WorldWideScience

Sample records for based proteomic technology

  1. Proteomics Technologies and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, the emphasis is shifting to the protein compliment of the human organism. Because proteome reflects more accurately on the dynamic state of a cell, tissue, or organism, much is expected from proteomics to yield better disease markers for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The advent of proteomics technologies for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of diseases. High-throughput proteomics technologies combining with advanced bioinformatics are extensively used to identify molecular signatures of diseases based on protein pathways and signaling cascades. Mass spectrometry plays a vital role in proteomics and has become an indispensable tool for molecular and cellular biology. While the potential is great, many challenges and issues remain to be solved, such as mining low abundant proteins and integration of proteomics with genomics and metabolomics data. Nevertheless, proteomics is the foundation for constructing and extracting useful knowledge to biomedical research. In this review, a snapshot of contemporary issues in proteomics technologies is discussed.

  2. Development and Application of Novel Electron Transfer Dissociation-based Technologies for Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Frese, C

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are key actors in all cellular processes and pathways and almost all diseases are linked to perturbations of proteins, their modification state or interaction networks. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured to a high-throughput quantitative technology, aiming to provide sensitive, accurate and complete information on protein abundance, interactions and networks. In the current workflow in MS-based proteomics, proteins are cleaved into peptides by proteolytic digestion follow...

  3. Simple and Integrated Spintip-Based Technology Applied for Deep Proteome Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendong; Wang, Shuai; Adhikari, Subash; Deng, Zuhui; Wang, Lingjue; Chen, Lan; Ke, Mi; Yang, Pengyuan; Tian, Ruijun

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been taken for developing high-sensitive mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic technologies, among which sample preparation is one of the major focus. Here, a simple and integrated spintip-based proteomics technology (SISPROT) consisting of strong cation exchange beads and C18 disk in one pipet tip was developed. Both proteomics sample preparation steps, including protein preconcentration, reduction, alkylation, and digestion, and reversed phase (RP)-based desalting and high-pH RP-based peptide fractionation can be achieved in a fully integrated manner for the first time. This easy-to-use technology achieved high sensitivity with negligible sample loss. Proteomic analysis of 2000 HEK 293 cells readily identified 1270 proteins within 1.4 h of MS time, while 7826 proteins were identified when 100000 cells were processed and analyzed within only 22 h of MS time. More importantly, the SISPROT can be easily multiplexed on a standard centrifuge with good reproducibility (Pearson correlation coefficient > 0.98) for both single-shot analysis and deep proteome profiling with five-step high-pH RP fractionation. The SISPROT was exemplified by the triplicate analysis of 100000 stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). This led to the identification of 9078 proteins containing 3771 annotated membrane proteins, which was the largest proteome data set for dental stem cells reported to date. We expect that the SISPROT will be well suited for deep proteome profiling for fewer than 100000 cells and applied for translational studies where multiplexed technology with good label-free quantification precision is required. PMID:27062885

  4. Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics: Biological and Technological Aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2010-12-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become the tool of choice for identifying and quantifying the proteome of an organism. Though recent years have seen a tremendous improvement in instrument performance and the computational tools used, significant challenges remain, and there are many opportunities for statisticians to make important contributions. In the most widely used "bottom-up" approach to proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are first subjected to enzymatic cleavage, the resulting peptide products are separated based on chemical or physical properties and analyzed using a mass spectrometer. The two fundamental challenges in the analysis of bottom-up MS-based proteomics are: (1) Identifying the proteins that are present in a sample, and (2) Quantifying the abundance levels of the identified proteins. Both of these challenges require knowledge of the biological and technological context that gives rise to observed data, as well as the application of sound statistical principles for estimation and inference. We present an overview of bottom-up proteomics and outline the key statistical issues that arise in protein identification and quantification.

  5. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based proteomics: Biological and technological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become the tool of choice for identifying and quantifying the proteome of an organism. Though recent years have seen a tremendous improvement in instrument performance and the computational tools used, significant challenges remain, and there are many opportunities for statisticians to make important contributions. In the most widely used “bottom-up” approach to proteomics, complex mixtures of proteins are first subjected to enzymati...

  6. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily I Chen

    Full Text Available Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9 and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8. MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2 suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  7. Developments of mass spectrometry-based technologies for effective drug development linked with clinical proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Noboru; Bando, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Haruhiko; Marko-Varga, György; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    A strong demand in drug discovery and development today is to overcome "Big Gaps" encountered by differences in species and races, to accelerate effective developments in cost and time, and to meet medical needs. Moreover, drugs of various types have emerged which cover middle-size molecules and polymers rather than conventional small molecules. Upon those challenges, mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, which will be described in this paper, will play an increasingly important role, among which the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) platform will be powerful as rapid and molecule-based analysis more than ever. nanoPore Optical Interferometry (nPOI) newly introduced can detect even weak interactions in protein-protein and protein-compound, and can be connected directly to LC/MS/MS for identification of binding molecular species, which will be quite useful for affinity ranking and high-throughput interaction screening. Imaging MS provides the molecular information and spatial distribution of targeted molecules within a tissue specimen. MS-based clinical proteomics utilizing clinical specimens and empowered by advanced bioinformatics can attain both key protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with major protein players responsible for functional mechanisms of a disease subtype. An integration of those MS-based technologies will deliver a seamless platform of drug development from molecules identified in human clinical specimens. PMID:26782309

  8. Francisella tularensis novicida proteomic and transcriptomic data integration and annotation based on semantic web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Nadia; Hunt, Ela

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper summarises the lessons and experiences gained from a case study of the application of semantic web technologies to the integration of data from the bacterial species Francisella tularensis novicida (Fn). Fn data sources are disparate and heterogeneous, as multiple laboratories across the world, using multiple technologies, perform experiments to understand the mechanism of virulence. It is hard to integrate these data sources in a flexible manner that allows new experimental data to be added and compared when required. Results Public domain data sources were combined in RDF. Using this connected graph of database cross references, we extended the annotations of an experimental data set by superimposing onto it the annotation graph. Identifiers used in the experimental data automatically resolved and the data acquired annotations in the rest of the RDF graph. This happened without the expensive manual annotation that would normally be required to produce these links. This graph of resolved identifiers was then used to combine two experimental data sets, a proteomics experiment and a transcriptomic experiment studying the mechanism of virulence through the comparison of wildtype Fn with an avirulent mutant strain. Conclusion We produced a graph of Fn cross references which enabled the combination of two experimental datasets. Through combination of these data we are able to perform queries that compare the results of the two experiments. We found that data are easily combined in RDF and that experimental results are easily compared when the data are integrated. We conclude that semantic data integration offers a convenient, simple and flexible solution to the integration of published and unpublished experimental data. PMID:19796400

  9. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | About

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  10. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  11. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics in cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, T. C.; Mann, M

    2010-01-01

    The global analysis of protein composition, modifications, and dynamics are important goals in cell biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)–based proteomics has matured into an attractive technology for this purpose. Particularly, high resolution MS methods have been extremely successful for quantitative analysis of cellular and organellar proteomes. Rapid advances in all areas of the proteomic workflow, including sample preparation, MS, and computational analysis, should make the technology more eas...

  12. Global MS-Based Proteomics Drug Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based technologies such as RNAi, chemical-genetic profiling, or gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays combined with other biochemical methods are established strategies for surveying drug mechanisms. Such approaches can provide mechanistic information on how drugs act and affect cellular pathways. By studying how cancer cells compensate for the drug treatment, novel targets used in a combined treatment can be designed. Furthermore, toxicity effects on cells not targeted can be obtained on a molecular level. For example, drug companies are particularly interested in studying the molecular side effects of drugs in the liver. In addition, experiments with the purpose of elucidating liver toxicity can be studied using samples obtained from animal models exposed to different concentrations of a drug over time. More recently considerable advances in mass spectrometry (MS) technologies and bioinformatics tools allows informative global drug profiling experiments to be performed at a cost comparable to other large-scale technologies such as DNA-based technologies. Moreover, MS-based proteomics provides an additional layer of information on the dynamic regulation of proteins translation and particularly protein degradation. MS-based proteomics approaches combined with other biochemical methods delivers information on regulatory networks, signaling cascades, and metabolic pathways upon drug treatment. Furthermore, MS-based proteomics can provide additional information on single amino acid polymorphisms, protein isoform distribution, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. In this chapter, we will share our experience using MS based proteomics as a pharmacoproteomics strategy to characterize drug mechanisms of action in single drug therapy or in multidrug combination. Finally, the emergence of integrated proteogenomics analysis, such as "The Cancer Genome Atlas" program, opened interesting perspectives to extend this approach to drug target

  13. Biomarker discovery in mass spectrometry-based urinary proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samuel; Hao, Ling; Ricke, William A; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Urinary proteomics has become one of the most attractive topics in disease biomarker discovery. MS-based proteomic analysis has advanced continuously and emerged as a prominent tool in the field of clinical bioanalysis. However, only few protein biomarkers have made their way to validation and clinical practice. Biomarker discovery is challenged by many clinical and analytical factors including, but not limited to, the complexity of urine and the wide dynamic range of endogenous proteins in the sample. This article highlights promising technologies and strategies in the MS-based biomarker discovery process, including study design, sample preparation, protein quantification, instrumental platforms, and bioinformatics. Different proteomics approaches are discussed, and progresses in maximizing urinary proteome coverage and standardization are emphasized in this review. MS-based urinary proteomics has great potential in the development of noninvasive diagnostic assays in the future, which will require collaborative efforts between analytical scientists, systems biologists, and clinicians. PMID:26703953

  14. Microbial Protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology: A Proteomics-Based Strategy for Rapid Identification of Microbial Targets of Host Humoral Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunogenic, pathogen-specific proteins have excellent potential for development of novel management modalities. Here, we describe an innovative application of proteomics called Microbial protein-Antigenome Determination (MAD) Technology for rapid identification of native microbial proteins that eli...

  15. Web Resources for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Tao CHEN; Zhao, Jie; Ma, Jie; Zhu, Yunping

    2015-01-01

    With the development of high-resolution and high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) technology, a large quantum of proteomic data is continually being generated. Collecting and sharing these data are a challenge that requires immense and sustained human effort. In this report, we provide a classification of important web resources for MS-based proteomics and present rating of these web resources, based on whether raw data are stored, whether data submission is supported, and whether data analy...

  16. New challenges for proteomics technologies: a mini perspective review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Robinson, Errol W.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-10-10

    Proteomics technologies have experienced rapid advances over the last decade to identify or quantify thousands of proteins per sample, typically in a few hours, enabling proteomics applications in environmental, biological, medical, and clinical research. A number of publications have reviewed advances in proteomic technologies and applications. This short review focuses first on a discussion of sensitivity in bottom-up (i.e. digested protein) proteomics and approaches for characterization of small cell populations, and secondly on protein separations for top-down (i.e. intact protein) proteomics including discussions of key technical challenges where recent advances are elucidating specific functions of proteins in biological processes.

  17. Web Resources for Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Jie Zhao; Jie Ma; Yunping Zhu

    2015-01-01

    With the development of high-resolution and high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) technology, a large quantum of proteomic data is continually being generated. Collecting and shar-ing these data are a challenge that requires immense and sustained human effort. In this report, we provide a classification of important web resources for MS-based proteomics and present rating of these web resources, based on whether raw data are stored, whether data submission is supported, and whether data analysis pipelines are provided. These web resources are important for biologists involved in proteomics research.

  18. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...... presented here is the largest published survey, so far, of the bovine claw tissue proteome....

  19. Mass Spectrometry-Based Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhong Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the differential protein expression in complex biological samples, strategies for rapid, highly reproducible and accurate quantification are necessary. Isotope labeling and fluorescent labeling techniques have been widely used in quantitative proteomics research. However, researchers are increasingly turning to label-free shotgun proteomics techniques for faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics falls into two general categories. In the first are the measurements of changes in chromatographic ion intensity such as peptide peak areas or peak heights. The second is based on the spectral counting of identified proteins. In this paper, we will discuss the technologies of these label-free quantitative methods, statistics, available computational software, and their applications in complex proteomics studies.

  20. Mass-spectrometry-based draft of the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Mathias; Schlegl, Judith; Hahne, Hannes; Moghaddas Gholami, Amin; Lieberenz, Marcus; Savitski, Mikhail M; Ziegler, Emanuel; Butzmann, Lars; Gessulat, Siegfried; Marx, Harald; Mathieson, Toby; Lemeer, Simone; Schnatbaum, Karsten; Reimer, Ulf; Wenschuh, Holger; Mollenhauer, Martin; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Boese, Joos-Hendrik; Bantscheff, Marcus; Gerstmair, Anja; Faerber, Franz; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-05-29

    Proteomes are characterized by large protein-abundance differences, cell-type- and time-dependent expression patterns and post-translational modifications, all of which carry biological information that is not accessible by genomics or transcriptomics. Here we present a mass-spectrometry-based draft of the human proteome and a public, high-performance, in-memory database for real-time analysis of terabytes of big data, called ProteomicsDB. The information assembled from human tissues, cell lines and body fluids enabled estimation of the size of the protein-coding genome, and identified organ-specific proteins and a large number of translated lincRNAs (long intergenic non-coding RNAs). Analysis of messenger RNA and protein-expression profiles of human tissues revealed conserved control of protein abundance, and integration of drug-sensitivity data enabled the identification of proteins predicting resistance or sensitivity. The proteome profiles also hold considerable promise for analysing the composition and stoichiometry of protein complexes. ProteomicsDB thus enables navigation of proteomes, provides biological insight and fosters the development of proteomic technology. PMID:24870543

  1. Network-based analysis of proteomic profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Limsoon

    2016-01-26

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a widely used and powerful tool for profiling systems-wide protein expression changes. It can be applied for various purposes, e.g. biomarker discovery in diseases and study of drug responses. Although RNA-based high-throughput methods have been useful in providing glimpses into the underlying molecular processes, the evidences they provide are indirect. Furthermore, RNA and corresponding protein levels have been known to have poor correlation. On the other hand, MS-based proteomics tend to have consistency issues (poor reproducibility and inter-sample agreement) and coverage issues (inability to detect the entire proteome) that need to be urgently addressed. In this talk, I will discuss how these issues can be addressed by proteomic profile analysis techniques that use biological networks (especially protein complexes) as the biological context. In particular, I will describe several techniques that we have been developing for network-based analysis of proteomics profile. And I will present evidence that these techniques are useful in identifying proteomics-profile analysis results that are more consistent, more reproducible, and more biologically coherent, and that these techniques allow expansion of the detected proteome to uncover and/or discover novel proteins.

  2. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: existing capabilities and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, Thomas E.; Aryal, Uma K.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-21

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a means for identification, characterization, and quantification of biomolecules that are integral components of the processes essential for life. Characterization of proteins present in a biological system at the proteome and sub-proteomes (e.g., the phosphoproteome, proteoglycome, or degradome/peptidome) levels provides a foundation for understanding fundamental aspects as well as potentially a range of translational applications. Emerging technologies such as ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry and microchip-based - proteome measurements combined with continued enhancement of MS instrumentation and separation techniques, such as reversed phase liquid chromatography and potentially capillary electrophoresis, show great promise for both broad undirected as well as targeted measurements and will be critical for e.g., the proteome-wide characterization of post translational modifications and identification, or the verification, and validation of potential biomarkers of disease. MS-based proteomics is also increasingly demonstrating great potential for contributing to our understanding of the dynamics, reactions, and roles proteins and peptides play advancing our understanding of biology on a system wide level for a wide range of applications, from investigations of microbial communities, bioremediation, and human health and disease states alike.

  3. A single lysis solution for the analysis of tissue samples by different proteomic technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, P.; Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.; Rank, Fritz; Timmermans, Vera Jacqueline Marita; Moreira, José

    2008-01-01

    Cancer, being a major healthcare concern worldwide, is one of the main targets for the application of emerging proteomic technologies and these tools promise to revolutionize the way cancer will be diagnosed and treated in the near future. Today, as a result of the unprecedented advances that have...... number of protocols for preparation of tissue lysates has been published, so far no single recipe is able to provide a "one-size fits all" solubilization procedure that can be used to analyse the same lysate using different proteomics technologies. Here we present evidence showing that cell lysis buffer......-based proteomics (reverse-phase lysate arrays or direct antibody arrays), allowing the direct comparison of qualitative and quantitative data yielded by these technologies when applied to the same samples. The usefulness of the CLB1 solution for gel-based proteomics was further established by 2D PAGE analysis of a...

  4. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  5. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  6. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Characterization Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  7. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Reagent Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics and Peptidomics for Systems Biology and Biomarker Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Robert; Ma, Di; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    The scientific community has shown great interest in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and peptidomics for its applications in biology. Proteomics technologies have evolved to produce large datasets of proteins or peptides involved in various biological and disease progression processes producing testable hypothesis for complex biological questions. This review provides an introduction and insight to relevant topics in proteomics and peptidomics including biological material sel...

  9. MSQuant, an Open Source Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter; Gouw, Joost W; Olsen, Jesper V;

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics critically depends on algorithms for data interpretation. A current bottleneck in the rapid advance of proteomics technology is the closed nature and slow development cycle of vendor-supplied software solutions. We have created an open source software environmen...

  10. Effective representation and storage of mass spectrometry-based proteomic data sets for the scientific community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as a technology of choice for global analysis of cell signaling networks. However, reporting and sharing of MS data are often haphazard, limiting the usefulness of proteomics to the signaling community. We argue that raw data should always be provided...... there are few mechanisms for community-wide sharing of these data....

  11. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information...... from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene...... for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  12. PROTEOMICS: AN EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY IN LABORATORY MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. D J Venter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid developments in both genomics and proteomics will allow scientists to define the molecular pathways in normal and diseased cells. With these models, researchers will have the ability to predict previously unknown interactions and verify such predictions experimentally. Novel proteins, cellular functions, and pathways will also be unravelled. It is hoped that understanding the connections between cellular pathways and the ability to identify their associated biomarkers will greatly reduce the suffering and loss of life due to diseases.

  13. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Translational Research: A Technical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kadiyala, Vivek; Paulo, Joao A.; Banks, Peter Alan; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based investigation of clinical samples enables the high-throughput identification of protein biomarkers. We provide an overview of mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques that are applicable to the investigation of clinical samples. We address sample collection, protein extraction and fractionation, mass spectrometry modalities, and quantitative proteomics. Finally, we examine the limitations and further potential of such technologies. Liquid chromatography fractionati...

  15. Fungal Secretome for Biorefinery: Recent Advances in Proteomic Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Siu Kwan Sze; Adav, Sunil S.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal biotechnology has been well established in food and healthcare sector, and now being explored for lignocellulosic biorefinery due to their great potential to produce a wide array of extracellular enzymes for nutrient recycling. Due to global warming, environmental pollution, green house gases emission and depleting fossil fuel, fungal enzymes for lignocellulosic biomass refinery become a major focus for utilizing renewal bioresources. Proteomic technologies tender better biological und...

  16. Mass Spectrometry-Based Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Ming Huang; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Wenhong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the differential protein expression in complex biological samples, strategies for rapid, highly reproducible and accurate quantification are necessary. Isotope labeling and fluorescent labeling techniques have been widely used in quantitative proteomics research. However, researchers are increasingly turning to label-free shotgun proteomics techniques for faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics falls into two general c...

  17. Urine in clinical proteomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Decramer, Stéphane; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Mischak, Harald; Monsarrat, Bernard; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2008-01-01

    Urine has become one of the most attractive biofluids in clinical proteomics as it can be obtained non-invasively in large quantities and is stable compared with other biofluids. The urinary proteome has been studied by almost any proteomics technology, but mass spectrometry-based urinary protein and peptide profiling has emerged as most suitable for clinical application. After a period of descriptive urinary proteomics the field is moving out of the discovery phase into an era of validation ...

  18. Computational approaches to enhance mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhauser, Nadin

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis I present three computational approaches that improve the analysis of mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. The novel search engine Andromeda allows efficient identification of peptides and proteins. Implementation of a rule-based expert system provides more detailed information contained in the mass spectra. Furthermore I adapted our computational proteomics pipeline to high performance computers.

  19. Mass spectrometry based proteomics, background, status and future needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the background for proteomics and a description of the present state of art are given with a description of the main strategies in proteomics. The advantages and limitations of the two major strategies, 2D-gel based and LC-MS based, are discussed and a combination for the two, CeLC...

  20. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics*

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied to a wide range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy and precision in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations and highlight their potential applications.

  1. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  2. Tissue-based map of the human proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Lindskog, Cecilia; Oksvold, Per; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Åsa; Kampf, Caroline; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Asplund, Anna; Olsson, IngMarie; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Navani, Sanjay; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Odeberg, Jacob; Djureinovic, Dijana; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia; Alm, Tove; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Rockberg, Johan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Hamsten, Marica; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Persson, Lukas; Johansson, Fredric; Zwahlen, Martin; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative...

  3. A Proteomics Approach to the Protein Normalization Problem: Selection of Unvarying Proteins for MS-Based Proteomics and Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Proteomics and other protein-based analysis methods such as Western blotting all face the challenge of discriminating changes in the levels of proteins of interest from inadvertent changes in the amount loaded for analysis. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics can now estimate the relative and absolute amounts of thousands of proteins across diverse biological systems. We reasoned that this new technology could prove useful for selection of very stably expressed proteins that could serve as better loading controls than those traditionally employed. Large-scale proteomic analyses of SDS lysates of cultured cells and tissues revealed deglycase DJ-1 as the protein with the lowest variability in abundance among different cell types in human, mouse, and amphibian cells. The protein constitutes 0.069 ± 0.017% of total cellular protein and occurs at a specific concentration of 34.6 ± 8.7 pmol/mg of total protein. Since DJ-1 is ubiquitous and therefore easily detectable with several peptides, it can be helpful in normalization of proteomic data sets. In addition, DJ-1 appears to be an advantageous loading control for Western blot that is superior to those used commonly used, allowing comparisons between tissues and cells originating from evolutionarily distant vertebrate species. Notably, this is not possible by the detection and quantitation of housekeeping proteins, which are often used in the Western blot technique. The approach introduced here can be applied to select the most appropriate loading controls for MS-based proteomics or Western blotting in any biological system. PMID:27297043

  4. Tissue proteomics in pancreatic cancer study: discovery, emerging technologies and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Kelly, Kimberly; Chen, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose and treat. The advances of proteomics technology, especially quantitative proteomics, have stimulated a great interest to apply this technology for pancreatic cancer study. A variety of tissue proteomics approaches have been applied to investigate pancreatic cancer and the associated diseases. These studies were carried out with various goals, aiming to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic t...

  5. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together with a...... comprehensive list of proteins. Post translation modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation, are pivotal for protein stability and function. Several strategies for enrichment of PTMs have been developed where targeted proteomic approaches are used to identify these PTMs. The sequenced and...... annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  6. Discovery based and targeted Mass Spectrometry in farm animal proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Emøke

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in mass spectrometry have greatly improved accuracy and speed of analyses of proteins and biochemical pathways. These proteome technologies have transformed research and diagnostic methods in the biomedical fields, and in food and farm animal sciences proteomics can be used...... experiments from tissues and body fluids from pig, cow and horse, and currently provides the primary public resource for designing SRM methods for farm animal applications...... approach for investigating farm animal biology. SRM is particularly important for validation biomarker candidates This talk will introduce the use of different mass spectrometry approaches through examples related to food quality and animal welfare, including studies of gut health in pigs, host pathogen...

  7. Innovative mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies in proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Milioli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis was divided in four main sections. In particular, the first section is composed by fourth chapters showing the main components of a mass spectrometer such as sources, analyzers and detectors followed by a brief introduction of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In the second chapter, the proteomics analysis of platelet-derived microparticles under different agonist stimulations has been described. In the third chapter, the PTMs analysis of platelet-derived microparticles has ...

  8. Computer Aided Manual Validation of Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Timothy G; Bryson, Bryan D.; Reigelhaupt, Michael; Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have increased the speed of analysis and the depth provided by a single analysis. Computational tools to evaluate the accuracy of peptide identifications from these high-throughput analyses have not kept pace with technological advances; currently the most common quality evaluation methods are based on statistical analysis of the likelihood of false positive identifications in large-scale data sets. While helpful, these calculations d...

  9. Computer aided manual validation of mass spectrometry-based proteomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Timothy G; Bryson, Bryan D.; Reigelhaupt, Michael; Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies have increased the speed of analysis and the depth provided by a single analysis. Computational tools to evaluate the accuracy of peptide identifications from these high-throughput analyses have not kept pace with technological advances; currently the most common quality evaluation methods are based on statistical analysis of the likelihood of false positive identifications in large-scale data sets. While helpful, these calculations d...

  10. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, R.; Bunkenborg, J.

    2013-01-01

    for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different...

  11. Decoding signalling networks by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Mann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Signalling networks regulate essentially all of the biology of cells and organisms in normal and disease states. Signalling is often studied using antibody-based techniques such as western blots. Large-scale 'precision proteomics' based on mass spectrometry now enables the system-wide characteriz......Signalling networks regulate essentially all of the biology of cells and organisms in normal and disease states. Signalling is often studied using antibody-based techniques such as western blots. Large-scale 'precision proteomics' based on mass spectrometry now enables the system...... perturbation. Current studies focus on phosphorylation, but acetylation, methylation, glycosylation and ubiquitylation are also becoming amenable to investigation. Large-scale proteomics-based signalling research will fundamentally change our understanding of signalling networks....

  12. Proteomics Discovery of Disease Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoun Ahram; Petricoin, Emanuel F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomics have shown promising initiatives in identifying novel biomarkers of various diseases. Such technologies are capable of investigating multiple samples and generating large amount of data end-points. Examples of two promising proteomics technologies are mass spectrometry, including an instrument based on surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization, and protein microarrays. Proteomics data must, however, undergo analytical processing using bioinfo...

  13. Mass Spectrometry-Based Biomarker Discovery: Toward a Global Proteome Index of Individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkridge, Adam M.; Muddiman, David C.

    2009-07-01

    Biomarker discovery and proteomics have become synonymous with mass spectrometry in recent years. Although this conflation is an injustice to the many essential biomolecular techniques widely used in biomarker-discovery platforms, it underscores the power and potential of contemporary mass spectrometry. Numerous novel and powerful technologies have been developed around mass spectrometry, proteomics, and biomarker discovery over the past 20 years to globally study complex proteomes (e.g., plasma). However, very few large-scale longitudinal studies have been carried out using these platforms to establish the analytical variability relative to true biological variability. The purpose of this review is not to cover exhaustively the applications of mass spectrometry to biomarker discovery, but rather to discuss the analytical methods and strategies that have been developed for mass spectrometry-based biomarker-discovery platforms and to place them in the context of the many challenges and opportunities yet to be addressed.

  14. Panorama: A Targeted Proteomics Knowledge Base

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eckels, Josh; Taylor, Greg K.; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Joyner, Shannon A.; Yan, Ping; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran N; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Carr, Steven A.; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2014-01-01

    Panorama is a web application for storing, sharing, analyzing, and reusing targeted assays created and refined with Skyline,1 an increasingly popular Windows client software tool for targeted proteomics experiments. Panorama allows laboratories to store and organize curated results contained in Skyline documents with fine-grained permissions, which facilitates distributed collaboration and secure sharing of published and unpublished data via a web-browser interface. It is fully integrated wit...

  15. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  16. Regulation of developmental processes: insights from mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Veraksa, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become an indispensable tool for protein identification and quantification. In this review, common MS workflows are described, with an emphasis on applications of MS-based proteomics in developmental biology. Progress has been made in the analysis of proteome changes during tissue differentiation and in various genetic perturbations. MS-based proteomics has been particularly useful for identifying novel protein interactions by affinity purification-...

  17. A highly scalable peptide-based assay system for proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Kozlov

    Full Text Available We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays.

  18. WaveletQuant, an improved quantification software based on wavelet signal threshold de-noising for labeled quantitative proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics technologies have been developed to comprehensively identify and quantify proteins in two or more complex samples. Quantitative proteomics based on differential stable isotope labeling is one of the proteomics quantification technologies. Mass spectrometric data generated for peptide quantification are often noisy, and peak detection and definition require various smoothing filters to remove noise in order to achieve accurate peptide quantification. Many traditional smoothing filters, such as the moving average filter, Savitzky-Golay filter and Gaussian filter, have been used to reduce noise in MS peaks. However, limitations of these filtering approaches often result in inaccurate peptide quantification. Here we present the WaveletQuant program, based on wavelet theory, for better or alternative MS-based proteomic quantification. Results We developed a novel discrete wavelet transform (DWT and a 'Spatial Adaptive Algorithm' to remove noise and to identify true peaks. We programmed and compiled WaveletQuant using Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition. We then incorporated the WaveletQuant program in the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP, a commonly used open source proteomics analysis pipeline. Conclusions We showed that WaveletQuant was able to quantify more proteins and to quantify them more accurately than the ASAPRatio, a program that performs quantification in the TPP pipeline, first using known mixed ratios of yeast extracts and then using a data set from ovarian cancer cell lysates. The program and its documentation can be downloaded from our website at http://systemsbiozju.org/data/WaveletQuant.

  19. Dissecting plasmodesmata molecular composition by mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Maria Françoise Bayer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In plants, the intercellular communication through the membranous channels called plasmodesmata (PD; singular plasmodesma plays pivotal roles in the orchestration of development, defence responses and viral propagation. PD are dynamic structures embedded in the plant cell wall that are defined by specialised domains of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. PD structure and unique functions are guaranteed by their particular molecular composition. Yet, up to recent years and despite numerous approaches such as mutant screens, immunolocalisation or screening of random cDNAs, only few PD proteins had been conclusively identified and characterised. A clear breakthrough in the search of PD constituents came from mass-spectrometry-based proteomic approaches coupled with subcellular fractionation strategies. Due to their position, firmly anchored in the extracellular matrix, PD are notoriously difficult to isolate for biochemical analysis. Proteomic-based approaches have therefore first relied on the use of cell wall fractions containing embedded PD then on free PD fractions whereby PD membranes were released from the walls by enzymatic degradation. To discriminate between likely contaminants and PD protein candidates, bioinformatics tools have often been used in combination with proteomic approaches. GFP fusion proteins of selected candidates have confirmed the PD association of several protein families. Here we review the accomplishments and limitations of the proteomic based strategies to unravel the functional and structural complexity of PD. We also discuss the role of the identified PD associated proteins.

  20. Centrosome isolation and analysis by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lis; Schrøder, Jacob Morville; Larsen, Katja M;

    2013-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with advan...... isolate centrosomes from human cells and strategies to selectively identify and study the properties of the associated proteins using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.......Centrioles are microtubule-based scaffolds that are essential for the formation of centrosomes, cilia, and flagella with important functions throughout the cell cycle, in physiology and during development. The ability to purify centriole-containing organelles on a large scale, combined with...... advances in protein identification using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, have revealed multiple centriole-associated proteins that are conserved during evolution in eukaryotes. Despite these advances, the molecular basis for the plethora of processes coordinated by cilia and centrosomes is not fully...

  1. Oxidative protein labeling in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Roeser, Julien; Bischoff, Rainer; Bruins, Andries P.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins and peptides is a common phenomenon, and can be employed as a labeling technique for mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. Nonspecific oxidative labeling methods can modify almost any amino acid residue in a protein or only surface-exposed regions. Specific agents may label reactive functional groups in amino acids, primarily cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Nonspecific radical intermediates (reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or halogen species) can be produced by ...

  2. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of contact lens deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Green-Church, Kari B.; Nichols, Jason J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the contact lens deposition proteome associated with two silicone hydrogel contact lenses and care solutions using a mass spectrometric-based approach. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, examiner-masked crossover clinical trial that included 48 participants. Lenses and no-rub care solutions evaluated included galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL), lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix, CIBA Vision Inc., Duluth, GA), AQuify (...

  3. Mass spectrometry based proteomics in cell biology and signaling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proteomics is one of the most powerful post-genomics technologies. Recently accomplishments include large scale protein-protein interaction mapping, large scale mapping of phosphorylation sites and the cloning of key signaling molecules. In this talk, current state of the art of the technology will be reviewed. Applications of proteomics to the mapping of multiprotein complexes will be illustrated with recent work on the spliceosome and the nucleolus. More than 300 proteins have been mapped to each of these complexes. Quantitative techniques are becoming more and more essential in proteomics. They are usually performed by the incorporation of stable isotopes - a light form in cell state 'A' and a heavy form in cell state 'E' - and subsequent comparison of mass spectrometric peak heights. A new technique called, SILAC for Stable isotope Incorporation by Amino acids in Cell culture, has been applied to studying cell differentiation and mapping secreted proteins from adipocytes. A number of known and novel proteins important in adipocyte differentiation have been identified by this technique. Some of these proved to be upregulated at the 1 mRNA level, too, whereas others appear to be regulated post-translationally. We have also applied the SILAC method to protein-protein interaction mapping. For example, we compared immunoprecipitates from stimulated and non-stimulated cells to find binding partners recruited to the bait due to the stimulus. Several novel substrates in the EGF pathway were found in this way. An important application of proteomics in the signaling field is the mapping of post-translational modifications. In particular, there are a number of techniques for phosphotyrosine phosphorylation mapping which have proven very useful. Making use of the mass deficiency of the phosphogroup, 'parent ion scans' con be performed, which selectively reveal phosphotyrosine peptides from complex peptides mixtures. This technique has been used to clone several

  4. Development and application of automated systems for plasmid-based functional proteomics to improve syntheitc biology of engineered industrial microbes for high level expression of proteases for biofertilizer production

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to microarray technology, which provides a robust method to study protein function in a rapid, economical, and proteome-wide fashion, plasmid-based functional proteomics is an important technology for rapidly obtaining large quantities of protein and determining protein function across a...

  5. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics--Lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods. Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we collected 35 original research articles published since 2010 and analysed them considering the following parameters, (i) resolution of modification site, (ii) quantitative information, including correction of modification levels by protein abundance changes and determination of modification site occupancy, (iii) throughput, including the amount of starting material required for analysis. The results of this meta-analysis are the core of this review, complemented by issues related to biological models and sample preparation in redox proteomics, including conditions for free thiol blocking and labelling of target cysteine oxoforms. PMID:26282677

  6. MS3 eliminates ratio distortion in isobaric labeling-based multiplexed quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Lily; Rad, Ramin; Gygi, Steven P.; Haas, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics is highly versatile, but not easily multiplexed. Isobaric labeling strategies allow mass spectrometry-based multiplexed proteome quantification; however, ratio distortion due to protein quantification interference is a common effect. We present a multi-proteome model (mixture of human and yeast proteins) in a 6-plex isobaric labeling system to fully document the interference effect, and we report that a multistage MS3-based approach almost compl...

  7. From Raw Data to Biological Discoveries: A Computational Analysis Pipeline for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Park, Sung Kyu Robin; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; He, Lin; Yates, John R.

    2015-11-01

    In the last two decades, computational tools for mass spectrometry-based proteomics data analysis have evolved from a few stand-alone software solutions serving specific goals, such as the identification of amino acid sequences based on mass spectrometry spectra, to large-scale complex pipelines integrating multiple computer programs to solve a collection of problems. This software evolution has been mostly driven by the appearance of novel technologies that allowed the community to tackle complex biological problems, such as the identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in two samples under different conditions. The achievement of such objectives requires a large suite of programs to analyze the intricate mass spectrometry data. Our laboratory addresses complex proteomics questions by producing and using algorithms and software packages. Our current computational pipeline includes, among other things, tools for mass spectrometry raw data processing, peptide and protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis, and protein functional enrichment analysis. In this paper, we describe a suite of software packages we have developed to process mass spectrometry-based proteomics data and we highlight some of the new features of previously published programs as well as tools currently under development.

  8. Increasing proteome coverage for gel-based human tear proteome maps: towards a more comprehensive profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraygord-Afshari, Neda; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Naderi, Mostafa

    2015-07-01

    In situations where the molecular mechanism of many ocular disorders is unknown, owing to the difficulties associated with sampling from ocular tissues, human tear film can be a promising medium in ophthalmic research. The present study demonstrates an in-depth gel-based proteome optimization survey to approach more appropriate and efficient systems in various situations such as normal and dry-eye syndromes. Therefore, systematic and statistical evaluations were performed on different preparation methods, including acetone, acetone-methanol, chloroform-methanol-water, trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-acetone, tri-n-butylphosphate-acetone-methanol precipitations and ammonium sulfate fractionation at three different percentages of saturations (50, 70 and 90%). Methods were compared quantitatively on both one- and two-dimensional patterns. Some important parameters such as total protein recovery yield, densitometric analysis of some protein contaminants, banding patterns and total spot numbers along with statistical models for proper clustering were considered. Findings revealed noticeable impacts of preparation methods on all aspects of gel-based separations as well as recovery yield (ranging from 5.29 ± 0.96 to 22.56 ± 1.77 µg/mm) and banding and pattern resolution. In addition to all these, the most important point is that the total protein spot number on the final two-dimensional patterns (varied from 528.00 ± 19.00 to 657.00 ± 21.52 for different methods) were also noticeably increased in comparison with previously published reports (maximum of 250 spots), which is essential for a more comprehensive analysis. Increasing the proteome coverage in the present study is supposed to originate from improved solubility and effective rehydration during the sample application and isoelectric focusing (IEF) procedure along with proper sample preparation. PMID:25450841

  9. A hybrid approach to protein differential expression in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuan; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein's associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics datasets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis.

  10. Current Trends in Computational Inference from Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-07-20

    Mass spectrometry offers a high-throughput approach to quantifying the proteome associated with a biological sample and hence has become the primary approach of proteomic analyses. Computation is tightly coupled to this advanced technological platform as a required component of not only peptide and protein identification, but quantification and functional inference, such as protein modifications and interactions. Proteomics faces several key computational challenges such as identification of proteins and peptides from tandem mass spectra as well as their quantitation. In addition, the application of proteomics to systems biology requires understanding the functional proteome including how the dynamics of the cell change in response to protein modifications and complex interactions between biomolecules. This review presents an overview of recently developed methods and their impact on these core computational challenges currently facing proteomics.

  11. Mass-spectrometry-based spatial proteomics data analysis using pRoloc and pRolocdata

    OpenAIRE

    L. Gatto; Breckels, L. M.; Wieczorek, S.; Burger, T; Lilley, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Experimental spatial proteomics, i.e. the high-throughput assignment of proteins to sub-cellular compartments based on quantitative proteomics data, promises to shed new light on many biological processes given adequate computational tools. Results: Here we present pRoloc, a complete infrastructure to support and guide the sound analysis of quantitative mass-spectrometry-based spatial proteomics data. It provides functionality for unsupervised and supervised machine learning for d...

  12. Mass spectrometry based proteomic studies on viruses and hosts - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    using this approach. As more virus and host genomes are being sequenced, MS-based proteomics is becoming an indispensable tool for virology. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the current technologies and their applications in studying selected viruses and hosts.

  13. Mass spectrometry based proteomic studies on viruses and hosts - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Jie [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Sugrue, Richard J. [Division of Molecular and Cell Biology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore); Tang Kai, E-mail: ktang@pmail.ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemical Biology and Biotechnology, School of Biological Science, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551 (Singapore)

    2011-09-30

    plant have been studied using this approach. As more virus and host genomes are being sequenced, MS-based proteomics is becoming an indispensable tool for virology. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the current technologies and their applications in studying selected viruses and hosts.

  14. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer. PMID:26827601

  15. Application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Venugopal Abhilash; Chaerkady Raghothama; Pandey Akhilesh

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach that has the potential to accelerate biomarker discovery, both for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes. Proteomics has traditionally been synonymous with 2D gels but is increasingly shifting to the use of gel-free systems and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Quantitative proteomic approaches have already been applied to investigate various neurological disorders, espe...

  16. Current challenges in software solutions for mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Cappadona, Salvatore; Baker, Peter R.; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Heck, Albert J.R.; van Breukelen, Bas

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has evolved as a high-throughput research field over the past decade. Significant advances in instrumentation, and the ability to produce huge volumes of data, have emphasized the need for adequate data analysis tools, which are nowadays often considered the main bottleneck for proteomics development. This review highlights important issues that directly impact the effectiveness of proteomic quantitation and educates software developers and end-users on avai...

  17. Proteomics, pathway array and signaling network-based medicine in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is a multifaceted disease that results from dysregulated normal cellular signaling networks caused by genetic, genomic and epigenetic alterations at cell or tissue levels. Uncovering the underlying protein signaling network changes, including cell cycle gene networks in cancer, aids in understanding the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and identifies the characteristic signaling network signatures unique for different cancers and specific cancer subtypes. The identified signatures can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment. During the past several decades, the available technology to study signaling networks has significantly evolved to include such platforms as genomic microarray (expression array, SNP array, CGH array, etc. and proteomic analysis, which globally assesses genetic, epigenetic, and proteomic alterations in cancer. In this review, we compared Pathway Array analysis with other proteomic approaches in analyzing protein network involved in cancer and its utility serving as cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic target identification. With the advent of bioinformatics, constructing high complexity signaling networks is possible. As the use of signaling network-based cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment is anticipated in the near future, medical and scientific communities should be prepared to apply these techniques to further enhance personalized medicine.

  18. Inside back cover: Biomarker discovery in mass spectrometry-based urinary proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Samuel; Hao, Ling; Ricke, William A; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    DOI: 10.1002/prca.201500102 Urine is among the most valuable sample materials for studies of human diseases. These urine solutes are shown with increasing approximate diameter from metabolite at 1 nm to protein at 5 nm to a group of exosomes at 100 nm each to a cell at 10 000 nm. This article highlights promising technologies and strategies in the mass spectrometry-based urine proteomics and its application to disease biomarker discovery. Further details can be found in the article by Samuel Thomas et al. on page 358. PMID:27061328

  19. Differential alkylation-based redox proteomics - Lessons learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylati......Cysteine is one of the most reactive amino acids. This is due to the electronegativity of sulphur atom in the side chain of thiolate group. It results in cysteine being present in several distinct redox forms inside the cell. Amongst these, reversible oxidations, S-nitrosylation and S......-sulfenylation are crucial mediators of intracellular redox signalling, with known associations to health and disease. Study of their functionalities has intensified thanks to the development of various analytical strategies, with particular contribution from differential alkylation-based proteomics methods....... Presented here is a critical evaluation of differential alkylation-based strategies for the analysis of S-nitrosylation and S-sulfenylation. The aim is to assess the current status and to provide insights for future directions in the dynamically evolving field of redox proteomics. To achieve that we...

  20. An efficient data format for mass spectrometry based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anuj R.; Davidson, Jennifer L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Danielson, William F.; Shi, Yan; Robinson, Aaron C.; Clowers, Brian H.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    The diverse range of mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation along with corresponding proprietary and non-proprietary data formats has generated a proteomics community driven call for a standardized format to facilitate management, processing, storing, visualization, and exchange of both experimental and processed data. To date, significant efforts have been extended towards standardizing XML-based formats for mass spectrometry data representation, despite the recognized inefficiencies associated with storing large numeric datasets in XML. The proteomics community has periodically entertained alternate strategies for data exchange, e.g., using a common application programming interface or a database-derived format. However these efforts have yet to garner significant attention, mostly because they haven’t illustrated significant performance benefits over existing standards, but also due to issues such as extensibility to multi-dimensional separation systems, robustness of operation, and incomplete or mismatched vocabulary. Here, we describe a format based on standard database principles that offers multiple benefits over existing formats in terms of storage size, ease of processing, data retrieval times and extensibility to accommodate multi-dimensional separation systems.

  1. Transplantation proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Traum, Avram Z.; Schachter, Asher D.

    2005-01-01

    The field of proteomics is developing at a rapid pace in the post-genome era. Translational proteomics investigations aim to apply a combination of established methods and new technologies to learn about protein expression profiles predictive of clinical events, therapeutic response, and underlying mechanisms. However, in contrast to genetic studies and in parallel with gene expression studies, the dynamic nature of the proteome in conjunction with the challenges of accounting for post-transl...

  2. Proteomics based compositional analysis of complex cellulase-hemicellulase mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chundawat, Shishir P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Gao, Dahai; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E.

    2011-10-07

    Efficient deconstruction of cellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars for fuel and chemical production is accomplished by a complex mixture of cellulases, hemicellulases and accessory enzymes (e.g., >50 extracellular proteins). Cellulolytic enzyme mixtures, produced industrially mostly using fungi like Trichoderma reesei, are poorly characterized in terms of their protein composition and its correlation to hydrolytic activity on cellulosic biomass. The secretomes of commercial glycosyl hydrolase producing microbes was explored using a proteomics approach with high-throughput quantification using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we show that proteomics based spectral counting approach is a reasonably accurate and rapid analytical technique that can be used to determine protein composition of complex glycosyl hydrolase mixtures that also correlates with the specific activity of individual enzymes present within the mixture. For example, a strong linear correlation was seen between Avicelase activity and total cellobiohydrolase content. Reliable, quantitative and cheaper analytical methods that provide insight into the cellulosic biomass degrading fungal and bacterial secretomes would lead to further improvements towards commercialization of plant biomass derived fuels and chemicals.

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Approaches Toward Absolute Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kito, Keiji; Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has served as a major tool for the discipline of proteomics to catalogue proteins in an unprecedented scale. With chemical and metabolic techniques for stable isotope labeling developed over the past decade, it is now routinely used as a method for relative quantification to provide valuable information on alteration of protein abundance in a proteome-wide scale. More recently, absolute or stoichiometric quantification of proteome is becoming feasible, in particular, with th...

  4. Environmental Proteomics: a Paradigm Shift in Characterizing Microbial Activities at the Molecular Level

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Martin; Hettich, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The increase in sequencing capacity led to a new wave of metagenomic projects, enabling and setting the prerequisite for the application of environmental proteomics technologies. This review describes the current status of environmental proteomics. It describes sample preparation as well as the two major technologies applied within this field: two-dimensional electrophoresis-based environmental proteomics and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based environmental proteomics. It ...

  5. Corra: Computational framework and tools for LC-MS discovery and targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Lukas N

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative proteomics holds great promise for identifying proteins that are differentially abundant between populations representing different physiological or disease states. A range of computational tools is now available for both isotopically labeled and label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS based quantitative proteomics. However, they are generally not comparable to each other in terms of functionality, user interfaces, information input/output, and do not readily facilitate appropriate statistical data analysis. These limitations, along with the array of choices, present a daunting prospect for biologists, and other researchers not trained in bioinformatics, who wish to use LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics. Results We have developed Corra, a computational framework and tools for discovery-based LC-MS proteomics. Corra extends and adapts existing algorithms used for LC-MS-based proteomics, and statistical algorithms, originally developed for microarray data analyses, appropriate for LC-MS data analysis. Corra also adapts software engineering technologies (e.g. Google Web Toolkit, distributed processing so that computationally intense data processing and statistical analyses can run on a remote server, while the user controls and manages the process from their own computer via a simple web interface. Corra also allows the user to output significantly differentially abundant LC-MS-detected peptide features in a form compatible with subsequent sequence identification via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. We present two case studies to illustrate the application of Corra to commonly performed LC-MS-based biological workflows: a pilot biomarker discovery study of glycoproteins isolated from human plasma samples relevant to type 2 diabetes, and a study in yeast to identify in vivo targets of the protein kinase Ark1 via phosphopeptide profiling. Conclusion The Corra computational framework leverages

  6. Properly reading the histone code by MS-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, Simone; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2015-09-01

    Histone proteins are essential elements for DNA packaging. Their PTMs contribute in modeling chromatin structure and recruiting enzymes involved in gene regulation, DNA repair, and chromosome condensation. This fundamental aspect, together with the fact that histone PTMs can be epigenetically inherited through cell generations, enlightens their importance in chromatin biology, and the consequent necessity of having biochemical techniques for their characterization. Nanoflow LC coupled to MS (nanoLC-MS) is the strategy of choice for protein PTM accurate quantification. However, histones require adjustments to the digestion protocol such as lysine derivatization to obtain suitable peptides for the analysis. nanoLC-MS has numerous advantages, spanning from high confidence identification to possibility of high throughput analyses, but the peculiarity of the histone preparation protocol requires continuous monitoring with the most modern available technologies to question its reliability. The work of Meert et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2966-2971) establishes which protocols lead to either incomplete derivatization or derivatization of undesired amino acid residues using a combination of high resolution MS and bioinformatics tools for the alignment and the characterization of nanoLC-MS runs. As well, they identify a number of side reactions that could be potentially misinterpreted as biological PTMs. PMID:26223514

  7. Knowledge-based variable selection for learning rules from proteomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan William R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incorporation of biological knowledge can enhance the analysis of biomedical data. We present a novel method that uses a proteomic knowledge base to enhance the performance of a rule-learning algorithm in identifying putative biomarkers of disease from high-dimensional proteomic mass spectral data. In particular, we use the Empirical Proteomics Ontology Knowledge Base (EPO-KB that contains previously identified and validated proteomic biomarkers to select m/zs in a proteomic dataset prior to analysis to increase performance. Results We show that using EPO-KB as a pre-processing method, specifically selecting all biomarkers found only in the biofluid of the proteomic dataset, reduces the dimensionality by 95% and provides a statistically significantly greater increase in performance over no variable selection and random variable selection. Conclusion Knowledge-based variable selection even with a sparsely-populated resource such as the EPO-KB increases overall performance of rule-learning for disease classification from high-dimensional proteomic mass spectra.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Debasish Paul; Avinash Kumar; Akshada Gajbhiye; Santra, Manas K.; Rapole Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE,...

  9. Proteomics analysis of cancer exosomes using a novel modified aptamer-based array (SOMAscan™) platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Stone, Timothy C; Katilius, Evaldas; Smith, Breanna C; Gordon, Bridget; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A; Clayton, Aled

    2014-04-01

    We have used a novel affinity-based proteomics technology to examine the protein signature of small secreted extracellular vesicles called exosomes. The technology uses a new class of protein binding reagents called SOMAmers® (slow off-rate modified aptamers) and allows the simultaneous precise measurement of over 1000 proteins. Exosomes were highly purified from the Du145 prostate cancer cell line, by pooling selected fractions from a continuous sucrose gradient (within the density range of 1.1 to 1.2 g/ml), and examined under standard conditions or with additional detergent treatment by the SOMAscan™ array (version 3.0). Lysates of Du145 cells were also prepared, and the profiles were compared. Housekeeping proteins such as cyclophilin-A, LDH, and Hsp70 were present in exosomes, and we identified almost 100 proteins that were enriched in exosomes relative to cells. These included proteins of known association with cancer exosomes such as MFG-E8, integrins, and MET, and also those less widely reported as exosomally associated, such as ROR1 and ITIH4. Several proteins with no previously known exosomal association were confirmed as exosomally expressed in experiments using individual SOMAmer® reagents or antibodies in micro-plate assays. Western blotting confirmed the SOMAscan™-identified enrichment of exosomal NOTCH-3, L1CAM, RAC1, and ADAM9. In conclusion, we describe here over 300 proteins of hitherto unknown association with prostate cancer exosomes and suggest that the SOMAmer®-based assay technology is an effective proteomics platform for exosome-associated biomarker discovery in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24505114

  10. Data Visualization and Feature Selection Methods in Gel-based Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé Santos; Richard, Nadege; Dias, Jorge P.;

    2014-01-01

    must be given not only to ensure proper experimental design, experimental practice and 2DE technical performance, but also a valid approach for data acquisition, processing and analysis. This paper reviews and illustrates several different aspects of data analysis within the context of gel-based...... proteomics, summarizing the current state of research within this field. Particular focus is given on discussing the usefulness of available multivariate analysis tools both for data visualization and feature selection purposes. Visual examples are given using a real gel-based proteomic dataset as basis.......Despite the increasing popularity of gel-free proteomic strategies, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is still the most widely used approach in top-down proteomic studies, for all sorts of biological models. In order to achieve meaningful biological insight using 2DE approaches, importance...

  11. Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Human Pancreatic and Hepatic Stellate Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo, Joao A.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the liver and the pancreas differ; however, chronic inflammation in both organs is associated with fibrosis. Evidence suggests that fibrosis in both organs is partially regulated by organ-specific stellate cells. We explore the proteome of human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and human pancreatic stellate cells (hPaSC) using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics to investigate pathophysiologic mechanisms. Proteins were isolated from whole cell lysates of immorta...

  12. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were ...

  13. Chemical Tools for Temporally and Spatially Resolved Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Yuet, Kai P.; Tirrell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the abundances, synthesis rates and degradation rates of cellular proteins are critical for understanding how cells and organisms respond to changes in their environments. Over the past two decades, there has been increasing interest in the use of mass spectrometry for proteomic analysis. In many systems, however, protein diversity as well as cell and tissue heterogeneity limit the usefulness of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. As a result, researchers have had dif...

  14. Pathobiochemical Changes in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle as Revealed by Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kay Ohlendieck

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissues and diabetes-related muscle weakness are serious pathophysiological problems of increasing medical importance. In order to determine global changes in the protein complement of contractile tissues due to diabetes mellitus, mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has been applied to the investigation of diabetic muscle. This review summarizes the findings from recent proteomic surveys of muscle preparations from patients and established animal models of...

  15. Open source libraries and frameworks for mass spectrometry based proteomics: A developer's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Müller, Markus; Müller, Markus; Vesada, Vladimir; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Data processing, management and visualization are central and critical components of a state of the art high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics experiment, and are often some of the most time-consuming steps, especially for labs without much bioinformatics support. The growing interest in the field of proteomics has triggered an increase in the development of new software libraries, including freely available and open-source software. From database search analysis to post-proc...

  16. Weighing in on Ubiquitin: The Expanding Role of Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Denison, Carilee; Gygi, Steven P.

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become an essential tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of cellular systems. The biochemical complexity and functional diversity of the ubiquitin system are well suited to proteomic studies. This review summarizes advances involving the identification of ubiquitinated proteins, the elucidation of ubiquitin-modification sites, and the determination of poly-ubiquitin chain linkages, while offering a perspective on the application of emerging tec...

  17. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics in the life sciences: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kambiz Gilany; Luc Moens

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics concerns itself with the characterization and function of all cellular proteins, the ultimate determinants of cellular function. Mass spectrometry has emerged as the preferred method for in-depth characterization of the protein components of biological systems. Using mass spectrometry, key insights into the composition, regulation and function of molecular complexes and pathways have been gained. Now days, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become an indispensable tool in the c...

  18. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) in response to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, He; Yang, Da-Hai; Yao, Heng; Bai, Ge; Zhang, Yi-Han; Xiao, Bing-Guang

    2016-01-15

    Drought is one of the most severe forms of abiotic stresses that threaten the survival of plants, including crops. In turn, plants dramatically change their physiology to increase drought tolerance, including reconfiguration of proteomes. Here, we studied drought-induced proteomic changes in leaves of cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), a solanaceous plant, using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based protein labeling technology. Of identified 5570 proteins totally, drought treatment increased and decreased abundance of 260 and 206 proteins, respectively, compared with control condition. Most of these differentially regulated proteins are involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, and stress and defense. Although abscisic acid (ABA) levels greatly increased in drought-treated tobacco leaves, abundance of detected ABA biosynthetic enzymes showed no obvious changes. In contrast, heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxins, ascorbate-, glutathione-, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-related proteins were up- or down-regulated in drought-treated tobacco leaves, suggesting that chaperones and redox signaling are important for tobacco tolerance to drought, and it is likely that redox-induced posttranslational modifications play an important role in modulating protein activity. This study not only provides a comprehensive dataset on overall protein changes in drought-treated tobacco leaves, but also shed light on the mechanism by which solanaceous plants adapt to drought stress. PMID:26692494

  19. Biometric-based Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    OECD

    2004-01-01

    This report is intended to provide an understanding of the benefits and limitations of biometric-based technologies. It also includes information on existing privacy and security methodologies for assessing biometrics.

  20. Study of monocyte membrane proteome perturbation during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Huoming

    2010-07-02

    Human monocytes\\' exposure to low-level lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces temporary monocytic insensitivity to subsequent LPS challenge. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon could have important clinical utilities in preventing and/or treating severe infections. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to comprehensively characterize the membrane proteomes of monocytes before and after LPS exposure. We identified a total of 1651 proteins, of which 53.6% were membrane proteins. Ninety-four percent of the proteins were quantified and 255 proteins were shown to be tightly regulated by LPS. Subcellular location analysis revealed organelle-specific response to LPS exposure: more than 90% of identified mitochondrial membrane proteins were significant downregulated, whereas the majority of proteins from other organelles such as ER, Golgi and ribosome were upregulated. Moreover, we found that the expression of most receptors potentially involved in LPS signal pathway (CD14, toll-like receptor 4, CD11/CD18 complex) were substantially decreased, while the expression of molecules involved in LPS neutralization were enhanced after LPS challenge. Together, these findings could be of significance in understanding the mechanism of LPS tolerance and provide values for designing new approaches for regulating monocytic responses in sepsis patients.

  1. Integrating proteomic and functional genomic technologies in discovery-driven translational breast cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina;

    2003-01-01

    . Here we describe the essence of a long-term initiative undertaken by The Danish Centre for Translational Breast Cancer Research and currently underway for cancer biomarker discovery using fresh tissue biopsies and bio-fluids. The Centre is a virtual hub that brings together scientists working......The application of state-of-the-art proteomics and functional genomics technologies to the study of cancer is rapidly shifting toward the analysis of clinically relevant samples derived from patients, as the ultimate aim of translational research is to bring basic discoveries closer to the bedside...... in various areas of basic cancer research such as cell cycle control, invasion and micro-environmental alterations, apoptosis, cell signaling, and immunology, with clinicians (oncologists, surgeons), pathologists, and epidemiologists, with the aim of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying breast...

  2. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun;

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several...... body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and......://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic...

  3. In Silico Instrumental Response Correction Improves Precision of Label-free Proteomics and Accuracy of Proteomics-based Predictive Models*

    OpenAIRE

    Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav; Yang, Hongqian; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of proteome changes arising during the early stages of a biological process (e.g. disease or drug treatment) or from the indirect influence of an important factor, the biological variations of interest are often small (∼10%). The corresponding requirements for the precision of proteomics analysis are high, and this often poses a challenge, especially when employing label-free quantification. One of the main contributors to the inaccuracy of label-free proteomics experiments is...

  4. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed proteins in prostate cancer based on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen C

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen Chen,1 Li-Guo Zhang,1 Jian Liu,1 Hui Han,1 Ning Chen,1 An-Liang Yao,1 Shao-San Kang,1 Wei-Xing Gao,1 Hong Shen,2 Long-Jun Zhang,1 Ya-Peng Li,1 Feng-Hong Cao,1 Zhi-Guo Li3 1Department of Urology, North China University of Science and Technology Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Modern Technology and Education Center, 3Department of Medical Research Center, International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Geriatric Medicine, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We mined the literature for proteomics data to examine the occurrence and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa through a bioinformatics analysis. We divided the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs into two groups: the group consisting of PCa and benign tissues (P&b and the group presenting both high and low PCa metastatic tendencies (H&L. In the P&b group, we found 320 DEPs, 20 of which were reported more than three times, and DES was the most commonly reported. Among these DEPs, the expression levels of FGG, GSN, SERPINC1, TPM1, and TUBB4B have not yet been correlated with PCa. In the H&L group, we identified 353 DEPs, 13 of which were reported more than three times. Among these DEPs, MDH2 and MYH9 have not yet been correlated with PCa metastasis. We further confirmed that DES was differentially expressed between 30 cancer and 30 benign tissues. In addition, DEPs associated with protein transport, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix (ECM–receptor interaction pathway were prevalent in the H&L group and have not yet been studied in detail in this context. Proteins related to homeostasis, the wound-healing response, focal adhesions, and the complement and coagulation pathways were overrepresented in both groups. Our findings suggest that the repeatedly reported DEPs in the two groups may function as potential biomarkers for detecting PCa and predicting its aggressiveness. Furthermore

  5. Using PSEA-Quant for Protein Set Enrichment Analysis of Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Yates, John R

    2016-01-01

    PSEA-Quant analyzes quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics datasets to identify enrichments of annotations contained in repositories such as the Gene Ontology and Molecular Signature databases. It allows users to identify the annotations that are significantly enriched for reproducibly quantified high abundance proteins. PSEA-Quant is available on the Web and as a command-line tool. It is compatible with all label-free and isotopic labeling-based quantitative proteomics methods. This protocol describes how to use PSEA-Quant and interpret its output. The importance of each parameter as well as troubleshooting approaches are also discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27010334

  6. Six alternative proteases for mass spectrometry-based proteomics beyond trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Piero; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Low, Teck Yew; Heck, Albert J R

    2016-05-01

    Protein digestion using a dedicated protease represents a key element in a typical mass spectrometry (MS)-based shotgun proteomics experiment. Up to now, digestion has been predominantly performed with trypsin, mainly because of its high specificity, widespread availability and ease of use. Lately, it has become apparent that the sole use of trypsin in bottom-up proteomics may impose certain limits in our ability to grasp the full proteome, missing out particular sites of post-translational modifications, protein segments or even subsets of proteins. To overcome this problem, the proteomics community has begun to explore alternative proteases to complement trypsin. However, protocols, as well as expected results generated from these alternative proteases, have not been systematically documented. Therefore, here we provide an optimized protocol for six alternative proteases that have already shown promise in their applicability in proteomics, namely chymotrypsin, LysC, LysN, AspN, GluC and ArgC. This protocol is formulated to promote ease of use and robustness, which enable parallel digestion with each of the six tested proteases. We present data on protease availability and usage including recommendations for reagent preparation. We additionally describe the appropriate MS data analysis methods and the anticipated results in the case of the analysis of a single protein (BSA) and a more complex cellular lysate (Escherichia coli). The digestion protocol presented here is convenient and robust and can be completed in ∼2 d. PMID:27123950

  7. Genomic comparisons of Brucella spp. and closely related bacteria using base compositional and proteome based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, Jon; Snipen, Lars; Cloeckaert, Axel; Lagesen, Karin; Ussery, David; Kristoffersen, Anja B.; Godfroid, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classification of bacteria within the genus Brucella has been difficult due in part to considerable genomic homogeneity between the different species and biovars, in spite of clear differences in phenotypes. Therefore, many different methods have been used to assess Brucella taxonomy...... differences could be detected between all genera included in this study using the codon and amino acid frequencies based methods. Proteome comparisons were found to be in strong accordance with current Brucella taxonomy indicating a remarkable association between gene gain or loss on one hand and mutations in...

  8. Mass spectrometry-based serum proteome pattern analysis in molecular diagnostics of early stage breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stobiecki Maciej

    2009-07-01

    .0003 increased level of osteopontin in blood of the group of cancer patients studied (however, the plasma level of osteopontin classified cancer samples with 88% sensitivity but only 28% specificity. Conclusion MALDI-ToF spectrometry of serum has an obvious potential to differentiate samples between early breast cancer patients and healthy controls. Importantly, a classifier built on MS-based serum proteome patterns outperforms available protein biomarkers analyzed in blood by immunoassays.

  9. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten; Schmidt, Bjarne G; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Svensson, Birte

    2012-04-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well-documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel-based NCFM proteomics addressed the so-called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6-11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D gel using MALDI-TOF-MS. The 102 unique gene products among the 150 protein identifications were assigned to different functional categories, and evaluated by considering a calculated distribution of abundance as well as grand average of hydrophobicity values. None of the very few available lactic acid bacteria proteome reference maps included the range of pI >7.0. The present report of such data on the proteome of NCFM fundamentally complements current knowledge on protein profiles limited to the acid and neutral pH range. PMID:22522807

  10. Uses and challenges of bioinformatic tools in mass spectrometric-based proteomic brain perturbation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guingab-Cagmat, Joy D; Cagmat, Emilio B; Kobeissy, Firas H; Anagli, John

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice to study the proteome of brain injury. The high throughput nature of MS-based proteomic experiments generates massive amount of mass spectral data presenting great challenges in downstream interpretation. Currently, different bioinformatics platforms are available for functional analysis and data mining of MS-generated proteomic data. These tools provide a way to convert data sets to biologically interpretable results and functional outcomes. In this review, a brief overview of the currently available bioinformatics strategies applied to neuroproteomic studies is presented. Application of commercially available bioinformatics software to different brain injury studies demonstrates integration of the data mining and analysis applications into neuroproteomic workflows that can identify major protein markers as well as highlight the biological processes and molecular functions involved. PMID:24449691

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  12. New technologies in proteomics: automated excision and digestion of fluorescently stained protein gel spots and identification of proteins by MALDI-QTOF mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is an overview of the techniques and systems we use for large-scale proteomics in plants. This includes a variety of 2D gel electrophoresis methods, and automation of spot-cutting, in-gel digestion, nanoLC-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry and SEQUEST based protein identification. Examples and applications of several new technologies will also be shown, including the use of a robotic spot cutter in conjunction with high sensitivity fluorescent protein staining and the identification of proteins by redundant peptide identification in a high-throughput fashion using a hybrid MALDI-Qtof mass spectrometer

  13. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well‐documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel‐based NCFM proteomics addressed the so‐called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6–11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D...

  14. Elucidating Host-Pathogen Interactions Based on Post-Translational Modifications Using Proteomics Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Jers, Carsten; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    display host specificity through a complex network of molecular interactions that aid their survival and propagation. Co-infection states further lead to complications by increasing the microbial burden and risk factors. Quantitative proteomics based approaches and post-translational modification analysis...

  15. A statistical framework for protein quantitation in bottom-up MS-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeff; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and associated confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low quality or incorrectly identified peptides and informative missingness. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level.

  16. Recent advances in atherosclerosis-based proteomics: new biomarkers and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria Eugenia G; Darde, Veronica; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando

    2008-10-01

    Vascular proteomics is providing two main types of data: proteins that actively participate in vascular pathophysiological processes and novel protein candidates that can potentially serve as useful clinical biomarkers. Although both types of proteins can be identified by similar proteomic strategies and methods, it is important to clearly distinguish biomarkers from mediators of disease. A particular protein, or group of proteins, may participate in a pathogenic process but not serve as an effective biomarker. Alternatively, a useful biomarker may not mediate pathogenic pathways associated with disease (i.e., C-reactive protein). To date, there are no clear successful examples in which discovery proteomics has led to a novel useful clinical biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, new sources of biomarkers are being explored (i.e., secretomes, circulating cells, exosomes and microparticles), an increasing number of novel proteins involved in atherogenesis are constantly described, and new technologies and analytical strategies (i.e., quantitative proteomics) are being developed to access low abundant proteins. Therefore, this presages a new era of discovery and a further step in the practical application to diagnosis, prognosis and early action by medical treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:18937558

  17. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  18. OryzaPG-DB: Rice Proteome Database based on Shotgun Proteogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Masaru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteogenomics aims to utilize experimental proteome information for refinement of genome annotation. Since mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics approaches provide large-scale peptide sequencing data with high throughput, a data repository for shotgun proteogenomics would represent a valuable source of gene expression evidence at the translational level for genome re-annotation. Description Here, we present OryzaPG-DB, a rice proteome database based on shotgun proteogenomics, which incorporates the genomic features of experimental shotgun proteomics data. This version of the database was created from the results of 27 nanoLC-MS/MS runs on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer, which offers high accuracy for analyzing tryptic digests from undifferentiated cultured rice cells. Peptides were identified by searching the product ion spectra against the protein, cDNA, transcript and genome databases from Michigan State University, and were mapped to the rice genome. Approximately 3200 genes were covered by these peptides and 40 of them contained novel genomic features. Users can search, download or navigate the database per chromosome, gene, protein, cDNA or transcript and download the updated annotations in standard GFF3 format, with visualization in PNG format. In addition, the database scheme of OryzaPG was designed to be generic and can be reused to host similar proteogenomic information for other species. OryzaPG is the first proteogenomics-based database of the rice proteome, providing peptide-based expression profiles, together with the corresponding genomic origin, including the annotation of novelty for each peptide. Conclusions The OryzaPG database was constructed and is freely available at http://oryzapg.iab.keio.ac.jp/.

  19. A Hybrid Approach to Protein Differential Expression in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuan; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2012-04-19

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein's associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics data sets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. Results: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of 'presence/ absence,' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amendable to quantitative analysis; e.g., 'one-state' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/ absence analysis of a given data set in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single associated FDR.

  20. Environmental Proteomics: a Paradigm Shift in Characterizing Microbial Activities at the Molecular Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The increase in sequencing capacity led to a new wave of metagenomic projects, enabling and setting the prerequisite for the application of environmental proteomics technologies. This review describes the current status of environmental proteomics. It describes sample preparation as well as the two major technologies applied within this field: two-dimensional electrophoresis-based environmental proteomics and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based environmental proteomics. It also highlights current publications and describes major scientific findings. The review closes with a discussion of critical improvements in the area of integrating experimental mass spectrometry technologies with bioinformatics as well as improved sample handling.

  1. Proteomics and the dynamic plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    plasma membrane is of particular interest, by not only serving as a barrier between the "cell interior" and the external environment, but moreover by organizing and clustering essential components to enable dynamic responses to internal and external stimuli. Defining and characterizing the dynamic plasma...... the challenges in functional proteomic studies of the plasma membrane. We review the recent progress in MS-based plasma membrane proteomics by presenting key examples from eukaryotic systems, including mammals, yeast and plants. We highlight the importance of enrichment and quantification technologies...... required for detailed functional and comparative analysis of the dynamic plasma membrane proteome....

  2. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Technology Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate has two primary discretionary avenues for its investment in technologies: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the ''Tech Base'' program. This volume summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts in FY2004. The Engineering Technical Reports exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of researching and developing (LDRD), and reducing to practice (technology-base) the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources. This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Tech Base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. The objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics of Endoscopically-Collected Pancreatic Fluid in Chronic Pancreatitis Research

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo, Joao A.; Lee, Linda S.; Wu, Bechien; Peter A Banks; Steen, Hanno; Darwin L Conwell

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based investigation of pancreatic fluid enables the high-throughput identification of proteins present in the pancreatic secretome. Pancreatic fluid is a complex admixture of digestive, inflammatory, and other proteins secreted by the pancreas into the duodenum, and thus is amenable to mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Recent advances in endoscopic techniques, in particular the endoscopic pancreatic function test (ePFT), have improved the collection methodology of ...

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Pre-Eclampsia and Preterm Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai P. Law

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy-related complications such as pre-eclampsia and preterm birth now represent a notable burden of adverse health. Pre-eclampsia is a hypertensive disorder unique to pregnancy. It is an important cause of maternal death worldwide and a leading cause of fetal growth restriction and iatrogenic prematurity. Fifteen million infants are born preterm each year globally, but more than one million of those do not survive their first month of life. Currently there are no predictive tests available for diagnosis of these pregnancy-related complications and the biological mechanisms of the diseases have not been fully elucidated. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics have all the necessary attributes to provide the needed breakthrough in understanding the pathophysiology of complex human diseases thorough the discovery of biomarkers. The mass spectrometry methodologies employed in the studies for pregnancy-related complications are evaluated in this article. Top-down proteomic and peptidomic profiling by laser mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography or capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry, and bottom-up quantitative proteomics and targeted proteomics by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry have been applied to elucidate protein biomarkers and biological mechanism of pregnancy-related complications. The proteomes of serum, urine, amniotic fluid, cervical-vaginal fluid, placental tissue, and cytotrophoblastic cells have all been investigated. Numerous biomarkers or biomarker candidates that could distinguish complicated pregnancies from healthy controls have been proposed. Nevertheless, questions as to the clinically utility and the capacity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the pre-eclampsia and preterm birth remain to be answered.

  5. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. PMID:22484059

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Study Makes High-Density Lipoprotein a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chiz-Tzung Chang; Chao-Yuh Yang; Fuu-Jen Tsai; Shih-Yi Lin; Chao-Jung Chen

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipid and protein complex that consists of apolipoproteins and lower level HDL-associated enzymes. HDL dysfunction is a factor in atherosclerosis and decreases patient survival. Mass spectrometry- (MS-) based proteomics provides a high throughput approach for analyzing the composition and modifications of complex HDL proteins in diseases. HDL can be separated according to size, surface charge, electronegativity, or apoprotein composition. MS-based proteomic...

  7. A statistical framework for protein quantitation in bottom-up MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    ABSTRACT Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low-quality or incorrectly identified peptides and widespread, informative, missing data. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model for protein abundance in terms of peptide peak intensities, applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. The model allows for both random and censoring missingness mechanisms and provides naturally for protein-level estimates and confidence measures. The model is also used to derive automated filtering and imputation routines. Three LC-MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. Availability: The software has been made available in the open-source proteomics platform DAnTE (Polpitiya et al. (2008)) (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu

  8. The contribution of mass spectrometry-based proteomics to understanding epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noberini, Roberta; Sigismondo, Gianluca; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Chromatin is a macromolecular complex composed of DNA and histones that regulate gene expression and nuclear architecture. The concerted action of DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and chromatin-associated proteins control the epigenetic regulation of the genome, ultimately determining cell fate and the transcriptional outputs of differentiated cells. Deregulation of this complex machinery leads to disease states, and exploiting epigenetic drugs is becoming increasingly attractive for therapeutic intervention. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics emerged as a powerful tool complementary to genomic approaches for epigenetic research, allowing the unbiased and comprehensive analysis of histone post-translational modifications and the characterization of chromatin constituents and chromatin-associated proteins. Furthermore, MS holds great promise for epigenetic biomarker discovery and represents a useful tool for deconvolution of epigenetic drug targets. Here, we will provide an overview of the applications of MS-based proteomics in various areas of chromatin biology. PMID:26606673

  9. Comparison of Different Protein Extraction Methods for Gel-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ganoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Saidi, Noor Baity; Usuldin, Siti Rokhiyah Ahmad; Hussin, Siti Nahdatul Isnaini Said; Yusoff, Noornabeela Md; Idris, Abu Seman

    2016-04-01

    Ganoderma species are a group of fungi that have the ability to degrade lignin polymers and cause severe diseases such as stem and root rot and can infect economically important plants and perennial crops such as oil palm, especially in tropical countries such as Malaysia. Unfortunately, very little is known about the complex interplay between oil palm and Ganoderma in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Proteomic technologies are simple yet powerful tools in comparing protein profile and have been widely used to study plant-fungus interaction. A critical step to perform a good proteome research is to establish a method that gives the best quality and a wide coverage of total proteins. Despite the availability of various protein extraction protocols from pathogenic fungi in the literature, no single extraction method was found suitable for all types of pathogenic fungi. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for 2-DE gel analysis of Ganoderma spp., three previously reported protein extraction protocols were compared: trichloroacetic acid, sucrose and phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol. The third method was found to give the most reproducible gels and highest protein concentration. Using the later method, a total of 10 protein spots (5 from each species) were successfully identified. Hence, the results from this study propose phenol/ammonium acetate in methanol as the most effective protein extraction method for 2-DE proteomic studies of Ganoderma spp. PMID:27016942

  10. Proteomics Analysis of Cancer Exosomes Using a Novel Modified Aptamer-based Array (SOMAscanTM) Platform*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Stone, Timothy C.; Katilius, Evaldas; Smith, Breanna C.; Gordon, Bridget; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2014-01-01

    We have used a novel affinity-based proteomics technology to examine the protein signature of small secreted extracellular vesicles called exosomes. The technology uses a new class of protein binding reagents called SOMAmers® (slow off-rate modified aptamers) and allows the simultaneous precise measurement of over 1000 proteins. Exosomes were highly purified from the Du145 prostate cancer cell line, by pooling selected fractions from a continuous sucrose gradient (within the density range of 1.1 to 1.2 g/ml), and examined under standard conditions or with additional detergent treatment by the SOMAscanTM array (version 3.0). Lysates of Du145 cells were also prepared, and the profiles were compared. Housekeeping proteins such as cyclophilin-A, LDH, and Hsp70 were present in exosomes, and we identified almost 100 proteins that were enriched in exosomes relative to cells. These included proteins of known association with cancer exosomes such as MFG-E8, integrins, and MET, and also those less widely reported as exosomally associated, such as ROR1 and ITIH4. Several proteins with no previously known exosomal association were confirmed as exosomally expressed in experiments using individual SOMAmer® reagents or antibodies in micro-plate assays. Western blotting confirmed the SOMAscanTM-identified enrichment of exosomal NOTCH-3, L1CAM, RAC1, and ADAM9. In conclusion, we describe here over 300 proteins of hitherto unknown association with prostate cancer exosomes and suggest that the SOMAmer®-based assay technology is an effective proteomics platform for exosome-associated biomarker discovery in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24505114

  11. Global detection and characterization of hypothetical proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using LC-MS based proteomics based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2005-08-01

    The availability of whole genome sequences has enabled the application of powerful tools for assaying global expression patterns in environmentally relevant bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A large number of genes in prokaryote genomes, including MR-1, have been annotated as hypothetical indicating that no similar protein has yet been identified in other organisms. Using high-sensitivity mass spectrometry coupled with accurate mass and time (AMT) tag methodology, 1078 tryptic peptides were collectively detected in MR-1 cultures, 671 of which were unique to their parent protein. Using only these unique tryptic peptides and a minimum of 2 peptides per protein, we identified, with high confidence, the expression of 258 hypothetical proteins. These proteins ranged from 3.5 kDa to 139 kDa, with 47 being 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions, presence within a specific cell fraction, and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some hypothetical proteins. Further, by applying this approach a number of proteins were found not only to be expressed, but only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby suggesting function while at the same time isolating several proteins to distinct locales of the cell. These results demonstrate the utility of the AMT tag methodology for comprehensive profiling of the microbial proteome while confirming the expression of a large number of hypothetical genes.

  12. MS-Viewer: A Web-based Spectral Viewer for Proteomics Results*

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Peter R.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The sharing and viewing of peptide identification results from search engines analyzing mass-spectrometry-based proteomic data is made difficult by the range of analysis tools employed, in that each produces a different output format. Annotated results associated with a journal article often have to be made available, but providing these in a format that can be queried by other researchers is often difficult. This is because although standard formats for results have been developed, these are...

  13. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics and its application to studies of Porphyromonas gingivalis invasion and pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont, Richard J.; Meila, Marina; Xia, Qiangwei; Hackett, Murray

    2006-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe that populates the subgingival crevice of the mouth. It is known to undergo a transition from its commensal status in healthy individuals to a highly invasive intracellular pathogen in human patients suffering from periodontal disease, where it is often the dominant species of pathogenic bacteria. The application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics to the study of P. gingivalis interactions with model host cell systems, invasion and patho...

  14. Illuminating spatial and temporal organization of protein interaction networks by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiwen eYang; Sebastian Alexander Wagner; Petra eBeli

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of all cellular functions and dynamic alterations in protein interactions regulate cellular signaling. In the last decade, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has delivered unprecedented insights into human protein interaction networks. Affinity purification-mass spectrometry has been extensively employed for focused and high-throughput studies of steady state protein-protein interactions. Future challenges remain in mapping transient protein intera...

  15. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  16. Illuminating Spatial and Temporal Organization of Protein Interaction Networks by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jiwen; Wagner, Sebastian A; Beli, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are at the core of all cellular functions and dynamic alterations in protein interactions regulate cellular signaling. In the last decade, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has delivered unprecedented insights into human protein interaction networks. Affinity purification-MS (AP-MS) has been extensively employed for focused and high-throughput studies of steady state protein–protein interactions. Future challenges remain in mapping transient protein interact...

  17. Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease Analysis by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Yahui Liu; Hong Qing; Yulin Deng

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common chronic and destructive disease. The early diagnosis of AD is difficult, thus the need for clinically applicable biomarkers development is growing rapidly. There are many methods to biomarker discovery and identification. In this review, we aim to summarize Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics studies on AD and discuss thoroughly the methods to identify candidate biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood. This review will also discuss the potent...

  18. GeLC-MS-based proteomics of Chromobacterium violaceum: comparison of proteome changes elicited by hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, D. C.; Duarte, F. T.; Medeiros, V. K. S.; Carvalho, P. C.; Nogueira, F. C. S.; Araujo, G. D. T.; Domont, G. B.; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living bacillus with several genes that enables it survival under different harsh environments such as oxidative and temperature stresses. Here we performed a label-free quantitative proteomic study to unravel the molecular mechanisms that enable C. violaceum to survive oxidative stress. To achieve this, total proteins extracted from control and C. violaceum cultures exposed during two hours with 8 mM hydrogen peroxide were analyzed using GeLC-MS proteomics. Analysis revealed that under the stress condition, the bacterium expressed proteins that protected it from the damage caused by reactive oxygen condition and decreasing the abundance of proteins responsible for bacterial growth and catabolism. GeLC-MS proteomics analysis provided an overview of the metabolic pathways involved in the response of C. violaceum to oxidative stress ultimately aggregating knowledge of the response of this organism to environmental stress. This study identified approximately 1500 proteins, generating the largest proteomic coverage of C. violaceum so far. We also detected proteins with unknown function that we hypothesize to be part of new mechanisms related to oxidative stress defense. Finally, we identified the mechanism of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), which has not yet been reported for this organism. PMID:27321545

  19. GeLC-MS-based proteomics of Chromobacterium violaceum: comparison of proteome changes elicited by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, D C; Duarte, F T; Medeiros, V K S; Carvalho, P C; Nogueira, F C S; Araujo, G D T; Domont, G B; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, S R

    2016-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a free-living bacillus with several genes that enables it survival under different harsh environments such as oxidative and temperature stresses. Here we performed a label-free quantitative proteomic study to unravel the molecular mechanisms that enable C. violaceum to survive oxidative stress. To achieve this, total proteins extracted from control and C. violaceum cultures exposed during two hours with 8 mM hydrogen peroxide were analyzed using GeLC-MS proteomics. Analysis revealed that under the stress condition, the bacterium expressed proteins that protected it from the damage caused by reactive oxygen condition and decreasing the abundance of proteins responsible for bacterial growth and catabolism. GeLC-MS proteomics analysis provided an overview of the metabolic pathways involved in the response of C. violaceum to oxidative stress ultimately aggregating knowledge of the response of this organism to environmental stress. This study identified approximately 1500 proteins, generating the largest proteomic coverage of C. violaceum so far. We also detected proteins with unknown function that we hypothesize to be part of new mechanisms related to oxidative stress defense. Finally, we identified the mechanism of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), which has not yet been reported for this organism. PMID:27321545

  20. Pathobiochemical Changes in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle as Revealed by Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Ohlendieck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle tissues and diabetes-related muscle weakness are serious pathophysiological problems of increasing medical importance. In order to determine global changes in the protein complement of contractile tissues due to diabetes mellitus, mass-spectrometry-based proteomics has been applied to the investigation of diabetic muscle. This review summarizes the findings from recent proteomic surveys of muscle preparations from patients and established animal models of type 2 diabetes. The potential impact of novel biomarkers of diabetes, such as metabolic enzymes and molecular chaperones, is critically examined. Disease-specific signature molecules may be useful for increasing our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance and possibly identify new therapeutic options that counteract diabetic abnormalities in peripheral organ systems. Importantly, the biomedical establishment of biomarkers promises to accelerate the development of improved diagnostic procedures for characterizing individual stages of diabetic disease progression, including the early detection of prediabetic complications.

  1. Predicting Ovarian Cancer Patients' Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy by Their Tumor Proteomic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Levine, Douglas A; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Zhen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy in the United States with most patients diagnosed in the advanced stage of the disease. Platinum-based antineoplastic therapeutics is indispensable to treating advanced ovarian serous carcinoma. However, patients have heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs, and it is difficult to predict these interindividual differences before administering medication. In this study, we investigated the tumor proteomic profiles and clinical characteristics of 130 ovarian serous carcinoma patients analyzed by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), predicted the platinum drug response using supervised machine learning methods, and evaluated our prediction models through leave-one-out cross-validation. Our data-driven feature selection approach indicated that tumor proteomics profiles contain information for predicting binarized platinum response (P drug responses as well as provided insights into the biological processes influencing the efficacy of platinum-based therapeutics. Our analytical approach is also extensible to predicting response to other antineoplastic agents or treatment modalities for both ovarian and other cancers. PMID:27312948

  2. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Rüetschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i early relapsed or refractory and (ii long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based functional proteomics of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic, Emilie; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Poirier, Guy G

    2011-12-01

    PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein that plays an essential role in the regulation of many genome integrity and chromatin-based processes, such as DNA repair, replication or transcriptional regulation. PARP-1 modulates the function of chromatin and nuclear proteins through several poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr)-dependent pathways. Aside from the clearly established role of PARP-1 in the maintenance of genome stability, PARP-1 also emerged as an important regulator that links chromatin functions with extranuclear compartments. pADPr signaling has notably been found to be responsible for PARP-1-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Defining the mechanisms that govern the intrinsic functions of PARP-1 is fundamental to the understanding of signaling networks regulated by pADPr. The emergence of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and its broad applications in the study of biological systems represents an outstanding opportunity to widen our knowledge of the functional spectrum of PARP-1. In this article, we summarize various PARP-1 targeted proteomics studies and proteome-wide analyses that shed light on its protein interaction partners, expression levels and post-translational modifications. PMID:22087659

  4. A preliminary screening study on the associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhankui Liu; Shengshun Tan; Chunshui Yu; Jinghua Fan; Zhuanli Bai; Junjie Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the optimum screening conditions of associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technique, and to screen the different expression proteins related with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods:Serum samples of peripheral blood were collected from newly diagnosed psoriasis vulgaris patients in the clinic, and 20 matched healthy persons.Serum albumin IgG was removed by filtering with ProteoExtract Albumin/IgG. After comparative proteomics analysis the different protein spots were identified using 2-DE and MS. Results :Electrophoresis figures with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained. Three different expression proteins were found only in the serum from psoriasis vulgaris patients,while nine other different proteins expressing from healthy volunteers. Conclusion:The protein expression was different in the serum between the psoriasis vulgaris patients and healthy volunteers. It was hoped that we could find the biomarkers related to psoriasis vulgaris by using proteomics.

  5. Solid-Phase Extraction Strategies to Surmount Body Fluid Sample Complexity in High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Marco R. Bladergroen; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2015-01-01

    For large-scale and standardized applications in mass spectrometry- (MS-) based proteomics automation of each step is essential. Here we present high-throughput sample preparation solutions for balancing the speed of current MS-acquisitions and the time needed for analytical workup of body fluids. The discussed workflows reduce body fluid sample complexity and apply for both bottom-up proteomics experiments and top-down protein characterization approaches. Various sample preparation methods t...

  6. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    OpenAIRE

    Haußmann Ute; Otto Andreas; Hahne Hannes; Albaum Stefan P; Becher Dörte; Poetsch Ansgar; Goesmann Alexander; Nattkemper Tim W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an org...

  7. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic discovery in aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Montine, Thomas J.; Woltjer, Randall L.; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Kathleen S.; Zhang, Jing

    2006-01-01

    Systems biology offers enormous potential to understand the complexity of human brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Proteomics has an important role in these investigations because of its unique strengths and because of the potential central pathogenic contribution of pathological protein to several of these diseases. Here we have reviewed the methods and presented some examples of liquid chromatography—electrospray ionization—tandem mass spectrometry— based proteomics, with and witho...

  8. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  9. Protein expression profiling during chick retinal maturation: a proteomics-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stitt Alan W

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The underlying pathways that drive retinal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis are still relatively poorly understood. Protein expression analysis can provide direct insight into these complex developmental processes. The aim of this study was therefore to employ proteomic analysis to study the developing chick retina throughout embryonic (E development commencing at day 12 through 13, 17, 19 and post-hatch (P 1 and 33 days. Results 2D proteomic and mass spectrometric analysis detected an average of 1514 spots per gel with 15 spots demonstrating either modulation or constitutive expression identified via MS. Proteins identified included alpha and beta-tubulin, alpha enolase, B-creatine kinase, gamma-actin, platelet-activating factor (PAF, PREDICTED: similar to TGF-beta interacting protein 1, capping protein (actin filament muscle Z line, nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase, triosphoaphate isomerase, DJ1, stathmin, fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7/B-FABP, beta-synuclein and enhancer of rudimentary homologue. Conclusion This study builds upon previous proteomic investigations of retinal development and represents the addition of a unique data set to those previously reported. Based on reported bioactivity some of the identified proteins are most likely to be important to normal retinal development in the chick. Continued analysis of the dynamic protein populations present at the early stages and throughout retinal development will increase our understanding of the molecular events underpinning retinogenesis.

  10. Biological network module-based model for the analysis of differential expression in shotgun proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Wang, Lily; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Protein differential expression analysis plays an important role in the understanding of molecular mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of complex diseases. With the rapid development of mass spectrometry, shotgun proteomics using spectral counts has become a prevailing method for the quantitative analysis of complex protein mixtures. Existing methods in differential proteomics expression typically carry out analysis at the single-protein level. However, it is well-known that proteins interact with each other when they function in biological processes. In this study, focusing on biological network modules, we proposed a negative binomial generalized linear model for differential expression analysis of spectral count data in shotgun proteomics. In order to show the efficacy of the model in protein expression analysis at the level of protein modules, we conducted two simulation studies using synthetic data sets generated from theoretical distribution of count data and a real data set with shuffled counts. Then, we applied our method to a colorectal cancer data set and a nonsmall cell lung cancer data set. When compared with single-protein analysis methods, the results showed that module-based statistical model which takes account of the interactions among proteins led to more effective identification of subtle but coordinated changes at the systems level. PMID:25327611

  11. Proteomic Stable Isotope Probing Reveals Biosynthesis Dynamics of Slow Growing Methane Based Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Skennerton, Connor T.; Li, Zhou; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine methane seep habitats represent an important control on the global flux of methane. Nucleotide-based meta-omics studies outline community-wide metabolic potential, but expression patterns of environmentally relevant proteins are poorly characterized. Proteomic stable isotope probing (proteomic SIP) provides additional information by characterizing phylogenetically specific, functionally relevant activity in mixed microbial communities, offering enhanced detection through system-wide product integration. Here we applied proteomic SIP to 15NH4+ and CH4 amended seep sediment microcosms in an attempt to track protein synthesis of slow-growing, low-energy microbial systems. Across all samples, 3495 unique proteins were identified, 11% of which were 15N-labeled. Consistent with the dominant anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) activity commonly observed in anoxic seep sediments, proteins associated with sulfate reduction and reverse methanogenesis—including the ANME-2 associated methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductase (Mer)—were all observed to be actively synthesized (15N-enriched). Conversely, proteins affiliated with putative aerobic sulfur-oxidizing epsilon- and gammaproteobacteria showed a marked decrease over time in our anoxic sediment incubations. The abundance and phylogenetic range of 15N-enriched methyl-coenzyme M reductase (Mcr) orthologs, many of which exhibited novel post-translational modifications, suggests that seep sediments provide niches for multiple organisms performing analogous metabolisms. In addition, 26 proteins of unknown function were consistently detected and actively expressed under conditions supporting AOM, suggesting that they play important roles in methane seep ecosystems. Stable isotope probing in environmental proteomics experiments provides a mechanism to determine protein durability and evaluate lineage-specific responses in complex microbial communities placed under environmentally relevant conditions. Our work here

  12. LC-MS/MS-based proteome profiling in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala: the Daphnia pulex genome database as a key for high throughput proteomics in Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayr Tobias

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daphniids, commonly known as waterfleas, serve as important model systems for ecology, evolution and the environmental sciences. The sequencing and annotation of the Daphnia pulex genome both open future avenues of research on this model organism. As proteomics is not only essential to our understanding of cell function, and is also a powerful validation tool for predicted genes in genome annotation projects, a first proteomic dataset is presented in this article. Results A comprehensive set of 701,274 peptide tandem-mass-spectra, derived from Daphnia pulex, was generated, which lead to the identification of 531 proteins. To measure the impact of the Daphnia pulex filtered models database for mass spectrometry based Daphnia protein identification, this result was compared with results obtained with the Swiss-Prot and the Drosophila melanogaster database. To further validate the utility of the Daphnia pulex database for research on other Daphnia species, additional 407,778 peptide tandem-mass-spectra, obtained from Daphnia longicephala, were generated and evaluated, leading to the identification of 317 proteins. Conclusion Peptides identified in our approach provide the first experimental evidence for the translation of a broad variety of predicted coding regions within the Daphnia genome. Furthermore it could be demonstrated that identification of Daphnia longicephala proteins using the Daphnia pulex protein database is feasible but shows a slightly reduced identification rate. Data provided in this article clearly demonstrates that the Daphnia genome database is the key for mass spectrometry based high throughput proteomics in Daphnia.

  13. [Challenge to the Development of Molecular Targeted Therapy against a Novel Target Candidate Identified by Antibody Proteomics Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Disease proteomics that systemically analyzes and identifies differentially expressed proteins between healthy and diseased samples is a potentially useful approach for obtaining target proteins for drug development. To date, however, very few target proteins have been identified from this field. A key issue that remains to be resolved is how to correctly identify target proteins from a number of potential candidates. To circumvent this problem, we have developed "antibody proteomics technology" in which a single chain Fv phage antibody library is utilized for proteome analysis. Here, we describe the application of this technology by primarily focusing on Eph receptor A10 (EphA10), a novel breast cancer-related protein that is a promising target for antibody drugs. To establish an effective and safe targeted cancer therapy, it is important that the target is specifically expressed in cancer tissues. Therefore, we attempted to analyze the EphA10 expression profiles. Tissue microarray analysis showed that EphA10 was expressed in all subtypes of breast cancer containing triple negative breast cancer cases. On the other hand, EphA10 was only expressed in testis tissue among 36 kinds of normal tissues. Thus, EphA10 could be a highly cancer-specific protein, making it a promising target for female breast cancer patients. Finally, we examined the anti-tumor effect by anti-EphA10 antibody, aiming for the development of a novel EphA10 targeting therapy. Administration of the antibody showed that tumor volumes were significantly inhibited. Our results suggest that targeting EphA10 in breast cancer cases might be a promising new form of therapy. PMID:26831784

  14. Development of Proteomics-Based Fungicides: New Strategies for Environmentally Friendly Control of Fungal Plant Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Rabie El-Akhal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics has become one of the most relevant high-throughput technologies. Several approaches have been used for studying, for example, tumor development, biomarker discovery, or microbiology. In this “post-genomic” era, the relevance of these studies has been highlighted as the phenotypes determined by the proteins and not by the genotypes encoding them that is responsible for the final phenotypes. One of the most interesting outcomes of these technologies is the design of new drugs, due to the discovery of new disease factors that may be candidates for new therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, no commercial fungicides have been developed from targeted molecular research, this review will shed some light on future prospects. We will summarize previous research efforts and discuss future innovations, focused on the fight against one of the main agents causing a devastating crops disease, fungal phytopathogens.

  15. A hybrid approach to protein differential expression in mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, X.

    2012-04-19

    MOTIVATION: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein\\'s associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics datasets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. RESULTS: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of \\'presence/absence,\\' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amenable to quantitative analysis; e.g. \\'one-state\\' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/absence analysis of a given dataset in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single-associated false discovery rate. AVAILABILITY: All R code available here: http://www.stat.tamu.edu/~adabney/share/xuan_code.zip.

  16. Proteomics approaches to fibrotic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucek Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This review provides an introduction to mass spectrometry based proteomics and discusses several proteomics approaches that are relevant in understanding the pathophysiology of fibrotic disorders and the approaches that are frequently used in biomarker discovery.

  17. Global and targeted proteomics in Arabidopsis thaliana: A study of secondary metabolism and phytohormone signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Slade Jr, William O

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics is defined as a tool to explore how proteins control and regulate important molecular and physiological processes. Further, peptide-centric approaches, or bottom-up methods, provide more comprehensive coverage of a proteome compared to whole-protein approaches. This body of work assesses the technical feasibility of several bottom-up proteomics technologies applied to Arabidopsis thaliana, including gel-based methods, those that require peptide derivitization, and those that do n...

  18. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical ...

  19. Proteomic expression of microfungal ripening starter Geotrichum candidum submitted to cold stress is strain-dependent: studies using 2d-dige technology and samespots software analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missous, Ghalia; Thammavongs, Bouachanh; Dieuleveux, Virginie; Houssin, Maryline; Henry, Joël; Panoff, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Geotrichum candidum is a micro-fungus widely used as a ripening starter in cheese making. In anthropogenic environments such as dairy industries, this microorganism is subjected to many environmental and technological stresses including low temperature exposure. Our aim was to study the proteomic response of G. candidum to cold stress using a comparative proteomic approach by two-dimensional Differential In Gel Electrophoresis (2D DIGE). This technique consists on the labeling of proteins by specific fluorescent dyes (CyDyes). The results, obtained with G. candidum cells subjected to cold temperature, show significant proteomic patterns differences compared with the standard conditions. Furthermore, this biochemical response seems strain specific. 2D DIGE technology combined with SameSpots™ software analysis support these results through an important statistical validity. The comparative studies in a single gel, using two different fluorescent CyDyes (Cy3 and Cy5), lead to proteins differentiation. Selected spots were treated and analyzed by mass spectrometry. PMID:22987240

  20. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  1. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Cell Response to Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Shack, Leslie A; Caitlin D Naske; Walters, Keisha B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the...

  2. Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease Analysis by Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common chronic and destructive disease. The early diagnosis of AD is difficult, thus the need for clinically applicable biomarkers development is growing rapidly. There are many methods to biomarker discovery and identification. In this review, we aim to summarize Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics studies on AD and discuss thoroughly the methods to identify candidate biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood. This review will also discuss the potential research areas on biomarkers.

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic and Proteomic Strategies in Organic Acidemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperlini, Esther; Santorelli, Lucia; Orrù, Stefania; Scolamiero, Emanuela; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Organic acidemias (OAs) are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiency of enzymatic activities in the catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. These disorders result in the accumulation of mono-, di-, or tricarboxylic acids, generally referred to as organic acids. The OA outcomes can involve different organs and/or systems. Some OA disorders are easily managed if promptly diagnosed and treated, whereas, in others cases, such as propionate metabolism-related OAs (propionic acidemia, PA; methylmalonic acidemia, MMA), neither diet, vitamin therapy, nor liver transplantation appears to prevent multiorgan impairment. Here, we review the recent developments in dissecting molecular bases of OAs by using integration of mass spectrometry- (MS-) based metabolomic and proteomic strategies. MS-based techniques have facilitated the rapid and economical evaluation of a broad spectrum of metabolites in various body fluids, also collected in small samples, like dried blood spots. This approach has enabled the timely diagnosis of OAs, thereby facilitating early therapeutic intervention. Besides providing an overview of MS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying OA pathophysiology, we discuss the principal challenges of metabolomic and proteomic applications to OAs.

  4. A Statistical Framework for Protein Quantitation in Bottom-Up MS-Based Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and associated confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low quality or incorrectly identified peptides and informative missingness. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model that carefully accounts for informative missingness in peak intensities and allows unbiased, model-based, protein-level estimation and inference. The model is applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. We also provide automated, model-based, algorithms for filtering of proteins and peptides as well as imputation of missing values. Two LC/MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. In simulation studies, our methods are shown to achieve substantially more discoveries than standard alternatives. Availability: The software has been made available in the opensource proteomics platform DAnTE (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics and its application to studies of Porphyromonas gingivalis invasion and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Richard J; Meila, Marina; Xia, Qiangwei; Hackett, Murray

    2006-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe that populates the subgingival crevice of the mouth. It is known to undergo a transition from its commensal status in healthy individuals to a highly invasive intracellular pathogen in human patients suffering from periodontal disease, where it is often the dominant species of pathogenic bacteria. The application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics to the study of P. gingivalis interactions with model host cell systems, invasion and pathogenicity is reviewed. These studies have evolved from qualitative identifications of small numbers of secreted proteins, using traditional gel-based methods, to quantitative whole cell proteomic studies using multiple dimension capillary HPLC coupled with linear ion trap mass spectrometry. It has become possible to generate a differential readout of protein expression change over the entire P. gingivalis proteome, in a manner analogous to whole genome mRNA arrays. Different strategies have been employed for generating protein level expression ratios from mass spectrometry data, including stable isotope metabolic labeling and most recently, spectral counting methods. A global view of changes in protein modification status remains elusive due to the limitations of existing computational tools for database searching and data mining. Such a view would be desirable for purposes of making global assessments of changes in gene regulation in response to host interactions during the course of adhesion, invasion and internalization. With a complete data matrix consisting of changes in transcription, protein abundance and protein modification during the course of invasion, the search for new protein drug targets would benefit from a more comprehensive understanding of these processes than what could be achieved prior to the advent of systems biology. PMID:16918489

  6. The mzTab Data Exchange Format: Communicating Mass-spectrometry-based Proteomics and Metabolomics Experimental Results to a Wider Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Griss, J.; A.R. Jones; Sachsenberg, T.; Walzer, M.; L. Gatto; Hartler, J.; Thallinger, G. G.; Salek, R. M.; Steinbeck, C.; Neuhauser, N.; Cox, J; Neumann, S.; Fan, J; Reisinger, F; Xu, Q.-W.

    2014-01-01

    The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed several standardized data formats to facilitate data sharing in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. These allow researchers to report their complete results in a unified way. However, at present, there is no format to describe the final qualitative and quantitative results for proteomics and metabolomics experiments in a simple tabular format. Many downstream analysis use cases are only concerned with the final results of an experime...

  7. Application for proteomic techniques in studying osteoarthritis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YvesHenrotin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available After the genomic era, proteomic corresponds to a wide variety of techniques to study the protein content of cells, tissue or organism and to isolate protein of interest. It offers the choice between gel-based and gel-free methods or shotgun proteomics. Applications of proteomic technology may concern three principal objectives in several biomedical or clinical domains of research as in osteoarthritis: (i to understand the physiopathology and underlying mechanisms leading to a disease or associated to a particular model, (ii, to find disease-specific biomarker and (iii to identify new therapeutic targets. This review aimed at gathering most of the data regarding the proteomic techniques and their applications to arthritis research. It also reported technical limitations and solutions, as for example for sample preparation. Proteomics open wide perspectives in biochemical research but many technical matters still remain to be solved.

  8. 2D Gel-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis during Larval Development and Metamorphosis of the Biofouling Polychaete Tubeworm Hydroides elegans

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu

    2010-09-03

    Larval settlement and metamorphosis of a common biofouling polychaete worm, Hydroides elegans, involve remarkable structural and physiological changes during this pelagic to sessile habitat shift. The endogenous protein molecules and post-translational modifications that drive this larval transition process are not only of interest to ecologists but also to the antifouling paint industry, which aims to control the settlement of this biofouling species on man-made structures (e.g., ship hulls). On the basis of our recent proteomic studies, we hypothesize that rapid larval settlement of H. elegans could be mediated through changes in phosphorylation status of proteins rather than extensive de novo synthesis of proteins. To test this hypothesis, 2D gel-based multiplexed proteomics technology was used to monitor the changes in protein expression and phosphorylation status during larval development and metamorphosis of H. elegans. The protein expression profiles of larvae before and after they reached competency to attach and metamorphose were similar in terms of major proteins, but the percentage of phosphorylated proteins increased from 41% to 49% after competency. Notably, both the protein and phosphoprotein profiles of the metamorphosed individuals (adult) were distinctly different from that of the larvae, with only 40% of the proteins phosphorylated in the adult stage. The intensity ratio of all phosphoprotein spots to all total protein spots was also the highest in the competent larval stage. Overall, our results indicated that the level of protein phosphorylation might play a crucial role in the initiation of larval settlement and metamorphosis. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Geng

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians.

  10. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  11. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize MS coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilization and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA (radioimmunoprecipitation assay) buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilization and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than that by 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone, allowing in excess of 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate into the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6 to 11% more distinct peptides and 14 to 19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone, with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  12. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilisation and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than by 10% TCA/acetone, allowing greater than 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone-wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate in the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6-11% more distinct peptides and 14-19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  13. A global comparability approach for biosimilar monoclonal antibodies using LC-tandem MS based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun-Li; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Huang, Li-Juan; Huang, Jia-Bao; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2013-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics for peptide mapping and sequencing was used to characterize the marketed monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and compare it with two biosimilar products, mAb A containing D359E and L361M variations at the Fc site and mAb B without variants. Complete sequence coverage (100%) including disulfide linkages, glycosylations and other commonly occurring modifications (i.e., deamidation, oxidation, dehydration and K-clipping) were identified using maps generated from multi-enzyme digestions. In addition to the targeted comparison for the relative populations of targeted modification forms, a non-targeted approach was used to globally compare ion intensities in tryptic maps. The non-targeted comparison provided an extra-dimensional view to examine any possible differences related to variants or modifications. A peptide containing the two variants in mAb A, D359E and L361M, was revealed using the non-targeted comparison of the tryptic maps. In contrast, no significant differences were observed when trastuzumab was self-compared or compared with mAb B. These results were consistent with the data derived from peptide sequencing via collision induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation. Thus, combined targeted and non-targeted approaches using powerful mass spectrometry-based proteomic tools hold great promise for the structural characterization of biosimilar products. PMID:23563225

  14. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zanivan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer progresses through distinct stages, and mouse models recapitulating traits of this progression are frequently used to explore genetic, morphological, and pharmacological aspects of tumor development. To complement genomic investigations of this process, we here quantify phosphoproteomic changes in skin cancer development using the SILAC mouse technology coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. We distill protein expression signatures from our data that distinguish between skin cancer stages. A distinct phosphoproteome of the two stages of cancer progression is identified that correlates with perturbed cell growth and implicates cell adhesion as a major driver of malignancy. Importantly, integrated analysis of phosphoproteomic data and prediction of kinase activity revealed PAK4-PKC/SRC network to be highly deregulated in SCC but not in papilloma. This detailed molecular picture, both at the proteome and phosphoproteome level, will prove useful for the study of mechanisms of tumor progression.

  15. Large-Scale, Ion-Current-Based Proteomic Investigation of the Rat Striatal Proteome in a Model of Short- and Long-Term Cocaine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shichen; Jiang, Xiaosheng; Li, Jun; Straubinger, Robert M; Suarez, Mauricio; Tu, Chengjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Thompson, Alexis C; Qu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Given the tremendous detriments of cocaine dependence, effective diagnosis and patient stratification are critical for successful intervention yet difficult to achieve due to the largely unknown molecular mechanisms involved. To obtain new insights into cocaine dependence and withdrawal, we employed a reproducible, reliable, and large-scale proteomics approach to investigate the striatal proteomes of rats (n = 40, 10 per group) subjected to chronic cocaine exposure, followed by either short- (WD1) or long- (WD22) term withdrawal. By implementing a surfactant-aided precipitation/on-pellet digestion procedure, a reproducible and sensitive nanoLC-Orbitrap MS analysis, and an optimized ion-current-based MS1 quantification pipeline, >2000 nonredundant proteins were quantified confidently without missing data in any replicate. Although cocaine was cleared from the body, 129/37 altered proteins were observed in WD1/WD22 that are implicated in several biological processes related closely to drug-induced neuroplasticity. Although many of these changes recapitulate the findings from independent studies reported over the last two decades, some novel insights were obtained and further validated by immunoassays. For example, significantly elevated striatal protein kinase C activity persisted over the 22 day cocaine withdrawal. Cofilin-1 activity was up-regulated in WD1 and down-regulated in WD22. These discoveries suggest potentially distinct structural plasticity after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. In addition, this study provides compelling evidence that blood vessel narrowing, a long-known effect of cocaine use, occurred after long-term but not short-term withdrawal. In summary, this work developed a well-optimized paradigm for ion-current-based quantitative proteomics in brain tissues and obtained novel insights into molecular alterations in the striatum following cocaine exposure and withdrawal. PMID:27018876

  16. Development of an open source laboratory information management system for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toda Tosifusa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genome era, most research scientists working in the field of proteomics are confronted with difficulties in management of large volumes of data, which they are required to keep in formats suitable for subsequent data mining. Therefore, a well-developed open source laboratory information management system (LIMS should be available for their proteomics research studies. Results We developed an open source LIMS appropriately customized for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow. The main features of its design are compactness, flexibility and connectivity to public databases. It supports the handling of data imported from mass spectrometry software and 2-D gel image analysis software. The LIMS is equipped with the same input interface for 2-D gel information as a clickable map on public 2DPAGE databases. The LIMS allows researchers to follow their own experimental procedures by reviewing the illustrations of 2-D gel maps and well layouts on the digestion plates and MS sample plates. Conclusion Our new open source LIMS is now available as a basic model for proteome informatics, and is accessible for further improvement. We hope that many research scientists working in the field of proteomics will evaluate our LIMS and suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  17. Knowledge Translation: Moving Proteomics Science to Innovation in Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Christina; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-06-01

    Proteomics is one of the pivotal next-generation biotechnologies in the current "postgenomics" era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics laboratory and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation in society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics. Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination-beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one's scientific peers within one's field-and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community. PMID:27223900

  18. Proteomics-based safety evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the biological responses to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Human monoblastic leukemia cells (U937) were exposed to As-grown MWCNTs and MWCNTs that were thermally treated at 1800 deg. C (HTT1800) and 2800 deg. C (HTT2800). Cell proliferation was highly inhibited by As-grown but not HTT2800. However, both As-grown and HTT1800, which include some impurities, were cytotoxic. Proteomics analysis of MWCNT-exposed cells revealed 37 protein spots on 2-dimensional electrophoresis gels that significantly changed (p < 0.05) after exposure to HTT1800 with a little iron and 20 spots that changed after exposure to HTT2800. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 45 proteins that included heat shock protein β-1, neutral α-glucosidase AB, and DNA mismatch repair protein Msh2. These altered proteins play roles in metabolism, biosynthesis, response to stress, and cell differentiation. Although HTT2800 did not inhibit cell proliferation or cause cytotoxicity in vitro, some proteins related to the response to stress were changed. Moreover, DJ-1 protein, which is a biomarker of Parkinson's disease and is related to cancer, was identified after exposure to both MWCNTs. These results show that the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs depends on their impurities, such as iron, while MWCNTs themselves cause some biological responses directly and/or indirectly in vitro. Our proteomics-based approach for detecting biological responses to nanomaterials is a promising new method for detailed safety evaluations.

  19. Polarity-based fractionation in proteomics: hydrophilic interaction vs reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M; Mirzaie, M; Khodabandeh, M; Rezadoost, H; Ghassempour, A; Aboul-Enein, H Y

    2016-07-01

    During recent decades, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) ahs been introduced to fractionate or purify especially polar solutes such as peptides and proteins while reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is also a common strategy. RPLC is also a common dimension in multidimensional chromatography. In this study, the potential of HILIC vs RPLC chromatography was compared for proteome mapping of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell extract. In HILIC a silica-based stationary phase and for RPLC a C18 column were applied. Then separated proteins were eluted to an ion trap mass spectrometry system. Our results showed that the HILIC leads to more proteins being identified in comparison to RPLC. Among the total 181 identified proteins, 56 and 38 proteins were fractionated specifically by HILIC and RPLC, respectively. In order to demonstrate this, the physicochemical properties of identified proteins such as polarity and hydrophobicity were considered. This analysis indicated that polarity may play a major role in the HILIC separation of proteins vs RPLC. Using gene ontology enrichment analysis, it was also observed that differences in physicochemical properties conform to the cellular compartment and biological features. Finally, this study highlighted the potential of HILIC and the great orthogonality of RPLC in gel-free proteomic studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26555197

  20. Feasibility study on blood sample investigations from former Wismut employees with respect to possible biomarkers for arsenic or radiation exposure using proteomics and cDNA microarray technologies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report on the feasibility of blood sample investigations from former Wismut employees with respect to possible biomarkers for arsenic or radiation exposure using proteomics and cDNA microarray technologies covers the following topics: blood samples; methodologies: 2D gel electrophoresis; protein identification using MALDI-MS; accomplishment and evaluation of the proteomics and cDNA microarray analysis.

  1. Human saliva proteome: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-06-01

    Human saliva contains a rich mixture of biomolecules. Proteins are a major component of this mixture. Given their role as the molecular effectors within biological systems, ranging from catalysis to transport to structure, proteins have great potential as biomarkers of health and disease. The ability to collect these salivary biomarkers easily using non-invasive means makes saliva proteins even more attractive for diagnostic applications. Thousands of proteins are now to be known to be present in human saliva - discovered using proteomic technologies. Emerging technologies are now making it possible to go beyond large-scale cataloging of salivary proteins. These include approaches to catalog protein contributions from the community of microorganisms residing in the oral cavity (metaproteomics) that may reflect the health state of the human host. New mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods are also emerging, shifting the emphasis from large-scale discovery experiments to hypothesis-driven assays for profiling proteins of interest within saliva, enabling validation of their association with specific health conditions. This paper provides a brief overview of efforts to catalog the proteome of human saliva. Recent developments making possible characterization of the metaproteome of human saliva will be discussed, and technologies driving new mass spectrometry-based assays for targeted analysis of proteins within complex samples, such as saliva.

  2. Moving forward in colorectal cancer research, what proteomics has to tell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and is highly fatal. During the last several years, research has been primarily based on the study of expression profiles using microarray technology. But now, investigators are putting into practice proteomic analyses of cancer tissues and cells to identify new diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers for this cancer. Because the proteome reflects the state of a cell, tissue or organism more accurately, much is expected from proteomics to yield better tumor markers for disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This review summarizes the most relevant applications of proteomics the biomarker discovery for colorectal cancer.

  3. Unbiased Selective Isolation of Protein N-Terminal Peptides from Complex Proteome Samples Using Phospho Tagging PTAG) and TiO2-based Depletion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommen, G.P.M.; Waterbeemd, van de B.; Meiring, H.D.; Kersten, G.; Heck, A.J.R.; Jong, de A.P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A positional proteomics strategy for global N-proteome analysis is presented based on phospho tagging (PTAG) of internal peptides followed by depletion by titanium dioxide (TiO2) affinity chromatography. Therefore, N-terminal and lysine amino groups are initially completely dimethylated with formald

  4. Mass Spectrometry Based Lipidomics: An Overview of Technological Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald C. Köfeler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One decade after the genomic and the proteomic life science revolution, new ‘omics’ fields are emerging. The metabolome encompasses the entity of small molecules—Most often end products of a catalytic process regulated by genes and proteins—with the lipidome being its fat soluble subdivision. Within recent years, lipids are more and more regarded not only as energy storage compounds but also as interactive players in various cellular regulation cycles and thus attain rising interest in the bio-medical community. The field of lipidomics is, on one hand, fuelled by analytical technology advances, particularly mass spectrometry and chromatography, but on the other hand new biological questions also drive analytical technology developments. Compared to fairly standardized genomic or proteomic high-throughput protocols, the high degree of molecular heterogeneity adds a special analytical challenge to lipidomic analysis. In this review, we will take a closer look at various mass spectrometric platforms for lipidomic analysis. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of various experimental setups like ‘shotgun lipidomics’, liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (LC-MS and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF based approaches. We will also examine available software packages for data analysis, which nowadays is in fact the rate limiting step for most ‘omics’ workflows.

  5. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    The gut epithelium formed between an organism and the environment plays an essential role in host–microbe interactions, yet remains one of the least characterized mammalian tissues. Especially the membrane proteins, which are critical to bacterial adhesion, are understudied, because these proteins...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  6. The mzIdentML Data Standard for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Results

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Jones; Eisenacher, M.; Mayer, G.; Kohlbacher, O.; Siepen, J.; Hubbard, S. J.; Selley, J. N.; Searle, B. C.; Shofstahl, J.; Seymour, S.L.; Julian, R.; Binz, P.-A.; Deutsch, E. W.; Hermjakob, H; Reisinger, F

    2012-01-01

    We report the release of mzIdentML, an exchange standard for peptide and protein identification data, designed by the Proteomics Standards Initiative. The format was developed by the Proteomics Standards Initiative in collaboration with instrument and software vendors, and the developers of the major open-source projects in proteomics. Software implementations have been developed to enable conversion from most popular proprietary and open-source formats, and mzIdentML will soon be supported b...

  7. Mass spectrometry based proteomics for absolute quantification of proteins from tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Sam

    2015-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of the proteome and sub-proteomes of tumor cells has relevance to tumor classification, the development of novel therapeutics, and of prognostic and predictive markers and to disease monitoring. In particular the tumor cell surface represents a highly relevant compartment for the development of targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy. We have developed a proteomic platform to profile tumor cells that encompasses enrichment of surface membrane proteins, intact p...

  8. MS-BID: a Java package for label-free LC-MS-based comparative proteomic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Daehee; Zhang, Ning; Lee, Hookeun; Yi, Eugene; Zhang, Hui; Lee, Inyoul Y.; Hood, Leroy; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2008-01-01

    Summary: MS-BID (MS Biomarker Discovery Platform) is an integrative computational pipeline for biomarker discovery using LC-MS-based comparative proteomic analysis. This platform consists of several computational tools for: (i) detecting peptides in the collected patterns; (ii) matching detected peptides across a number of LC-MS datasets and (iii) selecting discriminatory peptides between classes of samples.

  9. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  10. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A., E-mail: Michail.Alterman@fda.hhs.gov

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  11. Processing shotgun proteomics data on the Amazon cloud with the trans-proteomic pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-02-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost. PMID:25418363

  12. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  13. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal dentate granule cells in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Application of laser capture technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YairM.Gozal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is the most common cause of dementia with pre-senile onset, accounting for as many as 20% of cases. A common subset of FTLD cases is characterized by the presence of ubiquitinated inclusions in vulnerable neurons (FTLD-U. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in FTLD-U have not yet been elucidated, the presence of inclusions in this disease indicates enhanced aggregation of one or several proteins. Moreover, these inclusions suggest altered expression, processing, or degradation of proteins during FTLD-U pathogenesis. Thus, one approach to understanding disease mechanisms is to delineate the molecular changes in protein composition in FTLD-U brain. Using a combined approach consisting of laser capture microdissection (LCM and high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 1252 proteins in hippocampal dentate granule cells excised from three post-mortem FTLD-U and three unaffected control cases processed in parallel. Additionally, we employed a labeling-free quantification technique to compare the abundance of the identified proteins between FTLD-U and control cases. Quantification revealed 54 proteins with selective enrichment in FTLD-U, including TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43, a recently identified component of ubiquitinated inclusions. Moreover, 19 proteins were selectively decreased in FTLD-U. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of TDP-43 and three additional protein candidates suggests that our proteomic profiling of FTLD-U dentate granule cells reveals both inclusion-associated proteins and non-aggregated disease-specific proteins. Application of LCM is a valuable tool in the molecular analysis of complex tissues, and its application in the proteomic characterization of neurodegenerative disorders such as FTLD-U may be used to identify proteins altered in disease.

  14. Contributions of mass spectrometry-based proteomics to defining cellular mechanisms and diagnostic markers for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Korte, Erik A.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Powell, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease for which molecular diagnostics are limited and pathogenesis is not clearly understood. Important information is provided in this regard by identification and characterization of more specific molecular and cellular targets in SLE immune cells and target tissue and markers of early-onset and effective response to treatment of SLE complications. In recent years, advances in proteomic technologies and applications have facilitated such d...

  15. Proteogenomics: Integrating Next-Generation Sequencing and Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Human Proteomic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cesnik, Anthony J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry–based proteomics has emerged as the leading method for detection, quantification, and characterization of proteins. Nearly all proteomic workflows rely on proteomic databases to identify peptides and proteins, but these databases typically contain a generic set of proteins that lack variations unique to a given sample, precluding their detection. Fortunately, proteogenomics enables the detection of such proteomic variations and can be defined, broadly, as the use of nucleotide sequences to generate candidate protein sequences for mass spectrometry database searching. Proteogenomics is experiencing heightened significance due to two developments: (a) advances in DNA sequencing technologies that have made complete sequencing of human genomes and transcriptomes routine, and (b) the unveiling of the tremendous complexity of the human proteome as expressed at the levels of genes, cells, tissues, individuals, and populations. We review here the field of human proteogenomics, with an emphasis on its history, current implementations, the types of proteomic variations it reveals, and several important applications.

  16. Proteogenomics: Integrating Next-Generation Sequencing and Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Human Proteomic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheynkman, Gloria M; Shortreed, Michael R; Cesnik, Anthony J; Smith, Lloyd M

    2016-06-12

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as the leading method for detection, quantification, and characterization of proteins. Nearly all proteomic workflows rely on proteomic databases to identify peptides and proteins, but these databases typically contain a generic set of proteins that lack variations unique to a given sample, precluding their detection. Fortunately, proteogenomics enables the detection of such proteomic variations and can be defined, broadly, as the use of nucleotide sequences to generate candidate protein sequences for mass spectrometry database searching. Proteogenomics is experiencing heightened significance due to two developments: (a) advances in DNA sequencing technologies that have made complete sequencing of human genomes and transcriptomes routine, and (b) the unveiling of the tremendous complexity of the human proteome as expressed at the levels of genes, cells, tissues, individuals, and populations. We review here the field of human proteogenomics, with an emphasis on its history, current implementations, the types of proteomic variations it reveals, and several important applications. PMID:27049631

  17. Evaluation of EPS extraction protocols from anaerobic sludge for gel-based proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorel, J A; Aquino, S F; Sanson, A L; Castro-Borges, W; Silva, S Q

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of anaerobic sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), their characterization is limited to information regarding their chemical classes and molecular size. This work explores the possibility of using proteomic techniques to study the proteins present in this matrix. Thus, this paper compares eight EPS extraction methods regarding extraction yield, protein/carbohydrate ratio, size distribution profile and suitability to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses. Despite the differences found in quantification and size exclusion chromatography assays, the band profile found for all methods was very similar. Considering the band pattern, extraction time and background level, heating method followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation proved to be the most appropriate method for gel-based analyses of anaerobic sludge EPS proteins. PMID:26247751

  18. Activity-based chemical proteomics accelerates inhibitor development for deubiquitylating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Mikael; Kramer, Holger B; Willems, Lianne I; McDermott, Jeffrey L; Leach, Craig A; Goldenberg, Seth J; Kumar, K G Suresh; Konietzny, Rebecca; Fischer, Roman; Kogan, Edward; Mackeen, Mukram M; McGouran, Joanna; Khoronenkova, Svetlana V; Parsons, Jason L; Dianov, Grigory L; Nicholson, Benjamin; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2011-11-23

    Converting lead compounds into drug candidates is a crucial step in drug development, requiring early assessment of potency, selectivity, and off-target effects. We have utilized activity-based chemical proteomics to determine the potency and selectivity of deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) inhibitors in cell culture models. Importantly, we characterized the small molecule PR-619 as a broad-range DUB inhibitor, and P22077 as a USP7 inhibitor with potential for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent in cancer therapy. A striking accumulation of polyubiquitylated proteins was observed after both selective and general inhibition of cellular DUB activity without direct impairment of proteasomal proteolysis. The repertoire of ubiquitylated substrates was analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry, identifying distinct subsets for general or specific inhibition of DUBs. This enabled identification of previously unknown functional links between USP7 and enzymes involved in DNA repair. PMID:22118674

  19. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola J Edelmann

    Full Text Available Copper (II oxide (CuO nanoparticles (NP are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  20. MS-viewer: a web-based spectral viewer for proteomics results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Peter R; Chalkley, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    The sharing and viewing of peptide identification results from search engines analyzing mass-spectrometry-based proteomic data is made difficult by the range of analysis tools employed, in that each produces a different output format. Annotated results associated with a journal article often have to be made available, but providing these in a format that can be queried by other researchers is often difficult. This is because although standard formats for results have been developed, these are not necessarily easy to produce. In this manuscript we describe the MS-Viewer program, part of the Protein Prospector Web package, which uses easy-to-create tabular files as input for providing highly interactive viewing of search engine results. Thanks to the simplicity and flexibility of the input format, results from a wide variety of search engines have been successfully viewed through the Web interface of this tool. PMID:24591702

  1. Data on mass spectrometry based identification of allergens from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pollen proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Nandini; Sircar, Gaurab; Saha, Bodhisattwa; Pandey, Naren; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta

    2016-06-01

    Allergy is a type of abnormal immune reactions, which is triggered by environmental antigens or allergens and mediated by IgE antibodies. Now-a-days mass spectrometry is the method of choice for allergen identification based on homology searching. Here, we provide the mass spectrometry dataset associated with our previously published research article on identification of sunflower pollen allergens (Ghosh et al., 2015 [1]). In this study allergenicity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollen grains were primarily investigated by clinical studies followed by detailed immunobiochemical and immunoproteomic analyses. The mass spectrometry data for the identification of allergens were deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002397. PMID:27054187

  2. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  3. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472. PMID:27454336

  4. Home-based Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in non-clinical settings such as the private home can challenge, among others, older adults. To support such unsupervised care activities, an increasingly number of reminders and monitoring systems are being designed. However, most of these...... systems target a specific treatment or condition and might not be sufficient to support the care management work at home. Based on a case study approach, my research investigates home-based healthcare practices and how they can inform future design of home-based healthcare technology that better account...... for the home setting and people’s everyday activities....

  5. A workflow for peptide-based proteomics in a poorly sequenced plant: A case study on the plasma membrane proteome of banana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertommen, A.; Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Cordewener, J. H. G.;

    2011-01-01

    membrane proteomics. However, their application in non-model plants demands special precautions to prevent false positive identification of proteins.In the current paper, a workflow for membrane proteomics in banana, a poorly sequenced plant, is proposed. The main steps of this workflow are (i......, integral plasma membrane proteins from banana leaves were successfully identified....

  6. CAPER 3.0: A Scalable Cloud-Based System for Data-Intensive Analysis of Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuai; Zhang, Xinlei; Diao, Lihong; Guo, Feifei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Zhongyang; Li, Honglei; Zheng, Junjie; Pan, Jingshan; Nice, Edouard C; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2015-09-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) aims to catalog genome-encoded proteins using a chromosome-by-chromosome strategy. As the C-HPP proceeds, the increasing requirement for data-intensive analysis of the MS/MS data poses a challenge to the proteomic community, especially small laboratories lacking computational infrastructure. To address this challenge, we have updated the previous CAPER browser into a higher version, CAPER 3.0, which is a scalable cloud-based system for data-intensive analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 uses cloud computing technology to facilitate MS/MS-based peptide identification. In particular, it can use both public and private cloud, facilitating the analysis of C-HPP data sets. CAPER 3.0 provides a graphical user interface (GUI) to help users transfer data, configure jobs, track progress, and visualize the results comprehensively. These features enable users without programming expertise to easily conduct data-intensive analysis using CAPER 3.0. Here, we illustrate the usage of CAPER 3.0 with four specific mass spectral data-intensive problems: detecting novel peptides, identifying single amino acid variants (SAVs) derived from known missense mutations, identifying sample-specific SAVs, and identifying exon-skipping events. CAPER 3.0 is available at http://prodigy.bprc.ac.cn/caper3. PMID:25794139

  7. The quest of the human proteome and the missing proteins: digging deeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Ray, Sandipan; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-05-01

    Given the diverse range of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation, the estimates of the human proteome is likely subject to scientific surprises as the field of proteomics has gained momentum worldwide. In this regard, the establishment of the "Human Proteome Draft" using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), tissue microarrays, and immunohistochemistry by three independent research groups (laboratories of Pandey, Kuster, and Uhlen) accelerated the pace of proteomics research. The Chromosome Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) has taken initiative towards the completion of the Human Proteome Project (HPP) so as to understand the proteomics correlates of common complex human diseases and biological diversity, not to mention person-to-person and population differences in response to drugs, nutrition, vaccines, and other health interventions and host-environment interactions. Although high-resolution MS-based and antibody microarray approaches have shown enormous promises, we are still unable to map the whole human proteome due to the presence of numerous "missing proteins." In December 2014, at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai the 6(th) Annual Meeting of the Proteomics Society, India (PSI) and the International Proteomics Conference was held. As part of this interdisciplinary summit, a panel discussion session on "The Quest of the Human Proteome and Missing Proteins" was organized. Eminent scientists in the field of proteomics and systems biology, including Akhilesh Pandey, Gilbert S. Omenn, Mark S. Baker, and Robert L. Mortiz, shed light on different aspects of the human proteome drafts and missing proteins. Importantly, the possible reasons for the "missing proteins" in shotgun MS workflow were identified and debated by experts as low tissue expression, lack of enzymatic digestion site, or protein lost during extraction, among other contributing factors. To capture the missing proteins, the experts' collective

  8. Plasma Proteome Response to Severe Burn Injury Revealed by 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference-based Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled “universal” reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of ~35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions, as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure. PMID:20698492

  9. Mass spectrometry in food proteomics: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, the continuous and rapid evolution of proteomic approaches has provided an efficient platform for the characterization of food-derived proteins. Particularly, the impressive increasing in performance and versatility of the MS instrumentation has contributed to the development of new analytical strategies for proteins, evidencing how MS arguably represents an indispensable tool in food proteomics. Investigation of protein composition in foodstuffs is helpful for understanding the relationship between the protein content and the nutritional and technological properties of foods, the production of methods for food traceability, the assessment of food quality and safety, including the detection of allergens and microbial contaminants in foods, or even the characterization of genetically modified products. Given the high variety of the food-derived proteins and considering their differences in chemical and physical properties, a single proteomic strategy for all purposes does not exist. Rather, proteomic approaches need to be adapted to each analytical problem, and development of new strategies is necessary in order to obtain always the best results. In this tutorial, the most relevant aspects of MS-based methodologies in food proteomics will be examined, and their advantages and drawbacks will be discussed. PMID:25230173

  10. Bioinformatics Tools for Mass Spectrometry-Based High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Nefedov, Alexey V.; Gilski, Miroslaw J.; Sadygov, Rovshan G.

    2011-01-01

    Determining global proteome changes is important for advancing a systems biology view of cellular processes and for discovering biomarkers. Liquid chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry, has been widely used as a proteomics technique for discovering differentially expressed proteins in biological samples. However, although a large number of high-throughput studies have identified differentially regulated proteins, only a small fraction of these results have been reproduced and independe...

  11. A Call for Benchmark Data in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Allmer

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is a quickly developing field. New and better mass spectrometers, the platform of choice in proteomics, are being introduced frequently. New algorithms for the analysis of mass spectrometric data and assignment of amino acid sequence to tandem mass spectra are also presented on a frequent basis. Unfortunately, the best application area for these algorithms cannot be established at the moment. Furthermore, even the accuracy of the algorithms and their relative performance cannot be ...

  12. High-specificity quantification method for almond-by-products, based on differential proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiwei; Wang, Shifeng; Huang, Jingmin; Lai, Xintian; Du, Yegang; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Bifang; Feng, Ronghu; Yang, Guowu

    2016-03-01

    A highly specific competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol has been developed to identify and classify almond products based on differential proteomic analysis. We applied two-dimensional electrophoresis to compare the differences between almond and apricot kernels to search for almond-specific proteins. The amino acid of apricot Pru-1 was sequenced and aligned to almond Pru-1. One peptide, RQGRQQGRQQQEEGR, which exists in almond but not in apricot, was used as hapten to prepare monoclonal antibody against almond Pru-1. An optimized ELISA method was established using this antibody. The assay did not exhibit cross-reactivity with the tested apricot kernels and other edible plant seeds. The limit of detection (LOD) was 2.5-100μg/g based on different food samples. The recoveries of fortified samples at levels of twofold and eightfold LOD ranged from 82% to 96%. The coefficients of variation were less than 13.0%. Using 7M urea as extracting solution, the heat-treated protein loss ratios were 2%, 5% and 15% under pasteurization (65°C for 30min), baking (150°C for 30min) and autoclaved sterilization (120°C for 15min), respectively. PMID:26471588

  13. Evaluation of Hepcidin Isoforms in Hemodialysis Patients by a Proteomic Approach Based on SELDI-TOF MS

    OpenAIRE

    Oliviero Olivieri; Antonio Lupo; Nicola Martinelli; Albino Poli; Nicola Tessitore; Valeria Bedogna; Annalisa Castagna; Federica Zaninotto; Domenico Girelli; Natascia Campostrini

    2010-01-01

    The hepatic iron regulator hormone hepcidin consists, in its mature form, of 25 amino acids, but two other isoforms, hepcidin-20 and hepcidin-22, have been reported, whose biological meaning remains poorly understood. We evaluated hepcidin isoforms in sera from 57 control and 54 chronic haemodialysis patients using a quantitative proteomic approach based on SELDI-TOF-MS. Patients had elevated serum levels of both hepcidin-25 and hepcidin-20 as compared to controls (geometric means: 7.52 versu...

  14. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics Using Q Exactive, a High-performance Benchtop Quadrupole Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Michalski, A.; Damoc, E.; Hauschild, J.-P.; O. Lange; Wieghaus, A.; Makarov, A.; Nagaraj, N.; Cox, J; Mann, M; Horning, S.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has greatly benefitted from enormous advances in high resolution instrumentation in recent years. In particular, the combination of a linear ion trap with the Orbitrap analyzer has proven to be a popular instrument configuration. Complementing this hybrid trap-trap instrument, as well as the standalone Orbitrap analyzer termed Exactive, we here present coupling of a quadrupole mass filter to an Orbitrap analyzer. This “Q Exactive” instrument features high io...

  15. Biomarkers of HIV-1 associated dementia: proteomic investigation of sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Fenghai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New, more sensitive and specific biomarkers are needed to support other means of clinical diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. Proteomics technology is widely used in discovering new biomarkers. There are several difficulties with in-depth analysis of human plasma/serum, including that there is no one proteomic platform that can offer complete identification of differences in proteomic profiles. Another set of problems is associated with heterogeneity of human samples in addition intrinsic variability associated with every step of proteomic investigation. Validation is the very last step of proteomic investigation and it is very often difficult to validate potential biomarker with desired sensitivity and specificity. Even though it may be possible to validate a differentially expressed protein, it may not necessarily prove to be a valid diagnostic biomarker. Results In the current study we report results of proteomic analysis of sera from HIV-infected individuals with or without cognitive impairment. Application of SELDI-TOF analysis followed by weak cation exchange chromatography and 1-dimensional electrophoresis led to discovery of gelsolin and prealbumin as differentially expressed proteins which were not detected in this cohort of samples when previously investigated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis with Difference Gel Electrophoresis technology. Conclusion Validation using western-blot analysis led us to conclude that relative change of the levels of these proteins in one patient during a timeframe might be more informative, sensitive and specific than application of average level estimated based on an even larger cohort of patients.

  16. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proteomic based identification of clinical bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pathogenic bacteria often cause life threatening infections especially in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, rapid and reliable species identification is essential for a successful treatment and disease management. We evaluated a rapid, proteomic based technique for identification of clinical bacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time - of - flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Methods: Freshly grown bacterial isolates were selected from culture plates. Ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure was carried out, followed by charging of MALDI target plate with the extract and overlaying with α-cyano-4 hydroxy-cinnamic acid matrix solution. Identification was performed using the MALDI BioTyper 1.1, software for microbial identification (Bruker Daltonik GmbH, Bremen, Germany. Results: A comparative analysis of 82 clinical bacterial isolates using MALDI -TOF MS and conventional techniques was carried out. Amongst the clinical isolates, the accuracy at the species level for clinical isolates was 98.78%. One out of 82 isolates was not in accordance with the conventional assays because MALDI-TOF MS established it as Streptococcus pneumoniae and conventional methods as Streptococcus viridans. Interpretation & conclusions: MALDI - TOF MS was found to be an accurate, rapid, cost-effective and robust system for identification of clinical bacterial isolates. This innovative approach holds promise for earlier therapeutic intervention leading to better patient care.

  17. Microfluidics-Based Single-Cell Functional Proteomics for Fundamental and Applied Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R.

    2014-06-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  18. Mass spectrometry-based identification and characterisation of lysine and arginine methylation in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremang, Michael; Cuomo, Alessandro; Agresta, Anna Maria; Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Spadotto, Valeria; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) by which a variable number of methyl groups are transferred to lysine and arginine residues within proteins. Despite increased interest in this modification due to its reversible nature and its emerging role in a diverse set of biological pathways beyond chromatin, global identification of protein methylation has remained an unachieved goal. To characterise sites of lysine and arginine methylation beyond histones, we employed an approach that combines heavy methyl stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (hmSILAC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Through a broad evaluation of immuno-affinity enrichment and the application of two classical protein separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry, to nucleosolic and cytosolic fractions separately, we identified a total of 501 different methylation types, on 397 distinct lysine and arginine sites, present on 139 unique proteins. Our results considerably extend the number of known in vivo methylation sites and indicate their significant presence on several protein complexes involved at all stages of gene expression, from chromatin remodelling and transcription to splicing and translation. In addition, we describe the potential of the hmSILAC approach for accurate relative quantification of methylation levels between distinct functional states. PMID:23748837

  19. Mass spectrometry based translational proteomics for biomarker discovery and application in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Clinically, early detection of the disease is the most effective approach to tackle this tough challenge. Discovery and development of reliable and effective diagnostic tools for the assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to drug therapy are urgently needed for personalized therapies and better treatment outcomes. Among many ongoing efforts in search for potential CRC biomarkers, MS-based translational proteomics provides a unique opportunity for the discovery and application of protein biomarkers toward better CRC early detection and treatment. This review updates most recent studies that use preclinical models and clinical materials for the identification of CRC-related protein markers. Some new advances in the development of CRC protein markers such as CRC stem cell related protein markers, SRM/MRM-MS and MS cytometry approaches are also discussed in order to address future directions and challenges from bench translational research to bedside clinical application of CRC biomarkers. PMID:26616366

  20. Plasma Proteome Response to Severe Burn Injury Revealed by 18O-Labeled “Universal” Reference-based Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the ...

  1. MALDI-MS-Based Profiling of Serum Proteome: Detection of Changes Related to Progression of Cancer and Response to Anticancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Pietrowska; Piotr Widłak

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based analyses of the low-molecular-weight fraction of serum proteome allow identifying proteome profiles (signatures) that are potentially useful in detection and classification of cancer. Several published studies have shown that multipeptide signatures selected in numerical tests have potential values for diagnostics of different types of cancer. However due to apparent problems with standardization of methodological details, both experimental and computational, none of t...

  2. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bonomini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane’s performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane’s bio(incompatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research.

  3. Additions to the Human Plasma Proteome via a Tandem MARS Depletion iTRAQ-Based Workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust platforms for determining differentially expressed proteins in biomarker and discovery studies using human plasma are of great interest. While increased depth in proteome coverage is desirable, it is associated with costs of experimental time due to necessary sample fractionation. We evaluated a robust quantitative proteomics workflow for its ability (1 to provide increased depth in plasma proteome coverage and (2 to give statistical insight useful for establishing differentially expressed plasma proteins. The workflow involves dual-stage immunodepletion on a multiple affinity removal system (MARS column, iTRAQ tagging, offline strong-cation exchange chromatography, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Independent workflow experiments were performed in triplicate on four plasma samples tagged with iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. After stringent criteria were applied to database searched results, 689 proteins with at least two spectral counts (SC were identified. Depth in proteome coverage was assessed by comparison to the 2010 Human Plasma Proteome Reference Database in which our studies reveal 399 additional proteins which have not been previously reported. Additionally, we report on the technical variation of this quantitative workflow which ranges from ±11 to 30%.

  4. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers - Application to cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Overgaard, Martin; Melholt Rasmussen, Lars

    , this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead......There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore...

  5. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers – application to cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Beck

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead to the discovery of novel cardiovascular biomarkers.

  6. Approaches for targeted proteomics and its potential applications in neuroscience

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Sethi; Dipti Chourasia; Ishwar S Parhar

    2015-09-01

    An extensive guide on practicable and significant quantitative proteomic approaches in neuroscience research is important not only because of the existing overwhelming limitations but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. Early methodologies to understand the functioning of biological systems are now improving with high-throughput technologies, which allow analysis of various samples concurrently, or of thousand of analytes in a particular sample. Quantitative proteomic approaches include both gel-based and non-gel-based methods that can be further divided into different labelling approaches. This review will emphasize the role of existing technologies, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their applications in neuroscience. This review will also discuss advanced approaches for targeted proteomics using isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) coupled with laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. This technology can further be extended to single cell proteomics in other areas of biological sciences and can be combined with other ‘omics’ approaches to reveal the mechanism of a cellular alterations. This approach may lead to further investigation in basic biology, disease analysis and surveillance, as well as drug discovery. Although numerous challenges still exist, we are confident that this approach will increase the understanding of pathological mechanisms involved in neuroendocrinology, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders by delivering protein biomarker signatures for brain dysfunction.

  7. Solar based water treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In developing countries, the quality of drinking water is so poor that reports of 80% diseases from water-related causes is no surprise (Tebbet, 90). Frequently, there are reports in press of outbreak of epidemics in cities due to the unhygienic drinking-water. The state of affairs in the rural areas can be well imagined, where majority of the people live with no piped water. This paper describes the solar-based methods of removing organic pollutants from waste-water (also called Advanced Oxidation Technologies) and solar desalination. Experimental results of a simple solar water-sterilization technique have been discussed, along with suggestions to enhance the performance of this technique. (author)

  8. Strigolactone-Regulated Proteins Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhou [ORNL; Czarnecki, Olaf [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Yang, Jun [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. Here, a quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found SLs regulate the expression of about three dozens of proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  9. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Abunimer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs. For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases.

  10. Proteomics in Pancreatic Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ruihui; Li, Zhaoshen; Li, Shude; Gao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis and deeply affects the life of people. Therefore, the earlier diagnosis and better treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the proteomic technologies are well established and growing rapidly and have been widely applied in clinical applications, especially in pancreatic cancer research. In this paper, we attempt to discuss the development of current proteomic technologies and the application of proteomics to the field of pancreatic cancer research. This will explore the potential perspective in revealing pathogenesis, making the diagnosis earlier and treatment. PMID:22084685

  11. A proteomic-based characterization of liver metabolism in dairy cows and young pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Henrik

    This thesis deals with studies on liver metabolism in cows and pigs. Proteome analysis was used to quantify a large number of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. In cows, the objective was to characterize differences in the liver proteome between early lactation dairy cows with low or high...... total bilirubin are potential biomarkers. In pigs, the objective was to investigate whether young pigs can be used to model the liver response in adolescents to a high-fat diet and to diet restriction-induced weight loss. Our results show that the liver response to a high-fat diet and to diet...

  12. Biomarkers in Transplantation-Proteomics and Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jelena; Klawitter, Jost

    2016-04-01

    Modern multianalyte "omics" technologies allow for the identification of molecular signatures that confer significantly more information than measurement of a single parameter as typically used in current medical diagnostics. Proteomics and metabolomics bioanalytical assays capture a large set of proteins and metabolites in body fluids, cells, or tissues and, complementing genomics, assess the phenome. Proteomics and metabolomics contribute to the development of novel predictive clinical biomarkers in transplantation in 2 ways: they can be used to generate a diagnostic fingerprint or they can be used to discover individual proteins and metabolites of diagnostic potential. Much fewer metabolomics than proteomics biomarker studies in transplant patients have been reported, and, in contrast to proteomics discovery studies, new lead metabolite markers have yet to emerge. Most clinical proteomics studies have been discovery studies. Several of these studies have assessed diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Nevertheless, none of these newly discovered protein biomarkers have yet been implemented in clinical decision making in transplantation. The currently most advanced markers discovered in proteomics studies in transplant patients are the chemokines CXCL-9 and CXCL-10, which have successfully been validated in larger multicenter trials in kidney transplant patients. These chemokines can be measured using standard immunoassay platforms, which should facilitate clinical implementation. Based on the published evidence, it is reasonable to expect that these chemokine markers can help guiding and individualizing immunosuppressive regimens, may be able to predict acute and chronic T-cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection, and may be useful tools for risk stratification of kidney transplant patients. PMID:26418702

  13. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  14. Comparison of in-gel protein separation techniques commonly used for fractionation in mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Mohieddin; Primo, Vincent; Smejkal, Gary B.; Moskovets, Eugene V.; Kuo, Winston P.; Ivanov, Alexander R.

    2012-01-01

    Fractionation of complex samples at the cellular, subcellular, protein or peptide level is an indispensable strategy to improve the sensitivity in mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling. This study revisits, evaluates, and compares the most common gel-based protein separation techniques i.e., 1-D SDS PAGE, preparative 1-D SDS PAGE, isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients (IEF-IPG), and 2-D PAGE in their performance as fractionation approaches in nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of a mi...

  15. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  16. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of dioscin on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-01-01

    Dioscin shows various pharmacological effects. However, its activity on colorectal cancer is still unknown. The present work showed that dioscin significantly inhibited cell proliferation on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells, and affected Ca(2+) release and ROS generation. The content of nitric oxide (NO) and its producer inducible NO synthase (iNOS) associated with DNA damage and aberrant cell signaling were assayed using the kits. DNA damage and cell apoptosis caused by dioscin were also analyzed through single-cell gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assays. The results showed that dioscin increased the levels of NO and inducible NO synthase. The comet length in dioscin-treated groups was much longer than that of the control group, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling positive cells (apoptotic cells) was significantly increased by the compound (p dioscin caused mitochondrial damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest through transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. To study the cytotoxic mechanism of dioscin, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was used. There were 288 significantly different proteins expressed in response to dioscin, which were connected with each other and were involved in different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Then, some differentially expressed proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, Wnt, p53, and calcium signaling pathways were validated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assays. Our work elucidates the molecular mechanism of dioscin-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells, and the identified targets may be useful for treatment of colorectal cancer in future. PMID:24420967

  17. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  18. Feed based on vegetable materials changes the muscle proteome of the carnivore rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Flemming; Wulff, Tune; Bach Mikkelsen, J.;

    2011-01-01

    sustainable production of fish from aquaculture. However, such a change in feed will have an effect on the fish composition and metabolism and may also affect eating quality as well as different health and nutritional properties. A proteomic approach was taken to compare the muscle protein profile of rainbow...

  19. Using HPLC-Mass Spectrometry to Teach Proteomics Concepts with Problem-Based Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michael; Short, Anne; Vankempen, Rachel; Seymour, Michael; Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Practical instruction of proteomics concepts was provided using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass selective detection system (HPLC-MS) for the analysis of simulated protein digests. The samples were prepared from selected dipeptides in order to facilitate the mass spectral identification. As part of the prelaboratory…

  20. Temporal profiling of the adipocyte proteome during differentiation using a five-plex SILAC based strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Henrik; Yang, Yi; Ruch, Travis; Kim, Jae-Woo; Mortensen, Peter V.; Otto, Tamara; Nalli, Anuradha; Tang, Qi-Qun; Lane, M Daniel; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2009-01-01

    The adipose tissue has important secretory and endocrine functions in humans. The regulation of adipocyte differentiation has been actively pursued using transcriptomic methods over the last several years. Quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising approach to obtain temporal profiles of ...

  1. Proteomics in uveal melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramasamy, Pathma

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence of 5-7 per million per year. It is associated with the development of metastasis in about 50% of cases, and 40% of patients with uveal melanoma die of metastatic disease despite successful treatment of the primary tumour. The survival rates at 5, 10 and 15 years are 65%, 50% and 45% respectively. Unlike progress made in many other areas of cancer, uveal melanoma is still poorly understood and survival rates have remained similar over the past 25 years. Recently, advances made in molecular genetics have improved our understanding of this disease and stratification of patients into low risk and high risk for developing metastasis. However, only a limited number of studies have been performed using proteomic methods. This review will give an overview of various proteomic technologies currently employed in life sciences research, and discuss proteomic studies of uveal melanoma.

  2. FY02 Engineering Technology Reports Volume 1: Technology Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2003-01-28

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E. O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; and (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships. Five Centers focus and guide longer-term investments within Engineering. The Centers attract and retain top staff, develop and maintain critical core technologies, and enable programs. Through their technology-base projects, they oversee the application of known engineering approaches and techniques to scientific and technical problems.

  3. Proteomics-Based Identification and Analysis of Proteins Associated with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that causes the most common chronic infection in the human stomach. Approximately 1%-3% of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces gastric cancer are not completely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the virulence factor of H. pylori, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, and gastric cancer. To further characterize H. pylori virulence, we established three cell lines by infecting the gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and AGS with cagA+ H. pylori and transfecting SGC-7901 with a vector carrying the full-length cagA gene. We detected 135 differently expressed proteins from the three cell lines using proteome technology, and 10 differential proteins common to the three cell lines were selected and identified by LC-MS/MS as well as verified by western blot: β-actin, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, pre-mRNA-processing factor 19 homolog (PRPF19, ATP synthase, calmodulin (CaM, p64 CLCP, Ran-specific GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP, P43 and calreticulin. Detection of the expression of these proteins and genes encoding these proteins in human gastric cancer tissues by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR and western blot revealed that the expression of β-ACTIN, LDH, DLD, PRPF19 and CaM genes were up-regulated and RanGAP was down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and/or metastatic lymph nodes compared to peri-cancerous tissues. High gene expression was observed for H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, the LDH, DLD and CaM genes were demethylated at the promoter -2325, -1885 and -276 sites, respectively, and the RanGAP gene was highly methylated at the promoter -570 and -170 sites in H. pylori-infected and cagA-overexpressing cells. These results provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis and treatment targets for gastric cancer with H

  4. Applying mass spectrometry-based qualitative proteomics to human amygdaloid complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Zelaya

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The amygdaloid complex is a key brain structure involved in the expression of behaviours and emotions such as learning, fear, and anxiety. Brain diseases including depression, epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer`s disease, have been associated with amygdala dysfunction. For several decades, neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, volumetric, and cognitive approaches have been the gold standard techniques employed to characterize the amygdala functionality. However, little attention has been focused specifically on the molecular composition of the human amygdala from the perspective of proteomics. We have performed a global proteome analysis employing protein and peptide fractionation methods followed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS, detecting expression of at least 1820 protein species in human amygdala, corresponding to 1814 proteins which represent a 9-fold increase in proteome coverage with respect to previous proteomic profiling of the rat amygdala. Gene ontology analysis were used to determine biological process represented in human amygdala highlighting molecule transport, nucleotide binding, and oxidoreductase and GTPase activities. Bioinformatic analyses have revealed that nearly 4% of identified proteins have been previously associated to neurodegenerative syndromes, and 26% of amygdaloid proteins were also found to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In particular, a subset of amygdaloid proteins was mainly involved in axon guidance, synaptic vesicle release, L1CAM interactome, and signaling pathways transduced by NGF and NCAM1. Taken together, our data contributes to the repertoire of the human brain proteome, serving as a reference library to provide basic information for understanding the neurobiology of the human amygdala.

  5. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in platelet proteomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Angel

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics technology allows a comprehensive and efficient analysis of the proteome and has become an indispensable tool in biomedical research. Since the late 80s, advances on mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation and techniques have revolutionized the way proteins can be analyzed. Such analysis would only be possible with a proper sample preparation and separation ahead of the MS step. Different gel and nongel-based methods are available for protein separation. This chapter will focus on the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in proteomics and its application to platelet research. 2-DE separates proteins according to their isoelectric point (pI) and size (molecular weight) and allows the detection of thousands of proteins at a time. Platelets are enucleated cells that play a critical function in the control of bleeding and wound healing. As platelets do not have a nucleus, proteomics offers a powerful alternative approach to provide data on protein expression in these cells, helping to address their biology. This chapter presents a protocol for an efficient sample preparation, protein separation by 2-DE, and protein digestion ahead of the MS analysis. The experimental approach, already successfully applied to the study of the platelet proteome, includes recommendations for an efficient platelet preparation for proteomics studies. PMID:18287684

  6. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is Proteomics? Video Tutorial What is Cancer Proteomics? Print This Page The term "proteome" refers to ... that a cell or organism undergoes. The term "proteomics" is a large-scale comprehensive study of a ...

  7. Designing biomedical proteomics experiments: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Evelyne; Kelchtermans, Pieter; Bittremieux, Wout; De Grave, Kurt; Degroeve, Sven; Hooyberghs, Jef; Mertens, Inge; Baggerman, Geert; Ramon, Jan; Laukens, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    With the current expanded technical capabilities to perform mass spectrometry-based biomedical proteomics experiments, an improved focus on the design of experiments is crucial. As it is clear that ignoring the importance of a good design leads to an unprecedented rate of false discoveries which would poison our results, more and more tools are developed to help researchers designing proteomic experiments. In this review, we apply statistical thinking to go through the entire proteomics workflow for biomarker discovery and validation and relate the considerations that should be made at the level of hypothesis building, technology selection, experimental design and the optimization of the experimental parameters. PMID:27031651

  8. Enhanced Sensitivity for Selected Reaction Monitoring–Mass Spectrometry-based Targeted Proteomics using a Dual-Stage Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Mahmud; Kaleta, David T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-02-01

    Selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is playing an increasing role in quantitative proteomics and biomarker discovery studies as a method for high throughput candidate quantification and verification. While SRM-MS offers advantages in sensitivity and quantification compared to other MS-based techniques, current SRM technologies are still challenged by detection and quantification of low-abundance proteins (e.g., present at ~10 ng/mL or lower levels in blood plasma). Here we report enhanced detection sensitivity and reproducibility for SRM-based targeted proteomics by coupling a dual electrodynamic ion funnel interface to a commercial triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Due to the increased efficiency in ion transmission, significant enhancements in overall signal intensities and improved limits of detection were observed with the new interface compared to the original (capillary/skimmer) interface for SRM measurements of tryptic peptides from proteins spiked into non-depleted mouse plasma over a range of concentrations. Overall, average SRM peak intensities were increased by ~70-fold. The average level of detection for peptides also improved by ~14-fold, with notably improved reproducibility of peptide measurements as indicated by the reduced coefficients of variance. The ability to detect proteins ranging from 40 to 80 ng/mL within mouse plasma was demonstrated for all spiked proteins without the application of front-end immunoaffinity depletion and fractionation. This significant improvement in detection sensitivity for low-abundance proteins in complex matrices is expected to enhance a broad range of SRM-MS applications in addition to targeted protein and metabolite validation.

  9. Proteomics - new analytical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent developments in the sequencing of the human genome have indicated that the number of coding gene sequences may be as few as 30,000. It is clear, however, that the complexity of the human species is dependent on the much greater diversity of the corresponding protein complement. Estimates of the diversity (discrete protein species) of the human proteome range from 200,000 to 300,000 at the lower end to 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 at the high end. In addition, proteomics (the study of the protein complement to the genome) has been subdivided into two main approaches. Global proteomics refers to a high throughput examination of the full protein set present in a cell under a given environmental condition. Focused proteomics refers to a more detailed study of a restricted set of proteins that are related to a specified biochemical pathway or subcellular structure. While many of the advances in proteomics will be based on the sequencing of the human genome, de novo characterization of protein microheterogeneity (glycosylation, phosphorylation and sulfation as well as the incorporation of lipid components) will be required in disease studies. To characterize these modifications it is necessary to digest the protein mixture with an enzyme to produce the corresponding mixture of peptides. In a process analogous to sequencing of the genome, shot-gun sequencing of the proteome is based on the characterization of the key fragments produced by such a digest. Thus, a glycopeptide and hence a specific glycosylation motif will be identified by a unique mass and then a diagnostic MS/MS spectrum. Mass spectrometry will be the preferred detector in these applications because of the unparalleled information content provided by one or more dimensions of mass measurement. In addition, highly efficient separation processes are an absolute requirement for advanced proteomic studies. For example, a combination of the orthogonal approaches, HPLC and HPCE, can be very powerful

  10. Analysis of cell death induced by xCT deficiency based on differential proteomics technology%基于差异蛋白质组学技术解析xCT缺陷诱导的细胞死亡机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐建利; 李杨; 赵立平; 乔海晅

    2014-01-01

    目的:对Sut黑色素细胞和野生型黑色素细胞进行高分辨率差异蛋白质组学分析,探讨xCT缺陷引起细胞生长抑制的机制。方法分离Sut黑色素细胞和野生型黑色素细胞总蛋白,进行双向电泳和串联质谱分析,获得数值经Mascot软件处理后通过NCBI及Swiss-Prot蛋白质数据库检索,结合双向凝胶电泳相应点的表观等电点、相对分子质量、匹配肽段的多少和序列覆盖率等综合分析筛选差异蛋白质;逆转录-PCR分析Sut细胞差异蛋白mRNA表达水平,用蛋白免疫印迹法对xCT缺陷的Sut黑色素细胞进行自体吞噬分析。结果与结论得到20个明显上调或下调的蛋白,经MALDI-TOF质谱分析鉴定差异蛋白质,发现与自体吞噬和囊泡运输相关的调控因子( Anxa3、Hist 1h2bk、NDRG1、CaM)以及与细胞转移相关的调控因子(S100A-4、S100A-6、波形蛋白)表达发生了改变;对自噬标志蛋白分析发现,在xCT缺陷的Sut细胞中发生了自体吞噬。结果表明,xCT缺陷可能通过与细胞外基质的黏附异常以及激活Sut黑色素细胞中自噬相关的信号通路,从而导致细胞的生长抑制和自噬性死亡。%Objective To identify the mechanisms underlying xCT deficiency by high-resolution proteomic analysis of differential protein expression in Sut and wild melanocytes .Methods The proteins,extracted from Sut and wild melano-cytes,were analyzed by two dimensional electrophoresis and PDQuest software .Subsequent MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis was carried out .The protein identification was based on peptide mass fingerprint combined with the pI and the rela -tive molecular mass ( Mr) .Sequence coverage was performed with the Peptldent software on the NCBnlm website .Also,the autophagy marker protein LC3-Ⅱ, and the autophagic cell death marker protein Beclin 1 were detected by Western blotting . Results and Conclusion Twenty apparently upregulated or

  11. In Vivo SILAC-Based Proteomics Reveals Phosphoproteome Changes during Mouse Skin Carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanivan, Sara; Meves, Alexander; Behrendt, Kristina;

    2013-01-01

    SILAC technology in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) can be successfully used to measure phosphoproteomes in vivo. Here, Zanivan, Mann, and colleagues have applied SILAC-based MS to investigate phosphoproteomic changes during skin carcinogenesis, using the DMBA/TPA two-stag...

  12. Letter from the Director - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative is focused on developing a better understanding of cancer biology through the proteomic interrogation of genomically characterized tumors from sources such as The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  13. Proteomics: an efficient tool to analyze nematode proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomic technologies have been successfully used to analyze proteins structure and characterization in plants, animals, microbes and humans. We used proteomics methodologies to separate and characterize soybean cyst nematode (SCN) proteins. Optimizing the quantity of proteins required to separat...

  14. Virtual maintenance technology for reactor system based on PPR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Product, Process and Resources (PPR) technology, the establishing technology of virtual maintenance environment for the reactor system and the process structure tree for virtual maintenance is studied, and the flow for the maintainability design and simulation for reactor system is put forward. Based on the subsection simulation of maintenance process and layered design of maintenance actions, the leveled structure of the reactor system virtual maintenance task is studied. The relation for the data of product, process and resource is described by Plan Evaluation and Review Technology (PERT) diagram to define the maintenance operation. (authors)

  15. Evaluating the potential of a novel oral lesion exudate collection method coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics for oral cancer biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooren Joel A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Early diagnosis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC increases the survival rate of oral cancer. For early diagnosis, molecular biomarkers contained in samples collected non-invasively and directly from at-risk oral premalignant lesions (OPMLs would be ideal. Methods In this pilot study we evaluated the potential of a novel method using commercial PerioPaper absorbent strips for non-invasive collection of oral lesion exudate material coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics for oral cancer biomarker discovery. Results Our evaluation focused on three core issues. First, using an "on-strip" processing method, we found that protein can be isolated from exudate samples in amounts compatible with large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. Second, we found that the OPML exudate proteome was distinct from that of whole saliva, while being similar to the OPML epithelial cell proteome, demonstrating the fidelity of our exudate collection method. Third, in a proof-of-principle study, we identified numerous, inflammation-associated proteins showing an expected increase in abundance in OPML exudates compared to healthy oral tissue exudates. These results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying differentially abundant proteins from exudate samples, which is essential for biomarker discovery studies. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate that our exudate collection method coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics has great potential for transforming OSCC biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics assay development.

  16. Proteomic-based insight into Malpighian tubules of silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-wu Zhong

    Full Text Available Malpighian tubules (MTs are highly specific organs of arthropods (Insecta, Myriapoda and Arachnida for excretion and osmoregulation. In order to highlight the important genes and pathways involved in multi-functions of MTs, we performed a systematic proteomic analysis of silkworm MTs in the present work. Totally, 1,367 proteins were identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and as well as by Trans Proteomic Pipeline (TPP and Absolute protein expression (APEX analyses. Forty-one proteins were further identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some proteins were revealed to be significantly associated with various metabolic processes, organic solute transport, detoxification and innate immunity. Our results might lay a good foundation for future functional studies of MTs in silkworm and other lepidoptera.

  17. Proteomic based approach for identification of enzymes degrading the plant material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Šalplachta, Jiří; Bobálová, Janette; Omelková, J.

    Koszeg, 2010. s. 50. ISBN 978-963-7067-20-4. [IMMS. Informal Meeting on Mass Spectrometry /28./. 02.05.2010-06.05.2010, Koszeg] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570; GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : plant material * proteomic identification * MALDI Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  18. Lung Cancer Signatures in Plasma Based on Proteome Profiling of Mouse Tumor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Politi, Katerina; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Lockwood, William W; Faça, Vitor M.; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Wong, Chee-Hong; Zhang, Qing; Chin, Alice; Park, Kwon-Sik; Goodman, Gary; Gazdar, Adi F.; Sage, Julien; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the potential of in-depth quantitative proteomics to reveal plasma protein signatures that reflect lung tumor biology. We compared plasma protein profiles of four mouse models of lung cancer with profiles of models of pancreatic, ovarian, colon, prostate, and breast cancer and two models of inflammation. A protein signature for Titf1/Nkx2-1, a known lineage-survival oncogene in lung cancer, was found in plasmas of mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. An EGFR signature was foun...

  19. Building Information Modelling Incorporating Technology Based Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Maurice; Scott, Lloyd

    2011-01-01

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) is currently being developed as a virtual learning tool for construction and surveying students in the Dublin Institute of Technology. This advanced technology is also used to develop a technology based assessment practice for enhancing the learning environment of construction and surveying students. A theoretical design framework is presented in this paper, which combines advanced technology and assessment theory to create a virtual learning environment. ...

  20. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pquantitative differences in ground-base ion radiation and spaceflight experiments respectively. The functions of ground-base radiation and spaceflight proteins were both involved in a wide range of biological processes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis further revealed that ground-base radiation responsive proteins were mainly involved in removal of superoxide radicals, defense response to stimulus and photosynthesis, while spaceflight responsive proteins mainly participate in nucleoside metabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism

  1. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  2. Engineering Technology Reports, Volume 2: Technology Base FY01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Meeker, D

    2002-07-01

    Engineering has touched on every challenge, every accomplishment, and every endeavor of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during its fifty-year history. In this time of transition to new leadership, Engineering continues to be central to the mission of the Laboratory, returning to the tradition and core values of E.O. Lawrence: science-based engineering--turning scientific concepts into reality. This volume of Engineering Technical Reports summarizes progress on the projects funded for technology-base efforts. Technology-base projects effect the natural transition to reduction-to-practice of scientific or engineering methods that are well understood and established. They represent discipline-oriented, core competency activities that are multi-programmatic in application, nature, and scope. Objectives of technology-base funding include: (1) the development and enhancement of tools and processes to provide Engineering support capability, such as code maintenance and improved fabrication methods; (2) the support of Engineering science and technology infrastructure, such as the installation or integration of a new capability; (3) support for technical and administrative leadership through our technology Centers; (4) the initial scoping and exploration of selected technology areas with high strategic potential, such as assessment of university, laboratory, and industrial partnerships.

  3. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haußmann Ute

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1 which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2 are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis 12 and Corynebacterium glutamicum 3. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE 4. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de.

  4. Combined Statistical Analyses of Peptide Intensities and Peptide Occurrences Improves Identification of Significant Peptides from MS-based Proteomics Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; McCue, Lee Ann; Waters, Katrina M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Varnum, Susan M.; Pounds, Joel G.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based (LC-MS) proteomics uses peak intensities of proteolytic peptides to infer the differential abundance of peptides/proteins. However, substantial run-to-run variability in peptide intensities and observations (presence/absence) of peptides makes data analysis quite challenging. The missing abundance values in LC-MS proteomics data are difficult to address with traditional imputation-based approaches because the mechanisms by which data are missing are unknown a priori. Data can be missing due to random mechanisms such as experimental error, or non-random mechanisms such as a true biological effect. We present a statistical approach that uses a test of independence known as a G-test to test the null hypothesis of independence between the number of missing values and the experimental groups. We pair the G-test results evaluating independence of missing data (IMD) with a standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) that uses only means and variances computed from the observed data. Each peptide is therefore represented by two statistical confidence metrics, one for qualitative differential observation and one for quantitative differential intensity. We use two simulated and two real LC-MS datasets to demonstrate the robustness and sensitivity of the ANOVA-IMD approach for assigning confidence to peptides with significant differential abundance among experimental groups.

  5. Energy conservation employing membrane-based technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membranes based processes, if properly adapted to industrial processes have good potential with regard to optimisation and economisation of energy consumption. The specific benefits of MBT (membrane based technology) as an energy conservation methodology are highlighted. (author). 6 refs

  6. Communication Technologies Preferred by School Based Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the communication technologies preferred by school based administrators. This study surveyed and interviewed 96 school based administrators in a mid-sized suburban school system. The data show that individual emails, email lists, and cell phone technologies had the highest percentage effectiveness ratings…

  7. High-Throughput Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  8. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  9. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: A meta-analysis of response patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groh, Ksenia J., E-mail: ksenia.groh@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Suter, Marc J.-F. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Systems Science, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared reported proteome changes induced by various stressors in zebrafish. • Several proteins groups frequently responding to diverse stressors were identified. • These included energy metabolism enzymes, heat shock and cytoskeletal proteins. • Insufficient proteome coverage impedes identification of more specific responses. • Further research needs for proteomics in ecotoxicology are discussed. - Abstract: Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action

  10. Computing the functional proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien, Edward J.; Palsson, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    -Models). Recent expansions in network content to encompass proteome synthesis have resulted in models of metabolism and protein expression (ME-Models). ME-Models advance the predictions possible with constraint-based models from network flux states to the spatially resolved molecular composition of a cell....... Specifically, ME-Models enable the prediction of transcriptome and proteome allocation and limitations, and basal expression states and regulatory needs. Continued expansion in reconstruction content and constraints will result in an increasingly refined representation of cellular composition and behavior....

  11. Guidelines for reporting the use of gel electrophoresis in proteomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Frank; Anderson, Leigh; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Baker, Mark; Berth, Matthias; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Borthwick, Andy; Cash, Phil; Day, Billy W.; Friedman, David B; Garland, Donita; Gutstein, Howard B.; Hoogland, Christine; Jones, Neil A.; Khan, Alamgir

    2008-01-01

    the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis (MIAPE-GE) guidelines specify the minimum information that should be provided when reporting the use of n-dimensional gel electrophoresis in a proteomics experiment. Developed through a joint effort between the gel-based analysis working group of the Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI; http://www.psidev.info/) and the wider proteomics community, they constitute one part of the overall Minimum Information about a Proteomics Exp...

  12. How to use 2D gel electrophoresis in plant proteomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    International audience Two-dimensional electrophoresis has nurtured the birth of proteomics. It is however no longer the exclusive setup used in proteomics, with the development of shotgun proteomics techniques that appear more fancy and fashionable nowadays.Nevertheless, 2D gel-based proteomics still has valuable features, and sometimes unique ones, which make it often an attractive choice when a proteomics strategy must be selected. These features are detailed in this chapter, as is the ...

  13. 蛋白质组学技术在食品品质检测及鉴伪中的应用%Application of Proteomic Technology in Food Quality Detection and Authenticity Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵方圆; 吴亚君; 韩建勋; 葛毅强; 陈颖

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics technologys has become the important support of the rapid development of modern biological technology, which have been widely applied in the research of food such as food function, quality evaluation, nutritional analysis, safety detection and authenticity identification. Proteomic techniques provide new thoughts and techniques for food science research and offer a very promising prospect. This paper outlines the concept and techniques of proteomics, analyzes the application of proteomic techniques in the food research, and outlooks the prospect of the development of proteomic techniques in food quality detection and authenticity identification.%蛋白质组学技术的发展已经成为现代生物技术快速发展的重要支撑,被广泛地应用到食品功能研究、品质评价、营养分析、安全检测及真伪鉴别等研究中,为食品科学相关研究提供了新的思路和技术,具有很好的发展前景.本文概述了蛋白质组学的概念及主要研究技术,分析了蛋白质组学技术在食品研究中的应用,展望了蛋白质组学技术在食品品质检测及鉴伪中的发展前景.

  14. Identification of targets of miR-200b by a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arivusudar Marimuthu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to cognate mRNAs causing mRNA degradation or translational repression. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis is being widely used to identify miRNA targets. The miR-200b miRNA cluster is often overexpressed in multiple cancer types, but the identity of the targets remains elusive. Using SILAC-based analysis, we examined the effects of overexpression of a miR-200b mimic or a control miRNA in fibrosarcoma cells. We identified around 300 potential targets of miR-200b based on a change in the expression of protein levels. We validated a subset of potential targets at the transcript level using quantitative PCR.

  15. Technology for diamond based electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Kubovic, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The superior electrical and thermal properties of diamond predestine this material to become an important semiconductor. In this thesis, diamond field effect transistors and diodes were fabricated and evaluated. The progress in fabrication technology enabled DC, small and large signal measurements on FETs employing a hydrogen-induced p-type channel. Operation of such FETs at microwave frequencies showed high cut-off frequencies and first power measurements on diamond FETs have been performed ...

  16. Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Reveals Organ-Specific Expression Patterns To Be Used as Forensic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeier, Sascha; Nahnsen, Sven; Veit, Johannes; Wehner, Frank; Ueffing, Marius; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Standard forensic procedures to examine bullets after an exchange of fire include a mechanical or ballistic reconstruction of the event. While this is routine to identify which projectile hit a subject by DNA analysis of biological material on the surface of the projectile, it is rather difficult to determine which projectile caused the lethal injury--often the crucial point with regard to legal proceedings. With respect to fundamental law it is the duty of the public authority to make every endeavor to solve every homicide case. To improve forensic examinations, we present a forensic proteomic method to investigate biological material from a projectile's surface and determine the tissues traversed by it. To obtain a range of relevant samples, different major bovine organs were penetrated with projectiles experimentally. After tryptic "on-surface" digestion, mass-spectrometry-based proteome analysis, and statistical data analysis, we were able to achieve a cross-validated organ classification accuracy of >99%. Different types of anticipated external variables exhibited no prominent influence on the findings. In addition, shooting experiments were performed to validate the results. Finally, we show that these concepts could be applied to a real case of murder to substantially improve the forensic reconstruction. PMID:26593679

  17. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  18. ETISEQ – an algorithm for automated elution time ion sequencing of concurrently fragmented peptides for mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downard Kevin M

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent peptide fragmentation (i.e. shotgun CID, parallel CID or MSE has emerged as an alternative to data-dependent acquisition in generating peptide fragmentation data in LC-MS/MS proteomics experiments. Concurrent peptide fragmentation data acquisition has been shown to be advantageous over data-dependent acquisition by providing greater detection dynamic range and providing more accurate quantitative information. Nevertheless, concurrent peptide fragmentation data acquisition remains to be widely adopted due to the lack of published algorithms designed specifically to process or interpret such data acquired on any mass spectrometer. Results An algorithm called Elution Time Ion Sequencing (ETISEQ, has been developed to enable automated conversion of concurrent peptide fragmentation data acquisition data to LC-MS/MS data. ETISEQ generates MS/MS-like spectra based on the correlation of precursor and product ion elution profiles. The performance of ETISEQ is demonstrated using concurrent peptide fragmentation data from tryptic digests of standard proteins and whole influenza virus. It is shown that the number of unique peptides identified from the digests is broadly comparable between ETISEQ processed concurrent peptide fragmentation data and the data-dependent acquired LC-MS/MS data. Conclusion The ETISEQ algorithm has been designed for easy integration with existing MS/MS analysis platforms. It is anticipated that it will popularize concurrent peptide fragmentation data acquisition in proteomics laboratories.

  19. Advanced location-based technologies and services

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Hassan A

    2013-01-01

    Due to the rapid increase in the number of mobile device users worldwide, location-based services (LBSs) have become pervasive, and the demand for them will continue to grow. Exploring recent changes in the technology and its uses, Advanced Location-Based Technologies and Services takes an in-depth look at new and existing technologies, techniques, applications, and opportunities. Under the editorial guidance of Hassan Karimi, with contributions from experts in the field, the book examines the breadth and depth of advanced LBS technologies and techniques. The book provides up-to-date informati

  20. Standard guidelines for the chromosome-centric human proteome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Young-Ki; Omenn, Gilbert S; Uhlen, Mathias; Hanash, Samir; Marko-Varga, György; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bairoch, Amos; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Legrain, Pierre; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Na, Keun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; He, Fuchu; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Nishimura, Toshihide; Keown, Paul; Baker, Mark S; Yoo, Jong Shin; Garin, Jerome; Archakov, Alexander; Bergeron, John; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Hancock, William S

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the international Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is to map and annotate all proteins encoded by the genes on each human chromosome. The C-HPP consortium was established to organize a collaborative network among the research teams responsible for protein mapping of individual chromosomes and to identify compelling biological and genetic mechanisms influencing colocated genes and their protein products. The C-HPP aims to foster the development of proteome analysis and integration of the findings from related molecular -omics technology platforms through collaborations among universities, industries, and private research groups. The C-HPP consortium leadership has elicited broad input for standard guidelines to manage these international efforts more efficiently by mobilizing existing resources and collaborative networks. The C-HPP guidelines set out the collaborative consensus of the C-HPP teams, introduce topics associated with experimental approaches, data production, quality control, treatment, and transparency of data, governance of the consortium, and collaborative benefits. A companion approach for the Biology and Disease-Driven HPP (B/D-HPP) component of the Human Proteome Project is currently being organized, building upon the Human Proteome Organization's organ-based and biofluid-based initiatives (www.hupo.org/research). The common application of these guidelines in the participating laboratories is expected to facilitate the goal of a comprehensive analysis of the human proteome. PMID:22443261

  1. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Proteomics analysis of human oligodendroglioma proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaghani-Razi-Abad, Solmaz; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Pooladi, Mehdi; Entezari, Maliheh; Kazemi, Elham

    2015-09-10

    Proteomics analyses enable the identification and quantitation of proteins. From a purely clinical perspective, the application of proteomics based on innovations, may greatly affect the future management of malignant brain tumors. This optimism is based on four main reasons: diagnosis, prognosis, selection of targeted therapy based on molecular profile of the brain tumor and monitoring therapeutic response, or resistance. We extracted the proteins of tumor and normal brain tissues, and then evaluated the protein purity by Bradford test. In this study, we separated the proteins by two-dimensional (2DG) gel electrophoresis methods. Then spots were analyzed, compared using statistical data and specific software and were identified by pH isoelectric, molecular weights and data banks. The protein profiles were determined using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry approaches. Simple statistical tests were used to establish a putative hierarchy in which the change in protein level was ranked according to a cut-off point with pProteomics is a powerful way to identifying multiple proteins which are altered following a neuropharmacological intervention in a CNS disease. PMID:26002447

  3. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2008-01-01

    complex task and is currently achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that enable identification of glycoproteins and localization, classification, and analysis of individual glycan structures on proteins. In this chapter we briefly introduce a range of analytical technologies for recovery and...... analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. Combinations of affinity-enrichment techniques, chemical and biochemical protocols, and advanced mass spectrometry facilitate detailed glycoprotein analysis in proteomics, from fundamental biological studies to biomarker discovery in biomedicine.......Glycoproteins constitute a large fraction of the proteome. The fundamental role of protein glycosylation in cellular development, growth, and differentiation, tissue development, and in host-pathogen interactions is by now widely accepted. Proteome-wide characterization of glycoproteins is a...

  4. Cross-species comparison of mammalian saliva using an LC-MALDI based proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa-Pereira, Patrícia; Cova, Marta; Abrantes, Joana; Ferreira, Rita; Trindade, Fábio; Barros, António; Gomes, Pedro; Colaço, Bruno; Amado, Francisco; Esteves, Pedro J; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Despite the importance of saliva in the regulation of oral cavity homeostasis, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively compare the saliva of different mammal species. Aiming to define a proteome signature of mammals' saliva, an in-depth SDS-PAGE-LC coupled to MS/MS (GeLC-MS/MS) approach was used to characterize the saliva from primates (human), carnivores (dog), glires (rat and rabbit), and ungulates (sheep, cattle, horse). Despite the high variability in the number of distinct proteins identified per species, most protein families were shared by the mammals studied with the exception of cattle and horse. Alpha-amylase is an example that seems to reflect the natural selection related to digestion efficacy and food recognition. Casein protein family was identified in all species but human, suggesting an alternative to statherin in the protection of hard tissues. Overall, data suggest that different proteins might assure a similar role in the regulation of oral cavity homeostasis, potentially explaining the specific mammals' salivary proteome signature. Moreover, some protein families were identified for the first time in the saliva of some species, the presence of proline-rich proteins in rabbit's saliva being a good example. PMID:25641928

  5. Mass Spectrometry Based Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Glands of Urban Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salivary gland proteins of Anopheles mosquitoes offer attractive targets to understand interactions with sporozoites, blood feeding behavior, homeostasis, and immunological evaluation of malaria vectors and parasite interactions. To date limited studies have been carried out to elucidate salivary proteins of An. stephensi salivary glands. The aim of the present study was to provide detailed analytical attributives of functional salivary gland proteins of urban malaria vector An. stephensi. A proteomic approach combining one-dimensional electrophoresis (1DE, ion trap liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS, and computational bioinformatic analysis was adopted to provide the first direct insight into identification and functional characterization of known salivary proteins and novel salivary proteins of An. stephensi. Computational studies by online servers, namely, MASCOT and OMSSA algorithms, identified a total of 36 known salivary proteins and 123 novel proteins analysed by LC/MS/MS. This first report describes a baseline proteomic catalogue of 159 salivary proteins belonging to various categories of signal transduction, regulation of blood coagulation cascade, and various immune and energy pathways of An. stephensi sialotranscriptome by mass spectrometry. Our results may serve as basis to provide a putative functional role of proteins in concept of blood feeding, biting behavior, and other aspects of vector-parasite host interactions for parasite development in anopheline mosquitoes.

  6. Automated Sample Preparation Platform for Mass Spectrometry-Based Plasma Proteomics and Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilém Guryča

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of novel biomarkers from human plasma remains a critical need in order to develop and monitor drug therapies for nearly all disease areas. The discovery of novel plasma biomarkers is, however, significantly hampered by the complexity and dynamic range of proteins within plasma, as well as the inherent variability in composition from patient to patient. In addition, it is widely accepted that most soluble plasma biomarkers for diseases such as cancer will be represented by tissue leakage products, circulating in plasma at low levels. It is therefore necessary to find approaches with the prerequisite level of sensitivity in such a complex biological matrix. Strategies for fractionating the plasma proteome have been suggested, but improvements in sensitivity are often negated by the resultant process variability. Here we describe an approach using multidimensional chromatography and on-line protein derivatization, which allows for higher sensitivity, whilst minimizing the process variability. In order to evaluate this automated process fully, we demonstrate three levels of processing and compare sensitivity, throughput and reproducibility. We demonstrate that high sensitivity analysis of the human plasma proteome is possible down to the low ng/mL or even high pg/mL level with a high degree of technical reproducibility.

  7. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  8. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  9. Centennial Paper: Proteomics in animal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we wil...

  10. The promise of proteomics in animal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics hold significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will...

  11. Proteomic-driven biomarker discovery in gestational diabetes mellitus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Apoorva; Subramani, Elavarasan; Datta Ray, Chaitali; Rapole, Srikanth; Chaudhury, Koel

    2015-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy and it affects 18% of pregnant women worldwide. GDM is considered a high-risk state which may lead to type II diabetes which is associated with an increase in a number of interrelated adverse perinatal outcomes. Given the fact that the progress of a successful pregnancy is dependent on the intricate communication between several biological molecules, identification of the proteomic profile perturbations in women with GDM is expected to help in understanding the disease pathogenesis and also discovery of clinical biomarker(s). In recent years, both gel-free and gel-based proteomics have been extensively investigated for improving maternal and child health. Although there are several reports integrating various aspects of proteomics in pregnancy related diseases such as preeclampsia, extensive Pubmed search shows no review so far on the application of proteomics in gestational diabetes. In this review, we focus on various high-throughput proteomic technologies for the identification of unique biosignatures and biomarkers responsible for the early prediction of GDM. Further, different analytical strategies and biological samples involved in proteomic analysis of this pregnancy-related disease are discussed.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26216595

  12. Comparative bioinformatics analyses and profiling of lysosome-related organelle proteomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Valencia, Julio C.; Huang, Hongzhan; Chi, An; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hearing, Vincent J.; Appella, Ettore; Wu, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    Complete and accurate profiling of cellular organelle proteomes, while challenging, is important for the understanding of detailed cellular processes at the organelle level. Mass spectrometry technologies coupled with bioinformatics analysis provide an effective approach for protein identification and functional interpretation of organelle proteomes. In this study, we have compiled human organelle reference datasets from large-scale proteomic studies and protein databases for seven lysosome-related organelles (LROs), as well as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, for comparative organelle proteome analysis. Heterogeneous sources of human organelle proteins and rodent homologs are mapped to human UniProtKB protein entries based on ID and/or peptide mappings, followed by functional annotation and categorization using the iProXpress proteomic expression analysis system. Cataloging organelle proteomes allows close examination of both shared and unique proteins among various LROs and reveals their functional relevance. The proteomic comparisons show that LROs are a closely related family of organelles. The shared proteins indicate the dynamic and hybrid nature of LROs, while the unique transmembrane proteins may represent additional candidate marker proteins for LROs. This comparative analysis, therefore, provides a basis for hypothesis formulation and experimental validation of organelle proteins and their functional roles.

  13. MASPECTRAS: a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rader Robert

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advancements of proteomics technologies have led to a rapid increase in the number, size and rate at which datasets are generated. Managing and extracting valuable information from such datasets requires the use of data management platforms and computational approaches. Results We have developed the MAss SPECTRometry Analysis System (MASPECTRAS, a platform for management and analysis of proteomics LC-MS/MS data. MASPECTRAS is based on the Proteome Experimental Data Repository (PEDRo relational database schema and follows the guidelines of the Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI. Analysis modules include: 1 import and parsing of the results from the search engines SEQUEST, Mascot, Spectrum Mill, X! Tandem, and OMSSA; 2 peptide validation, 3 clustering of proteins based on Markov Clustering and multiple alignments; and 4 quantification using the Automated Statistical Analysis of Protein Abundance Ratios algorithm (ASAPRatio. The system provides customizable data retrieval and visualization tools, as well as export to PRoteomics IDEntifications public repository (PRIDE. MASPECTRAS is freely available at http://genome.tugraz.at/maspectras Conclusion Given the unique features and the flexibility due to the use of standard software technology, our platform represents significant advance and could be of great interest to the proteomics community.

  14. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  15. Recent developments of nanoparticle-based enrichment methods for mass spectrometric analysis in proteomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In proteome research, rapid and effective separation strategies are essential for successful protein identification due to the broad dynamic range of proteins in biological samples. Some important proteins are often expressed in ultra low abundance, thus making the pre-concentration procedure before mass spectrometric analysis prerequisite. The main purpose of enrichment is to isolate target molecules from complex mixtures to reduce sample complexity and facilitate the subsequent analyzing steps. The introduction of nanoparticles into this field has accelerated the development of enrichment methods. In this review, we mainly focus on recent developments of using different nanomaterials for pre-concentration of low-abundance peptides/ proteins, including those containing post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and glycosylation, prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

  16. Construction and analysis of protein-protein interaction networks based on proteomics data of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Shen, Hong; Zhang, Li-Guo; Liu, Jian; Cao, Xiao-Ge; Yao, An-Liang; Kang, Shao-San; Gao, Wei-Xing; Han, Hui; Cao, Feng-Hong; Li, Zhi-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Currently, using human prostate cancer (PCa) tissue samples to conduct proteomics research has generated a large amount of data; however, only a very small amount has been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we manually carried out the mining of the full text of proteomics literature that involved comparisons between PCa and normal or benign tissue and identified 41 differentially expressed proteins verified or reported more than 2 times from different research studies. We regarded these proteins as seed proteins to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The extended network included one giant network, which consisted of 1,264 nodes connected via 1,744 edges, and 3 small separate components. The backbone network was then constructed, which was derived from key nodes and the subnetwork consisting of the shortest path between seed proteins. Topological analyses of these networks were conducted to identify proteins essential for the genesis of PCa. Solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter), member 4 (SLC2A4) had the highest closeness centrality located in the center of each network, and the highest betweenness centrality and largest degree in the backbone network. Tubulin, beta 2C (TUBB2C) had the largest degree in the giant network and subnetwork. In addition, using module analysis of the whole PPI network, we obtained a densely connected region. Functional annotation indicated that the Ras protein signal transduction biological process, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), neurotrophin and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) signaling pathway may play an important role in the genesis and development of PCa. Further investigation of the SLC2A4, TUBB2C proteins, and these biological processes and pathways may therefore provide a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of PCa. PMID:27121963

  17. Quantitative iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Identification of Candidate Biomarkers for Diabetic Nephropathy in Plasma of Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Thingholm, Tine Engberg; Larsen, Martin R;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: As part of a clinical proteomics programme focused on diabetes and its complications, it was our goal to investigate the proteome of plasma in order to find improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: Proteins derived from plasma from a cross-sectional co...

  18. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  19. The Chordate Proteome History Database

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Levasseur; Julien Paganini; Jacques Dainat; Thompson, Julie D; Olivier Poch; Pierre Pontarotti; Philippe Gouret

    2012-01-01

    The chordate proteome history database (http://ioda.univ-provence.fr) comprises some 20,000 evolutionary analyses of proteins from chordate species. Our main objective was to characterize and study the evolutionary histories of the chordate proteome, and in particular to detect genomic events and automatic functional searches. Firstly, phylogenetic analyses based on high quality multiple sequence alignments and a robust phylogenetic pipeline were performed for the whole protein and for each i...

  20. Plant biology through quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Bygdell, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade the field of mass spectrometry based proteomics has advanced from qualitative, analyses leading to publications revolving around lists of identified proteins and peptides, to addressing more biologically relevant issues requiring measurement of the abundance of identified proteins and hence quantitive mass spectrometry. The work described in this thesis addresses problems with quantitive proteomics in plant sciences, particularly complications caused by the complexity...

  1. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Screen identifies LIPOCALIN-2 (LCN-2) as a potential biomarker for colonic lateral-spreading tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianfei; Li, Aimin; Guo, Yubin; Wang, Yadong; Zhao, Xinhua; Xiang, Li; Han, Zelong; Li, Yue; Xu, Wen; Zhuang, Kangmin; Yan, Qun; Zhong, Jietao; Xiong, Jing; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    The improvement and implementation of a colonoscopy technique has led to increased detection of laterally spreading tumors (LSTs), which are presumed to constitute an aggressive type of colonic neoplasm. Early diagnosis and treatment of LSTs is clinically challenging. To overcome this problem, we employed iTRAQ to identify LST-specific protein biomarkers potentially involved in LST progression. In this study, we identified 2,001 differentially expressed proteins in LSTs using iTRAQ-based proteomics technology. Lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) was the most up-regulated protein. LSTs expression levels of LCN-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) showed positive correlation with worse pathological grading, and up-regulation of these proteins in LSTs was also reflected in serum. Furthermore, LCN-2 protein overexpression was positively correlated with MMP-9 protein up-regulation in the tumor tissue and serum of LST patients (former rs = 0.631, P = 0.000; latter rs = 0.815, P = 0.000). Our results suggest that LCN-2 constitutes a potential biomarker for LST disease progression and might be a novel therapeutic target in LSTs. PMID:27339395

  2. A CRISPR-based approach for proteomic analysis of a single genomic locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrip, Zachary J; Byrum, Stephanie D; Storey, Aaron J; Gao, Jun; Byrd, Alicia K; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Wahls, Wayne P; Taverna, Sean D; Raney, Kevin D; Tackett, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Any given chromosomal activity (e.g., transcription) is governed predominantly by the local epiproteome. However, defining local epiproteomes has been limited by a lack of effective technologies to isolate discrete sections of chromatin and to identify with precision specific proteins and histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). We report the use of the Cas9 and guide RNA (gRNA) components of the CRISPR system for gRNA-directed purification of a discrete section of chromatin. Quantitative mass spectrometry provides for unambiguous identification of proteins and histone PTMs specifically associated with the enriched chromatin. This CRISPR-based Chromatin Affinity Purification with Mass Spectrometry (CRISPR-ChAP-MS) approach revealed changes in the local epiproteome of a promoter during activation of transcription. CRISPR-ChAP-MS thus has broad applications for discovering molecular components and dynamic regulation of any in vivo activity at a given chromosomal location. PMID:25147920

  3. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  4. Proteome-Wide Quantitation by SILAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing improvements in instrumentation, fractionation techniques, and enrichment procedures have dramatically increased the coverage of the proteome achievable via LC-MS/MS-based methodologies, opening the call for approaches to quantitatively assess differences at a proteome-wide scale. Stable...... isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a powerful and versatile approach for proteome-wide quantitation by mass spectrometry. SILAC utilizes the cells' own metabolism to incorporate isotopically labeled amino acids into its proteome which can be mixed with the proteome of...... detailed procedure for performing SILAC-based experiment for proteome-wide quantitation, including a protocol for optimizing SILAC labeling. We also provide an update on the most recent developments of this technique....

  5. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle: Focus on Insulin Resistance and Exercise Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul S. Deshmukh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence, of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle proteomics are challenging. This review describes the technical limitations of skeletal muscle proteomics as well as emerging developments in proteomics workflow with respect to samples preparation, liquid chromatography (LC, MS and computational analysis. These technologies have not yet been fully exploited in the field of skeletal muscle proteomics. Future studies that involve state-of-the-art proteomics technology will broaden our understanding of exercise-induced adaptations as well as molecular pathogenesis of insulin resistance. This could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  6. Quantification of microRNA by DNA-Peptide Probe and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Quasi-Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Chen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The distorted and unique expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer makes them an attractive source of biomarkers. However, one of prerequisites for the application of miRNAs in clinical practice is to accurately profile their expression. Currently available assays normally require pre-enrichment, amplification, and labeling steps, and most of them are semiquantitative. In this study, we converted the signal of target miR-21 into reporter peptide by a DNA-peptide probe and the reporter peptide was ultimately quantified using LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics. Specifically, substrate peptide GDKAVLGVDPFR containing reporter peptide AVLGVDPFR and tryptic cleavage site (lysine at position 3) was first designed, followed by the conjugation with DNA sequence that was complementary to miR-21. The newly formed DNA-peptide probe was then hybridized with miR-21, which was biotinylated and attached to streptavidin agarose in advance. After trypsin digestion, the reporter peptide was released and monitored by a targeted proteomics assay. The obtained limit of quantification (LOQ) was 1 pM, and the detection dynamic range spanned ∼5 orders of magnitude. Using this assay, the developed quasi-targeted proteomics approach was applied to determine miR-21 level in breast cells and tissue samples. Finally, qRT-PCR was also performed for a comparison. This report grafted the strategy of targeted proteomics into miRNA quantification. PMID:26641144

  7. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, T.A. [Chemica Technologies, Inc., Bend, OR (United States)

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  8. Proteome Sci.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann Matthias; Poustka Albert J; Mann Karlheinz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Sea urchin is a major model organism for developmental biology and biomineralization research. However, identification of proteins involved in larval skeleton formation and mineralization processes in the embryo and adult, and the molecular characterization of such proteins, has just gained momentum with the sequencing of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome and the introduction of high-throughput proteomics into the field. Results The present report contains the deter...

  9. Contribution of MS-based proteomics to the understanding of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EnriqueSantamaría

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other DNA viruses, Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 replicates and proliferates in host cells continuously modulating the host molecular environment. Following a sophisticated temporal expression pattern, HSV-1 encodes at least 89 multifunctional proteins that interplay with and modify the host cell proteome. During the last decade, advances in mass spectrometry applications coupled to the development of proteomic separation methods have allowed to partially monitor the impact of HSV-1 infection in human cells. In this review, we discuss the current use of different proteome fractionation strategies to define HSV-1 targets on two major application areas: i viral protein interactomics to decipher viral protein interactions in host cells and ii differential quantitative proteomics to analyse the virally induced changes in the cellular proteome. Moreover, we will also discuss the potential application of high throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and also post-translational modifications in HSV-1-infected cells, what will greatly improved our molecular knowledge of HSV-1 infection.

  10. Extending mass spectrometry's reach in proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Mass spectrometry is an essential component of proteome analysis. The accuracy, speed and sensitivity of mass spectrometric analysis is further aided by an ability to analyse proteins and peptides directly from two-dimensional sample arrays. This is accomplished either by gel excision and recovery of proteins or their proteolysis products, or after blotting of gel-separated proteins onto membranes. The protein components are most often analysed in each case by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry. Beyond automated protein identification, proteomics ultimately demands that protein function and activity be characterised. We have developed new mass spectrometry methodologies that enable protein-protein associations to be analysed by MALDI mass spectrometry. Methods to preserve protein-protein associations on 2D sample surfaces and to affect their ionisation and detection have been developed. This presentation will describe the features of protocol that are required for the successful analysis of protein-protein complexes. Data will be shown to illustrate the application of the technology to the study of important biological and immunological processes. The methods form the basis of powerful new mass spectrometric based assays for screening and affinity studies. Details of our investigations and their implications for high-throughput proteomics applications will be discussed in conjunction with directions of our future research

  11. Structural proteomics by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joon; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae

    2008-08-01

    Structural proteomics is one of the powerful research areas in the postgenomic era, elucidating structure-function relationships of uncharacterized gene products based on the 3D protein structure. It proposes biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated proteins and thereby identifies potential drug design and protein engineering targets. Recently, a number of pioneering groups in structural proteomics research have achieved proof of structural proteomic theory by predicting the 3D structures of hypothetical proteins that successfully identified the biological functions of those proteins. The pioneering groups made use of a number of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy, which has been applied successfully to structural proteomics studies over the past 10 years. In addition, advances in hardware design, data acquisition methods, sample preparation and automation of data analysis have been developed and successfully applied to high-throughput structure determination techniques. These efforts ensure that NMR spectroscopy will become an important methodology for performing structural proteomics research on a genomic scale. NMR-based structural proteomics together with x-ray crystallography will provide a comprehensive structural database to predict the basic biological functions of hypothetical proteins identified by the genome projects. PMID:18761469

  12. Analyzing Arabidopsis thaliana root proteome provides insights into the molecular bases of enantioselective imazethapyr toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Haifeng; Lu, Haiping; Ding, Haiyan; Lavoie, Michel; Li, Yali; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is a widely used chiral herbicide that inhibits the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). IM is thought to exert its toxic effects on amino acid synthesis mainly through inhibition of acetolactate synthase activity, but little is known about the potential effects of IM on other key biochemical pathways. Here, we exposed the model plant Arabidospsis thaliana to trace S- and R-IM enantiomer concentrations and examined IM toxicity effects on the root proteome using iTRAQ. Conventional analyses of root carbohydrates, organic acids, and enzyme activities were also performed. We discovered several previously unknown key biochemical pathways targeted by IM in Arabidospsis. 1,322 and 987 proteins were differentially expressed in response to R- and S-IM treatments, respectively. Bioinformatics and physiological analyses suggested that IM reduced the BCAA tissue content not only by strongly suppressing BCAA synthesis but also by increasing BCAA catabolism. IM also affected sugar and starch metabolism, changed the composition of root cell walls, increased citrate production and exudation, and affected the microbial community structure of the rhizosphere. The present study shed new light on the multiple toxicity mechanisms of a selective herbicide on a model plant.

  13. Prediction of Toxin Genes from Chinese Yellow Catfish Based on Transcriptomic and Proteomic Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish venom remains a virtually untapped resource. There are so few fish toxin sequences for reference, which increases the difficulty to study toxins from venomous fish and to develop efficient and fast methods to dig out toxin genes or proteins. Here, we utilized Chinese yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco as our research object, since it is a representative species in Siluriformes with its venom glands embedded in the pectoral and dorsal fins. In this study, we set up an in-house toxin database and a novel toxin-discovering protocol to dig out precise toxin genes by combination of transcriptomic and proteomic sequencing. Finally, we obtained 15 putative toxin proteins distributed in five groups, namely Veficolin, Ink toxin, Adamalysin, Za2G and CRISP toxin. It seems that we have developed a novel bioinformatics method, through which we could identify toxin proteins with high confidence. Meanwhile, these toxins can also be useful for comparative studies in other fish and development of potential drugs.

  14. Prediction of Toxin Genes from Chinese Yellow Catfish Based on Transcriptomic and Proteomic Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bing; Li, Xiaofeng; Lin, Zhilong; Ruan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Min; Liu, Jie; Tong, Ting; Li, Jia; Huang, Yu; Wen, Bo; Sun, Ying; Shi, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Fish venom remains a virtually untapped resource. There are so few fish toxin sequences for reference, which increases the difficulty to study toxins from venomous fish and to develop efficient and fast methods to dig out toxin genes or proteins. Here, we utilized Chinese yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) as our research object, since it is a representative species in Siluriformes with its venom glands embedded in the pectoral and dorsal fins. In this study, we set up an in-house toxin database and a novel toxin-discovering protocol to dig out precise toxin genes by combination of transcriptomic and proteomic sequencing. Finally, we obtained 15 putative toxin proteins distributed in five groups, namely Veficolin, Ink toxin, Adamalysin, Za2G and CRISP toxin. It seems that we have developed a novel bioinformatics method, through which we could identify toxin proteins with high confidence. Meanwhile, these toxins can also be useful for comparative studies in other fish and development of potential drugs. PMID:27089325

  15. WDM PONs based on colorless technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliou, Fabienne; Simon, Gael; Chanclou, Philippe; Pizzinat, Anna; Lin, Huafeng; Zhou, Enyu; Xu, Zhiguang

    2015-12-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) Passive Optical Network (PON) is foreseen to be part of the Next Generation Passive Optical Networks. Business and mobile fronthaul networks already express the need to develop WDM PONs in the access segment. Fixed wavelength transceivers based on Coarse WDM are already available to respond to today's market needs but Dense WDM technologies will be needed and colorless technologies are essential to provide simple and cost-effective WDM PON systems. We propose in this paper to demonstrate the capabilities of a DWDM PON system prototype based on self-seeded RSOAs and designed to transmit CPRI over 60 km of fiber at 2.5 Gbit/s.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Human Nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Nicolas, Armel; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed spectacular progress in the field of mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics, including advances in instrumentation, chromatography, sample preparation methods, and experimental design for multidimensional analyses. It is now possible not only to identify most of the protein components of a cell proteome in a single experiment, but also to describe additional proteome dimensions, such as protein turnover rates, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. Furthermore, by comparing the proteome at different time points, it is possible to create a "time-lapse" view of proteome dynamics. By combining high-throughput quantitative proteomics with detailed subcellular fractionation protocols and data analysis techniques it is also now possible to characterize in detail the proteomes of specific subcellular organelles, providing important insights into cell regulatory mechanisms and physiological responses. In this chapter we present a reliable workflow and protocol for MS-based analysis and quantitation of the proteome of nucleoli isolated from human cells. The protocol presented is based on a SILAC analysis of human MCF10A-Src-ER cells with analysis performed on a Q-Exactive Plus Orbitrap MS instrument (Thermo Fisher Scientific). The subsequent chapter describes how to process the resulting raw MS files from this experiment using MaxQuant software and data analysis procedures to evaluate the nucleolar proteome using customized R scripts. PMID:27576725

  17. Sakshat Labs: India's Virtual Proteomics Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sandipan Ray; Nicole R Koshy; Shyam Diwakar; Bipin Nair; Sanjeeva Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    The first Virtual Proteomics Lab of India has been developed at the IIT Bombay as a part of the “Sakshat” Lab Project, established to develop openly accessible, high-quality educational materials on science and technology.

  18. Analysis of soybean seed proteins using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different proteomics technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, different classes of soybean seed proteins are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists in obtaining a greater understanding of the...

  19. Communicating Customer Value Based on Modern Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Czarniewski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the idea of gaining a position of competitive advantage by companies operating in the knowledge-based economy and in the age of modern technology. The rate of change in companies’ environments forces organizations to react quickly to clients’ needs. In recent years, there has been an observed systematic increase in the importance of communicating customer value in Poland. This paper shows changes (trends in the system of market communication in the age of modern technology and changes in the economy. The author presents the mechanisms and effects of communication in age new technology in Poland. Modern technologies enable the collection, storage and transmission of information. Reflections contained in the paper do not have definite characteristics and should be treated as an opinion in the discussion.

  20. Biomimetic Cilia Based on MEMS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2008-01-01

    A review on the research of Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology based biomimetic cilia is presented. Biomimetic cilia, enabled by the advancement of MEMS technology, have been under dynamic development for the past decade. After a brief description of the background of cilia and MEMS technology, different biomimetic cilia applications are reviewed. Biomimetic cilia micro-actuators, including micromachined polyimide bimorph biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, electro-statically actuated polymer biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, and magnetically actuated nanorod array biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, are presented. Subsequently micromachined underwater flow biomimetic cilia micro-sensor is studied, followed by acoustic flow micro-sensor. The fabrication of these MEMS-based biomimetic cilia devices, characterization of their physical properties, and the results of their application experiments are discussed.

  1. Establishing research strategies, methodologies and technologies to link genomics and proteomics to seagrass productivity, community metabolism and ecosystem carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eMazzuca

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the mechanistic basis of marine ecosystem functioning is only possible through integrative and interdisciplinary research. This enables the prediction of change and possibly the mitigation of the consequences of anthropogenic impacts. One major aim of the COST Action ES0609 Seagrasses productivity. From genes to ecosystem management, is the calibration and synthesis of various methods and the development of innovative techniques and protocols for studying seagrass ecosystems.During ten days, twenty researchers representing a range of disciplines (molecular biology, physiology, botany, ecology, oceanography, underwater acoustics gathered at the marine station of STARESO (Corsica to study together the nearby Posidonia oceanica meadow. The Station de Recherches Sous-marine et Océanographiques (STARESO is located in an oligotrophic area classified as "pristine site" where environmental disturbances caused by anthropogenic pressure are exceptionally low. The healthy P. oceanica meadow, that grows in front of the lab, colonizes the sea bottom from the surface to 37 m depth. During the study, genomic and proteomic approaches were integrated with ecophysiological and physical approaches with the aim of understanding changes in seagrass productivity and metabolism at different depths and along daily cycles. In this paper we report details on the approaches utilized and we forecast the potential of the data that will come from this synergistic approach not only for P. oceanica but for seagrasses in general.

  2. Microbial proteomics: a mass spectrometry primer for biologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ciaren

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is now more than 10 years since the publication of the first microbial genome sequence and science is now moving towards a post genomic era with transcriptomics and proteomics offering insights into cellular processes and function. The ability to assess the entire protein network of a cell at a given spatial or temporal point will have a profound effect upon microbial science as the function of proteins is inextricably linked to phenotype. Whilst such a situation is still beyond current technologies rapid advances in mass spectrometry, bioinformatics and protein separation technologies have produced a step change in our current proteomic capabilities. Subsequently a small, but steadily growing, number of groups are taking advantage of this cutting edge technology to discover more about the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms. From this research it will be possible to move towards a systems biology understanding of a microorganism. Where upon researchers can build a comprehensive cellular map for each microorganism that links an accurately annotated genome sequence to gene expression data, at a transcriptomic and proteomic level. In order for microbiologists to embrace the potential that proteomics offers, an understanding of a variety of analytical tools is required. The aim of this review is to provide a basic overview of mass spectrometry (MS and its application to protein identification. In addition we will describe how the protein complexity of microbial samples can be reduced by gel-based and gel-free methodologies prior to analysis by MS. Finally in order to illustrate the power of microbial proteomics a case study of its current application within the Bacilliaceae is given together with a description of the emerging discipline of metaproteomics.

  3. Understanding the regulation of estivation in a freshwater snail through iTRAQ-based comparative proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jin

    2013-11-01

    The apple snail Pomacea canaliculata is a freshwater gastropod with a remarkable ability to withstand seasonal or unpredictable dry conditions by entering estivation. Studies of P. canaliculata using conventional biochemical and the individual gene approaches have revealed the expressional changes of several enzymes and antioxidative genes in response to estivation and arousal. In this study, we applied iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to identify and quantify the global protein expression during the estivation and arousal of P. canaliculata. A total of 1040 proteins were identified, among which 701 proteins were quantified and compared across four treatments (i.e., control, active snails; short-term estivation, 3 days of exposure to air; prolonged estivation, 30 days of exposure to air; and arousal, 6 h after resubmergence in water) revealing 53 differentially expressed proteins. A comparison of protein expression profiles across treatments indicated that the proteome of this species was very insensitive to initial estivation, with only 9 proteins differentially expressed as compared with the control. Among the 9 proteins, the up-regulations of two immune related proteins indicated the initial immune response to the detection of stress cues. Prolonged estivation resulted in many more differentially expressed proteins (47 compared with short-term estivation treatment), among which 16 were down-regulated and 31 were up-regulated. These differentially expressed proteins have provided the first global picture of a shift in energy usage from glucose to lipid, prevention of protein degradation and elevation of oxidative defense, and production of purine for uric acid production to remove toxic ammonia during prolonged estivation in a freshwater snail. From prolonged estivation to arousal, only 6 proteins changed their expression level, indicating that access to water and food alone is not a necessary condition to reactivate whole-sale protein expression. A

  4. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    Therefore, this chapter reflects on the current state of knowledge concerning the technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) with regard to the following issues: (1) How do TBM&As perform? (2) What are the contingency factors and how do they impact TBM&A performance? (3) What kind of...

  5. The Technology Vicinity: A Location Based View on Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de, NG Dick

    2001-01-01

    The issue of technology transfer has been viewed from many different perspectives. In this case the focus is on the process of (production) technology transfer. One of the difficulties in studying international technology transfer is the definition of technology. The many technology definitions that exist are either too ‘loosely’ formulated or they require thorough expert knowledge. This results in difficulties with measuring technology and comparing different studies meaningfully. This study...

  6. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. PMID:27041239

  7. Evaluation of Hepcidin Isoforms in Hemodialysis Patients by a Proteomic Approach Based on SELDI-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Campostrini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic iron regulator hormone hepcidin consists, in its mature form, of 25 amino acids, but two other isoforms, hepcidin-20 and hepcidin-22, have been reported, whose biological meaning remains poorly understood. We evaluated hepcidin isoforms in sera from 57 control and 54 chronic haemodialysis patients using a quantitative proteomic approach based on SELDI-TOF-MS. Patients had elevated serum levels of both hepcidin-25 and hepcidin-20 as compared to controls (geometric means: 7.52 versus 4.69 nM, and 4.06 versus 1.76 nM, resp., P<.05 for both. The clearance effects of a single dialysis session by different dialysis techniques and membranes were also investigated, showing an average reduction by 51.3% ± 29.2% for hepcidin-25 and 34.2% ± 28.4% for hepcidin-20 but only minor differences among the different dialysis modalities. Measurement of hepcidin isoforms through MS-based techniques can be a useful tool for better understanding of their biological role in hemodialysis patients and other clinical conditions.

  8. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26208148

  9. A Novel Immunogenic Spore Coat-Associated Protein in Bacillus Anthracis: Characterization via Proteomics Approaches and a Vector-Based Vaccine System

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Lin, Shwu-Bin; Huang, Cheng-Po; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    New generation anthrax vaccines have been actively explored with the aim of enhancing efficacies and decreasing undesirable side effects that could be caused by licensed vaccines. Targeting novel antigens and/or eliminating the requirements for multiple needle injections and adjuvants are major objectives in the development of new anthrax vaccines. Using proteomics approaches, we identified a spore coat-associated protein (SCAP) in Bacillus anthracis. An E. coli vector-based vaccine system wa...

  10. Proteomic insights into floral biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobai; Jackson, Aaron; Xie, Ming; Wu, Dianxing; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The flower is the most important biological structure for ensuring angiosperms reproductive success. Not only does the flower contain critical reproductive organs, but the wide variation in morphology, color, and scent has evolved to entice specialized pollinators, and arguably mankind in many cases, to ensure the successful propagation of its species. Recent proteomic approaches have identified protein candidates related to these flower traits, which has shed light on a number of previously unknown mechanisms underlying these traits. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in proteomic research in floral biology according to the order of flower structure, from corolla to male and female reproductive organs. It summarizes mainstream proteomic methods for plant research and recent improvements on two dimensional gel electrophoresis and gel-free workflows for both peptide level and protein level analysis. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide a new paradigm for the ever-increasing genome and transcriptome information on many organisms. It is now possible to integrate genomic and transcriptomic data with proteomic results for large-scale protein characterization, so that a global understanding of the complex molecular networks in flower biology can be readily achieved. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics - a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945514

  11. Energy conservation technologies based on thermodynamic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Masaru [Shibaura Institute of Technology of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to reduce CO{sub 2} emission to prevent global warming, the most promising way for electric generation in the Northeast Asia is to introduce cogeneration and {open_quotes}repowering{close_quotes} technologies based on high temperature gas turbines fueled by natural gas. Especially the old type coal burning boiler-steam turbine plants should be retrofit by introducing gas turbines to become highly efficient combined cycle. Same technologies should be applied to the old garbage incineration plants and/or even to the nuclear power plants. The exhaust heat or steam should become much increased and it should be utilized as the process heat for industries or heat supply as the distinct heating or cooling for residential area. This paper introduces a brief survey of these new technologies.

  12. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changes in the intestinal and colonic proteome in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may help to characterize the disease pathology and identify new biomarkers and treatment targets for NEC. Methods: Using gel-based proteomics, proteins in NEC-affected intestinal and coloni...

  13. Novel utilization of the outer membrane proteins for the identification and differentiation of pathogenic versus nonpathogenic microbial strains using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Rabih E.; Wade, Mary; Deshpande, Samir V.; McCubbin, Patrick; Snyder, A. Peter; Bevilacqua, Vicky

    2012-06-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomic approaches are showing promising capabilities in addressing various biological and biochemical issues. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are often associated with virulence in gram-negative pathogens and could prove to be excellent model biomarkers for strain level differentiation among bacteria. Whole cells and OMP extracts were isolated from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Francisella tularensis, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei. OMP extracts were compared for their ability to differentiate and delineate the correct database organism to an experimental sample and for the degree of dissimilarity to the nearest-neighbor database strains. This study addresses the comparative experimental proteome analyses of OMPs vs. whole cell lysates on the strain-level discrimination among gram negative pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains.

  14. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gaffrey, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Su, Dian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States); Liu, Tao [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camp, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  15. Evaluation of drug-induced neurotoxicity based on metabolomics, proteomics and electrical activity measurements in complementary CNS in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Luise; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Culot, Maxime; da Costa, Anaelle; Landry, Christophe; Bellwon, Patricia; Kristl, Theresa; Hörmann, Katrin; Ruzek, Silke; Aiche, Stephan; Reinert, Knut; Bielow, Chris; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Huber, Christian G; Schroeder, Olaf H-U; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Bal-Price, Anna

    2015-12-25

    The present study was performed in an attempt to develop an in vitro integrated testing strategy (ITS) to evaluate drug-induced neurotoxicity. A number of endpoints were analyzed using two complementary brain cell culture models and an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model after single and repeated exposure treatments with selected drugs that covered the major biological, pharmacological and neuro-toxicological responses. Furthermore, four drugs (diazepam, cyclosporine A, chlorpromazine and amiodarone) were tested more in depth as representatives of different classes of neurotoxicants, inducing toxicity through different pathways of toxicity. The developed in vitro BBB model allowed detection of toxic effects at the level of BBB and evaluation of drug transport through the barrier for predicting free brain concentrations of the studied drugs. The measurement of neuronal electrical activity was found to be a sensitive tool to predict the neuroactivity and neurotoxicity of drugs after acute exposure. The histotypic 3D re-aggregating brain cell cultures, containing all brain cell types, were found to be well suited for OMICs analyses after both acute and long term treatment. The obtained data suggest that an in vitro ITS based on the information obtained from BBB studies and combined with metabolomics, proteomics and neuronal electrical activity measurements performed in stable in vitro neuronal cell culture systems, has high potential to improve current in vitro drug-induced neurotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26026931

  16. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  17. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of Visual Cycle-Associated Proteins in RPE of rd12 Mice before and after RPE65 Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinxiang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the iTRAQ-based proteomic changes of visual cycle-associated proteins in RPE of rd12 mice before and after RPE65 gene delivery. Mehtods. The right eyes of rd12 mice underwent RPE65 gene delivery by subretinal injection at P14, leaving the left eyes as control. C57BL/6J mice were served as a wide-type control group. ERGs were recorded at P42, and RPE-choroid-sclera complex was collected to evaluate the proteomic changes in visual cycle-associated proteins by iTRAQ-based analysis. Western blot was used to confirm the changes in the differentially expressed proteins of interest. Results. ERG parameters improved dramatically at P42 after RPE65 delivery. The proteomics analysis identified a total 536 proteins with a global false discovery rate of 0.21%, out of which 7 were visual cycle-associated proteins. RALBP-1, RBP-1, and IRBP were reduced in the untreated rd12 eyes and the former two were improved after gene therapy, confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusions. RPE65 gene delivery restored retinal function at P42 and modified the expression of other functional proteins implicated in the visual cycle. The level of RALBP-1 was still below the normal level after gene therapy in rd12 mice, which may explain the delayed dark adaption in LCA patients undergoing similar therapy.

  18. The internet based on presence system technology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styugin, M.; Kaygorodov, A.

    2016-04-01

    In our study we analyze how to create the systems based on “communication-resource-presence”- technology. We formulate functional and architectural requirements. It is shown some new features in this systems that pertain to communication and information search on the Internet. The Internet passed three infrastructure stages from the communication between two hosts to the resource intermediation and communication in real presence systems. The systems based on the presence technologies have just started to develop. Our study shows what criteria’s they must meet. One of this criteria is the division of site resources into the "rooms" logically separated from each other. The users can see and connect to each other. The contextual data of user presence in a particular "room" can be used when searching for them in the context of professional competence.

  19. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the low ng/mL to pg/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in...

  20. Label-free and spike-in standard-free mass spectrometry in the proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins and membrane-associated protein networks

    OpenAIRE

    Niehage, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is the primary technology of proteomics. For the analysis of complex proteomes, protein identities and quantities are inferred from their peptides that are generated by cleaving all proteins with the endopeptidase trypsin. But there is one major disadvantage that is due to biophysical differences, different peptides cause different intensities. Miscellaneous approaches have been developed to circumvent this problem based on the chemical or metabolic introduction of heavy sta...

  1. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter...

  2. Advanced mass spectrometry-based multi-omics technologies for exploring the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wenna; Yan, Leyu; Lee, Yie H; Guha, Chandan; Kurland, Irwin J; Lu, Haitao

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the primary hepatic malignancies and is the third most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although a wealth of knowledge has been gained concerning the initiation and progression of HCC over the last half century, efforts to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis at a molecular level are still greatly needed, to enable clinicians to enhance the standards of the current diagnosis and treatment of HCC. In the post-genome era, advanced mass spectrometry driven multi-omics technologies (e.g., profiling of DNA damage adducts, RNA modification profiling, proteomics, and metabolomics) stand at the interface between chemistry and biology, and have yielded valuable outcomes from the study of a diversity of complicated diseases. Particularly, these technologies are being broadly used to dissect various biological aspects of HCC with the purpose of biomarker discovery, interrogating pathogenesis as well as for therapeutic discovery. This proof of knowledge-based critical review aims at exploring the selected applications of those defined omics technologies in the HCC niche with an emphasis on translational applications driven by advanced mass spectrometry, toward the specific clinical use for HCC patients. This approach will enable the biomedical community, through both basic research and the clinical sciences, to enhance the applicability of mass spectrometry-based omics technologies in dissecting the pathogenesis of HCC and could lead to novel therapeutic discoveries for HCC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:331-349, 2016. PMID:24890331

  3. Cell death proteomics database: consolidating proteomics data on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Bull, Vibeke H; Thiede, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process of utmost importance for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. More than 10 different types of programmed cell death forms have been discovered. Several proteomics analyses have been performed to gain insight in proteins involved in the different forms of programmed cell death. To consolidate these studies, we have developed the cell death proteomics (CDP) database, which comprehends data from apoptosis, autophagy, cytotoxic granule-mediated cell death, excitotoxicity, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, pyroptosis, and Wallerian degeneration. The CDP database is available as a web-based database to compare protein identifications and quantitative information across different experimental setups. The proteomics data of 73 publications were integrated and unified with protein annotations from UniProt-KB and gene ontology (GO). Currently, more than 6,500 records of more than 3,700 proteins are included in the CDP. Comparing apoptosis and autophagy using overrepresentation analysis of GO terms, the majority of enriched processes were found in both, but also some clear differences were perceived. Furthermore, the analysis revealed differences and similarities of the proteome between autophagosomal and overall autophagy. The CDP database represents a useful tool to consolidate data from proteome analyses of programmed cell death and is available at http://celldeathproteomics.uio.no. PMID:23537399

  4. Liquid junction based CE/MS interfacing for proteomic, glycomic and metabolomic analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenková, Jana; Foret, František

    2016. s. 79-79. ISBN N. [International Symposium on Hyphenated Techniques in Chromatography and Separation Technology /14./. 27.01.2016-29.01.2016, Ghent] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06319S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : CE/ESI/MS * liquid junction * polyimide Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  5. Normalization of peak intensities in bottom-up MS-based proteomics using singular value decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Karpievitch, Yuliya V.; Taverner, Thomas; Adkins, Joshua N.; Stephen J Callister; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: LC-MS allows for the identification and quantification of proteins from biological samples. As with any high-throughput technology, systematic biases are often observed in LC-MS data, making normalization an important preprocessing step. Normalization models need to be flexible enough to capture biases of arbitrary complexity, while avoiding overfitting that would invalidate downstream statistical inference. Careful normalization of MS peak intensities would enable greater accurac...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  7. Terahertz wireless communications based on photonics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsuma, Tadao; Horiguchi, Shogo; Minamikata, Yusuke; Yoshimizu, Yasuyuki; Hisatake, Shintaro; Kuwano, Shigeru; Yoshimoto, Naoto; Terada, Jun; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the application of terahertz (THz) waves to broadband wireless communications. In particular, use of frequencies above 275 GHz is one of the strong concerns among radio scientists and engineers, because these frequency bands have not yet been allocated at specific active services, and there is a possibility to employ extremely large bandwidths for ultra-broadband wireless communications. Introduction of photonics technologies for signal generation, modulation and detection is effective not only to enhance the bandwidth and/or the data rate, but also to combine fiber-optic (wired) and wireless networks. This paper reviews recent progress in THz wireless communications using telecom-based photonics technologies towards 100 Gbit/s. PMID:24104286

  8. Information-Technology Based Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    2001-04-01

    Developing countries emphasize expansion of the educated population but demand for quality improvement follows later. Current science education reform is driven in part by post cold war restructuring of the global economy and associated focus on the education of a more scientifically literate society, due to the industrial change from labor-intensive to high-technology type, and the societal change inherent in the present information era. Industry needs employees of broad and flexible background with inter disciplinary training, engineers with better physics training, and well trained physicists. Education researches have proved that active-learning based methods are superior to the traditional methods and the information technology (IT) has lot to offer in this. Use of IT for improving physics education is briefly discussed with prospects for collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region via Asian Physics Education Network (ASPEN), UNESCO University Foundation Course in Physics (UUFCP), etc.

  9. Human protein reference database as a discovery resource for proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Amanchy, Ramars; Surendranath, Vineeth; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Suresh, Shubha; Rashmi, B. P.; Shanker, K.; Padma, N.; Niranjan, Vidya; Harsha, H. C.; Talreja, Naveen; Vrushabendra, B. M.; Ramya, M. A.; Yatish, A. J.; Joy, Mary; Shivashankar, H. N.; Kavitha, M. P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Mohan, Sujatha; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Prasad, C. K.; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace at which genomic and proteomic data is being generated necessitates the development of tools and resources for managing data that allow integration of information from disparate sources. The Human Protein Reference Database (http://www.hprd.org) is a web-based resource based on open source technologies for protein information about several aspects of human proteins including protein–protein interactions, post-translational modifications, enzyme–substrate relationships and disease associations. This information was derived manually by a critical reading of the published literature by expert biologists and through bioinformatics analyses of the protein sequence. This database will assist in biomedical discoveries by serving as a resource of genomic and proteomic information and providing an integrated view of sequence, structure, function and protein networks in health and disease. PMID:14681466

  10. Mass Spectrometry-based PhyloProteomics (MSPP): A novel microbial typing Method

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Erich Zautner; Wycliffe Omurwa Masanta; Michael Weig; Uwe Groß; Oliver Bader

    2015-01-01

    MALDI-TOF-MS of microorganisms, which identifies microbes based on masses of high abundant low molecular weight proteins, is rapidly advancing to become another standard method in clinical routine laboratory diagnostics. Allelic isoforms of these proteins result in varying masses of detectable biomarker ions. These variations give rise to a novel typing method for microorganisms named mass spectrometry-based phyloproteomics (MSPP). The base of MSPP is an amino acid sequence list of allelic is...

  11. Proteomic approaches to bacterial differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Elias, Dwayne A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    While genomic approaches have been applied for the detection and identification of individual bacteria within microbial communities, analogous proteomics approaches have been effectively precluded due to their inherent complexity. An in silico assessment of peptides that could potentially be present in the proteomes of artificial simple and complex communities was performed to evaluate the effect of proteome complexity on species detection. A mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to experimentally detect and validate the predicted tryptic peptides initially identified as distinctive within the simple community. An assessment of peptide distinctiveness and the potential for mapping to a particular bacterium within a community was made throughout each step of the study. A second in silico assessment of peptide distinctiveness for a complex community of 25 microorganisms was conducted to investigate the levels of instrumental performance that would be required to experimentally detect these peptides, as well as how performance varied with complexity (e.g., the number of different microorganisms). The experimental data for a simple community showed that it is feasible to predict, observe, and to quantify distinctive peptides from one organism in the presence of at least a 100-fold greater abundance of another, thus yielding putative markers for identifying a bacterium of interest. This work represents a first step towards quantitative proteomic characterization of complex microbial communities and the possible development of community wide markers of perturbations to such communities.

  12. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M. Deelder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly used approach in proteomics is peptide and protein profiling. Here, we present an overview of profiling methods that have the potential for implementation in a clinical setting and in national screening programs.

  13. Recent development of multi-dimensional chromatography strategies in proteome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangming

    2008-04-15

    As a complementary approach to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), multi-dimensional chromatography separation methods have been widely applied in all kinds of biological sample investigations. Multi-dimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) coupled with bio-mass spectrometry (MS) is playing important roles in proteome research due to its high speed, high resolution and high sensitivity. Proteome analysis strategies mainly include bottom-up and top-down approaches which carry out biological sample separation based on peptide and protein levels, respectively. Electrophoretic methods combined with liquid chromatography like IEF-HPLC and HPLC-SDS-PAGE have been successful applied for protein separations. As for MDLC strategy, ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) together with reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is still a most widely used chromatography in proteome analysis, other chromatographic methods are also frequently used in protein pre-fractionations, while affinity chromatography is usually adopted for specific functional protein analysis. Recent MDLC technologies and applications to variety of proteome analysis have been achieved great development. A digest peptide-based approach as so-called "bottom-up" and intact protein-based approach "top-down" analysis of proteome samples were briefly reviewed in this paper. The diversity of combinations of different chromatography modes to set up MDLC systems was demonstrated and discussed. Novel developments of MDLC techniques such as high-abundance protein depletion and chromatography array were also included in this review. PMID:18289947

  14. Technology-based Mergers and Acquisitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Moini, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an updated review of what is known about the performance of technology-based mergers and acquisitions (TBM&As) and their determinants. This review brings together papers published from 1990 to 2012 in top-rated academic journals within nearly all fields of...... business, thus providing a comprehensive assessment of TBM&A research. The review follows a systematic approach using selected elements from the review methodology. We identified and examined the following: research questions, research designs, research contexts, data and methods, performance measures, and...

  15. Computer based training: Technology and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Based Training (CBT) offers great potential for revolutionizing the training environment. Tremendous advances in computer cost performance, instructional design science, and authoring systems have combined to put CBT within the reach of all. The ability of today's CBT systems to implement powerful training strategies, simulate complex processes and systems, and individualize and control the training process make it certain that CBT will now, at long last, live up to its potential. This paper reviews the major technologies and trends involved and offers some suggestions for getting started in CBT

  16. Mining the granule proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Goetze, Jens P; Johnsen, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics of secretory granules is an emerging strategy for identifying secreted proteins, including potentially novel candidate biomarkers and peptide hormones. In addition, proteomics can provide information about the abundance, localization and structure (post-translational modification) of...... granule proteins and peptides. Analytical strategies within this research line include so-called 'subtractive proteomics', 'peptidomics' and granule purification by the use of multiple gradient centrifugations. Here we review the literature, and describe the challenges and opportunities in proteomics of...

  17. Identification of Thioredoxin Disulfide Targets Using a Quantitative Proteomics Approach Based on Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Maeda, Kenji; Svensson, Birte

    2008-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous protein disulfide reductase involved in a wide range of cellular redox processes. A large number of putative target proteins have been identified using proteomics approaches, but insight into target specificity at the molecular level is lacking since the reactivi...

  18. Database independent proteomics analysis of the ostrich and human proteome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altelaar, A.F.; Navarro, D.; Boekhorst, J.; Breukelen, B. van; Snel, B.; Mohammed, S.; Heck, A.J.R. van

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis relies heavily on the presence of complete protein databases. Such a strategy is extremely powerful, albeit not adequate in the analysis of unpredicted postgenome events, such as posttranslational modifications, which exponentially increase the search s

  19. A Technology-based Model for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Williams

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Math Emporium, opened in 1997, is an open 7000-squaremeter facility with 550+ workstations arranged in an array of widely spaced hexagonal "pods", designed to support group work at the same time maintaining an academic air. We operate it 24/7 with math support personnel in attendance 12 hours per day. Students have access to online course resources at all times, from anywhere. We have used this unique asset to transform traditional classroom-based courses into technology based learning programs that have no class meetings at all. The structure of the program is very different from the conventional one, having a new set of expectations and motivations. The results include: more effective students, substantial cost savings, economies of scale and scope and a stream-lined process for creating new on-line courses.

  20. Tipping the Proteome with Gene-Based Vaccines: Weighing in on the Role of Nano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first generation of DNA vaccines was introduced in 1988, remarkable improvements have been made to improve their efficacy and immunogenicity. Although human clinical trials have shown that delivery of DNA vaccines is well tolerated and safe, the potency of these vaccines in humans is somewhat less than optimal. The development of a gene-based vaccine that was effective enough to be approved for clinical use in humans would be one of, if not the most important, advance in vaccines to date. This paper highlights the literature relating to gene-based vaccines, specifically DNA vaccines, and suggests possible approaches to boost their performance. In addition, we explore the idea that combining RNA and nano materials may hold the key to successful gene-based vaccines for prevention and treatment of disease

  1. Reuse-based software production technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Software reuse is viewed as a key technology to improve software product quality and productivity. This paper discusses a series of technologies related with software reuse and software component technology: component model, which describes component's essential characteristics; component acquisition technology, of which domain engineering is the main approach; component management technology, of which component library is the kernel; application integration and composition technology, of which application engineering is the main approach; software evolution technology, of which software reengineering is the main approach, etc. This paper introduces the software development environment: JadeBird Software Production Line System, which effectively integrates the above-mentioned technologies.

  2. A Proteomics-Based Platform for Systems Biology Analysis of Soybean Seed Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    A system based on fresh weight and color was used to define eight stages of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill, cv. Jack) seed development. Storage protein, oil, and starch were quantified from each stage, and used along with the morphological characteristics to establish a first-stage model of seed...

  3. GProX, a User-Friendly Platform for Bioinformatics Analysis and Visualization of Quantitative Proteomics Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rigbolt, K. T. G.; Vanselow, J. T.; Blagoev, B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to identify and quantify thousands of proteins in a single proteomics experiment. As a result of these developments, the analysis of data has become the bottleneck of proteomics experiment. To provide the proteomics community with a user-friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)1. The program requires no special bioinf...

  4. Proteomics of foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on recent research on foodborne bacterial pathogens that use mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques as well as protein microarrays. Mass spectrometry ionization techniques (e.g. electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization), analyzers (e.g. ion ...

  5. Structure-based druggability assessment of the mammalian structural proteome with inclusion of light protein flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Loving

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation in Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprenger, Richard Remko; Roepstorff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved into a crucial technology for the field of proteomics, enabling the comprehensive study of proteins in biological systems. Innovative developments have yielded flexible and versatile mass spectrometric tools, including quadrupole time-of-flight, linear ion trap......, Orbitrap and ion mobility instruments. Together they offer various and complementary capabilities in terms of ionization, sensitivity, speed, resolution, mass accuracy, dynamic range and methods of fragmentation. Mass spectrometers can acquire qualitative and quantitative information on a large scale...

  7. Ultra-deep and quantitative saliva proteome reveals dynamics of the oral microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassl, Niklas; Kulak, Nils Alexander; Pichler, Garwin;

    2016-01-01

    , disruptions in saliva secretion and changes in the oral microbiome contribute to conditions such as tooth decay and respiratory tract infections. Here we set out to quantitatively map the saliva proteome in great depth with a rapid and in-depth mass spectrometry-based proteomics workflow. METHODS: We used...... next-generation sequencing data from the Human Microbiome Project as well as a comparison to MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry on microbial cultures revealed strong agreement. The oral microbiome differs between individuals and changes drastically upon eating and tooth brushing. CONCLUSION: Rapid shotgun and...... robust technology can now simultaneously characterize the human and microbiome contributions to the proteome of a body fluid and is therefore a valuable complement to genomic studies. This opens new frontiers for the study of host-pathogen interactions and clinical saliva diagnostics....

  8. Proteomics-Based Analysis of Protein Complexes in Pluripotent Stem Cells and Cancer Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    A protein complex consists of two or more proteins that are linked together through protein-protein interactions. The proteins show stable/transient and direct/indirect interactions within the protein complex or between the protein complexes. Protein complexes are involved in regulation of most of the cellular processes and molecular functions. The delineation of protein complexes is important to expand our knowledge on proteins functional roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The genetic yeast-2-hybrid method has been extensively used to characterize protein-protein interactions. Alternatively, a biochemical-based affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach has been widely used to characterize the protein complexes. In the AP-MS method, a protein complex of a target protein of interest is purified using a specific antibody or an affinity tag (e.g., DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) and polyhistidine (His)) and is subsequently analyzed by means of MS. Tandem affinity purification, a two-step purification system, coupled with MS has been widely used mainly to reduce the contaminants. We review here a general principle for AP-MS-based characterization of protein complexes and we explore several protein complexes identified in pluripotent stem cell biology and cancer biology as examples. PMID:27011181

  9. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  10. Isotope labeling-based quantitative proteomics of developing seeds of castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Schwämmle, Veit;

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantification approach employing isotopic (ICPL) and isobaric (iTRAQ) labeling to investigate the pattern of protein deposition during castor oil seed (Ricinus communis L.) development, including that of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism...... give important insights into certain aspects of the biology of castor oil seed development such as carbon flow, anabolism, and catabolism of fatty acid and the pattern of deposition of SSPs, toxins, and allergens such as ricin and 2S albumins. We also found, for the first time, some genes of SSP that...... could be mapped to extant castor gene models, considerably expanding the number of proteins so far identified from developing castor seeds. Cluster validation and statistical analysis resulted in 975 protein trend patterns and the relative abundance of 618 proteins. The results presented in this work...

  11. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-12-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices. PMID:27456500

  12. KARDIONET: telecardiology based on GRID technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierdzinski, Janusz; Bala, Piotr; Rudowski, Robert; Grabowski, Marcin; Karpinski, Grzegorz; Kaczynski, Bartosz

    2009-01-01

    The telecardiological system Kardionet is being developed to support interventional cardiology. The main aim of the system is to collect specific and systemized patient data from the distant medical centers and to organize it in the best possible way to diagnose quickly and choose the medical treatment. It is the distributed GRID type system operating in shortest achievable time. Computational GRID solutions together with distributed archive data GRID support creation, implementation and operations of software using considerable computational power. Kardionet system devoted to cardiology purposes includes specially developed data bases for the multimodal data and metadata, including information on a patient and his/her medical examination results. As Kardionet uses modern technology and methods we expect it could have a considerable impact on telemedicine development in Poland. The presented telecardiological system can provide a number of important gains for the national health care system if it is implemented nationwide. PMID:19745355

  13. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-07-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices.

  14. Technology-based continuous inventory systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission has changed from producing materials for weapons and enriching uranium for fuel in nuclear reactors to the dismantlement of weapons and the long-term storage of strategic materials, the requirements for the DOE complex are changing. The Y-12 plant has been an integral part of the weapons production process from the days of the Manhattan Project and is still a key part of the system in the dismantlement and storage missions. The change in focus and the associated reduction in staff have provided the incentive to develop technology-based inventory systems to decrease the labor hours required to perform the required physical inventories and associated confirmatory measurements

  15. HAN-Based Monopropellant Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is sponsoring efforts to develop technology for high-performance, high-density, low-freezing point, low-hazards monopropellant systems. The program is focused on a family of monopropellant formulations composed of an aqueous solution of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and a fuel component. HAN-based monopropellants offer significant mass and volume savings to small (less than 100 kg) satellite for orbit raising and on-orbit propulsion applications. The low-hazards characteristics of HAN-based monopropellants make them attractive for applications where ground processing costs are a significant concern. A 1-lbf thruster has been demonstrated to a 20-kg satellite orbit insertion duty cycle, using a formulation compatible with currently available catalysts. To achieve specific impulse levels above those of hydrazine, catalyst materials that can withstand the high-temperature, corrosive combustion environment of HAN-based monopropellants have to be developed. There also needs to be work done to characterize propellant properties, burning behavior, and material compatibility. NASA is coordinating their monopropellant efforts with those of the United States Air Force.

  16. Sustaining nuclear fuel science and technology base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfil energy demand, the Indonesian Government has made efforts to optimize the use of various-fossil and non fossil-potential energy resources in synergy (energy mix), which is stated in national energy policy. According to national energy policy, Indonesia is going to use nuclear energy for electricity supply, and up to 2025, the use of nuclear energy is projected at about 2% of the total primary energy or 4 to 5% of the national electricity supply. This energy demand is described in NPP road map, which consists of NPP preparation, construction and operation up to 2025. To sustain the activity of nuclear power plants, the continuity of nuclear reactor fuel supply is an absolute necessity; therefore, it will become industrially prospective and have an effect on national industries. As a nuclear research center and guidance in nuclear energy system in Indonesia, Batan also plays a role to promote this prospect and to increase the national content at NPP construction. In this point of view, Batan should have the competency especially in nuclear fuel cycle technology, and in this case PTBN is viewed as the competent center since PTBN's main task is to conduct the development of Nuclear Fuel Technology. This competency is performed as mastering its science and technology base. In this case, PTBN is noticed to have the capability to function suitably since PTBN is equipped with documents for fuel fabrication industry such as bidding, construction and commissioning and qualified man power. Basically, PTBN does not have the mandatory to operate nuclear fuel fabrication commercially. However, PTBN has the capability to prepare competent man power through training and coaching in nuclear fuel fabrication. In fact, the present condition shows that some of the equipments does not function properly or are not utilized optimally or are not operable. Besides, the process documents available have not yet validated and qualified, and the man power is not qualified yet

  17. General intelligence is associated with subclinical inflammation in Nepalese children: A population-based plasma proteomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Eun; West, Keith P; Cole, Robert N; Schulze, Kerry J; Wu, Lee Shu-Fune; Yager, James D; Groopman, John; Christian, Parul

    2016-08-01

    Improving child cognition in impoverished countries is a public health priority. Yet, biological pathways and associated biomarkers of impaired cognition remain poorly understood and largely unknown, respectively. This study aimed to explore and quantify associations between functional plasma protein biomarkers and childhood intellectual test performance. We applied proteomics to quantify proteins in plasma samples of 249 rural Nepalese children, 6-8years of age who, 1year later at 7-9years of age, were administered the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT). Among 751 plasma proteins quantified, 22 were associated with UNIT scores, passing a false discovery rate threshold of 5.0% (qAsian child population. Plasma proteomics may offer opportunities to identify functional, antecedent biomarkers of child cognitive development. PMID:27039242

  18. Proteome-Based Analysis of Colloidal Instability Enables the Detection of Haze-Active Proteins in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Fabian; Flaschel, Erwin; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal haze is a serious quality defect of bright beers that considerably reduces their shelf life and is thought to be triggered by hordeins, a class of proline-rich barley proteins. In this work, the proteomes of fresh and old beers were investigated in bottled pilsners and compared to the protein inventory of haze to identify specific haze-active proteins. Haze isolates dissolved in rehydration buffer contained high concentrations of proteins and sugars but provided protein gels with weak spot signals. Consequently, a treatment for the chemical deglycation with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was applied, which resulted in the identification of protein Z4, LTP1, CMb, CMe, pUP13, 3a, and Bwiph as constituents of the haze proteome. Because only one hordein was detectable and the proline content in haze hydrolysates was lower than those of barley prolamins, our results suggest that this class of proteins is of minor importance for haze development. PMID:27515584

  19. Enhanced reproducibility of the human gel-based tear proteome maps in the presence of di-(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraygord-Afshari, Neda; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Naderi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Patterns obtained in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in the previously published articles suggest a varying number of proteins. To seek the cause of this variation, we investigated the effect of reduction power on the overall tear proteome maps. To this end, the buffers of two reducing agents, dithiothreitol (DTT) at nine different concentrations and di-(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide (HED), were examined. The assay showed that HED clearly improved 2-DE resolution, increased the number of detectable protein spots, and offered well-resolved chain regions in comparison with those treated with DTT. Furthermore, this study introduced increasing the reduction power as a remedy to increase the reproducibility of two-dimensional human tear proteome maps. In addition, the results of our assessment showed that improved reduction efficiency was accompanied by increased procedure reproducibility from 42% to 89%. PMID:24575874

  20. Unraveling the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes with proteomics: present and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Thomas; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Heding, Peter E; Karlsen, Allan E; Jensen, Ole N; Pociot, Flemming Michael

    2005-01-01

    . Proteomics may be useful in describing the protein expression profile and thus the diabetic phenotype. Relatively few studies using proteomics technologies to investigate the T1D pathogenesis have been published to date despite the defined target organ, the beta-cell. Proteomics has been applied in studies...

  1. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-01

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs. PMID:25927954

  2. Proteomics of human mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Bross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics have passed through a tremendous development in the recent years by the development of ever more sensitive, fast and precise mass spectrometry methods. The dramatically increased research in the biology of mitochondria and their prominent involvement in all kinds of diseases and ageing...... sensitivity of mass spectrometry technology aids in lowering this hurdle and new approaches like generation of induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells allow to produce patient-specific cellular disease models with great potential. We describe which human sample types are accessible, review the status of...... the catalog of human mitochondrial proteins and discuss proteins with dual localization in mitochondria and other cellular compartments. We describe the status and developments of pertinent mass spectrometric strategies, and the use of databases and bioinformatics. Using selected illustrative examples...

  3. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics- a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945515

  4. Decreased levels of CXC-chemokines in serum of benzene-exposed workers identified by array-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Vermeulen, Roel; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Luoping; Gunn, Laura; McCarthy, Diane; Woodbury, Ronald L; McGuire, Marielena; Podust, Vladimir N.; Li, Guilan; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Mu, Ruidong; Yin, Songnian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical and environmental contaminant that causes leukemia. To obtain mechanistic insight into benzene's mechanism of action, we examined the impact of benzene on the human serum proteome in a study of exposed healthy shoe-factory workers and unexposed controls. Two sequential studies were performed, each using sera from 10 workers exposed to benzene (overall mean benzene air level >30 ppm) and 10 controls. Serum samples were subjected to anion-exchange fra...

  5. ETISEQ – an algorithm for automated elution time ion sequencing of concurrently fragmented peptides for mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Downard Kevin M; Schwahn Alexander B; Wong Jason WH

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Concurrent peptide fragmentation (i.e. shotgun CID, parallel CID or MSE) has emerged as an alternative to data-dependent acquisition in generating peptide fragmentation data in LC-MS/MS proteomics experiments. Concurrent peptide fragmentation data acquisition has been shown to be advantageous over data-dependent acquisition by providing greater detection dynamic range and providing more accurate quantitative information. Nevertheless, concurrent peptide fragmentation data ...

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry for Peptide Analysis: Target-Based Approaches and Proteomics/Peptidomics Strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simo, C.; Cifuentes, A.; Kašička, Václav

    New York : Humana Press, 2013 - (Volpi, N.; Maccari, F.), s. 139-151 ISBN 978-1-62703-296-4. - (Methods in Molecular Biology. 984) R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) 2008CZ0019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : peptides * peptidomics * proteomics * CE-MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  7. Antibody-Array-Based Proteomic Screening of Serum Markers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Discovery Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianfu; Ding, Huihua; Han, Jie; Arriens, Cristina; Wei, Chungwen; Han, Weilu; Pedroza, Claudia; Jiang, Shan; Anolik, Jennifer; Petri, Michelle; Sanz, Ignacio; Saxena, Ramesh; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-07-01

    A discovery study was carried out where serum samples from 22 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and matched healthy controls were hybridized to antibody-coated glass slide arrays that interrogated the level of 274 human proteins. On the basis of these screens, 48 proteins were selected for ELISA-based validation in an independent cohort of 28 SLE patients. Whereas AXL, ferritin, and sTNFRII were significantly elevated in patients with active lupus nephritis (LN) relative to SLE patients who were quiescent, other molecules such as OPN, sTNFRI, sTNFRII, IGFBP2, SIGLEC5, FAS, and MMP10 exhibited the capacity to distinguish SLE from healthy controls with ROC AUC exceeding 90%, all with p serum markers were next tested in a cohort of 45 LN patients, where serum was obtained at the time of renal biopsy. In these patients, sTNFRII exhibited the strongest correlation with eGFR (r = -0.50, p = 0.0014) and serum creatinine (r = 0.57, p = 0.0001), although AXL, FAS, and IGFBP2 also correlated with these clinical measures of renal function. When concurrent renal biopsies from these patients were examined, serum FAS, IGFBP2, and TNFRII showed significant positive correlations with renal pathology activity index, while sTNFRII displayed the highest correlation with concurrently scored renal pathology chronicity index (r = 0.57, p = 0.001). Finally, in a longitudinal cohort of seven SLE patients examined at ∼3 month intervals, AXL, ICAM-1, IGFBP2, SIGLEC5, sTNFRII, and VCAM-1 demonstrated the ability to track with concurrent disease flare, with significant subject to subject variation. In summary, serum proteins have the capacity to identify patients with active nephritis, flares, and renal pathology activity or chronicity changes, although larger longitudinal cohort studies are warranted. PMID:27211902

  8. A proteomics-based identification of putative biomarkers for disease in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Altena, S E C; de Klerk, B; Hettinga, K A; van Neerven, R J J; Boeren, S; Savelkoul, H F J; Tijhaar, E J

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and characterize potential biomarkers for disease resistance in bovine milk that can be used to indicate dairy cows at risk to develop future health problems. We selected high- and low-resistant cows i.e. cows that were less or more prone to develop diseases according to farmers' experience and notifications in the disease registration data. The protein composition of milk serum samples of these high- and low-resistant cows were compared using NanoLC-MS/MS. In total 78 proteins were identified and quantified of which 13 were significantly more abundant in low-resistant cows than high-resistant cows. Quantification of one of these proteins, lactoferrin (LF), by ELISA in a new and much larger set of full fat milk samples confirmed higher LF levels in low- versus high-resistant cows. These high- and low-resistant cows were selected based on comprehensive disease registration and milk recording data, and absence of disease for at least 4 weeks. Relating the experienced diseases to LF levels in milk showed that lameness was associated with higher LF levels in milk. Analysis of the prognostic value of LF showed that low-resistant cows with higher LF levels in milk had a higher risk of being culled within one year after testing than high-resistant cows. In conclusion, LF in milk are higher in low-resistant cows, are associated with lameness and may be a prognostic marker for risk of premature culling. PMID:27185258

  9. Comprehensive and Scalable Highly Automated MS-Based Proteomic Workflow for Clinical Biomarker Discovery in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayon, Loïc; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Corthésy, John; Cominetti, Ornella; Kussmann, Martin

    2014-07-24

    Over the past decade, mass spectrometric performance has greatly improved in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and speed. By contrast, only limited progress has been accomplished with regard to automation, throughput, and robustness of the proteomic sample preparation process upstream of mass spectrometry. The present work delivers an optimized analysis of human plasma samples in both small preclinical and large clinical studies, enabled by the development of a highly automated quantitative proteomic workflow. Several iterative evaluation and validation steps were performed before process "design freeze" and development completion. A robotic liquid handling workflow and platform (including reduction, alkylation, digestion, TMT labeling, pooling, and purification) were shown to provide better quantitative trueness and precision than manual operation at the bench. Depletion of the most abundant human plasma proteins and subsequent buffer exchange were also developed and integrated. Finally, 96 identical pooled human plasma samples were prepared in a 96-well plate format, and each sample was individually subjected to our developed workflow. This test revealed increased throughput and robustness compared with to-date published manual or less automated workflows. Our workflow is ready-to-use for future (pre-) clinical studies. We expect our work to facilitate, accelerate, and improve clinical proteomic discovery in human blood plasma. PMID:25058407

  10. Pressurized Pepsin Digestion in Proteomics: An Automatable Alternative to Trypsin for Integrated Top-down Bottom-up Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Robinson, Errol W.; Hixson, Kim K.; Tian, Zhixin; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sang-Won; Tolic, Nikola; Weitz, Karl K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-02-01

    Integrated top-down bottom-up proteomics combined with online digestion has great potential to improve the characterization of protein isoforms in biological systems and is amendable to highthroughput proteomics experiments. Bottom-up proteomics ultimately provides the peptide sequences derived from the tandem MS analyses of peptides after the proteome has been digested. Top-down proteomics conversely entails the MS analyses of intact proteins for more effective characterization of genetic variations and/or post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein, we describe recent efforts towards efficient integration of bottom-up and top-down LCMS based proteomic strategies. Since most proteomic platforms (i.e. LC systems) operate in acidic environments, we exploited the compatibility of the pepsin (i.e. the enzyme’s natural acidic activity) for the integration of bottom-up and top-down proteomics. Pressure enhanced pepsin digestions were successfully performed and characterized with several standard proteins in either an offline mode using a Barocycler or an online mode using a modified high pressure LC system referred to as a fast online digestion system (FOLDS). FOLDS was tested using pepsin and a whole microbial proteome, and the results compared against traditional trypsin digestions on the same platform. Additionally, FOLDS was integrated with a RePlay configuration to demonstrate an ultra-rapid integrated bottom-up top-down proteomic strategy employing a standard mixture of proteins and a monkey pox virus proteome.

  11. Compositional Analysis of Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylated H3R2 Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry-Based Targeted Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Xu, Feifei; Liu, Liang; Chen, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Protein arginine methylation is one of the common post-translational modifications in cellular processes. To date, two isomeric forms of dimethylated arginine have been identified: asymmetric N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine (aDMA), and symmetric N(G),N'(G)-dimethylarginine (sDMA). Evidence indicated that these isomers can coexist and have different or even opposite functions, with aDMA and sDMA forms of arginine 2 on histone H3 (i.e., H3R2me2a and H3R2me2s) being an example. Thus, specific detection and quantification of each isomeric form is important. Current methods are capable of predicting and detecting thousands of methylarginine sites in proteins, whereas differentiation and stoichiometric measurement of dimethylated protein isomers are still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics has emerged as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein methylation using enzymatic peptides as surrogates of target proteins. However, it should be pointed out that a routine targeted proteomics strategy cannot easily distinguish sDMA- and aDMA-containing surrogate peptides due to their common nature. The estimated amount should be considered as the sum of both arginine dimethylated isomers. In this study, compositional analysis based on a linear algebra algorithm as an add-on to targeted proteomics was employed to quantify H3R2me2a and H3R2me2s (i.e., surrogate peptides of AR(me2a)TK(me1/2)QT and AR(me2s)TK(me1/2)QT). To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated for each isomer first. With the slope and intercept of their calibration curves for each multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transition, linear algebraic equations were derived. Using a series of mock mixtures consisting of isomers in varying concentrations, the reliability of the method was confirmed. Finally, the H3R2 dimethylation status was analyzed in normal MCF-10A cells

  12. Integration of proteomics into systems biology of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hanash, S; Schliekelman, M.; Q. Zhang; Taguchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer benefits from integration of proteomic level data into systems biology efforts. The opportunities available as a result of advances in proteomic technologies, the successes to date and the challenges involved in integrating diverse datasets are addressed in this review.

  13. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M H; Sieber, S A

    2016-05-01

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied "in situ" - in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss 'competitive mode' approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed. PMID:27098809

  14. Proteomics and Its Application in Biomarker Discovery and Drug Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Qing-Yu; Chiu Jen-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics is a research field aiming to characterize molecular and cellular dynamics in protein expression and function on a global level. The introduction of proteomics has been greatly broadening our view and accelerating our path in various medical researches. The most significant advantage of proteomics is its ability to examine a whole proteome or sub-proteome in a single experiment so that the protein alterations corresponding to a pathological or biochemical condition at a given time can be considered in an integrated way. Proteomic technology has been extensively used to tackle a wide variety of medical subjects including biomarker discovery and drug development. By complement with other new technique advance in genomics and bioinformatics,proteomics has a great potential to make considerable contribution to biomarker identification and revolutionize drug development process. A brief overview of the proteomic technologies will be provided and the application of proteomics in biomarker discovery and drug development will be discussed using our current research projects as examples.

  15. Engineering Technology Reports, Volume 2: Technology Base FY00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, A L; Langland, R T; Minichino, C

    2001-10-03

    In FY-2000, Engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory faced significant pressures to meet critical project milestones, and immediate demands to facilitate the reassignment of employees as the National Ignition Facility (the 600-TW laser facility being designed and built at Livermore, and one of the largest R&D construction projects in the world) was in the process of re-baselining its plan while executing full-speed its technology development efforts. This drive for change occurred as an unprecedented level of management and program changes were occurring within LLNL. I am pleased to report that we met many key milestones and achieved numerous technological breakthroughs. This report summarizes our efforts to perform feasibility and reduce-to-practice studies, demonstrations, and/or techniques--as structured through our technology centers. Whether using computational engineering to predict how giant structures like suspension bridges will respond to massive earthquakes or devising a suitcase-sized microtool to detect chemical and biological agents used by terrorists, we have made solid technical progress. Five Centers focus and guide longer-term investments within Engineering, as well as impact all of LLNL. Each Center is responsible for the vitality and growth of the core technologies it represents. My goal is that each Center will be recognized on an international scale for solving compelling national problems requiring breakthrough innovation. The Centers and their leaders are as follows: Center for Complex Distributed Systems--David B. McCallen; Center for Computational Engineering--Kyran D. Mish; Center for Microtechnology--Raymond P. Mariella, Jr.; Center for Nondestructive Characterization--Harry E. Martz, Jr.; and Center for Precision Engineering--Keith Carlisle.

  16. Towards delineating functions within the fasciola secreted cathepsin l protease family by integrating in vivo based sub-proteomics and phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell M Morphew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L protease family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: the sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: we have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase.

  17. Urinary proteomics as a novel tool for biomarker discovery in kidney diseases*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Yi-ding; Gu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Urine has become one of the most attractive biofluids in clinical proteomics, for its procurement is easy and noninvasive and it contains sufficient proteins and peptides. Urinary proteomics has thus rapidly developed and has been extensively applied to biomarker discovery in clinical diseases, especially kidney diseases. In this review, we discuss two important aspects of urinary proteomics in detail, namely, sample preparation and proteomic technologies. In addition, data mining in urinary ...

  18. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40 oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were also reflected on the mRNA level. These breast cancer features revealed by our work provide novel insights that may ultimately translate to development of subtype-specific therapeutics. PMID:26725330

  19. Proteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N; Krag, Sharon S; Cole, Robert N; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. Five-hundred four of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications, and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  20. Visualizing Meta-Features in Proteomic Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepouras George

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The steps of a high-throughput proteomics experiment include the separation, differential expression and mass spectrometry-based identification of proteins. However, the last and more challenging step is inferring the biological role of the identified proteins through their association with interaction networks, biological pathways, analysis of the effect of post-translational modifications, and other protein-related information. Results In this paper, we present an integrative visualization methodology that allows combining experimentally produced proteomic features with protein meta-features, typically coming from meta-analysis tools and databases, in synthetic Proteomic Feature Maps. Using three proteomics analysis scenarios, we show that the proposed visualization approach is effective in filtering, navigating and interacting with the proteomics data in order to address visually challenging biological questions. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease of integration of any user-defined proteomic features in easy-to-comprehend visual representations that resemble the familiar 2D-gel images, and can be adapted to the user's needs. The main capabilities of the developed VIP software, which implements the presented visualization methodology, are also highlighted and discussed. Conclusions By using this visualization and the associated VIP software, researchers can explore a complex heterogeneous proteomics dataset from different perspectives in order to address visually important biological queries and formulate new hypotheses for further investigation. VIP is freely available at http://pelopas.uop.gr/~egian/VIP/index.html.

  1. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in fluid proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E.; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The field of clinical proteomics offers opportunities to identify new disease biomarkers in body fluids, cells and tissues. These biomarkers can be used in clinical applications for diagnosis, stratification of patients for specific treatment, or therapy monitoring. New protein array formats and improved spectrometry technologies have brought these analyses to a level with potential for use in clinical diagnostics. The nature of the human body fluid proteome with its large dynamic range of pr...

  2. A comparison of methods for classifying clinical samples based on proteomics data: a case study for statistical and machine learning approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayle L Sampson

    Full Text Available The discovery of protein variation is an important strategy in disease diagnosis within the biological sciences. The current benchmark for elucidating information from multiple biological variables is the so called "omics" disciplines of the biological sciences. Such variability is uncovered by implementation of multivariable data mining techniques which come under two primary categories, machine learning strategies and statistical based approaches. Typically proteomic studies can produce hundreds or thousands of variables, p, per observation, n, depending on the analytical platform or method employed to generate the data. Many classification methods are limited by an n≪p constraint, and as such, require pre-treatment to reduce the dimensionality prior to classification. Recently machine learning techniques have gained popularity in the field for their ability to successfully classify unknown samples. One limitation of such methods is the lack of a functional model allowing meaningful interpretation of results in terms of the features used for classification. This is a problem that might be solved using a statistical model-based approach where not only is the importance of the individual protein explicit, they are combined into a readily interpretable classification rule without relying on a black box approach. Here we incorporate statistical dimension reduction techniques Partial Least Squares (PLS and Principal Components Analysis (PCA followed by both statistical and machine learning classification methods, and compared them to a popular machine learning technique, Support Vector Machines (SVM. Both PLS and SVM demonstrate strong utility for proteomic classification problems.

  3. Changes in iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Cladoceran Daphnia magna Exposed to Microcystin-Producing and Microcystin-Free Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Kai; Meng, Qingguo; Zhu, Xuexia; Dai, Daoxin; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Global warming and increased nutrient fluxes cause cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater ecosystems. These phenomena have increased the concern for human health and ecosystem services. The mass occurrences of toxic cyanobacteria strongly affect freshwater zooplankton communities, especially the unselective filter feeder Daphnia. However, the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial toxicity remain poorly understood. This study is the first to combine the established body growth rate (BGR), which is an indicator of life-history fitness, with differential peptide labeling (iTRAQ)-based proteomics in Daphnia magna influenced by microcystin-producing (MP) and microcystin-free (MF) Microcystis aeruginosa. A significant decrease in BGR was detected when D. magna was exposed to MP or MF M. aeruginosa. Conducting iTRAQ proteomic analyses, we successfully identified and quantified 211 proteins with significant changes in expression. A cluster of orthologous groups revealed that M. aeruginosa-affected differential proteins were strongly associated with lipid, carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolism. These parameters could potentially explain the reduced fitness based on the cost of the substance metabolism. PMID:27057760

  4. Technology-Based Classroom Assessments: Alternatives to Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2009-01-01

    Although many teachers are using new technologies to differentiate instruction and administer tests, educators are also employing a range of technology-based resources and strategies to implement a variety of classroom assessments as alternatives to standardized and teacher-made testing. Technology-based classroom assessments focus on the use of…

  5. MOEMS technology in laser based instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasers due to their high spatial coherence, low divergence and monochromaticity, can be used for precision metrology, trace measurement and remote diagnostics. At RRCAT several laser-based instruments have been developed to meet the requirements of the different stages of nuclear fuel cycle. The nuclear fuel cycle involves various stages right from uranium prospecting, to spent fuel inspection and reprocessing. At each stage of the fuel cycle instruments are required for monitoring different parameters with high sensitivity and accuracy. Several laser-based diagnostics and metrology systems have been developed for these applications which include laser uranium analyzer, optical dip-type probes for remote plutonium measurement, laser Scan guage for mixed carbide fuel metrology, fuel pellets inspection system, laser non-destructive testing systems for structural components of reactors, underwater inspection head for metrology of FBTR spent fuel bundles etc. One possible way of measurement or inspection in a high radiation environment would be to build the optical and mechanical front-end as a compact and miniaturized unit and connect it to the control arid data-acquisition electronics which sits far from the radiation field via a fiber optic cable. As the front end would contain only optical and mechanical components it would be easier to design a radiation hard system suitable for use in a hot cell environment. Miniaturization using Micro-Optical-Electronic-Mechanical-Systems (MOEMS) technology would further reduce the integrated dose received by the system and minimize the contaminated waste generated at end-of-life. These systems would be classified under the extrinsic fiber sensors category as the measurement is done by a MOEMS device external to the fiber and the fiber plays the roll' of carrying the control signals from the externally placed control unit to the MOEMS device and the measured parameter the other way round. This methodology of system design would

  6. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  7. Addressing the Challenge of Defining Valid Proteomic Biomarkers and Classifiers

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dakna, Mohammed

    2010-12-10

    Abstract Background The purpose of this manuscript is to provide, based on an extensive analysis of a proteomic data set, suggestions for proper statistical analysis for the discovery of sets of clinically relevant biomarkers. As tractable example we define the measurable proteomic differences between apparently healthy adult males and females. We choose urine as body-fluid of interest and CE-MS, a thoroughly validated platform technology, allowing for routine analysis of a large number of samples. The second urine of the morning was collected from apparently healthy male and female volunteers (aged 21-40) in the course of the routine medical check-up before recruitment at the Hannover Medical School. Results We found that the Wilcoxon-test is best suited for the definition of potential biomarkers. Adjustment for multiple testing is necessary. Sample size estimation can be performed based on a small number of observations via resampling from pilot data. Machine learning algorithms appear ideally suited to generate classifiers. Assessment of any results in an independent test-set is essential. Conclusions Valid proteomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis only can be defined by applying proper statistical data mining procedures. In particular, a justification of the sample size should be part of the study design.

  8. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  9. RFID Technology Based Attendance Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumita Nainan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RFID is a nascent technology, deeply rooted by its early developments in using radar as a harbinger of adversary planes during World War II. A plethora of industries have leveraged the benefits of RFID technology for enhancements in sectors like military, sports, security, airline, animal farms, healthcare and other areas. Industry specific key applications of this technology include vehicle tracking, automated inventory management, animal monitoring, secure store checkouts, supply chain management, automatic payment, sport timing technologies, etc. This paper introduces the distinctive components of RFID technology and focuses on its core competencies: scalability and security. It will be then supplemented by a detailed synopsis of an investigation conducted to test the feasibility and practicality of RFID technology.

  10. RFID Technology Based Attendance Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Sumita Nainan; Romin Parekh; Tanvi Shah

    2013-01-01

    RFID is a nascent technology, deeply rooted by its early developments in using radar as a harbinger of adversary planes during World War II. A plethora of industries have leveraged the benefits of RFID technology for enhancements in sectors like military, sports, security, airline, animal farms, healthcare and other areas. Industry specific key applications of this technology include vehicle tracking, automated inventory management, animal monitoring, secure store checkouts, supply chain mana...

  11. Attendance Control System based on RFID technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurbek Saparkhojayev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Kazakhstan, checking students' attendance is one of the important issues for universities, because many universities evaluate students attendance and while giving the final grade, professors consider their total number of appearances on classes during the whole semester. This brings to the idea of having some tool to control students attendance. Some universities prefer to use paper sheet for controlling attendance, whereas some universities prefer to use paper sheet for checking students' attendance and after this, fill out these information into a system manually, like Kazakh-British Technical University does. However, this is not an efficient way since there will be spent much of time for calling students names and putting marks like presence or absence if the class is a lecture class, and in this class at least 5 groups are presented. Moreover, some students may call his/her friend as presence even though this student is currently absent. After thinking all these issues, authors of the following research paper decided to create a system that makes easier to check students attendance automatically, and this system is implemented in Suleyman Demirel University, Kazakhstan. Actually, this is the first time when such kind of system is being used in educational system of Kazakhstan. The system is based on RFID technology, and in this paper, details of this system are presented.

  12. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, Pedro M.; Silva, Tomé S.; Dias, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological...... questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined...... nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Farm animal proteomics....

  13. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery. PMID:26565430

  14. Application of proteome technology in screening biomarkers associated with gastric cancer%蛋白质组技术在胃癌相关标志物筛查中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chibo Liu; Yong Liang; Haibao Wang; Chunqin Pan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To initially explore the application of proteome technologies in study of serum,to establish two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of human gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum,and to screen and identify differentially expressed proteins in poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum,in which try to find out significant biomarker candidates for gastric cancer.Methods:2-DE was adopted to separate the total proteins of poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum.After staining and analyzing by ImageMaster 2D Elite software,the differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight- mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).Results:2-DE serum profiles with high resolution were obtained.Five protein spots were found as differentially-expressed proteins and identified as Serpin B6 (Placental thrombin inhibitor) Cytoplasmic antiproteinase (CAP)(Protease inhibitor6) (P1-6),Septin-1 (LARP) (Serologically defined breast cancer antigen NY-BR-24),Kallikrein-6 precursor (Protease M) (Neurosin) (Zyme) (SP59),Hemoglobin beta chain,Hemoglobin beta chain and Beta-defensin 108 precursor (Beta-defensin 8) (DEFB-8).Conclusion:The differential proteins were demonstrated to present in poorly-differentiated gastric cancer serum and paired normal serum.The molecular biomarkers associated with poorly differentiated gastric cancer could be possibly identified by the high throughput screening proteome technology.

  15. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  16. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  17. Proteomic profiling of exosomes: Current perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, Richard J; Jensen, Søren S; Lim, Justin W E

    2008-01-01

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types in vitro. Recent studies have shown that exosomes are also found in vivo in body fluids such as blood, urine, amniotic fluid, malignant ascites, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, synovial fluid, and breast milk....... While the biological function of exosomes is still unclear, they can mediate communication between cells, facilitating processes such as antigen presentation and in trans signaling to neighboring cells. Exosome-like vesicles identified in Drosophila (referred to as argosomes) may be potential vehicles...... for the spread of morphogens in epithelia. The advent of current MS-based proteomic technologies has contributed significantly to our understanding of the molecular composition of exosomes. In addition to a common set of membrane and cytosolic proteins, it is becoming increasingly apparent that exosomes harbor...

  18. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yuri Matsumura

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration, annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory and HSP 47 (fibrosis were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties.

  19. Brain-Based Learning With Technological Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anita

    2004-01-01

    Utilization of technology in secondary schools is varied and depends on the training and interest of the individual instructors. Even though technology has advanced way beyond its utilitarian roots of being viewed solely by educators as a useful machine for teachers to key exams and worksheets on, there are still many secondary educators who still…

  20. Assessing CMT cell line stability by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, Stephen J;

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) followed by mass spectrometric identification of the proteins in the protein spots has become a central tool in proteomics. CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) cell lines, selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma, with high...... useful tool for assessing differences in cell line stability. This approach provided a tool to select the best cell line and optimal subculture period for studies of cancer related phenomena and for testing the effect of potential anticancer drugs....

  1. Creatine-induced activation of antioxidative defence in myotube cultures revealed by explorative NMR-based metabonomics and proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Niels

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine is a key intermediate in energy metabolism and supplementation of creatine has been used for increasing muscle mass, strength and endurance. Creatine supplementation has also been reported to trigger the skeletal muscle expression of insulin like growth factor I, to increase the fat-free mass and improve cognition in elderly, and more explorative approaches like transcriptomics has revealed additional information. The aim of the present study was to reveal additional insight into the biochemical effects of creatine supplementation at the protein and metabolite level by integrating the explorative techniques, proteomics and NMR metabonomics, in a systems biology approach. Methods Differentiated mouse myotube cultures (C2C12 were exposed to 5 mM creatine monohydrate (CMH for 24 hours. For proteomics studies, lysed myotubes were analyzed in single 2-DGE gels where the first dimension of protein separation was pI 5-8 and second dimension was a 12.5% Criterion gel. Differentially expressed protein spots of significance were excised from the gel, desalted and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF MS. For NMR metabonomic studies, chloroform/methanol extractions of the myotubes were subjected to one-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy and the intracellular oxidative status of myotubes was assessed by intracellular DCFH2 oxidation after 24 h pre-incubation with CMH. Results The identified differentially expressed proteins included vimentin, malate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin, thioredoxin dependent peroxide reductase, and 75 kDa and 78 kDa glucose regulated protein precursors. After CMH exposure, up-regulated proteomic spots correlated positively with the NMR signals from creatine, while down-regulated proteomic spots were negatively correlated with these NMR signals. The identified differentially regulated proteins were related to energy metabolism, glucose regulated stress, cellular structure and the

  2. History, Advances, Challenges and Guidelines for the Next 10 Years——Focus on Tropical Crop Proteomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuchu Wang

    2012-01-01

    In the past 10 years,plant proteomics has taken as the essential sources of the concentrations,interactions,functions,and catalytic activities of proteins which are the major structural and functional determinants of cells in crops.Recently,significant technology development has played important roles both at the level of data analysis software and mass spectrometry in proteomics.Conceptual progress in proteomics such as DIGE has made possible the analysis of entire proteomes at previously unprecedented density and accuracy.New concepts have emerged that comprise quantitative analyses of full proteomes,database-independent protein identification strategies,targeted quantitative proteomics approaches with proteotypic peptides such as iTRAQ technology and the systematic analysis of an increasing number of posttranslational modifications.However,there are still several challenges that await experimental and conceptual solutions.In some areas,it could be argued that we began to run before we could walk.New but immature technology has been over enthusiastically applied to significant biological questions,and the results have become part of the scientific literatures and databases.The major challenge in plant proteomics is the inability of proteomics to analyze all protein components.The proteome of each living cell is dynamic,altering in response to the individual cell metabolic state and reception of intracellular and extracellular signal molecules,and many of the proteins which are expressed will be post-translationally altered.Another challenge is based on the improvement of experimental design which helps to generate large amounts of biologically and statistically meaningful,high-quality data.New standards should be required for designing and analyzing experiments.A third challenge is due to the errors in protein identification.Another challenge is due to the different types of data which are remarkable variations in experimental design,tissue type,age and protocols

  3. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  4. Proteomics of Rice Seed Germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongli eHe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed is a condensed form of plant. Under suitable environmental conditions, it can resume the metabolic activity from physiological quiescent status, and mobilize the reserves, biosynthesize new proteins, regenerate organelles and cell membrane, eventually protrude the radicle and enter into seedling establishment. So far, how these activities are regulated in a coordinated and sequential manner is largely unknown. With the availability of more and more genome sequence information and the development of mass spectrometry (MS technology, proteomics has been widely applied in analyzing the mechanisms of different biological processes, and proved to be very powerful. Regulation of rice seed germination is critical for rice cultivation. In recent years, a lot of proteomic studies have been conducted in exploring the gene expression regulation, reserves mobilization and metabolisms reactivation, which brings us new insights on the mechanisms of metabolism regulation during this process. Nevertheless, it also invokes a lot of questions. In this mini-review, we summarized the progress in the proteomic studies of rice seed germination. The current challenges and future perspectives were also discussed, which might be helpful for the following studies.

  5. Plasma Proteome Profiling to Assess Human Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Philipp E; Kulak, Nils A; Pichler, Garwin; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Mann, Matthias

    2016-03-23

    Proteins in the circulatory system mirror an individual's physiology. In daily clinical practice, protein levels are generally determined using single-protein immunoassays. High-throughput, quantitative analysis using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics of blood, plasma, and serum would be advantageous but is challenging because of the high dynamic range of protein abundances. Here, we introduce a rapid and robust "plasma proteome profiling" pipeline. This single-run shotgun proteomic workflow does not require protein depletion and enables quantitative analysis of hundreds of plasma proteomes from 1 μl single finger pricks with 20 min gradients. The apolipoprotein family, inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein, gender-related proteins, and >40 FDA-approved biomarkers are reproducibly quantified (CV proteome obtained by simple peptide pre-fractionation. Plasma proteome profiling delivers an informative portrait of a person's health state, and we envision its large-scale use in biomedicine. PMID:27135364

  6. Shotgun MS proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Gharib, Sina A; Schnapp, Lynn M; Goodlett, David R

    2014-10-01

    We provide a review of proteomic techniques used to characterize the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome of normal healthy subjects. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is the most common technique for sampling the components of the alveolar space. The proteomic techniques used to study normal BALF include protein separation by 2DE, whereby proteins were identified by comparison to a reference gel as well as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS, also known as shotgun proteomics. We summarize recent progress using shotgun MS technologies to define the normal BALF proteome. Surprisingly, we find that despite advances in shotgun proteomic technologies over the course of the last 10 years, which have resulted in greater numbers of proteins being identified, the functional landscape of normal BALF proteome was similarly described by all methods examined. PMID:24616423

  7. From protein catalogues towards targeted proteomics approaches in cereal grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnie, Christine; Sultan, Abida; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their importance for human nutrition, the protein content of cereal grains has been a subject of intense study for over a century and cereal grains were not surprisingly one of the earliest subjects for 2D-gel-based proteome analysis. Over the last two decades, countless cereal grain...... extraction, separation and identification of proteins and peptides is facilitating functional proteomics and analysis of sub-proteomes from small amounts of starting material, such as seed tissues. The combination of proteomics with structural and functional analysis is increasingly applied to target subsets...

  8. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling: a view from quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Kratchmarova, Irina; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2009-01-01

    signal transduction. Numerous new post-translational modification sites have been identified by quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In addition, plentiful new players in signal transduction have been identified underlining the complexity and the modular architecture of most signaling...... networks. In this review, we outline the principles of signal transduction via RTKs and highlight some of the new insights obtained from proteomic approaches such as protein microarrays and quantitative mass spectrometry....... RTKs. In recent years proteomic approaches have yielded detailed descriptions of cellular signaling events. Quantitative proteomics is able to characterize the exact position and strength of post-translational modifications (PTMs) providing essential information for understanding the molecular basis of...

  9. Proteomic tools in clinical tissues: unlocking the pathology archives

    OpenAIRE

    Faoro, Valentina

    1982-01-01

    Background: Clinical proteomics aims to characterize the protein networks altered by pathologic processes or therapeutic treatment, and to develop biomarker profiling technologies to promptly detect diseases and treat them more effectively. The challenge of translating proteomic profiling to the bedside lies in applying technologies for the analysis of human tissues, which are routinely obtained by biopsy or surgery, without substantially modifying the clinical workflow. Formalin-fixed and...

  10. SPS’ Digest: the Swiss Proteomics Society selection of proteomics articles

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogland, C.; Lion, N.; Palagi, P.M.; Sanchez, J. C.; Tissot, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the consolidation of the specialized proteomics literature around a few established journals, such as Proteomics, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, and the Journal of Proteome Research, a lot of information is still spread in many different publications from different fields, such as analytical sciences, MS, bioinformatics, etc. The purpose of SPS’ Digest is to gather a selection of proteomics articles, to categorize them, and to make the list available on a periodic basis through a ...

  11. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  12. Human maternal plasma proteomic changes with parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Significance: Proteomic technology is constantly advancing, and the latest techniques enable gel-free analysis of minimally preprocessed, complex biological samples, enabling simultaneous identification and quantification of many hundreds of proteins. The technique of TMT labelling and Orbitrap mass spectrometry is applicable to the analysis of serial maternal plasma samples in order to identify potential markers of the onset of labour.

  13. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Deelder, André M; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Mertens, Bart J.; Yuri E. M. van der Burgt; Anouck Huijbers; Tim J. A. Dekker; Wilma E. Mesker; Berit Velstra

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly use...

  14. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, ...

  15. Proteogenomics Dashboard for the Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Alves-Cruzeiro, Joao; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Vialas, Vital; Prieto, Gorka; García, Carlos; Corrales, Fernando J; Albar, Juan Pablo; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    dasHPPboard is a novel proteomics-based dashboard that collects and reports the experiments produced by the Spanish Human Proteome Project consortium (SpHPP) and aims to help HPP to map the entire human proteome. We have followed the strategy of analog genomics projects like the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), which provides a vast amount of data on human cell lines experiments. The dashboard includes results of shotgun and selected reaction monitoring proteomics experiments, post-translational modifications information, as well as proteogenomics studies. We have also processed the transcriptomics data from the ENCODE and Human Body Map (HBM) projects for the identification of specific gene expression patterns in different cell lines and tissues, taking special interest in those genes having little proteomic evidence available (missing proteins). Peptide databases have been built using single nucleotide variants and novel junctions derived from RNA-Seq data that can be used in search engines for sample-specific protein identifications on the same cell lines or tissues. The dasHPPboard has been designed as a tool that can be used to share and visualize a combination of proteomic and transcriptomic data, providing at the same time easy access to resources for proteogenomics analyses. The dasHPPboard can be freely accessed at: http://sphppdashboard.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26144527

  16. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational pro

  17. Adhesives; A Base Syllabus on Wood Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern Kentucky Univ., Richmond.

    Prepared by participants in the 1968 National Defense Education Act Institute on Wood Technology, this syllabus is one of a series of basic outlines designed to aid college level industrial arts instructors in improving and broadening the scope and content of their programs. The guide is divided into three sections, the first of which deals with…

  18. Data for iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis of Brassica napus leaves in response to chlorophyll deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Chu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential pigment chlorophyll (Chl plays important roles in light harvesting and energy transfer during photosynthesis. Here we present the data from a comparative proteomic analysis of chlorophyll-deficient Brassica napus mutant cde1 and its corresponding wild-type using the iTRAQ approach (Pu Chu et al., 2014 [1]. The distribution of length and number of peptides, mass and sequence coverage of proteins identified was calculated, and the repeatability of the replicates was analyzed. A total of 443 differentially expressed proteins were identified in B. napus leaves, including 228 down-accumulated proteins mainly involved in photosynthesis, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, carbon fixation and 215 up-accumulated proteins that enriched in the spliceosome, mRNA surveillance and RNA degradation.

  19. RegStatGel: proteomic software for identifying differentially expressed proteins based on 2D gel images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Image analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is a key step in proteomic workflow for identifying proteins that change under different experimental conditions. Since there are usually large amount of proteins and variations shown in the gel images, the use of software for analysis of 2D gel images is inevitable. We developed open-source software with graphical user interface for differential analysis of 2D gel images. The user-friendly software, RegStatGel, contains fully automated as well as interactive procedures. It was developed and has been tested under Matlab 7.01. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.mediafire.com/FengLi/2DGelsoftware PMID:21904427

  20. Seed proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeds comprise a protective covering, a small embryonic plant, and a nutrient-storage organ. Seeds are protein-rich, and have been the subject of many mass spectrometry-based analyses. Seed storage proteins (SSP), which are transient depots for reduced nitrogen, have been studied for decades by cel...

  1. Information Technology & Goals of Standards-Based Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas A. Archbald

    2001-01-01

    This article examines goals of standards-based reform in education and ways in which developments in information technology have facilitated those goals. Since standards-based reform is a rather general concept, I begin by developing a more specific formulation which I refer to as the “standards-based instruction and assessment” model. Developments in information technology over the last fifteen years have contributed in important ways to the goals of standards-based reform at the policy leve...

  2. Comparison of a Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Method Based on Peptide Ion Current Area to the Isotope Coded Affinity Tag Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ah Goo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several research groups have published methods for the determination of proteomic expression profiling by mass spectrometry without the use of exogenously added stable isotopes or stable isotope dilution theory. These so-called label-free, methods have the advantage of allowing data on each sample to be acquired independently from all other samples to which they can later be compared in silico for the purpose of measuring changes in protein expression between various biological states. We developed label free software based on direct measurement of peptide ion current area (PICA and compared it to two other methods, a simpler label free method known as spectral counting and the isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT method. Data analysis by these methods of a standard mixture containing proteins of known, but varying, concentrations showed that they performed similarly with a mean squared error of 0.09. Additionally, complex bacterial protein mixtures spiked with known concentrations of standard proteins were analyzed using the PICA label-free method. These results indicated that the PICA method detected all levels of standard spiked proteins at the 90% confidence level in this complex biological sample. This finding confirms that label-free methods, based on direct measurement of the area under a single ion current trace, performed as well as the standard ICAT method. Given the fact that the label-free methods provide ease in experimental design well beyond pair-wise comparison, label-free methods such as our PICA method are well suited for proteomic expression profiling of large numbers of samples as is needed in clinical analysis.

  3. Making proteomics data accessible and reusable: current state of proteomics databases and repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Alpi, Emanuele; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Compared to other data-intensive disciplines such as genomics, public deposition and storage of MS-based proteomics, data are still less developed due to, among other reasons, the inherent complexity of the data and the variety of data types and experimental workflows. In order to address this need, several public repositories for MS proteomics experiments have been developed, each with different purposes in mind. The most established resources are the Global Proteome Machine Database (GPMDB), PeptideAtlas, and the PRIDE database. Additionally, there are other useful (in many cases recently developed) resources such as ProteomicsDB, Mass Spectrometry Interactive Virtual Environment (MassIVE), Chorus, MaxQB, PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL), Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED), and the Human Proteinpedia. In addition, the ProteomeXchange consortium has been recently developed to enable better integration of public repositories and the coordinated sharing of proteomics information, maximizing its benefit to the scientific community. Here, we will review each of the major proteomics resources independently and some tools that enable the integration, mining and reuse of the data. We will also discuss some of the major challenges and current pitfalls in the integration and sharing of the data. PMID:25158685

  4. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite in Response to the Antifouling Compound Meleagrin

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Zhuang

    2013-05-03

    Marine biofouling refers to the unwanted accumulation of fouling organisms, such as barnacles, on artificial surfaces, resulting in severe consequences for marine industries. Meleagrin is a potential nontoxic antifoulant that is isolated from the fungus Penicillium sp.; however, its mechanistic effect mode of action on larval settlement remains unknown. Here, we applied iTRAQ coupled with 2D LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis to investigate the effect of meleagrin on the proteomic expression profile of cyprid development and aging in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. Fifty proteins were differentially expressed in response to treatment with meleagrin, among which 26 proteins were associated with cyprid development/aging and 24 were specifically associated with the meleagrin treatment. The 66 proteins that were associated with aging only remained unaltered during exposure to meleagrin. Using KEGG analysis, those proteins were assigned to several groups, including metabolic pathways, ECM-receptor interactions, and the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the 24 proteins that were not related to the development/aging process, expression of the cyprid major protein (CMP), a vitellogenin-like protein, increased after the meleagrin treatment, which suggested that meleagrin might affect the endocrine system and prevent the larval molting cycle. With the exception of the chitin binding protein that mediates the molting process and ATPase-mediated energy processes, the majority of proteins with significant effects in previous studies in response to cyprid treatment with butenolide and polyether B remained unchanged in the present study, suggesting that meleagrin may exhibit a different mechanism. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Biofuels as a sustainable energy source: an update of the applications of proteomics in bioenergy crops and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Johnson, T Sudhakar; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Baba, Masato; Sirisattha, Sophon; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-11-20

    Sustainable energy is the need of the 21st century, not because of the numerous environmental and political reasons but because it is necessary to human civilization's energy future. Sustainable energy is loosely grouped into renewable energy, energy conservation, and sustainable transport disciplines. In this review, we deal with the renewable energy aspect focusing on the biomass from bioenergy crops to microalgae to produce biofuels to the utilization of high-throughput omics technologies, in particular proteomics in advancing our understanding and increasing biofuel production. We look at biofuel production by plant- and algal-based sources, and the role proteomics has played therein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Plant Proteomics. PMID:23792822

  6. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human pancreatic juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias;

    2004-01-01

    chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 170 unique proteins were identified including known pancreatic cancer tumor markers (e.g., CEA, MUC1) and proteins overexpressed in pancreatic cancers (e.g., hepatocarcinoma-intestine-pancreas/pancreatitis-associated protein (HIP/PAP) and lipocalin 2......Proteomic technologies provide an excellent means for analysis of body fluids for cataloging protein constituents and identifying biomarkers for early detection of cancers. The biomarkers currently available for pancreatic cancer, such as CA19-9, lack adequate sensitivity and specificity...... in this study could be directly assessed for their potential as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer by quantitative proteomics methods or immunoassays....

  7. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  8. Current application of proteomics in biomarker discoveryfor inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the field of proteomics has rapidly expanded inits application towards clinical research with objectivesranging from elucidating disease pathogenesis todiscovering clinical biomarkers. As proteins governand/or reflect underlying cellular processes, the studyof proteomics provides an attractive avenue for researchas it allows for the rapid identification of proteinprofiles in a biological sample. Inflammatory boweldisease (IBD) encompasses several heterogeneousand chronic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.Proteomic technology provides a powerful means ofaddressing major challenges in IBD today, especiallyfor identifying biomarkers to improve its diagnosis andmanagement. This review will examine the current stateof IBD proteomics research and its use in biomarkerresearch. Furthermore, we also discuss the challengesof translating proteomic research into clinically relevanttools. The potential application of this growing field isenormous and is likely to provide significant insightstowards improving our future understanding and managementof IBD.

  9. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of the plant to avoid irreversible fouling...

  10. In-depth Proteomics Characterization of Embryogenesis of the Honey Bee Worker (Apis mellifera ligustica) *

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Han, Bin; Lu, Xiaoshan; Ramadan, Haitham; Li, Jianke

    2014-01-01

    Identifying proteome changes of honey bee embryogenesis is of prime importance for unraveling the molecular mechanisms that they underlie. However, many proteomic changes during the embryonic period are not well characterized. We analyzed the proteomic alterations over the complete time course of honey bee worker embryogenesis at 24, 48, and 72 h of age, using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, label-free quantitation, and bioinformatics. Of the 1460 proteins identified the embryo of all thr...

  11. Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter description report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formal methodology has been developed for identifying technology gaps and assessing innovative or postulated technologies for inclusion in proposed Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) remediation systems. Called the Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter, the methodology provides a formalized selection process where technologies and systems are rated and assessments made based on performance measures, and regulatory and technical requirements. The results are auditable, and can be validated with field data. This analysis methodology will be applied to the remedial action of transuranic contaminated waste pits and trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  12. Optimized Protocol for Quantitative Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Based Proteomic Analysis of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Schoenherr, Regine M; Yan, Ping; Allison, Kimberly; Shipley, Melissa; Lerch, Melissa; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Baird, Geoffrey Stuart; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-08-01

    Despite a clinical, economic, and regulatory imperative to develop companion diagnostics, precious few new biomarkers have been successfully translated into clinical use, due in part to inadequate protein assay technologies to support large-scale testing of hundreds of candidate biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Although the feasibility of using targeted, multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) for quantitative analyses of FFPE tissues has been demonstrated, protocols have not been systematically optimized for robust quantification across a large number of analytes, nor has the performance of peptide immuno-MRM been evaluated. To address this gap, we used a test battery approach coupled to MRM-MS with the addition of stable isotope-labeled standard peptides (targeting 512 analytes) to quantitatively evaluate the performance of three extraction protocols in combination with three trypsin digestion protocols (i.e., nine processes). A process based on RapiGest buffer extraction and urea-based digestion was identified to enable similar quantitation results from FFPE and frozen tissues. Using the optimized protocols for MRM-based analysis of FFPE tissues, median precision was 11.4% (across 249 analytes). There was excellent correlation between measurements made on matched FFPE and frozen tissues, both for direct MRM analysis (R(2) = 0.94) and immuno-MRM (R(2) = 0.89). The optimized process enables highly reproducible, multiplex, standardizable, quantitative MRM in archival tissue specimens. PMID:27462933

  13. Database independent proteomics analysis of the ostrich and human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altelaar, A F Maarten; Navarro, Danny; Boekhorst, Jos; van Breukelen, Bas; Snel, Berend; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-01-10

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis relies heavily on the presence of complete protein databases. Such a strategy is extremely powerful, albeit not adequate in the analysis of unpredicted postgenome events, such as posttranslational modifications, which exponentially increase the search space. Therefore, it is of interest to explore "database-free" approaches. Here, we sampled the ostrich and human proteomes with a method facilitating de novo sequencing, utilizing the protease Lys-N in combination with electron transfer dissociation. By implementing several validation steps, including the combined use of collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation data and a cross-validation with conventional database search strategies, we identified approximately 2,500 unique de novo peptide sequences from the ostrich sample with over 900 peptides generating full backbone sequence coverage. This dataset allowed the appropriate positioning of ostrich in the evolutionary tree. The described database-free sequencing approach is generically applicable and has great potential in important proteomics applications such as in the analysis of variable parts of endogenous antibodies or proteins modified by a plethora of complex posttranslational modifications. PMID:22198768

  14. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals apolipoprotein A-I and transferrin as potential serum markers in CA19-9 negative pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Wu, Wen-Chuan; Zhao, Guo-Chao; Wang, Dan-Song; Lou, Wen-Hui; Jin, Da-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) relies on CA19-9 and radiological means, whereas some patients do not have elevated levels of CA19-9 secondary to pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify potential serum biomarkers for CA19-9 negative PDAC. A total of 114 serum samples were collected from 3 groups: CA19-9 negative PDAC patients (n = 34), CA19-9 positive PDAC patients (n = 44), and healthy volunteers (n = 36), whereas the first 12 samples from each group were used for isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis. Thereafter, candidate biomarkers were selected for validation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the rest specimens. Using the iTRAQ approach, a total of 5 proteins were identified as significantly different between CA19-9 negative PDAC patients and healthy subjects according to our defined criteria. Apolipoprotein A-I (APOA-I) and transferrin (TF) were selected to validate the proteomic results by ELISA in a further 78 serum specimens. It revealed that TF significantly correlated with the degree of histological differentiation (P = 0.042), and univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that TF is an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.302; 95% confidence interval, 0.118–0.774; P = 0.013) of patients with PDAC after curative surgery. ITRAQ-based quantitative proteomics revealed that APOA-I and TF may be potential CA19-9 negative PDAC serum markers. PMID:27495108

  15. Pan-proteomics, a concept for unifying quantitative proteome measurements when comparing closely-related bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, James A; Broszczak, Daniel A; Tennakoon, Imalka U K; Huygens, Flavia

    2016-04-01

    The comparison of proteomes between genetically heterogeneous bacterial strains may offer valuable insights into physiological diversity and function, particularly where such variation aids in the survival and virulence of clinically-relevant strains. However, reports of such comparisons frequently fail to account for underlying genetic variance. As a consequence, the current knowledge regarding bacterial physiological diversity at the protein level may be incomplete or inaccurate. To address this, greater consideration must be given to the impact of genetic heterogeneity on proteome comparisons. This may be possible through the use of pan-proteomics, an analytical concept that permits the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the proteomes of genetically heterogeneous organisms. Limited examples of this emerging technology highlight currently unmet analytical challenges. In this article we define pan-proteomics, where its value lies in microbiology, and discuss the technical considerations critical to its successful execution and potential future application. PMID:26889693

  16. In-depth analysis of the chicken egg white proteome using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hen's egg white has been the subject of intensive chemical, biochemical and food technological research for many decades, because of its importance in human nutrition, its importance as a source of easily accessible model proteins, and its potential use in biotechnological processes. Recently the arsenal of tools used to study the protein components of egg white has been complemented by mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies. Application of these fast and sensitive methods has already enabled the identification of a large number of new egg white proteins. Recent technological advances may be expected to further expand the egg white protein inventory. Results Using a dual pressure linear ion trap Orbitrap instrument, the LTQ Orbitrap Velos, in conjunction with data analysis in the MaxQuant software package, we identified 158 proteins in chicken egg white with two or more sequence unique peptides. This group of proteins identified with very high confidence included 79 proteins identified in egg white for the first time. In addition, 44 proteins were identified tentatively. Conclusions Our results, apart from identifying many new egg white components, indicate that current mass spectrometry technology is sufficiently advanced to permit direct identification of minor components of proteomes dominated by a few major proteins without resorting to indirect techniques, such as chromatographic depletion or peptide library binding, which change the composition of the proteome.

  17. Building information modeling based on intelligent parametric technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xudong; TAN Jie

    2007-01-01

    In order to push the information organization process of the building industry,promote sustainable architectural design and enhance the competitiveness of China's building industry,the author studies building information modeling (BIM) based on intelligent parametric modeling technology.Building information modeling is a new technology in the field of computer aided architectural design,which contains not only geometric data,but also the great amount of engineering data throughout the lifecycle of a building.The author also compares BIM technology with two-dimensional CAD technology,and demonstrates the advantages and characteristics of intelligent parametric modeling technology.Building information modeling,which is based on intelligent parametric modeling technology,will certainly replace traditional computer aided architectural design and become the new driving force to push forward China's building industry in this information age.

  18. Teaching Information Systems Technologies: a New Approach based on Virtualization and Hosting Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carmelo R.; Alexis Quesada-Arencibia; Santiago Candela; Eduardo Carrasco; Armide González

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how to provide suitable computing systems for information systems technologies learning using virtualization and hosting technologies. The main functionalities and components of an university learning lab based on these technologies are presented. All the software components used in its development are open source. Also, the use of this lab, providing the computing systems required for the learning activities of different matters related to the information systems technol...

  19. Design of distance teaching platform based on Agent technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoming; SUN Hongmin; WU Wansheng

    2007-01-01

    The computer network technology and multi-media technology offer a new teaching mode for the distance education. Now there are still many problems in modern distance education such as weak generality, flexibility and intelligence, etc. This paper brought up a design mode of distance teaching platform based on Agent mechanism and the concrete implementation method through analyzing the characteristic and structure of Agent technology.

  20. Reflection Of Student Teacher On Technology Based Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Patil

    2013-01-01

    Practice teaching is core training programme in B Ed practicum component which is to build teaching competencies in student teachers. Quality education depends upon quality teaching. Practice teaching is integration of many skillsTechnology based teaching is an instructional strategy which involves use of technological means in teaching. In the age of knowledge explosion the use of technology in teaching learning process is inevitable. . The researcher has made attempt to find out the problem...

  1. Research Technology (ASTP) Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's concept of the Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) launch. The RBCC's overall objective is to provide a technology test bed to investigate critical technologies associated with opperational usage of these engines. The program will focus on near term technologies that can be leveraged to ultimately serve as the near term basis for Two Stage to Orbit (TSTO) air breathing propulsions systems and ultimately a Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) air breathing propulsion system.

  2. The potential disruptive impact of Internet2 based technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pascu, C.; Osimo, D.; Ulbrich, M.; Turlea, G.; Burgelman, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the development of emerging computing applications that fall under the family of digital applications and technologies. These applications and technologies — Internet 2 based technologies for short — enable new ways of connectivity for networking, interfacing and producing content. They have the capacity and the force to disrupt existing social and economic relations and thus have major impacts on society. Hence, the term ‘e-ruptions’: emerging e-trends with potential disr...

  3. Image Restoration Technology Based on Discrete Neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Duoying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, the development of artificial intelligence advances rapidly in the field of image restoration. Based on the MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a kind of image restoration technology of artificial intelligence based on the discrete neural network and feedforward network, and carries out simulation and contrast of the restoration process by the use of the bionic algorithm. Through the application of simulation restoration technology, this paper verifies that the discrete neural network has a good convergence and identification capability in the image restoration technology with a better effect than that of the feedforward network. The restoration technology based on the discrete neural network can provide a reliable mathematical model for this field.

  4. Web-Based Information Extraction Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Information extraction techniques on the Web are the current research hotspot. Now many information extraction techniques based on different principles have appeared and have different capabilities. We classify the existing information extraction techniques by the principle of information extraction and analyze the methods and principles of semantic information adding, schema defining,rule expression, semantic items locating and object locating in the approaches. Based on the above survey and analysis,several open problems are discussed.

  5. Iris Identification Technology Based on Multiwavelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lian-xin; Ma Fu-ming; Xu Tao; Li Zhi-hui; Wu Deng-feng

    2005-01-01

    A new method for iris identification based on multiwavelets is proposed. By means of the properties of multiwavelets,such as orthogonality, symmetry, vanishing moments and approximation order, the iris texture can be simply presented. A brief overview of muhiwavelets is presented at first. Iris identification system and iris texture feature presentation and recognition based on multiwavelets are introduced subsequently. And the experiment indicates the validity of this method finally.

  6. Technology-based interventions in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J M

    2014-12-01

    There are several converging forces that create a particularly opportune time for technological solutions to enhance cost efficiency in healthcare. Health care costs are unsustainable, yet many patients do not have adequate access to state-of-the-art treatments or to ongoing disease management. Consumerism is an increasingly powerful force in healthcare and the emphasis on personalised medicine will help to define future research and clinical treatment strategies. At the same time, the phenomenal advances in internet utilisation and mobile device applications provide possibilities that have never before existed. We have reason to be very optimistic about these opportunities, but appropriate research will be required to develop scalable and sustainable methods as well as determine expected outcomes. PMID:25154596

  7. Genomics, proteomics and metabonomics in toxicology: hopefully not 'fashionomics'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pognan, Francois

    2004-10-01

    Genomics, proteomics and metabonomics are applied to toxicology either as stand-alone technologies or in combination, with the intention of providing a more efficient assessment of the potential side effects of new chemical entities. Two different approaches are taken: a predictive/proactive strategy based on a statistical analogy of 'signatures' of drugs to many known toxicant gene or metabolite fingerprints; and a mechanistic/reactive strategy based on the in-depth biological analysis of the gene, protein or metabolite profiles induced by one or a few compounds of interest. This article focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies, as well as the many hurdles associated with both these approaches in toxicology that have to be considered before applying them to the assessment of future drugs. PMID:15469409

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  9. CNPC Bases Its International Competitiveness on Technological Creation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Based on development of five decades, China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) has developed its own petroleum scientific theories and advanced applicable petroleum technologies to back China's oil industrial development. Meanwhile, CNPC depends on those theories and technologies to raise its international competitiveness, accelerating implementation of the multi-national operation strategy.

  10. STEM-Based Computational Modeling for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2008-01-01

    According to professionals in education, change is an ever-present and evolving process. With transformation in education at both state and national levels, technology education must determine a position in this climate of change. This paper reflects the views on the future of technology education based on an ongoing research project. The purpose…

  11. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  12. Proteomics-based Identification of Proteins with Altered Expression Induced by 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma CNE2 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Zhou JIANG; Ming GAN; Hua HUANG; Xin-Ming SHEN; Shuang WANG; Kai-Tai YAO

    2005-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignancy with high incidence in Southern China and South-East Asia. Etiology studies indicate that chemical carcinogen promoters, such as 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), are important factors causing NPC development. However, the mechanism of the TPA effect on NPC remains unclear. In the present study, cells from a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma NPC cell line, CNE2, were stimulated by TPA and proteomics technology was carried out to find protein discrepancies between control and TPA-treated cells. Results revealed that TPA treatment in CNE2 cells could upregulate the expression of "triosephosphate isomerase" and "14-3-3 protein sigma" and downregulate the expression of "reticulocalbin 1 precursor", "nucleophosmin", "mitochondrial matrix protein pl precursor", and "stathmin". The changes in the expression of these genes suggested that TPA induced CNE2 cells to antiproliferation and to apoptosis, which was confirmed by subsequent apoptosis detection. Therefore, the effects of TPA on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were distinct from the effects on primary epithelial cells and we suggest reasons for these differences.

  13. Physiological and iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analyses Reveal the Function of Spermidine on Improving Drought Tolerance in White Clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhou; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Xinquan; Peng, Yan; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Linkai; Yan, Yanhong

    2016-05-01

    Endogenous spermidine interacting with phytohormones may be involved in the regulation of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) associated with drought tolerance in white clover. Plants treated with or without spermidine (50 μM) were subjected to 20% PEG 6000 nutrient solution to induce drought stress (50% leaf-relative water content). The results showed that increased endogenous spermidine induced by exogenous spermidine altered endogenous phytohormones in association with improved drought tolerance, as demonstrated by the delay in water-deficit development, improved photosynthesis and water use efficiency, and lower oxidative damage. As compared to untreated plants, Spd-treated plants maintained a higher abundance of DEPs under drought stress involved in (1) protein biosynthesis (ribosomal and chaperone proteins); (2) amino acids synthesis; (3) the carbon and energy metabolism; (4) antioxidant and stress defense (ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, and dehydrins); and (5) GA and ABA signaling pathways (gibberellin receptor GID1, ABA-responsive protein 17, and ABA stress ripening protein). Thus, the findings of proteome could explain the Spd-induced physiological effects associated with drought tolerance. The analysis of functional protein-protein networks further proved that the alteration of endogenous spermidine and phytohormones induced the interaction among ribosome, photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis. These differences could contribute to improved drought tolerance. PMID:27030016

  14. 2D-gel based proteomics unravels neurogenesis and energetic metabolism dysfunction of the olfactory bulb in CUMS rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Li, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Rao, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuxiao; Wang, Wei; Guo, Hua; Fang, Liang; Zhu, Dan; Han, Yu; Xie, Peng

    2016-10-15

    Major depression is a devastating psychiatric disease worldwide currently. A reduced olfactory sensitivity in MDD patients was well evidenced. We previously interrogated the mechanism of decreasing hippocampus neurogenesis in CUMS rat model of depression. The Olfactory Bulb (OB) is crucial part of the olfactory system which functions in post-developmental neurogenesis. However, the mechanism of the dysfunction of OB induced by CUMS is still largely unknown. Herein, by using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rat model of depression, differential protein expression between the OB proteomes of CUMS and control group was interrogated through two-dimensional electrophoresis coupling with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty nine differential protein expression was analyzed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway over-representation and Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA). Seven identified differential proteins were selected for Western blotting validation. This study provides insight that neurogenesis and Energy metabolism disorder is involved in OB dysfunction induced by CUMS. PMID:27340088

  15. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  16. Proteomics in Traditional Chinese Medicine with an Emphasis on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanuar Alan Sulistio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing worldwide interest in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. This increasing demand for TCM needs to be accompanied by a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of action of TCM-based therapy. However, TCM is often described as a concept of Chinese philosophy, which is incomprehensible for Western medical society, thereby creating a gap between TCM and Western medicine (WM. In order to meet this challenge, TCM research has applied proteomics technologies for exploring the mechanisms of action of TCM treatment. Proteomics enables TCM researchers to oversee various pathways that are affected by treatment, as well as the dynamics of their interactions with one another. This review discusses the utility of comparative proteomics to better understand how TCM treatment may be used as a complementary therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Additionally, we review the data from comparative AD-related TCM proteomics studies and establish the relevance of the data with available AD hypotheses, most notably regarding the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS.

  17. A systematic approach to modeling, capturing, and disseminating proteomics experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Chris F; Paton, Norman W; Garwood, Kevin L; Kirby, Paul D; Stead, David A; Yin, Zhikang; Deutsch, Eric W; Selway, Laura; Walker, Janet; Riba-Garcia, Isabel; Mohammed, Shabaz; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie A; Dunkley, Tom; Aebersold, Ruedi; Kell, Douglas B; Lilley, Kathryn S; Roepstorff, Peter; Yates, John R; Brass, Andy; Brown, Alistair J P; Cash, Phil; Gaskell, Simon J; Hubbard, Simon J; Oliver, Stephen G

    2003-03-01

    Both the generation and the analysis of proteome data are becoming increasingly widespread, and the field of proteomics is moving incrementally toward high-throughput approaches. Techniques are also increasing in complexity as the relevant technologies evolve. A standard representation of both the methods used and the data generated in proteomics experiments, analogous to that of the MIAME (minimum information about a microarray experiment) guidelines for transcriptomics, and the associated MAGE (microarray gene expression) object model and XML (extensible markup language) implementation, has yet to emerge. This hinders the handling, exchange, and dissemination of proteomics data. Here, we present a UML (unified modeling language) approach to proteomics experimental data, describe XML and SQL (structured query language) implementations of that model, and discuss capture, storage, and dissemination strategies. These make explicit what data might be most usefully captured about proteomics experiments and provide complementary routes toward the implementation of a proteome repository. PMID:12610571

  18. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of «Omics» sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research. PMID:25583331

  19. The Redox Proteome*

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation,...

  20. Representative proteomes: a stable, scalable and unbiased proteome set for sequence analysis and functional annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuming Chen

    Full Text Available The accelerating growth in the number of protein sequences taxes both the computational and manual resources needed to analyze them. One approach to dealing with this problem is to minimize the number of proteins subjected to such analysis in a way that minimizes loss of information. To this end we have developed a set of Representative Proteomes (RPs, each selected from a Representative Proteome Group (RPG containing similar proteomes calculated based on co-membership in UniRef50 clusters. A Representative Proteome is the proteome that can best represent all the proteomes in its group in terms of the majority of the sequence space and information. RPs at 75%, 55%, 35% and 15% co-membership threshold (CMT are provided to allow users to decrease or increase the granularity of the sequence space based on their requirements. We find that a CMT of 55% (RP55 most closely follows standard taxonomic classifications. Further analysis of this set reveals that sequence space is reduced by more than 80% relative to UniProtKB, while retaining both sequence diversity (over 95% of InterPro domains and annotation information (93% of experimentally characterized proteins. All sets can be browsed and are available for sequence similarity searches and download at http://www.proteininformationresource.org/rps, while the set of 637 RPs determined using a 55% CMT are also available for text searches. Potential applications include sequence similarity searches, protein classification and targeted protein annotation and characterization.

  1. Representative proteomes: a stable, scalable and unbiased proteome set for sequence analysis and functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuming; Natale, Darren A; Finn, Robert D; Huang, Hongzhan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Cathy H; Mazumder, Raja

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating growth in the number of protein sequences taxes both the computational and manual resources needed to analyze them. One approach to dealing with this problem is to minimize the number of proteins subjected to such analysis in a way that minimizes loss of information. To this end we have developed a set of Representative Proteomes (RPs), each selected from a Representative Proteome Group (RPG) containing similar proteomes calculated based on co-membership in UniRef50 clusters. A Representative Proteome is the proteome that can best represent all the proteomes in its group in terms of the majority of the sequence space and information. RPs at 75%, 55%, 35% and 15% co-membership threshold (CMT) are provided to allow users to decrease or increase the granularity of the sequence space based on their requirements. We find that a CMT of 55% (RP55) most closely follows standard taxonomic classifications. Further analysis of this set reveals that sequence space is reduced by more than 80% relative to UniProtKB, while retaining both sequence diversity (over 95% of InterPro domains) and annotation information (93% of experimentally characterized proteins). All sets can be browsed and are available for sequence similarity searches and download at http://www.proteininformationresource.org/rps, while the set of 637 RPs determined using a 55% CMT are also available for text searches. Potential applications include sequence similarity searches, protein classification and targeted protein annotation and characterization. PMID:21556138

  2. Interferometer -based Technology for Optical Nanoscale Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabko M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the interferometer-based approach for nanoscale grating Critical Dimension (CD measurements and prove the possibility to achieve no worse than 10 nm accuracy of measurements for 100 nm pitch gratings. The approach is based on phase shift measurement of light fields specularly reflected from periodical pattern and adjacent substrate with subsequent comparison between experimental and simulation results. RCWA algorithm is used to fit the measured results and extract the CD value. It is shown that accuracy of CD value measurement depends rather on the grating’s CD/pitch ratio than its CD value

  3. Proteomics study revealed altered proteome of Dichogaster curgensis upon exposure to fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markad, Vijaykumar L; Adav, Sunil S; Ghole, Vikram S; Sze, Siu Kwan; Kodam, Kisan M

    2016-10-01

    Fly ash is toxic and its escalating use as a soil amendment and disposal by dumping into environment is receiving alarming attention due to its impact on environment. Proteomics technology is being used for environmental studies since proteins respond rapidly when an organism is exposed to a toxicant, and hence soil engineers such as earthworms are used as model organisms to assess the toxic effects of soil toxicants. This study adopted proteomics technology and profiled proteome of earthworm Dichogaster curgensis that was exposed to fly ash, with main aim to elucidate fly ash effects on cellular and metabolic pathways. The functional classification of identified proteins revealed carbohydrate metabolism (14.36%), genetic information processing (15.02%), folding, sorting and degradation (10.83%), replication and repair (3.95%); environmental information processing (2.19%), signal transduction (9.61%), transport and catabolism (17.27%), energy metabolism (6.69%), etc. in the proteome. Proteomics data and functional assays revealed that the exposure of earthworm to fly ash induced protein synthesis, up-regulation of gluconeogenesis, disturbed energy metabolism, oxidative and cellular stress, and mis-folding of proteins. The regulation of ubiquitination, proteasome and modified alkaline comet assay in earthworm coelomocytes suggested DNA-protein cross link affecting chromatin remodeling and protein folding. PMID:27371791

  4. Teaching Information Systems Technologies: a New Approach based on Virtualization and Hosting Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo R. García

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how to provide suitable computing systems for information systems technologies learning using virtualization and hosting technologies. The main functionalities and components of an university learning lab based on these technologies are presented. All the software components used in its development are open source. Also, the use of this lab, providing the computing systems required for the learning activities of different matters related to the information systems technologies, is illustrated. The model of computing lab proposed is a more sustainable and scalable alternative than the traditional academic computing lab.

  5. SIRE-technology-based biosensors: will they do the job?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Dario

    1997-06-01

    A new biosensor technology (SIRE--sensors based on injectable recognition elements) is described. Its application in laboratory equipment, medical survey equipment and process monitoring is reviewed. Furthermore, the promising practical and commercial relevance of SIRE- Biosensors is discussed.

  6. Technology and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Lorna; Beaumont, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been the focus of many developments in teaching and learning facilitation in recent years. It has been claimed that PBL produces independent learners who are motivated, engaged in deep learning, work as a team, and develop effective strategies, skills and knowledge for life-long learning and professional work.…

  7. An Agent Based Simulation Of Smart Metering Technology Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang,Tao; Nuttall, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Based on the classic behavioural theory ?the Theory of Planned Behaviour?, we develop an agent-based model to simulate the diffusion of smart metering technology in the electricity market. We simulate the emergent adoption of smart metering technology under different management strategies and economic regulations. Our research results show that in terms of boosting the take-off of smart meters in the electricity market, choosing the initial users on a random and geographically dispersed basis...

  8. Mobil/Badger to market zeolite-based cumene technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger (Cambridge, MA) and Mobil (Fairfax, VA) are ready to jointly license a new cumene technology that they say achieves higher yields and product purity than existing processes. The zeolite-based technology is scheduled to be introduced at next month's DeWitt Petrochemical Review in Houston. The Mobil/Badger technology aims to challenge the dominant position of UOP's (Des Plaines, IL) solid phosphoric acid (SPA) catalyst process - which accounts for 80%-90% of the world's cumene production. In addition, Monsanto/Kellogg's aluminum chloride-based technology has gained significant momentum since its introduction in the 1980s. And late last year, ABB Lummus Crest (Bloomfield, NJ) also began marketing a zeolite-based cumene technology. While all the technologies make cumene via the alkylation of benzene with propylene, the Mobil/Badger process uses a zeolite-containing catalyst designed by Mobil to selectively catalyze the benzene/propylene reaction, avoiding unwanted propylene oligomerization. Because the olefin reactions are so fast, says Frank A. Demers, Badger's v.p./technology development and marketing, other zeolite technologies are forced to use complex reactor arrangements to stop the propylene-propylene reactions. However, he says, 'Mobil has designed a catalyst that wants to react benzene with propylene to make cumene.'

  9. Cantilever-Based Biosensors in CMOS Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kirstein, K -U; Zimmermann, M; Vancura, C; Volden, T; Song, W H; Lichtenberg, J; Hierlemannn, A

    2011-01-01

    Single-chip CMOS-based biosensors that feature microcantilevers as transducer elements are presented. The cantilevers are functionalized for the capturing of specific analytes, e.g., proteins or DNA. The binding of the analyte changes the mechanical properties of the cantilevers such as surface stress and resonant frequency, which can be detected by an integrated Wheatstone bridge. The monolithic integrated readout allows for a high signal-to-noise ratio, lowers the sensitivity to external interference and enables autonomous device operation.

  10. Novel Fiber-Based Adsorbent Technology; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall of this Department of Energy (DOE) Phase II SBIR program was to develop a new class of highly robust fiber-based adsorbents for recovery of heavy metals from aqueous waste-streams. The fiber-based adsorbents,when commercialized,will be used for clean up metals in aqueous waste-streams emanating from DOE facilities,industry,mining,and groundwater-cleanup operations.The amount of toxic waste released by these streams is of great significance.The U.S.Environment Protection Agency (EPA) reports that in 1990 alone,4.8 billion pounds of toxic chemicals were released into the environment.Of this waste,the metals-containing waste was the second largest contributor,representing 569 million pounds. This report presents the results of the Phase II program,which successfully synthesized noval fiber-based adsorbents for the removal of Group 12 metals(i.e.mercury),Group 14 metals (lead),and Group 10 metals(platinum and palladium) from contaminated groundwater and industrial waste streams.These fiber-based adsorbents are ideally suited for the recovery of metal ions from aqueous waste streams presently not treatable due to the degrading nature of corrosive chemicals or radioactive components in the feed stream. The adsorbents developed in this program rely on chemically resistant and robust carbon fibers and fabrics as supports for metal-ion selective ligands.These adsorbents demonstrate loading capacities and selectivities for metal ions exceeding those of conventional ion-exchange resins.The adsorbents were also used to construct filter modules that demonstrate minimal fouling,minimal compaction,chemical and physical robustness,and regeneration of metal loading capacity without loss of performance

  11. Application of Proteomics in the Study of Tumor Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Cai; Jen-Fu Chiu; Qing-Yu He

    2004-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is the dominant cause of death in cancer patients. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tumor metastasis are still elusive.The identification of protein molecules with their expressions correlated to the metastatic process would help to understand the metastatic mechanisms and thus facilitate the development of strategies for the therapeutic interventions and clinical management of cancer. Proteomics is a systematic research approach aiming to provide the global characterization of protein expression and function under given conditions. Proteomic technology has been widely used in biomarker discovery and pathogenetic studies including tumor metastasis. This article provides a brief review of the application of proteomics in identifying molecular factors in tumor metastasis process. The combination of proteomics with other experimental approaches in biochemistry, cell biology, molecular genetics and chemistry, together with the development of new technologies and improvements in existing method ologies will continue to extend its application in studying cancer metastasis.

  12. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  13. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  14. Ocular Proteomics with Emphasis on Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoré Bent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intention of this review is to provide an overview of current methodologies employed in the rapidly developing field of ocular proteomics with emphasis on sample preparation, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry (MS. Appropriate sample preparation for the diverse range of cells and tissues of the eye is essential to ensure reliable results. Current methods of protein staining for 2D-PAGE, protein labelling for two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, gel-based expression analysis and protein identification by MS are summarised. The uses of gel-free MS-based strategies (MuDPIT, iTRAQ, ICAT and SILAC are also discussed. Proteomic technologies promise to shed new light onto ocular disease processes that could lead to the discovery of strong novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets useful in many ophthalmic conditions.

  15. Ocular Proteomics with Emphasis on Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Nakul

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The intention of this review is to provide an overview of current methodologies employed in the rapidly developing field of ocular proteomics with emphasis on sample preparation, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry (MS. Appropriate sample preparation for the diverse range of cells and tissues of the eye is essential to ensure reliable results. Current methods of protein staining for 2D-PAGE, protein labelling for two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, gel-based expression analysis and protein identification by MS are summarised. The uses of gel-free MS-based strategies (MuDPIT, iTRAQ, ICAT and SILAC are also discussed. Proteomic technologies promise to shed new light onto ocular disease processes that could lead to the discovery of strong novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets useful in many ophthalmic conditions.

  16. Proteomics-based Identification of Proapoptotic Caspase Adapter Protein 
as A Novel Serum Marker of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Heng; Chen, Shengxi; Huang, Lingjin

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Early diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer contribute to a patient’s prolonged survival. Proteomics and tissue culture were used to screen potential serum markers of lung cancer. Methods The differential proteomic technique and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to identify overexpressed proteins from cultured tumor tissues in a conditioned medium. Paired lung tissues in a conditioned medium were used as the contro...

  17. Robust Analysis of the Yeast Proteome under 50 kDa by Molecular-Mass-Based Fractionation and Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kellie, John F.; Catherman, Adam D.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Tran, John C.; Tipton, Jeremiah D.; Norris, Jeremy L.; Witkowski, Charles E.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2011-01-01

    As the process of top-down mass spectrometry continues to mature, we benchmark the next installment of an improving methodology that incorporates a Tube-Gel Electrophoresis (TGE) device to separate intact proteins by molecular weight. Top-down proteomics is accomplished in a robust fashion to yield the identification of hundreds of unique proteins, many of which correspond to multiple protein forms. The TGE platform separates 0–50 kDa proteins extracted from the yeast proteome into 12 fractio...

  18. Development of electromagnetic induction diagnostics technology for condition based maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ROKKASHO Reprocessing Plant (below, called 'RRP'), we have applied Condition Based Maintenance to rotating equipment with vibration diagnostics technology. However, a few rotating equipment are difficult to diagnose definitely, because have structural problems which exercise vibrational noise to peripheral and be impossible to install vibratory sensor. Electromagnetic induction diagnostics technology which measure magnetic fields to eddy current which is induced to rotary through static magnetic field, diagnose deterioration behavior such as abrasion and crack. As a result, it has possibilities to clear above problems. Therefore, we started our basic researches with this technology for Condition Based Maintenance. In this paper, it introduces basic data about 'Non-seal pump' that have installed in RRP. As a result, this technology is a possibility that be able to detect Condition Based Maintenance. (author)

  19. Role of the proteome in phytohormonal signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Martin; Novák, Jan; Habánová, Hana; Cerna, Hana; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2016-08-01

    Phytohormones are orchestrators of plant growth and development. A lot of time and effort has been invested in attempting to comprehend their complex signaling pathways but despite success in elucidating some key components, molecular mechanisms in the transduction pathways are far from being resolved. The last decade has seen a boom in the analysis of phytohormone-responsive proteins. Abscisic acid, auxin, brassinosteroids, cytokinin, ethylene, gibberellins, nitric oxide, oxylipins, strigolactones, salicylic acid - all have been analyzed to various degrees. For this review, we collected data from proteome-wide analyses resulting in a list of over 2000 annotated proteins from Arabidopsis proteomics and nearly 500 manually filtered protein families merged from all the data available from different species. We present the currently accepted model of phytohormone signaling, highlight the contributions made by proteomic-based research and describe the key nodes in phytohormone signaling networks, as revealed by proteome analysis. These include ubiquitination and proteasome mediated degradation, calcium ion signaling, redox homeostasis, and phosphoproteome dynamics. Finally, we discuss potential pitfalls and future perspectives in the field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics - a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26721743

  20. Structural Proteomics of Herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Baptiste; Gillet, Laurent; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are highly prevalent viruses associated with numerous pathologies both in animal and human populations. Until now, most of the strategies used to prevent or to cure these infections have been unsuccessful because these viruses have developed numerous immune evasion mechanisms. Therefore, a better understanding of their complex lifecycle is needed. In particular, while the genome of numerous herpesviruses has been sequenced, the exact composition of virions remains unknown for most of them. Mass spectrometry has recently emerged as a central method and has permitted fundamental discoveries in virology. Here, we review mass spectrometry-based approaches that have recently allowed a better understanding of the composition of the herpesvirus virion. In particular, we describe strategies commonly used for proper sample preparation and fractionation to allow protein localization inside the particle but also to avoid contamination by nonstructural proteins. A collection of other important data regarding post-translational modifications or the relative abundance of structural proteins is also described. This review also discusses the poorly studied importance of host proteins in herpesvirus structural proteins and the necessity to develop a quantitative workflow to better understand the dynamics of the structural proteome. In the future, we hope that this collaborative effort will assist in the development of new strategies to fight these infections. PMID:26907323