with distinct molecular features that are reflected in tumour characteristics and clinical outcomes. Compared with all other subtypes of breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer is perhaps the most distinct in nature and heterogeneity. In this review, we provide an introductory overview of the application of advanced proteomic technologies to triple-negative breast cancer research.

  2. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily I Chen

    Full Text Available Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9 and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8. MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2 suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  3. Evaluation of the anti-hypertensive effect of Tengfu Jiangya tablet by combination of UPLC-Q-exactive-MS-based metabolomics and iTRAQ-based proteomics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanpeng; Jiang, Feng; Li, Yunlun; Jiang, Haiqiang; Chu, Yanjun; Zhu, Lijuan; Guo, Weixing

    2018-04-01

    Tengfu Jiangya tablet (TJT) is a traditional Chinese medicine formulation composed of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Semen raphani. It is a hospital preparation that is widely used in clinics for treating hypertension. A previous metabolomics study reported that TJT exerted a protective effect on hypertension by restoring impaired NO production, ameliorating the inflammatory state, and vascular remodeling. A clinical proteomics study also revealed five key target proteins during TJT intervention. This study aimed to integrate proteome and metabolome data sets for a holistic view of the molecular mechanisms of TJT in treating hypertension. Serum samples from spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Q Exactive hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-Exactive-MS)-based metabolomics technology and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics technology. Moreover, we selected two candidate proteins and determined their expression levels in rat serum using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 20 potential biomarkers and 14 differential proteins in rat serum were identified. These substances were mainly involved in three biological pathways: the kallikrein-kinin pathway, the lipid metabolism pathway, and the PPARγ signaling pathway. The results suggested that TJT could effectively treat hypertension, partially by regulating the above three metabolic pathways. The combination of proteomics and metabolomics provided a feasible method to uncover the underlying interventional effect and therapeutic mechanism of TJT on spontaneously hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Applications of Proteomic Technologies to Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of gene expression at the protein level. This cutting edge technology has been extensively applied to toxicology research recently. The up-to-date development of proteomics has presented the toxicology community with an unprecedented opportunit...

  5. Examining hemodialyzer membrane performance using proteomic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Pieroni, Luisa; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Urbani, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    The success and the quality of hemodialysis therapy are mainly related to both clearance and biocompatibility properties of the artificial membrane packed in the hemodialyzer. Performance of a membrane is strongly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire during the extracorporeal procedure. Recognition that a number of medium-high molecular weight solutes, including proteins and protein-bound molecules, are potentially toxic has prompted the development of more permeable membranes. Such membrane engineering, however, may cause loss of vital proteins, with membrane removal being nonspecific. In addition, plasma proteins can be adsorbed onto the membrane surface upon blood contact during dialysis. Adsorption can contribute to the removal of toxic compounds and governs the biocompatibility of a membrane, since surface-adsorbed proteins may trigger a variety of biologic blood pathways with pathophysiologic consequences. Over the last years, use of proteomic approaches has allowed polypeptide spectrum involved in the process of hemodialysis, a key issue previously hampered by lack of suitable technology, to be assessed in an unbiased manner and in its full complexity. Proteomics has been successfully applied to identify and quantify proteins in complex mixtures such as dialysis outflow fluid and fluid desorbed from dialysis membrane containing adsorbed proteins. The identified proteins can also be characterized by their involvement in metabolic and signaling pathways, molecular networks, and biologic processes through application of bioinformatics tools. Proteomics may thus provide an actual functional definition as to the effect of a membrane material on plasma proteins during hemodialysis. Here, we review the results of proteomic studies on the performance of hemodialysis membranes, as evaluated in terms of solute removal efficiency and blood-membrane interactions. The evidence collected indicates that the information provided by proteomic

  6. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  7. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: existing capabilities and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Aryal, Uma K.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-21

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a means for identification, characterization, and quantification of biomolecules that are integral components of the processes essential for life. Characterization of proteins present in a biological system at the proteome and sub-proteomes (e.g., the phosphoproteome, proteoglycome, or degradome/peptidome) levels provides a foundation for understanding fundamental aspects as well as potentially a range of translational applications. Emerging technologies such as ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry and microchip-based - proteome measurements combined with continued enhancement of MS instrumentation and separation techniques, such as reversed phase liquid chromatography and potentially capillary electrophoresis, show great promise for both broad undirected as well as targeted measurements and will be critical for e.g., the proteome-wide characterization of post translational modifications and identification, or the verification, and validation of potential biomarkers of disease. MS-based proteomics is also increasingly demonstrating great potential for contributing to our understanding of the dynamics, reactions, and roles proteins and peptides play advancing our understanding of biology on a system wide level for a wide range of applications, from investigations of microbial communities, bioremediation, and human health and disease states alike.

  8. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database

    KAUST Repository

    Komatsu, Setsuko

    2017-05-10

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max ‘Enrei’). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. Biological significanceThe Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all

  9. Integration of gel-based and gel-free proteomic data for functional analysis of proteins through Soybean Proteome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Wang, Xin; Yin, Xiaojian; Nanjo, Yohei; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sakata, Katsumi

    2017-06-23

    The Soybean Proteome Database (SPD) stores data on soybean proteins obtained with gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The database was constructed to provide information on proteins for functional analyses. The majority of the data is focused on soybean (Glycine max 'Enrei'). The growth and yield of soybean are strongly affected by environmental stresses such as flooding. The database was originally constructed using data on soybean proteins separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which is a gel-based proteomic technique. Since 2015, the database has been expanded to incorporate data obtained by label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics, which is a gel-free proteomic technique. Here, the portions of the database consisting of gel-free proteomic data are described. The gel-free proteomic database contains 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as temporal and organ-specific samples of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions. In addition, data on organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored. Furthermore, the database integrates multiple omics data such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and proteomics. The SPD database is accessible at http://proteome.dc.affrc.go.jp/Soybean/. The Soybean Proteome Database stores data obtained from both gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques. The gel-free proteomic database comprises 39,212 proteins identified in 63 sample sets, such as different organs of soybean plants grown under flooding stress or non-stressed conditions in a time-dependent manner. In addition, organellar proteins identified in mitochondria, nuclei, and endoplasmic reticulum are stored in the gel-free proteomics database. A total of 44,704 proteins, including 5490 proteins identified using a gel-based proteomic technique, are stored in the SPD. It accounts for approximately 80% of all predicted proteins from

  10. Biomarker discovery in mass spectrometry-based urinary proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samuel; Hao, Ling; Ricke, William A; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Urinary proteomics has become one of the most attractive topics in disease biomarker discovery. MS-based proteomic analysis has advanced continuously and emerged as a prominent tool in the field of clinical bioanalysis. However, only few protein biomarkers have made their way to validation and clinical practice. Biomarker discovery is challenged by many clinical and analytical factors including, but not limited to, the complexity of urine and the wide dynamic range of endogenous proteins in the sample. This article highlights promising technologies and strategies in the MS-based biomarker discovery process, including study design, sample preparation, protein quantification, instrumental platforms, and bioinformatics. Different proteomics approaches are discussed, and progresses in maximizing urinary proteome coverage and standardization are emphasized in this review. MS-based urinary proteomics has great potential in the development of noninvasive diagnostic assays in the future, which will require collaborative efforts between analytical scientists, systems biologists, and clinicians. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A Cell-Based Approach to the Human Proteome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Neil L.

    2012-10-01

    The general scope of a project to determine the protein molecules that comprise the cells within the human body is framed. By focusing on protein primary structure as expressed in specific cell types, this concept for a cell-based version of the Human Proteome Project (CB-HPP) is crafted in a manner analogous to the Human Genome Project while recognizing that cells provide a primary context in which to define a proteome. Several activities flow from this articulation of the HPP, which enables the definition of clear milestones and deliverables. The CB-HPP highlights major gaps in our knowledge regarding cell heterogeneity and protein isoforms, and calls for development of technology that is capable of defining all human cell types and their proteomes. The main activities will involve mapping and sorting cell types combined with the application of beyond the state-of-the art in protein mass spectrometry.

  12. MSQuant, an Open Source Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Gouw, Joost W; Olsen, Jesper V

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics critically depends on algorithms for data interpretation. A current bottleneck in the rapid advance of proteomics technology is the closed nature and slow development cycle of vendor-supplied software solutions. We have created an open source software environment...

  13. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information...... from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene...... for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  14. PROTEOMICS: AN EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY IN LABORATORY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D J Venter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid developments in both genomics and proteomics will allow scientists to define the molecular pathways in normal and diseased cells. With these models, researchers will have the ability to predict previously unknown interactions and verify such predictions experimentally. Novel proteins, cellular functions, and pathways will also be unravelled. It is hoped that understanding the connections between cellular pathways and the ability to identify their associated biomarkers will greatly reduce the suffering and loss of life due to diseases.

  15. Top-down Proteomics: Technology Advancements and Applications to Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenxuan; Tucholski, Trisha M.; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of the heart are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for both men and women worldwide, and impose significant economic burdens on the healthcare systems. Despite substantial effort over the last several decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the heart remain poorly understood. Areas covered Altered protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein isoform switching are increasingly recognized as important disease mechanisms. Top-down high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has emerged as the most powerful method for the comprehensive analysis of PTMs and protein isoforms. Here, we will review recent technology developments in the field of top-down proteomics, as well as highlight recent studies utilizing top-down proteomics to decipher the cardiac proteome for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the heart. Expert commentary Top-down proteomics is a premier method for the global and comprehensive study of protein isoforms and their PTMs, enabling the identification of novel protein isoforms and PTMs, characterization of sequence variations, and quantification of disease-associated alterations. Despite significant challenges, continuous development of top-down proteomics technology will greatly aid the dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying diseases of the hearts for the identification of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27448560

  16. Discovery based and targeted Mass Spectrometry in farm animal proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke

    2013-01-01

    for investigating farm animal biology. SRM is particularly important for validation biomarker candidates This talk will introduce the use of different mass spectrometry approaches through examples related to food quality and animal welfare, including studies of gut health in pigs, host pathogen interactions......Technological advances in mass spectrometry have greatly improved accuracy and speed of analyses of proteins and biochemical pathways. These proteome technologies have transformed research and diagnostic methods in the biomedical fields, and in food and farm animal sciences proteomics can be used...... be monitored to improve welfare in large industrial settings of current livestock industry. The combination of discovery based LC-MS/MS methods and the more hypothesis-based targeted mass spectrometry method commonly referred to as selected reaction monitoring or SRM, provide a powerful approach...

  17. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  18. RAPID PROCESSING OF ARCHIVAL TISSUE SAMPLES FOR PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS USING PRESSURE-CYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuth N. Puttamallesh1,2

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advent of mass spectrometry based proteomics has revolutionized our ability to study proteins from biological specimen in a high-throughput manner. Unlike cell line based studies, biomedical research involving tissue specimen is often challenging due to limited sample availability. In addition, investigation of clinically relevant research questions often requires enormous amount of time for sample collection prospectively. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE archived tissue samples are a rich source of tissue specimen for biomedical research. However, there are several challenges associated with analysing FFPE samples. Protein cross-linking and degradation of proteins particularly affects proteomic analysis. We demonstrate that barocycler that uses pressure-cycling technology enables efficient protein extraction and processing of small amounts of FFPE tissue samples for proteomic analysis. We identified 3,525 proteins from six 10µm esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC tissue sections. Barocycler allows efficient protein extraction and proteolytic digestion of proteins from FFPE tissue sections at par with conventional methods.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic quest for diabetes biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shiying; Guo, Tiannan; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. Early diagnosis and complication prevention of DM are helpful for disease treatment. However, currently available DM diagnostic markers fail to achieve the goals. Identification of new diabetic biomarkers assisted by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics may offer solution for the clinical challenges. Here, we review the current status of biomarker discovery in DM, and describe the pressure cycling technology (PCT)-Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical fragment-ion (SWATH) workflow for sample-processing, biomarker discovery and validation, which may accelerate the current quest for DM biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  1. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together...... proteomics data. Two characteristics of legumes are the high seed protein level and the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. Thus, the majority of the proteomics studies in Lotus have been performed on seed/pod and nodule/root tissues in order to create proteome reference maps and to enable comparative analyses within...... Lotus tissues or toward similar tissues from other legume species. More recently, N-glycan structures and compositions have been determined from mature Lotus seeds using glycomics and glycoproteomics, and finally, phosphoproteomics has been employed...

  2. Tissue-based map of the human proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative...

  3. A Proteomics Approach to the Protein Normalization Problem: Selection of Unvarying Proteins for MS-Based Proteomics and Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Proteomics and other protein-based analysis methods such as Western blotting all face the challenge of discriminating changes in the levels of proteins of interest from inadvertent changes in the amount loaded for analysis. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics can now estimate the relative and absolute amounts of thousands of proteins across diverse biological systems. We reasoned that this new technology could prove useful for selection of very stably expressed proteins that could serve as better loading controls than those traditionally employed. Large-scale proteomic analyses of SDS lysates of cultured cells and tissues revealed deglycase DJ-1 as the protein with the lowest variability in abundance among different cell types in human, mouse, and amphibian cells. The protein constitutes 0.069 ± 0.017% of total cellular protein and occurs at a specific concentration of 34.6 ± 8.7 pmol/mg of total protein. Since DJ-1 is ubiquitous and therefore easily detectable with several peptides, it can be helpful in normalization of proteomic data sets. In addition, DJ-1 appears to be an advantageous loading control for Western blot that is superior to those used commonly used, allowing comparisons between tissues and cells originating from evolutionarily distant vertebrate species. Notably, this is not possible by the detection and quantitation of housekeeping proteins, which are often used in the Western blot technique. The approach introduced here can be applied to select the most appropriate loading controls for MS-based proteomics or Western blotting in any biological system.

  4. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, P.; Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.

    2008-01-01

    -based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis...... taken place in molecular biology, cell biology and genomics there is a pressing need to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications. This need, compounded by mounting evidence that cellular model systems are unable to fully recapitulate all biological aspects of human...... dissease, is driving scientists to increasingly use clinically relevant samples for biomarker and target discovery. Tissues are heterogeneous and as a result optimization of sample preparation is critical for generating accurate, representative, and highly reproducible quantitative data. Although a large...

  5. Autocorrelated logistic ridge regression for prediction based on proteomics spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeman, Jelle J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents autocorrelated logistic ridge regression, an extension of logistic ridge regression for ordered covariates that is based on the assumption that adjacent covariates have similar regression coefficients. The method is applied to the analysis of proteomics mass spectra.

  6. Marine proteomics: a critical assessment of an emerging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Corrales, Jone; Marsh-Hunkin, K Erica; Gochfeld, Deborah J; Willett, Kristine L; Rimoldi, John M

    2012-10-26

    The application of proteomics to marine sciences has increased in recent years because the proteome represents the interface between genotypic and phenotypic variability and, thus, corresponds to the broadest possible biomarker for eco-physiological responses and adaptations. Likewise, proteomics can provide important functional information regarding biosynthetic pathways, as well as insights into mechanism of action, of novel marine natural products. The goal of this review is to (1) explore the application of proteomics methodologies to marine systems, (2) assess the technical approaches that have been used, and (3) evaluate the pros and cons of this proteomic research, with the intent of providing a critical analysis of its future roles in marine sciences. To date, proteomics techniques have been utilized to investigate marine microbe, plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate physiology, developmental biology, seafood safety, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental change. However, marine proteomics studies often suffer from poor experimental design, sample processing/optimization difficulties, and data analysis/interpretation issues. Moreover, a major limitation is the lack of available annotated genomes and proteomes for most marine organisms, including several "model species". Even with these challenges in mind, there is no doubt that marine proteomics is a rapidly expanding and powerful integrative molecular research tool from which our knowledge of the marine environment, and the natural products from this resource, will be significantly expanded.

  7. Proteome Profiling Outperforms Transcriptome Profiling for Coexpression Based Gene Function Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Zihao; Carr, Steven A.; Mertins, Philipp; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Ellis, Matthew J. C.; Townsend, R. Reid; Smith, Richard D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Chen, Xian; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Boja, Emily S.; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-11-11

    Coexpression of mRNAs under multiple conditions is commonly used to infer cofunctionality of their gene products despite well-known limitations of this “guilt-by-association” (GBA) approach. Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have enabled global expression profiling at the protein level; however, whether proteome profiling data can outperform transcriptome profiling data for coexpression based gene function prediction has not been systematically investigated. Here, we address this question by constructing and analyzing mRNA and protein coexpression networks for three cancer types with matched mRNA and protein profiling data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC). Our analyses revealed a marked difference in wiring between the mRNA and protein coexpression networks. Whereas protein coexpression was driven primarily by functional similarity between coexpressed genes, mRNA coexpression was driven by both cofunction and chromosomal colocalization of the genes. Functionally coherent mRNA modules were more likely to have their edges preserved in corresponding protein networks than functionally incoherent mRNA modules. Proteomic data strengthened the link between gene expression and function for at least 75% of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and 90% of KEGG pathways. A web application Gene2Net (http://cptac.gene2net.org) developed based on the three protein coexpression networks revealed novel gene-function relationships, such as linking ERBB2 (HER2) to lipid biosynthetic process in breast cancer, identifying PLG as a new gene involved in complement activation, and identifying AEBP1 as a new epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker. Our results demonstrate that proteome profiling outperforms transcriptome profiling for coexpression based gene function prediction. Proteomics should be integrated if not preferred in gene function and human disease studies

  8. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, to improve therapeutic treatment and to identify cancer associated protein signatures, signaling events as well as interactions between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment. Here, we provide an overview on the tissue proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer reported in the past few years in light of discovery and technology development. PMID:23125171

  9. Effective representation and storage of mass spectrometry-based proteomic data sets for the scientific community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as a technology of choice for global analysis of cell signaling networks. However, reporting and sharing of MS data are often haphazard, limiting the usefulness of proteomics to the signaling community. We argue that raw data should always be provided...... with proteomics studies together with detailed peptide and protein identification and quantification information. Statistical criteria for peptide identification and their posttranslational modifications have largely been established for individual projects. However, the current practice of indiscriminately...... incorporating these individual results into databases such as UniProt is problematic. Because of the vast differences in underlying data quality, we advocate a differentiated annotation of data by level of reliability. Requirements for the reporting of quantitative data are being developed, but there are few...

  10. Mass Spectrometry–Based Biomarker Discovery: Toward a Global Proteome Index of Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkridge, Adam M.; Muddiman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Biomarker discovery and proteomics have become synonymous with mass spectrometry in recent years. Although this conflation is an injustice to the many essential biomolecular techniques widely used in biomarker-discovery platforms, it underscores the power and potential of contemporary mass spectrometry. Numerous novel and powerful technologies have been developed around mass spectrometry, proteomics, and biomarker discovery over the past 20 years to globally study complex proteomes (e.g., plasma). However, very few large-scale longitudinal studies have been carried out using these platforms to establish the analytical variability relative to true biological variability. The purpose of this review is not to cover exhaustively the applications of mass spectrometry to biomarker discovery, but rather to discuss the analytical methods and strategies that have been developed for mass spectrometry–based biomarker-discovery platforms and to place them in the context of the many challenges and opportunities yet to be addressed. PMID:20636062

  11. multiplierz: an extensible API based desktop environment for proteomics data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Jignesh R; Askenazi, Manor; Ficarro, Scott B; Cashorali, Tanya; Webber, James T; Blank, Nathaniel C; Zhang, Yi; Marto, Jarrod A

    2009-10-29

    Efficient analysis of results from mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments requires access to disparate data types, including native mass spectrometry files, output from algorithms that assign peptide sequence to MS/MS spectra, and annotation for proteins and pathways from various database sources. Moreover, proteomics technologies and experimental methods are not yet standardized; hence a high degree of flexibility is necessary for efficient support of high- and low-throughput data analytic tasks. Development of a desktop environment that is sufficiently robust for deployment in data analytic pipelines, and simultaneously supports customization for programmers and non-programmers alike, has proven to be a significant challenge. We describe multiplierz, a flexible and open-source desktop environment for comprehensive proteomics data analysis. We use this framework to expose a prototype version of our recently proposed common API (mzAPI) designed for direct access to proprietary mass spectrometry files. In addition to routine data analytic tasks, multiplierz supports generation of information rich, portable spreadsheet-based reports. Moreover, multiplierz is designed around a "zero infrastructure" philosophy, meaning that it can be deployed by end users with little or no system administration support. Finally, access to multiplierz functionality is provided via high-level Python scripts, resulting in a fully extensible data analytic environment for rapid development of custom algorithms and deployment of high-throughput data pipelines. Collectively, mzAPI and multiplierz facilitate a wide range of data analysis tasks, spanning technology development to biological annotation, for mass spectrometry-based proteomics research.

  12. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2017-05-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    -sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here...... is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original...

  14. Decoding signalling networks by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Mann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Signalling networks regulate essentially all of the biology of cells and organisms in normal and disease states. Signalling is often studied using antibody-based techniques such as western blots. Large-scale 'precision proteomics' based on mass spectrometry now enables the system...

  15. Plant iTRAQ-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handakumbura, Pubudu; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Jansson, Georg C.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana

    2017-06-21

    We present a simple one-­pot extraction protocol, which rapidly isolates hydrophyllic metabolites, lipids, and proteins from the same pulverized plant sample. Also detailed is a global plant proteomics sample preparation method utilizing iTRAQ multiplexing reagents that enables deep proteome coverage due to the use of HPLC fractionation of the peptides prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We have successfully used this protocol on several different plant tissues (e.g., roots, stems, leaves) from different plants (e.g., sorghum, poplar, Arabidopsis, soybean), and have been able to successfully detect and quantify thousands of proteins. Multiplexing strategies such as iTRAQ and the bioinformatics strategy outlined here, ultimately provide insight into which proteins are significantly changed in abundance between two or more groups (e.g., control, perturbation). Our bioinformatics strategy yields z-­score values, which normalize the expression data into a format that can easily be cross-­compared with other expression data (i.e., metabolomics, transcriptomics) obtained from different analytical methods and instrumentation.

  16. WaveletQuant, an improved quantification software based on wavelet signal threshold de-noising for labeled quantitative proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics technologies have been developed to comprehensively identify and quantify proteins in two or more complex samples. Quantitative proteomics based on differential stable isotope labeling is one of the proteomics quantification technologies. Mass spectrometric data generated for peptide quantification are often noisy, and peak detection and definition require various smoothing filters to remove noise in order to achieve accurate peptide quantification. Many traditional smoothing filters, such as the moving average filter, Savitzky-Golay filter and Gaussian filter, have been used to reduce noise in MS peaks. However, limitations of these filtering approaches often result in inaccurate peptide quantification. Here we present the WaveletQuant program, based on wavelet theory, for better or alternative MS-based proteomic quantification. Results We developed a novel discrete wavelet transform (DWT and a 'Spatial Adaptive Algorithm' to remove noise and to identify true peaks. We programmed and compiled WaveletQuant using Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition. We then incorporated the WaveletQuant program in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP, a commonly used open source proteomics analysis pipeline. Conclusions We showed that WaveletQuant was able to quantify more proteins and to quantify them more accurately than the ASAPRatio, a program that performs quantification in the TPP pipeline, first using known mixed ratios of yeast extracts and then using a data set from ovarian cancer cell lysates. The program and its documentation can be downloaded from our website at http://systemsbiozju.org/data/WaveletQuant.

  17. Proteomics: an evolving technology in Laboratory Medicine | Akhter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rapid developments in both genomics and proteomics will allow scientists to define the molecular pathways in normal and diseased cells. With these models, researchers will have the ability to predict previously unknown interactions and verify such predictions experimentally. Novel proteins, cellular functions, and ...

  18. Mass Spectrometry–based Proteomic Profiling of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Sebahat; Chaurand, Pierre; Massion, Pierre P.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to further our understanding of lung cancer biology and to identify new candidate biomarkers to be used in the management of lung cancer, we need to probe these tissues and biological fluids with tools that address the biology of lung cancer directly at the protein level. Proteins are responsible of the function and phenotype of cells. Cancer cells express proteins that distinguish them from normal cells. Proteomics is defined as the study of the proteome, the complete set of proteins produced by a species, using the technologies of large-scale protein separation and identification. As a result, new technologies are being developed to allow the rapid and systematic analysis of thousands of proteins. The analytical advantages of mass spectrometry (MS), including sensitivity and high-throughput, promise to make it a mainstay of novel biomarker discovery to differentiate cancer from normal cells and to predict individuals likely to develop or recur with lung cancer. In this review, we summarize the progress made in clinical proteomics as it applies to the management of lung cancer. We will focus our discussion on how MS approaches may advance the areas of early detection, response to therapy, and prognostic evaluation. PMID:19349484

  19. Building ProteomeTools based on a complete synthetic human proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolg, Daniel P.; Wilhelm, Mathias; Schnatbaum, Karsten; Zerweck, Johannes; Knaute, Tobias; Delanghe, Bernard; Bailey, Derek J.; Gessulat, Siegfried; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Weininger, Maximilian; Yu, Peng; Schlegl, Judith; Kramer, Karl; Schmidt, Tobias; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Deutsch, Eric W.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L.; Wenschuh, Holger; Moehring, Thomas; Aiche, Stephan; Huhmer, Andreas; Reimer, Ulf; Kuster, Bernhard

    2018-01-01

    The ProteomeTools project builds molecular and digital tools from the human proteome to facilitate biomedical and life science research. Here, we report the generation and multimodal LC-MS/MS analysis of >330,000 synthetic tryptic peptides representing essentially all canonical human gene products and exemplify the utility of this data. The resource will be extended to >1 million peptides and all data will be shared with the community via ProteomicsDB and proteomeXchange. PMID:28135259

  20. Genomic comparisons of Brucella spp. and closely related bacteria using base compositional and proteome based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, Jon; Snipen, Lars; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2010-01-01

    in marker genes on the other. The proteome based methods found greater similarity between Brucella species and Ochrobactrum species than between species within genus Agrobacterium compared to each other. In other words, proteome comparisons of species within genus Agrobacterium were found to be more diverse...

  1. Proteomics in quality control: Whey protein-based supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Bruno Carius; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Lourenço, Daniela C; Fasciotti, Maíra

    2016-09-16

    The growing consumption of nutritional supplements might represent a problem, given the concern about the quality of these supplements. One of the most used supplements is whey protein (WP); because of its popularity, it has been a target of adulteration with substitute products, such as cheaper proteins with lower biological value. To investigate this type of adulteration, this study used shotgun proteomics analyses by MS(E) (multiplexed, low- and high-collision energy, data-independent acquisition) of WP-based supplements. Seventeen WP-based supplement samples were evaluated. Chicken, maize, rice, potato, soybean, and wheat proteins were considered as probable sources of bovine whey adulteration. Collectively, 523 proteins were identified across all 16 samples and replicates, with 94% of peptides inside a normal distribution within 10ppm of maximum error. In 10 of the 16 samples analyzed, only proteins from bovine whey could be detected, while in the other samples several other protein sources were detected in high concentrations, especially soybean, wheat, and rice. These results point out a probable adulteration and/or sample contamination during manufacturing that could only be detected using this proteomic approach. The present work shows how shotgun proteomics can be used to provide reliable answers in quality control matters, especially focusing on Whey Protein nutritional supplements which are a very popular subject in food and nutrition. In order to achieve an appropriate methodology, careful evaluation was performed applying extremely rigorous quality criteria, established for the proteomic analysis. These criteria and the methodological approach used in this work might serve as a guide for other authors seeking to use proteomics in quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Panorama: a targeted proteomics knowledge base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eckels, Josh; Taylor, Greg K; Shulman, Nicholas J; Stergachis, Andrew B; Joyner, Shannon A; Yan, Ping; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Colangelo, Christopher M; Paulovich, Amanda G; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D; MacCoss, Michael J; MacLean, Brendan

    2014-09-05

    Panorama is a web application for storing, sharing, analyzing, and reusing targeted assays created and refined with Skyline,1 an increasingly popular Windows client software tool for targeted proteomics experiments. Panorama allows laboratories to store and organize curated results contained in Skyline documents with fine-grained permissions, which facilitates distributed collaboration and secure sharing of published and unpublished data via a web-browser interface. It is fully integrated with the Skyline workflow and supports publishing a document directly to a Panorama server from the Skyline user interface. Panorama captures the complete Skyline document information content in a relational database schema. Curated results published to Panorama can be aggregated and exported as chromatogram libraries. These libraries can be used in Skyline to pick optimal targets in new experiments and to validate peak identification of target peptides. Panorama is open-source and freely available. It is distributed as part of LabKey Server,2 an open source biomedical research data management system. Laboratories and organizations can set up Panorama locally by downloading and installing the software on their own servers. They can also request freely hosted projects on https://panoramaweb.org , a Panorama server maintained by the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington.

  3. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Ni?o, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B.; Ramos, Adrian M.; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not ava...

  4. Development and application of automated systems for plasmid-based functional proteomics to improve syntheitc biology of engineered industrial microbes for high level expression of proteases for biofertilizer production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to microarray technology, which provides a robust method to study protein function in a rapid, economical, and proteome-wide fashion, plasmid-based functional proteomics is an important technology for rapidly obtaining large quantities of protein and determining protein function across a...

  5. Integrating proteomic and functional genomic technologies in discovery-driven translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina

    2003-01-01

    The application of state-of-the-art proteomics and functional genomics technologies to the study of cancer is rapidly shifting toward the analysis of clinically relevant samples derived from patients, as the ultimate aim of translational research is to bring basic discoveries closer to the bedside...

  6. Clinical proteomics in kidney disease as an exponential technology: heading towards the disruptive phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Exponential technologies double in power or processing speed every year, whereas their cost halves. Deception and disruption are two key stages in the development of exponential technologies. Deception occurs when, after initial introduction, technologies are dismissed as irrelevant, while they continue to progress, perhaps not as fast or with so many immediate practical applications as initially thought. Twenty years after the first publications, clinical proteomics is still not available in most hospitals and some clinicians have felt deception at unfulfilled promises. However, there are indications that clinical proteomics may be entering the disruptive phase, where, once refined, technologies disrupt established industries or procedures. In this regard, recent manuscripts in CKJ illustrate how proteomics is entering the clinical realm, with applications ranging from the identification of amyloid proteins in the pathology lab, to a new generation of urinary biomarkers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) assessment and outcome prediction. Indeed, one such panel of urinary peptidomics biomarkers, CKD273, recently received a Food and Drug Administration letter of support, the first ever in the CKD field. In addition, a must-read resource providing information on kidney disease-related proteomics and systems biology databases and how to access and use them in clinical decision-making was also recently published in CKJ .

  7. Metriculator: quality assessment for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan M; Dance, Jamison; Taylor, Russ J; Prince, John T

    2013-11-15

    Quality control in mass spectrometry-based proteomics remains subjective, labor-intensive and inconsistent between laboratories. We introduce Metriculator, a software designed to facilitate long-term storage of extensive performance metrics as introduced by NIST in 2010. Metriculator features a web interface that generates interactive comparison plots for contextual understanding of metric values and an automated metric generation toolkit. The comparison plots are designed for at-a-glance determination of outliers and trends in the datasets, together with relevant statistical comparisons. Easy-to-use quantitative comparisons and a framework for integration plugins will encourage a culture of quality assurance within the proteomics community. Available under the MIT license at http://github.com/princelab/metriculator.

  8. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics – Lessons learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  9. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. multiplierz: an extensible API based desktop environment for proteomics data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber James T

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient analysis of results from mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments requires access to disparate data types, including native mass spectrometry files, output from algorithms that assign peptide sequence to MS/MS spectra, and annotation for proteins and pathways from various database sources. Moreover, proteomics technologies and experimental methods are not yet standardized; hence a high degree of flexibility is necessary for efficient support of high- and low-throughput data analytic tasks. Development of a desktop environment that is sufficiently robust for deployment in data analytic pipelines, and simultaneously supports customization for programmers and non-programmers alike, has proven to be a significant challenge. Results We describe multiplierz, a flexible and open-source desktop environment for comprehensive proteomics data analysis. We use this framework to expose a prototype version of our recently proposed common API (mzAPI designed for direct access to proprietary mass spectrometry files. In addition to routine data analytic tasks, multiplierz supports generation of information rich, portable spreadsheet-based reports. Moreover, multiplierz is designed around a "zero infrastructure" philosophy, meaning that it can be deployed by end users with little or no system administration support. Finally, access to multiplierz functionality is provided via high-level Python scripts, resulting in a fully extensible data analytic environment for rapid development of custom algorithms and deployment of high-throughput data pipelines. Conclusion Collectively, mzAPI and multiplierz facilitate a wide range of data analysis tasks, spanning technology development to biological annotation, for mass spectrometry-based proteomics research.

  11. Adapting mass spectrometry-based platforms for clinical proteomics applications: The capillary electrophoresis coupled mass spectrometry paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Jochen; Luppa, Peter B.; Good, David M.; Mischak, Harald

    2018-01-01

    Single biomarker detection is common in clinical laboratories due to the currently available method spectrum. For various diseases, however, no specific single biomarker could be identified. A strategy to overcome this diagnostic void is to shift from single analyte detection to multiplexed biomarker profiling. Mass spectrometric methods were employed for biomarker discovery in body fluids. The enormous complexity of biofluidic proteome compartments implies upstream fractionation. For this reason, mass spectrometry (MS) was coupled to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization, or capillary electrophoresis (CE). Differences in performance and operating characteristics make them differentially suited for routine laboratory applications. Progress in the field of clinical proteomics relies not only on the use of an adequate technological platform, but also on a fast and efficient proteomic workflow including standardized sample preparation, proteomic data processing, statistical validation of biomarker selection, and sample classification. Based on CE-MS analysis, we describe how proteomic technology can be implemented in a clinical laboratory environment. In the last part of this review, we give an overview of CE-MS-based clinical studies and present information on identity and biological significance of the identified peptide biomarkers providing evidence of disease-induced changes in proteolytic processing and posttranslational modification. PMID:19404829

  12. Mass spectrometry-based bacterial proteomics: focus on dermatological associated microbial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef eSoufi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition of human skin acts as a natural habitat for various bacterial species that function in a commensal and symbiotic fashion. In a healthy individual, bacterial flora serves to protect the host. Under certain conditions such as minor trauma, impaired host immunity, or environmental factors, the risk of developing skin infections is increased. Although a large majority of bacterial associated skin infections are common, a portion can potentially manifest into clinically significant morbidity. For example, Gram positive species that typically reside on the skin such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus can cause numerous epidermal (impetigo, ecthyma and dermal (cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, erysipelas skin infections. Moreover, the increasing incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance represents a serious challenge to modern medicine and threatens the health care system. Therefore, it is critical to develop tools and strategies that can allow us to better elucidate the nature and mechanism of bacterial virulence. To this end, mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics has been revolutionizing biomedical research, and has positively impacted the microbiology field. Advances in MS technologies have paved the way for numerous bacterial proteomes and their respective post translational modifications (PTMs to be accurately identified and quantified in a high throughput and robust fashion. This technological platform offers critical information with regards to signal transduction, adherence, and microbial-host interactions associated with bacterial pathogenesis. This mini-review serves to highlight the current progress proteomics has contributed towards the understanding of bacteria that are associated with skin related diseases, infections, and antibiotic resistance.

  13. Novel TIA biomarkers identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul M; Mlynash, Michael; Adams, Christopher M; Kuo, Calvin J; Albers, Gregory W; Olivot, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    Transient ischemic attacks remain a clinical diagnosis with significant variability between physicians. Finding reliable biomarkers to identify transient ischemic attacks would improve patient care and optimize treatment. Our aim is to identify novel serum TIA biomarkers through the use of mass spectroscopy-based proteomics. Patients with transient neurologic symptoms were prospectively enrolled. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, an unbiased method to identify candidate proteins, was used to test the serum of the patients for biomarkers of cerebral ischemia. Three candidate proteins were found, and serum concentrations of these proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in a second cohort of prospectively enrolled patients. The Student's t-test was used for comparison. The Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate controlling procedure for multiple comparison adjustments determined significance for the proteomic screen. Patients with transient ischemic attacks (n = 20), minor strokes (n = 15), and controls (i.e. migraine, seizure, n = 12) were enrolled in the first cohort. Ceruloplasmin, complement component C8 gamma (C8γ), and platelet basic protein were significantly different between the ischemic group (transient ischemic attack and minor stroke) and the controls (P = 0·0001, P = 0·00027, P = 0·00105, respectively). A second cohort of patients with transient ischemic attack (n = 22), minor stroke (n = 20), and controls' (n = 12) serum was enrolled. Platelet basic protein serum concentrations were increased in the ischemic samples compared with control (for transient ischemic attack alone, P = 0·019, for the ischemic group, P = 0·046). Ceruloplasmin trended towards increased concentrations in the ischemic group (P = 0·127); no significant difference in C8γ (P = 0·44) was found. Utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics, platelet basic protein has been identified as a candidate serum

  14. Systemic sclerosis biomarkers discovered using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălănescu, Paul; Lădaru, Anca; Bălănescu, Eugenia; Băicuş, Cristian; Dan, Gheorghe Andrei

    2014-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease with incompletely known physiopathology. There is a great challenge to predict its course and therapeutic response using biomarkers. To critically review proteomic biomarkers discovered from biological specimens from systemic sclerosis patients using mass spectrometry technologies. Medline and Embase databases were searched in February 2014. Out of the 199 records retrieved, a total of 20 records were included, identifying 116 candidate proteomic biomarkers. Research in SSc proteomic biomarkers should focus on biomarker validation, as there are valuable mass-spectrometry proteomics studies in the literature.

  15. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development.

  16. Mass spectrometry based proteomic studies on viruses and hosts - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Jie [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J. [Division of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Tang Kai, E-mail: ktang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2011-09-30

    plant have been studied using this approach. As more virus and host genomes are being sequenced, MS-based proteomics is becoming an indispensable tool for virology. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the current technologies and their applications in studying selected viruses and hosts.

  17. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of Proteomics in Food Technology and Food Biotechnology: Process Development, Quality Control and Product Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Gašo-Sokač

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human food is a very complex biological mixture and food processing and safety are very important and essential disciplines. Proteomics technology using different high-performance separation techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, one-dimensional and multidimensional chromatography, combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry has the power to monitor the protein composition of foods and their changes during the production process. The use of proteomics in food technology is presented, especially for characterization and standardization of raw materials, process development, detection of batch-to-batch variations and quality control of the final product. Further attention is paid to the aspects of food safety, especially regarding biological and microbial safety and the use of genetically modified foods.

  19. Proteomics, pathway array and signaling network-based medicine in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is a multifaceted disease that results from dysregulated normal cellular signaling networks caused by genetic, genomic and epigenetic alterations at cell or tissue levels. Uncovering the underlying protein signaling network changes, including cell cycle gene networks in cancer, aids in understanding the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and identifies the characteristic signaling network signatures unique for different cancers and specific cancer subtypes. The identified signatures can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment. During the past several decades, the available technology to study signaling networks has significantly evolved to include such platforms as genomic microarray (expression array, SNP array, CGH array, etc. and proteomic analysis, which globally assesses genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic alterations in cancer. In this review, we compared Pathway Array analysis with other proteomic approaches in analyzing protein network involved in cancer and its utility serving as cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic target identification. With the advent of bioinformatics, constructing high complexity signaling networks is possible. As the use of signaling network-based cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment is anticipated in the near future, medical and scientific communities should be prepared to apply these techniques to further enhance personalized medicine.

  20. Advances in Proteomic Technologies and Its Contribution to the Field of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mesri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic studies of the cancer genome have generated a wealth of knowledge in recent years. These studies have uncovered a number of new cancer genes not previously known to be causal targets in cancer. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies are not widely available for most cancers. Precision care plans still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics is continuing to make major strides in the discovery of fundamental biological processes as well as more recent transition into an assay platform capable of measuring hundreds of proteins in any biological system. As such, proteomics can translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of precision medicine. The proteomic field has progressed at a fast rate over the past five years in technology, breadth and depth of applications in all areas of the bioscience. Some of the previously experimental technical approaches are considered the gold standard today, and the community is now trying to come to terms with the volume and complexity of the data generated. Here I describe contribution of proteomics in general and biological mass spectrometry in particular to cancer research, as well as related major technical and conceptual developments in the field.

  1. Application of high-throughput technologies to a structural proteomics-type analysis of Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, K.; Folkers, G.E.; Kaptein, R.

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative project between two Structural Proteomics In Europe (SPINE) partner laboratories, York and Oxford, aimed at high-throughput (HTP) structure determination of proteins from Bacillus anthracis, the aetiological agent of anthrax and a biomedically important target, is described. Based

  2. An efficient data format for mass spectrometry based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anuj R.; Davidson, Jennifer L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Danielson, William F.; Shi, Yan; Robinson, Aaron C.; Clowers, Brian H.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    The diverse range of mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation along with corresponding proprietary and non-proprietary data formats has generated a proteomics community driven call for a standardized format to facilitate management, processing, storing, visualization, and exchange of both experimental and processed data. To date, significant efforts have been extended towards standardizing XML-based formats for mass spectrometry data representation, despite the recognized inefficiencies associated with storing large numeric datasets in XML. The proteomics community has periodically entertained alternate strategies for data exchange, e.g., using a common application programming interface or a database-derived format. However these efforts have yet to garner significant attention, mostly because they haven’t illustrated significant performance benefits over existing standards, but also due to issues such as extensibility to multi-dimensional separation systems, robustness of operation, and incomplete or mismatched vocabulary. Here, we describe a format based on standard database principles that offers multiple benefits over existing formats in terms of storage size, ease of processing, data retrieval times and extensibility to accommodate multi-dimensional separation systems.

  3. Research progress in applying proteomics technology to explore early diagnosis biomarkers of breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Dong, Li-You; Yan, Qi-Gui; Cao, San-Jie; Wen, Xin-Tian; Huang, Yong; Huang, Xiao-Bo; Wu, Rui; Ma, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    According to the China tumor registry 2013 annual report , breast cancer, lung cancer, and ovarian cancer are three common cancers in China nowadays, with high mortality due to the absence of early diagnosis technology. However, proteomics has been widespreadly implanted into every field of life science and medicine as an important part of post-genomics era research. The development of theory and technology in proteomics has provided new ideas and research fields for cancer research. Proteomics can be used not only for elucidating the mechanisms of carcinogenesis focussing on whole proteins of the tissue or cell, but also seeking the biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this review, we introduce proteomics principles, covering current technology used in exploring early diagnosis biomarkers of breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

  4. A Method for Microalgae Proteomics Analysis Based on Modified Filter-Aided Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Cao, Xupeng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Haowei; Xue, Song; Tian, Jing

    2017-11-01

    With the fast development of microalgal biofuel researches, the proteomics studies of microalgae increased quickly. A filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method is widely used proteomics sample preparation method since 2009. Here, a method of microalgae proteomics analysis based on modified filter-aided sample preparation (mFASP) was described to meet the characteristics of microalgae cells and eliminate the error caused by over-alkylation. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model, the prepared sample was tested by standard LC-MS/MS and compared with the previous reports. The results showed mFASP is suitable for most of occasions of microalgae proteomics studies.

  5. Centrosome isolation and analysis by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Schrøder, Jacob Morville; Larsen, Katja M

    2013-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with advan......Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined...... with advances in protein identification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have revealed multiple centriole-associated proteins that are conserved during evolution in eukaryotes. Despite these advances, the molecular basis for the plethora of processes coordinated by cilia and centrosomes is not fully...

  6. Blood based proteomic biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Louise Baird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and its long prodromal phase poses challenges for early diagnosis and yet allows for the possibility of the development of disease modifying treatments for secondary prevention. It is therefore of importance to develop biomarkers, in particular in the preclinical or early phases that reflect the pathological characteristics of the disease and moreover could be of utility in triaging subjects for preventative therapeutic clinical trials. Much research has sought biomarkers for diagnostic purposes by comparing affected people to unaffected controls. However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease. Blood based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various omics approaches in order to achieve this. This review will therefore examine the current literature regarding blood based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology.

  7. QCloud: A cloud-based quality control system for mass spectrometry-based proteomics laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, Cristina; Olivella, Roger; Borràs, Eva; Espadas, Guadalupe; Pastor, Olga; Solé, Amanda; Sabidó, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of biomedical and translational applications in mass spectrometry-based proteomics poses new analytical challenges and raises the need for automated quality control systems. Despite previous efforts to set standard file formats, data processing workflows and key evaluation parameters for quality control, automated quality control systems are not yet widespread among proteomics laboratories, which limits the acquisition of high-quality results, inter-laboratory comparisons and the assessment of variability of instrumental platforms. Here we present QCloud, a cloud-based system to support proteomics laboratories in daily quality assessment using a user-friendly interface, easy setup, automated data processing and archiving, and unbiased instrument evaluation. QCloud supports the most common targeted and untargeted proteomics workflows, it accepts data formats from different vendors and it enables the annotation of acquired data and reporting incidences. A complete version of the QCloud system has successfully been developed and it is now open to the proteomics community (http://qcloud.crg.eu). QCloud system is an open source project, publicly available under a Creative Commons License Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Serum Proteomics for Biomarker Discovery and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Santosh D; Moulder, Robert; Kouvonen, Petri; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Goodlett, David R

    2017-01-01

    Blood protein measurements are used frequently in the clinic in the assessment of patient health. Nevertheless, there remains the need for new biomarkers with better diagnostic specificities. With the advent of improved technology for bioanalysis and the growth of biobanks including collections from specific disease risk cohorts, the plasma proteome has remained a target of proteomics research toward the characterization of disease-related biomarkers. The following protocol presents a workflow for serum/plasma proteomics including details of sample preparation both with and without immunoaffinity depletion of the most abundant plasma proteins and methodology for selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry validation.

  9. Towards cracking the epigenetic code using a combination of high-throughput epigenomics and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2011-07-01

    High-throughput genomic sequencing and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics technology have recently emerged as powerful tools, increasing our understanding of chromatin structure and function. Both of these approaches require substantial investments and expertise in terms of instrumentation, experimental methodology, bioinformatics, and data interpretation and are, therefore, usually applied independently from each other by dedicated research groups. However, when applied reiteratively in the context of epigenetics research these approaches are strongly synergistic in nature. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mass spectrometry based proteomics, background, status and future needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    LC-MS is described. A number of challenging problems which have been solved using different proteomics strategies including the advantage of organell enrichment or modifications specific peptide isolation to get deeper into the proteome are described. Finally the present status and future needs discussed....

  11. High throughput and accurate serum proteome profiling by integrated sample preparation technology and single-run data independent mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zheng, Jiaxin; Yu, Quan; Chen, Wendong; Xing, Jinchun; Chen, Chenxi; Tian, Ruijun

    2018-03-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based serum proteome analysis is extremely challenging due to its high complexity and dynamic range of protein abundances. Developing high throughput and accurate serum proteomic profiling approach capable of analyzing large cohorts is urgently needed for biomarker discovery. Herein, we report a streamlined workflow for fast and accurate proteomic profiling from 1μL of blood serum. The workflow combined an integrated technique for highly sensitive and reproducible sample preparation and a new data-independent acquisition (DIA)-based MS method. Comparing with standard data dependent acquisition (DDA) approach, the optimized DIA method doubled the number of detected peptides and proteins with better reproducibility. Without protein immunodepletion and prefractionation, the single-run DIA analysis enables quantitative profiling of over 300 proteins with 50min gradient time. The quantified proteins span more than five orders of magnitude of abundance range and contain over 50 FDA-approved disease markers. The workflow allowed us to analyze 20 serum samples per day, with about 358 protein groups per sample being identified. A proof-of-concept study on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) serum samples confirmed the feasibility of the workflow for large scale serum proteomic profiling and disease-related biomarker discovery. Blood serum or plasma is the predominant specimen for clinical proteomic studies while the analysis is extremely challenging for its high complexity. Many efforts had been made in the past for serum proteomics for maximizing protein identifications, whereas few have been concerned with throughput and reproducibility. Here, we establish a rapid, robust and high reproducible DIA-based workflow for streamlined serum proteomic profiling from 1μL serum. The workflow doesn't need protein depletion and pre-fractionation, while still being able to detect disease-relevant proteins accurately. The workflow is promising in clinical application

  12. Mass spectrometry based proteomics profiling of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yong; Deng, Fei-Yan; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Lan; He, Hao; Xu, Chao; Tian, Qing; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhang, Li-Shu; Hu, Hong-Gang; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Human monocyte is an important cell type which is involved in various complex human diseases. To better understand the biology of human monocytes and facilitate further studies, we developed the first comprehensive proteome knowledge base specifically for human monocytes by integrating both in vivo and in vitro datasets. The top 2000 expressed genes from in vitro datasets and 779 genes from in vivo experiments were integrated into this study. Altogether, a total of 2237 unique monocyte-expressed genes were cataloged. Biological functions of these monocyte-expressed genes were annotated and classified via Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Furthermore, by extracting the overlapped genes from in vivo and in vitro datasets, a core gene list including 541 unique genes was generated. Based on the core gene list, further gene-disease associations, pathway and network analyses were performed. Data analyses based on multiple bioinformatics tools produced a large body of biologically meaningful information, and revealed a number of genes such as SAMHD1, G6PD, GPD2 and ENO1, which have been reported to be related to immune response, blood biology, bone remodeling, and cancer respectively. As a unique resource, this study can serve as a reference map for future in-depth research on monocytes biology and monocyte-involved human diseases.

  13. Ultrasonic-based membrane aided sample preparation of urine proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Jemmyson Romário; Santos, Hugo M; López-Fernández, H; Lodeiro, Carlos; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; Capelo, J L

    2018-02-01

    A new ultrafast ultrasonic-based method for shotgun proteomics as well as label-free protein quantification in urine samples is developed. The method first separates the urine proteins using nitrocellulose-based membranes and then proteins are in-membrane digested using trypsin. The enzymatic digestion process is accelerated from overnight to four minutes using a sonoreactor ultrasonic device. Overall, the sample treatment pipeline comprising protein separation, digestion and identification is done in just 3h. The process is assessed using urine of healthy volunteers. The method shows that male can be differentiated from female using the protein content of urine in a fast, easy and straightforward way. 232 and 226 proteins are identified in urine of male and female, respectively. From this, 162 are common to both genders, whilst 70 are unique to male and 64 to female. From the 162 common proteins, 13 are present at levels statistically different (p minimalism concept as outlined by Halls, as each stage of this analysis is evaluated to minimize the time, cost, sample requirement, reagent consumption, energy requirements and production of waste products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. iTRAQ-based comparative proteomic analysis provides insights into somatic embryogenesis in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hua-Guo; Cheng, Wen-Han; Tian, Wen-Gang; Li, Yang-Jun; Liu, Feng; Xue, Fei; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Sun, Yu-Qiang; Sun, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Key message iTRAQ based proteomic identified key proteins and provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying somatic embryogenesis in cotton. Abstract Somatic embryogenesis, which involves cell dedifferentiation and redifferentiation, has been used as a model system for understanding molecular events of plant embryo development in vitro. In this study, we performed comparative proteomics analysis using samples of non-embryogenic callus (NEC), embryogenic callus (EC) and somati...

  15. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress. Copyright © 2015 Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Agricultural Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An insight into fusion technology aiding efficient recombinant protein production for functional proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dinesh K; Yadav, Neelam; Yadav, Sarika; Haque, Shafiul; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-12-15

    Advancements in peptide fusion technologies to maximize the protein production has taken a big leap to fulfill the demands of post-genomics era targeting elucidation of structure/function of the proteome and its therapeutic applications, by over-expression in heterologous expression systems. Despite being most preferred protein expression system armed with variety of cardinal fusion tags, expression of the functionally active recombinant protein in E. coli remains plagued. The present review critically analyses the aptness of well-characterized fusion tags utilized for over-expression of recombinant proteins with improved solubility and their compatibility with downstream purification procedures. The combinatorial tandem affinity strategies have shown to provide more versatile options. Solubility decreasing fusion tags have proved to facilitate the overproduction of antimicrobial peptides. Efficient removal of fusion tags prior to final usage is of utmost importance and has been summarized discussing the efficiency of various enzymatic and chemical methods of tag removal. Unfortunately, no single fusion tag works as a magic bullet to completely fulfill the requirements of protein expression and purification in active form. The information provided might help in selection and development of a successful protocol for efficient recombinant protein production for functional proteomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomes: A New Proteomic Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek R. Wiśniewski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the early years of proteomics, mass spectrometry served only as a technique in protein chemistry facilitating the characterization of purified proteins and mapping their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. A bit later this technique almost completely replaced Edman degradation and amino acid analysis. The continuous development of the mass spectrometry techniques created a huge analytical potential allowing the study of nearly complete proteomes in single experiments. This evolution distanced proteomics from protein chemistry and placed it in a novel position. Its capability to identify and quantify in parallel thousands of proteins and their modifications at minute sample amount requirements is one of the most fascinating technological advances in biology today.

  18. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  19. iTRAQ-Based and Label-Free Proteomics Approaches for Studies of Human Adenovirus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Hung V.; Grossmann, Jonas; Gehrig, Peter; Roschitzki, Bernd; Schlapbach, Ralph; Greber, Urs F.; Hemmi, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and label-free methods are widely used for quantitative proteomics. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of these proteomics approaches based on large datasets from biological samples. iTRAQ-label-based and label-free quantitations were compared using protein lysate samples from noninfected human lung epithelial A549 cells and from cells infected for 24 h with human adenovirus type 3 or type 5. Either iTRAQ-label-based or lab...

  20. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... and operational data that is used within a university for daily routine work. This paper presents a hybrid cloud computing model for higher education institutions to share intellectual data. Moreover, it proposes, the strategies for the implementation of the cloud computing in the academic institutions. Keywords...

  1. Differences in the Elemental Isotope Definition May Lead to Errors in Modern Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesen, Jürgen; Lermyte, Frederik; Sobott, Frank; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2015-11-03

    The elemental isotope definition used to calculate the theoretical masses and isotope distribution of (bio)molecules is considered to be a fixed, universal standard in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. However, this is an incorrect assumption. In view of the ongoing advances in mass spectrometry technology, and in particular the ever-increasing mass precision, the elemental isotope definition and its variations should be taken into account. We illustrate the effect of the elemental isotope uncertainty on the theoretical and experimental masses with theoretical calculations and examples.

  2. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed proteins in prostate cancer based on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Chen,1 Li-Guo Zhang,1 Jian Liu,1 Hui Han,1 Ning Chen,1 An-Liang Yao,1 Shao-San Kang,1 Wei-Xing Gao,1 Hong Shen,2 Long-Jun Zhang,1 Ya-Peng Li,1 Feng-Hong Cao,1 Zhi-Guo Li3 1Department of Urology, North China University of Science and Technology Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Modern Technology and Education Center, 3Department of Medical Research Center, International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Geriatric Medicine, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We mined the literature for proteomics data to examine the occurrence and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa through a bioinformatics analysis. We divided the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs into two groups: the group consisting of PCa and benign tissues (P&b and the group presenting both high and low PCa metastatic tendencies (H&L. In the P&b group, we found 320 DEPs, 20 of which were reported more than three times, and DES was the most commonly reported. Among these DEPs, the expression levels of FGG, GSN, SERPINC1, TPM1, and TUBB4B have not yet been correlated with PCa. In the H&L group, we identified 353 DEPs, 13 of which were reported more than three times. Among these DEPs, MDH2 and MYH9 have not yet been correlated with PCa metastasis. We further confirmed that DES was differentially expressed between 30 cancer and 30 benign tissues. In addition, DEPs associated with protein transport, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix (ECM–receptor interaction pathway were prevalent in the H&L group and have not yet been studied in detail in this context. Proteins related to homeostasis, the wound-healing response, focal adhesions, and the complement and coagulation pathways were overrepresented in both groups. Our findings suggest that the repeatedly reported DEPs in the two groups may function as potential biomarkers for detecting PCa and predicting its aggressiveness. Furthermore

  3. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqi Li

    Full Text Available Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57 would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator, member 5 (SLC25A5 and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF. In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  4. YPED: an integrated bioinformatics suite and database for mass spectrometry-based proteomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Christopher M; Shifman, Mark; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Stone, Kathryn L; Carriero, Nicholas J; Gulcicek, Erol E; Lam, TuKiet T; Wu, Terence; Bjornson, Robert D; Bruce, Can; Nairn, Angus C; Rinehart, Jesse; Miller, Perry L; Williams, Kenneth R

    2015-02-01

    We report a significantly-enhanced bioinformatics suite and database for proteomics research called Yale Protein Expression Database (YPED) that is used by investigators at more than 300 institutions worldwide. YPED meets the data management, archival, and analysis needs of a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics research ranging from a single laboratory, group of laboratories within and beyond an institution, to the entire proteomics community. The current version is a significant improvement over the first version in that it contains new modules for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) database search results, label and label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, and several scoring outputs for phosphopeptide site localization. In addition, we have added both peptide and protein comparative analysis tools to enable pairwise analysis of distinct peptides/proteins in each sample and of overlapping peptides/proteins between all samples in multiple datasets. We have also implemented a targeted proteomics module for automated multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)/selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assay development. We have linked YPED's database search results and both label-based and label-free fold-change analysis to the Skyline Panorama repository for online spectra visualization. In addition, we have built enhanced functionality to curate peptide identifications into an MS/MS peptide spectral library for all of our protein database search identification results. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Data Visualization and Feature Selection Methods in Gel-based Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé Santos; Richard, Nadege; Dias, Jorge P.

    2014-01-01

    must be given not only to ensure proper experimental design, experimental practice and 2DE technical performance, but also a valid approach for data acquisition, processing and analysis. This paper reviews and illustrates several different aspects of data analysis within the context of gel-based...... proteomics, summarizing the current state of research within this field. Particular focus is given on discussing the usefulness of available multivariate analysis tools both for data visualization and feature selection purposes. Visual examples are given using a real gel-based proteomic dataset as basis....

  6. Gel-based and gel-free proteome data associated with controlled deterioration treatment ofGlycine maxseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Cheol Woo; Lee, Seo Hyun; Cheon, Ye Eun; Han, Won Young; Ko, Jong Min; Kang, Hang Won; Kim, Yong Chul; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Tae

    2017-12-01

    Data presented here are associated with the article: "In-depth proteomic analysis of soybean ( Glycine max ) seeds during controlled deterioration treatment (CDT) reveals a shift in seed metabolism" (Min et al., 2017) [1]. Seed deterioration is one of the major problems, affecting the seed quality, viability, and vigor in a negative manner. Here, we display the gel-based and gel-free proteomic data, associated with the CDT in soybean seeds. The present data was obtained from 2-DE, shotgun proteomic analysis (label-free quantitative proteomic analysis) using Q-Exactive, and gene ontology analysis associated with CDT in soybean seeds (Min et al., 2017) [1].

  7. Mass spectrometry-based serum proteome pattern analysis in molecular diagnostics of early stage breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stobiecki Maciej

    2009-07-01

    .0003 increased level of osteopontin in blood of the group of cancer patients studied (however, the plasma level of osteopontin classified cancer samples with 88% sensitivity but only 28% specificity. Conclusion MALDI-ToF spectrometry of serum has an obvious potential to differentiate samples between early breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Importantly, a classifier built on MS-based serum proteome patterns outperforms available protein biomarkers analyzed in blood by immunoassays.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debasish; Kumar, Avinash; Gajbhiye, Akshada; Santra, Manas K.; Srikanth, Rapole

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA) were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches. PMID:23586059

  9. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  10. Statistical design for biospecimen cohort size in proteomics-based biomarker discovery and verification studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skates, Steven J; Gillette, Michael A; LaBaer, Joshua; Carr, Steven A; Anderson, Leigh; Liebler, Daniel C; Ransohoff, David; Rifai, Nader; Kondratovich, Marina; Težak, Živana; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Oberg, Ann L; Wright, Ian; Barnes, Grady; Gail, Mitchell; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S

    2013-12-06

    Protein biomarkers are needed to deepen our understanding of cancer biology and to improve our ability to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers. Important analytical and clinical hurdles must be overcome to allow the most promising protein biomarker candidates to advance into clinical validation studies. Although contemporary proteomics technologies support the measurement of large numbers of proteins in individual clinical specimens, sample throughput remains comparatively low. This problem is amplified in typical clinical proteomics research studies, which routinely suffer from a lack of proper experimental design, resulting in analysis of too few biospecimens to achieve adequate statistical power at each stage of a biomarker pipeline. To address this critical shortcoming, a joint workshop was held by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An important output from the workshop was a statistical framework for the design of biomarker discovery and verification studies. Herein, we describe the use of quantitative clinical judgments to set statistical criteria for clinical relevance and the development of an approach to calculate biospecimen sample size for proteomic studies in discovery and verification stages prior to clinical validation stage. This represents a first step toward building a consensus on quantitative criteria for statistical design of proteomics biomarker discovery and verification research.

  11. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well‐documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel‐based NCFM proteomics addressed the so‐called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6–11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D...

  12. Clinical translation of MS-based, quantitative plasma proteomics: status, challenges, requirements, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Byrns, Simon; Pennington, Stephen R; Holmes, Daniel T; Anderson, N Leigh; Agreste, Tasha M; Duffy, Maureen A

    2016-07-01

    Aided by the advent of advanced mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies and methodologies, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a viable technique to capture meaningful data for candidate biomarker evaluation. To aid clinical translation, these methods generally utilize a bottom-up strategy with isotopically labeled standards and a targeted form of MS measurement. This article reviews the status, challenges, requirements, and potential of translating current, MS-based methods to the clinical laboratory. The described methods are discussed and contrasted within a fit-for-purpose approach, while different resources for quality control, quantitative analysis, and data interpretation are additionally provided. Expert commentary: Although great strides have been made over the past five years in developing reliable quantitative assays for plasma protein biomarkers, it is crucial for investigators to have an understanding of the clinical validation process, a major roadblock in translational research. Continued progress in method design and validation of protein assays is necessary to ultimately achieve widespread adoption and regulatory approval.

  13. Recent mass spectrometry-based proteomics for biomarker discovery in lung cancer, COPD, and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kiyonaga; Nakamura, Haruhiko; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer and related diseases have been one of the most common causes of deaths worldwide. Genomic-based biomarkers may hardly reflect the underlying dynamic molecular mechanism of functional protein interactions, which is the center of a disease. Recent developments in mass spectrometry (MS) have made it possible to analyze disease-relevant proteins expressed in clinical specimens by proteomic challenges. Areas covered: To understand the molecular mechanisms of lung cancer and its subtypes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and others, great efforts have been taken to identify numerous relevant proteins by MS-based clinical proteomic approaches. Since lung cancer is a multifactorial disease that is biologically associated with asthma and COPD among various lung diseases, this study focused on proteomic studies on biomarker discovery using various clinical specimens for lung cancer, COPD, and asthma. Expert commentary: MS-based exploratory proteomics utilizing clinical specimens, which can incorporate both experimental and bioinformatic analysis of protein-protein interaction and also can adopt proteogenomic approaches, makes it possible to reveal molecular networks that are relevant to a disease subgroup and that could differentiate between drug responders and non-responders, good and poor prognoses, drug resistance, and so on.

  14. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.

    2011-01-01

    for membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i......) optimization of the peptide separation, (ii) performing de novo sequencing to allow a sequence homology search and (iii) visualization of identified peptide–protein associations using Cytoscape to remove redundancy and wrongly assigned peptides, based on species-specific information. By applying this workflow...

  15. Coupling of gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches to dig deep into the leaf senescence proteome of Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, Su Ji; Min, Cheol Woo; Kim, So Wun; Park, Ki-Hun; Bae, Dong-Won; Lee, Byong Won; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2016-10-04

    Leaf senescence is the last stage of leaf development that re-mobilizes nutrients from the source to sink. Here, we have utilized the soybean as a model system to unravel senescence-associated proteins (SAPs). A comparative proteomics approach was used at two contrasting stages of leaf development, namely mature (R3) and senescent (R7). Selection criteria for these two stages were the contrasting differences in their biochemical parameters - chlorophyll, carotenoids and malondialdehyde contents. Proteome analysis involved subjecting the total leaf proteins to 15% poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) pre-fractional method to enrich the low-abundance proteins (LAPs) and their analyses by gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches. 2-DE profiling of PEG-supernatant and -pellet fractions detected 153 differential spots between R3 and R7 stages, of which 102 proteins were identified. In parallel, 1-DE shotgun proteomics approach identified 598 and 534 proteins in supernatant and pellet fractions of R3 and R7 stages, respectively. MapMan and Gene Ontology analyses showed increased abundance and/or specific accumulation of proteins related to jasmonic acid biosynthesis and defense, while proteins associated with photosynthesis and ROS-detoxification were decreased during leaf senescence. These findings and the generated datasets further our understanding on leaf senescence at protein level, providing a resource for the scientific community. Leaf senescence is a major biological event in the life cycle of plants that leads to the recycling of nutrients. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf senescence still remain poorly understood. Here, we used a combination of gel-based 2-DE and 1-DE shotgun proteomics approaches to dig deeper into the leaf senescence proteome using soybean leaf as a model experimental material. For the identification of low-abundance proteins, polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation was employed and both PEG-supernatant and -pellet

  16. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies required...... for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  17. Open source libraries and frameworks for mass spectrometry based proteomics: A developer's perspective☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Müller, Markus; Vesada, Vladimir; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Data processing, management and visualization are central and critical components of a state of the art high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics experiment, and are often some of the most time-consuming steps, especially for labs without much bioinformatics support. The growing interest in the field of proteomics has triggered an increase in the development of new software libraries, including freely available and open-source software. From database search analysis to post-processing of the identification results, even though the objectives of these libraries and packages can vary significantly, they usually share a number of features. Common use cases include the handling of protein and peptide sequences, the parsing of results from various proteomics search engines output files, and the visualization of MS-related information (including mass spectra and chromatograms). In this review, we provide an overview of the existing software libraries, open-source frameworks and also, we give information on some of the freely available applications which make use of them. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23467006

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Pre-Eclampsia and Preterm Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai P. Law

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy-related complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm birth now represent a notable burden of adverse health. Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder unique to pregnancy. It is an important cause of maternal death worldwide and a leading cause of fetal growth restriction and iatrogenic prematurity. Fifteen million infants are born preterm each year globally, but more than one million of those do not survive their first month of life. Currently there are no predictive tests available for diagnosis of these pregnancy-related complications and the biological mechanisms of the diseases have not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics have all the necessary attributes to provide the needed breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology of complex human diseases thorough the discovery of biomarkers. The mass spectrometry methodologies employed in the studies for pregnancy-related complications are evaluated in this article. Top-down proteomic and peptidomic profiling by laser mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry, and bottom-up quantitative proteomics and targeted proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry have been applied to elucidate protein biomarkers and biological mechanism of pregnancy-related complications. The proteomes of serum, urine, amniotic fluid, cervical-vaginal fluid, placental tissue, and cytotrophoblastic cells have all been investigated. Numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates that could distinguish complicated pregnancies from healthy controls have been proposed. Nevertheless, questions as to the clinically utility and the capacity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the pre-eclampsia and preterm birth remain to be answered.

  19. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Pre-Eclampsia and Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Kai P.; Han, Ting-Li; Tong, Chao; Baker, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-related complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm birth now represent a notable burden of adverse health. Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder unique to pregnancy. It is an important cause of maternal death worldwide and a leading cause of fetal growth restriction and iatrogenic prematurity. Fifteen million infants are born preterm each year globally, but more than one million of those do not survive their first month of life. Currently there are no predictive tests available for diagnosis of these pregnancy-related complications and the biological mechanisms of the diseases have not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics have all the necessary attributes to provide the needed breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology of complex human diseases thorough the discovery of biomarkers. The mass spectrometry methodologies employed in the studies for pregnancy-related complications are evaluated in this article. Top-down proteomic and peptidomic profiling by laser mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry, and bottom-up quantitative proteomics and targeted proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry have been applied to elucidate protein biomarkers and biological mechanism of pregnancy-related complications. The proteomes of serum, urine, amniotic fluid, cervical-vaginal fluid, placental tissue, and cytotrophoblastic cells have all been investigated. Numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates that could distinguish complicated pregnancies from healthy controls have been proposed. Nevertheless, questions as to the clinically utility and the capacity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the pre-eclampsia and preterm birth remain to be answered. PMID:26006232

  20. Proteomics studies in inner ear disorders: pathophysiology and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawieh, Ali; Mondello, Stefania; Kobeissy, Firas; Shibbani, Kamel; Bassim, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Although proteomics has been exploited in a wide range of diseases for identification of biomarkers and pathophysiological mechanisms, there are still biomedical disciplines such as otology where proteomics platforms are underused due to technical challenges and/or complex features of the disease. Thus, in the past few years, healthcare and scientific agencies have advocated the development and adoption of proteomic technologies in otological research. However, few studies have been conducted and limited literature is available in this area. Here, we present the state of the art of proteomics in otology, discussing the substantial evidence from recent experimental models and clinical studies in inner-ear conditions. We also delineate a series of critical issues including minute size of the inner ear, delicacy and poor accessibility of tissue that researchers face while undertaking otology proteomics research. Furthermore, we provide perspective to enhance the impact and lead to the clinical implementation of these proteomics-based strategies.

  1. Comparison of Different Protein Extraction Methods for Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ganoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Saidi, Noor Baity; Usuldin, Siti Rokhiyah Ahmad; Hussin, Siti Nahdatul Isnaini Said; Yusoff, Noornabeela Md; Idris, Abu Seman

    2016-04-01

    Ganoderma species are a group of fungi that have the ability to degrade lignin polymers and cause severe diseases such as stem and root rot and can infect economically important plants and perennial crops such as oil palm, especially in tropical countries such as Malaysia. Unfortunately, very little is known about the complex interplay between oil palm and Ganoderma in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Proteomic technologies are simple yet powerful tools in comparing protein profile and have been widely used to study plant-fungus interaction. A critical step to perform a good proteome research is to establish a method that gives the best quality and a wide coverage of total proteins. Despite the availability of various protein extraction protocols from pathogenic fungi in the literature, no single extraction method was found suitable for all types of pathogenic fungi. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for 2-DE gel analysis of Ganoderma spp., three previously reported protein extraction protocols were compared: trichloroacetic acid, sucrose and phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol. The third method was found to give the most reproducible gels and highest protein concentration. Using the later method, a total of 10 protein spots (5 from each species) were successfully identified. Hence, the results from this study propose phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol as the most effective protein extraction method for 2-DE proteomic studies of Ganoderma spp.

  2. Comparative analysis of cleavable diazobenzene-based affinity tags for bioorthogonal chemical proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ying; Grammel, Markus; Raghavan, Anuradha S.; Charron, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The advances in bioorthogonal ligation methods have provided new opportunities for proteomic analysis of newly synthesized proteins, posttranslational modifications and specific enzyme families using azide/alkyne-functionalized chemical reporters and activity-based probes. Efficient enrichment and elution of azide/alkyne-labeled proteins with selectively cleavable affinity tags is essential for protein identification and quantification applications. Here we report the synthesis and comparative analysis of Na2S2O4-cleavable diazobenzene-based affinity tags for bioorthogonal chemical proteomics. We demonstrated that ortho-hydroxyl substituent is required for efficient diazobenzene-bond cleavage and show that these cleavable affinity tags can be used to identify newly synthesized proteins in bacteria targeted by amino acid chemical reporters as well as their sites of modification on endogenously expressed proteins. The diazobenzene-based affinity tags are compatible with in-gel, in-solution and on-bead enrichment strategies and should afford useful tools for diverse bioorthogonal proteomic applications. PMID:21095571

  3. Comparative analysis of cleavable azobenzene-based affinity tags for bioorthogonal chemical proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Ying; Grammel, Markus; Raghavan, Anuradha S; Charron, Guillaume; Hang, Howard C

    2010-11-24

    The advances in bioorthogonal ligation methods have provided new opportunities for proteomic analysis of newly synthesized proteins, posttranslational modifications, and specific enzyme families using azide/alkyne-functionalized chemical reporters and activity-based probes. Efficient enrichment and elution of azide/alkyne-labeled proteins with selectively cleavable affinity tags are essential for protein identification and quantification applications. Here, we report the synthesis and comparative analysis of Na₂S₂O₄-cleavable azobenzene-based affinity tags for bioorthogonal chemical proteomics. We demonstrated that ortho-hydroxyl substituent is required for efficient azobenzene-bond cleavage and show that these cleavable affinity tags can be used to identify newly synthesized proteins in bacteria targeted by amino acid chemical reporters as well as their sites of modification on endogenously expressed proteins. The azobenzene-based affinity tags are compatible with in-gel, in-solution, and on-bead enrichment strategies and should afford useful tools for diverse bioorthogonal proteomic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Operational Experience of an Open-Access, Subscription-Based Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nicholas A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper discusses the successful adoption of a subscription-based, open-access model of service delivery for a mass spectrometry and proteomics facility. In 2009, the Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility at the University of Melbourne (Australia) moved away from the standard fee for service model of service provision. Instead, the facility adopted a subscription- or membership-based, open-access model of service delivery. For a low fixed yearly cost, users could directly operate the instrumentation but, more importantly, there were no limits on usage other than the necessity to share available instrument time with all other users. All necessary training from platform staff and many of the base reagents were also provided as part of the membership cost. These changes proved to be very successful in terms of financial outcomes for the facility, instrument access and usage, and overall research output. This article describes the systems put in place as well as the overall successes and challenges associated with the operation of a mass spectrometry/proteomics core in this manner. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Operational Experience of an Open-Access, Subscription-Based Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful adoption of a subscription-based, open-access model of service delivery for a mass spectrometry and proteomics facility. In 2009, the Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility at the University of Melbourne (Australia) moved away from the standard fee for service model of service provision. Instead, the facility adopted a subscription- or membership-based, open-access model of service delivery. For a low fixed yearly cost, users could directly operate the instrumentation but, more importantly, there were no limits on usage other than the necessity to share available instrument time with all other users. All necessary training from platform staff and many of the base reagents were also provided as part of the membership cost. These changes proved to be very successful in terms of financial outcomes for the facility, instrument access and usage, and overall research output. This article describes the systems put in place as well as the overall successes and challenges associated with the operation of a mass spectrometry/proteomics core in this manner.

  6. Method and platform standardization in MRM-based quantitative plasma proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Chambers, Andrew G; Yang, Juncong; Jackson, Angela M; Domanski, Dominik; Burkhart, Julia; Sickmann, Albert; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-12-16

    There exists a growing demand in the proteomics community to standardize experimental methods and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) platforms in order to enable the acquisition of more precise and accurate quantitative data. This necessity is heightened by the evolving trend of verifying and validating candidate disease biomarkers in complex biofluids, such as blood plasma, through targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based approaches with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS). Considering the lack of performance standards for quantitative plasma proteomics, we previously developed two reference kits to evaluate the MRM with SIS peptide approach using undepleted and non-enriched human plasma. The first kit tests the effectiveness of the LC/MRM-MS platform (kit #1), while the second evaluates the performance of an entire analytical workflow (kit #2). Here, these kits have been refined for practical use and then evaluated through intra- and inter-laboratory testing on 6 common LC/MS platforms. For an identical panel of 22 plasma proteins, similar concentrations were determined, regardless of the kit, instrument platform, and laboratory of analysis. These results demonstrate the value of the kit and reinforce the utility of standardized methods and protocols. The proteomics community needs standardized experimental protocols and quality control methods in order to improve the reproducibility of MS-based quantitative data. This need is heightened by the evolving trend for MRM-based validation of proposed disease biomarkers in complex biofluids such as blood plasma. We have developed two kits to assist in the inter- and intra-laboratory quality control of MRM experiments: the first kit tests the effectiveness of the LC/MRM-MS platform (kit #1), while the second evaluates the performance of an entire analytical workflow (kit #2). In this paper, we report the use of these kits in intra- and inter-laboratory testing on 6 common LC/MS platforms. This

  7. Proteomic study of hepatocellular carcinoma using a novel modified aptamer-based array (SOMAscan™) platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Pan, Xiaoqing; Parlayan, Cuneyd; Ojima, Hidenori; Kondo, Tadashi

    2017-04-01

    Vascular invasion is a pathological hallmark of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), associated with poor prognosis; it is strongly related to the early recurrence and poor survival after curative resection. In order to determine the proteomic backgrounds of HCC carcinogenesis and vascular invasion, we employed a novel modified aptamer-based array (SOMAscan) platform. SOMAscan is based on the Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers (SOMAmers), which rely on the natural 3D folding of single-stranded DNA-based protein affinity reagents. Currently, the expression level of 1129 proteins can be assessed quantitatively. Correlation matrix analysis showed that the overall proteomic features captured by SOMAscan differ between tumor and non-tumor tissues. Non-tumor tissues were shown to have more homogeneous proteome backgrounds than tumor tissues. A comparative study identified 68 proteins with differential expression between tumor and non-tumor tissues, together with eight proteins associated with vascular invasion. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the extracellular space and extracellular region proteins were predominantly detected. Network analysis revealed the linkage of seven proteins, AKT1, MDM2, PTEN, FGF1, MAPK8, PRKCB, and FN1, which were categorized as the components of "Pathways in cancer" in pathway analysis. The results of SOMAscan analysis were not concordant with those obtained by western blotting; only the determined FN1 levels were concordant between the two platforms. We demonstrated that the proteome captured by SOMAscan includes the proteins relevant to carcinogenesis and vascular invasion in HCC. The identified proteins may serve as candidates for the future studies of disease mechanisms and clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Extending the boundaries of MS-based proteomics: towards comprehensive analysis of the proteome and the HLA ligandome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, F.

    2016-01-01

    The work, described in this thesis, has been aimed at the improvement of proteomic workflows; from the sample preparation, to the optimization of state-of-art chromatographical separations and alternative MS fragmentation techniques. An important focus of this work is represented by the analysis of

  9. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  10. Pathobiochemical Changes in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle as Revealed by Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Ohlendieck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissues and diabetes-related muscle weakness are serious pathophysiological problems of increasing medical importance. In order to determine global changes in the protein complement of contractile tissues due to diabetes mellitus, mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has been applied to the investigation of diabetic muscle. This review summarizes the findings from recent proteomic surveys of muscle preparations from patients and established animal models of type 2 diabetes. The potential impact of novel biomarkers of diabetes, such as metabolic enzymes and molecular chaperones, is critically examined. Disease-specific signature molecules may be useful for increasing our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance and possibly identify new therapeutic options that counteract diabetic abnormalities in peripheral organ systems. Importantly, the biomedical establishment of biomarkers promises to accelerate the development of improved diagnostic procedures for characterizing individual stages of diabetic disease progression, including the early detection of prediabetic complications.

  11. High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, we review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  12. iTRAQ-based proteomic profiling of granulosa cells from lamb and ewe after superstimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiapeng; Wu, Yangsheng; Han, Bing; Chen, Ying; Wang, Liqin; Li, Xiaolin; Liu, Mingjun; Huang, Juncheng

    2017-10-01

    The number of oocytes obtained from lambs after FSH treatment is far greater than those acquired from adult ewes. However, these oocytes typically have reduced viability in comparison with adult ewe oocytes. However, the molecular mechanisms of differences in viability between lamb and ewe oocytes remain unknown. In the present research, we applied iTRAQ coupled with LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis in order to investigate the proteomic expression profile of granulosa cells from lambs and ewes following stimulation with FSH. We detected 5649 proteins; 574 were differentially expressed between adults and juveniles. Based on Gene Ontology enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, the majority of DEPs are participated in metabolic processes, ribosome and MAPK signaling pathways. Expression levels in ewes turned out to be lower than lambs. Protein interaction network analysis generated by STRING identified MAPK1, SMAD2, SMAD4, CDK1, FOS and ATM as the major findings among 54 significant differentially expressed of proteins. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was applied to verify the proteomic analysis. These proteins which were identified in lambs may contribute to the reduction of oocyte quality compared to adults. The present research provides understanding of the molecular mechanism for follicle development in lambs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians.

  14. Gel-based and gel-free proteome data associated with controlled deterioration treatment of Glycine max seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Woo Min

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Data presented here are associated with the article: “In-depth proteomic analysis of soybean (Glycine max seeds during controlled deterioration treatment (CDT reveals a shift in seed metabolism” (Min et al., 2017 [1]. Seed deterioration is one of the major problems, affecting the seed quality, viability, and vigor in a negative manner. Here, we display the gel-based and gel-free proteomic data, associated with the CDT in soybean seeds. The present data was obtained from 2-DE, shotgun proteomic analysis (label-free quantitative proteomic analysis using Q-Exactive, and gene ontology analysis associated with CDT in soybean seeds (Min et al., 2017 [1].

  15. Development of Proteomics-Based Fungicides: New Strategies for Environmentally Friendly Control of Fungal Plant Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Rabie El-Akhal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics has become one of the most relevant high-throughput technologies. Several approaches have been used for studying, for example, tumor development, biomarker discovery, or microbiology. In this “post-genomic” era, the relevance of these studies has been highlighted as the phenotypes determined by the proteins and not by the genotypes encoding them that is responsible for the final phenotypes. One of the most interesting outcomes of these technologies is the design of new drugs, due to the discovery of new disease factors that may be candidates for new therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, no commercial fungicides have been developed from targeted molecular research, this review will shed some light on future prospects. We will summarize previous research efforts and discuss future innovations, focused on the fight against one of the main agents causing a devastating crops disease, fungal phytopathogens.

  16. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    of these systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...

  17. Probe-based recording technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naberhuis, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) prompted researchers to contemplate whether such technology could be used as the basis for the storage and retrieval of information. With magnetic data storage technology facing limits in storage density due to the thermal instability of magnetic bits, the super-paramagnetic limit, the heir-apparent for information storage at higher densities appeared to be variants of the STM or similar probe-based storage techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Among these other techniques that could provide replacement technology for magnetic storage, near-field optical scanning optical microscopy (NSOM or SNOM) has also been investigated. Another alternative probe-based storage technology called atomic resolution storage (ARS) is also currently under development. An overview of these various technologies is herein presented, with an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages inherent in each particularly with respect to reduced device dimensions. The role of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) is emphasized

  18. Mass Spectrometry-based Workflow for Accurate Quantification of Escherichia coli Enzymes: How Proteomics Can Play a Key Role in Metabolic Engineering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauchessec, Mathieu; Jaquinod, Michel; Bonvalot, Aline; Brun, Virginie; Bruley, Christophe; Ropers, Delphine; de Jong, Hidde; Garin, Jérôme; Bestel-Corre, Gwenaëlle; Ferro, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic engineering aims to design high performance microbial strains producing compounds of interest. This requires systems-level understanding; genome-scale models have therefore been developed to predict metabolic fluxes. However, multi-omics data including genomics, transcriptomics, fluxomics, and proteomics may be required to model the metabolism of potential cell factories. Recent technological advances to quantitative proteomics have made mass spectrometry-based quantitative assays an interesting alternative to more traditional immuno-affinity based approaches. This has improved specificity and multiplexing capabilities. In this study, we developed a quantification workflow to analyze enzymes involved in central metabolism in Escherichia coli (E. coli). This workflow combined full-length isotopically labeled standards with selected reaction monitoring analysis. First, full-length 15N labeled standards were produced and calibrated to ensure accurate measurements. Liquid chromatography conditions were then optimized for reproducibility and multiplexing capabilities over a single 30-min liquid chromatography-MS analysis. This workflow was used to accurately quantify 22 enzymes involved in E. coli central metabolism in a wild-type reference strain and two derived strains, optimized for higher NADPH production. In combination with measurements of metabolic fluxes, proteomics data can be used to assess different levels of regulation, in particular enzyme abundance and catalytic rate. This provides information that can be used to design specific strains used in biotechnology. In addition, accurate measurement of absolute enzyme concentrations is key to the development of predictive kinetic models in the context of metabolic engineering. PMID:24482123

  19. Protein Structural Analysis via Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigues, Antonio; Nadeau, Owen W.; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Villar, Maria T.; Du, Xiuxia; Fenton, Aron W.; Carlson, Gerald M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided a versatile platform that can be combined with a large number of techniques to analyze protein structure and dynamics. These techniques include the three detailed in this chapter: 1) hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX), 2) limited proteolysis, and 3) chemical crosslinking (CX). HDX relies on the change in mass of a protein upon its dilution into deuterated buffer, which results in varied deuterium content within its backbone amides. Structural information on surface exposed, flexible or disordered linker regions of proteins can be achieved through limited proteolysis, using a variety of proteases and only small extents of digestion. CX refers to the covalent coupling of distinct chemical species and has been used to analyze the structure, function and interactions of proteins by identifying crosslinking sites that are formed by small multi-functional reagents, termed crosslinkers. Each of these MS applications is capable of revealing structural information for proteins when used either with or without other typical high resolution techniques, including NMR and X-ray crystallography. PMID:27975228

  20. A hybrid approach to protein differential expression in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, X.

    2012-04-19

    MOTIVATION: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein\\'s associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics datasets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. RESULTS: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of \\'presence/absence,\\' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amenable to quantitative analysis; e.g. \\'one-state\\' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/absence analysis of a given dataset in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single-associated false discovery rate. AVAILABILITY: All R code available here: http://www.stat.tamu.edu/~adabney/share/xuan_code.zip.

  1. Proteomic profiling of renal allograft rejection in serum using magnetic bead-based sample fractionation and MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Weiguo; Huang, Liling; Dai, Yong; Chen, Jiejing; Yan, Qiang; Huang, He

    2010-12-01

    Proteomics is one of the emerging techniques for biomarker discovery. Biomarkers can be used for early noninvasive diagnosis and prognosis of diseases and treatment efficacy evaluation. In the present study, the well-established research systems of ClinProt Micro solution incorporated unique magnetic bead sample preparation technology, which, based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), have become very successful in bioinformatics due to its outstanding performance and reproducibility for discovery disease-related biomarker. We collected fasting blood samples from patients with biopsy-confirmed acute renal allograft rejection (n = 12), chronic rejection (n = 12), stable graft function (n = 12) and also from healthy volunteers (n = 13) to study serum peptidome patterns. Specimens were purified with magnetic bead-based weak cation exchange chromatography and analyzed with a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer. The results indicated that 18 differential peptide peaks were selected as potential biomarkers of acute renal allograft rejection, and 6 differential peptide peaks were selected as potential biomarkers of chronic rejection. A Quick Classifier Algorithm was used to set up the classification models for acute and chronic renal allograft rejection. The algorithm models recognize 82.64% of acute rejection and 98.96% of chronic rejection episodes, respectively. We were able to identify serum protein fingerprints in small sample sizes of recipients with renal allograft rejection and establish the models for diagnosis of renal allograft rejection. This preliminary study demonstrated that proteomics is an emerging tool for early diagnosis of renal allograft rejection and helps us to better understand the pathogenesis of disease process.

  2. Enhanced Sensitivity for Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry-based Targeted Proteomics Using a Dual Stage Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mahmud; Kaleta, David T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is playing an increasing role in quantitative proteomics and biomarker discovery studies as a method for high throughput candidate quantification and verification. Although SRM-MS offers advantages in sensitivity and quantification compared with other MS-based techniques, current SRM technologies are still challenged by detection and quantification of low abundance proteins (e.g. present at ∼10 ng/ml or lower levels in blood plasma). Here we report enhanced detection sensitivity and reproducibility for SRM-based targeted proteomics by coupling a nanospray ionization multicapillary inlet/dual electrodynamic ion funnel interface to a commercial triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Because of the increased efficiency in ion transmission, significant enhancements in overall signal intensities and improved limits of detection were observed with the new interface compared with the original interface for SRM measurements of tryptic peptides from proteins spiked into non-depleted mouse plasma over a range of concentrations. Overall, average SRM peak intensities were increased by ∼70-fold. The average level of detection for peptides also improved by ∼10-fold with notably improved reproducibility of peptide measurements as indicated by the reduced coefficients of variance. The ability to detect proteins ranging from 40 to 80 ng/ml within mouse plasma was demonstrated for all spiked proteins without the application of front-end immunoaffinity depletion and fractionation. This significant improvement in detection sensitivity for low abundance proteins in complex matrices is expected to enhance a broad range of SRM-MS applications including targeted protein and metabolite validation. PMID:20410378

  3. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-08-22

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  4. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  5. Current status, new frontiers and challenges in radiation biodosimetry using cytogenetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenech, Michael, E-mail: michael.fenech@csiro.au [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Gate 13 Kintore Avenue, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    Biodosimetric methods for determining exposure dose in individuals following a radiation accident are important for the health management of the exposed cohort and prioritisation of high dose exposure cases to receive emergency medical treatment. This brief review provides a succinct outline of (i) the current status of standard cytogenetic methods used in radiation biodosimetry; (ii) development of high-throughput systems for current standard cytogenetic methods; (iii) emerging minimally invasive methods; (iv) the impact of nutrition and genotype on observed dose-response relationships and (v) new frontiers in biodosimetry using molecular biology techniques such as transcriptomics and proteomics.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic and Proteomic Strategies in Organic Acidemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Imperlini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic acidemias (OAs are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiency of enzymatic activities in the catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. These disorders result in the accumulation of mono-, di-, or tricarboxylic acids, generally referred to as organic acids. The OA outcomes can involve different organs and/or systems. Some OA disorders are easily managed if promptly diagnosed and treated, whereas, in others cases, such as propionate metabolism-related OAs (propionic acidemia, PA; methylmalonic acidemia, MMA, neither diet, vitamin therapy, nor liver transplantation appears to prevent multiorgan impairment. Here, we review the recent developments in dissecting molecular bases of OAs by using integration of mass spectrometry- (MS- based metabolomic and proteomic strategies. MS-based techniques have facilitated the rapid and economical evaluation of a broad spectrum of metabolites in various body fluids, also collected in small samples, like dried blood spots. This approach has enabled the timely diagnosis of OAs, thereby facilitating early therapeutic intervention. Besides providing an overview of MS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying OA pathophysiology, we discuss the principal challenges of metabolomic and proteomic applications to OAs.

  7. The use of time-resolved fluorescence in gel-based proteomics for improved biomarker discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, AnnSofi; Buschmann, Volker; Kapusta, Peter; Erdmann, Rainer; Wheelock, Åsa M.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a new platform for quantitative intact proteomics, entitled Cumulative Time-resolved Emission 2-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis (CuTEDGE). The CuTEDGE technology utilizes differences in fluorescent lifetimes to subtract the confounding background fluorescence during in-gel detection and quantification of proteins, resulting in a drastic improvement in both sensitivity and dynamic range compared to existing technology. The platform is primarily designed for image acquisition in 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), but is also applicable to 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE), and proteins electroblotted to membranes. In a set of proof-of-principle measurements, we have evaluated the performance of the novel technology using the MicroTime 100 instrument (PicoQuant GmbH) in conjunction with the CyDye minimal labeling fluorochromes (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) to perform differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses. The results indicate that the CuTEDGE technology provides an improvement in the dynamic range and sensitivity of detection of 3 orders of magnitude as compared to current state-of-the-art image acquisition instrumentation available for 2-DE (Typhoon 9410, GE Healthcare). Given the potential dynamic range of 7-8 orders of magnitude and sensitivities in the attomol range, the described invention represents a technological leap in detection of low abundance cellular proteins, which is desperately needed in the field of biomarker discovery.

  8. Proteomics in Argentina - limitations and future perspectives: A special emphasis on meat proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Silvina; Almeida, André M

    2015-11-01

    Argentina is one of the most relevant countries in Latin America, playing a major role in regional economics, culture and science. Over the last 80 years, Argentinean history has been characterized by several upward and downward phases that had major consequences on the development of science in the country and most recently on proteomics. In this article, we characterize the evolution of Proteomics sciences in Argentina over the last decade and a half. We describe the proteomics publication output of the country in the framework of the regional and international contexts, demonstrating that Argentina is solidly anchored in a regional context, showing results similar to other emergent and Latin American countries, albeit still far from the European, American or Australian realities. We also provide a case-study on the importance of Proteomics to a specific sector in the area of food science: the use of bacteria of technological interest, highlighting major achievements obtained by Argentinean proteomics scientists. Finally, we provide a general picture of the endeavors being undertaken by Argentinean Proteomics scientists and their international collaborators to promote the Proteomics-based research with the new generation of scientists and PhD students in both Argentina and other countries in the Southern cone. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Application for proteomic techniques in studying osteoarthritis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharbi, Myriam; Deberg, Michelle; Henrotin, Yves

    2011-01-01

    After the genomic era, proteomic corresponds to a wide variety of techniques that study the protein content of cells, tissue, or organism and that allow the isolation of protein of interest. It offers the choice between gel-based and gel-free methods or shotgun proteomics. Applications of proteomic technology may concern three principal objectives in several biomedical or clinical domains of research as in osteoarthritis: (i) to understand the physiopathology or underlying mechanisms leading to a disease or associated with a particular model, (ii), to find disease-specific biomarker, and (iii) to identify new therapeutic targets. This review aimed at gathering most of the data regarding the proteomic techniques and their applications to osteoarthritis research. It also reported technical limitations and solutions, as for example for sample preparation. Proteomics open wide perspectives in biochemical research but many technical matters still remain to be solved.

  10. PROTICdb: a web-based application to store, track, query, and compare plant proteome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry-Dumazet, Hélène; Houel, Gwenn; Montalent, Pierre; Moreau, Luc; Langella, Olivier; Negroni, Luc; Vincent, Delphine; Lalanne, Céline; de Daruvar, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe; Zivy, Michel; Joets, Johann

    2005-05-01

    PROTICdb is a web-based application, mainly designed to store and analyze plant proteome data obtained by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The purposes of PROTICdb are (i) to store, track, and query information related to proteomic experiments, i.e., from tissue sampling to protein identification and quantitative measurements, and (ii) to integrate information from the user's own expertise and other sources into a knowledge base, used to support data interpretation (e.g., for the determination of allelic variants or products of post-translational modifications). Data insertion into the relational database of PROTICdb is achieved either by uploading outputs of image analysis and MS identification software, or by filling web forms. 2-D PAGE annotated maps can be displayed, queried, and compared through a graphical interface. Links to external databases are also available. Quantitative data can be easily exported in a tabulated format for statistical analyses. PROTICdb is based on the Oracle or the PostgreSQL Database Management System and is freely available upon request at the following URL: http://moulon.inra.fr/ bioinfo/PROTICdb.

  11. A proteomics based approach for the identification of gastric cancer related markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Mirza, Zeenat; Ali, Ashraf; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the amongst the most common cancer types causing second largest number of cancer related deaths globally. GC is characterized as an aggressive malignancy which is very tough to be detected at an early stage. GC has been defined as a complex, multistep process involving multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations leading to aberrant expression of key regulating factors. GC according to WHO has been defined as malignant epithelial tumors of the gastric mucosa with glandular differentiation. About one half of the GCs are located in the lower stomach, and remaining is located in the corpus and fundus of the stomach (20%), lesser curvature (20%), cardia (10%) and greater curvature (3%). GC has been classified into intestinal and diffuse types based on epidemiological and clinico- and histopathological features. The etiology of GC is multifactorial and includes dietary as well as non-dietary factors. Despite a lot of research efforts, GC remains to be the cancer without clear symptoms at onset, poor prognosis, with metastasis and recurrence. Thus, there is an urgent need for identifying novel and diagnostic GC biomarkers and techniques with high sensitivity and specificity. In the present review, we provide a synopsis of proteomics based GC biomarkers discovered from various cancerous specimens such as blood, gastric fluid, tissues, cells and H. pylori infected cancer cell lines. The advent of proteomics based GC biomarkers will be a great asset for the early detection and treatment of GC.

  12. 2D Gel-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis during Larval Development and Metamorphosis of the Biofouling Polychaete Tubeworm Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-09-03

    Larval settlement and metamorphosis of a common biofouling polychaete worm, Hydroides elegans, involve remarkable structural and physiological changes during this pelagic to sessile habitat shift. The endogenous protein molecules and post-translational modifications that drive this larval transition process are not only of interest to ecologists but also to the antifouling paint industry, which aims to control the settlement of this biofouling species on man-made structures (e.g., ship hulls). On the basis of our recent proteomic studies, we hypothesize that rapid larval settlement of H. elegans could be mediated through changes in phosphorylation status of proteins rather than extensive de novo synthesis of proteins. To test this hypothesis, 2D gel-based multiplexed proteomics technology was used to monitor the changes in protein expression and phosphorylation status during larval development and metamorphosis of H. elegans. The protein expression profiles of larvae before and after they reached competency to attach and metamorphose were similar in terms of major proteins, but the percentage of phosphorylated proteins increased from 41% to 49% after competency. Notably, both the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of the metamorphosed individuals (adult) were distinctly different from that of the larvae, with only 40% of the proteins phosphorylated in the adult stage. The intensity ratio of all phosphoprotein spots to all total protein spots was also the highest in the competent larval stage. Overall, our results indicated that the level of protein phosphorylation might play a crucial role in the initiation of larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zanivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progresses through distinct stages, and mouse models recapitulating traits of this progression are frequently used to explore genetic, morphological, and pharmacological aspects of tumor development. To complement genomic investigations of this process, we here quantify phosphoproteomic changes in skin cancer development using the SILAC mouse technology coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. We distill protein expression signatures from our data that distinguish between skin cancer stages. A distinct phosphoproteome of the two stages of cancer progression is identified that correlates with perturbed cell growth and implicates cell adhesion as a major driver of malignancy. Importantly, integrated analysis of phosphoproteomic data and prediction of kinase activity revealed PAK4-PKC/SRC network to be highly deregulated in SCC but not in papilloma. This detailed molecular picture, both at the proteome and phosphoproteome level, will prove useful for the study of mechanisms of tumor progression.

  14. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  15. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Geng

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians.

  16. Mass Spectrometry Based Lipidomics: An Overview of Technological Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köfeler, Harald C.; Fauland, Alexander; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Trötzmüller, Martin

    2012-01-01

    One decade after the genomic and the proteomic life science revolution, new ‘omics’ fields are emerging. The metabolome encompasses the entity of small molecules—Most often end products of a catalytic process regulated by genes and proteins—with the lipidome being its fat soluble subdivision. Within recent years, lipids are more and more regarded not only as energy storage compounds but also as interactive players in various cellular regulation cycles and thus attain rising interest in the bio-medical community. The field of lipidomics is, on one hand, fuelled by analytical technology advances, particularly mass spectrometry and chromatography, but on the other hand new biological questions also drive analytical technology developments. Compared to fairly standardized genomic or proteomic high-throughput protocols, the high degree of molecular heterogeneity adds a special analytical challenge to lipidomic analysis. In this review, we will take a closer look at various mass spectrometric platforms for lipidomic analysis. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of various experimental setups like ‘shotgun lipidomics’, liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) based approaches. We will also examine available software packages for data analysis, which nowadays is in fact the rate limiting step for most ‘omics’ workflows. PMID:24957366

  17. Mass Spectrometry Based Lipidomics: An Overview of Technological Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald C. Köfeler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One decade after the genomic and the proteomic life science revolution, new ‘omics’ fields are emerging. The metabolome encompasses the entity of small molecules—Most often end products of a catalytic process regulated by genes and proteins—with the lipidome being its fat soluble subdivision. Within recent years, lipids are more and more regarded not only as energy storage compounds but also as interactive players in various cellular regulation cycles and thus attain rising interest in the bio-medical community. The field of lipidomics is, on one hand, fuelled by analytical technology advances, particularly mass spectrometry and chromatography, but on the other hand new biological questions also drive analytical technology developments. Compared to fairly standardized genomic or proteomic high-throughput protocols, the high degree of molecular heterogeneity adds a special analytical challenge to lipidomic analysis. In this review, we will take a closer look at various mass spectrometric platforms for lipidomic analysis. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of various experimental setups like ‘shotgun lipidomics’, liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (LC-MS and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF based approaches. We will also examine available software packages for data analysis, which nowadays is in fact the rate limiting step for most ‘omics’ workflows.

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  19. The Use of Proteomics in Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteria, Ioanna; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Chrousos, George P; Tsangaris, George T

    2017-01-01

    Despite the explosive increase in the use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) over the last 30 years, their success rates remain suboptimal. Proteomics is a rapidly-evolving technology-driven science that has already been widely applied in the exploration of human reproduction and fertility, providing useful insights into its physiology and leading to the identification of numerous proteins that may be potential biomarkers and/or treatment targets of a successful ART pregnancy. Here we present a brief overview of the techniques used in proteomic analyses and attempt a comprehensive presentation of recent data from mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies in humans, regarding all components of ARTs, including the male and female gamete, the derived zygote and embryo, the endometrium and, finally, the ART offspring both pre- and postnatally. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Development of an open source laboratory information management system for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toda Tosifusa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genome era, most research scientists working in the field of proteomics are confronted with difficulties in management of large volumes of data, which they are required to keep in formats suitable for subsequent data mining. Therefore, a well-developed open source laboratory information management system (LIMS should be available for their proteomics research studies. Results We developed an open source LIMS appropriately customized for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow. The main features of its design are compactness, flexibility and connectivity to public databases. It supports the handling of data imported from mass spectrometry software and 2-D gel image analysis software. The LIMS is equipped with the same input interface for 2-D gel information as a clickable map on public 2DPAGE databases. The LIMS allows researchers to follow their own experimental procedures by reviewing the illustrations of 2-D gel maps and well layouts on the digestion plates and MS sample plates. Conclusion Our new open source LIMS is now available as a basic model for proteome informatics, and is accessible for further improvement. We hope that many research scientists working in the field of proteomics will evaluate our LIMS and suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  1. Improving data quality and preserving HCD-generated reporter ions with EThcD for isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qing [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Shi, Xudong [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Feng, Yu [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Kent, K. Craig [Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Li, Lingjun, E-mail: lingjun.li@wisc.edu [School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based isobaric labeling has undergone rapid development in recent years due to its capability for high throughput quantitation. Apart from its originally designed use with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), isobaric tagging technique could also work with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), which provides complementarity to CID and is preferred in sequencing peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs). However, ETD suffers from long reaction time, reduced duty cycle and bias against peptides with lower charge states. In addition, common fragmentation mechanism in ETD results in altered reporter ion production, decreased multiplexing capability, and even loss of quantitation capability for some of the isobaric tags, including custom-designed dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) tags. Here, we demonstrate a novel electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) approach that preserves original reporter ion channels, mitigates bias against lower charge states, improves sensitivity, and significantly improves data quality for quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies. Systematic optimization was performed to achieve a balance between data quality and sensitivity. We provide direct comparison of EThcD with ETD and HCD for DiLeu- and TMT-labeled HEK cell lysate and IMAC enriched phosphopeptides. Results demonstrate improved data quality and phosphorylation localization accuracy while preserving sufficient reporter ion production. Biological studies were performed to investigate phosphorylation changes in a mouse vascular smooth muscle cell line treated with four different conditions. Overall, EThcD exhibits superior performance compared to conventional ETD and offers distinct advantages compared to HCD in isobaric labeling based quantitative proteomics and quantitative PTM studies. - Highlights: • EThcD was optimized for isobaric tag-labeled peptides for quantitative

  2. Improving data quality and preserving HCD-generated reporter ions with EThcD for isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qing; Shi, Xudong; Feng, Yu; Kent, K. Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based isobaric labeling has undergone rapid development in recent years due to its capability for high throughput quantitation. Apart from its originally designed use with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD), isobaric tagging technique could also work with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD), which provides complementarity to CID and is preferred in sequencing peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs). However, ETD suffers from long reaction time, reduced duty cycle and bias against peptides with lower charge states. In addition, common fragmentation mechanism in ETD results in altered reporter ion production, decreased multiplexing capability, and even loss of quantitation capability for some of the isobaric tags, including custom-designed dimethyl leucine (DiLeu) tags. Here, we demonstrate a novel electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) approach that preserves original reporter ion channels, mitigates bias against lower charge states, improves sensitivity, and significantly improves data quality for quantitative proteomics and proteome-wide PTM studies. Systematic optimization was performed to achieve a balance between data quality and sensitivity. We provide direct comparison of EThcD with ETD and HCD for DiLeu- and TMT-labeled HEK cell lysate and IMAC enriched phosphopeptides. Results demonstrate improved data quality and phosphorylation localization accuracy while preserving sufficient reporter ion production. Biological studies were performed to investigate phosphorylation changes in a mouse vascular smooth muscle cell line treated with four different conditions. Overall, EThcD exhibits superior performance compared to conventional ETD and offers distinct advantages compared to HCD in isobaric labeling based quantitative proteomics and quantitative PTM studies. - Highlights: • EThcD was optimized for isobaric tag-labeled peptides for quantitative

  3. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance.

  4. Proteomic and histopathological response in the gills of Poecilia reticulata exposed to glyphosate-based herbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Santos, Ana Paula Rezende Dos; Yamada, Áureo Tatsumi; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are one of the most used herbicide nowadays, whilst there is growing concern over their impact on aquatic environment. Since data about the early proteomic response and toxic mechanisms of GBH in fish is very limited, the aim of this study was to investigate the early toxicity of GBH in the gills of guppies Poecilia reticulata using a proteomic approach associated with histopathological index. Median lethal concentration (LC50,96 h) was determined and LC50,96h values of guppies exposed to GBH were 3.6 ± 0.4 mg GLIL(-1). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry, 14 proteins regulated by GBH were identified, which are involved in different cell processes, as energy metabolism, regulation and maintenance of cytoskeleton, nucleic acid metabolism and stress response. Guppies exposed to GBH at 1.82 mg GLIL(-1) showed time-dependent histopathological response in different epithelial and muscle cell types. The histopathological indexes indicate that GBH cause regressive, vascular and progressive disorders in the gills of guppies. This study helped to unravel the molecular and tissue mechanisms associated with GBH toxicity, which are potential biomarkers for biomonitoring water pollution by herbicides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical proteomics: Current status, challenges, and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Horng Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This account will give an overview and evaluation of the current advances in mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics platforms and technology. A general review of some background information concerning the application of these methods in the characterization of molecular sizes and related protein expression profiles associated with different types of cells under varied experimental conditions will be presented. It is intended to provide a concise and succinct overview to those clinical researchers first exposed to this foremost powerful methodology in modern life sciences of postgenomic era. Proteomic characterization using highly sophisticated and expensive instrumentation of MS has been used to characterize biological samples of complex protein mixtures with vastly different protein structure and composition. These systems are then used to highlight the versatility and potential of the MS-based proteomic strategies for facilitating protein expression analysis of various disease-related organisms or tissues of interest. Major MS-based strategies reviewed herein include (1 matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MS and electron-spray ionization proteomics; (2 one-dimensional or two-dimensional gel-based proteomics; (3 gel-free shotgun proteomics in conjunction with liquid chromatography/tandem MS; (4 Multiple reaction monitoring coupled tandem MS quantitative proteomics and; (5 Phosphoproteomics based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-MS/MS.

  6. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several...... and stringent validation criteria, false positive identification rates in MAPU are lower than 1:1000. Thus MAPU datasets can serve as reference proteomes in biomarker discovery. MAPU contains the peptides identifying each protein, measured masses, scores and intensities and is freely available at http...

  7. Changing the concepts of immune-mediated glomerular diseases through proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Dawn J; Hobeika, Liliane; Klein, Jon B; Powell, David W; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    Standard classification of glomerular diseases is based on histopathologic abnormalities. The recent application of proteomic technologies has resulted in paradigm changes in the understanding and classification of idiopathic membranous nephropathy and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Those examples provide evidence that proteomics will lead to advances in understanding of the molecular basis of other glomerular diseases, such as lupus nephritis. Proof of principle experiments show that proteomics can be applied to patient renal biopsy specimens. This viewpoint summarizes the advances in immune-mediated glomerular diseases that have relied on proteomics, and potential future applications are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis and bioinformatics study of proteins in pterygia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linghu, Dandan; Guo, Lili; Zhao, Yinghua; Liu, Zhiming; Zhao, Mingwei; Huang, Lvzhen; Li, Xiaoxin

    2017-07-01

    To analyze proteins in the tissue of pterygia, and to investigate their potential roles in pterygia, using the comparative proteomic technique of Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with offline 2DLC-MS/MS, Western-bolt. The tissue of pterygia and healthy conjunctiva was collected from 10 pterygia patients (6 females, 4 males; average age was 52 years old; average course of disease was 6 years) in our hospital from September, 2015 to March, 2016. iTRAQ was used to analyze proteins in the patients' pterygia and healthy conjunctiva. Proteins with a fold change of >2. 0 or proteins were subjected to subsequent gene ontology analysis using the DAVID database. Then we confirmed the targeted proteins with western-blot. 156 proteins that expressed differently between the pterygia and healthy conjunctiva were identified using iTRAQ analysis. Of these proteins, 18 were down-regulated, and 138 were up-regulated. On the basis of biological processes in gene ontology, the identified proteins were mainly involved in cellular process, metabolic process, developmental process, location, cellular component organization, Among these proteins, matrix Metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10) and CD34 may have potential roles in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Then we confirmed with Western-bolt that MMP-10 and CD34 were up-regulated in pterygia. This study is the first to identify 156 proteins associated with pterygia with iTRAQ technology. Data in our study will aid in providing a better understanding of pterygia. © 2017 The Authors. PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  9. Feed based on vegetable materials changes the muscle proteome of the carnivore rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune; Bach Mikkelsen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Feed production for aquaculture of carnivore fish species relies heavily on protein and lipid from the limited resources of wild fish and other sea living organisms. Thus the development of alternative feeds replacing fish meal and oil with components of vegetable origin is important for a sustai......Feed production for aquaculture of carnivore fish species relies heavily on protein and lipid from the limited resources of wild fish and other sea living organisms. Thus the development of alternative feeds replacing fish meal and oil with components of vegetable origin is important...... trout fed two different diets identical in protein and oil content, but with diet C based on fish meal and oil and diet V based on rapeseed oil and vegetable proteins. In addition to the proteomic investigation the textural properties of the fish were analysed by sensory profiling. Protein expression...

  10. Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)-based nanobiocrystallography at the frontiers of cancer proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Fiordoro, Stefano; Nicolini, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films used as templates for crystallization lead to marked changes in protein stability and water dehydration, despite slight changes in protein atomic structure. Herein, we discuss the importance of LB-based nanocrystallography at the frontiers of cancer proteomics focusing on two model proteins with important biological roles in cancer, namely CK2alpha and RNase A. Computational mutagenesis using the KINARI Mutagen webserver exhibits different behaviors in terms of stability and robustness, as well as in terms of water dynamics. Introduction of LB film leads to the appearance of water molecules close to the protein surface with larger volume, causing changes in crystal stability against radiation and appearing replicated in mutant proteins. Implications for drug design, drug delivery and cancer-causing protein variants are herein presented, along with a review of the most recent findings in LB-based nanobiocrystallography. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Processing Shotgun Proteomics Data on the Amazon Cloud with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost. PMID:25418363

  12. Processing shotgun proteomics data on the Amazon cloud with the trans-proteomic pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-02-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Unbiased Selective Isolation of Protein N-Terminal Peptides from Complex Proteome Samples Using Phospho Tagging PTAG) and TiO2-based Depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommen, G.P.M.; Waterbeemd, van de B.; Meiring, H.D.; Kersten, G.; Heck, A.J.R.; Jong, de A.P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A positional proteomics strategy for global N-proteome analysis is presented based on phospho tagging (PTAG) of internal peptides followed by depletion by titanium dioxide (TiO2) affinity chromatography. Therefore, N-terminal and lysine amino groups are initially completely dimethylated with

  14. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A., E-mail: Michail.Alterman@fda.hhs.gov

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  15. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A.

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  16. Identification of hepatic biomarkers for physiological imbalance of dairy cows in early and mid lactation using proteomic technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyes, Kasey; Bendixen, Emøke; Codrea, Marius Cosmin

    2013-01-01

    either the greatest (PI) or least (normal; N) degree of PI and were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative profiling in liver using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We identified pyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate dehydrogenase......Identification of biomarkers for degree of physiological imbalance (PI), a situation in which physiological parameters deviate from normal, is needed to reduce disease risk and improve production and reproduction performance of cows. The objective was to describe the liver proteome in early and mid...... lactation for cows with different degrees of PI with a special focus on biomarkers and pathways involved in periparturient disease complexes. Twenty-nine cows in early [49 ± 22 d in milk (DIM); n = 14] and mid (159 ± 39 DIM; n = 15) lactation were nutrient restricted for 4 d to increase PI by supplementing...

  17. Comparative Analysis of two Helicobacter pylori Strains using Genomics and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Karlsson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gastroenteric pathogen believed to have co-evolved with humans over 100,000 years, shows significant genetic variability. This motivates the study of different H. pylori strains and the diseases they cause in order to identify determinants for disease evolution. In this study, we used proteomics tools to compare two H. pylori strains. Nic25_A was isolated in Nicaragua from a patient with intestinal metaplasia, and P12 was isolated in Europe from a patient with duodenal ulcers. Differences in the abundance of surface proteins between the two strains were determined with two mass spectrometry-based methods, label-free quantification (MaxQuant or the use of tandem mass tags (TMT. Each approach used a lipid-based protein immobilization (LPI™ technique to enrich peptides of surface proteins. Using the MaxQuant software, we found 52 proteins that differed significantly in abundance between the two strains (up- or downregulated by a factor of 1.5; with TMT, we found 18 proteins that differed in abundance between the strains. Strain P12 had a higher abundance of proteins encoded by the cag pathogenicity island, while levels of the acid response regulator ArsR and its regulatory targets (KatA, AmiE, and proteins involved in urease production were higher in strain Nic25_A. Our results show that differences in protein abundance between H. pylori strains can be detected with proteomic approaches; this could have important implications for the study of disease progression.

  18. From SOMAmer-based biomarker discovery to diagnostic and clinical applications: a SOMAmer-based, streamlined multiplex proteomic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kraemer

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported a SOMAmer-based, highly multiplexed assay for the purpose of biomarker identification. To enable seamless transition from highly multiplexed biomarker discovery assays to a format suitable and convenient for diagnostic and life-science applications, we developed a streamlined, plate-based version of the assay. The plate-based version of the assay is robust, sensitive (sub-picomolar, rapid, can be highly multiplexed (upwards of 60 analytes, and fully automated. We demonstrate that quantification by microarray-based hybridization, Luminex bead-based methods, and qPCR are each compatible with our platform, further expanding the breadth of proteomic applications for a wide user community.

  19. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  20. Clinical diagnosis and typing of systemic amyloidosis in subcutaneous fat aspirates by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrana, Julie A; Theis, Jason D; Dasari, Surendra; Mereuta, Oana M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Gertz, Morie A; Kurtin, Paul J; Grogg, Karen L; Dogan, Ahmet

    2014-07-01

    Examination of abdominal subcutaneous fat aspirates is a practical, sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis. Here we describe the development and implementation of a clinical assay using mass spectrometry-based proteomics to type amyloidosis in subcutaneous fat aspirates. First, we validated the assay comparing amyloid-positive (n=43) and -negative (n=26) subcutaneous fat aspirates. The assay classified amyloidosis with 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity. We then implemented the assay as a clinical test, and analyzed 366 amyloid-positive subcutaneous fat aspirates in a 4-year period as part of routine clinical care. The assay had a sensitivity of 90%, and diverse amyloid types, including immunoglobulin light chain (74%), transthyretin (13%), serum amyloid A (%1), gelsolin (1%), and lysozyme (1%), were identified. Using bioinformatics, we identified a universal amyloid proteome signature, which has high sensitivity and specificity for amyloidosis similar to that of Congo red staining. We curated proteome databases which included variant proteins associated with systemic amyloidosis, and identified clonotypic immunoglobulin variable gene usage in immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, and the variant peptides in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis. In conclusion, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of subcutaneous fat aspirates offers a powerful tool for the diagnosis and typing of systemic amyloidosis. The assay reveals the underlying pathogenesis by identifying variable gene usage in immunoglobulin light chains and the variant peptides in hereditary amyloidosis. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. The Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics: a big data ecosystem for (prote)omics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Alejandro; Afzal, Vackar; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I

    2018-01-04

    Driven by improvements in speed and resolution of mass spectrometers (MS), the field of proteomics, which involves the large-scale detection and analysis of proteins in cells, tissues and organisms, continues to expand in scale and complexity. There is a resulting growth in datasets of both raw MS files and processed peptide and protein identifications. MS-based proteomics technology is also used increasingly to measure additional protein properties affecting cellular function and disease mechanisms, including post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, subcellular and tissue distributions. Consequently, biologists and clinicians need innovative tools to conveniently analyse, visualize and explore such large, complex proteomics data and to integrate it with genomics and other related large-scale datasets. We have created the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (EPD) to meet this need (https://peptracker.com/epd/). The EPD combines a polyglot persistent database and web-application that provides open access to integrated proteomics data for >30 000 proteins from published studies on human cells and model organisms. It is designed to provide a user-friendly interface, featuring graphical navigation with interactive visualizations that facilitate powerful data exploration in an intuitive manner. The EPD offers a flexible and scalable ecosystem to integrate proteomics data with genomics information, RNA expression and other related, large-scale datasets. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  3. QC-ART: A tool for real-time quality control assessment of mass spectrometry-based proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfill, Bryan A; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Bramer, Lisa M; Thompson, Allison M; Ansong, Charles K; Clauss, Therese; Gritsenko, Marina A; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Orton, Daniel J; Piehowski, Paul D; Schepmoes, Athena A; Smith, Richard D; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Metz, Thomas O; TEDDY Study Group, The Environmental Determinants Of Diabetes In The Young

    2018-04-17

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomics studies of large sample cohorts can easily require from months to years to complete. Acquiring consistent, high-quality data in such large-scale studies is challenging because of normal variations in instrumentation performance over time, as well as artifacts introduced by the samples themselves, such as those due to collection, storage and processing. Existing quality control methods for proteomics data primarily focus on post-hoc analysis to remove low-quality data that would degrade downstream statistics; they are not designed to evaluate the data in near real-time, which would allow for interventions as soon as deviations in data quality are detected.  In addition to flagging analyses that demonstrate outlier behavior, evaluating how the data structure changes over time can aide in understanding typical instrument performance or identify issues such as a degradation in data quality due to the need for instrument cleaning and/or re-calibration.  To address this gap for proteomics, we developed Quality Control Analysis in Real-Time (QC-ART), a tool for evaluating data as they are acquired in order to dynamically flag potential issues with instrument performance or sample quality.  QC-ART has similar accuracy as standard post-hoc analysis methods with the additional benefit of real-time analysis.  We demonstrate the utility and performance of QC-ART in identifying deviations in data quality due to both instrument and sample issues in near real-time for LC-MS-based plasma proteomics analyses of a sample subset of The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young cohort. We also present a case where QC-ART facilitated the identification of oxidative modifications, which are often underappreciated in proteomic experiments. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. ITRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Triptolide On Human A549 Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangqiong; Zhao, Dongxiao; Yang, Suwen; Wang, Juan; Liu, Qin; Jin, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Triptolide (TP) is a diterpenoid triepoxide extracted from the traditional Chinese medical herb Tripterygium wilfordii that exerts prominent broad-spectrum anticancer activity to repress proliferation and induce cancer cell apoptosis through various molecular pathways. We previously observed that TP inhibits the progression of A549 cells and pancreatic cancer cells (PNCA-1) in vitro. However, the complex molecular mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of TP is not well understood. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which TP induces lung cancer cell apoptosis, we investigated changes in the protein profile of A549 cells treated with TP using a proteomics approach (iTRAQ [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation] combined with NanoLC-MS/MS [nano liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry]). Changes in the profiles of the expressed proteins were analyzed using the bioinformatics tools OmicsBean and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and were verified using western blotting. Apoptosis and cell cycle effects were analyzed using flow cytometry. TP induced apoptosis in A549 cells and blocked A549 cells at the G2/M phase. Using iTRAQ technology, we observed 312 differentially expressed proteins associated in networks and implicated in different KEGG pathways. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed the overviews of dysregulated proteins in the biological process (BP), cell component (CC), and molecular function (MF) categories. Moreover, some candidate proteins involved in PARP1/AIF and nuclear Akt signaling pathways or metastasis processes were validated by western blotting. TP exerted anti-tumor activity on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells by dysregulating tumor-related protein expression. Herein, we provide a preliminary study of TP-related cytotoxicity on A549 cells using proteomics tools. These findings may improve the current understanding of the anti-tumor effects of TP on lung cancer cells and may

  5. A feasibility study to identify proteins in the residual Pap test fluid of women with normal cytology by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Kristin Lm; Afiuni-Zadeh, Somaieh; Geller, Melissa A; Hickey, Kayla; Griffin, Timothy J; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Skubitz, Amy Pn

    2014-01-01

    The proteomic analysis of body fluids is a growing technology for the identification of protein biomarkers of disease. Given that Papanicolaou tests (Pap tests) are routinely performed on over 30 million women annually in the U.S. to screen for cervical cancer, we examined the residual Pap test fluid as a source of protein for analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In the liquid-based Pap test, cervical cells are collected from the ectocervix and placed into an alcohol-based fixative prior to staining and pathologic examination. We hypothesized that proteins shed by cells of the female genital tract can be detected in the Pap test fixative by MS-based proteomic techniques. We examined the feasibility of using residual fluid from discarded Pap tests with cytologically "normal" results to optimize sample preparation for MS analysis. The protein composition of the cell-free Pap test fluid was determined by silver staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate -polyacrylamide gels, and the abundance of serum proteins was examined by Western immunoblot using an antibody against human serum albumin. Both pooled and individual samples were trypsin digested and analyzed by two-dimensional MS/MS. Proteins were identified by searching against the Human Uniprot database, and characterized for localization, function and relative abundance. The average volume of the residual Pap test fluid was 1.5 ml and the average protein concentration was 0.14 mg/ml. By Western immunoblot we showed that the amount of albumin in each sample was significantly reduced compared to normal serum. By MS/MS, we identified 714 unique proteins in pooled Pap test samples and an average of 431 proteins in individual samples. About 40% of the proteins identified were extracellular or localized to the plasma membrane. Almost 20% of the proteins identified were involved in immunity and defense, characteristic of the healthy cervical-vaginal proteome. By merging the protein sets from the individual and pooled Pap test

  6. Identification of p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase 2 as a Novel Host Protein in HBx Augmenting HBV Replication by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Comparative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-Bo; Yu, You-Jia; Zhang, Qing-Bo; Tang, Xiao-Qiong; Bai, Lang; Huang, FeiJun; Tang, Hong

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to screen for novel host proteins that play a role in HBx augmenting Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. Three HepG2 cell lines stably harboring different functional domains of HBx (HBx, HBx-Cm6, and HBx-Cm16) were cultured. ITRAQ technology integrated with LC-MS/MS analysis was applied to identify the proteome differences among these three cell lines. In brief, a total of 70 different proteins were identified among HepG2-HBx, HepG2-HBx-Cm6, and HepG2-HBx-Cm16 by double repetition. Several differentially expressed proteins, including p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2), were further validated. RSK2 was expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBx and HepG2-HBx-Cm6 compared with HepG2-HBx-Cm16. Furthermore, levels of HBV replication intermediates were decreased after silencing RSK2 in HepG2.2.15. An HBx-minus HBV mutant genome led to decreased levels of HBV replication intermediates and these decreases were restored to levels similar to wild-type HBV by transient ectopic expression of HBx. After silencing RSK2 expression, the levels of HBV replication intermediates synthesized from the HBx-minus HBV mutant genome were not restored to levels that were observed with wild-type HBV by transient HBx expression. Based on iTRAQ quantitative comparative proteomics, RSK2 was identified as a novel host protein that plays a role in HBx augmenting HBV replication. © 2018 The Authors. Proteomics - Clinical Application Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. [New-generation high-throughput technologies based 'omics' research strategy in human disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Jiao, Rui; Yang, Lin; Wu, Li-Ping; Li, Ying-Rui; Wang, Jun

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, new-generation high-throughput technologies, including next-generation sequencing technology and mass spectrometry method, have been widely applied in solving biological problems, especially in human diseases field. This data driven, large-scale and industrialized research model enables the omnidirectional and multi-level study of human diseases from the perspectives of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics levels, etc. In this paper, the latest development of the high-throughput technologies that applied in DNA, RNA, epigenomics, metagenomics including proteomics and some applications in translational medicine are reviewed. At genomics level, exome sequencing has been the hot spot of the recent research. However, the predominance of whole genome resequencing in detecting large structural variants within the whole genome level is coming to stand out as the drop of sequencing cost, which also makes it possible for personalized genome based medicine application. At trancriptomics level, e.g., small RNA sequencing can be used to detect known and predict unknown miRNA. Those small RNA could not only be the biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis, but also show the potential of disease treatment. At proteomics level, e.g., target proteomics can be used to detect the possible disease-related protein or peptides, which can be useful index for clinical staging and typing. Furthermore, the application and development of trans-omics study in disease research are briefly introduced. By applying bioinformatics technologies for integrating multi-omics data, the mechanism, diagnosis and therapy of the disease are likely to be systemically explained and realized, so as to provide powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapies.

  8. Proteomic changes in the base of chrysanthemum cuttings during adventitious root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruixia; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Zhu, Lu; Zheng, Chen; Han, Shuang; Gu, Jing; Sun, Jing; Li, Huiyun; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; Chen, Fadi

    2013-12-26

    A lack of competence to form adventitious roots by cuttings of Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) is an obstacle for the rapid fixation of elite genotypes. We performed a proteomic analysis of cutting bases of chrysanthemum cultivar 'Jinba' during adventitious root formation (ARF) in order to identify rooting ability associated protein and/or to get further insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling adventitious rooting. The protein profiles during ARF were analyzed by comparing the 2-DE gels between 0-day-old (just severed from the stock plant) and 5-day-old cutting bases of chrysanthemum. A total of 69 differentially accumulated protein spots (two-fold change; t-test: 95% significance) were excised and analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF, among which 42 protein spots (assigned as 24 types of proteins and 7 unknown proteins) were confidently identified using the NCBI database. The results demonstrated that 19% proteins were related to carbohydrate and energy metabolism, 16% to photosynthesis, 10% to protein fate, 7% to plant defense, 6% to cell structure, 7% to hormone related, 3% to nitrate metabolism, 3% to lipid metabolism, 3% to ascorbate biosynthesis and 3% to RNA binding, 23% were unknown proteins. Twenty types of differentially accumulated proteins including ACC oxidase (CmACO) were further analyzed at the transcription level, most of which were in accordance with the results of 2-DE. Moreover, the protein abundance changes of CmACO are supported by western blot experiments. Ethylene evolution was higher during the ARF compared with day 0 after cutting, while silver nitrate, an inhibitor of ethylene synthesis, pretreatment delayed the ARF. It suggested that ACC oxidase plays an important role in ARF of chrysanthemum. The proteomic analysis of cutting bases of chrysanthemum allowed us to identify proteins whose expression was related to ARF. We identified auxin-induced protein PCNT115 and ACC oxidase positively or negatively correlated to ARF

  9. Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies Program Funding Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI is very pleased to announce that the Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program funding opportunity announcements have been posted for calendar year (CY) 2013. Please visit this website for more information on these announcements. For your convenience, a link to each solicitation is provided below with associated submission deadlines for new applications and resubmissions. Please contact the NCI IMAT program director, Dr.

  10. A HaloTag-Based Multicolor Fluorogenic Sensor Visualizes and Quantifies Proteome Stress in Live Cells Using Solvatochromic and Molecular Rotor-Based Fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Miao, Kun; Li, Yinghao; Fares, Matthew; Chen, Shuyuan; Zhang, Xin

    2018-02-28

    Protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, is essential for cellular fitness and viability. Many environmental factors compromise proteostasis, induce global proteome stress, and cause diseases. The proteome stress sensor is a powerful tool for dissecting the mechanism of cellular stress and finding therapeutics that ameliorate these diseases. In this work, we present a multicolor HaloTag-based sensor (named AgHalo) to visualize and quantify proteome stresses in live cells. The current AgHalo sensor is equipped with three fluorogenic probes that turn on fluorescence when the sensor forms either soluble oligomers or insoluble aggregates upon exposure to stress conditions, both in vitro and in cellulo. In addition, AgHalo probes can be combined with commercially available always-fluorescent HaloTag ligands to enable two-color imaging, allowing for direct visualization of the AgHalo sensor both before and after cells are subjected to stress conditions. Finally, pulse-chase experiments can be performed to discern changes in the cellular proteome in live cells by first forming the AgHalo conjugate and then either applying or removing stress at any desired time point. In summary, the AgHalo sensor can be used to visualize and quantify proteome stress in live cells, a task that is difficult to accomplish using previous always-fluorescent methods. This sensor should be suited to evaluating cellular proteostasis under various exogenous stresses, including chemical toxins, drugs, and environmental factors.

  11. Elucidating Host-Pathogen Interactions Based on Post-Translational Modifications Using Proteomics Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Jers, Carsten; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    abundance, the modification status, the site occupancy level, interactors, functional significance of key players, potential drug targets, etc. This mini review discusses the potential of proteomics to investigate the involvement of post-translational modifications in bacterial pathogenesis and host...

  12. ProteomicsDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Samaras, Patroklos; Frejno, Martin; Gessulat, Siegfried; Barnert, Maximilian; Kienegger, Harald; Krcmar, Helmut; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Kuster, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Mathias

    2018-01-04

    ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. ProteomicsDB was first released in 2014 to enable the interactive exploration of the first draft of the human proteome. To date, it contains quantitative data from 78 projects totalling over 19k LC-MS/MS experiments. A standardized analysis pipeline enables comparisons between multiple datasets to facilitate the exploration of protein expression across hundreds of tissues, body fluids and cell lines. We recently extended the data model to enable the storage and integrated visualization of other quantitative omics data. This includes transcriptomics data from e.g. NCBI GEO, protein-protein interaction information from STRING, functional annotations from KEGG, drug-sensitivity/selectivity data from several public sources and reference mass spectra from the ProteomeTools project. The extended functionality transforms ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource connecting quantification and meta-data for each protein. The rich user interface helps researchers to navigate all data sources in either a protein-centric or multi-protein-centric manner. Several options are available to download data manually, while our application programming interface enables accessing quantitative data systematically. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. ITRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of the Metabolic Mechanisms Behind Lipid Accumulation and Degradation during Peanut Seed Development and Postgermination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Ma, Xingli; Zhang, Xingguo; He, Xiaoyan; Li, Hemin; Cui, Dangqun; Yin, Dongmei

    2016-12-02

    Peanut seeds have a high oil content making them an important oil crop. During development and germination, seeds undergo complex dynamic and physiological changes. Changes in lipid metabolism and underlying mechanisms during seed development have been studied extensively by DNA and RNA sequencing; however, there are few studies on dynamic changes of proteomics during peanut seed development and germination. In this study, proteomic analyses were carried out 20, 40, 60, and 80 days after pollination and 5, 10, 20, and 30 days after germination using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology to determine the protein profiles of lipid dynamics during peanut seed development and postgermination. A total of 5712 of 8505 proteins were identified, quantified, and divided into 23 functional groups, the largest of which was metabolism-related. Further analyses of the proteins and their pathways revealed initiation of fatty acid accumulation at early stages after flowering, while lipid degradation occurred largely through the lipoxygenase-dependent pathway. Protein expression patterns related to lipid accumulation and degradation were also verified at transcript levels using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The proteome profiles determined here will significantly enrich our understanding of the process of lipid accumulation and degradation and the dynamic changes in metabolic networks during peanut development.

  14. Solar based water treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Hyder, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    In developing countries, the quality of drinking water is so poor that reports of 80% diseases from water-related causes is no surprise (Tebbet, 90). Frequently, there are reports in press of outbreak of epidemics in cities due to the unhygienic drinking-water. The state of affairs in the rural areas can be well imagined, where majority of the people live with no piped water. This paper describes the solar-based methods of removing organic pollutants from waste-water (also called Advanced Oxidation Technologies) and solar desalination. Experimental results of a simple solar water-sterilization technique have been discussed, along with suggestions to enhance the performance of this technique. (author)

  15. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: An Integrated Proteomics-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Jaskoll, T. (2001) The functional genomic response of developing embryonic submandibular glands to NF-κB inhibition. BMC Dev. Biol. 1, 15 12 Malakhov, M...biomarkers for breast cancer . J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia 7, 407-13. 23. McDonald, W. H., and Yates, J. R., 3rd (2002) Shotgun proteomics and...YANG, A., et al. (2002). Evalu- ation of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis for proteomic expression analysis of a model breast cancer cell

  16. Identification of Hip BMD Loss and Fracture Risk Markers Through Population-Based Serum Proteomics: HIP BMD LOSS & FRACTURE RISK MARKERS BY POPULATION-BASED SERUM PROTEOMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Carrie; Wiedrick, Jack; Shen, Jian; Jacobs, Jon M.; Baker, Erin M.; Baraff, Aaron; Piehowski, Paul D.; Lee, Christine; Baratt, Arie; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Lim, Jeong Youn; Bauer, Douglas C.; Lane, Nancy E.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Smith, Richard D.; Lapidus, Jodi; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2017-04-06

    Accelerated bone loss significantly increases the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. The mechanisms underlying bone loss remain incompletely understood, and there are few available biomarkers. We utilized a novel proteomics approach to identify serum peptides and proteins associated with bone loss in 1967 older men who were randomly chosen from the Osteoporotic Fracture in Men Study (MrOS study) (age ≥ 65 yrs). Men had 2-3 measures of femoral neck BMD over an average follow-up of 4.6 years. Change in BMD was estimated and then categorized into three groups: maintained BMD (n=453), expected loss (n=1185) and accelerated loss (n=237). A liquid chromatography–ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) proteomics platform was used to identify and quantify peptides from serum proteins. The whole cohort was randomly divided into discovery (N= 960) and validation (N= 915) sub-cohorts. Linear regression models and a random forest approach were used to discover differentially abundant individual peptides and a proteomic signature that distinguished individuals with accelerated bone loss from those who maintained BMD. Network analyses were performed using the MetaCore knowledgebase. We identified 12 peptides that were associated with BMD loss in both discovery (P< 0.1 FDR) and replication sub-cohorts (P<0.05). Those 12 peptides mapped to the following proteins: ALS, LYVE1, RNAS1, C2, ICOSL, C163A, C7, HEMO, CD14, CERU, CRAC1 and CD59. Meta-analysis of peptidesassociated with bone loss identified 6 additional proteins including GRP78, IGF-2, SHBG, ENPP2, IBP2 and IBP6. We also identified a proteomic signature that was predictive of BMD loss with a discriminative value similar to serum bone marker carboxy-terminal collagen crosslink peptide (CTX). Interestingly, combining the proteomic signature with CTX significantly improved the ability to discriminate men with accelerated loss. In summary, we have identified potential new biomarkers for bone loss that provide

  17. Bacterial membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetsch, Ansgar; Wolters, Dirk

    2008-10-01

    About one quarter to one third of all bacterial genes encode proteins of the inner or outer bacterial membrane. These proteins perform essential physiological functions, such as the import or export of metabolites, the homeostasis of metal ions, the extrusion of toxic substances or antibiotics, and the generation or conversion of energy. The last years have witnessed completion of a plethora of whole-genome sequences of bacteria important for biotechnology or medicine, which is the foundation for proteome and other functional genome analyses. In this review, we discuss the challenges in membrane proteome analysis, starting from sample preparation and leading to MS-data analysis and quantification. The current state of available proteomics technologies as well as their advantages and disadvantages will be described with a focus on shotgun proteomics. Then, we will briefly introduce the most abundant proteins and protein families present in bacterial membranes before bacterial membrane proteomics studies of the last years will be presented. It will be shown how these works enlarged our knowledge about the physiological adaptations that take place in bacteria during fine chemical production, bioremediation, protein overexpression, and during infections. Furthermore, several examples from literature demonstrate the suitability of membrane proteomics for the identification of antigens and different pathogenic strains, as well as the elucidation of membrane protein structure and function.

  18. Proteomic-Based Biosignatures in Breast Cancer Classification and Prediction of Therapeutic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianbo; Whelan, Stephen A.; Lu, Ming; Shen, Dejun; Chung, Debra U.; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Chang, Helena R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-based markers that classify tumor subtypes and predict therapeutic response would be clinically useful in guiding patient treatment. We investigated the LC-MS/MS-identified protein biosignatures in 39 baseline breast cancer specimens including 28 HER2-positive and 11 triple-negative (TNBC) tumors. Twenty proteins were found to correctly classify all HER2 positive and 7 of the 11 TNBC tumors. Among them, galectin-3-binding protein and ALDH1A1 were found preferentially elevated in TNBC, whereas CK19, transferrin, transketolase, and thymosin β4 and β10 were elevated in HER2-positive cancers. In addition, several proteins such as enolase, vimentin, peroxiredoxin 5, Hsp 70, periostin precursor, RhoA, cathepsin D preproprotein, and annexin 1 were found to be associated with the tumor responses to treatment within each subtype. The MS-based proteomic findings appear promising in guiding tumor classification and predicting response. When sufficiently validated, some of these candidate protein markers could have great potential in improving breast cancer treatment. PMID:22110952

  19. MSstats: an R package for statistical analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Meena; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Broudy, Daniel; Killeen, Trevor; MacLean, Brendan; Vitek, Olga

    2014-09-01

    MSstats is an R package for statistical relative quantification of proteins and peptides in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Version 2.0 of MSstats supports label-free and label-based experimental workflows and data-dependent, targeted and data-independent spectral acquisition. It takes as input identified and quantified spectral peaks, and outputs a list of differentially abundant peptides or proteins, or summaries of peptide or protein relative abundance. MSstats relies on a flexible family of linear mixed models. The code, the documentation and example datasets are available open-source at www.msstats.org under the Artistic-2.0 license. The package can be downloaded from www.msstats.org or from Bioconductor www.bioconductor.org and used in an R command line workflow. The package can also be accessed as an external tool in Skyline (Broudy et al., 2014) and used via graphical user interface. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2])...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  1. Proteomics-based systems biology modeling of bovine germinal vesicle stage oocyte and cumulus cell interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyaswetha Peddinti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oocytes are the female gametes which establish the program of life after fertilization. Interactions between oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells at germinal vesicle (GV stage are considered essential for proper maturation or 'programming' of oocytes, which is crucial for normal fertilization and embryonic development. However, despite its importance, little is known about the molecular events and pathways involved in this bidirectional communication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used differential detergent fractionation multidimensional protein identification technology (DDF-Mud PIT on bovine GV oocyte and cumulus cells and identified 811 and 1247 proteins in GV oocyte and cumulus cells, respectively; 371 proteins were significantly differentially expressed between each cell type. Systems biology modeling, which included Gene Ontology (GO and canonical genetic pathway analysis, showed that cumulus cells have higher expression of proteins involved in cell communication, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, as well as transport than GV oocytes. Our data also suggests a hypothesis that oocytes may depend on the presence of cumulus cells to generate specific cellular signals to coordinate their growth and maturation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cells in the context of GO and protein interaction networks identified the signaling pathways associated with the proteins involved in cell-to-cell signaling biological process that may have implications in oocyte competence and maturation. This first comprehensive systems biology modeling of bovine oocytes and cumulus cell proteomes not only provides a foundation for signaling and cell physiology at the GV stage of oocyte development, but are also valuable for comparative studies of other stages of oocyte development at the molecular level.

  2. Mass spectrometry-based identification and characterisation of lysine and arginine methylation in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremang, Michael; Cuomo, Alessandro; Agresta, Anna Maria; Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Spadotto, Valeria; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) by which a variable number of methyl groups are transferred to lysine and arginine residues within proteins. Despite increased interest in this modification due to its reversible nature and its emerging role in a diverse set of biological pathways beyond chromatin, global identification of protein methylation has remained an unachieved goal. To characterise sites of lysine and arginine methylation beyond histones, we employed an approach that combines heavy methyl stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (hmSILAC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Through a broad evaluation of immuno-affinity enrichment and the application of two classical protein separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry, to nucleosolic and cytosolic fractions separately, we identified a total of 501 different methylation types, on 397 distinct lysine and arginine sites, present on 139 unique proteins. Our results considerably extend the number of known in vivo methylation sites and indicate their significant presence on several protein complexes involved at all stages of gene expression, from chromatin remodelling and transcription to splicing and translation. In addition, we describe the potential of the hmSILAC approach for accurate relative quantification of methylation levels between distinct functional states.

  3. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis in vernalization-treated faba bean (Vicia faba L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ying Cao

    Full Text Available Vernalization is classically defined as the induction of flowering process by exposure of the plants to a prolonged cold condition. Normally, it is considered as a precondition of flowering. Vicia faba, commonly known as faba bean, belongs to family Fabaceae. It is one of the plant species that has been cultivated in the earliest human settlements. In this study, an iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomic analysis has been conducted to compare the vernalized faba bean seedlings and its corresponding control. In total, 91 proteins from various functional categories were observed to be differentially accumulated in vernalized faba bean seedlings. Subsequent gene ontology analysis indicated that several biological processes or metabolic pathways including photosynthesis and phytic acid metabolism were differentially respond to vernalization in comparison to the control sample. Further investigation revealed that a family of proteins nominated as glycine-rich RNA-binding factor was accumulated in vernalized seedlings, indicating an extra layer of regulation by alternative splicing on transcript abundance in response to vernalization. These findings raise a possibility that these candidate proteins could be important to represent the responsive network under vernalization process. Therefore, we propose that the regulation of vernalization in faba bean not only occurs at the transcriptional level as previously reported, but also at the post-transcriptional level.

  4. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proteomic based identification of clinical bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pathogenic bacteria often cause life threatening infections especially in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, rapid and reliable species identification is essential for a successful treatment and disease management. We evaluated a rapid, proteomic based technique for identification of clinical bacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time - of - flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Methods: Freshly grown bacterial isolates were selected from culture plates. Ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure was carried out, followed by charging of MALDI target plate with the extract and overlaying with α-cyano-4 hydroxy-cinnamic acid matrix solution. Identification was performed using the MALDI BioTyper 1.1, software for microbial identification (Bruker Daltonik GmbH, Bremen, Germany. Results: A comparative analysis of 82 clinical bacterial isolates using MALDI -TOF MS and conventional techniques was carried out. Amongst the clinical isolates, the accuracy at the species level for clinical isolates was 98.78%. One out of 82 isolates was not in accordance with the conventional assays because MALDI-TOF MS established it as Streptococcus pneumoniae and conventional methods as Streptococcus viridans. Interpretation & conclusions: MALDI - TOF MS was found to be an accurate, rapid, cost-effective and robust system for identification of clinical bacterial isolates. This innovative approach holds promise for earlier therapeutic intervention leading to better patient care.

  5. In-gel equilibration for improved protein retention in 2DE-based proteomic workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Phu T; Ganesan, Vinitha; Bass, Victor; Parthasarathy, Amritha; Schlesinger, Danielle; Minden, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    The 2DE is a powerful proteomic technique, with excellent protein separation capabilities where intact proteins are spatially separated by pI and molecular weight. 2DE is commonly used in conjunction with MS to identify proteins of interest. Current 2DE workflow requires several manual processing steps that can lead to experimental variability and sample loss. One such step is the transition between first dimension IEF and second-dimension SDS-PAGE, which requires exchanging denaturants and the reduction and alkylation of proteins. This in-solution-based equilibration step has been shown to be rather inefficient, losing up to 30% of the original starting material through diffusion effects. We have developed a refinement of this equilibration step using agarose stacking gels poured on top of the second-dimension SDS-PAGE gel, referred to as in-gel equilibration. We show that in-gel equilibration is effective at reduction and alkylation in SDS-PAGE gels. Quantification of whole-cell extracts separated on 2DE gels shows that in-gel equilibration increases protein retention, decreased intergel variability, and simplifies 2DE workflow. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A CTAB based method for the preparation of total protein extract of wine spoilage microrganisms for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polati, Rita; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Giudici, Paolo; Bossi, Alessandra

    2009-04-01

    Mapping the proteome of microrganisms by 2D-electrophoresis is often a hard task, because many contaminants, e.g. polysaccharides of the cell wall and nucleic acid, can obstruct the pores of the IEF gel resulting in streaks and smears. A protocol based on the use of the cationic detergent cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and its salt-dependent solubility was developed. The cellulose-producing strain Gluconoacetobacter hansenii AAB0248 was resolved on 7cm Minigels in over 500 protein spots (a hundred more than with protocols reported in literature). The method was further employed for mapping the proteome of some acid adapted, wine spoilage microrganisms e.g. acetic acid bacteria and a yeast.

  7. Deep Proteome Coverage Based on Ribosome Profiling Aids Mass Spectrometry-based Protein and Peptide Discovery and Provides Evidence of Alternative Translation Products and Near-cognate Translation Initiation Events*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menschaert, Gerben; Van Criekinge, Wim; Notelaers, Tineke; Koch, Alexander; Crappé, Jeroen; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies involve integrative analysis of gene and protein expression data, taking advantage of new technologies such as next-generation transcriptome sequencing and highly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Recently, a strategy, termed ribosome profiling (or RIBO-seq), based on deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments, indirectly monitoring protein synthesis, has been described. We devised a proteogenomic approach constructing a custom protein sequence search space, built from both Swiss-Prot- and RIBO-seq-derived translation products, applicable for MS/MS spectrum identification. To record the impact of using the constructed deep proteome database, we performed two alternative MS-based proteomic strategies as follows: (i) a regular shotgun proteomic and (ii) an N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) approach. Although the former technique gives an overall assessment on the protein and peptide level, the latter technique, specifically enabling the isolation of N-terminal peptides, is very appropriate in validating the RIBO-seq-derived (alternative) translation initiation site profile. We demonstrate that this proteogenomic approach increases the overall protein identification rate 2.5% (e.g. new protein products, new protein splice variants, single nucleotide polymorphism variant proteins, and N-terminally extended forms of known proteins) as compared with only searching UniProtKB-SwissProt. Furthermore, using this custom database, identification of N-terminal COFRADIC data resulted in detection of 16 alternative start sites giving rise to N-terminally extended protein variants besides the identification of four translated upstream ORFs. Notably, the characterization of these new translation products revealed the use of multiple near-cognate (non-AUG) start codons. As deep sequencing techniques are becoming more standard, less expensive, and widespread, we anticipate that mRNA sequencing

  8. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore......, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead...... to the discovery of novel cardiovascular biomarkers....

  9. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José; Gromova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis......, and both prognosis and prediction of outcome of chemotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise what has been achieved to date using proteomic technologies and to bring forward novel strategies - based on the analysis of clinically relevant samples - that promise to accelerate...

  10. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Pieroni, Luisa; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Urbani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(in)compatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research. PMID:26690416

  11. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bonomini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(incompatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  12. 3D profile-based approach to proteome-wide discovery of novel human chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Tomczak

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small secreted proteins with important roles in immune responses. They consist of a conserved three-dimensional (3D structure, so-called IL8-like chemokine fold, which is supported by disulfide bridges characteristic of this protein family. Sequence- and profile-based computational methods have been proficient in discovering novel chemokines by making use of their sequence-conserved cysteine patterns. However, it has been recently shown that some chemokines escaped annotation by these methods due to low sequence similarity to known chemokines and to different arrangement of cysteines in sequence and in 3D. Innovative methods overcoming the limitations of current techniques may allow the discovery of new remote homologs in the still functionally uncharacterized fraction of the human genome. We report a novel computational approach for proteome-wide identification of remote homologs of the chemokine family that uses fold recognition techniques in combination with a scaffold-based automatic mapping of disulfide bonds to define a 3D profile of the chemokine protein family. By applying our methodology to all currently uncharacterized human protein sequences, we have discovered two novel proteins that, without having significant sequence similarity to known chemokines or characteristic cysteine patterns, show strong structural resemblance to known anti-HIV chemokines. Detailed computational analysis and experimental structural investigations based on mass spectrometry and circular dichroism support our structural predictions and highlight several other chemokine-like features. The results obtained support their functional annotation as putative novel chemokines and encourage further experimental characterization. The identification of remote homologs of human chemokines may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms causing pathologies such as cancer or AIDS, and may contribute to the development of novel treatments. Besides

  13. Systematic and quantitative comparison of digest efficiency and specificity reveals the impact of trypsin quality on MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Julia Maria; Schumbrutzki, Cornelia; Wortelkamp, Stefanie; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René Peiman

    2012-02-02

    Trypsin is the most frequently used proteolytic enzyme in mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Beside its good availability, it also offers some major advantages such as an optimal average peptide length of ~14 amino acids, and typically the presence of at least two defined positive charges at the N-terminus as well as the C-terminal Arg/Lys, rendering tryptic peptides well suited for CID-based LC-MS/MS. Here, we conducted a systematic study of different types of commercially available trypsin in order to qualitatively and quantitatively compare cleavage specificity, efficiency as well as reproducibility and the potential impact on quantitation and proteome coverage. We present a straightforward strategy applied to complex digests of human platelets, comprising (1) digest controls using a monolithic column HPLC-setup, (2) SCX enrichment of semitryptic/nonspecific peptides, (3) targeted MRM analysis of corresponding full cleavage/missed cleavage peptide pairs as well as (4) LC-MS analyses of complete digests with a three-step data interpretation. Thus, differences in digest performance can be readily assessed, rendering these procedures extremely beneficial to quality control not only the trypsin of choice, but also to effectively compare as well as optimize different digestion conditions and to evaluate the reproducibility of a dedicated digest protocol for all kinds of quantitative proteome studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Robustness analysis of a constraint-based metabolic model links cell growth and proteomics of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis under temperature perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Zhe; Wang, Quanhui; Zhang, Jiyuan; Bai, Xue; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2013-04-05

    The integration of omic data with metabolic networks has been demonstrated to be an effective approach to elucidate the underlying metabolic mechanisms in life. Because the metabolic pathways of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) are incomplete, we used a 1-(13)C-glucose culture to monitor intracellular isotope-labeled metabolites by GC/MS and identified the gap gene in glucose catabolism, Re-citrate synthase. Based on genome annotation and biochemical information, we reconstructed the metabolic network of glucose metabolism and amino acid synthesis in T. tengcongensis, including 253 reactions, 227 metabolites, and 236 genes. Furthermore, we performed constraint based modeling (CBM)-derived robustness analysis on the model to study the dynamic changes of the metabolic network. By perturbing the culture temperature from 75 to 55 °C, we collected the bacterial growth rates and differential proteomes. Assuming that protein abundance changes represent metabolic flux variations, we proposed that the robustness analysis of the CBM model could decipher the effect of proteome change on the bacterial growth under perturbation. For approximately 73% of the reactions, the predicted cell growth changes due to such reaction flux variations matched the observed cell growth data. Our study, therefore, indicates that differential proteome data can be integrated with metabolic network modeling and that robustness analysis is a strong method for representing the dynamic change in cell phenotypes under perturbation.

  15. PACOM: A Versatile Tool for Integrating, Filtering, Visualizing, and Comparing Multiple Large Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; López-García, Miguel Ángel; González-Tejedo, Carmen; Prieto, Gorka; Navajas, Rosana; Salazar-Donate, Emilio; Fernández-Costa, Carolina; Yates, John R; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2018-04-06

    Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has evolved into a high-throughput technology in which numerous large-scale data sets are generated from diverse analytical platforms. Furthermore, several scientific journals and funding agencies have emphasized the storage of proteomics data in public repositories to facilitate its evaluation, inspection, and reanalysis. (1) As a consequence, public proteomics data repositories are growing rapidly. However, tools are needed to integrate multiple proteomics data sets to compare different experimental features or to perform quality control analysis. Here, we present a new Java stand-alone tool, Proteomics Assay COMparator (PACOM), that is able to import, combine, and simultaneously compare numerous proteomics experiments to check the integrity of the proteomic data as well as verify data quality. With PACOM, the user can detect source of errors that may have been introduced in any step of a proteomics workflow and that influence the final results. Data sets can be easily compared and integrated, and data quality and reproducibility can be visually assessed through a rich set of graphical representations of proteomics data features as well as a wide variety of data filters. Its flexibility and easy-to-use interface make PACOM a unique tool for daily use in a proteomics laboratory. PACOM is available at https://github.com/smdb21/pacom .

  16. Temporal profiling of the adipocyte proteome during differentiation using a five-plex SILAC based strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Henrik; Yang, Yi; Ruch, Travis

    2009-01-01

    The adipose tissue has important secretory and endocrine functions in humans. The regulation of adipocyte differentiation has been actively pursued using transcriptomic methods over the last several years. Quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising approach to obtain temporal profiles...... of biological processes such as differentiation. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a simple and robust method for labeling proteins in vivo. Here, we describe the development and application of a five-plex SILAC experiment using four different heavy stable isotopic forms...... of arginine to study the nuclear proteome and the secretome during the course of adipocyte differentiation. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis using a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument resulted in identification of a total 882 proteins from these two proteomes. Of these proteins, 427 were identified...

  17. Strigolactone-Regulated Proteins Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhou [ORNL; Czarnecki, Olaf [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. Here, a quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found SLs regulate the expression of about three dozens of proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  18. Strigolactone-regulated proteins revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Czarnecki, Olaf; Chourey, Karuna; Yang, Jun; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hurst, Gregory B; Pan, Chongle; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-03-07

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. A quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found that SLs regulate the expression of about three dozen proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  19. Proteomics in reproductive biology: beacon for unraveling the molecular complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rahul D; Balasinor, N H; Kumar, Anita V; Sachdeva, Geetanjali; Parte, Priyanka; Dumasia, Kushaan

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics, an interface of rapidly evolving advances in physics and biology, is rapidly developing and expanding its potential applications to molecular and cellular biology. Application of proteomics tools has contributed towards identification of relevant protein biomarkers that can potentially change the strategies for early diagnosis and treatment of several diseases. The emergence of powerful mass spectrometry-based proteomics technique has added a new dimension to the field of medical research in liver, heart diseases and certain forms of cancer. Most proteomics tools are also being used to study physiological and pathological events related to reproductive biology. There have been attempts to generate the proteomes of testes, sperm, seminal fluid, epididymis, oocyte, and endometrium from reproductive disease patients. Here, we have reviewed proteomics based investigations in humans over the last decade, which focus on delineating the mechanism underlying various reproductive events such as spermatogenesis, oogenesis, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, embryo development. The challenge is to harness new technologies like 2-DE, DIGE, MALDI-MS, SELDI-MS, MUDPIT, LC-MS etc., to a greater extent to develop widely applicable clinical tools in understanding molecular aspects of reproduction both in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of Urea Based Protein Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue for Shotgun Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebker, Stephen A; Koepsell, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Urea based protein extraction of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue provides the most efficient workflow for proteomics due to its compatibility with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). This study optimizes the use of urea for proteomic analysis of clinical FFPE tissue. A series of protein extraction conditions manipulating temperature and buffer composition were compared to reduce carbamylation introduced by urea and increase protein detection. Each extraction was performed on a randomized pair of serial sections of homogenous FFPE tissue and analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS. Results were compared in terms of yield, missed cleavages, and peptide carbamylation. Lowering extraction temperature to 60°C decreased carbamylation at the cost of decreased protein detection and yield. Protein extraction for at least 20 minutes at 95°C followed by 60°C for 2 hours maximized total protein yield while maintaining protein detection and reducing carbamylation by 7.9%. When accounting for carbamylation during analysis, this modified extraction temperature provides equivalent peptide and protein detection relative to the commercially available Qproteome® FFPE Tissue Kit. No changes to buffer composition containing 7 M urea, 2 M thiourea, and 1 M ammonium bicarbonate resulted in improvements to control conditions. Optimized urea in-solution digestion provides an efficient workflow with maximized yields for proteomic analysis of clinically relevant FFPE tissue.

  1. Effect of Rocket (Eruca sativa Extract on MRSA Growth and Proteome: Metabolic Adjustments in Plant-Based Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapi I. Doulgeraki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in food has provoked a great concern about the presence of MRSA in associated foodstuff. Although MRSA is often detected in various retailed meat products, it seems that food handlers are more strongly associated with this type of food contamination. Thus, it can be easily postulated that any food could be contaminated with this pathogen in an industrial environment or in household and cause food poisoning. To this direction, the effect of rocket (Eruca sativa extract on MRSA growth and proteome was examined in the present study. This goal was achieved with the comparative study of the MRSA strain COL proteome, cultivated in rocket extract versus the standard Luria-Bertani growth medium. The obtained results showed that MRSA was able to grow in rocket extract. In addition, proteome analysis using 2-DE method showed that MRSA strain COL is taking advantage of the sugar-, lipid-, and vitamin-rich substrate in the liquid rocket extract, although its growth was delayed in rocket extract compared to Luria–Bertani medium. This work could initiate further research about bacterial metabolism in plant-based media and defense mechanisms against plant-derived antibacterials.

  2. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis reveals alterations in the liver induced by restricted meal frequency in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Liu, Zhengqun; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Hongfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of meal frequency on metabolite levels in pig plasma and hepatic proteome by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Twenty-four pigs (60.7 ± 1.0 kg) consumed the same amount of feed either in 2 (M2, n = 12) or 12 (M12, n = 12) meals per day. After an 8-wk feeding period, plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones, hepatic biochemical traits, and proteome (n = 4 per group) were measured. Pigs on the M12 regimen had lower average daily gain and gain-to-feed ratio than pigs fed the M2 regimen. The M2 regimen resulted in lower total lipid, glycogen, and triacylglycerol content in the liver and circulating triacylglycerol concentration than that in the M12 pigs. The metabolic hormone concentrations were not affected by meal frequency, with the exception of elevated fibroblast growth factor 21 concentrations in the M2 regimen compared with the M12 regimen. The iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis revealed 35 differentially expressed proteins in the liver between pigs fed two and 12 meals per day, and these differentially expressed proteins were involved in the regulation of general biological process such as glucose and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, protein and amino acid metabolism, stress response, and cell redox homeostasis. Altogether, the proteomic results provide insights into the mechanism mediating the beneficial effects of restricted meal frequency on the metabolic fitness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Abunimer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs. For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases.

  4. Challenges in translating plasma proteomics from bench to bedside: update from the NHLBI Clinical Proteomics Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Gerszten, Robert E.; Accurso, Frank; Bernard, Gordon R.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Klee, Eric W.; Klee, George G.; Kullo, Iftikhar; Laguna, Theresa A.; Roth, Frederick P.; Sabatine, Marc; Srinivas, Pothur; Wang, Thomas J.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2008-01-01

    The emerging scientific field of proteomics encompasses the identification, characterization, and quantification of the protein content or proteome of whole cells, tissues, or body fluids. The potential for proteomic technologies to identify and quantify novel proteins in the plasma that can function as biomarkers of the presence or severity of clinical disease states holds great promise for clinical use. However, there are many challenges in translating plasma proteomics from bench to bedsid...

  5. Evolution of Clinical Proteomics and its Role in Medicine | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research authored a review of the current state of clinical proteomics in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. The review highlights outcomes from the CPTC program and also provides a thorough overview of the different technologies that have pushed the field forward. Additionally, the review provides a vision for moving the field forward through linking advances in genomic and proteomic analysis to develop new, molecularly targeted interventions.

  6. Virtual maintenance technology for reactor system based on PPR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yaxiang; Ma Baiyong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Product, Process and Resources (PPR) technology, the establishing technology of virtual maintenance environment for the reactor system and the process structure tree for virtual maintenance is studied, and the flow for the maintainability design and simulation for reactor system is put forward. Based on the subsection simulation of maintenance process and layered design of maintenance actions, the leveled structure of the reactor system virtual maintenance task is studied. The relation for the data of product, process and resource is described by Plan Evaluation and Review Technology (PERT) diagram to define the maintenance operation. (authors)

  7. High Concentrations of Atmospheric Ammonia Induce Alterations in the Hepatic Proteome of Broilers (Gallus gallus: An iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jize Zhang

    Full Text Available With the development of the poultry industry, ammonia, as a main contaminant in the air, is causing increasing problems with broiler health. To date, most studies of ammonia toxicity have focused on the nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract in mammals. However, few detailed studies have been conducted on the hepatic response to ammonia toxicity in poultry. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects remain unclear. In the present study, our group applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis to investigate changes in the protein profile change in hepatic tissue of broilers exposed to high concentrations of atmospheric ammonia, with the goal of characterizing the molecular mechanisms of chronic liver injury from exposure to high ambient levels of ammonia. Overall, 30 differentially expressed proteins that are involved in nutrient metabolism (energy, lipid, and amino acid, immune response, transcriptional and translational regulation, stress response, and detoxification were identified. In particular, two of these proteins, beta-1 galactosidase (GLB1 and a kinase (PRKA anchor protein 8-like (AKAP8 L, were previously suggested to be potential biomarkers of chronic liver injury. In addition to the changes in the protein profile, serum parameters and histochemical analyses of hepatic tissue also showed extensive hepatic damage in ammonia-exposed broilers. Altogether, these findings suggest that longtime exposure to high concentrations of atmospheric ammonia can trigger chronic hepatic injury in broilers via different mechanisms, providing new information that can be used for intervention using nutritional strategies in the future.

  8. Electrophoresis-Based Proteomics to Study Development and Germination of Date Palm Zygotic Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier-Hammami, Besma; Drira, Noureddine; Bahloul, Mouna; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V

    2017-01-01

    Proteomics has become an important and powerful tool in plant biology research. To establish a proteomic reference map of date palm zygotic embryos (ZE), we separated and identified proteins from zygotic embryos during different developmental and germination phases using one, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Proteins are extracted with trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone-phenol and resolved by gel electrophoresis. Gel images are captured and analyzed by appropriate software and statistical packages. Quantitative or qualitative variable bands or spots are subjected to MS analysis in order to identify them and correlate differences in the protein profiles with the different stages of date palm zygotic embryo development, maturation, and germination.

  9. A comparison of labeling and label-free mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vibhuti J; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Slade, Susan E; Connolly, Joanne B; Crombie, Andrew; Murrell, J Colin; Scrivens, James H

    2009-07-01

    The proteome of the recently discovered bacterium Methylocella silvestris has been characterized using three profiling and comparative proteomics approaches. The organism has been grown on two different substrates enabling variations in protein expression to be identified. The results obtained using the experimental approaches have been compared with respect to number of proteins identified, confidence in identification, sequence coverage and agreement of regulated proteins. The sample preparation, instrumental time and sample loading requirements of the differing experiments are compared and discussed. A preliminary screen of the protein regulation results for biological significance has also been performed.

  10. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  11. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  12. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  13. Chemostat-based proteomic analysis of toluene-affected Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Jong, A.L. de; Hulst, A.G.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Bont, J.A.M. de; Wery, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cellular response of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 to toluene as the single effector. Proteomic analysis (two-dimensional difference-in-gel-electrophoresis) was used to assess the response of P. putida S12 cultured in chemostats. This approach

  14. Using HPLC-Mass Spectrometry to Teach Proteomics Concepts with Problem-Based Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michael; Short, Anne; Vankempen, Rachel; Seymour, Michael; Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Practical instruction of proteomics concepts was provided using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass selective detection system (HPLC-MS) for the analysis of simulated protein digests. The samples were prepared from selected dipeptides in order to facilitate the mass spectral identification. As part of the prelaboratory…

  15. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Subcellular localization of extracytoplasmic proteins in monoderm bacteria: rational secretomics-based strategy for genomic and proteomic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Renier

    Full Text Available Genome-scale prediction of subcellular localization (SCL is not only useful for inferring protein function but also for supporting proteomic data. In line with the secretome concept, a rational and original analytical strategy mimicking the secretion steps that determine ultimate SCL was developed for Gram-positive (monoderm bacteria. Based on the biology of protein secretion, a flowchart and decision trees were designed considering (i membrane targeting, (ii protein secretion systems, (iii membrane retention, and (iv cell-wall retention by domains or post-translocational modifications, as well as (v incorporation to cell-surface supramolecular structures. Using Listeria monocytogenes as a case study, results were compared with known data set from SCL predictors and experimental proteomics. While in good agreement with experimental extracytoplasmic fractions, the secretomics-based method outperforms other genomic analyses, which were simply not intended to be as inclusive. Compared to all other localization predictors, this method does not only supply a static snapshot of protein SCL but also offers the full picture of the secretion process dynamics: (i the protein routing is detailed, (ii the number of distinct SCL and protein categories is comprehensive, (iii the description of protein type and topology is provided, (iv the SCL is unambiguously differentiated from the protein category, and (v the multiple SCL and protein category are fully considered. In that sense, the secretomics-based method is much more than a SCL predictor. Besides a major step forward in genomics and proteomics of protein secretion, the secretomics-based method appears as a strategy of choice to generate in silico hypotheses for experimental testing.

  17. Communication Technologies Preferred by School Based Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the communication technologies preferred by school based administrators. This study surveyed and interviewed 96 school based administrators in a mid-sized suburban school system. The data show that individual emails, email lists, and cell phone technologies had the highest percentage effectiveness ratings…

  18. Methodology base and problems of information technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovetov, Boris Y.

    1993-04-01

    Information product qualitative forming and effective use is the aim of any information technology. Information technology as a system provides both computer-aided problem solving for the user and automation of information processes, which in turn support the problem solving process. That's why the information technology methods are the methods for data transmission, processing, and storage. The tools of methodology, mathematics, algorithms, hardware, software, and information are the tools of information technology. We propose to differ between global, basic, and applied information technologies depending on information product significance and characteristics of models, methods, and tools used. The global technology is aimed to use information resources in the social sphere as a whole. The basic technology is oriented on the application sphere (industry, scientific research, design, training). Transition towards new information technology should have in its concern business area model merged with the formal model of problem solving: computing organization based on the data concept; user's intellectual interface development.

  19. An attempt to understand kidney's protein handling function by comparing plasma and urine proteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the help of proteomics technology, the human plasma and urine proteomes, which closely represent the protein compositions of the input and output of the kidney, respectively, have been profiled in much greater detail by different research teams. Many datasets have been accumulated to form "reference profiles" of the plasma and urine proteomes. Comparing these two proteomes may help us understand the protein handling aspect of kidney function in a way, however, which has been unavailable until the recent advances in proteomics technology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After removing secreted proteins downstream of the kidney, 2611 proteins in plasma and 1522 in urine were identified with high confidence and compared based on available proteomic data to generate three subproteomes, the plasma-only subproteome, the plasma-and-urine subproteome, and the urine-only subproteome, and they correspond to three groups of proteins that are handled in three different ways by the kidney. The available experimental molecular weights of the proteins in the three subproteomes were collected and analyzed. Since the functions of the overrepresented proteins in the plasma-and-urine subproteome are probably the major functions that can be routinely regulated by excretion from the kidney in physiological conditions, Gene Ontology term enrichment in the plasma-and-urine subproteome versus the whole plasma proteome was analyzed. Protease activity, calcium and growth factor binding proteins, and coagulation and immune response-related proteins were found to be enriched. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison method described in this paper provides an illustration of a new approach for studying organ functions with a proteomics methodology. Because of its distinctive input (plasma and output (urine, it is reasonable to predict that the kidney will be the first organ whose functions are further elucidated by proteomic methods in the near future. It

  20. Proteomics dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Ellingsen, Torkell

    2017-01-01

    The datasets presented in this article are related to the research articles entitled “Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Ulcerative Colitis: A Proteome Analysis of Intestinal Biopsies” (Bennike et al., 2015 [1]), and “Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa” (Bennike et al., 2017 [2...... conducted the sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of all samples in one batch, enabling label-free comparison between all biopsies. The datasets are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyses. The proteomics data and search results, have...... been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001608 for ulcerative colitis and control samples, and PXD003082 for rheumatoid arthritis samples....

  1. Clinical proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Frederiksen, Hanne; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2018-01-01

    )-platforms already implemented in many clinical laboratories for routine quantitation of small molecules (i.e. uHPLC coupled to triple-quadrupole MS). Progress in targeted proteomics of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) have provided valuable insights about tryptic peptides, transitions, internal......Clinical proteomics aims to deliver cost-effective multiplexing of potentially hundreds of diagnostic proteins, including distinct protein isoforms. The analytical strategy known as targeted proteomics is particularly promising because it is compatible with robust mass spectrometry (MS...... standards and calibrants. The present challenge is to examine if targeted proteomics of IGF-I can truly measure up to the routine performance that must be expected from a clinical testing platform....

  2. Proteomics - new analytical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Recent developments in the sequencing of the human genome have indicated that the number of coding gene sequences may be as few as 30,000. It is clear, however, that the complexity of the human species is dependent on the much greater diversity of the corresponding protein complement. Estimates of the diversity (discrete protein species) of the human proteome range from 200,000 to 300,000 at the lower end to 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 at the high end. In addition, proteomics (the study of the protein complement to the genome) has been subdivided into two main approaches. Global proteomics refers to a high throughput examination of the full protein set present in a cell under a given environmental condition. Focused proteomics refers to a more detailed study of a restricted set of proteins that are related to a specified biochemical pathway or subcellular structure. While many of the advances in proteomics will be based on the sequencing of the human genome, de novo characterization of protein microheterogeneity (glycosylation, phosphorylation and sulfation as well as the incorporation of lipid components) will be required in disease studies. To characterize these modifications it is necessary to digest the protein mixture with an enzyme to produce the corresponding mixture of peptides. In a process analogous to sequencing of the genome, shot-gun sequencing of the proteome is based on the characterization of the key fragments produced by such a digest. Thus, a glycopeptide and hence a specific glycosylation motif will be identified by a unique mass and then a diagnostic MS/MS spectrum. Mass spectrometry will be the preferred detector in these applications because of the unparalleled information content provided by one or more dimensions of mass measurement. In addition, highly efficient separation processes are an absolute requirement for advanced proteomic studies. For example, a combination of the orthogonal approaches, HPLC and HPCE, can be very powerful

  3. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic exploration of the human immune system: focus on the inflammasome, global protein secretion, and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Tuula A; Lorey, Martina B; Cypryk, Wojciech; Matikainen, Sampsa

    2017-05-01

    The immune system is our defense system against microbial infections and tissue injury, and understanding how it works in detail is essential for developing drugs for different diseases. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can provide in-depth information on the molecular mechanisms involved in immune responses. Areas covered: Summarized are the key immunology findings obtained with MS-based proteomics in the past five years, with a focus on inflammasome activation, global protein secretion, mucosal immunology, immunopeptidome and T cells. Special focus is on extracellular vesicle-mediated protein secretion and its role in immune responses. Expert commentary: Proteomics is an essential part of modern omics-scale immunology research. To date, MS-based proteomics has been used in immunology to study protein expression levels, their subcellular localization, secretion, post-translational modifications, and interactions in immune cells upon activation by different stimuli. These studies have made major contributions to understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. New developments in proteomics offer constantly novel possibilities for exploring the immune system. Examples of these techniques include mass cytometry and different MS-based imaging approaches which can be widely used in immunology.

  4. Proteomic View of the Crosstalk between Lactobacillus mucosae and Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Co-culture Revealed by Q Exactive-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Alain B. Pajarillo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are bacteria that are beneficial to host health, but information on communication between Lactobacilli and host cells in the intestine is lacking. In this study, we examined the proteomes of the Lactobacillus mucosae strain LM1, as a model of beneficial bacteria, and the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2 after co-culture. Label-free proteomics demonstrated the high-throughput capability of the technique, and robust characterization of the functional profiles and changes in the bacteria and intestinal cells was achieved in pure and mixed cultures. After co-culture, we identified totals of 376 and 653 differentially expressed proteins in the LM1 and IPEC-J2 proteomes, respectively. The major proteomic changes in the LM1 strain occurred in the functional categories of transcription, general function, and translation, whereas those in IPEC-J2 cells involved metabolic and cellular processes, and cellular component organization/biogenesis. Among them, elongation factor Tu, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphocarrier protein HPr, which are known to be involved in bacterial adhesion, were upregulated in LM1. In contrast, proteins involved in tight junction assembly, actin organization, and genetic information processing (i.e., histones and signaling pathways were significantly upregulated in IPEC-J2 cells. Furthermore, we identified functional pathways that are possibly involved in host–microbe crosstalk and response. These findings will provide novel insights into host–bacteria communication and the molecular mechanism of probiotic establishment in the intestine.

  5. Proteomic View of the Crosstalk betweenLactobacillus mucosaeand Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Co-culture Revealed by Q Exactive-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Kim, Sang Hoon; Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacilli are bacteria that are beneficial to host health, but information on communication between Lactobacilli and host cells in the intestine is lacking. In this study, we examined the proteomes of the Lactobacillus mucosae strain LM1, as a model of beneficial bacteria, and the intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) after co-culture. Label-free proteomics demonstrated the high-throughput capability of the technique, and robust characterization of the functional profiles and changes in the bacteria and intestinal cells was achieved in pure and mixed cultures. After co-culture, we identified totals of 376 and 653 differentially expressed proteins in the LM1 and IPEC-J2 proteomes, respectively. The major proteomic changes in the LM1 strain occurred in the functional categories of transcription, general function, and translation, whereas those in IPEC-J2 cells involved metabolic and cellular processes, and cellular component organization/biogenesis. Among them, elongation factor Tu, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphocarrier protein HPr, which are known to be involved in bacterial adhesion, were upregulated in LM1. In contrast, proteins involved in tight junction assembly, actin organization, and genetic information processing (i.e., histones and signaling pathways) were significantly upregulated in IPEC-J2 cells. Furthermore, we identified functional pathways that are possibly involved in host-microbe crosstalk and response. These findings will provide novel insights into host-bacteria communication and the molecular mechanism of probiotic establishment in the intestine.

  6. Encryption Technology based on Human Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research progress of encryption technologies based on human biometrics is reviewed in this paper.The technologies that utilize human biometrics to make information encryption and identity authentication,and the technologies which combine biometrics encryption with optical encryption methods are introduced in detail.The advantages and disadvantages of these encryption systems are discussed,and the obstacles in practical applications are pointed out.Finally,the prospect of the new encryption technologies that are based on human biometrics are predicted.

  7. Advanced location-based technologies and services

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Hassan A

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rapid increase in the number of mobile device users worldwide, location-based services (LBSs) have become pervasive, and the demand for them will continue to grow. Exploring recent changes in the technology and its uses, Advanced Location-Based Technologies and Services takes an in-depth look at new and existing technologies, techniques, applications, and opportunities. Under the editorial guidance of Hassan Karimi, with contributions from experts in the field, the book examines the breadth and depth of advanced LBS technologies and techniques. The book provides up-to-date informati

  8. Summarization vs Peptide-Based Models in Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics: Performance, Pitfalls, and Data Analysis Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeminne, Ludger J E; Argentini, Andrea; Martens, Lennart; Clement, Lieven

    2015-06-05

    Quantitative label-free mass spectrometry is increasingly used to analyze the proteomes of complex biological samples. However, the choice of appropriate data analysis methods remains a major challenge. We therefore provide a rigorous comparison between peptide-based models and peptide-summarization-based pipelines. We show that peptide-based models outperform summarization-based pipelines in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision. We also demonstrate that the predefined FDR cutoffs for the detection of differentially regulated proteins can become problematic when differentially expressed (DE) proteins are highly abundant in one or more samples. Care should therefore be taken when data are interpreted from samples with spiked-in internal controls and from samples that contain a few very highly abundant proteins. We do, however, show that specific diagnostic plots can be used for assessing differentially expressed proteins and the overall quality of the obtained fold change estimates. Finally, our study also illustrates that imputation under the "missing by low abundance" assumption is beneficial for the detection of differential expression in proteins with low abundance, but it negatively affects moderately to highly abundant proteins. Hence, imputation strategies that are commonly implemented in standard proteomics software should be used with care.

  9. Proteomic-based insight into Malpighian tubules of silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wu Zhong

    Full Text Available Malpighian tubules (MTs are highly specific organs of arthropods (Insecta, Myriapoda and Arachnida for excretion and osmoregulation. In order to highlight the important genes and pathways involved in multi-functions of MTs, we performed a systematic proteomic analysis of silkworm MTs in the present work. Totally, 1,367 proteins were identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and as well as by Trans Proteomic Pipeline (TPP and Absolute protein expression (APEX analyses. Forty-one proteins were further identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some proteins were revealed to be significantly associated with various metabolic processes, organic solute transport, detoxification and innate immunity. Our results might lay a good foundation for future functional studies of MTs in silkworm and other lepidoptera.

  10. 2 D gel based analysis of biological variability of the human plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rentsch, Maria Louise; Jessen, Flemming

    individuals and within an individual changes will also happen over time (e.g. after meal intake). Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine the inter-individual variability of plasma protein levels in humans after meal intake. Five subjects consumed three single meals in a randomised order separated......Human blood plasma is a valuable specimen for the biomarker discovery process, since it is easily accessible and contains proteins that are synthesised, secreted or lost from cells and tissue. In this way, changes in plasma proteome reflect the current state of the organism. The analysis of plasma...... proteome is yet challenging due to the huge dynamic range of protein abundance. When evaluating a potential biomarker, stable basal level of the protein is needed before it can be considered a functional biomarker. However, basal level differences of plasma proteins are naturally occurring between...

  11. Standard Dyes for Total Protein Staining in Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Fran?ois

    2010-01-01

    Staining of two-dimensional gels is a primary concern in proteomic studies using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with respect to the number of proteins analyzed, the accuracy of spot quantification and reproducibility. In this review article, the efficiency of the most widely used dyes was investigated. Visible dyes (Coomassie blue and silver nitrate), fluorescent dyes (Sypro Ruby, Deep Purple) and cyanine labeled methods were compared.

  12. Network-based proteomic analysis for postmenopausal osteoporosis in Caucasian females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zeng, Yong; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhu, Jia-Qiang; He, Hao; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Deng, Fei-Yan; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is one of the crucial physiological events during the life of a woman. Transition of menopause status is accompanied by increased risks of various health problems such as osteoporosis. Peripheral blood monocytes can differentiate into osteoclasts and produce cytokines important for osteoclast activity. With quantitative proteomics LC-nano-ESI-MS(E) (where MS(E) is elevated-energy MS), we performed protein expression profiling of peripheral blood monocytes in 42 postmenopausal women with discordant bone mineral density (BMD) levels. Traditional comparative analysis showed proteins encoded by four genes (LOC654188, PPIA, TAGLN2, YWHAB) and three genes (LMNB1, ANXA2P2, ANXA2) were significantly down- and upregulated, respectively, in extremely low- versus high-BMD subjects. To study functionally orchestrating groups of detected proteins in the form of networks, we performed weighted gene coexpression network analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis showed that the module including the annexin gene family was most significantly correlated with low BMD, and the lipid-binding related GO terms were enriched in this identified module. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that two significantly enriched gene sets may be involved in postmenopausal BMD variation by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines activities. To gain more insights into the proteomics data generated, we performed integrative analyses of the datasets available to us at the genome (DNA level), transcriptome (RNA level), and proteome levels jointly. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Proteomic-Based Approaches for the Study of Cytokines in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Marrugal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic techniques are currently used to understand the biology of different human diseases, including studies of the cell signaling pathways implicated in cancer progression, which is important in knowing the roles of different proteins in tumor development. Due to its poor prognosis, proteomic approaches are focused on the identification of new biomarkers for the early diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment of lung cancer. Cytokines are proteins involved in inflammatory processes and have been proposed as lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets because it has been reported that some cytokines play important roles in tumor development, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we aim to summarize the different proteomic techniques used to discover new lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Several cytokines have been identified as important players in lung cancer using these techniques. We underline the most important cytokines that are useful as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We also summarize some of the therapeutic strategies targeted for these cytokines in lung cancer.

  14. Opportunities and Challenges for Nutritional Proteomics in Cancer Prevention12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Milner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge gaps persist about the efficacy of cancer prevention strategies based on dietary food components. Adaptations to nutrient supply are executed through tuning of multiple protein networks that include transcription factors, histones, modifying enzymes, translation factors, membrane and nuclear receptors, and secreted proteins. However, the simultaneous quantitative and qualitative measurement of all proteins that regulate cancer processes is not practical using traditional protein methodologies. Proteomics offers an attractive opportunity to fill this knowledge gap and unravel the effects of dietary components on protein networks that impinge on cancer. The articles presented in this supplement are from talks proffered in the “Nutrition Proteomics and Cancer Prevention” session at the American Institute for Cancer Research Annual Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer held in Washington, DC on October 21 and 22, 2010. Recent advances in MS technologies suggest that studies in nutrition and cancer prevention may benefit from the adoption of proteomic tools to elucidate the impact on biological processes that govern the transition from normal to malignant phenotype; to identify protein changes that determine both positive and negative responses to food components; to assess how protein networks mediate dose-, time-, and tissue-dependent responses to food components; and, finally, for predicting responders and nonresponders. However, both the limited accessibility to proteomic technologies and research funding appear to be hampering the routine adoption of proteomic tools in nutrition and cancer prevention research. PMID:22649262

  15. Derivative component analysis for mass spectral serum proteomic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As a promising way to transform medicine, mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have seen a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, there is a lack of effective feature selection methods that are able to capture essential data behaviors to achieve clinical level disease diagnosis. Moreover, it faces a challenge from data reproducibility, which means that no two independent studies have been found to produce same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issue causes the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevents it from real clinical usage. Methods In this work, we propose a novel machine-learning algorithm: derivative component analysis (DCA) for high-dimensional mass spectral proteomic profiles. As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis examines input proteomics data in a multi-resolution approach by seeking its derivatives to capture latent data characteristics and conduct de-noising. We further demonstrate DCA's advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input proteomics data as a profile biomarker via integrating it with support vector machines to tackle the reproducibility issue, besides comparing it with state-of-the-art peers. Results Our results show that high-dimensional proteomics data are actually linearly separable under proposed derivative component analysis (DCA). As a novel multi-resolution feature selection algorithm, DCA not only overcomes the weakness of the traditional methods in subtle data behavior discovery, but also suggests an effective resolution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem and provides new techniques and insights in translational bioinformatics and machine learning. The DCA-based profile biomarker diagnosis makes clinical level diagnostic performances reproducible across different proteomic data, which is more robust and systematic than the existing biomarker discovery based

  16. A Primer on Concepts and Applications of Proteomics in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Fabian; Mann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    The enormous complexity of the central nervous system has impeded its systemic exploration for decades but powerful "omic" technologies are now pushing forward the frontiers of neuroscience research at an increasing pace. This Primer reviews the most recent progress in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, focusing on the analysis of whole proteomes, protein-based interactions, and post-translational modifications. We also discuss how advanced workflows help to unravel spatial, regulatory, and temporal aspects of neuronal systems. These tools and approaches have already led to detailed and quantitative proteomic maps of the brain and its signaling architecture, generating new insights into health and disease. We predict that these new approaches will also accelerate biomarker discovery and contribute to novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative and other brain-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mass-spectrometric exploration of proteome structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Numerous biological processes are concurrently and coordinately active in every living cell. Each of them encompasses synthetic, catalytic and regulatory functions that are, almost always, carried out by proteins organized further into higher-order structures and networks. For decades......, the structures and functions of selected proteins have been studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. However, the properties and behaviour of the proteome as an integrated system have largely remained elusive. Powerful mass-spectrometry-based technologies now provide unprecedented insights...... into the composition, structure, function and control of the proteome, shedding light on complex biological processes and phenotypes....

  18. Revisiting biomarker discovery by plasma proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    slow rate. As described in this review, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology in biological research and it is now poised to allow the characterization of the plasma proteome in great depth. Previous "triangular strategies" aimed at discovering single biomarker......Clinical analysis of blood is the most widespread diagnostic procedure in medicine, and blood biomarkers are used to categorize patients and to support treatment decisions. However, existing biomarkers are far from comprehensive and often lack specificity and new ones are being developed at a very...

  19. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  20. Information and Communication Technology and School Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication technology and school based assessment (SBA) is practice that broadens the form mode, means and scope of assessment in the school using modern technologies in order to facilitate and enhance learning. This study sought to ascertain the efficacy of Information and Communication ...

  1. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haußmann Ute

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1 which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2 are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis 12 and Corynebacterium glutamicum 3. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE 4. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  2. Host Proteome Research in HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Qing; Zhou, Honghao

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has been widely used in the last few years to look for new biomarkers and decipher the mechanism of HIV?host interaction. Herein, we review the recent developments of HIV/AIDS proteomic research, including the samples used in HIV/AIDS related research, the technologies used for proteomic study, the diagnosis biomarkers of HIV-associated disease especially HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment, the mechanisms of HIV?host interaction, HIV-associated dementia, substance abuse, and ...

  3. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  4. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, Ksenia J.; Suter, Marc J.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  5. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Developing technologies for lunar-based astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stewart W.; Burns, Jack O.; Chua, Koon Meng; Wetzel, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Prospects for lunar-based astronomy and the development of the required technologies are briefly reviewed. A systematic approach to lunar-based astronomy includes a progression in capability from small automated telescopes to the 16-meter reflector on the moon. A next step beyond the 16-meter reflector will be a Lunar Optical/Ultraviolet/Infrared Synthesis Array. Intermediate steps are represented by the Lunar Transit Telescope and the Lunar Cluster Telescope Experiment. Priorities for the required technology development are identified.

  7. DNA based radiological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Quijada, Gerardo A.; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor; Dumoulin, Michel M.; Vachon, Caroline; Blagoeva, Rosita; Pierre, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this project is to develop a personal and wearable dosimeter using a highly-innovative approach based on the specific recognition of DNA damage with a polymer hybrid. Our biosensor will be sensitive to breaks in nucleic acid macromolecules and relevant to mixed-field radiation. The dosimeter proposed will be small, field deployable and will sense damages for all radiation types at the DNA level. The generalized concept for the novel-based radiological dosimeter: 1) Single or double stranded oligonucleotide is immobilized on surface; 2) Single stranded has higher cross-section for fragmentation; 3) Double stranded is more biological relevant; 4) Radiation induces fragmentation; 5) Ultra-sensitive detection of fragments provides radiation dose. Successful efforts have been made towards a proof-of-concept personal wearable DNA-based dosimeter that is appropriate for mixed-field radiation. The covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides on large areas of plastic surfaces has been demonstrated and corroborated spectroscopically. The surface concentration of DNA was determined to be 8 x 1010 molecules/cm 2 from a Ce(IV) catalyzed hydrolysis study of a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide. Current efforts are being directed at studying radiation induced fragmentation of DNA followed by its ultra-sensitive detection via a novel method. In addition, proof-of-concept wearable personal devices and a detection platform are presently being fabricated. (author)

  8. Proteomic analysis of mouse astrocytes and their secretome by a combination of FASP and StageTip-based, high pH, reversed-phase fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Jin, Jonghwa; Woo, Jongmin; Min, Hophil; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-07-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS, but their function remains largely unknown. Characterization of the whole-cell proteome and secretome in astrocytes would facilitate the study of their functions in various neurodegenerative diseases and astrocyte-neuron communication. To build a reference proteome, we established a C8-D1A astrocyte proteome to a depth of 7265 unique protein groups using a novel strategy that combined two-step digestion, filter-aided sample preparation, StageTip-based high pH fractionation, and high-resolution MS. Nearly, 6000 unique protein groups were identified from conditioned media of astrocyte cultures, constituting the largest astrocyte secretome that has been reported. High-confidence whole-cell proteomes and secretomes are valuable resources in studying astrocyte function by label-free quantitation and bioinformatics analysis. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000501 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000501). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  10. Identification of targets of miR-200b by a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arivusudar Marimuthu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to cognate mRNAs causing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis is being widely used to identify miRNA targets. The miR-200b miRNA cluster is often overexpressed in multiple cancer types, but the identity of the targets remains elusive. Using SILAC-based analysis, we examined the effects of overexpression of a miR-200b mimic or a control miRNA in fibrosarcoma cells. We identified around 300 potential targets of miR-200b based on a change in the expression of protein levels. We validated a subset of potential targets at the transcript level using quantitative PCR.

  11. Standard guidelines for the chromosome-centric human proteome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young-Ki; Omenn, Gilbert S; Uhlen, Mathias; Hanash, Samir; Marko-Varga, György; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bairoch, Amos; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Legrain, Pierre; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Na, Keun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; He, Fuchu; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Nishimura, Toshihide; Keown, Paul; Baker, Mark S; Yoo, Jong Shin; Garin, Jerome; Archakov, Alexander; Bergeron, John; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Hancock, William S

    2012-04-06

    The objective of the international Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is to map and annotate all proteins encoded by the genes on each human chromosome. The C-HPP consortium was established to organize a collaborative network among the research teams responsible for protein mapping of individual chromosomes and to identify compelling biological and genetic mechanisms influencing colocated genes and their protein products. The C-HPP aims to foster the development of proteome analysis and integration of the findings from related molecular -omics technology platforms through collaborations among universities, industries, and private research groups. The C-HPP consortium leadership has elicited broad input for standard guidelines to manage these international efforts more efficiently by mobilizing existing resources and collaborative networks. The C-HPP guidelines set out the collaborative consensus of the C-HPP teams, introduce topics associated with experimental approaches, data production, quality control, treatment, and transparency of data, governance of the consortium, and collaborative benefits. A companion approach for the Biology and Disease-Driven HPP (B/D-HPP) component of the Human Proteome Project is currently being organized, building upon the Human Proteome Organization's organ-based and biofluid-based initiatives (www.hupo.org/research). The common application of these guidelines in the participating laboratories is expected to facilitate the goal of a comprehensive analysis of the human proteome.

  12. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes during Spiroplasma eriocheiris infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Libo; Xiu, Yunji; Wang, Jian; Liu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Yuhan; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2016-03-16

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris, as a novel aquaculture pathogen, has led into catastrophic economic losses in aquaculture. The Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes were major target cells in S. eriocheiris infection. Our study was designed to examine the hemocytes' immune response at the protein levels. The differential proteomes of the prawn hemocytes were analyzed immediately prior to injection with the pathogen, and at 192h post-injection by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantization (iTRAQ) labeling, followed by liquid chromatogramphytandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 69 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Forty-nine proteins were up-regulated and 20 proteins were down-regulated resulting from a S. eriocheiris infection. Up-regulated proteins included vertebrate gliacolin-like protein, vitellogenin, Gram-negative binding protein 1, alpha2 macroglobulin isoform 2 (a2M), etc. Down-regulated proteins, involved with beta-1,3-glucan-binding protein (BGBP), immunoglobulin like, Rab7, lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan (LGBP), actin-related protein, etc. Selected bioactive factors (tachylectin, α2M and vitellogenin, BGBP, C-type lectin, LGBP and Rab7) were verified by their immune roles in the S. eriocheiris infection using real-time PCR. The present work could serve as a basis for future studies on the proteins implicated in the susceptibility/resistance of M. rosenbergii to S. eriocheiris, as well as contribute to our understanding of disease processes in prawns. This is the first time using an iTRAQ approach to analyze proteomes of M. rosenbergii mobilized against S. eriocheiris infection and substantiated the hemocytes' proteomic changes in M. rosenbergii using an infection model. The results reported here can provide a significant step forward toward a more complete elucidation of the immune relationship between M. rosenbergii and the pathogen S. eriocheiris. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications.

  14. Improvement of a sample preparation method assisted by sodium deoxycholate for mass-spectrometry-based shotgun membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Lin, Haiyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Kunbo; Yan, Yujun

    2014-11-01

    In current shotgun-proteomics-based biological discovery, the identification of membrane proteins is a challenge. This is especially true for integral membrane proteins due to their highly hydrophobic nature and low abundance. Thus, much effort has been directed at sample preparation strategies such as use of detergents, chaotropes, and organic solvents. We previously described a sample preparation method for shotgun membrane proteomics, the sodium deoxycholate assisted method, which cleverly circumvents many of the challenges associated with traditional sample preparation methods. However, the method is associated with significant sample loss due to the slightly weaker extraction/solubilization ability of sodium deoxycholate when it is used at relatively low concentrations such as 1%. Hence, we present an enhanced sodium deoxycholate sample preparation strategy that first uses a high concentration of sodium deoxycholate (5%) to lyse membranes and extract/solubilize hydrophobic membrane proteins, and then dilutes the detergent to 1% for a more efficient digestion. We then applied the improved method to shotgun analysis of proteins from rat liver membrane enriched fraction. Compared with other representative sample preparation strategies including our previous sodium deoxycholate assisted method, the enhanced sodium deoxycholate method exhibited superior sensitivity, coverage, and reliability for the identification of membrane proteins particularly those with high hydrophobicity and/or multiple transmembrane domains. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Methods for proteomics-based analysis of the human muscle secretome using an in vitro exercise model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Mika; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Weigert, Cora; Lehr, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the skeletal muscle as a secretory organ gained in importance. A growing number of peptides are described which are produced and released by the muscle fibers and work in an autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine fashion. The contraction-induced secretion of these myokines is considered to contribute to the health-promoting effects of exercise. To gain further insights into the molecular processes that occur during contraction an in vitro exercise model, electric pulse stimulation (EPS), was established. Recent publications show that this model is suitable to electro-stimulate human skeletal muscle cells and thus mimic muscle contraction in vitro. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the proteomics-based analysis of the human muscle secretome, starting with the cultivation of human myotubes and their electric pulse stimulation, ending with sample preparation for targeted and untargeted proteome analysis of the cell culture supernatant. This whole workflow should allow deeper insights into the complex nature of the muscle secretome and the identification of new myokines which might help to understand the crosstalk of the working muscle with different organs and the beneficial effects of exercise.

  16. Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Reveals Organ-Specific Expression Patterns To Be Used as Forensic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeier, Sascha; Nahnsen, Sven; Veit, Johannes; Wehner, Frank; Ueffing, Marius; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-01-04

    Standard forensic procedures to examine bullets after an exchange of fire include a mechanical or ballistic reconstruction of the event. While this is routine to identify which projectile hit a subject by DNA analysis of biological material on the surface of the projectile, it is rather difficult to determine which projectile caused the lethal injury--often the crucial point with regard to legal proceedings. With respect to fundamental law it is the duty of the public authority to make every endeavor to solve every homicide case. To improve forensic examinations, we present a forensic proteomic method to investigate biological material from a projectile's surface and determine the tissues traversed by it. To obtain a range of relevant samples, different major bovine organs were penetrated with projectiles experimentally. After tryptic "on-surface" digestion, mass-spectrometry-based proteome analysis, and statistical data analysis, we were able to achieve a cross-validated organ classification accuracy of >99%. Different types of anticipated external variables exhibited no prominent influence on the findings. In addition, shooting experiments were performed to validate the results. Finally, we show that these concepts could be applied to a real case of murder to substantially improve the forensic reconstruction.

  17. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40...... oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell......-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were...

  18. Identification of differentially expressed proteins in retinoblastoma tumors using mass spectrometry-based comparative proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naru, Jasmine; Aggarwal, Ritu; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Usha; Bansal, Deepak; Kakkar, Nandita; Agnihotri, Navneet

    2017-04-21

    In India, retinoblastoma is among the top five childhood cancers. Children mostly present with extraocular extension and high risk features that results in unsatisfactory treatment and low survival rate. In addition, lack of potential therapeutic and prognostic targets is another challenge in the management of retinoblastoma. We studied comparative proteome of retinoblastoma patients (HPV positive and negative (n=4 each) and controls (n=4), in order to identify potential retinoblastoma-specific protein targets. 2D-DIGE coupled MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identified 39 unique proteins. Highly deregulated proteins were GFAP,RBP3,APOA1,CRYAA,CRABP1,SAG and TF. Gene ontology (Panther 7.0) revealed majority of proteins to be associated with metabolic processes (26%) and catalytic activity (38%). 8 proteins were significantly upregulated in HPV positive vis-a-vis HPV negative cases. Patient group exhibited 12 upregulated and 18 downregulated proteins compared to controls. Pathway and network analysis (IPA software) revealed CTNNB1 as most significantly regulated signalling pathway in HPV positive than HPV negative retinoblastoma. The trends in transcriptional change of 9 genes were consistent with those at proteomic level. The Western blot analysis confirmed the expression pattern of RBP3,GFAP and CRABP1. We suggest GFAP,RBP3,CRABP1,CRYAAA,APOA1 and SAG as prospective targets that could further be explored as potential candidates in therapy and may further assist in studying the disease mechanism. In this study we evaluated tumor tissue specimens from retinoblastoma patients and identified 39 differentially regulated proteins compared to healthy retina. From these, we propose RBP3, CRABP1, GFAP, CRYAA, APOA1 and SAG as promising proteomic signatures that could further be explored as efficient prognostic and therapeutic targets in retinoblastoma. The present study is not only a contribution to the ongoing endeavour for the discovery of proteomic signatures in

  19. Changes to the Aqueous Humor Proteome during Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeslin, Martha Andrea; Killer, Hanspeter Ezriel; Fuhrer, Cyril Adrian; Zeleny, Nauke; Huber, Andreas Robert; Neutzner, Albert

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the aqueous humor proteome in patients with glaucoma and a control group. Aqueous humor was obtained from five human donors diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and five age- and sex-matched controls undergoing cataract surgery. Quantitative proteome analysis of the aqueous humor by hyper reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HRM-MS) based on SWATH technology was performed. Expression levels of 87 proteins were found to be different between glaucomatous and control aqueous humor. Of the 87 proteins, 34 were significantly upregulated, whereas 53 proteins were downregulated in the aqueous humor from glaucoma patients compared to controls. Differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in cholesterol-related, inflammatory, metabolic, antioxidant as well as proteolysis-related processes. Glaucoma leads to profound changes to the aqueous humor proteome consistent with an altered metabolic state, an inflammatory response and impaired antioxidant defense.

  20. Changes to the Aqueous Humor Proteome during Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Andrea Kaeslin

    Full Text Available To investigate the aqueous humor proteome in patients with glaucoma and a control group.Aqueous humor was obtained from five human donors diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and five age- and sex-matched controls undergoing cataract surgery. Quantitative proteome analysis of the aqueous humor by hyper reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (HRM-MS based on SWATH technology was performed.Expression levels of 87 proteins were found to be different between glaucomatous and control aqueous humor. Of the 87 proteins, 34 were significantly upregulated, whereas 53 proteins were downregulated in the aqueous humor from glaucoma patients compared to controls. Differentially expressed proteins were found to be involved in cholesterol-related, inflammatory, metabolic, antioxidant as well as proteolysis-related processes.Glaucoma leads to profound changes to the aqueous humor proteome consistent with an altered metabolic state, an inflammatory response and impaired antioxidant defense.

  1. Rapid Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles from Blood Plasma with Size-Exclusion Chromatography Followed by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Simion; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2017-01-01

    The presented procedure allows rapid isolation of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from plasma using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Additionally, an approach for reducing the lipid and salt content of the EV isolate in preparation for mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis is presented. An example setup for proteomic profiling of the processed samples by nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) is also presented. Approximately 1000 protein groups in blood plasma-derived EVs can be identified and quantitated following this procedure and using the described instrumentation.

  2. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  3. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based approaches for proteomics and biologics: Great contribution for developing therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Noriko; Shimada, Takashi

    2017-12-22

    Since the turn of the century, mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have continued to improve dramatically, and advanced strategies that were impossible a decade ago are increasingly becoming available. The basic characteristics behind these advancements are MS resolution, quantitative accuracy, and information science for appropriate data processing. The spectral data from MS contain various types of information. The benefits of improving the resolution of MS data include accurate molecular structural-derived information, and as a result, we can obtain a refined biomolecular structure determination in a sequential and large-scale manner. Moreover, in MS data, not only accurate structural information but also the generated ion amount plays an important rule. This progress has greatly contributed a research field that captures biological events as a system by comprehensively tracing the various changes in biomolecular dynamics. The sequential changes of proteome expression in biological pathways are very essential, and the amounts of the changes often directly become the targets of drug discovery or indicators of clinical efficacy. To take this proteomic approach, it is necessary to separate the individual MS spectra derived from each biomolecule in the complexed biological samples. MS itself is not so infinite to perform the all peak separation, and we should consider improving the methods for sample processing and purification to make them suitable for injection into MS. The above-described characteristics can only be achieved using MS with any analytical instrument. Moreover, MS is expected to be applied and expand into many fields, not only basic life sciences but also forensic medicine, plant sciences, materials, and natural products. In this review, we focus on the technical fundamentals and future aspects of the strategies for accurate structural identification, structure-indicated quantitation, and on the challenges for pharmacokinetics of high

  4. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilém Guryča

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by tissue leakage products, circulating in plasma at low levels. It is therefore necessary to find approaches with the prerequisite level of sensitivity in such a complex biological matrix. Strategies for fractionating the plasma proteome have been suggested, but improvements in sensitivity are often negated by the resultant process variability. Here we describe an approach using multidimensional chromatography and on-line protein derivatization, which allows for higher sensitivity, whilst minimizing the process variability. In order to evaluate this automated process fully, we demonstrate three levels of processing and compare sensitivity, throughput and reproducibility. We demonstrate that high sensitivity analysis of the human plasma proteome is possible down to the low ng/mL or even high pg/mL level with a high degree of technical reproducibility.

  5. Mass spectrometry based data of the blister fluid proteome of paediatric burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuo Zang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here are associated with the article “The blister fluid proteome of paediatric burns” (Zang et al., 2016 [1]. Burn injury is a highly traumatic event for children. The degree of burn severity (superficial-, deep-, or full-thickness injury often dictates the extent of later scar formation which may require long term surgical operation or skin grafting. The data were obtained by fractionating paediatric burn blister fluid samples, which were pooled according to burn depth and then analysed using data dependent acquisition LC–MS/MS. The data includes a table of all proteins identified, in which burn depth category they were found, the percentage sequence coverage for each protein and the number of high confidence peptide identifications for each protein. Further Gene Ontology enrichment analysis shows the significantly over-represented biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components of the burn blister fluid proteome. In addition, tables include the proteins associated with the biological processes of “wound healing” and “response to stress” as examples of highly relevant processes that occur in burn wounds.

  6. Making Sense of Blood-Based Proteomics and Metabolomics in Psychiatric Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Paul C; Guest, Francesca L; Martins-de Souza, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript describes the basics of proteomic and metabolic profiling of blood serum and plasma from patients with psychiatric disorders. It will also explain the rationale behind the use of these bodily fluids, due to the need for user-friendly and rapid tests in clinics with simple sampling procedures. It has become evident over the last 15 years or so that psychiatric disorders are whole-body diseases and the bloodstream is a means of molecular transport that therefore provides a conduit for two-way communication with the brain. Here we also describe some of the basic biomarker findings from studies of serum or plasma from patients with psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, major depression, and bipolar disorder. Finally, we will discuss potential future advancements in this area, which include the development of hand-held devices containing miniature proteomic and metabolic assays which can be used for facilitating diagnoses in a point-of-care setting and yield results in less than 15 minutes from a single drop of blood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  7. Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Glands of Urban Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland proteins of Anopheles mosquitoes offer attractive targets to understand interactions with sporozoites, blood feeding behavior, homeostasis, and immunological evaluation of malaria vectors and parasite interactions. To date limited studies have been carried out to elucidate salivary proteins of An. stephensi salivary glands. The aim of the present study was to provide detailed analytical attributives of functional salivary gland proteins of urban malaria vector An. stephensi. A proteomic approach combining one-dimensional electrophoresis (1DE, ion trap liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS, and computational bioinformatic analysis was adopted to provide the first direct insight into identification and functional characterization of known salivary proteins and novel salivary proteins of An. stephensi. Computational studies by online servers, namely, MASCOT and OMSSA algorithms, identified a total of 36 known salivary proteins and 123 novel proteins analysed by LC/MS/MS. This first report describes a baseline proteomic catalogue of 159 salivary proteins belonging to various categories of signal transduction, regulation of blood coagulation cascade, and various immune and energy pathways of An. stephensi sialotranscriptome by mass spectrometry. Our results may serve as basis to provide a putative functional role of proteins in concept of blood feeding, biting behavior, and other aspects of vector-parasite host interactions for parasite development in anopheline mosquitoes.

  8. Voice Based Elderly Assistance Using Wireless Technology

    OpenAIRE

    K.N.V.Kiran; P.Aswani Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The voice controlled wheel robot system needs to make use of the latest technological components available. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a voice based wheel chair system where communication technologies and Internet have been used. All these techniques are successfully merged in a voice controlled wheel chair system. With this, the fully designed voice controlled system can be designed where it can move from any part of the house or office. The main part of this ...

  9. An introduction into proteomics and its clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahram, Mamoun

    2007-04-01

    The completion of the human genome project has marked the official start of the post-genomic era. Due to limitations in DNA and RNA studies, the advent of proteomics, or large-scale analysis of proteins, is considered a crucial consequence and a chief player of post-genomic initiatives. An immediate goal of proteomic studies is the understanding of proteins including their expression, function, interaction, and structure with an endpoint of discovery of protein biomarkers. Such biomarkers can be used in detection, prognostication, and treatment of diseases. However, the challenge of studying complete sets of cellular proteins, or proteomes, is driving the development of newer technologies. In this review, a discussion of proteomic biotechnologies and their clinical applications is offered. The main techniques covered are the 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, and protein microarrays. These tools have been successfully utilized in analyzing human and other biological samples in discovery of biomarkers. Recent advancement in proteomics has added and will continue to add valuable information to our knowledge-base of the human biological system.

  10. MASPECTRAS: a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Robert

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advancements of proteomics technologies have led to a rapid increase in the number, size and rate at which datasets are generated. Managing and extracting valuable information from such datasets requires the use of data management platforms and computational approaches. Results We have developed the MAss SPECTRometry Analysis System (MASPECTRAS, a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data. MASPECTRAS is based on the Proteome Experimental Data Repository (PEDRo relational database schema and follows the guidelines of the Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI. Analysis modules include: 1 import and parsing of the results from the search engines SEQUEST, Mascot, Spectrum Mill, X! Tandem, and OMSSA; 2 peptide validation, 3 clustering of proteins based on Markov Clustering and multiple alignments; and 4 quantification using the Automated Statistical Analysis of Protein Abundance Ratios algorithm (ASAPRatio. The system provides customizable data retrieval and visualization tools, as well as export to PRoteomics IDEntifications public repository (PRIDE. MASPECTRAS is freely available at http://genome.tugraz.at/maspectras Conclusion Given the unique features and the flexibility due to the use of standard software technology, our platform represents significant advance and could be of great interest to the proteomics community.

  11. Identification of proteins associated with pyrethroid resistance by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis in Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijie; Lv, Yuan; Fang, Fujin; Hong, Shanchao; Guo, Qin; Hu, Shengli; Zou, Feifei; Shi, Linna; Lei, Zhentao; Ma, Kai; Zhou, Dan; Zhang, Donghui; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-02-10

    Mosquito control based on chemical insecticides is considered as an important element in the current global strategies for the control of mosquito-borne diseases. Unfortunately, the development of pyrethroid resistance in important vector mosquito species jeopardizes the effectiveness of insecticide-based mosquito control. To date, the mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance are still unclear. Recent advances in proteomic techniques can facilitate to identify pyrethroid resistance-associated proteins at a large-scale for improving our understanding of resistance mechanisms, and more importantly, for seeking some genetic markers used for monitoring and predicting the development of resistance. We performed a quantitative proteomic analysis between a deltamethrin-susceptible strain and a deltamethrin-resistant strain of laboratory population of Culex pipiens pallens using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was used to find the relative processes that these differentially expressed proteins were involved in. One differentially expressed protein was chosen to confirm by Western blot in the laboratory and field populations of Cx. pipiens pallens. We identified 30 differentially expressed proteins assigned into 10 different categories, including oxidoreductase activity, transporter activity, catalytic activity, structural constituent of cuticle and hypothetical proteins. GO analysis revealed that 25 proteins were sub-categorized into 35 hierarchically-structured GO classifications. Western blot results showed that CYP6AA9 as one of the up-regulated proteins was confirmed to be overexpressed in the deltamethrin-resistant strains compared with the deltamethrin-susceptible strains both in the laboratory and field populations. This is the first study to use modern proteomic tools for identifying pyrethroid resistance-related proteins in Cx. pipiens. The present study brought to light many proteins that were not

  12. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  13. The technology vicinity: a location based view on technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Kocaoglu, D.F.; Anderson, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    The issue of technology transfer has been viewed from many different perspectives. In this case the focus is on the process of (production) technology transfer. One of the difficulties in studying international technology transfer is the definition of technology. The many technology definitions that

  14. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  15. WDM PONs based on colorless technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliou, Fabienne; Simon, Gael; Chanclou, Philippe; Pizzinat, Anna; Lin, Huafeng; Zhou, Enyu; Xu, Zhiguang

    2015-12-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) Passive Optical Network (PON) is foreseen to be part of the Next Generation Passive Optical Networks. Business and mobile fronthaul networks already express the need to develop WDM PONs in the access segment. Fixed wavelength transceivers based on Coarse WDM are already available to respond to today's market needs but Dense WDM technologies will be needed and colorless technologies are essential to provide simple and cost-effective WDM PON systems. We propose in this paper to demonstrate the capabilities of a DWDM PON system prototype based on self-seeded RSOAs and designed to transmit CPRI over 60 km of fiber at 2.5 Gbit/s.

  16. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  17. Identification of Thioredoxin Disulfide Targets Using a Quantitative Proteomics Approach Based on Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Maeda, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous protein disulfide reductase involved in a wide range of cellular redox processes. A large number of putative target proteins have been identified using proteomics approaches, but insight into target specificity at the molecular level is lacking since the reactivity......, protein extract of embryos from germinated barley seeds was treated +/- Trx, and thiols released from target protein disulfides were irreversibly blocked with iodoacetamide. The remaining cysteine residues in the Trx-treated and the control (-Trx) samples were then chemically reduced and labeled...... with the "light" (C-12) and "heavy" (C-13) ICAT reagent, respectively. The extent of Trx-mediated reduction was thus quantified for individual cysteine residues based on ratios of tryptic peptides labeled with the two ICAT reagents as measured by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC...

  18. Comprehensive Phenotyping in Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Based Proteomics and the Current Understanding of Putative Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. O’Connor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis (MS. Diagnosis is confirmed through clinical evaluation, abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF chemistry. The early and accurate diagnosis of the disease, monitoring of progression, and gauging of therapeutic intervention are important but elusive elements of patient care. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the disease pathology is needed, including discovery of accurate biomarkers for MS. Herein we review putative biomarkers of MS relating to neurodegeneration and contributions to neuropathology, with particular focus on autoimmunity. In addition, novel assessments of biomarkers not driven by hypotheses are discussed, featuring our application of advanced proteomics and metabolomics for comprehensive phenotyping of CSF and blood. This strategy allows comparison of component expression levels in CSF and serum between MS and control groups. Examination of these preliminary data suggests that several CSF proteins in MS are differentially expressed, and thus, represent putative biomarkers deserving of further evaluation.

  19. Using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk: the role of mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sallie S; Aslebagh, Roshanak; Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Sturgeon, Susan R; Darie, Costel C; Arcaro, Kathleen F

    2014-01-01

    Although mammography and treatment advances have led to declines in breast cancer mortality in the United States, breast cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Breast cancer in young women is associated with increased mortality and current methods of detecting breast cancers in this group of women have known limitations. Tools for accurately assessing personal breast cancer risk in young women are needed to identify those women who would benefit the most from earlier intervention. Proteomic analysis of breast milk could identify biomarkers of breast cancer risk and provide a tool for identifying women at increased risk. A preliminary analysis of milk from four women provides a proof of concept for using breast milk to assess breast cancer risk.

  20. Multisegment injections improve peptide identification rates in capillary zone electrophoresis-based bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boley, Danielle A; Zhang, Zhenbin; Dovichi, Norman J

    2017-11-10

    While capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) provides dramatically improved numbers of peptide identifications compared with reversed-phase chromatography for bottom-up proteomics of mass limited samples, CZE inevitably produces lower numbers of peptide identifications than RPLC for larger samples. One reason for this poorer performance is the dead time between injection of samples and subsequent appearance of the fastest moving component. This dead time is typically 25% of the separation window in CZE, but is only 5% of the separation window in gradient elution RPLC. This dead time can be eliminated in CZE by use of a multisegment injection mode where a series of samples is analyzed by injecting each sample while the preceding sample is still being separated. In this paper, we demonstrate that capillary zone electrophoresis employing sequential injections can produce a doubling in peptide identification rate with no degradation in separation efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibitory mechanism of butylated hydroxyanisole against infection of Fusarium proliferatum based on comparative proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taotao; Jian, Qijie; Wang, Yong; Chen, Feng; Yang, Chengwei; Gong, Liang; Duan, Xuewu; Yang, Bao; Jiang, Yueming

    2016-10-04

    Fusarium proliferatum as a filamentous fungal pathogen can produce mycotoxins that can contaminate postharvest fruits and thus impact risks on human health. The extracellular proteomes of F. proliferatum grown in the absence and presence of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were analyzed comparatively. A total of 66 significantly different expressed secreted proteins were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. The BHA treatment suppressed the accumulation of some pathogenic factors such as aspartic protease, cell wall degradation enzymes, porin, superoxide dismutase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. On the contrary, the BHA treatment increased the abundances of some proteins, such as ATP binding cassette transporter substrate-binding protein and lipopolysaccharide-assembly lipoprotein, involved in the growth of F. proliferatum. These findings suggest that BHA treatment could influence the pathogenic ability of F. proliferatum via inhibiting the levels of virulence factors and cell wall degradation-associated enzymes. Moreover, the induction of the growth-related proteins after the BHA treatment suggests that the livelihood of F. proliferatum might depend on the cost of reduced pathogenic ability. This study has provided some evidence for understanding the complicated mechanisms of F. proliferatum infection in an effort to develop new targets for the control of this fungal pathogen. To better understand the inhibitory mechanism of F. proliferatum by butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) treatment, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the secreted proteins of F. proliferatum was firstly conducted. Among the 66 identified spots, 34 and 32 proteins were down- and up-accumulated significantly by BHA treatment, respectively. Many of the identified key protein species were involved in the pathogenic ability and the growth of F. proliferatum. This study is helpful for broadening our knowledge of the pathogenic mechanism of F. proliferatum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  2. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali K Nath

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs. However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies.Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs.The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  3. Proteomic-based detection of a protein cluster dysregulated during cardiovascular development identifies biomarkers of congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K; Krauthammer, Michael; Li, Puyao; Davidov, Eugene; Butler, Lucas C; Copel, Joshua; Katajamaa, Mikko; Oresic, Matej; Buhimschi, Irina; Buhimschi, Catalin; Snyder, Michael; Madri, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies. Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others) were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B) was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1) as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF) samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs. The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs.

  4. The technology vicinity: a location based view on technology

    OpenAIRE

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Kocaoglu, D.F.; Anderson, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    The issue of technology transfer has been viewed from many different perspectives. In this case the focus is on the process of (production) technology transfer. One of the difficulties in studying international technology transfer is the definition of technology. The many technology definitions that exist are either too ‘loosely’ formulated or they require thorough expert knowledge. This results in difficulties with measuring technology and comparing different studies meaningfully. This study...

  5. The proteome of human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  6. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Screen identifies LIPOCALIN-2 (LCN-2) as a potential biomarker for colonic lateral-spreading tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfei; Li, Aimin; Guo, Yubin; Wang, Yadong; Zhao, Xinhua; Xiang, Li; Han, Zelong; Li, Yue; Xu, Wen; Zhuang, Kangmin; Yan, Qun; Zhong, Jietao; Xiong, Jing; Liu, Side

    2016-06-24

    The improvement and implementation of a colonoscopy technique has led to increased detection of laterally spreading tumors (LSTs), which are presumed to constitute an aggressive type of colonic neoplasm. Early diagnosis and treatment of LSTs is clinically challenging. To overcome this problem, we employed iTRAQ to identify LST-specific protein biomarkers potentially involved in LST progression. In this study, we identified 2,001 differentially expressed proteins in LSTs using iTRAQ-based proteomics technology. Lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) was the most up-regulated protein. LSTs expression levels of LCN-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) showed positive correlation with worse pathological grading, and up-regulation of these proteins in LSTs was also reflected in serum. Furthermore, LCN-2 protein overexpression was positively correlated with MMP-9 protein up-regulation in the tumor tissue and serum of LST patients (former rs = 0.631, P = 0.000; latter rs = 0.815, P = 0.000). Our results suggest that LCN-2 constitutes a potential biomarker for LST disease progression and might be a novel therapeutic target in LSTs.

  7. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields...

  8. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul S. Deshmukh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC, MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  9. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  10. Proteome-Wide Quantitation by SILAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing improvements in instrumentation, fractionation techniques, and enrichment procedures have dramatically increased the coverage of the proteome achievable via LC-MS/MS-based methodologies, opening the call for approaches to quantitatively assess differences at a proteome-wide scale. Stable...... isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a powerful and versatile approach for proteome-wide quantitation by mass spectrometry. SILAC utilizes the cells' own metabolism to incorporate isotopically labeled amino acids into its proteome which can be mixed with the proteome...... detailed procedure for performing SILAC-based experiment for proteome-wide quantitation, including a protocol for optimizing SILAC labeling. We also provide an update on the most recent developments of this technique....

  11. Combined use of peptide ion and normalized delta scores to evaluate milk authenticity by ion-trap based proteomics coupled with error tolerant searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardiello, Donatella; Natale, Anna; Palermo, Carmen; Quinto, Maurizio; Centonze, Diego

    2017-03-01

    A fundamental issue in proteomics is the peptide identification by database searching and the assessment of the goodness of fit between experimental and theoretical data. Despite the different number of ways to measure the quality of search results, the definition of a scoring criterion is still highly desirable in ion-trap based proteomics. Indeed, in order to fully take advantage of a low resolution MS/MS dataset, it is essential to strike a balance between greater information capture and reduced number of incorrect peptide assignments. In addition, the development of user-specified rules is a crucial aspect when very similar proteins of the same family are analyzed in order to infer the origin species. In this study, a post-processing validation scheme is provided for the evaluation of proteomic data in shot-gun ion-trap proteomics, when a flexible database searching based on the error tolerant mode is adopted in combination with a low-specificity enzyme to maximize sequence coverage. To validate peptide assignments, we used standard β-casein digested with trypsin/chymotrypsin or trypsin alone and the popular search engine MASCOT to identify the relevant (known) peptide sequences. A linear combination between peptide ion score and normalized delta score (i.e. the difference between the best and the second best ion score, divided by the best score) is proposed to increase the accuracy in sequence assignments from low-resolution tandem mass spectra. Finally, the optimized post-processing database validation was successfully applied to the direct analysis of milk tryptic/chymotryptic digests of different origin, without resorting to two-dimensional electrophoresis that is usually performed for protein separation in ion-trap proteomics. The identification of species-specific amino acidic sequences among the validated peptide spectrum matches has allowed to fully discriminate between the animal species, so evaluating accurately the milk authenticity. Copyright

  12. Extending mass spectrometry's reach in proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downard, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Mass spectrometry is an essential component of proteome analysis. The accuracy, speed and sensitivity of mass spectrometric analysis is further aided by an ability to analyse proteins and peptides directly from two-dimensional sample arrays. This is accomplished either by gel excision and recovery of proteins or their proteolysis products, or after blotting of gel-separated proteins onto membranes. The protein components are most often analysed in each case by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Beyond automated protein identification, proteomics ultimately demands that protein function and activity be characterised. We have developed new mass spectrometry methodologies that enable protein-protein associations to be analysed by MALDI mass spectrometry. Methods to preserve protein-protein associations on 2D sample surfaces and to affect their ionisation and detection have been developed. This presentation will describe the features of protocol that are required for the successful analysis of protein-protein complexes. Data will be shown to illustrate the application of the technology to the study of important biological and immunological processes. The methods form the basis of powerful new mass spectrometric based assays for screening and affinity studies. Details of our investigations and their implications for high-throughput proteomics applications will be discussed in conjunction with directions of our future research

  13. Contribution of MS-based proteomics to the understanding of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eSantamaría

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other DNA viruses, Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 replicates and proliferates in host cells continuously modulating the host molecular environment. Following a sophisticated temporal expression pattern, HSV-1 encodes at least 89 multifunctional proteins that interplay with and modify the host cell proteome. During the last decade, advances in mass spectrometry applications coupled to the development of proteomic separation methods have allowed to partially monitor the impact of HSV-1 infection in human cells. In this review, we discuss the current use of different proteome fractionation strategies to define HSV-1 targets on two major application areas: i viral protein interactomics to decipher viral protein interactions in host cells and ii differential quantitative proteomics to analyse the virally induced changes in the cellular proteome. Moreover, we will also discuss the potential application of high throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and also post-translational modifications in HSV-1-infected cells, what will greatly improved our molecular knowledge of HSV-1 infection.

  14. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Masaru [Shibaura Institute of Technology of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  15. Proteomics reveals the effects of sustained weight loss on the human plasma proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Tyanova, Stefka

    2016-01-01

    Sustained weight loss is a preferred intervention in a wide range of metabolic conditions, but the effects on an individual's health state remain ill-defined. Here, we investigate the plasma proteomes of a cohort of 43 obese individuals that had undergone 8 weeks of 12% body weight loss followed...... in the plasma proteome, and eight plasma proteins correlated better with insulin resistance than the known marker adiponectin. Nearly all study participants benefited from weight loss regarding a ten-protein inflammation panel defined from the proteomics data. We conclude that plasma proteome profiling broadly...... by a year of weight maintenance. Using mass spectrometry-based plasma proteome profiling, we measured 1,294 plasma proteomes. Longitudinal monitoring of the cohort revealed individual-specific protein levels with wide-ranging effects of losing weight on the plasma proteome reflected in 93 significantly...

  16. iTRAQ-based proteomics of sunflower cultivars differing in resistance to parasitic weed Orobanche cumana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chong; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Na; Islam, Faisal; Song, Wenjian; Hu, Luyang; Liu, Dan; Xie, Xiaonan; Zhou, Weijun

    2017-07-01

    Orobanche cumana is an obligate root parasite causing severe damage to many economically important crops, including sunflowers worldwide. For efficient control measures, it is necessary to understand the resistant mechanism during interaction at molecular level. The present study emphasizes on comparative proteomics to investigate the mechanistic basis of compatible and incompatible interaction of O. cumana with resistant (JY207) and susceptible (TK0409) sunflowers. More than 3500 proteins were identified from two cultivars by iTRAQ analysis. Identified proteins associated with general functions, posttranslational modification, energy production and conversion, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and signal transduction mechanisms were the most represented category of induced proteins in both cultivars. The resistant interaction was characterized by alteration of defense-related proteins involved in recognition of parasites, accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins, biosynthesis of lignin, and detoxification of toxic metabolites in JY207 after inoculation. The susceptible interaction was characterized by decreased abundance of proteins involved in biosynthesis and signaling of plant growth regulators including auxin, gibberellin, brassinosteroid, and ethylene in TK0409 after inoculation. The present study provides comprehensive details of proteins and differential modulation of pathways regulated under compatible and incompatible interaction, allowing the identification of important molecular components for development of sustainable resistance against this parasite. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Prediction of Toxin Genes from Chinese Yellow Catfish Based on Transcriptomic and Proteomic Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish venom remains a virtually untapped resource. There are so few fish toxin sequences for reference, which increases the difficulty to study toxins from venomous fish and to develop efficient and fast methods to dig out toxin genes or proteins. Here, we utilized Chinese yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco as our research object, since it is a representative species in Siluriformes with its venom glands embedded in the pectoral and dorsal fins. In this study, we set up an in-house toxin database and a novel toxin-discovering protocol to dig out precise toxin genes by combination of transcriptomic and proteomic sequencing. Finally, we obtained 15 putative toxin proteins distributed in five groups, namely Veficolin, Ink toxin, Adamalysin, Za2G and CRISP toxin. It seems that we have developed a novel bioinformatics method, through which we could identify toxin proteins with high confidence. Meanwhile, these toxins can also be useful for comparative studies in other fish and development of potential drugs.

  18. Gel-based proteomics approach for detecting low nitrogen-responsive proteins in cultivated rice species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Hyun; Shibato, Junko; Kim, Dea-Wook; Oh, Myung Kyu; Kim, Myung Ki; Shim, Ie Sung; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Masuo, Yoshinori; Rakwal, Randeep

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilization is essential for increasing rice production to meet the food demands of increasing world's population. We established an in vivo hydroponic rice seedling culture system to investigate physio-biochemical/molecular responses of various rice japonica and indica cultivars to low nitrogen (N). Three-week-old seedlings grown in Yoshida's nutrient solution manifested stable and reproducible symptoms, such as reduced shoot growth and length under low N. Out of 12 genetically selected cultivars, 11 cultivars showed varied degrees of growth reduction response to applied N (4 and 40 ppm N for treatment and control, respectively), whereas one cultivar (no. 12) showed similar growth as the control though its leaf width was smaller than control. Leaves of a representative low N-responsive cultivar (BG90-2) were sampled for revealing protein profiles between low and normal (control) N application by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE). Forty-one proteins were identified with MALDI-TOF-MS and nESI-LC-MS/MS. Assignment of proteins into major (energy metabolism, photosynthesis and oxidative stress) and minor functional categories, revealed many novel low N-responsive proteins, including those having energy/photosynthesis- and defense/stress- and iron homeostasis-related functions. Results suggest the usefulness of proteomics in identifying novel N-responsive proteins and may provide potential markers for rice response to low N.

  19. Prediction of Toxin Genes from Chinese Yellow Catfish Based on Transcriptomic and Proteomic Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bing; Li, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhilong; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Min; Liu, Jie; Tong, Ting; Li, Jia; Huang, Yu; Wen, Bo; Sun, Ying; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Fish venom remains a virtually untapped resource. There are so few fish toxin sequences for reference, which increases the difficulty to study toxins from venomous fish and to develop efficient and fast methods to dig out toxin genes or proteins. Here, we utilized Chinese yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) as our research object, since it is a representative species in Siluriformes with its venom glands embedded in the pectoral and dorsal fins. In this study, we set up an in-house toxin database and a novel toxin-discovering protocol to dig out precise toxin genes by combination of transcriptomic and proteomic sequencing. Finally, we obtained 15 putative toxin proteins distributed in five groups, namely Veficolin, Ink toxin, Adamalysin, Za2G and CRISP toxin. It seems that we have developed a novel bioinformatics method, through which we could identify toxin proteins with high confidence. Meanwhile, these toxins can also be useful for comparative studies in other fish and development of potential drugs. PMID:27089325

  20. Embryology in the era of proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Jaffe, Mandy G; McReynolds, Susanna

    2013-03-15

    Proteomic technologies have begun providing evidence that viable embryos possess unique protein profiles. Some of these potential protein biomarkers have been identified as extracellular and could be used in the development of a noninvasive quantitative method for embryo assessment. The field of assisted reproductive technologies would benefit from defining the human embryonic proteome and secretome, thereby expanding our current knowledge of embryonic cellular processes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap...

  2. Proteome reference map of Drosophila melanogaster head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tian-Ren; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lee, Hsiao-Yun; Chan, Hsin-Tzu; Lin, Kuo-Sen; Chan, Hong-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2012-06-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a genetic model organism to understand the fundamental molecular mechanisms in human biology including memory formation that has been reported involving protein synthesis and/or post-translational modification. In this study, we employed a proteomic platform based on fluorescent 2DE and MALDI-TOF MS to build a standard D. melanogaster head proteome map for proteome-proteome comparison. In order to facilitate the comparison, an interactive database has been constructed for systematically integrating and analyzing the proteomes from different conditions and further implicated to study human diseases related to D. melanogaster model. In summary, the fundamental head proteomic database and bioinformatic analysis will be useful for further elucidating the biological mechanisms such as memory formation and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Microbial proteomics: a mass spectrometry primer for biologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ciaren

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is now more than 10 years since the publication of the first microbial genome sequence and science is now moving towards a post genomic era with transcriptomics and proteomics offering insights into cellular processes and function. The ability to assess the entire protein network of a cell at a given spatial or temporal point will have a profound effect upon microbial science as the function of proteins is inextricably linked to phenotype. Whilst such a situation is still beyond current technologies rapid advances in mass spectrometry, bioinformatics and protein separation technologies have produced a step change in our current proteomic capabilities. Subsequently a small, but steadily growing, number of groups are taking advantage of this cutting edge technology to discover more about the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms. From this research it will be possible to move towards a systems biology understanding of a microorganism. Where upon researchers can build a comprehensive cellular map for each microorganism that links an accurately annotated genome sequence to gene expression data, at a transcriptomic and proteomic level. In order for microbiologists to embrace the potential that proteomics offers, an understanding of a variety of analytical tools is required. The aim of this review is to provide a basic overview of mass spectrometry (MS and its application to protein identification. In addition we will describe how the protein complexity of microbial samples can be reduced by gel-based and gel-free methodologies prior to analysis by MS. Finally in order to illustrate the power of microbial proteomics a case study of its current application within the Bacilliaceae is given together with a description of the emerging discipline of metaproteomics.

  4. Proteome profile of a pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus SC192 strain in the planktonic and biofilm condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmaprakash, Akhilandeswarre; Mutt, Eshita; Jaleel, Abdul; Ramanathan, Sowdhamini; Thomas, Sabu

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is one of the leading causative agents of foodborne diseases in humans. In this study, the proteome profiles of the pandemic strain V. parahaemolyticus SC192 belonging to the O3:K6 serovar during the planktonic and biofilm stages were analyzed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This non-gel-based multidimensional protein identification technology approach identified 45.5% of the proteome in the reference genome V. parahaemolyticus RIMD 2210633. This is the largest proteome coverage obtained so far in V. parahaemolyticus and provides evidence for expression of 27% of the hypothetical proteins. Comparison of the planktonic and biofilm proteomes based on their cluster of orthologous groups, gene ontologies and KEGG pathways provides basic information on biofilm specific functions and pathways. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to generate a global proteome profile of the pandemic strain of V. parahaemolyticus and the method reported here could be used to rapidly obtain a snapshot of the proteome of any microorganism at a given condition.

  5. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana

    2008-01-01

    and analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. Combinations of affinity-enrichment techniques, chemical and biochemical protocols, and advanced mass spectrometry facilitate detailed glycoprotein analysis in proteomics, from fundamental biological studies to biomarker discovery in biomedicine....... is a complex task and is currently achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that enable identification of glycoproteins and localization, classification, and analysis of individual glycan structures on proteins. In this chapter we briefly introduce a range of analytical technologies for recovery...

  6. Analysis of initial changes in the proteins of soybean root tip under flooding stress using gel-free and gel-based proteomic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaojian; Sakata, Katsumi; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-06-25

    Flooding has a severe negative effect on soybean cultivation in the early stages of growth. To obtain a better understanding of the response mechanisms of soybean to flooding stress, initial changes in root tip proteins under flooding were analyzed using two proteomic techniques. Two-day-old soybeans were treated with flooding for 3, 6, 12, and 24h. The weight of soybeans increased during the first 3h of flooding, but root elongation was not observed. Using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques, 115 proteins were identified in root tips, of which 9 proteins were commonly detected by both methods. The 71 proteins identified by the gel-free proteomics were analyzed by a hierarchical clustering method based on induction levels during the flooding, and the proteins were divided into 5 clusters. Additional interaction analysis of the proteins revealed that ten proteins belonging to cluster I formed the center of a protein interaction network. mRNA expression analysis of these ten proteins showed that citrate lyase and heat shock protein 70 were down-regulated, whereas calreticulin was up-regulated in initial phase of flooding. These results suggest that flooding stress to soybean induces calcium-related signal transduction, which might play important roles in the early responses to flooding. Flooding has a severe negative effect on soybean cultivation, particularly in the early stages of growth. To better understand the response mechanisms of soybean to the early stages of flooding stress, two proteomic techniques were used. Two-day-old soybeans were treated without or with flooding for 3, 6, 12, and 24h. The fresh weight of soybeans increased during the first 3h of flooding stress, but the growth then slowed and no root elongation was observed. Using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques, 115 proteins were identified in root tips, of which 9 proteins were commonly detected by both methods. The 71 proteins identified by the gel-free proteomics were analyzed

  7. Transcriptome and proteomic analysis of mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-xia; Jia, Hui-min; Ma, Xiao-wei; Wang, Song-biao; Yao, Quan-sheng; Xu, Wen-tian; Zhou, Yi-gang; Gao, Zhong-shan; Zhan, Ru-lin

    2014-06-13

    Here we used Illumina RNA-seq technology for transcriptome sequencing of a mixed fruit sample from 'Zill' mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruit pericarp and pulp during the development and ripening stages. RNA-seq generated 68,419,722 sequence reads that were assembled into 54,207 transcripts with a mean length of 858bp, including 26,413 clusters and 27,794 singletons. A total of 42,515(78.43%) transcripts were annotated using public protein databases, with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5), of which 35,198 and 14,619 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous groups respectively. Functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database identified 23,741(43.79%) transcripts which were mapped to 128 pathways. These pathways revealed many previously unknown transcripts. We also applied mass spectrometry-based transcriptome data to characterize the proteome of ripe fruit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the mango fruit proteome was using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in an LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Thermo) coupled online to the HPLC. This approach enabled the identification of 7536 peptides that matched 2754 proteins. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of transcriptome during mango fruit development and the most comprehensive fruit proteome to date, which are useful for further genomics research and proteomic studies. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of both the transcriptome and proteome of mango fruit, and a valuable reference for further research on gene expression and protein identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding the regulation of estivation in a freshwater snail through iTRAQ-based comparative proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jin

    2013-11-01

    The apple snail Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater gastropod with a remarkable ability to withstand seasonal or unpredictable dry conditions by entering estivation. Studies of P. canaliculata using conventional biochemical and the individual gene approaches have revealed the expressional changes of several enzymes and antioxidative genes in response to estivation and arousal. In this study, we applied iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to identify and quantify the global protein expression during the estivation and arousal of P. canaliculata. A total of 1040 proteins were identified, among which 701 proteins were quantified and compared across four treatments (i.e., control, active snails; short-term estivation, 3 days of exposure to air; prolonged estivation, 30 days of exposure to air; and arousal, 6 h after resubmergence in water) revealing 53 differentially expressed proteins. A comparison of protein expression profiles across treatments indicated that the proteome of this species was very insensitive to initial estivation, with only 9 proteins differentially expressed as compared with the control. Among the 9 proteins, the up-regulations of two immune related proteins indicated the initial immune response to the detection of stress cues. Prolonged estivation resulted in many more differentially expressed proteins (47 compared with short-term estivation treatment), among which 16 were down-regulated and 31 were up-regulated. These differentially expressed proteins have provided the first global picture of a shift in energy usage from glucose to lipid, prevention of protein degradation and elevation of oxidative defense, and production of purine for uric acid production to remove toxic ammonia during prolonged estivation in a freshwater snail. From prolonged estivation to arousal, only 6 proteins changed their expression level, indicating that access to water and food alone is not a necessary condition to reactivate whole-sale protein expression. A

  9. Quantification of mutant SPOP proteins in prostate cancer using mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Barbieri, Christopher E.; He, Jintang; Gao, Yuqian; Shi, Tujin; Wu, Chaochao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chae, Sung-Suk; Huang, Dennis; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Kagan, Jacob; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Rubin, Mark A.; Liu, Tao

    2017-08-15

    Speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein that functions as a potential tumor suppressor, and SPOP mutations have been identified in ~10% of human prostate cancers. However, it remains unclear if mutant SPOP proteins can be utilized as biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis or targeted therapy of prostate cancer. Moreover, the SPOP mutation sites are distributed in a relatively short region where multiple lysine residues, posing significant challenges for bottom-up proteomics analysis of the SPOP mutations. To address this issue, PRISM (high-pressure, high-resolution separations coupled with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) mass spectrometry assays have been developed for quantifying wild-type SPOP protein and 11 prostate cancer-derived SPOP mutations. Despite inherent limitations due to amino acid sequence constraints, all the PRISM-SRM assays developed using Arg-C digestion showed a linear dynamic range of at least two orders of magnitude, with limits of quantification range from 0.1 to 1 fmol/μg of total protein in the cell lysate. Applying these SRM assays to analyze HEK293T cells with and without expression of the three most frequent SPOP mutations in prostate cancer (Y87N, F102C or F133V) led to confident detection of all three SPOP mutations in corresponding positive cell lines but not in the negative cell lines. Expression of the F133V mutation and wild-type SPOP was at much lower levels compared to that of F102C and Y87N mutations; however, at present it is unknown if this also affects the activity of the SPOP protein. In summary, PRISM-SRM enables multiplexed, isoform-specific detection of mutant SPOP proteins in cell lysates, which holds great potential in biomarker development for prostate cancer.

  10. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification- based comparative proteomics reveals the features of plasma membrane-associated proteomes of pollen grains and pollen tubes from Lilium davidii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun; Yang, Ning; Wang, Tai

    2010-12-01

    Mature pollen grains (PGs) from most plant species are metabolically quiescent. However, once pollinated onto stigma, they quickly hydrate and germinate. A PG can give rise to a vegetative cell-derived polarized pollen tube (PT), which represents a specialized polar cell. The polarized PT grows by the tip and requires interaction of different signaling molecules localized in the apical plasma membrane and active membrane trafficking. The mechanisms underlying the interaction and membrane trafficking are not well understood. In this work, we purified PG and PT plasma-membrane vesicles from Lilium davidii Duch. using the aqueous two-phase partition technique, then enriched plasma membrane proteins by using Brij58 and KCl to remove loosely bound contaminants. We identified 223 integral and membrane-associated proteins in the plasma membrane of PGs and PTs by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and 2-D high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. More than 68% of the proteins have putative transmembrane domains and/or lipid-modified motifs. Proteins involved in signal transduction, membrane trafficking and transport are predominant in the plasma-membrane proteome. We revealed most components of the clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway. Statistical analysis revealed 14 proteins differentially expressed in the two development stages: in PTs, six upregulated and eight downregulated are mainly involved in signaling, transport and membrane trafficking. These results provide novel insights into polarized PT growth. © 2010 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. TMT-based quantitative proteomics analyses reveal novel defense mechanisms of Brassica napus against the devastating necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia-Yi; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-06-30

    The white mould disease, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases in the vital oil crop Brassica napus. Nevertheless, the defense mechanisms of B. napus against S. sclerotiorum are poorly understood. In this study, we performed comparative quantitative proteomics analyses to reveal B. napus defense mechanisms against S. sclerotiorum. The proteomes of B. napus leaves inoculated with S. sclerotiorum wild-type strain 1980 and nonpathogenic mutant strain Ep-1PB as well as empty agar plug as the control were analyzed using TMT label-based quantitative analysis technique. A total of 79, 299 and 173 proteins consistently differentially expressed between Ep-1PB- and mock-inoculated leaves, 1980- and mock-inoculated leaves, as well as 1980- and Ep-1PB-inoculated leaves, respectively, were identified. The differential expression of 12 selected proteins was confirmed by qRT-PCR analyses. The Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and protein-protein interaction prediction analyses revealed that redox homeostasis, lipid signaling, calcium signaling, histone and DNA methylation-mediated transcription regulation and defense-related proteins such as defensin and defensin-like proteins and cyanate lyase, contribute to defense against S. sclerotiorum. Our results provide new insights into molecular mechanisms that may be involved in defense responses of B. napus to S. sclerotiorum. The Sclerotinia white mould disease is one of the most important diseases in the significant oil crop Brassica napus. Nevertheless, the defense mechanisms of B. napus against S. sclerotiorum are still largely unknown to date. In this study, we addressed this issue by performing TMT label-based comparative quantitative analyses of the proteomes of B. napus leaves inoculated with S. sclerotiorum wild-type strain 1980 and nonpathogenic mutant strain Ep-1PB as well as empty agar plug as the control. Through comparative analyses on 79, 299, and 173

  12. Evaluation of Hepcidin Isoforms in Hemodialysis Patients by a Proteomic Approach Based on SELDI-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Campostrini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic iron regulator hormone hepcidin consists, in its mature form, of 25 amino acids, but two other isoforms, hepcidin-20 and hepcidin-22, have been reported, whose biological meaning remains poorly understood. We evaluated hepcidin isoforms in sera from 57 control and 54 chronic haemodialysis patients using a quantitative proteomic approach based on SELDI-TOF-MS. Patients had elevated serum levels of both hepcidin-25 and hepcidin-20 as compared to controls (geometric means: 7.52 versus 4.69 nM, and 4.06 versus 1.76 nM, resp., P<.05 for both. The clearance effects of a single dialysis session by different dialysis techniques and membranes were also investigated, showing an average reduction by 51.3% ± 29.2% for hepcidin-25 and 34.2% ± 28.4% for hepcidin-20 but only minor differences among the different dialysis modalities. Measurement of hepcidin isoforms through MS-based techniques can be a useful tool for better understanding of their biological role in hemodialysis patients and other clinical conditions.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  14. Vehicle positioning based on UWB technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Siquan; Kang, Min; She, Chundong

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, with the rapid increase of the number of urban cars, the vehicle internet is becoming a trend of smart transportion. In such vehicle network, accurate location is very crucial in many new applications such as autopilot, semi-autopilot and Car-to-x communications. UWB technology has been used for indoor closed range positioning and ranging widely, while UWB outdoor positioning and ranging research is relatively less. This paper proposed UWB as the vehicle positioning technology and developed a method based on two-way-ranging (TWR) to solve the ranging problem between vehicles. At the same time, the improved TOA method was used to locate vehicles, which has higher precision compared with traditional GPS or LBS. A hardware module is introduced and the simulation results show that the modules are capable of precise positioning for vehicles in vehicle network.

  15. Integrated transcriptome and proteome data: the challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Catherine Jane

    2004-11-01

    The recent availability of platform technologies for high throughput proteome analysis has led to the emergence of integrated messenger RNA and protein expression data. The Pearson correlation coefficients for these data range from 0.46 to 0.76. In these integrated studies, serial analyses of gene expression and DNA microarrays have been used to quantify the transcriptome, while proteome analysis has been based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, isotope coded affinity tags and multidimensional protein identification technology. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the analytical techniques used in these studies and explores the extent to which the choice of experimental methodology can bias the correlation or the ability to detect proteins.

  16. Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ)-Based Untargeted Quantitative Proteomic Approach To Identify Change of the Plasma Proteins by Salbutamol Abuse in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Tang, Chaohua; Liang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Qingyu; Zhang, Junmin

    2018-01-10

    Salbutamol, a selective β 2 -agonist, endangers the safety of animal products as a result of illegal use in food animals. In this study, an iTRAQ-based untargeted quantitative proteomic approach was applied to screen potential protein biomarkers in plasma of cattle before and after treatment with salbutamol for 21 days. A total of 62 plasma proteins were significantly affected by salbutamol treatment, which can be used as potential biomarkers to screen for the illegal use of salbutamol in beef cattle. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements of five selected proteins demonstrated the reliability of iTRAQ-based proteomics in screening of candidate biomarkers among the plasma proteins. The plasma samples collected before and after salbutamol treatment were well-separated by principal component analysis (PCA) using the differentially expressed proteins. These results suggested that an iTRAQ-based untargeted quantitative proteomic strategy combined with PCA pattern recognition methods can discriminate differences in plasma protein profiles collected before and after salbutamol treatment.

  17. Parasites, proteomes and systems: has Descartes' clock run out of time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastling, J M; Armstrong, S D; Krishna, R; Xia, D

    2012-08-01

    Systems biology aims to integrate multiple biological data types such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics across different levels of structure and scale; it represents an emerging paradigm in the scientific process which challenges the reductionism that has dominated biomedical research for hundreds of years. Systems biology will nevertheless only be successful if the technologies on which it is based are able to deliver the required type and quality of data. In this review we discuss how well positioned is proteomics to deliver the data necessary to support meaningful systems modelling in parasite biology. We summarise the current state of identification proteomics in parasites, but argue that a new generation of quantitative proteomics data is now needed to underpin effective systems modelling. We discuss the challenges faced to acquire more complete knowledge of protein post-translational modifications, protein turnover and protein-protein interactions in parasites. Finally we highlight the central role of proteome-informatics in ensuring that proteomics data is readily accessible to the user-community and can be translated and integrated with other relevant data types.

  18. Immature Seed Endosperm and Embryo Proteomics of the Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn.) by One-Dimensional Gel-Based Tandem Mass Spectrometry and a Comparison with the Mature Endosperm Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Carlo; Fukao, Yoichiro; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh; Shioda, Seiji; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Yonekura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seed proteome has been the focus of our studies, and we have recently established the first proteome dataset for its mature seed endosperm. The current study unravels the immature endosperm, as well as the embryo proteome, to provide a comprehensive dataset of the lotus seed proteins and a comparison between the mature and immature endosperm tissues across the seed’s development. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) linked with tandem mass spectrome...

  19. [Hospital-based Health Technology Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadil, Martin; Rogalewicz, Vladimír; Kubátová, Ivana; Matloňová, Veronika; Salačová, Kristýna

    Hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) consists in implementation of assessment activities "in" or "for" hospitals; hence, it covers processes and methods supporting organization and execution of health technology assessment (HTA) at the level of individual hospitals. This process is multidisciplinary, systematic and evidence-based.HB-HTA objectives and methods differ from the classic utilization of HTA at the national regulator level. Most experience and information concerning HB-HTA has originated in two large recent projects: activities of the HB-HTA Interest Group of the HTAi international association established in 2006, and the AdHopHTA European research project (20122015).This paper describes four basic organizational models of HB-HTA, their characteristics and utilization in various countries and hospital types. Results of the AdHopHTA project are analyzed, and recommendations for HB-HTA implementation in Czech hospitals are formulated.Key words: hospital-based HTA, medical device, implementation, hospital strategy.

  20. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Identification of Serum Biomarkers of Two Chronic Hepatitis B Subtypes Diagnosed by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiankun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. By traditional Chinese medicine (TCM pattern classification, damp heat stasis in the middle-jiao (DHSM and liver Qi stagnation and spleen deficiency (LSSD are two most common subtypes of CHB. Results. In this study, we employed iTRAQ proteomics technology to identify potential serum protein biomarkers in 30 LSSD-CHB and 30 DHSM-CHB patients. Of the total 842 detected proteins, 273 and 345 were differentially expressed in LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB patients compared to healthy controls, respectively. LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB shared 142 upregulated and 84 downregulated proteins, of which several proteins have been reported to be candidate biomarkers, including immunoglobulin (Ig related proteins, complement components, apolipoproteins, heat shock proteins, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, and alpha-2-macroglobulin. In addition, we identified that proteins might be potential biomarkers to distinguish LSSD-CHB from DHSM-CHB, such as A0A0A0MS51_HUMAN (gelsolin, PON3_HUMAN, Q96K68_HUMAN, and TRPM8_HUMAN that were differentially expressed exclusively in LSSD-CHB patients and A0A087WT59_HUMAN (transthyretin, ITIH1_HUMAN, TSP1_HUMAN, CO5_HUMAN, and ALBU_HUMAN that were differentially expressed specifically in DHSM-CHB patients. Conclusion. This is the first time to report serum proteins in CHB subtype patients. Our findings provide potential biomarkers can be used for LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB.

  1. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  2. Maintenance of neural activities in torpid Rhinolophus ferrumequinum bats revealed by 2D gel-based proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiuyuan; Zhang, Yijian; Dong, Dong; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Shuyi; Liao, Chen-Chung; Pan, Yi-Hsuan

    2017-08-01

    Bats are the only mammals capable of self-powered flying. Many bat species hibernate in winter. A reversible control of cerebral activities is critical for bats to accommodate a repeated torpor-arousal cycle during hibernation. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate neuronal activities in torpid bats. In this study, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum bat brain proteins were fractionated, and their abundance in active and torpid states was compared. Results of 2D gel-based proteomics showed that 38% of identified proteins with a significant change in abundance are involved in synaptic vesicle recycling and cytoskeletal integrity. Changes in the abundance of proteins related to RNA splicing, proteostasis, redox homeostasis, mitochondrial function, and energy metabolism were also detected. In addition, the levels of GNAO1 (guanine nucleotide-binding protein G αo subunit), an important modulator of neuronal transmembrane signaling, were significantly increased in the insoluble protein fraction of torpid bats; this may be due to GNAO1 palmitoylation making it insoluble. Our data provide molecular evidence for the maintenance of neuronal activities in torpid bats and suggest that a reversible palmitoylation of the G protein plays a role in the regulation of neuronal activities during bat hibernation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gaffrey, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Su, Dian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States); Liu, Tao [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camp, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  4. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals new metabolic pathways of wheat seedling growth under hydrogen peroxide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pei; Hao, Pengchao; Cao, Min; Guo, Guangfang; Lv, Dongwen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Jitian; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yueming

    2013-10-01

    As an abundant ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In this work, we conducted for the first time an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of wheat seedling growth under different exogenous H2 O2 treatments. The growth of seedlings and roots was significantly restrained by increased H2 O2 concentration stress. Malondialdehyde, soluble sugar, and proline contents as well as peroxidase activity increased with increasing H2 O2 levels. A total of 3,425 proteins were identified by iTRAQ, of which 157 showed differential expression and 44 were newly identified H2 O2 -responsive proteins. H2 O2 -responsive proteins were mainly involved in stress/defense/detoxification, signal transduction, and carbohydrate metabolism. It is clear that up-regulated expression of signal transduction and stress/defence/detoxification-related proteins under H2 O2 stress, such as plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1, fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein, and superoxide dismutase, could contribute to H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. Increased gluconeogenesis (phosphoenol-pyruvate carboxykinase) and decreased pyruvate kinase proteins are potentially related to the higher H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. A metabolic pathway of wheat seedling growth under H2 O2 stress is presented. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. IBT-based quantitative proteomics identifies potential regulatory proteins involved in pigmentation of purple sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lili; Sun, Lina; Liu, Shilin; Li, Xiaoni; Zhang, Libin; Yang, Hongsheng

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are an important economic species and exhibit high yield value among aquaculture animals. Purple sea cucumbers are very rare and beautiful and have stable hereditary patterns. In this study, isobaric tags (IBT) were first used to reveal the molecular mechanism of pigmentation in the body wall of the purple sea cucumber. We analyzed the proteomes of purple sea cucumber in early pigmentation stage (Pa), mid pigmentation stage (Pb) and late pigmentation stage (Pc), resulting in the identification of 5580 proteins, including 1099 differentially expressed proteins in Pb: Pa and 339 differentially expressed proteins in Pc: Pb. GO and KEGG analyses revealed possible differentially expressed proteins, including"melanogenesis", "melanosome", "melanoma", "pigment-biosynthetic process", "Epidermis development", "Ras-signaling pathway", "Wnt-signaling pathway", "response to UV light", and "tyrosine metabolism", involved in pigment synthesis and regulation in purple sea cucumbers. The large number of differentially expressed proteins identified here should be highly useful in further elucidating the mechanisms underlying pigmentation in sea cucumbers. Furthermore, these results may also provide the base for further identification of proteins involved in resistance mechanisms against melanoma, albinism, UV damage, and other diseases in sea cucumbers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Proteomic profiling of nephrotic syndrome in serum using magnetic bead based sample fractionation & MALDI-TOF MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Weiguo; Dai, Yong; Zhang, Yue; Chen, Jiejing; Liu, Huaying; Huang, He

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: At present, the diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome (NS) requires a renal biopsy which is an invasive procedure. We undertook this pilot study to develop an alternative method and potential new biomarkers for diagnosis, and validated a set of well-integrated tools called ClinProt to investigate serum petidome in NS patients. Methods: The fasting blood samples from 49 patients diagnosed with NS by renal biopsy, including 17 mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN), 12 minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS), 10 focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and 10 membranous nephropathy (MN), were collected and screened to describe their variability of the serum peptidome. The results in NS group were compared with those in 10 control healthy individuals. Specimens were purified with magnetic beads-based weak cation exchange chromatography and analyzed in a MALDI-TOF MS. Results: The results showed 43, 61, 45 and 19 differential peptide peaks in MsPGN, MCNS, MN and FSGS groups, respectively. A Genetic Algorithm was used to set up the classification models. Cross validation of healthy controls from MsPGN, MCNS, MN and FSGS was 96.18, 100, 98.53 and 94.12 per cent, respectively. The recognition capabilities were 100 per cent. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that proteomic analysis of serum with MALDI-TOF MS is a fast and reproducible approach, which may give an early idea of the pathology of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:22561615

  7. Computer based training: Technology and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Computer Based Training (CBT) offers great potential for revolutionizing the training environment. Tremendous advances in computer cost performance, instructional design science, and authoring systems have combined to put CBT within the reach of all. The ability of today's CBT systems to implement powerful training strategies, simulate complex processes and systems, and individualize and control the training process make it certain that CBT will now, at long last, live up to its potential. This paper reviews the major technologies and trends involved and offers some suggestions for getting started in CBT

  8. Omics technologies for microalgae-based fuels and chemicals; challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aqib Zafar; Shahid, Ayesha; Cheng, Hairong; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Bilal, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Zohaib

    2018-01-21

    Microalgae have been appeared as promising feedstocks of significant biotechnological interest due to their enormous potential for the sustainable production of industrially valuable compounds such as lipids/fatty acids, proteins, metabolites, pigments, and biofuels. However, exploitation of algal biomass for commercial purposes is still in infancy due to the dearth of the knowledge regarding state-of-the-art sophisticated technologies. Inarguably, over the past several years, biological sciences have witnessed an explosion of innovative strategies enabling scientific community and research-based organizations to scrutinize entire classes of biomolecules from a cell type or whole organism, collectively titled as 'Omics, including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and lipidomics. The relative advantages and drawbacks of these technologies can be debated; nevertheless, these 'Omics strategies have played a key role in the better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of specific gene products, regulatory constraints, metabolic pathways and potential genes and protein targets which might be employed in tailoring microalgae for enhanced productivity. In this critical review, an understanding of recent omics technologies, their potential applications, and limitations for microalgae-based fuel and other commodity chemicals are comprehensively discussed. In the scenario of uncertain petro-based reserves, global warming and energy insecurity, the exploration of metabolic potentialities of microalgae using "Omics" are believed to be a green and environmentally-responsive approach that will further expand its industrial and environmental scope. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Proteomics survey of Solanaceae family: Current status and challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Arindam; Chaturvedi, Palak; Paul, Puneet; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Gupta, Ravi

    2017-10-03

    Solanaceae is one of the major economically important families of higher plants and has played a central role in human nutrition since the dawn of human civilization. Therefore, researchers have always been interested in understanding the complex behavior of Solanaceae members to identify key transcripts, proteins or metabolites, which are potentially associated with major traits. Proteomics studies have contributed significantly to understanding the physiology of Solanaceae members. A compilation of all the published reports showed that both gel-based (75%) and gel-free (25%) proteomic technologies have been utilized to establish the proteomes of different tissues, organs, and organelles under normal and adverse environmental conditions. Among the Solanaceae members, most of the research has been focused on tomato (42%) followed by potato (28%) and tobacco (20%), owing to their economic importance. This review comprehensively covers the progress made so far in the field of Solanaceae proteomics including novel methods developed to isolate the proteins from different tissues. Moreover, key proteins presented in this review can serve as a resource to select potential targets for crop improvement. We envisage that information presented in this review would enable us to design the stress tolerant plants with enhanced yields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Profiling of Thrombotic Material Obtained by Endovascular Thrombectomy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Muñoz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic material retrieved from acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients represents a valuable source of biological information. In this study, we have developed a clinical proteomics workflow to characterize the protein cargo of thrombi derived from AIS patients. To analyze the thrombus proteome in a large-scale format, we developed a workflow that combines the isolation of thrombus by endovascular thrombectomy and peptide chromatographic fractionation coupled to mass-spectrometry. Using this workflow, we have characterized a specific proteomic expression profile derived from four AIS patients included in this study. Around 1600 protein species were unambiguously identified in the analyzed material. Functional bioinformatics analyses were performed, emphasizing a clustering of proteins with immunological functions as well as cardiopathy-related proteins with blood-cell dependent functions and peripheral vascular processes. In addition, we established a reference proteomic fingerprint of 341 proteins commonly detected in all patients. Protein interactome network of this subproteome revealed protein clusters involved in the interaction of fibronectin with 14-3-3 proteins, TGFβ signaling, and TCP complex network. Taken together, our data contributes to the repertoire of the human thrombus proteome, serving as a reference library to increase our knowledge about the molecular basis of thrombus derived from AIS patients, paving the way toward the establishment of a quantitative approach necessary to detect and characterize potential novel biomarkers in the stroke field.

  11. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes...

  12. A Technology-based Model for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  13. Proteomic survey of metabolic pathways in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Antonius; Washburn, Michael P; Lange, B Markus; Andon, Nancy L; Deciu, Cosmin; Haynes, Paul A; Hays, Lara; Schieltz, David; Ulaszek, Ryan; Wei, Jing; Wolters, Dirk; Yates, John R

    2002-09-03

    A systematic proteomic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) leaf, root, and seed tissue using two independent technologies, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry and multidimensional protein identification technology, allowed the detection and identification of 2,528 unique proteins, which represents the most comprehensive proteome exploration to date. A comparative display of the expression patterns indicated that enzymes involved in central metabolic pathways are present in all tissues, whereas metabolic specialization is reflected in the occurrence of a tissue-specific enzyme complement. For example, tissue-specific and subcellular compartment-specific isoforms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were detected, thus providing proteomic confirmation of the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and breakdown of separate starch pools in different tissues. In addition, several previously characterized allergenic proteins were identified in the seed sample, indicating the potential of proteomic approaches to survey food samples with regard to the occurrence of allergens.

  14. Maillard Proteomics: Opening New Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Soboleva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein glycation is a ubiquitous non-enzymatic post-translational modification, formed by reaction of protein amino and guanidino groups with carbonyl compounds, presumably reducing sugars and α-dicarbonyls. Resulting advanced glycation end products (AGEs represent a highly heterogeneous group of compounds, deleterious in mammals due to their pro-inflammatory effect, and impact in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease and ageing. The body of information on the mechanisms and pathways of AGE formation, acquired during the last decades, clearly indicates a certain site-specificity of glycation. It makes characterization of individual glycation sites a critical pre-requisite for understanding in vivo mechanisms of AGE formation and developing adequate nutritional and therapeutic approaches to reduce it in humans. In this context, proteomics is the methodology of choice to address site-specific molecular changes related to protein glycation. Therefore, here we summarize the methods of Maillard proteomics, specifically focusing on the techniques providing comprehensive structural and quantitative characterization of glycated proteome. Further, we address the novel break-through areas, recently established in the field of Maillard research, i.e., in vitro models based on synthetic peptides, site-based diagnostics of metabolism-related diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, proteomics of anti-glycative defense, and dynamics of plant glycated proteome during ageing and response to environmental stress.

  15. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina; Schoof, Erwin M.; Neilson, Lisa J.; Cox, Jürgen; Tang, Hao R.; Kalna, Gabriela; van Ree, Janine H.; van Deursen, Jan M.; Trempus, Carol S.; Machesky, Laura M.; Linding, Rune; Wickström, Sara A.; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progresses through distinct stages, and mouse models recapitulating traits of this progression are frequently used to explore genetic, morphological, and pharmacological aspects of tumor development. To complement genomic investigations of this process, we here quantify phosphoproteomic changes in skin cancer development using the SILAC mouse technology coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. We distill protein expression signatures from our data that distinguish between skin can...

  16. Applying mass spectrometry based proteomic technology to advance the understanding of multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Ken

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple myeloma (MM is the second most common hematological malignancy in adults. It is characterized by clonal proliferation of terminally differentiated B lymphocytes and over-production of monoclonal immunoglobulins. Recurrent genomic aberrations have been identified to contribute to the aggressiveness of this cancer. Despite a wealth of knowledge describing the molecular biology of MM as well as significant advances in therapeutics, this disease remains fatal. The identification of biomarkers, especially through the use of mass spectrometry, however, holds great promise to increasing our understanding of this disease. In particular, novel biomarkers will help in the diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic stratification of MM. To date, results from mass spectrometry studies of MM have provided valuable information with regards to MM diagnosis and response to therapy. In addition, mass spectrometry was employed to study relevant signaling pathways activated in MM. This review will focus on how mass spectrometry has been applied to increase our understanding of MM.

  17. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the pg/mL to low ng/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in the cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation, which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed.

  18. Characterization of rubella-specific humoral immunity following two doses of MMR vaccine using proteome microarray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralambieva, Iana H.; Gibson, Michael J.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Warner, Nathaniel D.; Grill, Diane E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction//Background The lack of standardization of the currently used commercial anti-rubella IgG antibody assays leads to frequent misinterpretation of results for samples with low/equivocal antibody concentration. The use of alternative approaches in rubella serology could add new information leading to a fuller understanding of rubella protective immunity and neutralizing antibody response after vaccination. Methods We applied microarray technology to measure antibodies to all rubella virus proteins in 75 high and 75 low rubella virus-specific antibody responders after two MMR vaccine doses. These data were used in multivariate penalized logistic regression modeling of rubella-specific neutralizing antibody response after vaccination. Results We measured antibodies to all rubella virus structural proteins (i.e., the glycoproteins E1 and E2 and the capsid C protein) and to the non-structural protein P150. Antibody levels to each of these proteins were: correlated with the neutralizing antibody titer (prubella virus-specific neutralizing antibody titers (misclassification error = 0.2). Conclusion Our study supports the use of this new technology, as well as the use of antibody profiles/patterns (rather than single antibody measures) as biomarkers of neutralizing antibody response and correlates of protective immunity in rubella virus serology. PMID:29145521

  19. Next-Generation Proteomics and Its Application to Clinical Breast Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardamshina, Mariya; Geiger, Tamar

    2017-10-01

    Proteomics technology aims to map the protein landscapes of biological samples, and it can be applied to a variety of samples, including cells, tissues, and body fluids. Because the proteins are the main functional molecules in the cells, their levels reflect much more accurately the cellular phenotype and the regulatory processes within them than gene levels, mutations, and even mRNA levels. With the advancement in the technology, it is possible now to obtain comprehensive views of the biological systems and to study large patient cohorts in a streamlined manner. In this review we discuss the technological advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, which allow analysis of breast cancer tissue samples, leading to the first large-scale breast cancer proteomics studies. Furthermore, we discuss the technological developments in blood-based biomarker discovery, which provide the basis for future development of assays for routine clinical use. Although these are only the first steps in implementation of proteomics into the clinic, extensive collaborative work between these worlds will undoubtedly lead to major discoveries and advances in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Proteomic-based identification of multiple pathways underlying n-butylidenephthalide-induced apoptosis in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Chiu, Sheng-Chun; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Zhai, Wei-Jun; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Yang, Hsueh-Hui

    2013-09-01

    Although numerous studies have shown the cancer-preventive properties of butylidenephthalide (BP), there is little report of BP affecting human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, proteomic-based approaches were used to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of BP in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. BP treatment decreased the viability of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which was correlated with G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Increased cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in the level of CCND1, CDK2, and PCNA proteins and an increase in the level of CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and SFN proteins. Proteomic studies revealed that among 48 differentially expressed proteins, 25 proteins were down-regulated and 23 proteins were up-regulated and these proteins fall into one large protein protein interaction network. Among these proteins, FAS, AIFM1, BIK, CYCS, SFN, PPP2R1A, CALR, HSPA5, DDIT3, and ERN1 are apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated proteins. Proteomic data suggested that multiple signaling pathways including FAS-dependent pathway, mitochondrial pathway, and ER stress pathway are involved in the apoptosis induced by BP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell-based technologies for Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santoro Haddad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal genetic disorder, which causes the progressive breakdown of neurons in the human brain. HD deteriorates human physical and mental abilities over time and has no cure. Stem cell-based technologies are promising novel treatments, and in HD, they aim to replace lost neurons and/or to prevent neural cell death. Herein we discuss the use of human fetal tissue (hFT, neural stem cells (NSCs of hFT origin or embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs, in clinical and pre-clinical studies. The in vivo use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which are derived from non-neural tissues, will also be discussed. All these studies prove the potential of stem cells for transplantation therapy in HD, demonstrating cell grafting and the ability to differentiate into mature neurons, resulting in behavioral improvements. We claim that there are still many problems to overcome before these technologies become available for HD patient treatment, such as: a safety regarding the use of NSCs and pluripotent stem cells, which are potentially teratogenic; b safety regarding the transplantation procedure itself, which represents a risk and needs to be better studied; and finally c technical and ethical issues regarding cells of fetal and embryonic origin.

  3. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Profiling for Precision Medicine in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Iglesias-Gato, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men in the western societies. Many PCa patients bear tumors that will not threat their lives if left untreated or if treatment is delayed. Our inability for early identification of these patients has resulted in massive overtreatment. Therefore, there is a great need of finding biomarkers for patient stratification according to prognostic risk; as well as there is a need for novel targets that can allow the development of effective treatments for patients that progress to castration-resistant PCa. Most biomarkers in cancer are proteins, including the widely-used prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Recent developments in mass spectrometry allow the identification and quantification of thousands of proteins and posttranslational modifications from small amounts of biological material, including formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, and biological fluids. Novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers have been identified in tissue, blood, urine, and seminal plasma of PCa patients, and new insights in the ethology and progression of this disease have been achieved using this technology. In this review, we summarize these findings and discuss the potential of this technology to pave the way toward the clinical implementation of precision medicine in PCa. PMID:29164064

  4. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-07-04

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions.

  5. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of g...

  6. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ginsenoside F2 on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells SGC7901

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside F2 (F2, a protopanaxdiol type of saponin, was reported to inhibit human gastric cancer cells SGC7901. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of F2, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was applied to define protein expression profiles in SGC7901 cells in response to lower dose (20 μM and shorter duration (12 hour of F2 treatment, compared with previous study. 205 proteins were screened in terms of the change in their expression level which met our predefined criteria. Further bioinformatics and experiments demonstrated that F2 treatment downregulated PRR5 and RPS15 and upregulated RPL26, which are implicated in ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway. F2 also inhibited CISD2, Bcl-xl, and NLRX1, which are associated with autophagic pathway. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that F2 treatment increased Atg5, Atg7, Atg10, and PUMA, the critical downstream effectors of ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway, and Beclin-1, UVRAG, and AMBRA-1, the important molecules in Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway. The 6 differentially abundant proteins, PRR5, CISD2, Bcl-xl, NLRX1, RPS15, and RPL26, were confirmed by western blot. Taken together, ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway and Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway might be the most significantly regulated biological process by F2 treatment in SGC7901 cells, which provided valuable insights into the deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of F2 for gastric cancer treatment.

  7. Revealing critical mechanisms of BR-mediated apple nursery tree growth using iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liwei; Ma, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lizhi; Gao, Cai; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Han, Mingyu

    2018-02-20

    Brassinosteroid is identified as an important hormone. However, information about brassinosteroid has not been fully elucidated, and few studies concerned its role in apple. The aim of this work was to study the role of brassinosteroid for apple tree growth. In our study, the effect of brassinosteroid on apple nursery tree was analyzed. The biomass, cell size and xylem content of apple nursery tree were obviously evaluated by brassinosteroid treatment; mineral elements contents, photosynthesis indexes, carbohydrate level and hormone contents were significantly high in brassinosteroid treated trees. To explore the molecular mechanisms of these phenotypic differences, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics were used to identify the expression profiles of proteins in apple nursery tree shoot tips in response to brassinosteroid at a key period (14days after brassinosteroid treatment). A total of 175 differentially expressed proteins were identified. They were mainly involved in chlorophyII biosynthesis, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, glycolysis, citric acid cycle, respiratory action, hormone signal, cell growth and ligin metabolism. The findings in this study indicate that brassinosteroid mediating apple nursery tree growth may be mainly through energy metabolism. Important biological processes identified here can be useful theoretical basis and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of brassinosteroid. Brassinosteroid is very important for plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroid mediating growth process is not perfectly clear in plant, especially in apple nursery tree. We used a combination of physiological and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the effects of brassinosteroid on apple nursery tree growth and development. The data reported here demonstrated that brassinosteroid regulates apple nursery tree growth mainly through energy metabolism. Therefore it can provide a theoretical basis from energy

  8. Comparison of two anoxia models in rainbow trout cells by a 2-DE and MS/MS-based proteome approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Tune; Hoffmann, E.K.; Roepstorff, P.

    2008-01-01

    In the literature, a variety of ways have been used to obtain anoxia, and most often results are compared between studies without taking into consideration how anoxia has been obtained. Here, we provide a comprehensive study of two types of anoxia, using a proteomics approach to compare changes...

  9. The Phage Proteomic Tree: a Genome-Based Taxonomy for Phage

    OpenAIRE

    Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Rob

    2002-01-01

    There are ∼1031 phage in the biosphere, making them the most abundant biological entities on the planet. Despite their great numbers and ubiquitous presence, very little is known about phage biodiversity, biogeography, or phylogeny. Information is limited, in part, because the current ICTV taxonomical system is based on culturing phage and measuring physical parameters of the free virion. No sequence-based taxonomic systems have previously been established for phage. We present here the “Phag...

  10. Marine data security based on blockchain technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Xie, Weiwei; Huang, Lei; Wei, Zhiqiang

    2018-03-01

    With the development of marine observation technology and network technology, the volume of marine data growing rapidly. This brings new challenges for data storage and transmission. How to protect data security of marine big data has become an urgent problem. The traditional information security methods’ characteristic is centralization. These technologies cannot provide whole process protection, e.g., data storage, data management and application of data. The blockchain technology is a novel technology, which can keep the data security and reliability by using decentralized methodology. It has aroused wide interest in the financial field. In this paper, we describe the concept, characteristics and key technologies of blockchain technology and introduce it into the field of marine data security.

  11. Tipping the Proteome with Gene-Based Vaccines: Weighing in on the Role of Nano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, K.J.; Craig, M.; Smith, J.J.; DeLong, R.K.; Wanekaya, A.; Dong, L.

    2012-01-01

    Since the first generation of DNA vaccines was introduced in 1988, remarkable improvements have been made to improve their efficacy and immunogenicity. Although human clinical trials have shown that delivery of DNA vaccines is well tolerated and safe, the potency of these vaccines in humans is somewhat less than optimal. The development of a gene-based vaccine that was effective enough to be approved for clinical use in humans would be one of, if not the most important, advance in vaccines to date. This paper highlights the literature relating to gene-based vaccines, specifically DNA vaccines, and suggests possible approaches to boost their performance. In addition, we explore the idea that combining RNA and nano materials may hold the key to successful gene-based vaccines for prevention and treatment of disease

  12. Swarm intelligence based wavelet coefficient feature selection for mass spectral classification: an application to proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-09-28

    This paper introduces the ant colony algorithm, a novel swarm intelligence based optimization method, to select appropriate wavelet coefficients from mass spectral data as a new feature selection method for ovarian cancer diagnostics. By determining the proper parameters for the ant colony algorithm (ACA) based searching algorithm, we perform the feature searching process for 100 times with the number of selected features fixed at 5. The results of this study show: (1) the classification accuracy based on the five selected wavelet coefficients can reach up to 100% for all the training, validating and independent testing sets; (2) the eight most popular selected wavelet coefficients of the 100 runs can provide 100% accuracy for the training set, 100% accuracy for the validating set, and 98.8% accuracy for the independent testing set, which suggests the robustness and accuracy of the proposed feature selection method; and (3) the mass spectral data corresponding to the eight popular wavelet coefficients can be located by reverse wavelet transformation and these located mass spectral data still maintain high classification accuracies (100% for the training set, 97.6% for the validating set, and 98.8% for the testing set) and also provide sufficient physical and medical meaning for future ovarian cancer mechanism studies. Furthermore, the corresponding mass spectral data (potential biomarkers) are in good agreement with other studies which have used the same sample set. Together these results suggest this feature extraction strategy will benefit the development of intelligent and real-time spectroscopy instrumentation based diagnosis and monitoring systems.

  13. Genetically-Based Biologic Technologies. Biology and Human Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.; McInerney, Joseph D.

    The purpose of this six-part booklet is to review the current status of genetically-based biologic technologies and to suggest how information about these technologies can be inserted into existing educational programs. Topic areas included in the six parts are: (1) genetically-based technologies in the curriculum; (2) genetic technologies…

  14. Methodologies and perspectives of proteomics applied to filamentous fungi: from sample preparation to secretome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Linda; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2015-03-12

    Filamentous fungi possess the extraordinary ability to digest complex biomasses and mineralize numerous xenobiotics, as consequence of their aptitude to sensing the environment and regulating their intra and extra cellular proteins, producing drastic changes in proteome and secretome composition. Recent advancement in proteomic technologies offers an exciting opportunity to reveal the fluctuations of fungal proteins and enzymes, responsible for their metabolic adaptation to a large variety of environmental conditions. Here, an overview of the most commonly used proteomic strategies will be provided; this paper will range from sample preparation to gel-free and gel-based proteomics, discussing pros and cons of each mentioned state-of-the-art technique. The main focus will be kept on filamentous fungi. Due to the biotechnological relevance of lignocellulose degrading fungi, special attention will be finally given to their extracellular proteome, or secretome. Secreted proteins and enzymes will be discussed in relation to their involvement in bio-based processes, such as biomass deconstruction and mycoremediation.

  15. Shotgun Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hayes McDonald

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupling large-scale sequencing projects with the amino acid sequence information that can be gleaned from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS has made it much easier to analyze complex mixtures of proteins. The limits of this “shotgun” approach, in which the protein mixture is proteolytically digested before separation, can be further expanded by separating the resulting mixture of peptides prior to MS/MS analysis. Both single dimensional high pressure liquid chromatography (LC and multidimensional LC (LC/LC can be directly interfaced with the mass spectrometer to allow for automated collection of tremendous quantities of data. While there is no single technique that addresses all proteomic challenges, the shotgun approaches, especially LC/LC-MS/MS-based techniques such as MudPIT (multidimensional protein identification technology, show advantages over gel-based techniques in speed, sensitivity, scope of analysis, and dynamic range. Advances in the ability to quantitate differences between samples and to detect for an array of post-translational modifications allow for the discovery of classes of protein biomarkers that were previously unassailable.

  16. Structure-based druggability assessment of the mammalian structural proteome with inclusion of light protein flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Loving

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets.

  17. [Proteomics and transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, N; Prudent, M; Crettaz, D; Tissot, J-D

    2011-04-01

    The term "proteomics" covers tools and techniques that are used to analyze and characterize complex mixtures of proteins from various biological samples. In this short review, a typical proteomic approach, related to the study of particular and illustrative situation related to transfusion medicine is reported. This "case report" will allow the reader to be familiar with a practical proteomic approach of a real situation, and will permit to describe the tools that are usually used in proteomic labs, and, in a second part, to present various proteomic applications in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The landscape of viral proteomics and its potential to impact human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Wendler, Jason P.; McDermott, Jason E.; White III, Richard A.; Powell, Joshua D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2016-05-06

    Translating the intimate discourse between viruses and their host cells during infection is a challenging but critical task for development of antiviral interventions and diagnostics. Viruses commandeer cellular processes at every step of their life cycle, altering expression of genes and proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies are enhancing studies of viral pathogenesis by identifying virus-induced changes in the protein repertoire of infected cells or extracellular fluids. Interpretation of proteomics results using knowledge of cellular pathways and networks leads to identification of proteins that influence a range of infection processes, thereby focusing efforts for clinical diagnoses and therapeutics development. Herein we discuss applications of global proteomic studies of viral infections with the goal of providing a basis for improved studies that will benefit community-wide data integration and interpretation.

  19. P-MartCancer–Interactive Online Software to Enable Analysis of Shotgun Cancer Proteomic Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Kobold, Markus A.; Stratton, Kelly G.; White, Amanda M.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2017-10-31

    P-MartCancer is a new interactive web-based software environment that enables biomedical and biological scientists to perform in-depth analyses of global proteomics data without requiring direct interaction with the data or with statistical software. P-MartCancer offers a series of statistical modules associated with quality assessment, peptide and protein statistics, protein quantification and exploratory data analyses driven by the user via customized workflows and interactive visualization. Currently, P-MartCancer offers access to multiple cancer proteomic datasets generated through the Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) at the peptide, gene and protein levels. P-MartCancer is deployed using Azure technologies (http://pmart.labworks.org/cptac.html), the web-service is alternatively available via Docker Hub (https://hub.docker.com/r/pnnl/pmart-web/) and many statistical functions can be utilized directly from an R package available on GitHub (https://github.com/pmartR).

  20. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  1. When does a protein become an allergen? Searching for a dynamic definition based on most advanced technology tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, A

    2008-07-01

    Since the early beginning of allergology as a science considerable efforts have been made by clinicians and researchers to identify and characterize allergic triggers as raw allergenic materials, allergenic sources and tissues, and more recently basic allergenic structures defined as molecules. The last 15-20 years have witnessed many centres focusing on the identification and characterization of allergenic molecules leading to an expanding wealth of knowledge. The need to organize this information leads to the most important question 'when does a protein become an allergen?' In this article, I try to address this question by reviewing a few basic concepts of the immunology of IgE-mediated diseases, reporting on the current diagnostic and epidemiological tools used for allergic disease studies and discussing the usefulness of novel biotechnology tools (i.e. proteomics and molecular biology approaches), information technology tools (i.e. Internet-based resources) and microtechnology tools (i.e. proteomic microarray for IgE testing on molecular allergens). A step-wise staging of the identification and characterization process, including bench, clinical and epidemiological aspects, is proposed, in order to classify allergenic molecules dynamically. This proposal reflects the application and use of all the new tools available from current technologies.

  2. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Gloeothece sp. PCC 6909: Comparison with its sheathless mutant and adaptations to nitrate deficiency and sulfur limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara B; Ow, Saw Yen; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Wright, Phillip C; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tamagnini, Paula

    2011-12-10

    Gloeothece sp. PCC 6909 is a unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium with a well defined and highly developed sheath surrounding its cells. A sheathless mutant of this strain was previously obtained by chemical mutagenesis and, although lacking the sheath, it releases large amounts of polysaccharides into the culture medium. To provide a global understanding on the metabolic differences between the two phenotypes, the proteomes of the wild type and mutant were analyzed using a cross-species proteomics approach coupled with iTRAQ isobaric tagging technology, since their genome sequences are not yet available. Effects arising from the presence/absence of nitrate and sulfur are presented as two metabolically directed follow-up iTRAQ studies. These nutrients are believed to play a major role in Gloeothece's metabolism, including the production of extracellular polymeric substances - EPS. 454, 124, and 53 proteins were identified and reliably quantified using homology anchoring approaches for iTRAQ previously described. The results obtained strongly suggest that the chemical mutagenesis affected the regulation of a number of key cellular processes, as revealed by the significant fold changes observed for proteins covering a large spectrum of functional groups. Moreover, they provide new insights on the adaptations of Gloeothece cells to nitrate-deficiency and sulfur-limitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteomics analysis of maize (Zea mays L.) grain based on iTRAQ reveals molecular mechanisms of poor grain filling in inferior grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Li, Geng; Liu, Peng; Dong, Shuting; Zhang, Jiwang; Zhao, Bin

    2017-06-01

    In maize, inferior grains (IG) located on the upper part of the ear have poor grain filling process compared to superior grains (SG) located on the middle and lower parts of the ear. This difference limits satisfactory yield and quality; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, using the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology, the proteomes of IG and SG during early and middle grain filling stages were investigated. In total, 4720 proteins were identified in maize grain and 305 differentially accumulated proteins (DiAPs) were detected between IG and SG. These DiAPs were involved in diverse cellular and metabolic processes with preferred distribution in protein synthesis/destination and metabolism. Compared to SG, DiAPs related to cell growth/division and starch synthesis were lag-accumulated and down-regulated in IG, respectively, resulting in smaller sink sizes and lower sink activities in IG. Meanwhile, impediment of the glycolysis pathway in IG may lead to reduce energy supply and building materials for substance synthesis. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and the defense system were disturbed in IG, which might lead to reduce protection against various environmental stresses. The present study provides new information on the proteomic differences between IG and SG, and explains possible molecular mechanisms for poor grain filling in IG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma-based proteomics reveals immune response, complement and coagulation cascades pathway shifts in heat-stressed lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Cheng, Jianbo; Zhao, Shengguo; Tian, He; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Yang, Hongjian; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-09-02

    Heat stress (HS) has an enormous economic impact on the dairy industry. In recent years, many researchers have investigated changes in the gene expression and metabolomics profiles in dairy cows caused by HS. However, the proteomics profiles of heat-stressed dairy cows have not yet been completely elucidated. We compared plasma proteomics from HS-free and heat-stressed dairy cows using an iTRAQ labeling approach. After the depletion of high abundant proteins in the plasma, 1472 proteins were identified. Of these, 85 proteins were differentially abundant in cows exposed to HS relative to HS-free. Database searches combined with GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses revealed that many components of the complement and coagulation cascades were altered in heat-stressed cows compared with HS-free cows. Of these, many factors in the complement system (including complement components C1, C3, C5, C6, C7, C8, and C9, complement factor B, and factor H) were down-regulated by HS, while components of the coagulation system (including coagulation factors, vitamin K-dependent proteins, and fibrinogens) were up-regulated by HS. In conclusion, our results indicate that HS decreases plasma levels of complement system proteins, suggesting that immune function is impaired in dairy cows exposed to HS. Though many aspects of heat stress (HS) have been extensively researched, relatively little is known about the proteomics profile changes that occur during heat exposure. In this work, we employed a proteomics approach to investigate differential abundance of plasma proteins in HS-free and heat-stressed dairy cows. Database searches combined with GO and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses revealed that HS resulted in a decrease in complement components, suggesting that heat-stressed dairy cows have impaired immune function. In addition, through integrative analyses of proteomics and previous metabolomics, we showed enhanced glycolysis, lipid metabolic pathway shifts, and nitrogen

  5. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut in silkworm infected with Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kun; Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Shang, Meng-Ke; Qin, Guang-Xing; Hou, Cheng-Xiang; Guo, Xi-Jie

    2017-01-30

    Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) specifically infects the epithelial cells in the midgut of silkworm and causes them to death, which negatively affects the sericulture industry. In order to determine the midgut response at the protein levels to the virus infection, differential proteomes of the silkworm midgut responsive to BmCPV infection were identified with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). 193, 408, 189 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were reliably quantified by iTRAQ analysis in the midgut of BmCPV-infected and control larvae at 24, 48, 72h post infection (hpi) respectively. KEGG enrichment analysis showed that Oxidative phosphorylation, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, steroid hormone biosynthesis were the significant pathways (Q value≤0.05) both at 24 and 48hpi. qRT-PCR was used to further verify gene transcription of 30 DEPs from iTRAQ, showing that the regulations of 24 genes at the transcript level were consistent with those at the proteomic level. Moreover, the cluster analysis of the three time groups showed that there were seven co-regulated DEPs including BGIBMGA002620-PA, which was a putative p62/sequestosome-1 protein in silkworm. It was upregulated at both the mRNA level and the proteomic level and may play an important role in regulating the autophagy and apoptosis (especially apoptosis) induced by BmCPV infection. This was the first report using an iTRAQ approach to analyze proteomes of the silkworm midgut against BmCPV infection, which contributes to understanding the defense mechanisms of silkworm midgut to virus infection. The domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori, is renowned for silk production as well as being a traditional lepidopteron model insect served as a subject for morphological, genetic, physiological, and developmental studies. Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis

  6. Progress and challenges for abiotic stress proteomics of crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar

    2013-06-01

    Plants are continually challenged to recognize and respond to adverse changes in their environment to avoid detrimental effects on growth and development. Understanding the mechanisms that crop plants employ to resist and tolerate abiotic stress is of considerable interest for designing agriculture breeding strategies to ensure sustainable productivity. The application of proteomics technologies to advance our knowledge in crop plant abiotic stress tolerance has increased dramatically in the past few years as evidenced by the large amount of publications in this area. This is attributed to advances in various technology platforms associated with MS-based techniques as well as the accessibility of proteomics units to a wider plant research community. This review summarizes the work which has been reported for major crop plants and evaluates the findings in context of the approaches that are widely employed with the aim to encourage broadening the strategies used to increase coverage of the proteome. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Semantic Technology Recommendation Based on the Analytic Network Process

    OpenAIRE

    Radulovic, F.; García-Castro, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Semantic technologies have become widely adopted in recent years, and choosing the right technologies for the problems that users face is often a difficult task. This paper presents an application of the Analytic Network Process for the recommendation of semantic technologies, which is based on a quality model for semantic technologies. Instead of relying on expert-based comparisons of alternatives, the comparisons in our framework depend on real evaluation results. Furthermore, the recommend...

  8. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-03-22

    A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein-protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) and polyhistidine (His)) and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples.

  9. Immature Seed Endosperm and Embryo Proteomics of the Lotus (Nelumbo NuciferaGaertn.) by One-Dimensional Gel-Based Tandem Mass Spectrometry and a Comparison with the Mature Endosperm Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Carlo F; Fukao, Yoichiro; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Shioda, Seiji; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Yonekura, Masami

    2015-08-14

    Lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seed proteome has been the focus of our studies, and we have recently established the first proteome dataset for its mature seed endosperm. The current study unravels the immature endosperm, as well as the embryo proteome, to provide a comprehensive dataset of the lotus seed proteins and a comparison between the mature and immature endosperm tissues across the seed's development. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) linked with tandem mass spectrometry provided a protein inventory of the immature endosperm (122 non-redundant proteins) and embryo (141 non-redundant proteins) tissues. Comparing with the previous mature endosperm dataset (66 non-redundant proteins), a total of 206 non-redundant proteins were identified across all three tissues of the lotus seed. Results revealed some significant differences in proteome composition between the three lotus seed tissues, most notably between the mature endosperm and its immature developmental stage shifting the proteins from nutrient production to nutrient storage.

  10. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A proteomic-based characterization of liver metabolism in dairy cows and young pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Henrik

    liver fat content and suggest potential blood-based biomarkers for early detection of fatty liver to substantiate prevention strategies. Our results show that several proteins in liver metabolic pathways are affected by liver fat content and that blood aspartate aminotransferase, ß......-hydroxybutyrate, and total bilirubin are potential biomarkers. In pigs, the objective was to investigate whether young pigs can be used to model the liver response in adolescents to a high-fat diet and to diet restriction-induced weight loss. Our results show that the liver response to a high-fat diet and to diet...... restriction is overall similar to humans. However, in contrast to humans, young pigs are resistant to dietary fat-induced liver fat accumulation, while diet restriction decreases fatty acid oxidation and subsequent ketone body formation in the liver. Consequently, the liver response in adolescents to a high...

  12. Isotope labeling-based quantitative proteomics of developing seeds of castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Schwämmle, Veit

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantification approach employing isotopic (ICPL) and isobaric (iTRAQ) labeling to investigate the pattern of protein deposition during castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.) development, including that of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism...... give important insights into certain aspects of the biology of castor oil seed development such as carbon flow, anabolism, and catabolism of fatty acid and the pattern of deposition of SSPs, toxins, and allergens such as ricin and 2S albumins. We also found, for the first time, some genes of SSP...... could be mapped to extant castor gene models, considerably expanding the number of proteins so far identified from developing castor seeds. Cluster validation and statistical analysis resulted in 975 protein trend patterns and the relative abundance of 618 proteins. The results presented in this work...

  13. Brain-Based Learning With Technological Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anita

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of technology in secondary schools is varied and depends on the training and interest of the individual instructors. Even though technology has advanced way beyond its utilitarian roots of being viewed solely by educators as a useful machine for teachers to key exams and worksheets on, there are still many secondary educators who still…

  14. Simultaneous quantification of protein phosphorylation sites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics: a linear algebra approach for isobaric phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Sheng, Yuan; Zhong, Ting; Yang, Mi; Chen, Yun

    2014-12-05

    As one of the most studied post-translational modifications (PTM), protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in almost all cellular processes. Current methods are able to predict and determine thousands of phosphorylation sites, whereas stoichiometric quantification of these sites is still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics is emerging as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein phosphorylation using proteolytic peptides as surrogates of proteins. However, several issues may limit its application, one of which relates to the phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and the same mass (i.e., isobaric phosphopeptides). While employment of site-specific product ions allows for these isobaric phosphopeptides to be distinguished and quantified, site-specific product ions are often absent or weak in tandem mass spectra. In this study, linear algebra algorithms were employed as an add-on to targeted proteomics to retrieve information on individual phosphopeptides from their common spectra. To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for each phosphopeptide. Given the slope and intercept of calibration curves of phosphopeptides in each transition, linear algebraic equations were developed. Using a series of mock mixtures prepared with varying concentrations of each phosphopeptide, the reliability of the approach to quantify isobaric phosphopeptides containing multiple phosphorylation sites (≥ 2) was discussed. Finally, we applied this approach to determine the phosphorylation stoichiometry of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) at Ser78 and Ser82 in breast cancer cells and tissue samples.

  15. A comparative proteomics method for multiple samples based on a 18O-reference strategy and a quantitation and identification-decoupled strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Yongqian; Gui, Shuqi; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Fuping; Deng, Yulin

    2017-08-15

    Comparisons across large numbers of samples are frequently necessary in quantitative proteomics. Many quantitative methods used in proteomics are based on stable isotope labeling, but most of these are only useful for comparing two samples. For up to eight samples, the iTRAQ labeling technique can be used. For greater numbers of samples, the label-free method has been used, but this method was criticized for low reproducibility and accuracy. An ingenious strategy has been introduced, comparing each sample against a 18 O-labeled reference sample that was created by pooling equal amounts of all samples. However, it is necessary to use proportion-known protein mixtures to investigate and evaluate this new strategy. Another problem for comparative proteomics of multiple samples is the poor coincidence and reproducibility in protein identification results across samples. In present study, a method combining 18 O-reference strategy and a quantitation and identification-decoupled strategy was investigated with proportion-known protein mixtures. The results obviously demonstrated that the 18 O-reference strategy had greater accuracy and reliability than other previously used comparison methods based on transferring comparison or label-free strategies. By the decoupling strategy, the quantification data acquired by LC-MS and the identification data acquired by LC-MS/MS are matched and correlated to identify differential expressed proteins, according to retention time and accurate mass. This strategy made protein identification possible for all samples using a single pooled sample, and therefore gave a good reproducibility in protein identification across multiple samples, and allowed for optimizing peptide identification separately so as to identify more proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring the potential of public proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudel, Marc; Verheggen, Kenneth; Csordas, Attila; Raeder, Helge; Berven, Frode S; Martens, Lennart; Vizcaíno, Juan A; Barsnes, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In a global effort for scientific transparency, it has become feasible and good practice to share experimental data supporting novel findings. Consequently, the amount of publicly available MS-based proteomics data has grown substantially in recent years. With some notable exceptions, this extensive material has however largely been left untouched. The time has now come for the proteomics community to utilize this potential gold mine for new discoveries, and uncover its untapped potential. In this review, we provide a brief history of the sharing of proteomics data, showing ways in which publicly available proteomics data are already being (re-)used, and outline potential future opportunities based on four different usage types: use, reuse, reprocess, and repurpose. We thus aim to assist the proteomics community in stepping up to the challenge, and to make the most of the rapidly increasing amount of public proteomics data. © 2015 The Authors. Proteomics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Quantitative iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Identification of Candidate Biomarkers for Diabetic Nephropathy in Plasma of Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Thingholm, Tine Engberg; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry in three identical repetitions using isobaric mass tags (iTRAQ). The results were further analysed with ingenuity pathway analysis. Levels of apolipoprotein A1, A2, B, C3, E and J were analysed and validated by a multiplex immunoassay in 20 type 1 diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria and 10......INTRODUCTION: As part of a clinical proteomics programme focused on diabetes and its complications, it was our goal to investigate the proteome of plasma in order to find improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Proteins derived from plasma from a cross......-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric were enriched with hexapeptide library beads and subsequently pooled within three groups. Proteins from the three groups were compared by online liquid chromatography and tandem mass...

  18. Proteomic data analysis of glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Wengert, Georg; Houben, Ivo; Lobbes, Marc; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the application of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the protein-level fold changes and putative upstream regulators for the GSCs. However the extracted molecular information is insufficient in classifying GSCs and paving the pathway to an improved therapeutics of the heterogeneous glioma.

  19. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-05

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs.

  20. Elevated host lipid metabolism revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Jun [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Yang, Yongtao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Department of Neurology, Yongchuan Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chen, Jin; Cheng, Ke; Li, Qi; Wei, Yongdong; Zhu, Dan; Shao, Weihua; Zheng, Peng [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Xie, Peng, E-mail: xiepeng@cqmu.edu.cn [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing (China); Department of Neurology, Yongchuan Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-10-30

    Purpose: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) remains to be one of the most deadly infectious diseases. The pathogen interacts with the host immune system, the process of which is largely unknown. Various cellular processes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) centers around lipid metabolism. To determine the lipid metabolism related proteins, a quantitative proteomic study was performed here to identify differential proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from TBM patients (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 12). Methods: CSF samples were desalted, concentrated, labelled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ™), and analyzed by multi-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Gene ontology and proteomic phenotyping analysis of the differential proteins were conducted using Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) Bioinformatics Resources. ApoE and ApoB were selected for validation by ELISA. Results: Proteomic phenotyping of the 4 differential proteins was invloved in the lipid metabolism. ELISA showed significantly increased ApoB levels in TBM subjects compared to healthy controls. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated ApoB levels could distinguish TBM subjects from healthy controls and viral meningitis subjects with 89.3% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Conclusions: CSF lipid metabolism disregulation, especially elevated expression of ApoB, gives insights into the pathogenesis of TBM. Further evaluation of these findings in larger studies including anti-tuberculosis medicated and unmedicated patient cohorts with other center nervous system infectious diseases is required for successful clinical translation. - Highlights: • The first proteomic study on the cerebrospinal fluid of tuberculous meningitis patients using iTRAQ. • Identify 4 differential proteins invloved in the lipid metabolism. • Elevated expression of ApoB gives

  1. Comparative iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Pelteobagrus vachelli Liver under Acute Hypoxia: Implications in Metabolic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guosong; Zhang, Jiajia; Wen, Xin; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Hongye; Li, Xinru; Yin, Shaowu

    2017-09-01

    More and more frequently these days, aquatic ecosystems are being stressed by nutrient enrichment, pollutants, and global warming, leading to a serious depletion in oxygen concentrations. Although a sudden, significant lack of oxygen will result in mortality, fishes can have an acute behavior (e.g., an increase in breathing rate, reduction in swimming frequency) and physiology responses (e.g., increase in oxygen delivery, and reduction in oxygen consumption) to hypoxia, which allows them to maintain normal physical activity. Therefore, in order to shed further light on the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes, the authors conduct comparative quantitative proteomics on Pelteobagrus vachelli livers using iTRAQ. The research identifies 511 acute hypoxia-responsive proteins in P. vachelli. Furthermore, comparison of several of the diverse key pathways studied (e.g., peroxisome pathway, PPAR signaling pathway, lipid metabolism, glycolysis/gluco-neogenesis, and amino acid metabolism) help to articulate the different mechanisms involved in the hypoxia response of P. vachelli. Data from proteome analysis shows that P. vachelli can have an acute reaction to hypoxia, including detoxification of metabolic by-products and oxidative stress in light of continued metabolic activity (e.g., peroxisomes), an activation in the capacity of catabolism to get more energy (e.g., lipolysis and amino acid catabolism), a depression in the capacity of biosynthesis to reduce energy consumption (e.g., biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids), and a shift in the aerobic and anaerobic contributions to total metabolism. The observed hypoxia-related changes in the liver proteome of the fish can help to understand or can be related to the hypoxia-related response that takes place in similar conditions in the liver or other proteomes of mammals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Network reconstruction based on proteomic data and prior knowledge of protein connectivity using graph theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Stavrakas

    Full Text Available Modeling of signal transduction pathways is instrumental for understanding cells' function. People have been tackling modeling of signaling pathways in order to accurately represent the signaling events inside cells' biochemical microenvironment in a way meaningful for scientists in a biological field. In this article, we propose a method to interrogate such pathways in order to produce cell-specific signaling models. We integrate available prior knowledge of protein connectivity, in a form of a Prior Knowledge Network (PKN with phosphoproteomic data to construct predictive models of the protein connectivity of the interrogated cell type. Several computational methodologies focusing on pathways' logic modeling using optimization formulations or machine learning algorithms have been published on this front over the past few years. Here, we introduce a light and fast approach that uses a breadth-first traversal of the graph to identify the shortest pathways and score proteins in the PKN, fitting the dependencies extracted from the experimental design. The pathways are then combined through a heuristic formulation to produce a final topology handling inconsistencies between the PKN and the experimental scenarios. Our results show that the algorithm we developed is efficient and accurate for the construction of medium and large scale signaling networks. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by interrogating a manually curated interaction graph model of EGF/TNFA stimulation against made up experimental data. To avoid the possibility of erroneous predictions, we performed a cross-validation analysis. Finally, we validate that the introduced approach generates predictive topologies, comparable to the ILP formulation. Overall, an efficient approach based on graph theory is presented herein to interrogate protein-protein interaction networks and to provide meaningful biological insights.

  3. PiB-PET Imaging-Based Serum Proteome Profiles Predict Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seokjo; Jeong, Hyobin; Baek, Je-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Jin; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hee; Hong, Hyun Seok; Kim, Young Ho; Yi, Eugene C; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Hwang, Daehee; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-07-06

    Development of a simple, non-invasive early diagnosis platform of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using blood is urgently required. Recently, PiB-PET imaging has been shown to be powerful to quantify amyloid-β plaque loads leading to pathophysiological alterations in AD brains. Thus, there has been a need for serum biomarkers reflecting PiB-PET imaging data as an early diagnosis platform of AD. Here, using LC-MS/MS analysis coupled with isobaric tagging, we performed comprehensive proteome profiling of serum samples from cognitively normal controls, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD patients, who were selected using PiB-PET imaging. Comparative analysis of the proteomes revealed 79 and 72 differentially expressed proteins in MCI and AD, respectively, compared to controls. Integrated analysis of these proteins with genomic and proteomic data of AD brain tissues, together with network analysis, identified three biomarker candidates representing the altered proteolysis-related process in MCI or AD: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), coagulation factor XIII, A1 polypeptide (F13A1), and dermcidin (DCD). In independent serum samples of MCI and AD, we confirmed the elevation of the candidates using western blotting and ELISA. Our results suggest that these biomarker candidates can serve as a potential non-invasive early diagnosis platform reflecting PiB-PET imaging for MCI and AD.

  4. Proteomics-Based Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response in Sporotrichosis: Toward Discovery of Potential Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; Araujo, Leticia Mendes; Della Terra, Paula Portella; dos Santos, Priscila Oliveira; Pereira, Sandro Antonio; Schubach, Tânia Maria Pacheco; Burger, Eva; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Sporothrix schenckii and associated species are agents of human and animal sporotrichosis that cause large sapronoses and zoonoses worldwide. Epidemiological surveillance has highlighted an overwhelming occurrence of the highly pathogenic fungus Sporothrix brasiliensis during feline outbreaks, leading to massive transmissions to humans. Early diagnosis of feline sporotrichosis by demonstrating the presence of a surrogate marker of infection can have a key role for selecting appropriate disease control measures and minimizing zoonotic transmission to humans. Methodology We explored the presence and diversity of serum antibodies (IgG) specific against Sporothrix antigens in cats with sporotrichosis and evaluated the utility of these antibodies for serodiagnosis. Antigen profiling included protein extracts from the closest known relatives S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting enabled us to characterize the major antigens of feline sporotrichosis from sera from cats with sporotrichosis (n = 49), healthy cats (n = 19), and cats with other diseases (n = 20). Principal Findings Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based quantitation of anti-Sporothrix IgG exhibited high sensitivity and specificity in cats with sporotrichosis (area under the curve, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.94–1; PSporothrix antigens were remarkably cross-reactive, supporting the hypothesis that antigenic epitopes may be conserved among closely related agents. One-dimensional immunoblotting indicated that 3-carboxymuconate cyclase (a 60-kDa protein in S. brasiliensis and a 70-kDa protein in S. schenckii) is the immunodominant antigen in feline sporotrichosis. Two-dimensional immunoblotting revealed six IgG-reactive isoforms of gp60 in the S. brasiliensis proteome, similar to the humoral response found in human sporotrichosis. Conclusions A convergent IgG-response in various hosts (mice, cats, and humans) has important implications for our

  5. Deep coverage of the beer proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochalová, Martina; Konečná, Hana; Stejskal, Karel; Potěšil, David; Fridrichová, Danuše; Srbová, Eva; Ornerová, Kateřina; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2017-06-06

    We adopted an approach based on peptide immobilized pH gradient-isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) separation, coupled with LC-MS/MS, in order to maximize coverage of the beer proteome. A lager beer brewed using traditional Czech technology was degassed, desalted and digested. Tryptic peptides were separated by isoelectric focusing on an immobilized pH gradient strip and, after separation, the gel strip was divided into seven equally sized parts. Peptides extracted from gel fractions were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. This approach resulted in a three-fold increase in the number of proteins identified (over 1700) when compared to analysis of unfractionated beer processed by a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). Over 1900 protein groups (PGs) in total were identified by both approaches. The study significantly extends knowledge about the beer proteome and demonstrates its complexity. Detailed knowledge of the protein content, especially gluten proteins, will enhance the evaluation of potential health risks related to beer consumption (coeliac disease) and will contribute to improving beer quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical-Mechanisms Based Reliability Analysis For Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0095 PHYSICAL -MECHANISMS BASED RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES Ron Schrimpf VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY 110 21ST...SUBTITLE PHYSICAL -MECHANISMS BASED RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-11-1-0307 5c.  PROGRAM...which reliability models can be built. Thus, it is important to develop more predictive reliability models for advanced technologies, based on physical

  7. Cable-Based Water Leak Detection Technology

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Water leaks can be considered as a serious problem from many sources such as water supply and return chains, air conditioning units, cold-water chillers, clogged drains, damaged skylights or windows, or even construction errors. The new water leak detection technologies can provide significant advantages in cost, reliability, and easy adoption have continued since the traditional technology mainly focusing on a spot detector revealed several limitations.

  8. Towards Delineating Functions within the Fasciola Secreted Cathepsin L Protease Family by Integrating In Vivo Based Sub-Proteomics and Phylogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M.; Wright, Hazel A.; LaCourse, E. James; Porter, Joanne; Barrett, John; Woods, Debra J.; Brophy, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES) products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L) protease family. Methodology/Principal Findings The sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples. Conclusions/Significance We have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase. PMID:21245911

  9. Towards delineating functions within the fasciola secreted cathepsin l protease family by integrating in vivo based sub-proteomics and phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell M Morphew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L protease family.the sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples.we have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase.

  10. Distinct metabolic changes between wheat embryo and endosperm during grain development revealed by 2D-DIGE-based integrative proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; He, Miao; Zhu, Chong; Yuan, Linlin; Dong, Liwei; Bian, Yanwei; Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Yueming

    2016-05-01

    Two Chinese bread wheat cultivars, Jinghua 9 and Zhongmai 175, distinct in grain weight and dough quality, were used to study proteome changes in the embryo and endosperm during grain development using a two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomics approach. In total, 138 and 127 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 116 and 113 unique DEPs were identified in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Among them, 54 (31%) DEPs were commonly present in both organs while 62 (35%) and 59 (34%) DEPs occurred only in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Embryonic DEPs are primarily stress-related proteins and involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, while those from the endosperm are related primarily to carbohydrate metabolism and storage. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the proteome differences in the endosperm caused by different cultivars were greater than those by development stages, while the differences in the embryo showed the opposite pattern. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a complex network centered primarily on enzymes involved in carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The transcriptional levels of fourteen important DEPs encoding genes showed high similarity between organs and cultivars. In particular, some key DEPs of the endosperm, such as phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), and sucrose synthase (SUS), showed significantly upregulated expression, indicating their key roles in starch biosynthesis and grain yield. Moreover, upregulated expression of some storage proteins in the endosperm could improve wheat bread-making quality. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Tackling probiotic and gut microbiota functionality through proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lorena; Hidalgo, Claudio; Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Lourenço, Anália; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo

    2016-09-16

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Many strains exert their beneficial effects after transiently colonizing the human gut, where they interact with the rest of the intestinal microorganisms and with the host mucosa. Indeed the human gut harbours a huge number of microorganisms also known as gut microbiota. Imbalances in the relative abundances of the individual components of the gut microbiota may determine the health status of the host and alterations in specific groups have been related to different diseases and metabolic disorders. Proteomics provide a set of high-throughput methodologies for protein identification that are extremely useful for studying probiotic functionality and helping in the assessment of specific health-promoting activities, such as their immunomodulatory activity, the intestinal colonization processes, and the crosstalk mechanisms with the host. Furthermore, proteomics have been used to identify markers of technological performance and stress adaptation, which helps to predict traits such as behaviour into food matrices and ability to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this review is to compile studies in which proteomics have been used to assess probiotic functionality and to identify molecular players supporting their mechanisms of action. Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Molecular basis underlying the functional properties of probiotic bacteria responsible for the health promoting effects have been in the background for many years. Breakthrough of omics technologies in the probiotic and microbiota fields has had a very relevant impact in the elucidation of probiotic mechanisms and in the procedures to select these microorganisms, based on solid scientific evidence. It is unquestionable that, in the near future, the evolution of proteomic techniques

  12. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Konstantin; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas. PMID:27832160

  13. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linan Wang

    Full Text Available Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas.

  14. Re-fraction: a machine learning approach for deterministic identification of protein homologues and splice variants in large-scale MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengyi; Humphrey, Sean J; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Prior, Matthew J; Yang, Guang; James, David E; Yang, Jean Yee-Hwa

    2012-05-04

    A key step in the analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data is the inference of proteins from identified peptide sequences. Here we describe Re-Fraction, a novel machine learning algorithm that enhances deterministic protein identification. Re-Fraction utilizes several protein physical properties to assign proteins to expected protein fractions that comprise large-scale MS-based proteomics data. This information is then used to appropriately assign peptides to specific proteins. This approach is sensitive, highly specific, and computationally efficient. We provide algorithms and source code for the current version of Re-Fraction, which accepts output tables from the MaxQuant environment. Nevertheless, the principles behind Re-Fraction can be applied to other protein identification pipelines where data are generated from samples fractionated at the protein level. We demonstrate the utility of this approach through reanalysis of data from a previously published study and generate lists of proteins deterministically identified by Re-Fraction that were previously only identified as members of a protein group. We find that this approach is particularly useful in resolving protein groups composed of splice variants and homologues, which are frequently expressed in a cell- or tissue-specific manner and may have important biological consequences.

  15. Proteomics meets blue biotechnology: a wealth of novelties and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Erica M; Durighello, Emie; Pible, Olivier; Nogales, Balbina; Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Bosch, Rafael; Christie-Oleza, Joseph A; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-10-01

    Blue biotechnology, in which aquatic environments provide the inspiration for various products such as food additives, aquaculture, biosensors, green chemistry, bioenergy, and pharmaceuticals, holds enormous promise. Large-scale efforts to sequence aquatic genomes and metagenomes, as well as campaigns to isolate new organisms and culture-based screenings, are helping to push the boundaries of known organisms. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can complement 16S gene sequencing in the effort to discover new organisms of potential relevance to blue biotechnology by facilitating the rapid screening of microbial isolates and by providing in depth profiles of the proteomes and metaproteomes of marine organisms, both model cultivable isolates and, more recently, exotic non-cultivable species and communities. Proteomics has already contributed to blue biotechnology by identifying aquatic proteins with potential applications to food fermentation, the textile industry, and biomedical drug development. In this review, we discuss historical developments in blue biotechnology, the current limitations to the known marine biosphere, and the ways in which mass spectrometry can expand that knowledge. We further speculate about directions that research in blue biotechnology will take given current and near-future technological advancements in mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing the Challenge of Defining Valid Proteomic Biomarkers and Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanstra Joost P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this manuscript is to provide, based on an extensive analysis of a proteomic data set, suggestions for proper statistical analysis for the discovery of sets of clinically relevant biomarkers. As tractable example we define the measurable proteomic differences between apparently healthy adult males and females. We choose urine as body-fluid of interest and CE-MS, a thoroughly validated platform technology, allowing for routine analysis of a large number of samples. The second urine of the morning was collected from apparently healthy male and female volunteers (aged 21-40 in the course of the routine medical check-up before recruitment at the Hannover Medical School. Results We found that the Wilcoxon-test is best suited for the definition of potential biomarkers. Adjustment for multiple testing is necessary. Sample size estimation can be performed based on a small number of observations via resampling from pilot data. Machine learning algorithms appear ideally suited to generate classifiers. Assessment of any results in an independent test-set is essential. Conclusions Valid proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis only can be defined by applying proper statistical data mining procedures. In particular, a justification of the sample size should be part of the study design.

  17. Addressing the Challenge of Defining Valid Proteomic Biomarkers and Classifiers

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dakna, Mohammed

    2010-12-10

    Abstract Background The purpose of this manuscript is to provide, based on an extensive analysis of a proteomic data set, suggestions for proper statistical analysis for the discovery of sets of clinically relevant biomarkers. As tractable example we define the measurable proteomic differences between apparently healthy adult males and females. We choose urine as body-fluid of interest and CE-MS, a thoroughly validated platform technology, allowing for routine analysis of a large number of samples. The second urine of the morning was collected from apparently healthy male and female volunteers (aged 21-40) in the course of the routine medical check-up before recruitment at the Hannover Medical School. Results We found that the Wilcoxon-test is best suited for the definition of potential biomarkers. Adjustment for multiple testing is necessary. Sample size estimation can be performed based on a small number of observations via resampling from pilot data. Machine learning algorithms appear ideally suited to generate classifiers. Assessment of any results in an independent test-set is essential. Conclusions Valid proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis only can be defined by applying proper statistical data mining procedures. In particular, a justification of the sample size should be part of the study design.

  18. Research on Network Defense Strategy Based on Honey Pot Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jianchao; Hua, Ying

    2018-03-01

    As a new network security technology of active defense, The honeypot technology has become a very effective and practical method of decoy attackers. The thesis discusses the theory, structure, characteristic, design and implementation of Honeypot in detail. Aiming at the development of means of attack, put forward a kind of network defense technology based on honeypot technology, constructing a virtual Honeypot demonstrate the honeypot’s functions.

  19. Comparative analysis of Brassica napus plasma membrane proteins under phosphorus deficiency using label-free and MaxQuant-based proteomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuisen; Luo, Ying; Ding, Guangda; Xu, Fangsen

    2016-02-05

    Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a primary constraint for plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. To better understand the genotypic differences in the adaptation mechanism of Brassica napus to P deficiency, we purified the plasma membrane (PM) from the roots of two genotypes: P-efficient "Eyou Changjia" and P-inefficient "B104-2". Combining label-free quantitative proteomics with the MaxQuant approach, a total of 71 proteins that significantly changed in abundances were identified in the two genotypes in response to P-free starvation, including 31 in "Eyou Changjia" and 40 in "B104-2". Based on comparative genomics study, 28 proteins were mapped to the confidence intervals of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for P efficiency related traits. Seven decreased proteins with transporter activity were found to be located in the PM by subcellular localization analyses. These proteins involved in intracellular protein transport and ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport were mapped to the QTL for P content and dry weight. Compared with "B104-2", more decreased proteins referring to transporter activity were found in "Eyou Changjia", showing that substance exchange was decreased in response to short-term P-free starvation. Together with the finding, more decreased proteins functioning in signal transduction and protein synthesis/degradation suggested that "Eyou Changjia" could slow the progression of growth and save more P in response to short-term P-free starvation. P deficiency seriously limits the production and quality of B. napus. Roots absorb water and nutrients and anchor the plant in the soil. Therefore, to study root PM proteome under P stress would be helpful to understand the adaptation mechanism for P deficiency. However, PM proteome analysis in B. napus has been seldom reported due to the high hydrophobicity and low abundance of PM. Thus, we herein investigated the PM proteome alteration of roots in two B. napus genotypes, with different P deficient tolerances, in

  20. Proteomics: A new perspective for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaradhya Sahukar Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, several ground breaking discoveries in life science were made. The completion of sequencing the human genome certainly belongs to the key tasks successfully completed, representing a true milestone in the biomedicine. The accomplishment of the complete genome also brings along a new, even more challenging task for scientists: The characterization of the human proteome. Proteomics, the main tool for proteome research, is a relatively new and extremely dynamically evolving branch of science, focused on the evaluation of gene expression at proteome level. Due to the specific properties of proteins, current proteomics deals with different issues, such as protein identification, quantification, characterization of post-translational modification, structure and function elucidation, and description of possible interactions. This field incorporates technologies that can be applied to serum and tissue in order to extract important biological information in the form of biomarkers to aid clinicians and scientists in understanding the dynamic biology of their system of interest, such as a patient with cancer. The present review article provides a detail description of proteomics and its role in cancer research.

  1. Making proteomics data accessible and reusable: current state of proteomics databases and repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Alpi, Emanuele; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Compared to other data-intensive disciplines such as genomics, public deposition and storage of MS-based proteomics, data are still less developed due to, among other reasons, the inherent complexity of the data and the variety of data types and experimental workflows. In order to address this need, several public repositories for MS proteomics experiments have been developed, each with different purposes in mind. The most established resources are the Global Proteome Machine Database (GPMDB), PeptideAtlas, and the PRIDE database. Additionally, there are other useful (in many cases recently developed) resources such as ProteomicsDB, Mass Spectrometry Interactive Virtual Environment (MassIVE), Chorus, MaxQB, PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL), Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED), and the Human Proteinpedia. In addition, the ProteomeXchange consortium has been recently developed to enable better integration of public repositories and the coordinated sharing of proteomics information, maximizing its benefit to the scientific community. Here, we will review each of the major proteomics resources independently and some tools that enable the integration, mining and reuse of the data. We will also discuss some of the major challenges and current pitfalls in the integration and sharing of the data. © 2014 The Authors. PROTEOMICS published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  3. Political Economy of the New Technology Based Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Güler Aydın

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available New technology based firms are effective not only changes in economic but also in institutional areas. These firms provide continuous technological innovations (creative entrepreneur in Schumpeterian sense rather than the rationalization process that routinizes the entrepreneur in big firms. The aim of this study is to denote that the Schumpeterian analysis is appropriate framework for the new technology based firms and to introduce the effects of technological innovations of these firms both economic and institutional areas. This study is composed of two parts. In the first part, the basic characteristics of new technology based firms will be examined by the help of the literature. In the second part of the study, the appropriateness of the Schumpeterian framework for these firms will be displayed and Schumpeter's views on the process of capitalist development within the context of new technology based firms will be re-questioned

  4. Simultaneous Synthesis and Biotinylation of Proteins Using Puromycin-Based Labeling Technology for Fabrication of Protein Array Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumal, Subhashini Raj; Biyani, Manish; Ueno, Shingo; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    Protein arrays represent a class of devices that are of growing importance in the field of proteomics. These arrays enable screening of a large amount of proteins in a short time and at a lower cost. Here we present a method to fabricate protein array using biotin-conjugated puromycin to simultaneously synthesize and label proteins followed by immobilization onto streptavidin-functionalized surface based on the noncovalent biotin-streptavidin interaction. This method demonstrates the fabrication of protein array based on cell-free transcription/translation system using unmodified DNA as a starting genetic material. As a consequence, the procedure of protein arraying has been greatly simplified over the conventional approaches that require tedious and multi-step reactions. Further, an integrated approach of micro reactor array technology makes this method very simple and robust for achieving high-density protein arrays.

  5. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational

  6. utilization of sweetpotato based confection technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oma

    Keywords: Technology, Sweet potato, utilization, households, southeastern, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Sweet potato (lpomoea batatas L) is among the worlds most important, versatile, and under exploited food crops, with more than 133 million tones (FAOSTAT, 1997) in annual production. Sweet potato currently ranks as ...

  7. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, ...

  8. Food production: technology and the resource base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, S H

    1975-05-09

    Despite a growing population and increasing demands of that population for improved diets, it appears that the world is not close to universal famine (3, 53). There is enough food now produced to feed the world's hungry (54). That people are malnourished or starving is a question of distribution, delivery, and economics, not agricultural limits. The problem is putting the food where the people are and providing an income so that they can buy it. As to the future, there are clouds on the far horizon. Only increased scientific and technological innovation, coupled with a change in human behavior and in national policy with regard to increased investments in agricultural research, can avert a growing food and population crisis. Only scientists develop new technology. Only farmers produce food. Motivation and incentives are important both for scientific discovery and food production. Agricultural research is also a process. There is no finite beginning or end. It is a continuing search to unravel mysteries. We must force the pace of agricultural development, but technology must be tailored to local conditions. Thiscan be done by scientists who also know how to farm. Individual dedication and sustained government commitments are important. Rapidity of information transfer and of acceptance of technology is also crucial (55). There is a wide gap between progress in research and the point of application for human benefit (Table 5). What accounts for the vast time differences in rapidity of technology acceptance? The current avalanche of new knowledge coupled with problems of food, feed, and fiber supplies, and issues of availability, preservation, protection, renewability, and costs of resources should bring to the front the urgency of rapid information transfer and reassessment of information systems for agricultural and other renewable resources.

  9. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis of Brassica napus leaves reveals pathways associated with chlorophyll deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Pu; Yan, Gui Xia; Yang, Qing; Zhai, Li Na; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Feng Qi; Guan, Rong Zhan

    2015-01-15

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of plant biomass, is important for plant growth and crop yield. Chlorophyll is highly abundant in plant leaves and plays essential roles in photosynthesis. We recently isolated a chlorophyll-deficient mutant (cde1) from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized Brassica napus. Herein, quantitative proteomics analysis using the iTRAQ approach was conducted to investigate cde1-induced changes in the proteome. We identified 5069 proteins from B. napus leaves, of which 443 showed differential accumulations between the cde1 mutant and its corresponding wild-type. The differentially accumulated proteins were found to be involved in photosynthesis, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, carbon fixation, spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and RNA degradation. Our results suggest that decreased abundance of chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes and photosynthetic proteins, impaired carbon fixation efficiency and disturbed redox homeostasis might account for the reduced chlorophyll contents, impaired photosynthetic capacity and increased lipid peroxidation in this mutant. Epigenetics was implicated in the regulation of gene expression in cde1, as proteins involved in DNA/RNA/histone methylation and methylation-dependent chromatin silencing were up-accumulated in the mutant. Biological significance Photosynthesis produces more than 90% of plant biomass and is an important factor influencing potential crop yield. The pigment chlorophyll plays essential roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis. Mutants deficient in chlorophyll synthesis have been used extensively to investigate the chlorophyll metabolism, development and photosynthesis. However, limited information is available with regard to the changes of protein profiles upon chlorophyll deficiency. Here, a combined physiological, histological, proteomics and molecular analysis revealed several important pathways associated with

  10. Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic-Based Approaches to Identifying Signature Biomarkers and Pathways for Elucidation of Daoy and UW228 Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Higdon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Patient survival has remained largely the same for the past 20 years, with therapies causing significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental complications for those who survive the tumor. In this study, we profiled the total transcriptome and proteome of two established MB cell lines, Daoy and UW228, using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq and label-free nano-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics, coupled with advanced pathway analysis. While Daoy has been suggested to belong to the sonic hedgehog (SHH subtype, the exact UW228 subtype is not yet clearly established. Thus, a goal of this study was to identify protein markers and pathways that would help elucidate their subtype classification. A number of differentially expressed genes and proteins, including a number of adhesion, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, were observed between the two cell lines. While several cancer-associated genes/proteins exhibited similar expression across the two cell lines, upregulation of a number of signature proteins and enrichment of key components of SHH and WNT signaling pathways were uniquely observed in Daoy and UW228, respectively. The novel information on differentially expressed genes/proteins and enriched pathways provide insights into the biology of MB, which could help elucidate their subtype classification.

  11. Nano-liquid Chromatography-orbitrap MS-based Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Differences Between the Mechanisms of Action of Carnosic Acid and Carnosol in Colon Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Alberto; Artemenko, Konstantin A.; Simó, Carolina; Bergquist, Jonas; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) and carnosol (CS) are two structurally related diterpenes present in rosemary herb (Rosmarinus officinalis). Although several studies have demonstrated that both diterpenes can scavenge free radicals and interfere in cellular processes such as cell proliferation, they may not necessarily exert the same effects at the molecular level. In this work, a shotgun proteomics study based on stable isotope dimethyl labeling (DML) and nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) has been performed to identify the relative changes in proteins and to gain some light on the specific molecular targets and mechanisms of action of CA and CS in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Protein profiles revealed that CA and CS induce different Nrf2-mediated response. Furthermore, examination of our data revealed that each diterpene affects protein homeostasis by different mechanisms. CA treatment induces the expression of proteins involved in the unfolded protein response in a concentration dependent manner reflecting ER stress, whereas CS directly inhibits chymotrypsin-like activity of the 20S proteasome. In conclusion, the unbiased proteomics-wide method applied in the present study has demonstrated to be a powerful tool to reveal differences on the mechanisms of action of two related bioactive compounds in the same biological model. PMID:27834734

  12. Science and Technology Innovation for the Base of the Pyramid ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Approximately four billion of the world's people subsist at the base of the social and economic pyramid, while a mere 75-100 million make up the top. Despite the many challenges facing those at the base, it is the affluent minority at the top who have benefited most from technological innovation. Indeed, some technological ...

  13. School-based data and management of technological innovations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School-based data and management of technological innovations in public secondary schools in Cross River State. ... Global Journal of Educational Research ... Result indicated that: there is no significant positive relationship between school-based data and principals management of technological innovation.

  14. Creatine-induced activation of antioxidative defence in myotube cultures revealed by explorative NMR-based metabonomics and proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Niels

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine is a key intermediate in energy metabolism and supplementation of creatine has been used for increasing muscle mass, strength and endurance. Creatine supplementation has also been reported to trigger the skeletal muscle expression of insulin like growth factor I, to increase the fat-free mass and improve cognition in elderly, and more explorative approaches like transcriptomics has revealed additional information. The aim of the present study was to reveal additional insight into the biochemical effects of creatine supplementation at the protein and metabolite level by integrating the explorative techniques, proteomics and NMR metabonomics, in a systems biology approach. Methods Differentiated mouse myotube cultures (C2C12 were exposed to 5 mM creatine monohydrate (CMH for 24 hours. For proteomics studies, lysed myotubes were analyzed in single 2-DGE gels where the first dimension of protein separation was pI 5-8 and second dimension was a 12.5% Criterion gel. Differentially expressed protein spots of significance were excised from the gel, desalted and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF MS. For NMR metabonomic studies, chloroform/methanol extractions of the myotubes were subjected to one-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy and the intracellular oxidative status of myotubes was assessed by intracellular DCFH2 oxidation after 24 h pre-incubation with CMH. Results The identified differentially expressed proteins included vimentin, malate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin, thioredoxin dependent peroxide reductase, and 75 kDa and 78 kDa glucose regulated protein precursors. After CMH exposure, up-regulated proteomic spots correlated positively with the NMR signals from creatine, while down-regulated proteomic spots were negatively correlated with these NMR signals. The identified differentially regulated proteins were related to energy metabolism, glucose regulated stress, cellular structure and the

  15. Discovering Altered Regulation and Signaling Through Network-based Integration of Transcriptomic, Epigenomic, and Proteomic Tumor Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedaigle, Amanda J; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2018-01-01

    With the extraordinary rise in available biological data, biologists and clinicians need unbiased tools for data integration in order to reach accurate, succinct conclusions. Network biology provides one such method for high-throughput data integration, but comes with its own set of algorithmic problems and needed expertise. We provide a step-by-step guide for using Omics Integrator, a software package designed for the integration of transcriptomic, epigenomic, and proteomic data. Omics Integrator can be found at http://fraenkel.mit.edu/omicsintegrator .

  16. Assessing CMT cell line stability by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) followed by mass spectrometric identification of the proteins in the protein spots has become a central tool in proteomics. CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) cell lines, selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma, with high...... to be a useful tool for assessing differences in cell line stability. This approach provided a tool to select the best cell line and optimal subculture period for studies of cancer related phenomena and for testing the effect of potential anticancer drugs....

  17. Discovery of nutritional biomarkers: future directions based on omics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, Leticia; Corrales, Fernado J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the interactions between food and human biology is of utmost importance to facilitate the development of more efficient nutritional interventions that might improve our wellness status and future health outcomes by reducing risk factors for non-transmittable chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms that mediate the physiological effects of diets and bioactive compounds is one of the main goals of current nutritional investigation and the food industry as might lead to the discovery of novel biomarkers. It is widely recognized that the availability of robust nutritional biomarkers represents a bottleneck that delays the innovation process of the food industry. In this regard, omics sciences have opened up new avenues of research and opportunities in nutrition. Advances in mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, next generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow massive genome, gene expression, proteomic and metabolomic profiling, obtaining a global and in-depth analysis of physiological/pathological scenarios. For this reason, omics platforms are most suitable for the discovery and characterization of novel nutritional markers that will define the nutritional status of both individuals and populations in the near future, and to identify the nutritional bioactive compounds responsible for the health outcomes.

  18. Aptamer-based technology for food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xuewu

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers are short and functional single-stranded oligonucleotide sequences selected from systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process, which have the capacity to recognize various classes of target molecules with high affinity and specificity. Various analytical aptamers acquired by SELEX are widely used in many research fields, such as medicine, biology, and chemistry. However, the application of this innovative and emerging technology to food safety is just in infant stage. Food safety plays a very important role in our daily lives because varieties of poisonous and harmful substances in food affect human health. Aptamer technique is promising, which can overcome many disadvantages of existing detection methods in food safety, such as long detection time, low sensitivity, difficult, and expensive antibody preparation. This review provides an overview of various aptamer screening technologies and summarizes the recent applications of aptamers in food safety, and future prospects are also discussed.

  19. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  20. Mathematical modelling of the MAP kinase pathway using proteomic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tianhai; Song, Jiangning

    2012-01-01

    The advances in proteomics technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity and valuable resources to understand how living organisms execute necessary functions at systems levels. However, little work has been done up to date to utilize the highly accurate spatio-temporal dynamic proteome data generated by phosphoprotemics for mathematical modeling of complex cell signaling pathways. This work proposed a novel computational framework to develop mathematical models based on proteomic datasets. Using the MAP kinase pathway as the test system, we developed a mathematical model including the cytosolic and nuclear subsystems; and applied the genetic algorithm to infer unknown model parameters. Robustness property of the mathematical model was used as a criterion to select the appropriate rate constants from the estimated candidates. Quantitative information regarding the absolute protein concentrations was used to refine the mathematical model. We have demonstrated that the incorporation of more experimental data could significantly enhance both the simulation accuracy and robustness property of the proposed model. In addition, we used the MAP kinase pathway inhibited by phosphatases with different concentrations to predict the signal output influenced by different cellular conditions. Our predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations when the MAP kinase pathway was inhibited by phosphatase PP2A and MKP3. The successful application of the proposed modeling framework to the MAP kinase pathway suggests that our method is very promising for developing accurate mathematical models and yielding insights into the regulatory mechanisms of complex cell signaling pathways.

  1. Microgravity induces proteomics changes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial protection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To reveal outcomes of microgravity on molecular processes within the cellular environment we have employed a mass-spectrometry based proteomics approach. Proteomics...

  2. Comparative analysis of methicillin-sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus exposed to emodin based on proteomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Peng, Yuanxia; Zhan, Ruoting; Xu, Hui; Ge, Xijin

    2017-12-09

    Emodin has a strong antibacterial activity, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the mechanism by which emodin induces growth inhibition against MRSA remains unclear. In this study, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics approach was used to investigate the modes of action of emodin on a MRSA isolate and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus ATCC29213(MSSA). Proteomic analysis showed that expression levels of 145 and 122 proteins were changed significantly in MRSA and MSSA, respectively, after emodin treatment. Comparative analysis of the functions of differentially expressed proteins between the two strains was performed via bioinformatics tools blast2go and STRING database. Proteins related to pyruvate pathway imbalance induction, protein synthesis inhibition, and DNA synthesis suppression were found in both methicillin-sensitive and resistant strains. Moreover, Interference proteins related to membrane damage mechanism were also observed in MRSA. Our findings indicate that emodin is a potential antibacterial agent targeting MRSA via multiple mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  4. Innovative cold joining technologies based on tube forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on innovative cold joining technologies for connecting tubes and fixing tubes to sheets. The proposed technologies are based on the utilization of plastic instability waves in thin-walled tubes subjected to axial compression and may be seen as an alternative to conventional joining technologies based on mechanical fixing with fasteners, welding and structural adhesive bonding. Besides allowing connecting dissimilar materials and being successfully employed in fixture conditions that are difficult and costly to achieve by means of conventional joining the new proposed technologies also cope with the growing concerns on the demand, lifecycle and recycling of materials.

  5. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Morneau, R.A.; Rudin, M.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1992-05-01

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  6. Human maternal plasma proteomic changes with parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Significance: Proteomic technology is constantly advancing, and the latest techniques enable gel-free analysis of minimally preprocessed, complex biological samples, enabling simultaneous identification and quantification of many hundreds of proteins. The technique of TMT labelling and Orbitrap mass spectrometry is applicable to the analysis of serial maternal plasma samples in order to identify potential markers of the onset of labour.

  7. Reconciling proteomics with next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teck Yew; Heck, Albert Jr

    2015-01-01

    Both genomics and proteomics technologies have matured in the last decade to a level where they are able to deliver system-wide data on the qualitative and quantitative abundance of their respective molecular entities, that is DNA/RNA and proteins. A next logical step is the collective use of these

  8. Use of monolithic supports for high-throughput protein and peptide separation in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelković, Uroš; Tufegdžić, Srdjan; Popović, Milica

    2017-11-01

    The exclusive properties of monolithic supports enable fast mass transfer, high porosity, low back pressure, easy preparation process and miniaturisation, and the availability of different chemistries make them particularly suitable materials for high-throughput (HTP) protein and peptide separation. In this review recent advances in monolith-based chromatographic supports for HTP screening of protein and peptide samples are presented and their application in HTP sample preparation (separation, enrichment, depletion, proteolytic digestion) for HTP proteomics is discussed. Development and applications of different monolithic capillary columns in HTP MS-based bottom-up and top-down proteomics are overviewed. By discussing the chromatographic conditions and the mass spectrometric data acquisition conditions an attempt is made to present currently demonstrated capacities of monolithic capillary columns for HTP identification and quantification of proteins and peptides from complex biological samples by MS-based proteomics. Some recent advances in basic monolith technology of importance for proteomics are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Immature Seed Endosperm and Embryo Proteomics of the Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera Gaertn. by One-Dimensional Gel-Based Tandem Mass Spectrometry and a Comparison with the Mature Endosperm Proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo F. Moro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. seed proteome has been the focus of our studies, and we have recently established the first proteome dataset for its mature seed endosperm. The current study unravels the immature endosperm, as well as the embryo proteome, to provide a comprehensive dataset of the lotus seed proteins and a comparison between the mature and immature endosperm tissues across the seed’s development. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE linked with tandem mass spectrometry provided a protein inventory of the immature endosperm (122 non-redundant proteins and embryo (141 non-redundant proteins tissues. Comparing with the previous mature endosperm dataset (66 non-redundant proteins, a total of 206 non-redundant proteins were identified across all three tissues of the lotus seed. Results revealed some significant differences in proteome composition between the three lotus seed tissues, most notably between the mature endosperm and its immature developmental stage shifting the proteins from nutrient production to nutrient storage.

  10. Biological Detection System Technologies Technology and Industrial Base Study. A Primer on Biological Detection Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    processes for manufacturers; pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries; trade associations; and government agencies supporting energy, the...microsatellite genotyping of DNA; gene expression studies; and analyses of gene mutations . Technology Development Two major research thrusts at the

  11. Didactics, Technology, and Organisation of Project Based Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack; Borch, Ole M.; Helbo, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The didactics, technology, and organization of an ICT supported distance engineering Master education are described. A systematic monitoring and evaluation of the basis year has given useful experience, subsequently used for adjustments and improvements. A successful on-campus project organized...... as asynchronous, which is possible with extensive utilization of new information and communication technology. Virtual meetings are conducted with text, sound and video based communication. Also the organization requires technology. A new learning management system, specifically designed to the didactic form...

  12. Quantification of Technology Innovation Usinga Risk-Based Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard E. Sleefe

    2010-01-01

    There is significant interest in achieving technology innovation through new product development activities. It is recognized, however, that traditional project management practices focused only on performance, cost, and schedule attributes, can often lead to risk mitigation strategies that limit new technology innovation. In this paper, a new approach is proposed for formally managing and quantifying technology innovation. This approach uses a risk-based framework that s...

  13. Resistive and Capacitive Based Sensing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winncy Y. Du

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Resistive and capacitive (RC sensors are the most commonly used sensors. Their applications span homeland security, industry, environment, space, traffic control, home automation, aviation, and medicine. More than 30% of modern sensors are direct or indirect applications of the RC sensing principles. This paper reviews resistive and capacitive sensing technologies. The physical principles of resistive sensors are governed by several important laws and phenomena such as Ohm’s Law, Wiedemann-Franz Law; Photoconductive-, Piezoresistive-, and Thermoresistive Effects. The applications of these principles are presented through a variety of examples including accelerometers, flame detectors, pressure/flow rate sensors, RTDs, hygristors, chemiresistors, and bio-impedance sensors. The capacitive sensors are described through their three configurations: parallel (flat, cylindrical (coaxial, and spherical (concentric. Each configuration is discussed with respect to its geometric structure, function, and application in various sensor designs. Capacitance sensor arrays are also presented in the paper.

  14. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, this paper verifies that the discrete neural network has a good convergence and identification capability in the image restoration technology with a better effect than that of the feedforward network. The restoration technology based on the discrete neural network can provide a reliable mathematical model for this field.

  15. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Teaching Information Systems Technologies: a New Approach based on Virtualization and Hosting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo R. García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how to provide suitable computing systems for information systems technologies learning using virtualization and hosting technologies. The main functionalities and components of an university learning lab based on these technologies are presented. All the software components used in its development are open source. Also, the use of this lab, providing the computing systems required for the learning activities of different matters related to the information systems technologies, is illustrated. The model of computing lab proposed is a more sustainable and scalable alternative than the traditional academic computing lab.

  17. MASH Suite Pro: A Comprehensive Software Tool for Top-Down Proteomics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenxuan; Guner, Huseyin; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Chen, Albert J.; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Peng, Ying; Valeja, Santosh G.; Liu, Xiaowen; Ge, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is arguably a disruptive technology for the comprehensive analysis of all proteoforms arising from genetic variation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, the complexity of top-down high-resolution mass spectra presents a significant challenge for data analysis. In contrast to the well-developed software packages available for data analysis in bottom-up proteomics, the data analysis tools in top-down proteomics remain underdeveloped. Moreover, despite recent efforts to develop algorithms and tools for the deconvolution of top-down high-resolution mass spectra and the identification of proteins from complex mixtures, a multifunctional software platform, which allows for the identification, quantitation, and characterization of proteoforms with visual validation, is still lacking. Herein, we have developed MASH Suite Pro, a comprehensive software tool for top-down proteomics with multifaceted functionality. MASH Suite Pro is capable of processing high-resolution MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) data using two deconvolution algorithms to optimize protein identification results. In addition, MASH Suite Pro allows for the characterization of PTMs and sequence variations, as well as the relative quantitation of multiple proteoforms in different experimental conditions. The program also provides visualization components for validation and correction of the computational outputs. Furthermore, MASH Suite Pro facilitates data reporting and presentation via direct output of the graphics. Thus, MASH Suite Pro significantly simplifies and speeds up the interpretation of high-resolution top-down proteomics data by integrating tools for protein identification, quantitation, characterization, and visual validation into a customizable and user-friendly interface. We envision that MASH Suite Pro will play an integral role in advancing the burgeoning field of top-down proteomics. PMID:26598644

  18. Embryology in the era of proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Jaffe, M G; Gardner, D K

    2007-09-01

    Currently, relatively little is known regarding the protein production of mammalian embryos. Unlike the genome, the proteome itself is dynamic reflecting both internal and external environmental stimuli. Until now the lack of sensitivity has remained a stumbling block for the global introduction of proteomics into the field of mammalian embryology. However, new developments in mass spectrometry have been revolutionary, utilizing protein profiling and peptide sequencing to elucidate underlying biological processes. The sensitivity of these platforms have allowed for the development of new protocols that are capable of profiling the proteome of individual mammalian oocytes and embryos. This information is fundamental to unravelling the complexity of embryo physiology including the dialogue between the developing embryo and its maternal environment. Such proteomic approaches are also assisting in the optimization of ART techniques, including oocyte cryopreservation and in vitro maturation. Embryo selection for transfer is another area of ART that should benefit in this era of proteomics. Currently, mammalian embryos are selected for transfer based on morphological grading systems. Although of great value, analysis of morphology alone cannot determine the embryo's physiological state or chromosomal complement. Subsequently, there is a need to identify in culture those embryos with the highest implantation potential. Proteomic analysis of the embryonic secretome (proteins produced by the embryo and secreted into the surrounding medium) followed by the identification of specific proteins critical for implantation, may lead to the development of a non-invasive viability assay to assist in the selection of embryos for transfer.

  19. Proteogenomics Dashboard for the Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Alves-Cruzeiro, Joao; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Vialas, Vital; Prieto, Gorka; García, Carlos; Corrales, Fernando J; Albar, Juan Pablo; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2015-09-04

    dasHPPboard is a novel proteomics-based dashboard that collects and reports the experiments produced by the Spanish Human Proteome Project consortium (SpHPP) and aims to help HPP to map the entire human proteome. We have followed the strategy of analog genomics projects like the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), which provides a vast amount of data on human cell lines experiments. The dashboard includes results of shotgun and selected reaction monitoring proteomics experiments, post-translational modifications information, as well as proteogenomics studies. We have also processed the transcriptomics data from the ENCODE and Human Body Map (HBM) projects for the identification of specific gene expression patterns in different cell lines and tissues, taking special interest in those genes having little proteomic evidence available (missing proteins). Peptide databases have been built using single nucleotide variants and novel junctions derived from RNA-Seq data that can be used in search engines for sample-specific protein identifications on the same cell lines or tissues. The dasHPPboard has been designed as a tool that can be used to share and visualize a combination of proteomic and transcriptomic data, providing at the same time easy access to resources for proteogenomics analyses. The dasHPPboard can be freely accessed at: http://sphppdashboard.cnb.csic.es.

  20. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  1. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  2. Data for iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis of Brassica napus leaves in response to chlorophyll deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Chu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential pigment chlorophyll (Chl plays important roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis. Here we present the data from a comparative proteomic analysis of chlorophyll-deficient Brassica napus mutant cde1 and its corresponding wild-type using the iTRAQ approach (Pu Chu et al., 2014 [1]. The distribution of length and number of peptides, mass and sequence coverage of proteins identified was calculated, and the repeatability of the replicates was analyzed. A total of 443 differentially expressed proteins were identified in B. napus leaves, including 228 down-accumulated proteins mainly involved in photosynthesis, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, carbon fixation and 215 up-accumulated proteins that enriched in the spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and RNA degradation.

  3. Anatomy and evolution of database search engines-a central component of mass spectrometry based proteomic workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen, Kenneth; Raeder, Helge; Berven, Frode S; Martens, Lennart; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc

    2017-09-13

    Sequence database search engines are bioinformatics algorithms that identify peptides from tandem mass spectra using a reference protein sequence database. Two decades of development, notably driven by advances in mass spectrometry, have provided scientists with more than 30 published search engines, each with its own properties. In this review, we present the common paradigm behind the different implementations, and its limitations for modern mass spectrometry datasets. We also detail how the search engines attempt to alleviate these limitations, and provide an overview of the different software frameworks available to the researcher. Finally, we highlight alternative approaches for the identification of proteomic mass spectrometry datasets, either as a replacement for, or as a complement to, sequence database search engines. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dithiothreitol-based protein equalization technology to unravel biomarkers for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, J E; López-Fernández, H; Diniz, M S; Baltazar, Pedro M; Pinheiro, Luís Campos; da Silva, Fernando Calais; Carrascal, Mylène; Videira, Paula; Santos, H M; Capelo, J L

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the benefits of dithiothreitol (DTT)-based sample treatment for protein equalization to assess potential biomarkers for bladder cancer. The proteome of plasma samples of patients with bladder carcinoma, patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and healthy volunteers, was equalized with dithiothreitol (DTT) and compared. The equalized proteomes were interrogated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Six proteins, namely serum albumin, gelsolin, fibrinogen gamma chain, Ig alpha-1 chain C region, Ig alpha-2 chain C region and haptoglobin, were found dysregulated in at least 70% of bladder cancer patients when compared with a pool of healthy individuals. One protein, serum albumin, was found overexpressed in 70% of the patients when the equalized proteome of the healthy pool was compared with the equalized proteome of the LUTS patients. The pathways modified by the proteins differentially expressed were analyzed using Cytoscape. The method here presented is fast, cheap, of easy application and it matches the analytical minimalism rules as outlined by Halls. Orthogonal validation was done using western-blot. Overall, DTT-based protein equalization is a promising methodology in bladder cancer research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing computational model-based diagnostics to analyse clinical chemistry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Bochove, K. van; Ommen, B. van; Freidig, A.P.; Someren, E.P. van; Greef, J. van der; Graaf, A.A. de

    2010-01-01

    This article provides methodological and technical considerations to researchers starting to develop computational model-based diagnostics using clinical chemistry data.These models are of increasing importance, since novel metabolomics and proteomics measuring technologies are able to produce large

  6. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predicting the outer membrane proteome of Pasteurella multocida based on consensus prediction enhanced by results integration and manual confirmation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-komon Teerasak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane proteins (OMPs of Pasteurella multocida have various functions related to virulence and pathogenesis and represent important targets for vaccine development. Various bioinformatic algorithms can predict outer membrane localization and discriminate OMPs by structure or function. The designation of a confident prediction framework by integrating different predictors followed by consensus prediction, results integration and manual confirmation will improve the prediction of the outer membrane proteome. Results In the present study, we used 10 different predictors classified into three groups (subcellular localization, transmembrane β-barrel protein and lipoprotein predictors to identify putative OMPs from two available P. multocida genomes: those of avian strain Pm70 and porcine non-toxigenic strain 3480. Predicted proteins in each group were filtered by optimized criteria for consensus prediction: at least two positive predictions for the subcellular localization predictors, three for the transmembrane β-barrel protein predictors and one for the lipoprotein predictors. The consensus predicted proteins were integrated from each group into a single list of proteins. We further incorporated a manual confirmation step including a public database search against PubMed and sequence analyses, e.g. sequence and structural homology, conserved motifs/domains, functional prediction, and protein-protein interactions to enhance the confidence of prediction. As a result, we were able to confidently predict 98 putative OMPs from the avian strain genome and 107 OMPs from the porcine strain genome with 83% overlap between the two genomes. Conclusions The bioinformatic framework developed in this study has increased the number of putative OMPs identified in P. multocida and allowed these OMPs to be identified with a higher degree of confidence. Our approach can be applied to investigate the outer membrane proteomes of other Gram

  8. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite in Response to the Antifouling Compound Meleagrin

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Zhuang

    2013-05-03

    Marine biofouling refers to the unwanted accumulation of fouling organisms, such as barnacles, on artificial surfaces, resulting in severe consequences for marine industries. Meleagrin is a potential nontoxic antifoulant that is isolated from the fungus Penicillium sp.; however, its mechanistic effect mode of action on larval settlement remains unknown. Here, we applied iTRAQ coupled with 2D LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis to investigate the effect of meleagrin on the proteomic expression profile of cyprid development and aging in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. Fifty proteins were differentially expressed in response to treatment with meleagrin, among which 26 proteins were associated with cyprid development/aging and 24 were specifically associated with the meleagrin treatment. The 66 proteins that were associated with aging only remained unaltered during exposure to meleagrin. Using KEGG analysis, those proteins were assigned to several groups, including metabolic pathways, ECM-receptor interactions, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the 24 proteins that were not related to the development/aging process, expression of the cyprid major protein (CMP), a vitellogenin-like protein, increased after the meleagrin treatment, which suggested that meleagrin might affect the endocrine system and prevent the larval molting cycle. With the exception of the chitin binding protein that mediates the molting process and ATPase-mediated energy processes, the majority of proteins with significant effects in previous studies in response to cyprid treatment with butenolide and polyether B remained unchanged in the present study, suggesting that meleagrin may exhibit a different mechanism. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Integrated SDS removal and protein digestion by hollow fiber membrane based device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Simin; Yuan, Huiming; Chen, Yuanbo; Liang, Zheng; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a novel integrated sample preparation device for SDS-assisted proteome analysis was developed, by which proteins dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS were first diluted by 50% methanol, and then SDS was online removed by a hollow fiber membrane interface (HFMI) with 50mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 8.0) as an exchange buffer, finally digested by an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). To evaluate the performance of such an integrated device, bovine serum albumin dissolved in 4% (w/v) SDS as a model sample was analyzed; it could be found that similar to that obtained by direct analysis of BSA digests without SDS (the sequence coverage of 60.3±1.0%, n=3), with HFMI as an interface for SDS removal, BSA was identified with the sequence coverage of 61.0±1.0% (n=3). However, without SDS removal by HFMI, BSA could not be digested by the IMER and none peptides could be detected. In addition, such an integrated sample preparation device was also applied for the analysis of SDS extracted proteins from rat brain, compared to those obtained by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), not only the identified protein group and unique peptide number were increased by 12% and 39% respectively, but also the sample pretreatment time was shortened from 24h to 4h. All these results demonstrated that such an integrated sample preparation device would provide an alternative tool for SDS assisted proteome analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Method validation for preparing serum and plasma samples from human blood for downstream proteomic, metabolomic, and circulating nucleic acid-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, Wim; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Lescuyer, Pierre; Mathay, Conny; Hiller, Karsten; Betsou, Fay

    2014-08-01

    Formal method validation for biospecimen processing in the context of accreditation in laboratories and biobanks is lacking. Serum and plasma processing protocols were validated for fitness-for-purpose in terms of key downstream endpoints, and this article demonstrates methodology for biospecimen processing method validation. Serum and plasma preparation from human blood was optimized for centrifugation conditions with respect to microparticle counts. Optimal protocols were validated for methodology and reproducibility in terms of acceptance criteria based on microparticle counts, DNA and hemoglobin concentration, and metabolomic and proteomic profiles. These parameters were also used to evaluate robustness for centrifugation temperature (4°C versus room temperature [RT]), deceleration (low, medium, high) and blood stability (after a 2-hour delay). Optimal protocols were 10-min centrifugation for serum and 20-min for plasma at 2000 g, medium brake, RT. Methodology and reproducibility acceptance criteria were met for both protocols except for reproducibility of plasma metabolomics. Overall, neither protocol was robust for centrifugation at 4°C versus RT. RT gave higher microparticles and free DNA yields in serum, and fewer microparticles with less hemolysis in plasma. Overall, both protocols were robust for fast, medium, and low deceleration, with a medium brake considered optimal. Pre-centrifugation stability after a 2-hour delay was seen at both temperatures for hemoglobin concentration and proteomics, but not for microparticle counts. We validated serum and plasma collection methods suitable for downstream protein, metabolite, or free nucleic acid-based applications. Temperature and pre-centrifugation delay can influence analytic results, and laboratories and biobanks should systematically record these conditions in the scope of accreditation.

  11. Comparison of a Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Method Based on Peptide Ion Current Area to the Isotope Coded Affinity Tag Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ah Goo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several research groups have published methods for the determination of proteomic expression profiling by mass spectrometry without the use of exogenously added stable isotopes or stable isotope dilution theory. These so-called label-free, methods have the advantage of allowing data on each sample to be acquired independently from all other samples to which they can later be compared in silico for the purpose of measuring changes in protein expression between various biological states. We developed label free software based on direct measurement of peptide ion current area (PICA and compared it to two other methods, a simpler label free method known as spectral counting and the isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT method. Data analysis by these methods of a standard mixture containing proteins of known, but varying, concentrations showed that they performed similarly with a mean squared error of 0.09. Additionally, complex bacterial protein mixtures spiked with known concentrations of standard proteins were analyzed using the PICA label-free method. These results indicated that the PICA method detected all levels of standard spiked proteins at the 90% confidence level in this complex biological sample. This finding confirms that label-free methods, based on direct measurement of the area under a single ion current trace, performed as well as the standard ICAT method. Given the fact that the label-free methods provide ease in experimental design well beyond pair-wise comparison, label-free methods such as our PICA method are well suited for proteomic expression profiling of large numbers of samples as is needed in clinical analysis.

  12. Integrative bioinformatics and proteomics-based discovery of an eEF2K inhibitor (cefatrizine) with ER stress modulation in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiqiang; Li, Juntang; Liu, Zhongyu; Zheng, Lu; Fan, Naijun; Zhang, Ying; Jia, Nan; Lv, Jingjing; Liu, Ningning; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Du, Jiangbo; Lv, Ci; Xie, Feng; Liu, Yigang; Wang, Xingke; Fei, Zhou; Gao, Chunfang

    2016-03-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase (eEF2K), a unique calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, is well known to regulate apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress in many types of human cancers. Therefore, eEF2K would be regarded as a promising therapeutic target; however, the eEF2K-regulated mechanism and its targeted inhibitor still remain to be discovered in cancer. Herein, we constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of eEF2K and achieved an eEF2K-regulated ER stress subnetwork by bioinformatics prediction. Then, we found that the differential protein expressions involved in ER stress in the context of si-eEF2K-treated MCF-7 and MDA-MB-436 cells by iTRAQ-based analyses, respectively. Integrated into these aforementioned results, we constructed a core eEF2K-regulated ER stress subnetwork in breast cancer cells. Subsequently, we screened a series of candidate compounds targeting eEF2K and discovered a novel eEF2K inhibitor (cefatrizine) with an anti-proliferative activity toward breast cancer cells. Moreover, we found that cefatrizine induced ER stress in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-436 cells. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the mechanism of cefatrizine-induced ER stress was in good agreement with our bioinformatics and proteomics-based results. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that a novel eEF2K inhibitor (cefatrizine) induces ER stress in breast cancer cells by integrating bioinformatics prediction, proteomics analyses and experimental validation, which would provide a clue for exploring more mechanisms of eEF2K and its targeted inhibitors in cancer therapy.

  13. Comparison of a label-free quantitative proteomic method based on peptide ion current area to the isotope coded affinity tag method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Soyoung; Gallis, Byron; Goo, Young Ah; Shaffer, Scott A; Radulovic, Dragan; Goodlett, David R

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several research groups have published methods for the determination of proteomic expression profiling by mass spectrometry without the use of exogenously added stable isotopes or stable isotope dilution theory. These so-called label-free, methods have the advantage of allowing data on each sample to be acquired independently from all other samples to which they can later be compared in silico for the purpose of measuring changes in protein expression between various biological states. We developed label free software based on direct measurement of peptide ion current area (PICA) and compared it to two other methods, a simpler label free method known as spectral counting and the isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) method. Data analysis by these methods of a standard mixture containing proteins of known, but varying, concentrations showed that they performed similarly with a mean squared error of 0.09. Additionally, complex bacterial protein mixtures spiked with known concentrations of standard proteins were analyzed using the PICA label-free method. These results indicated that the PICA method detected all levels of standard spiked proteins at the 90% confidence level in this complex biological sample. This finding confirms that label-free methods, based on direct measurement of the area under a single ion current trace, performed as well as the standard ICAT method. Given the fact that the label-free methods provide ease in experimental design well beyond pair-wise comparison, label-free methods such as our PICA method are well suited for proteomic expression profiling of large numbers of samples as is needed in clinical analysis.

  14. Investigating Modern Communication Technologies: The effect of Internet-based Communication Technologies on the Investigation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Phillip Simon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication technologies are commonplace in modern society. For many years there were only a handful of communication technologies provided by large companies, namely the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN and mobile telephony; these can be referred to as traditional communication technologies. Over the lifetime of traditional communication technologies has been little technological evolution and as such, law enforcement developed sound methods for investigating targets using them. With the advent of communication technologies that use the Internet – Internet-based or contemporary communication technologies – law enforcement are faced with many challenges. This paper discusses these challenges and their potential impact. It first looks at what defines the two technologies then explores the laws and methods used for their investigation. It then looks at the issues of applying the current methodologies to the newer and fundamentally different technology. The paper concludes that law enforcement will be required to update their methods in order to remain effective against the current technology trends.

  15. Unravelling the Neospora caninum secretome through the secreted fraction (ESA) and quantification of the discharged tachyzoite using high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum causes neosporosis, a disease that leads to abortion or stillbirth in cattle, generating an economic impact on the dairy and beef cattle trade. As an obligatory intracellular parasite, N. caninum needs to invade the host cell in an active manner to survive. The increase in parasite cytosolic Ca2+ upon contact with the host cell mediates critical events, including the exocytosis of phylum-specific secretory organelles and the activation of the parasite invasion motor. Because invasion is considered a requirement for pathogen survival and replication within the host, the identification of secreted proteins (secretome) involved in invasion may be useful to reveal interesting targets for therapeutic intervention. Methods To chart the currently missing N. caninum secretome, we employed mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify proteins present in the N. caninum tachyzoite using two different approaches. The first approach was identifying the proteins present in the tachyzoite-secreted fraction (ESA). The second approach was determining the relative quantification through peptide stable isotope labelling of the tachyzoites submitted to an ethanol secretion stimulus (discharged tachyzoite), expecting to identify the secreted proteins among the down-regulated group. Results As a result, 615 proteins were identified at ESA and 2,011 proteins quantified at the discharged tachyzoite. We have analysed the connection between the secreted and the down-regulated proteins and searched for putative regulators of the secretion process among the up-regulated proteins. An interaction network was built by computational prediction involving the up- and down-regulated proteins. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000424. Conclusions The comparison between the protein abundances in ESA and their measure in the discharged tachyzoite allowed for a more precise

  16. A mammalian transcription factor-specific peptide repository for targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simicevic, Jovan; Moniatte, Marc; Hamelin, Romain; Ahrné, Erik; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-02-01

    Site-specific transcription factors (TFs) play an essential role in mammalian development and function as they are vital for the majority of cellular processes. Despite their biological importance, TF proteomic data is scarce in the literature, likely due to difficulties in detecting peptides as the abundance of TFs in cells tends to be low. In recent years, significant improvements in MS-based technologies in terms of sensitivity and specificity have increased the interest in developing quantitative methodologies specifically targeting relatively lowly abundant proteins such as TFs in mammalian models. Such efforts would be greatly aided by the availability of TF peptide-specific information as such data would not only enable improvements in speed and accuracy of protein identifications, but also ameliorate cross-comparisons of quantitative proteomics data and allow for a more efficient development of targeted proteomics assays. However, to date, no comprehensive TF proteotypic peptide database has been developed. To address this evident lack of TF peptide data in public repositories, we are generating a comprehensive, experimentally derived TF proteotypic peptide spectral library dataset based on in vitro protein expression. Our library currently contains peptide information for 89 TFs and this number is set to increase in the near future. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001212 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001212). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotman, D.

    1993-01-01

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, 'Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  18. Proteomics studies on stress responses in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhseen, Ziyad Tariq; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diverse group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that are distributed throughout marine and freshwater environments and are believed to be responsible for approximately 40% of the total marine primary productivity. The ecological success of diatoms suggests that they have developed a range of strategies to cope with various biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is of great interest to understand the adaptive responses of diatoms to different stresses in the marine environment. Proteomic technologies have been applied to the adaptive responses of marine diatoms under different growth conditions in recent years such as nitrogen starvation, iron limitation and phosphorus deficiency. These studies have provided clues to elucidate the sophisticated sensing mechanisms that control their adaptive responses. Although only a very limited number of proteomic studies were conducted in diatoms, the obtained data have led to a better understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success. This review presents the current status of proteomic studies of diatom stress responses and discusses the novel developments and applications for the analysis of protein post-translational modification in diatoms. The potential future application of proteomics could contribute to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying diatom acclimation to a given stress and the acquisition of an enhanced diatom stress tolerance. Future challenges and research opportunities in the proteomics studies of diatoms are also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hospital Based Health Technology Assessment: an example from Siena

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro Manzi; Pietro Barberini; Fabrizio Dori

    2015-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment (HTA) has emerged in recent years as a useful tool in healthcare decision-making. It is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology and provides evidence-based information on how to allocate resources. The experience of Siena University Hospital is an example of multidisciplinary hospital-based HTA. In the present paper we summarize the organization of ...

  20. Mobile-Based Dictionary of Information and Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liando, O. E. S.; Mewengkang, A.; Kaseger, D.; Sangkop, F. I.; Rantung, V. P.; Rorimpandey, G. C.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to design and build mobile-based dictionary of information and communication technology applications to provide access to information in the form of glossary of terms in the context of information and communication technologies. Applications built in this study using the Android platform, with SQLite database model. This research uses prototype model development method which covers the stages of communication, Quick Plan, Quick Design Modeling, Construction of Prototype, Deployment Delivery & Feedback, and Full System Transformation. The design of this application is designed in such a way as to facilitate the user in the process of learning and understanding the new terms or vocabularies encountered in the world of information and communication technology. Mobile-based dictionary of Information And Communication Technology applications that have been built can be an alternative to learning literature. In its simplest form, this application is able to meet the need for a comprehensive and accurate dictionary of Information And Communication Technology function.

  1. Navigation studies based on the ubiquitous positioning technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Mi, Weijie; Wang, Defeng

    2007-11-01

    This paper summarized the nowadays positioning technologies, such as absolute positioning methods and relative positioning methods, indoor positioning and outdoor positioning, active positioning and passive positioning. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technologies were introduced as the omnipresent out-door positioning technologies, including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BD-1/2. After analysis of the shortcomings of GNSS, indoor positioning technologies were discussed and compared, including A-GPS, Cellular network, Infrared, Electromagnetism, Computer Vision Cognition, Embedded Pressure Sensor, Ultrasonic, RFID (Radio Frequency IDentification), Bluetooth, WLAN etc.. Then the concept and characteristics of Ubiquitous Positioning was proposed. After the ubiquitous positioning technologies contrast and selection followed by system engineering methodology, a navigation system model based on Incorporate Indoor-Outdoor Positioning Solution was proposed. And this model was simulated in the Galileo Demonstration for World Expo Shanghai project. In the conclusion, the prospects of ubiquitous positioning based navigation were shown, especially to satisfy the public location information acquiring requirement.

  2. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mdoe, S.L.; Kimaro, E.

    2006-01-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  3. In-depth analysis of the chicken egg white proteome using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hen's egg white has been the subject of intensive chemical, biochemical and food technological research for many decades, because of its importance in human nutrition, its importance as a source of easily accessible model proteins, and its potential use in biotechnological processes. Recently the arsenal of tools used to study the protein components of egg white has been complemented by mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies. Application of these fast and sensitive methods has already enabled the identification of a large number of new egg white proteins. Recent technological advances may be expected to further expand the egg white protein inventory. Results Using a dual pressure linear ion trap Orbitrap instrument, the LTQ Orbitrap Velos, in conjunction with data analysis in the MaxQuant software package, we identified 158 proteins in chicken egg white with two or more sequence unique peptides. This group of proteins identified with very high confidence included 79 proteins identified in egg white for the first time. In addition, 44 proteins were identified tentatively. Conclusions Our results, apart from identifying many new egg white components, indicate that current mass spectrometry technology is sufficiently advanced to permit direct identification of minor components of proteomes dominated by a few major proteins without resorting to indirect techniques, such as chromatographic depletion or peptide library binding, which change the composition of the proteome.

  4. Proteomic landscape in Central and Eastern Europe: the 9th Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference, Poznań, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadher, Suresh Jivan; Marczak, Łukasz; Łuczak, Magdalena; Stobiecki, Maciej; Widlak, Piotr; Kovarova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Every year since 2007, the Central and Eastern European Proteomic Conference (CEEPC) has excelled in representing state-of-the-art proteomics in and around Central and Eastern Europe, and linking it to international institutions worldwide. Its mission remains to contribute to all approaches of proteomics including traditional and often-revisited methodologies as well as the latest technological achievements in clinical, quantitative and structural proteomics with a view to systems biology of a variety of processes. The 9th CEEPC was held from June 15th to 18th, 2015, at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań, Poland. The scientific program stimulated exchange of proteomic knowledge whilst the spectacular venue of the conference allowed participants to enjoy the cobblestoned historical city of Poznań.

  5. Speech Enhancement Based on Compressed Sensing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS is a sampled approach on signal sparsity-base, and it can effectively extract the information which is contained in the signal. This paper presents a noisy speech enhancement new method based on CS process. Algorithm uses a voice sparsity in the discrete fast Fourier transform (Fast Fourier transform, FFT, and complex domain observation matrix is designed, and the noisy speech compression measurement and de-noising are made by soft threshold, and the speech signal is sparsely reconstructed by separable approximation (Sparse Reconstruction by Separable Approximation, SpaRSA algorithm to restore, speech enhancement is improved. Experimental results show that the denoising compression reconstruction of the noisy signal is done in the algorithm, SNR margin is improved greatly, and the background noise can been more effectively suppressed.

  6. Technological Perspectives for Air Base Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    day if personnel must be encased in chemical warfare suits. Moreover, there is no need to match proper wires together; color blindness is not a...cost associated with the present ’- minicomputer-based distributed networks. Engineering development and possibly some R&D are necessary, but the...fil" 940 TECNOLOGICAL. PERSPECTIVES FOR RJR ESE CM IRIN 1 (U) RAND ORP SANTA MONICA CA H H HARE OCT 85 UNCL~~R ANFI D I10N

  7. Dynamic metasurface lens based on MEMS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapashree Roy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, metasurfaces, being flat and lightweight, have been designed to replace bulky optical components with various functions. We demonstrate a monolithic Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS integrated with a metasurface-based flat lens that focuses light in the mid-infrared spectrum. A two-dimensional scanning MEMS platform controls the angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by ±9°, thus enabling dynamic beam steering. The device could be used to compensate for off-axis incident light and thus correct for aberrations such as coma. We show that for low angular displacements, the integrated lens-on-MEMS system does not affect the mechanical performance of the MEMS actuators and preserves the focused beam profile as well as the measured full width at half maximum. We envision a new class of flat optical devices with active control provided by the combination of metasurfaces and MEMS for a wide range of applications, such as miniaturized MEMS-based microscope systems, LIDAR scanners, and projection systems.

  8. Dynamic metasurface lens based on MEMS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tapashree; Zhang, Shuyan; Jung, Il Woong; Troccoli, Mariano; Capasso, Federico; Lopez, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    In the recent years, metasurfaces, being flat and lightweight, have been designed to replace bulky optical components with various functions. We demonstrate a monolithic Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) integrated with a metasurface-based flat lens that focuses light in the mid-infrared spectrum. A two-dimensional scanning MEMS platform controls the angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by ±9°, thus enabling dynamic beam steering. The device could be used to compensate for off-axis incident light and thus correct for aberrations such as coma. We show that for low angular displacements, the integrated lens-on-MEMS system does not affect the mechanical performance of the MEMS actuators and preserves the focused beam profile as well as the measured full width at half maximum. We envision a new class of flat optical devices with active control provided by the combination of metasurfaces and MEMS for a wide range of applications, such as miniaturized MEMS-based microscope systems, LIDAR scanners, and projection systems.

  9. Contribution of proteomics of Leishmania spp. to the understanding of differentiation, drug resistance mechanisms, vaccine and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paape, Daniel; Aebischer, Toni

    2011-08-24

    Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites with a digenetic life cycle, cause a spectrum of diseases in humans. Recently several Leishmania spp. have been sequenced which significantly boosted the number and quality of proteomic studies conducted. Here a historic review will summarize work of the pre-genomic era and then focus on studies after genome information became available. Firstly works comparing the different life cycle stages, in order to identify stage specific proteins, will be discussed. Identifying post-translational modifications by proteomics especially phosphorylation events will be discussed. Further the contribution of proteomics to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of drug resistance and the investigation of immunogenic proteins for the identification of vaccine candidates will be summarized. Approaches of how potentially secreted proteins were identified are discussed. So far 30-35% of the total predicted proteome of Leishmania spp. have been identified. This comprises mainly the abundant proteins, therefore the last section will look into technological approaches on how this coverage may be increased and what the gel-free and gel-based proteomics have to offer will be compared. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Toner display based on particle control technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    Toner Display is based on an electrical movement of charged particles. Two types of black toner and white particles charged in the different electric polarity are enclosed between two electrodes. The particle movement is controlled by the external electric field applied between two transparent electrodes. The toner is collected to the electrode by an electrostatic force across the insulating layer to display a black image. The toners can be put back to the counter electrode by applying a reverse electric field, and white solid image is displayed. We have studied on the movement of three color particles independently to display color image in Toner Display. Two positively charged color particles with different amount of charge to mass ratio and negatively charged white particles were enclosed in the toner display cell. Yellow, cyan and white images were displayed by an application of voltage.

  11. Mass Spectrometry for Translational Proteomics: Progress and Clinical Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-08-31

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics measurements have become increasingly utilized in a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, and have significantly enhanced the understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of the proteome and its connections to biology and diseases. While some MS techniques such as those for targeted analysis are increasingly applied with great success, others such as global quantitative analysis (for e.g. biomarker discovery) are more challenging and continue to be developed and refined to provide the desired throughput, sensitivity and/ or specificity. New MS capabilities and proteomics-based pipelines/strategies also keep enhancing for the advancement of clinical proteomics applications such as protein biomarker discovery and validation. Herein, we provide a brief review to summarize the current state of MS-based proteomics with respect to its advantages and present limitations, while highlighting its potential in future clinical applications.

  12. Integration of a central protein repository into a standard data processing application for mining proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzemeier, Kai; Kristensen, Jakob; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    efficient data mining and categorizing of large data sets. Methods All samples were analyzed on an Orbitrap mass Spectrometer coupled to a nano Easy LC. The proteomics repository database is built using the Sun Java technology and the Microsoft mySQL database technology for optimal performance. Proteome...

  13. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Black Rice Grain Development Reveals Metabolic Pathways Associated with Anthocyanin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linghua; Huang, Yining; Xu, Ming; Cheng, Zuxin; Zhang, Dasheng; Zheng, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Black rice (Oryza sativa L.), whose pericarp is rich in anthocyanins (ACNs), is considered as a healthier alternative to white rice. Molecular species of ACNs in black rice have been well documented in previous studies; however, information about the metabolic mechanisms underlying ACN biosynthesis during black rice grain development is unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine changes in the metabolic pathways that are involved in the dynamic grain proteome during the development of black rice indica cultivar, (Oryza sativa L. indica var. SSP). Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) MS/MS were employed to identify statistically significant alterations in the grain proteome. Approximately 928 proteins were detected, of which 230 were differentially expressed throughout 5 successive developmental stages, starting from 3 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). The greatest number of differentially expressed proteins was observed on 7 and 10 DAF, including 76 proteins that were upregulated and 39 that were downregulated. The biological process analysis of gene ontology revealed that the 230 differentially expressed proteins could be sorted into 14 functional groups. Proteins in the largest group were related to metabolic process, which could be integrated into multiple biochemical pathways. Specifically, proteins with a role in ACN biosynthesis, sugar synthesis, and the regulation of gene expression were upregulated, particularly from the onset of black rice grain development and during development. In contrast, the expression of proteins related to signal transduction, redox homeostasis, photosynthesis and N-metabolism decreased during grain maturation. Finally, 8 representative genes encoding different metabolic proteins were verified via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, these genes had differed in transcriptional and translational expression during grain development. Expression analyses of

  14. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Black Rice Grain Development Reveals Metabolic Pathways Associated with Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linghua; Huang, Yining; Xu, Ming; Cheng, Zuxin; Zhang, Dasheng; Zheng, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Background Black rice (Oryza sativa L.), whose pericarp is rich in anthocyanins (ACNs), is considered as a healthier alternative to white rice. Molecular species of ACNs in black rice have been well documented in previous studies; however, information about the metabolic mechanisms underlying ACN biosynthesis during black rice grain development is unclear. Results The aim of the present study was to determine changes in the metabolic pathways that are involved in the dynamic grain proteome during the development of black rice indica cultivar, (Oryza sativa L. indica var. SSP). Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) MS/MS were employed to identify statistically significant alterations in the grain proteome. Approximately 928 proteins were detected, of which 230 were differentially expressed throughout 5 successive developmental stages, starting from 3 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). The greatest number of differentially expressed proteins was observed on 7 and 10 DAF, including 76 proteins that were upregulated and 39 that were downregulated. The biological process analysis of gene ontology revealed that the 230 differentially expressed proteins could be sorted into 14 functional groups. Proteins in the largest group were related to metabolic process, which could be integrated into multiple biochemical pathways. Specifically, proteins with a role in ACN biosynthesis, sugar synthesis, and the regulation of gene expression were upregulated, particularly from the onset of black rice grain development and during development. In contrast, the expression of proteins related to signal transduction, redox homeostasis, photosynthesis and N-metabolism decreased during grain maturation. Finally, 8 representative genes encoding different metabolic proteins were verified via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, these genes had differed in transcriptional and translational expression during grain development. Conclusions

  15. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Miller, Ingrid; Tasneem, Fareeha; Böhm, Josef; Gemeiner, Manfred; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim

    2010-08-01

    Genome sequencing for many important fungi has begun during recent years; however, there is still some deficiency in proteome profiling of aspergilli. To obtain a comprehensive overview of proteins and their expression, a proteomic approach based on 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to investigate A. ochraceus. The cell walls of fungi are exceptionally resistant to destruction, therefore two lysis protocols were tested: (1) lysis via manual grinding using liquid nitrogen, and (2) mechanical lysis via rapid agitation with glass beads using MagNalyser. Mechanical grinding with mortar and pestle using liquid nitrogen was found to be a more efficient extraction method for our purpose, resulting in extracts with higher protein content and a clear band pattern in SDS-PAGE. Two-dimensional electrophoresis gave a complex spot pattern comprising proteins of a broad range of isoelectric points and molecular masses. The most abundant spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. We could identify 31 spots representing 26 proteins, most of them involved in metabolic processes and response to stress. Seventeen spots were identified by de novo sequencing due to a lack of DNA and protein database sequences of A. ochraceus. The proteins identified in our study have been reported for the first time in A. ochraceus and this represents the first proteomic approach with identification of major proteins, when the fungus was grown under submerged culture.

  16. Knowledge base technology: a developer view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ginkul

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available In present paper we have endeavoured to tell about some reasonings, conclusions and pricticals results, to which we have come being busy with one of most interesting problems of modern science. This paper is a brief report of the group of scientists from the Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence Systems about their experience of work in the field of knowledge engineering. The researches in this area was started in our Laboratory more than 10 years ago, i.e. about in the moment, when there was just another rise in Artificial Intelligence, caused by mass emerging of expert systems. The tasks of knowledge engineering were being varied, and focal point of our researches was being varied too. Certainly, we have not solved all the problems, originating in this area. Our knowledge still has an approximate nature, but nevertheless, the outcomes obtained by us seem rather important and interesting. So, we want to tell about our experience in building of knowledge-based systems, and expert systems, in particular.

  17. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M.; Silva, Tomé S.; Dias, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous...... of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological...... questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined...

  18. Proteomic and metallomic strategies for understanding the mode of action of anticancer metallodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, Chiara; Magherini, Francesca; Modesti, Alessandra; Messori, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin and its introduction in the clinics, metal compounds have been intensely investigated in view of their possible application in cancer therapy. In this frame, a deeper understanding of their mode of action, still rather obscure, might turn crucial for the design and the obtainment of new and better anticancer agents. Due to the extreme complexity of the biological systems, it is now widely accepted that innovative and information-rich methods are absolutely needed to afford such a goal. Recently, both proteomic and metallomic strategies were successfully implemented for the elucidation of specific mechanistic features of anticancer metallodrugs within an innovative "Systems Biology" perspective. Particular attention was paid to the following issues: i) proteomic studies of the molecular basis of platinum resistance; ii) proteomic analysis of cellular responses to cytotoxic metallodrugs; iii) metallomic studies of the transformation and fate of metallodrugs in cellular systems. Notably, those pioneering studies, that are reviewed here, allowed a significant progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metal based drugs at the cellular level. A further extension of those studies and a closer integration of proteomic and metallomic strategies and technologies might realistically lead to rapid and significant advancements in the mechanistic knowledge of anticancer metallodrugs.

  19. Proteomics in Traditional Chinese Medicine with an Emphasis on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Alan Sulistio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing worldwide interest in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. This increasing demand for TCM needs to be accompanied by a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of action of TCM-based therapy. However, TCM is often described as a concept of Chinese philosophy, which is incomprehensible for Western medical society, thereby creating a gap between TCM and Western medicine (WM. In order to meet this challenge, TCM research has applied proteomics technologies for exploring the mechanisms of action of TCM treatment. Proteomics enables TCM researchers to oversee various pathways that are affected by treatment, as well as the dynamics of their interactions with one another. This review discusses the utility of comparative proteomics to better understand how TCM treatment may be used as a complementary therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Additionally, we review the data from comparative AD-related TCM proteomics studies and establish the relevance of the data with available AD hypotheses, most notably regarding the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS.

  20. Target identification of natural and traditional medicines with quantitative chemical proteomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Gao, Liqian; Lee, Yew Mun; Kalesh, Karunakaran A; Ong, Yong Siang; Lim, Jaehong; Jee, Joo-Eun; Sun, Hongyan; Lee, Su Seong; Hua, Zi-Chun; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-06-01

    Natural and traditional medicines, being a great source of drugs and drug leads, have regained wide interests due to the limited success of high-throughput screening of compound libraries in the past few decades and the recent technology advancement. Many drugs/bioactive compounds exert their functions through interaction with their protein targets, with more and more drugs showing their ability to target multiple proteins, thus target identification has an important role in drug discovery and biomedical research fields. Identifying drug targets not only furthers the understanding of the mechanism of action (MOA) of a drug but also reveals its potential therapeutic applications and adverse side effects. Chemical proteomics makes use of affinity chromatography approaches coupled with mass spectrometry to systematically identify small molecule-protein interactions. Although traditional affinity-based chemical proteomics approaches have made great progress in the identification of cellular targets and elucidation of MOAs of many bioactive molecules, nonspecific binding remains a major issue which may reduce the accuracy of target identification and may hamper the drug development process. Recently, quantitative proteomics approaches, namely, metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, or label-free approaches, have been implemented in target identification to overcome such limitations. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recent advances in the application of various quantitative chemical proteomics approaches for the identification of targets of natural and traditional medicines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Strong, sudden cooling alleviates the inflammatory responses in heat-stressed dairy cows based on iTRAQ proteomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianbo; Min, Li; Zheng, Nan; Fan, Caiyun; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Yangdong; Wang, Jiaqi

    2018-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of sudden cooling on the physiological responses of 12 heat-stressed Holstein dairy cows using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling approach. Plasma samples were collected from these cows during heat stress (HS), and after strong, sudden cooling in the summer (16 days later). We compared plasma proteomic data before and after sudden cooling to identify the differentially abundant proteins. The results showed that sudden cooling in summer effectively alleviated the negative consequences of HS on body temperature and production variables. Expressions of plasma hemoglobin alpha and hemoglobin beta were upregulated, whereas lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and haptoglobin were downregulated in this process. The increase of hemoglobin after cooling may improve oxygen transport and alleviate the rise in respiration rates in heat-stressed dairy cows. The decrease of LBP and haptoglobin suggests that the inflammatory responses caused by HS are relieved after cooling. Our findings provide new insight into the physiological changes that occur when heat-stressed dairy cows experience strong, sudden cooling.

  2. Proteomics-based identification of novel proteins in temporal tendons of patients with masticatory muscle tendon--aponeurosis hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, A; Sato, T; Hirosawa, N; Nakamoto, N; Enoki, Y; Chida, D; Usui, M; Takeda, S; Nagai, T; Sasaki, A; Sakamoto, Y; Yoda, T

    2014-01-01

    Masticatory muscle tendon-aponeurosis hyperplasia (MMTAH) is a new disease associated with limited mouth opening that is often misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular disorder; subsequently, patients are mistakenly treated with irreversible operations. Due to the poor presentation and characterization of symptoms, the underlying pathological conditions remain unclear. We have previously conducted a proteomic analysis of tendons derived from one MMTAH subject and one facial deformity subject using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. However, the results were obtained for only one subject. The aim of the present study was to confirm the expression of specific molecules in tendon tissues from multiple subjects with MMTAH by applying two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the 19 proteins identified in tendons from both MMTAH and facial deformity patients, fibrinogen fragment D and beta-crystallin A4 were up-regulated, whereas myosin light chain 4 was down-regulated in MMTAH. We also found fibrinogen to be expressed robustly in tendon tissues of MMTAH patients. Our data provide the possibility that the distinctive expression of these novel proteins is associated with the pathology of MMTAH. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sodium laurate, a novel protease- and mass spectrometry-compatible detergent for mass spectrometry-based membrane proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Lin

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic nature of most membrane proteins severely complicates their extraction, proteolysis and identification. Although detergents can be used to enhance the solubility of the membrane proteins, it is often difficult for a detergent not only to have a strong ability to extract membrane proteins, but also to be compatible with the subsequent proteolysis and mass spectrometric analysis. In this study, we made evaluation on a novel application of sodium laurate (SL to the shotgun analysis of membrane proteomes. SL was found not only to lyse the membranes and solubilize membrane proteins as efficiently as SDS, but also to be well compatible with trypsin and chymotrypsin. Furthermore, SL could be efficiently removed by phase transfer method from samples after acidification, thus ensuring not to interfere with the subsequent CapLC-MS/MS analysis of the proteolytic peptides of proteins. When SL was applied to assist the digestion and identification of a standard protein mixture containing bacteriorhodoposin and the proteins in rat liver plasma membrane-enriched fractions, it was found that, compared with other two representative enzyme- and MS-compatible detergents RapiGest SF (RGS and sodium deoxycholate (SDC, SL exhibited obvious superiority in the identification of membrane proteins particularly those with high hydrophobicity and/or multiple transmembrane domains.

  4. Change of ranibizumab-induced human vitreous protein profile in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy based on proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chen; Han, Changjing; Zhao, Minjie; Yu, Jingjing; Bai, Lin; Yao, Yuan; Gao, Shuaixin; Cao, Hui; Zheng, Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative treatment of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents is extensively used in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), but the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. The objective of this research is to observe change of protein profile induced by ranibizumab (an anti-VEGF agent) in vitreous humor from PDR patients and reveal the effects of anti-VEGF treatment on PDR. A proteomic method was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in vitreous humor. Untreated PDR patients were defined as PDR group, while those who treated with intravitreal injection of ranibizumab (IVR) were defined as IVR. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation and REACTOME pathways were obtained from DAVID Bioinformatics Resources. Intravitreal level of apolipoprotein C-I (APOC1), serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 5 (SERPINA5), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP2), and keratin 1 (KRT1) were determined by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). 339 differentially expressed proteins were identified in response to IVR. The most notable GO annotation describes the altered proteins was "innate immune response". The most notable REACTOME pathway was "platelet degranulation". ELISA result showed increased level of APOC1, SERPINA5, KRT1 and a decreased level of TIMP2 in PDR group compared with IVR. In addition to decreasing VEGF level, ranibizumab is associated with change of human vitreous protein profile in patients with PDR, in which the differential proteins are involved in immune response, platelet degranulation, complement activation etc., suggesting that the effects of VEGF are involved in these signaling pathways.

  5. iTRAQ-Based Comparative Proteomics Analysis of the Fruiting Dikaryon and the Non-fruiting Monokaryon of Flammulina velutipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Yu; Chang, Ming-Chang; Meng, Jun-Long; Feng, Cui-Ping; Liu, Yong-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes is a potentially excellent fungus to study basic mechanisms of basidiomycete mycelium biology. To provide a better understanding of the mechanism of hyphae growth and fruit-body formation, the biological functions of the differentially abundant proteins between the fruiting dikaryon and the non-fruiting monokaryon of F. velutipes were investigated at the proteomic level using iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry technique. Among the 1198 proteins identified with high confidence, a total of 472 proteins were detected differentially abundant at least one of the mycelium development stages. In-depth data analysis revealed that differentially expressed proteins were influenced a variety of cellular processes, particularly metabolic processes. Functional pathway analysis indicated that 63 up-regulated proteins at only the fruiting dikaryon (Fv13) stage were mainly distributed in 51 specific Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathways, such as amino acids biosynthesis and metabolism, signaling pathway, and central carbon metabolism. These up-regulated proteins could possibly serve as potential biomarkers to study the mycelium development pathways as well as provide new insights on the mycelium heterogenic compatibility and fruit-body formation mechanisms of basidiomycetes.

  6. A Survey of Technologies Supporting Virtual Project Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of technologies and to what extent they support virtual project based learning. The paper argues that a survey of learning technologies should be related to concrete learning tasks and processes. Problem oriented project pedagogy (POPP) is discussed, and a framework...... for evaluation is proposed where negotiation of meaning, coordination and resource management are identified as the key concepts in virtual project based learning. Three e-learning systems are selected for the survey, Virtual-U, Lotus Learningspace and Lotus Quickplace, as each system offers different strategies...... for e-learning. The paper concludes that virtual project based learning may benefit from facilities of all these systems....

  7. Applying Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Construction Safety Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Cao, Tianzhuo; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-08-11

    Construction sites are dynamic and complicated systems. The movement and interaction of people, goods and energy make construction safety management extremely difficult. Due to the ever-increasing amount of information, traditional construction safety management has operated under difficult circumstances. As an effective way to collect, identify and process information, sensor-based technology is deemed to provide new generation of methods for advancing construction safety management. It makes the real-time construction safety management with high efficiency and accuracy a reality and provides a solid foundation for facilitating its modernization, and informatization. Nowadays, various sensor-based technologies have been adopted for construction safety management, including locating sensor-based technology, vision-based sensing and wireless sensor networks. This paper provides a systematic and comprehensive review of previous studies in this field to acknowledge useful findings, identify the research gaps and point out future research directions.

  8. The role of geo-based technology in place experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Zach, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Today, as various context-aware technologies have become increasingly ubiquitous, tourists have access to retrieve voluminous geographic information about tourism destinations. These technologies are suggested to aid tourists in gaining meaningful experiences with places. This study identifies how...... the use of geo-based technology plays a role in the acquisition of geographic knowledge and behavior. It is identified that the use of geo-based technology while traveling contributes to the different components that frame the structure of tourism experience. Further, this study also confirms that tourism...... experience can be seen as a part of the everyday experience as geographic behavior exhibited on a day-to-day basis is found to have an effect on tourism experience....

  9. Representative proteomes: a stable, scalable and unbiased proteome set for sequence analysis and functional annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuming Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating growth in the number of protein sequences taxes both the computational and manual resources needed to analyze them. One approach to dealing with this problem is to minimize the number of proteins subjected to such analysis in a way that minimizes loss of information. To this end we have developed a set of Representative Proteomes (RPs, each selected from a Representative Proteome Group (RPG containing similar proteomes calculated based on co-membership in UniRef50 clusters. A Representative Proteome is the proteome that can best represent all the proteomes in its group in terms of the majority of the sequence space and information. RPs at 75%, 55%, 35% and 15% co-membership threshold (CMT are provided to allow users to decrease or increase the granularity of the sequence space based on their requirements. We find that a CMT of 55% (RP55 most closely follows standard taxonomic classifications. Further analysis of this set reveals that sequence space is reduced by more than 80% relative to UniProtKB, while retaining both sequence diversity (over 95% of InterPro domains and annotation information (93% of experimentally characterized proteins. All sets can be browsed and are available for sequence similarity searches and download at http://www.proteininformationresource.org/rps, while the set of 637 RPs determined using a 55% CMT are also available for text searches. Potential applications include sequence similarity searches, protein classification and targeted protein annotation and characterization.

  10. Data-Base Software For Tracking Technological Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliberti, James A.; Wright, Simon; Monteith, Steve K.

    1996-01-01

    Technology Tracking System (TechTracS) computer program developed for use in storing and retrieving information on technology and related patent information developed under auspices of NASA Headquarters and NASA's field centers. Contents of data base include multiple scanned still images and quick-time movies as