WorldWideScience

Sample records for based plant metabolomics

  1. Mass spectrometry-based plant metabolomics: Metabolite responses to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Tiago F; Rodrigues, João A; Caldana, Camila; Schmidt, Romy; van Dongen, Joost T; Thomas-Oates, Jane; António, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Metabolomics is one omics approach that can be used to acquire comprehensive information on the composition of a metabolite pool to provide a functional screen of the cellular state. Studies of the plant metabolome include analysis of a wide range of chemical species with diverse physical properties, from ionic inorganic compounds to biochemically derived hydrophilic carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, and a range of hydrophobic lipid-related compounds. This complexitiy brings huge challenges to the analytical technologies employed in current plant metabolomics programs, and powerful analytical tools are required for the separation and characterization of this extremely high compound diversity present in biological sample matrices. The use of mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical platforms to profile stress-responsive metabolites that allow some plants to adapt to adverse environmental conditions is fundamental in current plant biotechnology research programs for the understanding and development of stress-tolerant plants. In this review, we describe recent applications of metabolomics and emphasize its increasing application to study plant responses to environmental (stress-) factors, including drought, salt, low oxygen caused by waterlogging or flooding of the soil, temperature, light and oxidative stress (or a combination of them). Advances in understanding the global changes occurring in plant metabolism under specific abiotic stress conditions are fundamental to enhance plant fitness and increase stress tolerance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:620-649, 2016.

  2. Chemical Composition and Seasonality of Aromatic Mediterranean Plant Species by NMR-Based Metabolomics

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    Monica Scognamiglio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An NMR-based metabolomic approach has been applied to analyse seven aromatic Mediterranean plant species used in traditional cuisine. Based on the ethnobotanical use of these plants, the approach has been employed in order to study the metabolic changes during different seasons. Primary and secondary metabolites have been detected and quantified. Flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, and kaempferol derivatives and phenylpropanoid derivatives (e.g., chlorogenic and rosmarinic acid are the main identified polyphenols. The richness in these metabolites could explain the biological properties ascribed to these plant species.

  3. MeRy-B, a metabolomic database and knowledge base for exploring plant primary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Plant primary metabolites are organic compounds that are common to all or most plant species and are essential for plant growth, development, and reproduction. They are intermediates and products of metabolism involved in photosynthesis and other biosynthetic processes. Primary metabolites belong to different compound families, mainly carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, steroids, or lipids. Until recently, unlike the Human Metabolome Database ( http://www.hmdb.ca ) dedicated to human metabolism, there was no centralized database or repository dedicated exclusively to the plant kingdom that contained information on metabolites and their concentrations in a detailed experimental context. MeRy-B is the first platform for plant (1)H-NMR metabolomic profiles (MeRy-B, http://bit.ly/meryb ), designed to provide a knowledge base of curated plant profiles and metabolites obtained by NMR, together with the corresponding experimental and analytical metadata. MeRy-B contains lists of plant metabolites, mostly primary metabolites and unknown compounds, with information about experimental conditions, the factors studied, and metabolite concentrations for 19 different plant species (Arabidopsis, broccoli, daphne, grape, maize, barrel clover, melon, Ostreococcus tauri, palm date, palm tree, peach, pine tree, eucalyptus, plantain rice, strawberry, sugar beet, tomato, vanilla), compiled from more than 2,300 annotated NMR profiles for various organs or tissues deposited by 30 different private or public contributors in September 2013. Currently, about half of the data deposited in MeRy-B is publicly available. In this chapter, readers will be shown how to (1) navigate through and retrieve data of publicly available projects on MeRy-B website; (2) visualize lists of experimentally identified metabolites and their concentrations in all plant species present in MeRy-B; (3) get primary metabolite list for a particular plant species in MeRy-B; and for a

  4. Recent advances of metabolomics in plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yozo; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Biotechnology, including genetic modification, is a very important approach to regulate the production of particular metabolites in plants to improve their adaptation to environmental stress, to improve food quality, and to increase crop yield. Unfortunately, these approaches do not necessarily lead to the expected results due to the highly complex mechanisms underlying metabolic regulation in plants. In this context, metabolomics plays a key role in plant molecular biotechnology, where plant cells are modified by the expression of engineered genes, because we can obtain information on the metabolic status of cells via a snapshot of their metabolome. Although metabolome analysis could be used to evaluate the effect of foreign genes and understand the metabolic state of cells, there is no single analytical method for metabolomics because of the wide range of chemicals synthesized in plants. Here, we describe the basic analytical advancements in plant metabolomics and bioinformatics and the application of metabolomics to the biological study of plants.

  5. Plant bioassay to assess the effects of allelochemicals on the metabolome of the target species Aegilops geniculata by an NMR-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrosca, Brigida; Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiumano, Vittorio; Esposito, Assunta; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    A metabolomic-based approach for the study of allelopathic interactions in the Mediterranean area is proposed using Aegilops geniculata Roth (Poaceae), a Mediterranean herbaceous plant, as test species. Its metabolome has been elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Hydroponic plant cultures of A. geniculata were treated with specific compounds of known allelopathic potential: catechol, coumarin, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid and juglone. The metabolic variations due to the presence of allelochemicals have been analyzed and measured. All of the compounds showed the strongest effects at the highest concentration, with coumarin and juglone as the most active compounds, causing an increase of several metabolites. The metabolome changes in test plants confirmed the allelochemicals' reported modes of action. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a promising tool. It can be applied to plant extracts, making it possible to evidence the metabolites responsible for the activity, as well as their mechanisms of action.

  6. Monolithic columns in plant proteomics and metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello-Masini, Marilda; Penteado, José Carlos Pires; Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2013-03-01

    Since "omics" techniques emerged, plant studies, from biochemistry to ecology, have become more comprehensive. Plant proteomics and metabolomics enable the construction of databases that, with the help of genomics and informatics, show the data obtained as a system. Thus, all the constituents of the system can be seen with their interactions in both space and time. For instance, perturbations in a plant ecosystem as a consequence of application of herbicides or exposure to pollutants can be predicted by using information gathered from these databases. Analytical chemistry has been involved in this scientific evolution. Proteomics and metabolomics are emerging fields that require separation, identification, and quantification of proteins, peptides, and small molecules of metabolites in complex biological samples. The success of this work relies on efficient chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques, and on mass spectrometric detection. This paper reviews recent developments in the use of monolithic columns, focusing on their applications in "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches, including their use as supports for immobilization of proteolytic enzymes and their use in two-dimensional and multidimensional chromatography. Whereas polymeric columns have been predominantly used for separation of proteins and polypeptides, silica-based monoliths have been more extensively used for separation of small molecules of metabolites. Representative applications in proteomics and in analysis of plant metabolites are given and summarized in tables.

  7. Recent advances in plant metabolomics and greener pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Lloyd W

    2010-01-27

    Metabolomics is an extension of the omics concept and experimental approaches. However, is metabolomics just another trendy omics fashion perturbation or is metabolomics actually delivering novel content and value? This article highlights some recent advances that definitely support the role of plant metabolomics in the movement toward greener pastures.

  8. Monolithic silica-based capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry for plant metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolstikov, V.V.; Lommen, A.; Nakanishi, K.; Tanaka, N.; Fiehn, O.

    2003-01-01

    Application of C18 monolithic silica capillary columns in HPLC coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry detection was studied for probing the metabolome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It could be shown that the use of a long capillary column is an easy and effective approach to reduce ionizat

  9. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Shi, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality.

  10. Plant Metabolomics: An Indispensable System Biology Tool for Plant Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As genomes of many plant species have been sequenced, demand for functional genomics has dramatically accelerated the improvement of other omics including metabolomics. Despite a large amount of metabolites still remaining to be identified, metabolomics has contributed significantly not only to the understanding of plant physiology and biology from the view of small chemical molecules that reflect the end point of biological activities, but also in past decades to the attempts to improve plant behavior under both normal and stressed conditions. Hereby, we summarize the current knowledge on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms underlying plant growth, development, and stress responses, focusing further on the contributions of metabolomics to practical applications in crop quality improvement and food safety assessment, as well as plant metabolic engineering. We also highlight the current challenges and future perspectives in this inspiring area, with the aim to stimulate further studies leading to better crop improvement of yield and quality.

  11. NMR-Based Milk Metabolomics

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    Hanne C. Bertram

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining a better understanding of how milk composition is linked to nutritional or quality traits.

  12. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality...... and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive...

  13. Time-resolved NMR metabolomics of plant cells based on a microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Jan; Kreppenhofer, Kristina; Büchler, Silke; Merle, Christian; Sobich, Shukhrat; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Ahrens, Ralf; Guber, Andreas E; Nick, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The plant secondary metabolism generates numerous compounds harbouring pharmaceutical activity. In plants, these compounds are typically formed by different and specialised cell types that have to interact constituting a metabolic process chain. This interactivity impedes biotechnological production of secondary compounds, because cell differentiation is suppressed under the conditions of a batch bio-fermenter. We present a novel strategy to address this limitation using a biomimetic approach, where we simulate the situation in a real tissue by a microfluidic chamber system, where plant cells can be integrated into a process flow. We show that walled cells of the plant model tobacco BY-2 can be successfully cultivated in this system and that physiological parameters (such as cell viability, mitotic index and division synchrony) can be preserved over several days. The microfluidic design allows to resolve dynamic changes of specific metabolites over different stages of culture development. These results serve as proof-of-principle that a microfluidic organisation of cultivated plant cells can mimic the metabolic flows in a real plant tissue.

  14. Novel quantitative metabolomic approach for the study of stress responses of plant root metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Wang, Xu; Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Chang, Chi-Peng; Cao, Xiaohong

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative metabolomics (qMetabolomics) is a powerful tool for understanding the intricate metabolic processes involved in plant abiotic stress responses. qMetabolomics is hindered by the limited coverage and high cost of isotopically labeled standards. In this study, we first selected 271 metabolites which might play important roles in abiotic stress responses as the targets and established a comprehensive LC-MS/MS based qMetabolomic method. We then developed a novel metabolic labeling method using E. coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-step cultivation for the production of uniformly (13)C-labeled metabolites as internal standards. Finally, we applied the developed qMetabolomic method to investigate the influence of Pb stress on maize root metabolism. The absolute concentration of 226 metabolites in maize roots was accurately quantified in a single run within 30 min. Our study also revealed that glycolysis, purine, pyrimidine, and phospholipids were the main metabolic pathways in maize roots involved in Pb stress response. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive qMetabolomic method for plant metabolomics thus far. We developed a simple and inexpensive metabolic labeling method which dramatically expanded the availability of uniformly (13)C labeled metabolites. Our findings also provided new insights of maize metabolic responses to Pb stress.

  15. Inter-laboratory reproducibility of fast gas chromatography–electron impact–time of flight mass spectrometry (GC–EI–TOF/MS) based plant metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Allwood, J W; Erban, A.; de Koning, S.; Dun, W.B.; Luedemann, A.; Lommen, A; Kay, L.; Löscher, R.; Kopka, J.; Goodacre, R

    2009-01-01

    The application of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) to the ‘global’ analysis of metabolites in complex samples (i.e. metabolomics) has now become routine. The generation of these data-rich profiles demands new strategies in data mining and standardisation of experimental and reporting aspects across laboratories. As part of the META-PHOR project’s (METAbolomics for Plants Health and OutReach: http://www.meta-phor.eu/) priorities towards robust technology development, a GC–MS ring ...

  16. Basics of mass spectrometry based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    The emerging field of metabolomics, aiming to characterize small molecule metabolites present in biological systems, promises immense potential for different areas such as medicine, environmental sciences, agronomy, etc. The purpose of this article is to guide the reader through the history of the field, then through the main steps of the metabolomics workflow, from study design to structure elucidation, and help the reader to understand the key phases of a metabolomics investigation and the rationale underlying the protocols and techniques used. This article is not intended to give standard operating procedures as several papers related to this topic were already provided, but is designed as a tutorial aiming to help beginners understand the concept and challenges of MS-based metabolomics. A real case example is taken from the literature to illustrate the application of the metabolomics approach in the field of doping analysis. Challenges and limitations of the approach are then discussed along with future directions in research to cope with these limitations. This tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP18).

  17. Fusion of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, A.K.; Werf, M.J. van der; Bijlsma, S.; Werff-van der Vat, B.J.C. van der; Jellema, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    A general method is presented for combining mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data. Such data are becoming more and more abundant, and proper tools for fusing these types of data sets are needed. Fusion of metabolomics data leads to a comprehensive view on the metabolome of an organism or biologi

  18. Metabolomics and bioactive substances in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakimov, Bekzod

    (Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, In Press, DOI: 10.1007/s00216-013-7341-z) outlines a novel GC-MS derivatization method using TMSCN for trimethylsilylation for improved analysis of complex biological mixtures . A review paper (Journal of Cereal Science, Accepted) written for the special issue...... of the Journal of Cereal Science dedicated to the journal’s 30th anniversary comprises current analytical challenges and perspectives of cereal metabolomics with emphasis on new development in the use of multivariate data nalysis methods for exploitation of the full information level in the analytical platforms...

  19. Liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomic study for varietal discrimination of grapes according to plant sterols content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Laura; Sampedro, M Carmen; Sánchez, Alicia; Delporte, Cédric; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-07-08

    Grapevine and derived products are rich in a wide range of compounds and its quality mainly depends on its metabolites, as a result of viticulture practices. Plant sterols, also called phytosterols (PS), are secondary metabolites regarded as bioactive substance present in grape berries and other plant-based food. The present study deals with a metabolomic approach focusing on phytosterols family in six varieties of Rioja grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Graciano, Garnacha, White Garnacha and Viura), in order to find significant differences among them. Liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry with a quadrupole-time of flight mass analyzer (LC-QTOF) was used to find as many metabolites as possible in the different grape berry fractions, and using statistics to help finding significant clustering of the metabolic profile of pulp, peel and seeds in relation to the variety. The best chromatographic and detection conditions were achieved by gas phase ionization via atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in positive mode. Furthermore, analysis with electrospray (ESI) is also needed for phytosterol derivatives confirmation. Putative compounds of interest in the analyzed samples were found by an automated compound extraction algorithm (Molecular Feature Extraction, MFE) and an initial differential expression from the data was created with the aid of commercial software. Once the data were collected, the results were filtered, aligned and normalized, and evaluating applying one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a 95% significance level. For sample class prediction, partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) is used as a supervised pattern recognition method and excellent separation among the grape varieties is shown. An overall accuracy of 93.3% (pulp samples), 100.0% (peel) or 96.7% (seeds) in discriminating between grape varieties was achieved when comparing the different fractions. In general, 7 PS derivatives were identified with ID scores

  20. Bridging the gap between comprehensive extraction protocols in plant metabolomics studies and method validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijttebier, Sebastiaan; Van der Auwera, Anastasia; Foubert, Kenn; Voorspoels, Stefan; Pieters, Luc; Apers, Sandra

    2016-09-07

    It is vital to pay much attention to the design of extraction methods developed for plant metabolomics, as any non-extracted or converted metabolites will greatly affect the overall quality of the metabolomics study. Method validation is however often omitted in plant metabolome studies, as the well-established methodologies for classical targeted analyses such as recovery optimization cannot be strictly applied. The aim of the present study is to thoroughly evaluate state-of-the-art comprehensive extraction protocols for plant metabolomics with liquid chromatography-photodiode array-accurate mass mass spectrometry (LC-PDA-amMS) by bridging the gap with method validation. Validation of an extraction protocol in untargeted plant metabolomics should ideally be accomplished by validating the protocol for all possible outcomes, i.e. for all secondary metabolites potentially present in the plant. In an effort to approach this ideal validation scenario, two plant matrices were selected based on their wide versatility of phytochemicals: meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) for its polyphenols content, and spicy paprika powder (from the genus Capsicum) for its apolar phytochemicals content (carotenoids, phytosterols, capsaicinoids). These matrices were extracted with comprehensive extraction protocols adapted from literature and analysed with a generic LC-PDA-amMS characterization platform that was previously validated for broad range phytochemical analysis. The performance of the comprehensive sample preparation protocols was assessed based on extraction efficiency, repeatability and intermediate precision and on ionization suppression/enhancement evaluation. The manuscript elaborates on the finding that none of the extraction methods allowed to exhaustively extract the metabolites. Furthermore, it is shown that depending on the extraction conditions enzymatic degradation mechanisms can occur. Investigation of the fractions obtained with the different extraction methods

  1. Understanding Plant Nitrogen Metabolism through Metabolomics and Computational Approaches

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    Perrin H. Beatty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of plant metabolism could provide a direct mechanism for improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE in crops. One of the major barriers to achieving this outcome is our poor understanding of the complex metabolic networks, physiological factors, and signaling mechanisms that affect NUE in agricultural settings. However, an exciting collection of computational and experimental approaches has begun to elucidate whole-plant nitrogen usage and provides an avenue for connecting nitrogen-related phenotypes to genes. Herein, we describe how metabolomics, computational models of metabolism, and flux balance analysis have been harnessed to advance our understanding of plant nitrogen metabolism. We introduce a model describing the complex flow of nitrogen through crops in a real-world agricultural setting and describe how experimental metabolomics data, such as isotope labeling rates and analyses of nutrient uptake, can be used to refine these models. In summary, the metabolomics/computational approach offers an exciting mechanism for understanding NUE that may ultimately lead to more effective crop management and engineered plants with higher yields.

  2. Cell-based metabolomics approach for assessing the impact of wastewater treatment plant effluent on downstream water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are a known source of various types of chemicals including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), naturally occurring hormones, and pesticides. There is great concern regarding their adverse effects on human and ecological health th...

  3. Progress in NMR-based metabolomics of Catharanthus roseus

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    Qifang PAN,Jingya ZHAO,Yuliang WANG,Kexuan TANG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics has been rapidly developed as an important field in plant sciences and natural products chemistry. As the only natural source for a diversity of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs, especially the low-abundance antitumor agents vinblastine and vincristine, Catharanthus roseus is highly valued and has been studied extensively as a model for medicinal plants improvement. Due to multistep enzymatic biosynthesis and complex regulation, genetic modification in the MIA pathway has resulted in complicated changes of both secondary and primary metabolism in C. roseus, affecting not only the MIA pathway but also other pathways. Research at the metabolic level is necessary to increase knowledge on the genetic regulation of the whole metabolic network connected to MIA biosynthesis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR is a very suitable and powerful complementary technique for the identification and quantification of metabolites in the plant matrix. NMR-based metabolomics has been used in studies of C. roseus for pathway elucidation, understanding stress responses, classification among different cultivars, safety and quality controls of transgenic plants, cross talk between pathways, and diversion of carbon fluxes, with the aim of fully unravelling MIA biosynthesis, its regulation and the function of the alkaloids in the plant from a systems biology point of view.

  4. Plant Metabolomics : the missiong link in functional genomics strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Beale, M.; Fiehn, O.; Hardy, N.; Summer, L.; Bino, R.

    2002-01-01

    After the establishment of technologies for high-throughput DNA sequencing (genomics), gene expression analysis (transcriptomics), and protein analysis (proteomics), the remaining functional genomics challenge is that of metabolomics. Metabolomics is the term coined for essentially comprehensive, no

  5. A proposed framework for the description of plant metabolomics experiments and their results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenkens, H.; Hardy, N.; Beckmann, M.; Draper, J.; Smith, A.R.; Taylor, J.; Fiehn, O.; Goodacre, R.; Bino, R.J.; Hall, R.D.; Kopka, J.; Lane, G.A.; Lange, B.M.; Liu, J.R.; Mendes, P.; Nikolau, B.J.; Oliver, S.G.; Paton, I.R.; Roessner-Tunali, U.; Saito, K.; Smedsgaard, J.; Sumner, L.W.; Wang, T.; Walsh, S.; Wurtele, E.S.; Kell, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the metabolite complement of biological samples, known as metabolomics, is creating large amounts of data, and support for handling these data sets is required to facilitate meaningful analyses that will answer biological questions. We present a data model for plant metabolomics known a

  6. A proposed framework for the description of plant metabolomics experiments and their results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenkins, H.; Hardy, N.; Beckmann, M-;

    2004-01-01

    The study of the metabolite complement of biological samples, known as metabolomics, is creating large amounts of data, and support for handling these data sets is required to facilitate meaningful analyses that will answer biological questions. We present a data model for plant metabolomics know...

  7. Are the metabolomic responses to folivory of closely related plant species linked to macroevolutionary and plant-folivore coevolutionary processes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354 USA; CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08913 Catalonia Spain; Hódar, José A. [Grupo de Ecología Terrestre, Departamento de Biología Animal y Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada Spain; Sardans, Jordi [CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08913 Catalonia Spain; CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08913 Catalonia Spain; Kyle, Jennifer E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354 USA; Kim, Young-Mo [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington 99354 USA; Oravec, Michal [Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bĕlidla 4a CZ-603 00 Brno Czech Republic; Urban, Otmar [Global Change Research Centre, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bĕlidla 4a CZ-603 00 Brno Czech Republic; Guenther, Alex [Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California 92697 USA; Peñuelas, Josep [CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08913 Catalonia Spain; CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-CSIC-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallès 08913 Catalonia Spain

    2016-06-02

    The debate whether the coevolution of plants and insects or macroevolutionary processes (phylogeny) is the main driver determining the arsenal of molecular defensive compounds of plants remains unresolved. Attacks by herbivorous insects affect not only the composition of defensive compounds in plants but the entire metabolome (the set of molecular metabolites), including defensive compounds. Metabolomes are the final products of genotypes and are directly affected by macroevolutionary processes, so closely related species should have similar metabolomic compositions and may respond in similar ways to attacks by folivores. We analyzed the elemental compositions and metabolomes of needles from Pinus pinaster, P. nigra and P. sylvestris to determine if these closely related Pinus species with different coevolutionary histories with the caterpillars of the processionary moth respond similarly to attacks by this lepidopteran. All pines had different metabolomes and metabolic responses to herbivorous attack. The metabolomic variation among the pine species and the responses to folivory reflected their macroevolutionary relationships, with P. pinaster having the most divergent metabolome. The concentrations of phenolic metabolites were generally not higher in the attacked trees, which had lower concentrations of terpenes, suggesting that herbivores avoid individuals with high concentrations of terpenes. Our results suggest that macroevolutionary history plays important roles in the metabolomic responses of these pine species to folivory, but plant-insect coevolution probably constrains those responses. Combinations of different evolutionary factors and trade-offs are likely responsible for the different responses of each species to folivory, which is not necessarily exclusively linked to plant-insect coevolution.

  8. Metabolomics in Plants and Humans: Applications in the Prevention and Diagnosis of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego F. Gomez-Casati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, there has been an increase in the number of metabolomic approaches used, in parallel with proteomic and functional genomic studies. The wide variety of chemical types of metabolites available has also accelerated the use of different techniques in the investigation of the metabolome. At present, metabolomics is applied to investigate several human diseases, to improve their diagnosis and prevention, and to design better therapeutic strategies. In addition, metabolomic studies are also being carried out in areas such as toxicology and pharmacology, crop breeding, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the use and application of metabolomics in human diseases and plant research to improve human health.

  9. Metabolomics in Population-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics is the study of small molecules of both endogenous and exogenous origin, such as metabolic substrates and their products, lipids, small peptides, vitamins and other protein cofactors generated by metabolism, which are downstream from genes.

  10. Aspects of experimental design for plant metabolomics experiments and guidelines for growth of plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, Yves; Rolin, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Experiments involve the deliberate variation of one or more factors in order to provoke responses, the identification of which then provides the first step towards functional knowledge. Because environmental, biological, and/or technical noise is unavoidable, biological experiments usually need to be designed. Thus, once the major sources of experimental noise have been identified, individual samples can be grouped, randomised, and/or pooled. Like other 'omics approaches, metabolomics is characterised by the numbers of analytes largely exceeding sample number. While this unprecedented singularity in biology dramatically increases false discovery, experimental error can nevertheless be decreased in plant metabolomics experiments. For this, each step from plant cultivation to data acquisition needs to be evaluated in order to identify the major sources of error and then an appropriate design can be produced, as with any other experimental approach. The choice of technology, the time at which tissues are harvested, and the way metabolism is quenched also need to be taken into consideration, as they decide which metabolites can be studied. A further recommendation is to document data and metadata in a machine readable way. The latter should also describe every aspect of the experiment. This should provide valuable hints for future experimental design and ultimately give metabolomic data a second life. To facilitate the identification of critical steps, a list of items to be considered before embarking on time-consuming and costly metabolomic experiments is proposed.

  11. Plant metabolomics and its potential application for human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Brouwer, I.D.; Fitzgerald, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    With the growing interest in the use of metabolomic technologies for a wide range of biological targets, food applications related to nutrition and quality are rapidly emerging. Metabolomics offers us the opportunity to gain deeper insights into, and have better control of, the fundamental biochemic

  12. Inter-laboratory reproducibility of fast gas chromatography-electron impact-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-EI-TOF/MS) based plant metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allwood, J.W.; Erban, A.; Koning, S.; Dun, W.B.; Luedemann, A.; Lommen, A.; Kay, L.; Löscher, R.; Kopka, J.; Goodacre, R.

    2009-01-01

    The application of gas chromatography¿mass spectrometry (GC¿MS) to the `global¿ analysis of metabolites in complex samples (i.e. metabolomics) has now become routine. The generation of these data-rich profiles demands new strategies in data mining and standardisation of experimental and reporting as

  13. Analyzing metabolomics-based challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, D.J.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Jacobs, D.M.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Wopereis, S.; Ommen, van B.; Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Smilde, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Challenge tests are used to assess the resilience of human beings to perturbations by analyzing responses to detect functional abnormalities. Well known examples are allergy tests and glucose tolerance tests. Increasingly, metabolomics analysis of blood or serum samples is used to analyze the biolog

  14. Novel chemistry of invasive plants: exotic species have more unique metabolomic profiles than native congeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Jansen, J.J.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that exotic plants can become invasive when they possess novel secondary chemistry compared with native plants in the introduced range. Using untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting, we compared a broad range of metabolites of six successful exotic plant species and their native co

  15. Discrimination of conventional and organic white cabbage from a long-term field trial study using untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Åberg, K. Magnus;

    2014-01-01

    The influence of organic and conventional farming practices on the content of single nutrients in plants is disputed in the scientific literature. Here, large-scale untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics was used to compare the composition of white cabbage from organic and conventional agriculture, ...... % of cases. Thus, it was concluded that the investigated conventional and organic management practices have a systematic impact on the metabolome of white cabbage. This emphasizes the potential of untargeted metabolomics for authenticity testing of organic plant products....

  16. Are ant feces nutrients for plants? A metabolomics approach to elucidate the nutritional effects on plants hosting weaver ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidkjær, Nanna Hjort; Wollenweber, Bernd; Gislum, René

    2015-01-01

    Weaver ants (genus Oecophylla) are tropical carnivorous ant species living in high numbers in the canopies of trees. The ants excrete copious amounts of fecal matter on leaf surfaces, and these feces may provide nutrients to host trees. This hypothesis is supported by studies of ant-plant interac......Weaver ants (genus Oecophylla) are tropical carnivorous ant species living in high numbers in the canopies of trees. The ants excrete copious amounts of fecal matter on leaf surfaces, and these feces may provide nutrients to host trees. This hypothesis is supported by studies of ant......-plant interactions involving other ant species that have demonstrated the transfer of nutrients from ants to plants. In this 7-months study, a GC–MS-based metabolomics approach along with an analysis of total nitrogen and carbon levels was used to study metabolic changes in ant-hosting Coffea arabica plants compared...... with control plants. The results showed elevated levels of total nitrogen, amino acids, fatty acids, caffeine, and secondary metabolites of the phenylpropanoid pathway in leaves from ant-hosting plants. Minor effects were observed for sugars, whereas little or no effect was observed for organic acids, despite...

  17. Stable Isotope-Assisted Evaluation of Different Extraction Solvents for Untargeted Metabolomics of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Doppler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of extraction protocols for untargeted metabolomics approaches is still difficult. We have applied a novel stable isotope-assisted workflow for untargeted LC-HRMS-based plant metabolomics , which allows for the first time every detected feature to be considered for method evaluation. The efficiency and complementarity of commonly used extraction solvents, namely 1 + 3 (v/v mixtures of water and selected organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile or methanol/acetonitrile 1 + 1 (v/v, with and without the addition of 0.1% (v/v formic acid were compared. Four different wheat organs were sampled, extracted and analysed by LC-HRMS. Data evaluation was performed with the in-house-developed MetExtract II software and R. With all tested solvents a total of 871 metabolites were extracted in ear, 785 in stem, 733 in leaf and 517 in root samples, respectively. Between 48% (stem and 57% (ear of the metabolites detected in a particular organ were found with all extraction mixtures, and 127 of 996 metabolites were consistently shared between all extraction agent/organ combinations. In aqueous methanol, acidification with formic acid led to pronounced pH dependency regarding the precision of metabolite abundance and the number of detectable metabolites, whereas extracts of acetonitrile-containing mixtures were less affected. Moreover, methanol and acetonitrile have been found to be complementary with respect to extraction efficiency. Interestingly, the beneficial properties of both solvents can be combined by the use of a water-methanol-acetonitrile mixture for global metabolite extraction instead of aqueous methanol or aqueous acetonitrile alone.

  18. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  19. Heavy Metal Tolerance in Plants: Role of Transcriptomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, and Ionomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Singh, Rachana; Singh, Vijay P; Prasad, Sheo M

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soil and water causing toxicity/stress has become one important constraint to crop productivity and quality. This situation has further worsened by the increasing population growth and inherent food demand. It has been reported in several studies that counterbalancing toxicity due to heavy metal requires complex mechanisms at molecular, biochemical, physiological, cellular, tissue, and whole plant level, which might manifest in terms of improved crop productivity. Recent advances in various disciplines of biological sciences such as metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, etc., have assisted in the characterization of metabolites, transcription factors, and stress-inducible proteins involved in heavy metal tolerance, which in turn can be utilized for generating heavy metal-tolerant crops. This review summarizes various tolerance strategies of plants under heavy metal toxicity covering the role of metabolites (metabolomics), trace elements (ionomics), transcription factors (transcriptomics), various stress-inducible proteins (proteomics) as well as the role of plant hormones. We also provide a glance of some strategies adopted by metal-accumulating plants, also known as "metallophytes."

  20. Metabolomics and Cheminformatics Analysis of Antifungal Function of Plant Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Cuperlovic-Culf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. Partial resistance to FHB of several wheat cultivars includes specific metabolic responses to inoculation. Previously published studies have determined major metabolic changes induced by pathogens in resistant and susceptible plants. Functionality of the majority of these metabolites in resistance remains unknown. In this work we have made a compilation of all metabolites determined as selectively accumulated following FHB inoculation in resistant plants. Characteristics, as well as possible functions and targets of these metabolites, are investigated using cheminformatics approaches with focus on the likelihood of these metabolites acting as drug-like molecules against fungal pathogens. Results of computational analyses of binding properties of several representative metabolites to homology models of fungal proteins are presented. Theoretical analysis highlights the possibility for strong inhibitory activity of several metabolites against some major proteins in Fusarium graminearum, such as carbonic anhydrases and cytochrome P450s. Activity of several of these compounds has been experimentally confirmed in fungal growth inhibition assays. Analysis of anti-fungal properties of plant metabolites can lead to the development of more resistant wheat varieties while showing novel application of cheminformatics approaches in the analysis of plant/pathogen interactions.

  1. Discrimination of conventional and organic white cabbage from a long-term field trial study using untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Åberg, K. Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The influence of organic and conventional farming practices on the content of single nutrients in plants is disputed in the scientific literature. Here, large-scale untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics was used to compare the composition of white cabbage from organic and conventional agriculture......, measuring 1,600 compounds. Cabbage was sampled in 2 years from one conventional and two organic farming systems in a rigidly controlled long-term field trial in Denmark. Using Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures–Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), we found that the production system leaves a significant...... % of cases. Thus, it was concluded that the investigated conventional and organic management practices have a systematic impact on the metabolome of white cabbage. This emphasizes the potential of untargeted metabolomics for authenticity testing of organic plant products....

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an "omics" technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical "routine".

  3. Metabolomics Unravel Contrasting Effects of Biodiversity on the Performance of Individual Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherling, Christian; Roscher, Christiane; Giavalisco, Patrick; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    In spite of evidence for positive diversity-productivity relationships increasing plant diversity has highly variable effects on the performance of individual plant species, but the mechanisms behind these differential responses are far from being understood. To gain deeper insights into the physiological responses of individual plant species to increasing plant diversity we performed systematic untargeted metabolite profiling on a number of herbs derived from a grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). The Jena Experiment comprises plots of varying species number (1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 60) and number and composition of functional groups (1 to 4; grasses, legumes, tall herbs, small herbs). In this study the metabolomes of two tall-growing herbs (legume: Medicago x varia; non-legume: Knautia arvensis) and three small-growing herbs (legume: Lotus corniculatus; non-legumes: Bellis perennis, Leontodon autumnalis) in plant communities of increasing diversity were analyzed. For metabolite profiling we combined gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and UPLC coupled to FT-ICR-MS (LC-FT-MS) analyses from the same sample. This resulted in several thousands of detected m/z-features. ANOVA and multivariate statistical analysis revealed 139 significantly changed metabolites (30 by GC-TOF-MS and 109 by LC-FT-MS). The small-statured plants L. autumnalis, B. perennis and L. corniculatus showed metabolic response signatures to increasing plant diversity and species richness in contrast to tall-statured plants. Key-metabolites indicated C- and N-limitation for the non-leguminous small-statured species B. perennis and L. autumnalis, while the metabolic signature of the small-statured legume L. corniculatus indicated facilitation by other legumes. Thus, metabolomic analysis provided evidence for negative effects of resource competition on the investigated small-statured herbs that might mechanistically explain their decreasing performance

  4. Metabolomics unravel contrasting effects of biodiversity on the performance of individual plant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scherling

    Full Text Available In spite of evidence for positive diversity-productivity relationships increasing plant diversity has highly variable effects on the performance of individual plant species, but the mechanisms behind these differential responses are far from being understood. To gain deeper insights into the physiological responses of individual plant species to increasing plant diversity we performed systematic untargeted metabolite profiling on a number of herbs derived from a grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment. The Jena Experiment comprises plots of varying species number (1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 60 and number and composition of functional groups (1 to 4; grasses, legumes, tall herbs, small herbs. In this study the metabolomes of two tall-growing herbs (legume: Medicago x varia; non-legume: Knautia arvensis and three small-growing herbs (legume: Lotus corniculatus; non-legumes: Bellis perennis, Leontodon autumnalis in plant communities of increasing diversity were analyzed. For metabolite profiling we combined gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS and UPLC coupled to FT-ICR-MS (LC-FT-MS analyses from the same sample. This resulted in several thousands of detected m/z-features. ANOVA and multivariate statistical analysis revealed 139 significantly changed metabolites (30 by GC-TOF-MS and 109 by LC-FT-MS. The small-statured plants L. autumnalis, B. perennis and L. corniculatus showed metabolic response signatures to increasing plant diversity and species richness in contrast to tall-statured plants. Key-metabolites indicated C- and N-limitation for the non-leguminous small-statured species B. perennis and L. autumnalis, while the metabolic signature of the small-statured legume L. corniculatus indicated facilitation by other legumes. Thus, metabolomic analysis provided evidence for negative effects of resource competition on the investigated small-statured herbs that might mechanistically explain their decreasing

  5. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies.

  6. Desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants: new insights from transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinakar eChallabathula

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most higher plants are unable to survive desiccation to an air-dried state. An exception is a small group of vascular angiosperm plants, termed resurrection plants. They have evolved unique mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and thus can tolerate severe water loss, and mostly adjust their water content with the relative humidity in the environment. Desiccation tolerance is a complex phenomenon and depends on the regulated expression of numerous genes during dehydration and subsequent rehydration. Most of the resurrection plants have a large genome and are difficult to transform which makes them unsuitable for genetic approaches. However, technical advances have made it possible to analyse changes in gene expression on a large scale. These approaches together with comparative studies with non-desiccation tolerant plants provide novel insights into the molecular processes required for desiccation tolerance and will shed light on identification of orphan genes with unknown functions. Here, we review large scale recent transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies that have been performed in desiccation tolerant plants and discuss how these studies contribute to understanding the molecular basis of desiccation tolerance.

  7. Illuminating a plant's tissue-specific metabolic diversity using computational metabolomics and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Heiling, Sven; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2016-11-22

    Secondary metabolite diversity is considered an important fitness determinant for plants' biotic and abiotic interactions in nature. This diversity can be examined in two dimensions. The first one considers metabolite diversity across plant species. A second way of looking at this diversity is by considering the tissue-specific localization of pathways underlying secondary metabolism within a plant. Although these cross-tissue metabolite variations are increasingly regarded as important readouts of tissue-level gene function and regulatory processes, they have rarely been comprehensively explored by nontargeted metabolomics. As such, important questions have remained superficially addressed. For instance, which tissues exhibit prevalent signatures of metabolic specialization? Reciprocally, which metabolites contribute most to this tissue specialization in contrast to those metabolites exhibiting housekeeping characteristics? Here, we explore tissue-level metabolic specialization in Nicotiana attenuata, an ecological model with rich secondary metabolism, by combining tissue-wide nontargeted mass spectral data acquisition, information theory analysis, and tandem MS (MS/MS) molecular networks. This analysis was conducted for two different methanolic extracts of 14 tissues and deconvoluted 895 nonredundant MS/MS spectra. Using information theory analysis, anthers were found to harbor the most specialized metabolome, and most unique metabolites of anthers and other tissues were annotated through MS/MS molecular networks. Tissue-metabolite association maps were used to predict tissue-specific gene functions. Predictions for the function of two UDP-glycosyltransferases in flavonoid metabolism were confirmed by virus-induced gene silencing. The present workflow allows biologists to amortize the vast amount of data produced by modern MS instrumentation in their quest to understand gene function.

  8. HPLC-based metabolomics to identify cytotoxic compounds from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng against human breast cancer MCF-7Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Wahid; Andarwulan, Nuri; Giriwono, Puspo Edi; Pamungkas, Joko

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify the active compounds in Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng which play a role to inhibit viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells using HPLC-based metabolomics approach. Five fractions of the plant extract were observed including ethanol, hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and water fraction. There were 45 HPLC chromatograms resulted from 5 fractions with 3 replications and 3 wavelengths detection. The chromatograms were compared to the data of IC50 from MTT assay of each fraction against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells using metabolomics. The OPLS analysis result promptly pointed towards a chloroform fraction at retention time of 40.16-41.28min that has the greatest contribution to the cytotoxic activity. The data of mass spectra indicated that an abietane diterpene namely 7-acetoxy-6-hydroxyroyleanone was the main compound that contributed to the cytotoxic activity. This metabolomics application method can be used as a quick preliminary guideline to uncover the most dominant compound related to the bioactivity.

  9. (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach to study the toxic effects of herbicide butachlor on goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Dong; Wang, Jun-Song; Li, Ming-Hui; Liu, Yan; Chen, Ting; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2015-02-01

    Butachlor, one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, has been reported with high ecotoxicity to aquatic plants and animals. In this study, a (1)H NMR based metabolomics approach combined with histopathological examination and biochemical assays was applied to comprehensively investigate the toxic effects of butachlor on four important organs (gill, brain, liver and kidney) of goldfish (Carassius auratus) for the first time. After 10 days' butachlor exposure at two dosages of 3.2 and 0.64 μmol/L, fish tissues (gill, brain, liver and kidney) and serum were collected. Histopathological inspection revealed severe impairment of gill filaments and obvious cellular edema in livers and kidneys. The increase of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in gill and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level in four tissues reflected the disturbance of antioxidative system in the intoxicated goldfish. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and creatinine (CRE) level were increased in butachlor exposure groups, suggesting liver and kidney injuries induced by butachlor. Orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) of NMR profiles disclosed metabolic changes that were related to the toxic effects of butachlor including oxidative stress, disorder of energy metabolism and amino acids metabolism, and disturbance of neurotransmitter balance in butachlor exposed goldfish. This integrated metabolomics approach provided a molecular basis underlying the toxicity of butachlor and demonstrated that metabolomics was a powerful and highly effective approach to elucidate the toxicity and underlying mechanisms of herbicides and pesticides, applicable for their risk assessment.

  10. Diurnal effects of anoxia on the metabolome of the seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Environmental metabolomics has become interesting in marine ecological studies. One example is the revealing of new insights in stress response of Zostera marina. This is essential to understand how, at which level and to what extend aquatic plants adapt, tolerate and react to environmental...... stressors. We exposed Z. marina to water column anoxia and assessed the diurnal metabolomic response by GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics identifying 109 known and 217 unknown metabolites. During day time photosynthetic oxygen production prevents severe effects of anoxia on the metabolome (complete set of small...... the applicability of metabolomics to assess environmental stress responses of Zostera marina....

  11. Genetic algorithm based two-mode clustering of metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.A.; Berg, R.A. van den; Westerhuis, J.A.; Werf, M.J. van der; Smilde, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Metabolomics and other omics tools are generally characterized by large data sets with many variables obtained under different environmental conditions. Clustering methods and more specifically two-mode clustering methods are excellent tools for analyzing this type of data. Two-mode clustering metho

  12. Novel personalized pathway-based metabolomics models reveal key metabolic pathways for breast cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Sijia; Chong, Nicole; Lewis, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: We propose that higher-order functional representation of metabolomics data, such as pathway-based metabolomic features, can be used as robust biomarkers for breast cancer. Towards this, we have developed a new computational method that uses personalized pathway dysregulation scores for disease...... the Curve, a receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.968 and 0.934, sensitivities of 0.946 and 0.954, and specificities of 0.934 and 0.918. These two metabolomics-based pathway models are further validated by RNA-Seq-based TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) breast cancer data, with AUCs of 0.995 and 0.......993. Moreover, important metabolic pathways, such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and the alanine, aspartate, and glutamate pathway, are revealed as critical biological pathways for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Conclusions: We have successfully developed a new type of pathway-based model to study...

  13. NMR-based metabolomics of prostate cancer: a protagonist in clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Gupta, Ashish; Nath, Kavindra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the application of NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer comprises a potential tactic for understanding the impaired biochemical pathways arising due to a disease evolvement and progression. This technique involves qualitative and quantitative estimation of plethora of small molecular weight metabolites of body fluids or tissues using state-of-the-art chemometric methods delivering an important platform for translational research from basic to clinical, to reveal the pathophysiological snapshot in a single step. This review summarizes the present arrays and recent advancements in NMR-based metabolomics and a glimpse of currently used medical imaging tactics, with their role in clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  14. Metabolic differentiations and classification of Verbascum species by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Milen I; Ali, Kashif; Alipieva, Kalina; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2011-11-01

    The genus Verbascum L. (mulleins) comprises of about 360 species of flowering plants in the Scrophulariaceae family. Mulleins have been used in the traditional folk medicine for centuries, for treatment of a wide range of human ailments, inter alia bronchitis, tuberculosis, asthma, and different inflammations. Despite all applications the knowledge of the metabolites, accumulated in different mullein species, is still limited and based mainly on determination of the major compounds. Here we report the application of 1H NMR metabolic fingerprinting in combination with principal component analyses (PCA) in five different Verbascum species. Based on the obtained results mulleins were divided in two groups: group A (Verbascum phlomoides and Verbascum densiflorum) and group B (Verbascum xanthophoeniceum, Verbascum nigrum and Verbascum phoeniceum). Further it was found that the plants in group B accumulate higher amounts of bioactive iridoid and phenylethanoid glycosides. V. xanthophoeniceum and V. nigrum accumulate higher amounts of the pharmaceutically-important harpagoside (∼0.5% on dry weight basis) and verbascoside, forsythoside B and leucosceptoside B (in total 5.6-5.8% on dry weight basis), which underlines the possibility for their application in pharmaceutical industry. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the analyses of Verbascum sp. leaf metabolome.

  15. Recent Advances in the Application of Metabolomics to Studies of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC Produced by Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Iijima

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In many plants, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs are produced as specialized metabolites that contribute to the characteristics of each plant. The varieties and composition of BVOCs are chemically diverse by plant species and the circumstances in which the plants grow, and also influenced by herbivory damage and pathogen infection. Plant-produced BVOCs are receptive to many organisms, from microorganisms to human, as both airborne attractants and repellants. In addition, it is known that some BVOCs act as signals to prime a plant for the defense response in plant-to-plant communications. The compositional profiles of BVOCs can, thus, have profound influences in the physiological and ecological aspects of living organisms. Apart from that, some of them are commercially valuable as aroma/flavor compounds for human. Metabolomic technologies have recently revealed new insights in biological systems through metabolic dynamics. Here, the recent advances in metabolomics technologies focusing on plant-produced BVOC analyses are overviewed. Their application markedly improves our knowledge of the role of BVOCs in chemosystematics, ecological influences, and aroma research, as well as being useful to prove the biosynthetic mechanisms of BVOCs.

  16. The MetabolomeExpress Project: enabling web-based processing, analysis and transparent dissemination of GC/MS metabolomics datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Adam J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of analytical approaches and reporting methods via community-wide collaboration can work synergistically with web-tool development to result in rapid community-driven expansion of online data repositories suitable for data mining and meta-analysis. In metabolomics, the inter-laboratory reproducibility of gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS makes it an obvious target for such development. While a number of web-tools offer access to datasets and/or tools for raw data processing and statistical analysis, none of these systems are currently set up to act as a public repository by easily accepting, processing and presenting publicly submitted GC/MS metabolomics datasets for public re-analysis. Description Here, we present MetabolomeExpress, a new File Transfer Protocol (FTP server and web-tool for the online storage, processing, visualisation and statistical re-analysis of publicly submitted GC/MS metabolomics datasets. Users may search a quality-controlled database of metabolite response statistics from publicly submitted datasets by a number of parameters (eg. metabolite, species, organ/biofluid etc.. Users may also perform meta-analysis comparisons of multiple independent experiments or re-analyse public primary datasets via user-friendly tools for t-test, principal components analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis and correlation analysis. They may interact with chromatograms, mass spectra and peak detection results via an integrated raw data viewer. Researchers who register for a free account may upload (via FTP their own data to the server for online processing via a novel raw data processing pipeline. Conclusions MetabolomeExpress https://www.metabolome-express.org provides a new opportunity for the general metabolomics community to transparently present online the raw and processed GC/MS data underlying their metabolomics publications. Transparent sharing of these data will allow researchers to

  17. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H.; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots...

  18. Study of Leaf Metabolome Modifications Induced by UV-C Radiations in Representative Vitis, Cissus and Cannabis Species by LC-MS Based Metabolomics and Antioxidant Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available UV-C radiation is known to induce metabolic modifications in plants, particularly to secondary metabolite biosynthesis. To assess these modifications from a global and untargeted perspective, the effects of the UV-C radiation of the leaves of three different model plant species, Cissus antarctica Vent. (Vitaceae, Vitis vinifera L. (Vitaceae and Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae, were evaluated by an LC-HRMS-based metabolomic approach. The approach enabled the detection of significant metabolite modifications in the three species studied. For all species, clear modifications of phenylpropanoid metabolism were detected that led to an increased level of stilbene derivatives. Interestingly, resveratrol and piceid levels were strongly induced by the UV-C treatment of C. antarctica leaves. In contrast, both flavonoids and stilbene polymers were upregulated in UV-C-treated Vitis leaves. In Cannabis, important changes in cinnamic acid amides and stilbene-related compounds were also detected. Overall, our results highlighted phytoalexin induction upon UV-C radiation. To evaluate whether UV-C stress radiation could enhance the biosynthesis of bioactive compounds, the antioxidant activity of extracts from control and UV-C-treated leaves was measured. The results showed increased antioxidant activity in UV-C-treated V. vinifera extracts.

  19. Waste materials derived bio-effectors used as growth promoters for strawberry plants. An agronomic and metabolomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, Brankica; Chami, Ziad Al; De Pascali, Sandra; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a novel concept of bio-effectors has emerged to describe a group of products that are able to improve plant performance more than fertilizers. In this study, three different agro-industrial residues, i.e. brewers' spent grain (BSG), fennel processing residues (FPR) and lemon processing residues (LPR) were chosen as potential bio-effectors. A greenhouse soilless pot experiment was conducted on strawberry plants (Fragaria x ananassa var. Festival) in order to study the effect of BSG, FPR and LPR water extracts, at different concentrations, on plant growth and fruit quality. Their effect was compared with humic-like substances as a positive/reference control (Ctrl+) and with Hoagland solution as a negative control (Ctrl-). Agronomic parameters and the nutrient uptake were measured on shoots, roots and fruits. Metabolomic profiling tests were carried out on leaves, roots and fruit juices through the NMR technique. Plants treated with the FPR extract showed better vegetative growth, while plants treated with the BSG extract gave higher yield and better fruit size. Metabolomic profiling showed that fruits and roots of plants treated with FPR and LPR extracts had higher concentrations of sucrose, malate and acetate, while BSG treated plants had higher concentrations of citrate and β-glucose. In conclusion, according to the results achieved, the bio-effectors used in this study promote plant growth and fruit quality regardless of their nutritional content. Keywords: bio-effectors, agro-industrial waste, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), strawberry, growth promotion, fruit quality.

  20. Comparison of histological, genetic, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods for sex determination in marine mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Adam; Yeung, Wai Ho; Craft, John; Brown, Margaret; Kennedy, Jill; Bignell, John; Stentiford, Grant D; Viant, Mark R

    2007-10-15

    Omics technologies are increasingly being used to monitor organismal responses to environmental stressors. Previous studies have shown that species identification, an appreciation of life history traits, and organism phenotype (e.g., gender) are essential for the accurate interpretation of omics data from field samples. As marine mussels are increasingly being used in ecotoxicogenomics and monitoring, a technique to determine mussel gender throughout their annual reproductive cycle is urgently needed. This study examines four methods for sex determination in the two mussel species found in the United Kingdom, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis, and their hybrid. Each of these methods-histology, a lipid-based assay, a new reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics-initially was evaluated using sexually mature ("ripe") mussels whose gender was clearly distinguishable using histology. The methods subsequently were tested on spawned ("spent") mussels. For ripe animals, all techniques yielded high classification accuracies: histology, 100%; RT-PCR, 94.6%; lipid analysis, 90.6%; and metabolomics, 89.5%. The gender of spent animals, however, could not be determined by histology (0%) or lipid analysis (55.6%), but RT-PCR (100%) and metabolomics (88.9%) both proved to be successful. In addition, the RT-PCR, metabolomics, and lipid-based methods identified animals of mixed sex. Our findings highlight the application of a novel RT-PCR method as a robust technique for gender determination of ripe and spent mussels.

  1. Quantitative metabolomics based on gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Status and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Jellema, R.H.; Greef, J. van der; Tas, A.C.; Hankemeier, T.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics involves the unbiased quantitative and qualitative analysis of the complete set of metabolites present in cells, body fluids and tissues (the metabolome). By analyzing differences between metabolomes using biostatistics (multivariate data analysis; pattern recognition), metabolites rele

  2. Metabolomics as a Tool to Investigate Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Gómez-Cadenas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites reflect the integration of gene expression, protein interaction and other different regulatory processes and are therefore closer to the phenotype than mRNA transcripts or proteins alone. Amongst all –omics technologies, metabolomics is the most transversal and can be applied to different organisms with little or no modifications. It has been successfully applied to the study of molecular phenotypes of plants in response to abiotic stress in order to find particular patterns associated to stress tolerance. These studies have highlighted the essential involvement of primary metabolites: sugars, amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates as direct markers of photosynthetic dysfunction as well as effectors of osmotic readjustment. On the contrary, secondary metabolites are more specific of genera and species and respond to particular stress conditions as antioxidants, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS scavengers, coenzymes, UV and excess radiation screen and also as regulatory molecules. In addition, the induction of secondary metabolites by several abiotic stress conditions could also be an effective mechanism of cross-protection against biotic threats, providing a link between abiotic and biotic stress responses. Moreover, the presence/absence and relative accumulation of certain metabolites along with gene expression data provides accurate markers (mQTL or MWAS for tolerant crop selection in breeding programs.

  3. Distinguishing between the metabolome and xenobiotic exposome in environmental field samples analysed by direct-infusion mass spectrometry based metabolomics and lipidomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Andrew D; Lange, Anke; Al-Salhi, Raghad; Hill, Elizabeth M; Tyler, Charles R; Viant, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Environmental metabolomics is increasingly used to investigate organismal responses to complex chemical mixtures, including waste water effluent (WWE). In parallel, increasingly sensitive analytical methods are being used in metabolomics studies, particularly mass spectrometry. This introduces a considerable, yet overlooked, challenge that high analytical sensitivity will not only improve the detection of endogenous metabolites in biological specimens but also exogenous chemicals. If these often unknown xenobiotic features are not removed from the "biological" dataset, they will bias the interpretation and could lead to incorrect conclusions about the biotic response. Here we illustrate and validate a novel workflow classifying the origin of peaks detected in biological samples as: endogenous, xenobiotics, or metabolised xenobiotics. The workflow is demonstrated using direct infusion mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analysis of testes from roach exposed to different concentrations of a complex WWE. We show that xenobiotics and their metabolic products can be detected in roach testes (including triclosan, chloroxylenol and chlorophene), and that these compounds have a disproportionately high level of statistical significance within the total (bio)chemical changes induced by the WWE. Overall we have demonstrated that this workflow extracts more information from an environmental metabolomics study of complex mixture exposures than was possible previously.

  4. NMR-based metabolomics in human disease diagnosis: Applications, limitations, and recommendations

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-04-03

    Metabolomics is a dynamic and emerging research field, similar to proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics in affording global understanding of biological systems. It is particularly useful in functional genomic studies in which metabolism is thought to be perturbed. Metabolomics provides a snapshot of the metabolic dynamics that reflect the response of living systems to both pathophysiological stimuli and/or genetic modification. Because this approach makes possible the examination of interactions between an organism and its diet or environment, it is particularly useful for identifying biomarkers of disease processes that involve the environment. For example, the interaction of a high fat diet with cardiovascular disease can be studied via such a metabolomics approach by modeling the interaction between genes and diet. The high reproducibility of NMR-based techniques gives this method a number of advantages over other analytical techniques in large-scale and long-term metabolomic studies, such as epidemiological studies. This approach has been used to study a wide range of diseases, through the examination of biofluids, including blood plasma/serum, urine, blister fluid, saliva and semen, as well as tissue extracts and intact tissue biopsies. However, complicating the use of NMR spectroscopy in biomarker discovery is the fact that numerous variables can effect metabolic composition including, fasting, stress, drug administration, diet, gender, age, physical activity, life style and the subject\\'s health condition. To minimize the influence of these variations in the datasets, all experimental conditions including sample collection, storage, preparation as well as NMR spectroscopic parameters and data analysis should be optimized carefully and conducted in an identical manner as described by the local standard operating protocol. This review highlights the potential applications of NMR-based metabolomics studies and gives some recommendations to improve sample

  5. Metabolomics-Based Screening of Biofilm-Inhibitory Compounds against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Burdock Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixiang Lou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Screening of anti-biofilm compounds from the burdock leaf based on metabolomics is reported here. The crystal violet assay indicated 34% ethanol elution fraction of burdock leaf could completely inhibit biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at 1 mg·mL−1. Then, the chemical composition of burdock leaf fraction was analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS and 11 active compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, ursolic acid, rutin, cynarin, luteolin, crocin, benzoic acid, and Tenacissoside I were identified. Lastly, UPLC-MS analysis was employed to obtain the metabolic fingerprints of burdock leaf fractions before and after inhibiting the biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The metabolic fingerprints were transformed to data, analyzed with PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis and the peaks whose area was significantly changed were found out. Thus, 81 compounds were screened as potential anti-biofilm ingredients. Among them, rutin, ursolic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and quercetin were identified and confirmed as the main anti-biofilm compounds in burdock leaf. The study provided basic anti-biofilm profile data for the compounds in burdock leaf, as well as provided a convenient method for fast screening of anti-biofilm compounds from natural plants.

  6. Discovery of biomarkers for oxidative stress based on cellular metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningli; Wei, Jianteng; Liu, Yewei; Pei, Dong; Hu, Qingping; Wang, Yu; Di, Duolong

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has a close relationship with various pathologic physiology phenomena and the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide evidence for clinical diagnosis or disease prevention. Metabolomics was employed to identify the potential biomarkers of oxidative stress. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector, mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminate analysis were used in this study. The 10, 15 and 13 metabolites were considered to discriminate the model group, vitamin E-treated group and l-glutathione-treated group, respectively. Some of them have been identified, namely, malic acid, vitamin C, reduced glutathione and tryptophan. Identification of other potential biomarkers should be conducted and their physiological significance also needs to be elaborated.

  7. Nutri-metabolomics: subtle serum metabolic differences in healthy subjects by NMR-based metabolomics after a short-term nutritional intervention with two tomato sauces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Cañellas, Nicolau; Abete, Itziar; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zulet, M Ángeles; Correig, Xavier; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Postgenomics research and development is witnessing novel intersections of omics data intensive technology and applications in health and personalized nutrition. Chief among these is the nascent field of nutri-metabolomics that harnesses metabolomics platforms to discern person-to-person variations in nutritional responses. To this end, differences in the origin and ripening stage of fruits might have a strong impact on their phytochemical composition, and consequently, on their potential nutri-metabolomics effects on health. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a 4-week cross-over nutritional intervention on the metabolic status of 24 young healthy subjects. The intervention was carried out with two tomato sauces differing in their natural lycopene content, which was achieved by using tomatoes harvested at different times. Blood samples were drawn from each subject before and after each intervention period. Aqueous and lipid extracts from serum samples were analyzed by 1H-NMR metabolic profiling combined with analysis of variance simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) and multilevel simultaneous component analysis (MSCA). These methods allowed the interpretation of the variation induced by the main factors of the study design (sauce treatment and time). The levels of creatine, creatinine, leucine, choline, methionine, and acetate in aqueous extracts were increased after the intervention with the high-lycopene content sauce, while those of ascorbic acid, lactate, pyruvate, isoleucine, alanine were increased after the normal-lycopene content sauce. In conclusion, NMR-based metabolomics of aqueous and lipid extracts allowed the detection of different metabolic changes after the nutritional intervention. This outcome might partly be due to the different ripening state of the fruits used in production of the tomato sauces. The findings presented herein collectively attest to the emergence of the field of nutri-metabolomics as a novel

  8. Distinct urine metabolome after Asian ginseng and American ginseng intervention based on GC-MS metabolomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Yu, Qing-Tao; Ge, Ya-Zhong; Zhang, Wen-Song; Fan, Yong; Ma, Chung-Wah; Liu, Qun; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng occupies a prominent position in the list of best-selling natural products worldwide. Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) show different properties and medicinal applications in pharmacology, even though the main active constituents of them are both thought to be ginsenosides. Metabolomics is a promising method to profile entire endogenous metabolites and monitor their fluctuations related to exogenous stimulus. Herein, an untargeted metabolomics approach was applied to study the overall urine metabolic differences between Asian ginseng and American ginseng in mice. Metabolomics analyses were performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) together with multivariate statistical data analysis. A total of 21 metabolites related to D-glutamine and D-glutamate metabolism, glutathione metabolism, TCA cycle and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, differed significantly under the Asian ginseng treatment; 34 metabolites mainly associated with glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, TCA cycle and taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, were significantly altered after American ginseng treatment. Urinary metabolomics reveal that Asian ginseng and American ginseng can benefit organism physiological and biological functions via regulating multiple metabolic pathways. The important pathways identified from Asian ginseng and American ginseng can also help to explore new therapeutic effects or action targets so as to broad application of these two ginsengs. PMID:27991533

  9. Metabolome based reaction graphs of M. tuberculosis and M. leprae: a comparative network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketki D Verkhedkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several types of networks, such as transcriptional, metabolic or protein-protein interaction networks of various organisms have been constructed, that have provided a variety of insights into metabolism and regulation. Here, we seek to exploit the reaction-based networks of three organisms for comparative genomics. We use concepts from spectral graph theory to systematically determine how differences in basic metabolism of organisms are reflected at the systems level and in the overall topological structures of their metabolic networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Metabolome-based reaction networks of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Escherichia coli have been constructed based on the KEGG LIGAND database, followed by graph spectral analysis of the network to identify hubs as well as the sub-clustering of reactions. The shortest and alternate paths in the reaction networks have also been examined. Sub-cluster profiling demonstrates that reactions of the mycolic acid pathway in mycobacteria form a tightly connected sub-cluster. Identification of hubs reveals reactions involving glutamate to be central to mycobacterial metabolism, and pyruvate to be at the centre of the E. coli metabolome. The analysis of shortest paths between reactions has revealed several paths that are shorter than well established pathways. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that severe downsizing of the leprae genome has not significantly altered the global structure of its reaction network but has reduced the total number of alternate paths between its reactions while keeping the shortest paths between them intact. The hubs in the mycobacterial networks that are absent in the human metabolome can be explored as potential drug targets. This work demonstrates the usefulness of constructing metabolome based networks of organisms and the feasibility of their analyses through graph spectral methods. The insights obtained from such studies provide a

  10. MetaDB a Data Processing Workflow in Untargeted MS-Based Metabolomics Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro eFranceschi; Roman eMylonas; Nir eShahaf; Matthias eScholz; Panagiotis eArapitsas; Domenico eMasuero; Georg eWeingart; Silvia eCarlin; Urska eVrhovsek; Fulvio eMattivi; Ron eWehrens

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sensitivity and speed, mass-spectrometry based analytical technologies are widely used to in metabolomics to characterize biological phenomena. To address issues like metadata organization, quality assessment, data processing, data storage and, finally, submission to public repositories, bioinformatic pipelines of a non-interactive nature are often employed, complementing the interactive software used for initial inspection and visualization of the data. These pipelines often are...

  11. Shotgun metabolomic approach based on mass spectrometry for hepatic mitochondria of mice under arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Navarro, F; Montero-Lobato, Z; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2015-04-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based toxicometabolomics requires analytical approaches for obtaining unbiased metabolic profiles. The present work explores the general application of direct infusion MS using a high mass resolution analyzer (a hybrid systems triple quadrupole-time-of-flight) and a complementary gas chromatography-MS analysis to mitochondria extracts from mouse hepatic cells, emphasizing on mitochondria isolation from hepatic cells with a commercial kit, sample treatment after cell lysis, comprehensive metabolomic analysis and pattern recognition from metabolic profiles. Finally, the metabolomic platform was successfully checked on a case-study based on the exposure experiment of mice Mus musculus to inorganic arsenic during 12 days. Endogenous metabolites alterations were recognized by partial least squares-discriminant analysis. Subsequently, metabolites were identified by combining MS/MS analysis and metabolomics databases. This work reports for the first time the effects of As-exposure on hepatic mitochondria metabolic pathways based on MS, and reveals disturbances in Krebs cycle, β-oxidation pathway, amino acids degradation and perturbations in creatine levels. This non-target analysis provides extensive metabolic information from mitochondrial organelle, which could be applied to toxicology, pharmacology and clinical studies.

  12. [A novel metabolomic data scaling method based on K-L divergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ling-Li; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Shen, Gui-Ping; Zhou, Ling; Liu, Xin-Zhuo; Dong, Ji-Yang; Chen, Zhong

    2014-10-01

    A new scaling method in the current study based on Kullback-Leibler (K-L) divergence is proposed for NMR metabolomic data. The proposed method (called K-L scaling) is a supervised scaling method as group information is incorporated in the scaling procedure. Notably, K-L divergence measures the difference between two different datasets by their probability distributions, it can be used for the analysis of data that either follows Gaussian or non-Gaussian distributions. In K-L scaling, all variables were first standardized to unit variance, then their variance was adjusted using Kullback-Leibler divergence to highlight the significant variables. K-L scaling can tell effectively the difference in spectral data points between two experimental groups, and then enhances the weights of biological-relevant variables, and at the same time reduces the weight of noise and uninformative variables. The developed method was applied to a H-NMR metabolomic dataset acquired from human urine. Analysis results of the dataset showed that this new scaling method is efficient in suppressing the contribution of noise in the resulting multivariate model In addition, it can increase the weights of important variables, and improve the interpretability and predictability of subsequent principal component regression (PCR) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Furthermore, the scaling method facilitated the identification of metabolic signatures. The current result suggested that the developed K-L scaling method may become a useful alternative for the preprocessing of NMR-based metabolomic data.

  13. Advances in high-resolution mass spectrometry based on metabolomics studies for food--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Josep; Zachariasova, Milena; Hajslova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Food authenticity becomes a necessity for global food policies, since food placed in the market without fail has to be authentic. It has always been a challenge, since in the past minor components, called also markers, have been mainly monitored by chromatographic methods in order to authenticate the food. Nevertheless, nowadays, advanced analytical methods have allowed food fingerprints to be achieved. At the same time they have been also combined with chemometrics, which uses statistical methods in order to verify food and to provide maximum information by analysing chemical data. These sophisticated methods based on different separation techniques or stand alone have been recently coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) in order to verify the authenticity of food. The new generation of HRMS detectors have experienced significant advances in resolving power, sensitivity, robustness, extended dynamic range, easier mass calibration and tandem mass capabilities, making HRMS more attractive and useful to the food metabolomics community, therefore becoming a reliable tool for food authenticity. The purpose of this review is to summarise and describe the most recent metabolomics approaches in the area of food metabolomics, and to discuss the strengths and drawbacks of the HRMS analytical platforms combined with chemometrics.

  14. Bio-effectors from waste materials as growth promoters for tomato plants, an agronomic and metabolomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chehade, Lara; Chami, Ziad Al; De Pascali, Sandra; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2015-04-01

    In organic farming, where nutrient management is constrained and sustainability is claimed, bio-effectors pave their way. Considering selected bio-effectors, this study integrates metabolomics to agronomy in depicting induced relevant phenomena. Extracts of three agro-industrial wastes (Lemon processing residues, Fennel processing residues and Brewer's spent grain) are being investigated as sources of bio-effectors for the third trial consequently. Corresponding individual and mixture aqueous extracts are assessed for their synergistic and/or single agronomic and qualitative performances on soil-grown tomato, compared to both a control and humic acid treatments. A metabolomic profiling of tomato fruits via the Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as holistic indicator of fruit quality and extract-induced responses, complements crop productivity and organoleptic/nutritional qualitative analyses. Results are expected to show mainly an enhancement of the fruit qualitative traits, and to confirm partly the previous results of better crop productivity and metabolism enhancement. Waste-derived bio-effectors could be, accordingly, demonstrated as potential candidates of plant-enhancing substances. Keywords: bio-effectors, organic farming, agro-industrial wastes, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), tomato.

  15. Targeted metabolomics shows plasticity in the evolution of signaling lipids and uncovers old and new endocannabinoids in the plant kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, María Salomé; Schubert, Alexandra; Calarco, Serafina; Boccard, Julien; Gertsch, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable absence of arachidonic acid (AA) in seed plants prompted us to systematically study the presence of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, stearic acid, oleic acid, jasmonic acid (JA), N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) and endocannabinoids (ECs) in 71 plant species representative of major phylogenetic clades. Given the difficulty of extrapolating information about lipid metabolites from genetic data we employed targeted metabolomics using LC-MS/MS and GC-MS to study these signaling lipids in plant evolution. Intriguingly, the distribution of AA among the clades showed an inverse correlation with JA which was less present in algae, bryophytes and monilophytes. Conversely, ECs co-occurred with AA in algae and in the lower plants (bryophytes and monilophytes), thus prior to the evolution of cannabinoid receptors in Animalia. We identified two novel EC-like molecules derived from the eicosatetraenoic acid juniperonic acid, an omega-3 structural isomer of AA, namely juniperoyl ethanolamide and 2-juniperoyl glycerol in gymnosperms, lycophytes and few monilophytes. Principal component analysis of the targeted metabolic profiles suggested that distinct NAEs may occur in different monophyletic taxa. This is the first report on the molecular phylogenetic distribution of apparently ancient lipids in the plant kingdom, indicating biosynthetic plasticity and potential physiological roles of EC-like lipids in plants. PMID:28120902

  16. PLS-based and regularization-based methods for the selection of relevant variables in non-targeted metabolomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bujak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-targeted metabolomics constitutes a part of systems biology and aims to determine many metabolites in complex biological samples. Datasets obtained in non-targeted metabolomics studies are multivariate and high-dimensional due to the sensitivity of mass spectrometry-based detection methods as well as complexity of biological matrices. Proper selection of variables which contribute into group classification is a crucial step, especially in metabolomics studies which are focused on searching for disease biomarker candidates. In the present study, three different statistical approaches were tested using two metabolomics datasets (RH and PH study. Orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA without and with multiple testing correction as well as least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO were tested and compared. For the RH study, OPLS-DA model built without multiple testing correction, selected 46 and 218 variables based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the case of the PH study, 217 and 320 variables were selected based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the RH study, OPLS-DA model built with multiple testing correction, selected 4 and 19 variables as statistically significant in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. For PH study, 14 and 18 variables were selected based on VIP criteria in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. Additionally, the concept and fundaments of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO with bootstrap procedure evaluating reproducibility of results, was demonstrated. In the RH and PH study, the LASSO selected 14 and 4 variables with reproducibility between 99.3% and 100%. However, apart from the popularity of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA methods in metabolomics, it should be highlighted that they do not control type I or type II error, but only arbitrarily establish a cut-off value for PLS-DA loadings

  17. Performance evaluation of tile-based Fisher Ratio analysis using a benchmark yeast metabolome dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathanial E; Parsons, Brendon A; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-08-12

    Performance of tile-based Fisher Ratio (F-ratio) data analysis, recently developed for discovery-based studies using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS), is evaluated with a metabolomics dataset that had been previously analyzed in great detail, but while taking a brute force approach. The previously analyzed data (referred to herein as the benchmark dataset) were intracellular extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), either metabolizing glucose (repressed) or ethanol (derepressed), which define the two classes in the discovery-based analysis to find metabolites that are statistically different in concentration between the two classes. Beneficially, this previously analyzed dataset provides a concrete means to validate the tile-based F-ratio software. Herein, we demonstrate and validate the significant benefits of applying tile-based F-ratio analysis. The yeast metabolomics data are analyzed more rapidly in about one week versus one year for the prior studies with this dataset. Furthermore, a null distribution analysis is implemented to statistically determine an adequate F-ratio threshold, whereby the variables with F-ratio values below the threshold can be ignored as not class distinguishing, which provides the analyst with confidence when analyzing the hit table. Forty-six of the fifty-four benchmarked changing metabolites were discovered by the new methodology while consistently excluding all but one of the benchmarked nineteen false positive metabolites previously identified.

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic and Proteomic Strategies in Organic Acidemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Imperlini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic acidemias (OAs are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficiency of enzymatic activities in the catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. These disorders result in the accumulation of mono-, di-, or tricarboxylic acids, generally referred to as organic acids. The OA outcomes can involve different organs and/or systems. Some OA disorders are easily managed if promptly diagnosed and treated, whereas, in others cases, such as propionate metabolism-related OAs (propionic acidemia, PA; methylmalonic acidemia, MMA, neither diet, vitamin therapy, nor liver transplantation appears to prevent multiorgan impairment. Here, we review the recent developments in dissecting molecular bases of OAs by using integration of mass spectrometry- (MS- based metabolomic and proteomic strategies. MS-based techniques have facilitated the rapid and economical evaluation of a broad spectrum of metabolites in various body fluids, also collected in small samples, like dried blood spots. This approach has enabled the timely diagnosis of OAs, thereby facilitating early therapeutic intervention. Besides providing an overview of MS-based approaches most frequently used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying OA pathophysiology, we discuss the principal challenges of metabolomic and proteomic applications to OAs.

  19. (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis of the effect of moderate wine consumption on subjects with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Llorach, Rafael; Alcaro, Francesca; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Vinaixa, Maria; Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Estruch, Ramon; Correig, Xavier; Andrés-Lacueva, Cristina

    2012-08-01

    Moderate wine consumption is associated with health-promoting activities. An H-NMR-based metabolomic approach was used to identify urinary metabolomic differences of moderate wine intake in the setting of a prospective, randomized, crossover, and controlled trial. Sixty-one male volunteers with high cardiovascular risk factors followed three dietary interventions (28 days): dealcoholized red wine (RWD) (272mL/day, polyphenol control), alcoholized red wine (RWA) (272mL/day) and gin (GIN) (100mL/day, alcohol control). After each period, 24-h urine samples were collected and analyzed by (1) H-NMR. According to the results of a one-way ANOVA, significant markers were grouped in four categories: alcohol-related markers (ethanol); gin-related markers; wine-related markers; and gut microbiota markers (hippurate and 4-hydroxphenylacetic acid). Wine metabolites were classified into two groups; first, metabolites of food metabolome: tartrate (RWA and RWD), ethanol, and mannitol (RWA); and second, biomarkers that relates to endogenous modifications after wine consumption, comprising branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolite (3-methyl-oxovalerate). Additionally, a possible interaction between alcohol and gut-related biomarkers has been identified. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been applied in a nutritional intervention with red wine. The results show the capacity of this approach to obtain a comprehensive metabolome picture including food metabolome and endogenous biomarkers of moderate wine intake.

  20. Overexpression of ORCA3 and G10H in Catharanthus roseus plants regulated alkaloid biosynthesis and metabolism revealed by NMR-metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifang Pan

    Full Text Available In order to improve the production of the anticancer dimeric indole alkaloids in Catharanthuse roseus, much research has been dedicated to culturing cell lines, hairy roots, and efforts to elucidate the regulation of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA biosynthesis. In this study, the ORCA3 (Octadecanoid-derivative Responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain gene alone or integrated with the G10H (geraniol 10-hydroxylase gene were first introduced into C. roseus plants. Transgenic C. roseus plants overexpressing ORCA3 alone (OR lines, or co-overexpressing G10H and ORCA3 (GO lines were obtained by genetic modification. ORCA3 overexpression induced an increase of AS, TDC, STR and D4H transcripts but did not affect CRMYC2 and G10H transcription. G10H transcripts showed a significant increase under G10H and ORCA3 co-overexpression. ORCA3 and G10H overexpression significantly increased the accumulation of strictosidine, vindoline, catharanthine and ajmalicine but had limited effects on anhydrovinblastine and vinblastine levels. NMR-based metabolomics confirmed the higher accumulation of monomeric indole alkaloids in OR and GO lines. Multivariate data analysis of (1H NMR spectra showed change of amino acid, organic acid, sugar and phenylpropanoid levels in both OR and GO lines compared to the controls. The result indicated that enhancement of MIA biosynthesis by ORCA3 and G10H overexpression might affect other metabolic pathways in the plant metabolism of C. roseus.

  1. MetaDB a Data Processing Workflow in Untargeted MS-Based Metabolomics Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Pietro; Mylonas, Roman; Shahaf, Nir; Scholz, Matthias; Arapitsas, Panagiotis; Masuero, Domenico; Weingart, Georg; Carlin, Silvia; Vrhovsek, Urska; Mattivi, Fulvio; Wehrens, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sensitivity and speed, mass-spectrometry based analytical technologies are widely used to in metabolomics to characterize biological phenomena. To address issues like metadata organization, quality assessment, data processing, data storage, and, finally, submission to public repositories, bioinformatic pipelines of a non-interactive nature are often employed, complementing the interactive software used for initial inspection and visualization of the data. These pipelines often are created as open-source software allowing the complete and exhaustive documentation of each step, ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis of extensive and often expensive experiments. In this paper, we will review the major steps which constitute such a data processing pipeline, discussing them in the context of an open-source software for untargeted MS-based metabolomics experiments recently developed at our institute. The software has been developed by integrating our metaMS R package with a user-friendly web-based application written in Grails. MetaMS takes care of data pre-processing and annotation, while the interface deals with the creation of the sample lists, the organization of the data storage, and the generation of survey plots for quality assessment. Experimental and biological metadata are stored in the ISA-Tab format making the proposed pipeline fully integrated with the Metabolights framework.

  2. Effect of the environment on the secondary metabolic profile of Tithonia diversifolia: a model for environmental metabolomics of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2016-07-07

    Tithonia diversifolia is an invasive weed commonly found in tropical ecosystems. In this work, we investigate the influence of different abiotic environmental factors on the plant's metabolite profile by multivariate statistical analyses of spectral data deduced by UHPLC-DAD-ESI-HRMS and NMR methods. Different plant part samples of T. diversifolia which included leaves, stems, roots, and inflorescences were collected from two Brazilian states throughout a 24-month period, along with the corresponding monthly environmental data. A metabolomic approach employing concatenated LC-MS and NMR data was utilised for the first time to study the relationships between environment and plant metabolism. A seasonal pattern was observed for the occurrence of metabolites that included sugars, sesquiterpenes lactones and phenolics in the leaf and stem parts, which can be correlated to the amount of rainfall and changes in temperature. The distribution of the metabolites in the inflorescence and root parts were mainly affected by variation of some soil nutrients such as Ca, Mg, P, K and Cu. We highlight the environment-metabolism relationship for T. diversifolia and the combined analytical approach to obtain reliable data that contributed to a holistic understanding of the influence of abiotic environmental factors on the production of metabolites in various plant parts.

  3. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Huanglongbing-Asymptomatic and -Symptomatic Citrus Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Deisy dos Santos; Carlos, Eduardo Fermino; Gil, Márcia Cristina Soares de Souza; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2015-09-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most severe diseases that affects citrus trees worldwide and is associated with the yet uncultured bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp. To assess the metabolomic differences between HLB-asymptomatic and -symptomatic tissues, extracts from leaf and root samples taken from a uniform 6-year-old commercial orchard of Valencia trees were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics. The results show that the symptomatic trees had higher sucrose content in their leaves and no variation in their roots. In addition, proline betaine and malate were detected in smaller amounts in the HLB-affected symptomatic leaves. The changes in metabolic processes of the plant in response to HLB are corroborated by the relationship between the bacterial levels and the metabolic profiles.

  4. NMR-based metabolomics for the environmental assessment of Kaohsiung Harbor sediments exemplified by a marine amphipod (Hyalella azteca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, K H; Dong, C D; Chen, C F; Tsai, M L; Ju, Y R; Chen, T M; Chen, C W

    2017-03-03

    Inflow of wastewater from upstream causes a large flux of pollutants to enter Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan daily. To reveal the ecological risk posed by Kaohsiung Harbor sediments, an ecological metabolomic approach was employed to investigate environmental factors pertinent to the physiological regulation of the marine amphipod Hyalella azteca. The amphipods were exposed to sediments collected from different stream inlets of the Love River (LR), Canon River (CR), Jen-Gen River (JR), and Salt River (SR). Harbor entrance 1 (E1) was selected as a reference site. After 10-day exposure, metabolomic analysis of the Hyalella azteca revealed differences between two groups: {E1, LR, CR} and {JR, SR}. The metabolic pathways identified in the two groups of amphipods were significantly different. The results demonstrated that NMR-based metabolomics can be effectively used to characterize metabolic response related to sediment from polluted areas.

  5. MetaDB a Data Processing Workflow in Untargeted MS-Based Metabolomics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eFranceschi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their sensitivity and speed, mass-spectrometry based analytical technologies are widely used to in metabolomics to characterize biological phenomena. To address issues like metadata organization, quality assessment, data processing, data storage and, finally, submission to public repositories, bioinformatic pipelines of a non-interactive nature are often employed, complementing the interactive software used for initial inspection and visualization of the data. These pipelines often are created as open-source software allowing the complete and exhaustive documentation of each step, ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis of extensive and often expensive experiments.In this paper we will review the major steps which constitute such a data processing pipeline, discussing them in the context of open source software for untargeted Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS metabolomics experiments recently developed at our institute. The software has been developed by integrating our metaMS R package with a user-friendly web based application written in Grails. MetaMS takes care of data pre-processing and annotation, while the interface deals with the creation of the sample lists, the organization of the data storage and the generation of survey plots for quality assessment. Experimental and biological metadata are stored in the ISA-Tab format making the proposed pipeline fully integrated with the Metabolights framework.

  6. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study of earthworm Perionyx excavatus in vermifiltration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xulei; Laserna, Anna Karen Carrasco; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-10-01

    In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to characterize the metabolic response of the earthworm Perionyx excavatus in continuous vermifiltration for two months under hydraulic loading rates of 1m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1) and 1.5m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1.5). Both VF1 and VF1.5 showed higher removal of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen than the biofilter without earthworms. Principal component analysis of the NMR spectra of earthworm metabolites showed significant separations between those not subjected to wastewater filtration (control) and VF1 or VF1.5. Temporal variations of earthworm biomass, and the identified metabolites that are significantly different between control, VF1 and VF1.5 revealed that worms underwent increasing metabolic activity within 20days in VF1 and 14days in VF1.5, then decreasing metabolic activity. The use of NMR-based metabolomics in monitoring earthworm metabolism was demonstrated to be a novel approach in studying engineered vermifiltration systems.

  7. Quality assurance of metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Beger, Richard; Flynn, Thomas; Guo, Lining; Harris, Georgina; Hogberg, Helena; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Kamp, Hennicke; Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Odwin-DaCosta, Shelly; Pamies, David; Robertson, Donald; Smirnova, Lena; Sun, Jinchun; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics promises a holistic phenotypic characterization of biological responses to toxicants. This technology is based on advanced chemical analytical tools with reasonable throughput, including mass-spectroscopy and NMR. Quality assurance, however - from experimental design, sample preparation, metabolite identification, to bioinformatics data-mining - is urgently needed to assure both quality of metabolomics data and reproducibility of biological models. In contrast to microarray-based transcriptomics, where consensus on quality assurance and reporting standards has been fostered over the last two decades, quality assurance of metabolomics is only now emerging. Regulatory use in safety sciences, and even proper scientific use of these technologies, demand quality assurance. In an effort to promote this discussion, an expert workshop discussed the quality assurance needs of metabolomics. The goals for this workshop were 1) to consider the challenges associated with metabolomics as an emerging science, with an emphasis on its application in toxicology and 2) to identify the key issues to be addressed in order to establish and implement quality assurance procedures in metabolomics-based toxicology. Consensus has still to be achieved regarding best practices to make sure sound, useful, and relevant information is derived from these new tools.

  8. Exploring human breast milk composition by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, Giulia; Capuani, Giorgio; Tomassini, Alberta; Baldassarre, Maria Elisabetta; Delfini, Maurizio; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is a complex fluid evolutionarily adapted to satisfy the nutritional requirements of growing infants. In addition, milk biochemical and immunological components protect newborns against infective agents in the new environment. Human milk oligosaccharides, the third most abundant component of breast milk, are believed to modulate the microbiota composition, thus influencing a wide range of physiological processes of the infant. Human milk also contains a number of other bioactive compounds, the functional role of which has not yet been clearly elucidated. In this scenario, NMR-based metabolic profiling can provide a rapid characterisation of breast milk composition, thus allowing a better understanding of its nutritional properties.

  9. Effect of the environment on the secondary metabolic profile of Tithonia diversifolia: a model for environmental metabolomics of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2016-07-01

    Tithonia diversifolia is an invasive weed commonly found in tropical ecosystems. In this work, we investigate the influence of different abiotic environmental factors on the plant’s metabolite profile by multivariate statistical analyses of spectral data deduced by UHPLC-DAD-ESI-HRMS and NMR methods. Different plant part samples of T. diversifolia which included leaves, stems, roots, and inflorescences were collected from two Brazilian states throughout a 24-month period, along with the corresponding monthly environmental data. A metabolomic approach employing concatenated LC-MS and NMR data was utilised for the first time to study the relationships between environment and plant metabolism. A seasonal pattern was observed for the occurrence of metabolites that included sugars, sesquiterpenes lactones and phenolics in the leaf and stem parts, which can be correlated to the amount of rainfall and changes in temperature. The distribution of the metabolites in the inflorescence and root parts were mainly affected by variation of some soil nutrients such as Ca, Mg, P, K and Cu. We highlight the environment-metabolism relationship for T. diversifolia and the combined analytical approach to obtain reliable data that contributed to a holistic understanding of the influence of abiotic environmental factors on the production of metabolites in various plant parts.

  10. Application of NMR-based metabolomics to the study of gut microbiota in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvani, Riccardo; Brasili, Elisa; Praticò, Giulia; Sciubba, Fabio; Roselli, Marianna; Finamore, Alberto; Marini, Federico; Marzetti, Emanuele; Miccheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle habits, host gene repertoire, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota concur to the development of obesity. A great deal of research has recently been focused on investigating the role gut microbiota plays in the pathogenesis of metabolic dysfunctions and increased adiposity. Altered microbiota can affect host physiology through several pathways, including enhanced energy harvest, and perturbations in immunity, metabolic signaling, and inflammatory pathways. A broad range of "omics" technologies is now available to help decipher the interactions between the host and the gut microbiota at detailed genetic and functional levels. In particular, metabolomics--the comprehensive analysis of metabolite composition of biological fluids and tissues--could provide breakthrough insights into the links among the gut microbiota, host genetic repertoire, and diet during the development and progression of obesity. Here, we briefly review the most insightful findings on the involvement of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of obesity. We also discuss how metabolomic approaches based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy could help understand the activity of gut microbiota in relation to obesity, and assess the effects of gut microbiota modulation in the treatment of this condition.

  11. Enabling Metabolomics Based Biomarker Discovery Studies Using Molecular Phenotyping of Exosome-Like Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Altadill

    Full Text Available Identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers with clinical and translational utility will require smart experimental strategies that would augment expanding the breadth and depth of molecular measurements within the constraints of currently available technologies. Exosomes represent an information rich matrix to discern novel disease mechanisms that are thought to contribute to pathologies such as dementia and cancer. Although proteomics and transcriptomic studies have been reported using Exosomes-Like Vesicles (ELVs from different sources, exosomal metabolome characterization and its modulation in health and disease remains to be elucidated. Here we describe methodologies for UPLC-ESI-MS based small molecule profiling of ELVs from human plasma and cell culture media. In this study, we present evidence that indeed ELVs carry a rich metabolome that could not only augment the discovery of low abundance biomarkers but may also help explain the molecular basis of disease progression. This approach could be easily translated to other studies seeking to develop predictive biomarkers that can subsequently be used with simplified targeted approaches.

  12. Performance Evaluation and Online Realization of Data-driven Normalization Methods Used in LC/MS based Untargeted Metabolomics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Tang, Jing; Yang, Qingxia; Cui, Xuejiao; Li, Shuang; Chen, Sijie; Cao, Quanxing; Xue, Weiwei; Chen, Na; Zhu, Feng

    2016-12-13

    In untargeted metabolomics analysis, several factors (e.g., unwanted experimental &biological variations and technical errors) may hamper the identification of differential metabolic features, which requires the data-driven normalization approaches before feature selection. So far, ≥16 normalization methods have been widely applied for processing the LC/MS based metabolomics data. However, the performance and the sample size dependence of those methods have not yet been exhaustively compared and no online tool for comparatively and comprehensively evaluating the performance of all 16 normalization methods has been provided. In this study, a comprehensive comparison on these methods was conducted. As a result, 16 methods were categorized into three groups based on their normalization performances across various sample sizes. The VSN, the Log Transformation and the PQN were identified as methods of the best normalization performance, while the Contrast consistently underperformed across all sub-datasets of different benchmark data. Moreover, an interactive web tool comprehensively evaluating the performance of 16 methods specifically for normalizing LC/MS based metabolomics data was constructed and hosted at http://server.idrb.cqu.edu.cn/MetaPre/. In summary, this study could serve as a useful guidance to the selection of suitable normalization methods in analyzing the LC/MS based metabolomics data.

  13. Food metabolomics: from farm to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics, one of the latest components in the suite of systems biology, has been used to understand the metabolism and physiology of living systems, including microorganisms, plants, animals and humans. Food metabolomics can be defined as the application of metabolomics in food systems, including food resources, food processing and diet for humans. The study of food metabolomics has increased gradually in the recent years, because food systems are directly related to nutrition and human health. This review describes the recent trends and applications of metabolomics to food systems, from farm to human, including food resource production, industrial food processing and food intake by humans.

  14. UPLC/Q-TOF MS-based metabolomics and qRT-PCR in enzyme gene screening with key role in triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis of Polygala tenuifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Zhang

    Full Text Available The dried root of Polygala tenuifolia, named Radix Polygalae, is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine. Triterpenoid saponins are some of the most important components of Radix Polygalae extracts and are widely studied because of their valuable pharmacological properties. However, the relationship between gene expression and triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis in P. tenuifolia is unclear.In this study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS-based metabolomic analysis was performed to identify and quantify the different chemical constituents of the roots, stems, leaves, and seeds of P. tenuifolia. A total of 22 marker compounds (VIP>1 were explored, and significant differences in all 7 triterpenoid saponins among the different tissues were found. We also observed an efficient reference gene GAPDH for different tissues in this plant and determined the expression level of some genes in the triterpenoid saponin biosynthetic pathway. Results showed that MVA pathway has more important functions in the triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis of P. tenuifolia. The expression levels of squalene synthase (SQS, squalene monooxygenase (SQE, and beta-amyrin synthase (β-AS were highly correlated with the peak area intensity of triterpenoid saponins compared with data from UPLC/Q-TOF MS-based metabolomic analysis.This finding suggested that a combination of UPLC/Q-TOF MS-based metabolomics and gene expression analysis can effectively elucidate the mechanism of triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis and can provide useful information on gene discovery. These findings can serve as a reference for using the overexpression of genes encoding for SQS, SQE, and/or β-AS to increase the triterpenoid saponin production of P. tenuifolia.

  15. Nutrimetabolomics: An Update on Analytical Approaches to Investigate the Role of Plant-Based Foods and Their Bioactive Compounds in Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Huerta, Oscar Daniel; Gil, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the study of low-weight molecules present in biological samples such as biofluids, tissue/cellular extracts, and culture media. Metabolomics research is increasing, and at the moment, it has several applications in the food science and nutrition fields. In the present review, we provide an update about the most frequently used methodologies and metabolomic platforms in these areas. Also, we discuss different metabolomic strategies regarding the discovery of new bioactive compounds (BACs) in plant-based foods. Furthermore, we review the existing literature related to the use of metabolomics to investigate the potential protective role of BACs in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable chronic diseases, namely cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:27941699

  16. Nutrimetabolomics: An Update on Analytical Approaches to Investigate the Role of Plant-Based Foods and Their Bioactive Compounds in Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Daniel Rangel-Huerta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is the study of low-weight molecules present in biological samples such as biofluids, tissue/cellular extracts, and culture media. Metabolomics research is increasing, and at the moment, it has several applications in the food science and nutrition fields. In the present review, we provide an update about the most frequently used methodologies and metabolomic platforms in these areas. Also, we discuss different metabolomic strategies regarding the discovery of new bioactive compounds (BACs in plant-based foods. Furthermore, we review the existing literature related to the use of metabolomics to investigate the potential protective role of BACs in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable chronic diseases, namely cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

  17. A novel serum metabolomics-based diagnostic approach for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nishiumi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve the quality of life of colorectal cancer patients, it is important to establish new screening methods for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed serum metabolome analysis using gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS. First, the accuracy of our GC/MS-based serum metabolomic analytical method was evaluated by calculating the RSD% values of serum levels of various metabolites. Second, the intra-day (morning, daytime, and night and inter-day (among 3 days variances of serum metabolite levels were examined. Then, serum metabolite levels were compared between colorectal cancer patients (N = 60; N = 12 for each stage from 0 to 4 and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (N = 60 as a training set. The metabolites whose levels displayed significant changes were subjected to multiple logistic regression analysis using the stepwise variable selection method, and a colorectal cancer prediction model was established. The prediction model was composed of 2-hydroxybutyrate, aspartic acid, kynurenine, and cystamine, and its AUC, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 0.9097, 85.0%, 85.0%, and 85.0%, respectively, according to the training set data. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CEA were 35.0%, 96.7%, and 65.8%, respectively, and those of CA19-9 were 16.7%, 100%, and 58.3%, respectively. The validity of the prediction model was confirmed using colorectal cancer patients (N = 59 and healthy volunteers (N = 63 as a validation set. At the validation set, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the prediction model were 83.1%, 81.0%, and 82.0%, respectively, and these values were almost the same as those obtained with the training set. In addition, the model displayed high sensitivity for detecting stage 0-2 colorectal cancer (82.8%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our prediction model established via GC/MS-based serum metabolomic analysis

  18. metaMS: An open-source pipeline for GC–MS-based untargeted metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehrens, H.R.M.J.; Weingart, G.; Mattivi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics are rapidly becoming an important tool for studying complex biological samples. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) is the most widely used analytical technology for metabolomic analysis of compounds that are volatile or can be chemically derivatised into volatile co

  19. Evaluation of dried blood spots as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sing Teang; Lin, Hai-Shu; Ching, Jianhong; Ho, Paul C

    2011-06-01

    We propose using dried blood spots (DBS) as sample matrix for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) based metabolomic profiling for the benefits of higher sample stability, more convenient sample acquisition with DBS, higher analyte separation power, and more readily biomarker identification with GC/MS. To establish this proposition, the metabolomic profiles generated from DBS were compared with that obtained from the conventional whole blood and plasma matrixes and also with dried plasma spots (DPS) as another covariate control. Our findings indicated that whole blood produced the most number of detectable markers (866), whereas DPS yielded the least number (614). DBS and plasma matrix, on the other hand, produced the most similar numbers of detectable (695 vs 749) and identifiable markers (137 vs 147, matching with Fiehn library). From the analysis of the DBS and plasma metabolomic profiles, it was concluded that when l-lysine 2, iminodiacetic acid 2, dl-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartic acid, citric acid, or adenosine-5-monophosphate 2 are not involved as markers, DBS could be a suitable substitute for plasma for metabolomic profiling.

  20. GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics approach to study the cellular immunotoxicity of deoxynivalenol on murine macrophage ANA-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Sun, Jiadi; Pi, Fuwei; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Chao; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-08-25

    Gas chromatography-time of fly/mass spectrum (GC-TOF/MS) based complete murine macrophage ANA-1 cell metabolome strategy, including the endo-metabolome and the exo-metabolome, ANA-1 cell viability assays and apoptosis induced by diverse concentrations of DON were evaluated for selection of an optimized dose for in-depth metabolomic research. Using the optimized chromatography and mass spectrometry parameters, the metabolites detected by GC-TOF/MS were identified and processed with multivariate statistical analysis, including principal componentanalysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) analysis. The data sets were screened with a t-test (P) value  1, similarity value > 500, leaving 16 exo-metabolite variables and 11 endo-metabolite variables for further pathway analysis. Implementing the integration of key metabolic pathways, the metabolism pathways were categorized into two dominating types, metabolism of amino acid and glycometabolism. Glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan biosynthesis and phenylalanine metabolism were the significant amino acids affected by the metabolic pathways, indicating statistically significant fold changes including pyruvate, serine, glycine, lactate and threonine. Glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and galactose metabolism, belonging to glycometabolism, were the pathways that were found to be primarily affected, resulting in abnormal metabolites such as glucose-1P, Glucose, gluconic acid, myo-inositol, sorbitol and glycerol.

  1. Non-targeted Metabolomics in Diverse Sorghum Breeding Lines Indicates Primary and Secondary Metabolite Profiles Are Associated with Plant Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Marie F.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Kirkwood, Jay S.; Collins, Carl C.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Jahn, Courtney E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging method to improve our understanding of how genetic diversity affects phenotypic variation in plants. Recent studies have demonstrated that genotype has a major influence on biochemical variation in several types of plant tissues, however, the association between metabolic variation and variation in morphological and physiological traits is largely unknown. Sorghum bicolor (L.) is an important food and fuel crop with extensive genetic and phenotypic variation. Sorghum lines have been bred for differing phenotypes beneficial for production of grain (food), stem sugar (food, fuel), and cellulosic biomass (forage, fuel), and these varying phenotypes are the end products of innate metabolic programming which determines how carbon is allocated during plant growth and development. Further, sorghum has been adapted among highly diverse environments. Because of this geographic and phenotypic variation, the sorghum metabolome is expected to be highly divergent; however, metabolite variation in sorghum has not been characterized. Here, we utilize a phenotypically diverse panel of sorghum breeding lines to identify associations between leaf metabolites and morpho-physiological traits. The panel (11 lines) exhibited significant variation for 21 morpho-physiological traits, as well as broader trends in variation by sorghum type (grain vs. biomass types). Variation was also observed for cell wall constituents (glucan, xylan, lignin, ash). Non-targeted metabolomics analysis of leaf tissue showed that 956 of 1181 metabolites varied among the lines (81%, ANOVA, FDR adjusted p < 0.05). Both univariate and multivariate analyses determined relationships between metabolites and morpho-physiological traits, and 384 metabolites correlated with at least one trait (32%, p < 0.05), including many secondary metabolites such as glycosylated flavonoids and chlorogenic acids. The use of metabolomics to explain relationships between two or more morpho

  2. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  3. IDEOM : an Excel interface for analysis of LC-MS-based metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creek, Darren J.; Jankevics, Andris; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Barrett, Michael P.; Wren, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The application of emerging metabolomics technologies to the comprehensive investigation of cellular biochemistry has been limited by bottlenecks in data processing, particularly noise filtering and metabolite identification. IDEOM provides a user-friendly data processing application that automates

  4. Recent breakthroughs in metabolomics promise to reveal the cryptic chemical traits that mediate plant community composition, character evolution and lineage diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedio, Brian E

    2017-01-30

    I. II. III. IV. V. References SUMMARY: Much of our understanding of the mechanisms by which biotic interactions shape plant communities has been constrained by the methods available to study the diverse secondary chemistry that defines plant relationships with other organisms. Recent innovations in analytical chemistry and bioinformatics promise to reveal the cryptic chemical traits that mediate plant ecology and evolution by facilitating simultaneous structural comparisons of hundreds of unknown molecules to each other and to libraries of known compounds. Here, I explore the potential for mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics to enable unprecedented tests of seminal, but largely untested hypotheses that propose a fundamental role for plant chemical defenses against herbivores and pathogens in the evolutionary origins and ecological coexistence of plant species diversity.

  5. COordination of Standards in MetabOlomicS (COSMOS): facilitating integrated metabolomics data access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, Reza M; Neumann, Steffen; Schober, Daniel; Hummel, Jan; Billiau, Kenny; Kopka, Joachim; Correa, Elon; Reijmers, Theo; Rosato, Antonio; Tenori, Leonardo; Turano, Paola; Marin, Silvia; Deborde, Catherine; Jacob, Daniel; Rolin, Dominique; Dartigues, Benjamin; Conesa, Pablo; Haug, Kenneth; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; O'Hagan, Steve; Hao, Jie; van Vliet, Michael; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Ludwig, Christian; Bouwman, Jildau; Cascante, Marta; Ebbels, Timothy; Griffin, Julian L; Moing, Annick; Nikolski, Macha; Oresic, Matej; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Viant, Mark R; Goodacre, Royston; Günther, Ulrich L; Hankemeier, Thomas; Luchinat, Claudio; Walther, Dirk; Steinbeck, Christoph

    Metabolomics has become a crucial phenotyping technique in a range of research fields including medicine, the life sciences, biotechnology and the environmental sciences. This necessitates the transfer of experimental information between research groups, as well as potentially to publishers and funders. After the initial efforts of the metabolomics standards initiative, minimum reporting standards were proposed which included the concepts for metabolomics databases. Built by the community, standards and infrastructure for metabolomics are still needed to allow storage, exchange, comparison and re-utilization of metabolomics data. The Framework Programme 7 EU Initiative 'coordination of standards in metabolomics' (COSMOS) is developing a robust data infrastructure and exchange standards for metabolomics data and metadata. This is to support workflows for a broad range of metabolomics applications within the European metabolomics community and the wider metabolomics and biomedical communities' participation. Here we announce our concepts and efforts asking for re-engagement of the metabolomics community, academics and industry, journal publishers, software and hardware vendors, as well as those interested in standardisation worldwide (addressing missing metabolomics ontologies, complex-metadata capturing and XML based open source data exchange format), to join and work towards updating and implementing metabolomics standards.

  6. Data preprocessing method for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Shi, Xue; Kim, Seongho; Zhang, Li; Patrick, Jeffrey S; Binkley, Joe; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-09-18

    A set of data preprocessing algorithms for peak detection and peak list alignment are reported for analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics data. For spectrum deconvolution, peak picking is achieved at the selected ion chromatogram (XIC) level. To estimate and remove the noise in XICs, each XIC is first segmented into several peak groups based on the continuity of scan number, and the noise level is estimated by all the XIC signals, except the regions potentially with presence of metabolite ion peaks. After removing noise, the peaks of molecular ions are detected using both the first and the second derivatives, followed by an efficient exponentially modified Gaussian-based peak deconvolution method for peak fitting. A two-stage alignment algorithm is also developed, where the retention times of all peaks are first transferred into the z-score domain and the peaks are aligned based on the measure of their mixture scores after retention time correction using a partial linear regression. Analysis of a set of spike-in LC-MS data from three groups of samples containing 16 metabolite standards mixed with metabolite extract from mouse livers demonstrates that the developed data preprocessing method performs better than two of the existing popular data analysis packages, MZmine2.6 and XCMS(2), for peak picking, peak list alignment, and quantification.

  7. Gut microbiota profiling: metabolomics based approach to unravel compounds affecting human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vernocchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The gut microbiota is composed of a huge number of different bacteria, which produce a large amount of compounds playing a key role in microbe selection and in the construction of a metabolic signaling network. The microbial activity is affected by environmental stimuli leading to the generation of a wide number of compounds, which influence the host metabolome and human health. Indeed, metabolic profiles related to the gut microbiota can offer deep insights on the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on chronic and acute diseases. Metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics are some of the meta-omics approaches to study the modulation of the gut microbiota. Metabolomic research applied to biofluids allows to: define the metabolic profile; identify and quantify classes and compounds of interest; characterize small molecules produced by intestinal microbes; and define the biochemical pathways of metabolites. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are the principal technologies applied to metabolomics in terms of coverage, sensitivity and quantification. Moreover, the use of biostatistics and mathematical approaches coupled with metabolomics play a key role in the extraction of biologically meaningful information from wide datasets. Metabolomic studies in gut microbiota-related research have increased, focusing on the generation of novel biomarkers, which could lead to the development of mechanistic hypotheses potentially applicable to the development of nutritional and personalized therapies.

  8. 2D NMR-based metabolomics uncovers interactions between conserved biochemical pathways in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Robinette, Steven L; Bose, Neelanjan; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Ascarosides are small-molecule signals that play a central role in C. elegans biology, including dauer formation, aging, and social behaviors, but many aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. Using automated 2D NMR-based comparative metabolomics, we identified ascaroside ethanolamides as shunt metabolites in C. elegans mutants of daf-22, a gene with homology to mammalian 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases predicted to function in conserved peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation. Two groups of ethanolamide...

  9. Mass Spectrometry-Based Quantitative Metabolomics Revealed a Distinct Lipid Profile in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer accounts for the largest number of newly diagnosed cases in female cancer patients. Although mammography is a powerful screening tool, about 20% of breast cancer cases cannot be detected by this method. New diagnostic biomarkers for breast cancer are necessary. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics method to analyze plasma samples from 55 breast cancer patients and 25 healthy controls. A number of 30 patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls were used as a training dataset to establish a diagnostic model and to identify potential biomarkers. The remaining samples were used as a validation dataset to evaluate the predictive accuracy for the established model. Distinct separation was obtained from an orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA model with good prediction accuracy. Based on this analysis, 39 differentiating metabolites were identified, including significantly lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholines and higher levels of sphingomyelins in the plasma samples obtained from breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls. Using logical regression, a diagnostic equation based on three metabolites (lysoPC a C16:0, PC ae C42:5 and PC aa C34:2 successfully differentiated breast cancer patients from healthy controls, with a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 96.0%.

  10. Comparison of Fruits of Forsythia suspensa at Two Different Maturation Stages by NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jinping; Zhang, Fusheng; Li, Zhenyu; Qin, Xuemei; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-05-29

    Forsythiae Fructus (FF), the dried fruit of Forsythia suspensa, has been widely used as a heat-clearing and detoxifying herbal medicine in China. Green FF (GF) and ripe FF (RF) are fruits of Forsythia suspensa at different maturity stages collected about a month apart. FF undergoes a complex series of physical and biochemical changes during fruit ripening. However, the clinical uses of GF and RF have not been distinguished to date. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of GF and RF, NMR-based metabolomics coupled with HPLC and UV spectrophotometry methods were adopted in this study. Furthermore, the in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of 50% methanol extracts of GF and RF were also evaluated. A total of 27 metabolites were identified based on NMR data, and eight of them were found to be different between the GF and RF groups. The GF group contained higher levels of forsythoside A, forsythoside C, cornoside, rutin, phillyrin and gallic acid and lower levels of rengyol and β-glucose compared with the RF group. The antioxidant activity of GF was higher than that of RF, but no significant difference was observed between the antibacterial activities of GF and RF. Given our results showing their distinct chemical compositions, we propose that NMR-based metabolic profiling can be used to discriminate between GF and RF. Differences in the chemical and biological activities of GF and RF, as well as their clinical efficacies in traditional Chinese medicine should be systematically investigated in future studies.

  11. ProbMetab: an R package for Bayesian probabilistic annotation of LC–MS-based metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ricardo R.; Jourdan, Fabien; Salvanha, Diego M.; Letisse, Fabien; Jamin, Emilien L.; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos A.; Vêncio, Ricardo Z. N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We present ProbMetab, an R package that promotes substantial improvement in automatic probabilistic liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based metabolome annotation. The inference engine core is based on a Bayesian model implemented to (i) allow diverse source of experimental data and metadata to be systematically incorporated into the model with alternative ways to calculate the likelihood function and (ii) allow sensitive selection of biologically meaningful biochemical reaction databases as Dirichlet-categorical prior distribution. Additionally, to ensure result interpretation by system biologists, we display the annotation in a network where observed mass peaks are connected if their candidate metabolites are substrate/product of known biochemical reactions. This graph can be overlaid with other graph-based analysis, such as partial correlation networks, in a visualization scheme exported to Cytoscape, with web and stand-alone versions. Availability and implementation: ProbMetab was implemented in a modular manner to fit together with established upstream (xcms, CAMERA, AStream, mzMatch.R, etc) and downstream R package tools (GeneNet, RCytoscape, DiffCorr, etc). ProbMetab, along with extensive documentation and case studies, is freely available under GNU license at: http://labpib.fmrp.usp.br/methods/probmetab/. Contact: rvencio@usp.br Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24443383

  12. NMR-based metabolomics of urine for the atherosclerotic mouse model using apolipoprotein-E deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Gregory C; Darrow, Andrew L

    2009-12-01

    NMR-based metabolomics of mouse urine was used in conjunction with the traditional staining and imaging of aortas for the characterization of disease advancement, that is, plaque formation in untreated and drug-treated apolipoprotein-E (apoE) knockout mice. The metabolomics approach with multivariate analysis was able to differentiate the captopril-treated from the untreated mice in general agreement with the staining results. Principal component analysis showed a pattern shift in both the drug-treated and untreated samples as a function of time that could possibly be explained as the effect of aging. Allantoin, a marker attributed to captopril treatment was elevated in the drug-treated mice. From partial least squares-discriminant analysis, xanthine and ascorbate were elevated in the untreated mice and were possible markers of plaque formation in the apoE knockout mice. Several additional peaks in the spectra characterizing the study endpoint were found but their respective metabolite identities were unknown.

  13. Study of the cardiotoxicity of Venenum Bufonis in rats using an 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Dong

    Full Text Available Venenum Bufonis, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in Asia and has gained popularity in Western countries over the last decade. Venenum Bufonis has obvious side effects that have been observed in clinical settings, but few studies have reported on its cardiotoxicity. In this work, the cardiotoxicity of Venenum Bufonis was investigated using a 11H NMR-based metabolomics approach. The 1H NMR profiles of the serum, myocardial extracts and liver extracts of specific-pathogen-free rats showed that Venenum Bufonis produced significant metabolic perturbations dose-dependently with a distinct time effect, peaking at 2 hr after dosing and attenuating gradually. Clinical chemistry, electrocardiographic recordings, and histopathological evaluation provided additional evidence of Venenum Bufonis-induced cardiac damage that complemented and supported the metabolomics findings. The combined results demonstrated that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy metabolism perturbations were associated with the cardiac damage that results from Venenum Bufonis.

  14. Evaluation of normalization methods to pave the way towards large-scale LC-MS-based metabolomics profiling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejigu, Bedilu Alamirie; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Vanaerschot, Manu; Witters, Erwin; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Berg, Maya

    2013-09-01

    Combining liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomics experiments that were collected over a long period of time remains problematic due to systematic variability between LC-MS measurements. Until now, most normalization methods for LC-MS data are model-driven, based on internal standards or intermediate quality control runs, where an external model is extrapolated to the dataset of interest. In the first part of this article, we evaluate several existing data-driven normalization approaches on LC-MS metabolomics experiments, which do not require the use of internal standards. According to variability measures, each normalization method performs relatively well, showing that the use of any normalization method will greatly improve data-analysis originating from multiple experimental runs. In the second part, we apply cyclic-Loess normalization to a Leishmania sample. This normalization method allows the removal of systematic variability between two measurement blocks over time and maintains the differential metabolites. In conclusion, normalization allows for pooling datasets from different measurement blocks over time and increases the statistical power of the analysis, hence paving the way to increase the scale of LC-MS metabolomics experiments. From our investigation, we recommend data-driven normalization methods over model-driven normalization methods, if only a few internal standards were used. Moreover, data-driven normalization methods are the best option to normalize datasets from untargeted LC-MS experiments.

  15. Evaluation of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei health during a superintensive aquaculture growout using NMR-based metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey B Schock

    Full Text Available Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc. The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production.

  16. Evaluation of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) health during a superintensive aquaculture growout using NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Tracey B; Duke, Jessica; Goodson, Abby; Weldon, Daryl; Brunson, Jeff; Leffler, John W; Bearden, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Success of the shrimp aquaculture industry requires technological advances that increase production and environmental sustainability. Indoor, superintensive, aquaculture systems are being developed that permit year-round production of farmed shrimp at high densities. These systems are intended to overcome problems of disease susceptibility and of water quality issues from waste products, by operating as essentially closed systems that promote beneficial microbial communities (biofloc). The resulting biofloc can assimilate and detoxify wastes, may provide nutrition for the farmed organisms resulting in improved growth, and may aid in reducing disease initiated from external sources. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic techniques were used to assess shrimp health during a full growout cycle from the nursery phase through harvest in a minimal-exchange, superintensive, biofloc system. Aberrant shrimp metabolomes were detected from a spike in total ammonia nitrogen in the nursery, from a reduced feeding period that was a consequence of surface scum build-up in the raceway, and from the stocking transition from the nursery to the growout raceway. The biochemical changes in the shrimp that were induced by the stressors were essential for survival and included nitrogen detoxification and energy conservation mechanisms. Inosine and trehalose may be general biomarkers of stress in Litopenaeus vannamei. This study demonstrates one aspect of the practicality of using NMR-based metabolomics to enhance the aquaculture industry by providing physiological insight into common environmental stresses that may limit growth or better explain reduced survival and production.

  17. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated.

  18. Stress-inducible GmGSTU4 shapes transgenic tobacco plants metabolome towards increased salinity tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, Christos; Kalloniati, Chrissanthi; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Madesis, Panagiotis; Labrou, Nikolaos E.; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Nianiou-Obeidat, Irini

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of glutathione transferases (GSTs) in plant’s tolerance to abiotic stresses has been extensively studied; however, the metabolic changes occurring in the plants with altered GSTs expression have not been studied in detail. We have previously demonstrated that GmGSTU4 overexpressio

  19. The anti-atherosclerotic effect of tanshinol borneol ester using fecal metabolomics based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pu; Wang, Shixiang; Xiao, Chaoni; Yang, Lumeng; Chen, Yongyong; Jiang, Wei; Zheng, Xiaopu; Zhao, Guifang; Zang, Weijin; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2016-02-07

    Tanshinol borneol ester (DBZ) is a novel experimental compound that consists of two chemical structural units from danshensu and borneol. It exhibits efficacious anti-ischemic and anti-atherosclerosis activities in rats. A fecal metabolomics based on Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry combined with clinical histopathology and blood lipid estimation was employed to assess the efficacy and the metabolic changes caused by administration of DBZ in atherosclerotic rats. There were the typical pathological features of atherosclerosis and significantly increased levels of TC, TG and LDL-C in the atherosclerotic rat group. Nevertheless, atherosclerotic rats administered both DBZ (at a dose of 40 mg kg(-1)) and simvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg kg(-1)) showed good therapeutic effects. The results of the metabolomics studies showed that 55 differential metabolites such as sebacic acid, enterodiol, nonanedioic acid, dodecanedioic acid, cholic acid, 13(S)-HPODE, deoxycholic acid, some phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acids were found, indicating that abnormal metabolism occurred in the pathways of fatty acid oxidation, linoleic acid metabolism, bile acid biosynthesis and glycerophospholipid metabolism in atherosclerotic rats. Compared to those in the model group, the contents of 41 differential metabolites showed a tendency to recover to a healthy level after DBZ administration. Metabolomics studies suggested that DBZ exhibited good treatment efficacy against atherosclerosis by adjusting disturbed metabolic pathways related to atherosclerosis. This study could provide an experimental basis for DBZ's application to act as a candidate drug with anti-atherosclerosis activity.

  20. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Evidence of vintage effects on grape wines using 1H NMR-based metabolomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Van Den Berg, Frans; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-08-19

    The chemical composition of grape wines varies with grape variety, environmental factors of climate and soil, and bacterial strains, which can each affect the wine quality. Using (1)H NMR analysis coupled with multivariate statistical data sets, we investigated the effects of grape vintage on metabolic profiles of wine and the relationship between wine metabolites and meteorological data. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear differentiation between Meoru wines that were vinified with the same yeast strain and Meoru grapes harvested from the same vineyard but with a different vintage. The metabolites contributing to the differentiation were identified as 2,3-butandiol, lactic acid, alanine, proline, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), choline, and polyphenols, by complementary PCA loading plot. Markedly higher levels of proline, lactic acid and polyphenols were observed in the 2006 vintage wines compared to those of 2007 vintage, showing excellent agreement with the meteorological data that the sun-exposed time and rainfall in 2006 were approximately two times more and four times less, respectively, than those in 2007. These results revealed the important role of climate during ripening period in the chemical compositions of the grape. This study highlights the reliability of NMR-based metabolomic data by integration with meteorological data in characterizing wine or grape.

  2. Butia spp. (Arecaceae) LC-MS-Based Metabolomics for Species and Geographical Origin Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jessica Fernanda; Carvalho, Ivan Ricardo; Barbieri, Rosa Lia; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor; Chaves, Fabio Clasen

    2017-01-18

    The metabolic variability of fruit from Butia spp. (Arecaceae) genotypes from different geographical locations was characterized using untargeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) followed by multivariate data analyses. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) from LC-MS data sets showed a clear distinction among Butia catarinensis, Butia odorata, Butia paraguayensis, and Butia yatay. The major metabolites that contributed to species discrimination were primary metabolites including sugars and organic acids and specialized metabolites such as tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene and rutin. B. odorata fruit from Tapes, RS, Brazil, showed a high content of organic acids and flavonoids, whereas B. odorata fruits from Capão do Leão, RS, Brazil, showed a high sugar content. The results demonstrate that LC-ESI-qToF-MS-based metabolic profiling coupled with chemometric analysis can be used to discriminate among Butia species and between geographical origins of B. odorata and to identify primary and specialized metabolites responsible for the discrimination.

  3. NMR based serum metabolomics reveals a distinctive signature in patients with Lupus Nephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Anupam; Pratap, Avadhesh; Dubey, Durgesh; Rawat, Atul; Chaurasia, Smriti; Sukesh, Edavalath; Phatak, Sanat; Ajmani, Sajal; Kumar, Umesh; Khetrapal, Chunni Lal; Bacon, Paul; Misra, Ramnath; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Management of patient with Lupus Nephritis (LN) continues to remain a challenge for the treating physicians because of considerable morbidity and even mortality. The search of biomarkers in serum and urine is a focus of researchers to unravel new targets for therapy. In the present study, the utility of NMR-based serum metabolomics has been evaluated for the first time in discriminating LN patients from non-nephritis lupus patients (SLE) and further to get new insights into the underlying disease processes for better clinical management. Metabolic profiling of sera obtained from 22 SLE patients, 40 LN patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) were performed using high resolution 1D 1H-CPMG and diffusion edited NMR spectra to identify the potential molecular biomarkers. Using multivariate analysis, we could distinguish SLE and LN patients from HC and LN from SLE patients. Compared to SLE patients, the LN patients had increased serum levels of lipid metabolites (including LDL/VLDL lipoproteins), creatinine and decreased levels of acetate. Our results revealed that metabolic markers especially lipids and acetate derived from NMR spectroscopy has high sensitivity and specificity to distinguish LN among SLE patients and has the potential to be a useful adjunctive tool in diagnosis and clinical management of LN. PMID:27739464

  4. (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach for understanding the fermentation behaviors of wine yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hong-Seok; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Ki Myong; Kim, Eun-Young; van den Berg, Frans; Park, Won-Mok; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-02-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes in musts during alcoholic fermentation and wines during aging. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (RC-212, KIV-1116, and KUBY-501) were also evaluated for their impacts on the metabolic changes in must and wine. Pattern recognition (PR) methods, including PCA, PLS-DA, and OPLS-DA scores plots, showed clear differences for metabolites among musts or wines for each fermentation stage up to 6 months. Metabolites responsible for the differentiation were identified as valine, 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), pyruvate, succinate, proline, citrate, glycerol, malate, tartarate, glucose, N-methylnicotinic acid (NMNA), and polyphenol compounds. PCA scores plots showed continuous movements away from days 1 to 8 in all musts for all yeast strains, indicating continuous and active fermentation. During alcoholic fermentation, the highest levels of 2,3-BD, succinate, and glycerol were found in musts with the KIV-1116 strain, which showed the fastest fermentation or highest fermentative activity of the three strains, whereas the KUBY-501 strain showed the slowest fermentative activity. This study highlights the applicability of NMR-based metabolomics for monitoring wine fermentation and evaluating the fermentative characteristics of yeast strains.

  5. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth.

  6. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  7. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-10-20

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  8. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  9. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  10. Discrimination of conventional and organic white cabbage from a long-term field trial study using untargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Åberg, K. Magnus;

    2014-01-01

    , measuring 1,600 compounds. Cabbage was sampled in 2 years from one conventional and two organic farming systems in a rigidly controlled long-term field trial in Denmark. Using Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures–Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), we found that the production system leaves a significant...... (p = 0.013) imprint in the white cabbage metabolome that is retained between production years. We externally validated this finding by predicting the production system of samples from one year using a classification model built on samples from the other year, with a correct classification in 83...... % of cases. Thus, it was concluded that the investigated conventional and organic management practices have a systematic impact on the metabolome of white cabbage. This emphasizes the potential of untargeted metabolomics for authenticity testing of organic plant products....

  11. Agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic characterisation of Sicilian Origanum vulgare (L.) ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Martinelli, Federico; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Leto, Claudio; Maggio, Antonella; La Bella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Although Origanum vulgare (L.) has been deeply analysed at phytochemical level, poor knowledge is available regarding non-volatile compounds such as lipids. The aim of this work was to characterise five wild Sicilian Origanum ecotypes from an agronomic, metabolomic and lipidomic perspective. Serradifalco presented higher dry weight and inflorescences/plant than the others while Favara had a significantly higher number of branches per plant and more extensive flowered stratum. Metabolomic analysis, performed with LC-MS-TOF, allowed a preliminary characterisation of the non-volatile metabolome of the five oregano ecotypes Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum. Twenty-five metabolites were identified belonging to organic acids, amino acids, lysophosphatidylcholines, carnithines, nucleic bases and lysophosphatidylethanolamines. Lipidomic analysis identified 115 polar plant membrane glycerolipid species. Thirteen of them were differentially present in the two chosen ecotypes. The role of these metabolites in plant physiology from a qualitative and pharmacological point of view was discussed.

  12. Conventional and Advanced Separations in Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics: Methodologies and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyman, Heino M.; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Keqi; Baker, Erin Shammel; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-02-16

    Metabolomics is the quantitative analysis of all metabolites in a given sample. Due to the chemical complexity of the metabolome, optimal separations are required for comprehensive identification and quantification of sample constituents. This chapter provides an overview of both conventional and advanced separations methods in practice for reducing the complexity of metabolite extracts delivered to the mass spectrometer detector, and covers gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separation techniques coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as both uni-dimensional and as multi-dimensional approaches.

  13. Comparison of Fruits of Forsythia suspensa at Two Different Maturation Stages by NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Jia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Forsythiae Fructus (FF, the dried fruit of Forsythia suspensa, has been widely used as a heat-clearing and detoxifying herbal medicine in China. Green FF (GF and ripe FF (RF are fruits of Forsythia suspensa at different maturity stages collected about a month apart. FF undergoes a complex series of physical and biochemical changes during fruit ripening. However, the clinical uses of GF and RF have not been distinguished to date. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of GF and RF, NMR-based metabolomics coupled with HPLC and UV spectrophotometry methods were adopted in this study. Furthermore, the in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of 50% methanol extracts of GF and RF were also evaluated. A total of 27 metabolites were identified based on NMR data, and eight of them were found to be different between the GF and RF groups. The GF group contained higher levels of forsythoside A, forsythoside C, cornoside, rutin, phillyrin and gallic acid and lower levels of rengyol and β-glucose compared with the RF group. The antioxidant activity of GF was higher than that of RF, but no significant difference was observed between the antibacterial activities of GF and RF. Given our results showing their distinct chemical compositions, we propose that NMR-based metabolic profiling can be used to discriminate between GF and RF. Differences in the chemical and biological activities of GF and RF, as well as their clinical efficacies in traditional Chinese medicine should be systematically investigated in future studies.

  14. Direct metabolomics for plant cells by live single-cell mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tejedor, Mónica Lorenzo; Esaki, Tsuyoshi; Sakane, Iwao; Mizuno, Hajime; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2015-09-01

    Live single-cell mass spectrometry (live MS) provides a mass spectrum that shows thousands of metabolite peaks from a single live plant cell within minutes. By using an optical microscope, a cell is chosen for analysis and a metal-coated nanospray microcapillary tip is used to remove the cell's contents. After adding a microliter of ionization solvent to the opposite end of the tip, the trapped contents are directly fed into the mass spectrometer by applying a high voltage between the tip and the inlet port of the spectrometer to induce nanospray ionization. Proteins are not detected because of insufficient sensitivity. Metabolite peaks are identified by exact mass or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis, and isomers can be separated by combining live MS with ion-mobility separation. By using this approach, spectra can be acquired in 10 min. In combination with metabolic maps and/or molecular databases, the data can be annotated into metabolic pathways; the data analysis takes 30 min to 4 h, depending on the MS/MS data availability from databases. This method enables the analysis of a number of metabolites from a single cell with rapid sampling at sub-attomolar-level sensitivity.

  15. Computational approaches for systems metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumsiek, Jan; Bartel, Jörg; Theis, Fabian J

    2016-06-01

    Systems genetics is defined as the simultaneous assessment and analysis of multi-omics datasets. In the past few years, metabolomics has been established as a robust tool describing an important functional layer in this approach. The metabolome of a biological system represents an integrated state of genetic and environmental factors and has been referred to as a 'link between genotype and phenotype'. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in statistical analysis methods for metabolomics data in combination with other omics layers. We put a special focus on complex, multivariate statistical approaches as well as pathway-based and network-based analysis methods. Moreover, we outline current challenges and pitfalls of metabolomics-focused multi-omics analyses and discuss future steps for the field.

  16. Strategy for nuclear-magnetic-resonance-based metabolomics of human feces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamichhane, Santosh; Yde, Christian Clement; Schmedes, Mette Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomic analyses of fecal material are gaining increasing attention because the gut microbial ecology and activity have an impact on the human phenotype and regulate host metabolism. Sample preparation is a crucial step, and in this study we recommend a methodology for extraction and analysis...

  17. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resul...

  18. Assessment of clam ruditapes philippinarum as Heavy metal bioindicators using NMR-based metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Linbao; You, Liping [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Junbao; Cong, Ming; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Li, Lianzhen; Zhao, Jianmin; Li, Chenghua; Wu, Huifeng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China)

    2011-08-15

    There are mainly distributed three pedigrees (White, Liangdao Red, and Zebra) of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in Yantai population along the Bohai marine and coast. However, the biological differences to environmental stressors have been ignored in toxicology studies, which could lead to the distortion of biological interpretations of toxicological effects induced by environmental contaminants. In this study, we applied a system biology approach, metabolomics to compare the metabolic profiles in digestive gland from three pedigrees of clam and characterize and compare the metabolic responses induced by mercury in clam digestive gland tissues to determine a sensitive pedigree of clam as a preferable bioindicator for metal pollution monitoring and toxicology research. The most abundant metabolites, respectively, included branched-chain amino acids, alanine, and arginine in White samples, glutamate, dimethylglycine, and glycine in Zebra clams and acetylcholine, betaine, glucose, and glycogen in Liangdao Red clams. After 48 h exposure of 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+}, the metabolic profiles from the three pedigrees of clams showed differentially significant changes in alanine, glutamate, succinate, taurine, hypotaurine, glycine, arginine, glucose, etc. Our findings indicate the toxicological effects of mercury exposure in Manila clams including the neurotoxicity, disturbances in energetic metabolisms and osmoregulation in the digestive glands and suggest that Liangdao Red pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator for the metal pollution monitoring based on the more sensitive classes of metabolic changes from digestive glands compared with other two (White and Zebra) pedigrees of clams. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. 1H NMR- based metabolomics approaches as non- invasive tools for diagnosis of endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: So far, non-invasive diagnostic approaches such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or blood tests do not have sufficient diagnostic power for endometriosis disease. Lack of a non-invasive diagnostic test contributes to the long delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis of endometriosis. Objective: The present study focuses on the identification of predictive biomarkers in serum by pattern recognition techniques and uses partial least square discriminant analysis, multi-layer feed forward artificial neural networks (ANNs and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA modeling tools for the early diagnosis of endometriosis in a minimally invasive manner by 1H- NMR based metabolomics. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was done in Pasteur Institute, Iran in June 2013. Serum samples of 31 infertile women with endometriosis (stage II and III who confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy and 15 normal women were collected and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model was built by using partial least square discriminant analysis, QDA, and ANNs to determine classifier metabolites for early prediction risk of disease. Results: The levels of 2- methoxyestron, 2-methoxy estradiol, dehydroepiandrostion androstendione, aldosterone, and deoxy corticosterone were enhanced significantly in infertile group. While cholesterol and primary bile acids levels were decreased. QDA model showed significant difference between two study groups. Positive and negative predict value levels obtained about 71% and 78%, respectively. ANNs provided also criteria for detection of endometriosis. Conclusion: The QDA and ANNs modeling can be used as computational tools in noninvasive diagnose of endometriosis. However, the model designed by QDA methods is more efficient compared to ANNs in diagnosis of endometriosis patients.

  20. Metabolite identification for mass spectrometry-based metabolomics using multiple types of correlated ion information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Yet-Ran; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Ann; Lih, T Mamie; Chang, Hui-Yin; Huang, Ching-jang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Pan, Wen-Harn; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2015-02-17

    Metabolite identification remains a bottleneck in mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics. Currently, this process relies heavily on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra generated separately for peaks of interest identified from previous MS runs. Such a delayed and labor-intensive procedure creates a barrier to automation. Further, information embedded in MS data has not been used to its full extent for metabolite identification. Multimers, adducts, multiply charged ions, and fragments of given metabolites occupy a substantial proportion (40-80%) of the peaks of a quantitation result. However, extensive information on these derivatives, especially fragments, may facilitate metabolite identification. We propose a procedure with automation capability to group and annotate peaks associated with the same metabolite in the quantitation results of opposite modes and to integrate this information for metabolite identification. In addition to the conventional mass and isotope ratio matches, we would match annotated fragments with low-energy MS/MS spectra in public databases. For identification of metabolites without accessible MS/MS spectra, we have developed characteristic fragment and common substructure matches. The accuracy and effectiveness of the procedure were evaluated using one public and two in-house liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data sets. The procedure accurately identified 89% of 28 standard metabolites with derivative ions in the data sets. With respect to effectiveness, the procedure confidently identified the correct chemical formula of at least 42% of metabolites with derivative ions via MS/MS spectrum, characteristic fragment, and common substructure matches. The confidence level was determined according to the fulfilled identification criteria of various matches and relative retention time.

  1. NMR-based metabolomics approach to study the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin to goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minghui [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Junsong, E-mail: wang.junsong@gmail.com [Center for Molecular Metabolism, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 Xiao Ling Wei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lu, Zhaoguang; Wei, Dandan; Yang, Minghua [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Kong, Lingyi, E-mail: cpu_lykong@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tong Jia Xiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: •A goldfish model was established to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) exposure on multiple organs. •NMR based metabolomics approach were firstly used to provide a global view of the toxicity of LCT. •LCT induced neurotransmitters and osmoregulatory imbalances, oxidative stress, energy and amino acid metabolic disorders. •Glutamate–glutamine–GABA axis as a potential target for LCT toxicity was first found. -- Abstract: In this study, a {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the toxicity of lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) in goldfish (Carassius auratus). LCT showed tissue-specific damage to gill, heart, liver and kidney tissues of goldfish. NMR profiling combined with statistical methods such as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and two-dimensional statistical total correlation spectroscopy (2D-STOCSY) was developed to discern metabolite changes occurring after one week LCT exposure in brain, heart and kidney tissues of goldfish. LCT exposure influenced levels of many metabolites (e.g., leucine, isoleucine and valine in brain and kidney; lactate in brain, heart and kidney; alanine in brain and kidney; choline in brain, heart and kidney; taurine in brain, heart and kidney; N-acetylaspartate in brain; myo-inositol in brain; phosphocreatine in brain and heart; 2-oxoglutarate in brain; cis-aconitate in brain, and etc.), and broke the balance of neurotransmitters and osmoregulators, evoked oxidative stress, disturbed metabolisms of energy and amino acids. The implication of glutamate–glutamine–gamma-aminobutyric axis in LCT induced toxicity was demonstrated for the first time. Our findings demonstrated the applicability and potential of metabolomics approach for the elucidation of toxicological effects of pesticides and the underlying mechanisms, and the discovery of biomarkers for pesticide pollution in aquatic environment.

  2. Targeted High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics differentiates metabolic syndrome from obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Fanyi; Xu, Mengyang; Bruno, Richard S; Ballard, Kevin D; Zhu, Jiangjiang

    2017-04-01

    Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome are risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Identification of novel biomarkers are needed to distinguish metabolic syndrome from equally obese individuals in order to direct them to early interventions that reduce their risk of developing further health problems. We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to evaluate the associations between metabolite profiles and established metabolic syndrome criteria (i.e. elevated waist circumference, hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in plasma samples from obese men ( n = 29; BMI = 35.5 ± 5.2 kg/m(2)) and women ( n = 40; 34.9 ± 6.7 kg/m(2)), of which 26 met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (17 men and 9 women). Compared to obese individuals without metabolic syndrome, univariate statistical analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis showed that a specific group of metabolites from multiple metabolic pathways (i.e. purine metabolism, valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation, and tryptophan metabolism) were associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. Receiver operating characteristic curves generated based on the PLS-DA models showed excellent areas under the curve (0.85 and 0.96, for metabolites only model and enhanced metabolites model, respectively), high specificities (0.86 and 0.93), and good sensitivities (0.71 and 0.91). Moreover, principal component analysis revealed that metabolic profiles can be used to further differentiate metabolic syndrome with 3 versus 4-5 metabolic syndrome criteria. Collectively, these findings support targeted metabolomics approaches to distinguish metabolic syndrome from obesity alone, and to stratify metabolic syndrome status based on the number of criteria met. Impact statement We utilized mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolic profiling of 221 metabolites to

  3. Relationship between the metabolite profile and technological properties of bovine milk from two dairy breeds elucidated by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik Kræmer; Frederiksen, Pernille Dorthea; Clausen, Morten Rahr; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2011-07-13

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the metabolite profile of milk and important technological properties by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. The metabolomics approach was introduced for the metabolic profiling of a set of milk samples from two dairy breeds representing a wide span in coagulation properties. The milk metabolite profiles obtained by proton and carbon NMR spectroscopy could be correlated to breed and, more interestingly, also with the coagulation profile, as established by traditional methods by using principal component analysis (PCA). The metabolites responsible for the separation into breed could mainly be ascribed to carnitine and lactose, whereas the metabolites varying in the samples with respect to coagulation properties included citrate, choline, carnitine, and lactose. The results found in the present study demonstrated a promising potential of NMR-based metabolomics for a rapid analysis and classification of milk samples, both of which are useful for the dairy industry.

  4. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Sanchez, Laura M.

    2015-12-22

    health and disease.

    IMPORTANCEStudies characterizing both the taxonomic composition and metabolic profile of various microbial communities are becoming increasingly common, yet new computational methods are needed to integrate and interpret these data in terms of known biological mechanisms. Here, we introduce an analytical framework to link species composition and metabolite measurements, using a simple model to predict the effects of community ecology on metabolite concentrations and evaluating whether these predictions agree with measured metabolomic profiles. We find that a surprisingly large proportion of metabolite variation in the vaginal microbiome can be predicted based on species composition (including dramatic shifts associated with disease), identify putative mechanisms underlying these predictions, and evaluate the roles of individual bacterial species and genes. Analysis of gut microbiome data using this framework recovers similar community metabolic trends. This framework lays the foundation for model-based multi-omic integrative studies, ultimately improving our understanding of microbial community metabolism.

  5. Mass spectra-based framework for automated structural elucidation of metabolome data to explore phytochemical diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio eMatsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel framework for automated elucidation of metabolite structures in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS metabolome data was constructed by integrating databases. High-resolution tandem mass spectra data automatically acquired from each metabolite signal were used for database searches. Three distinct databases, KNApSAcK, ReSpect, and the PRIMe standard compound database, were employed for the structural elucidation. The outputs were retrieved using the CAS metabolite identifier for identification and putative annotation. A simple metabolite ontology system was also introduced to attain putative characterization of the metabolite signals. The automated method was applied for the metabolome data sets obtained from the rosette leaves of 20 Arabidopsis accessions. Phenotypic variations in novel Arabidopsis metabolites among these accessions could be investigated using this method.

  6. A serum metabolomics-based profile in low bone mineral density postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takeshi; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Sato, Yuiko; Koboyashi, Tami; Katsuyama, Eri; Kanagawa, Hiroya; Miyamoto, Hiroya; Mori, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Shigeyuki; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Morita, Mayu; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Tando, Toshimi; Miyamoto, Kana; Tsuji, Takashi; Funayama, Atsushi; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized as a metabolic disorder of bone tissue, and various metabolic markers are now available to support its diagnosis and evaluate treatment effects. Substances produced as end products of metabolomic activities are the correlated factors to the biological or metabolic status, and thus, metabolites are considered highly sensitive markers of particular pathological states, including osteoporosis. Here we undertook comprehensive serum metabolomics analysis in postmenopausal women with or without low bone mineral density (low BMD vs controls) for the first time using capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry. Among the metabolites tested, 57 were detected in sera. Levels of hydroxyproline, Gly-Gly and cystine, differed significantly between groups, with Gly-Gly and cystine significantly lower in the low BMD group and hydroxyproline, a reported marker of osteoporosis, significantly higher. Levels of TRACP5b, a bone resorption marker, were significantly higher in the low BMD group, supporting the study's validity. Taken together, our findings represent novel metabolomic profiling in low BMD in postmenopausal women.

  7. Recommendations and Standardization of Biomarker Quantification Using NMR-based Metabolomics with Particular Focus on Urinary Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2016-01-08

    NMR-based metabolomics has shown considerable promise in disease diagnosis and biomarker discovery because it allows one to non-destructively identify and quantify large numbers of novel metabolite biomarkers in both biofluids and tissues. Indeed, precise metabolite quantification is a necessary prerequisite to move any chemical biomarker or biomarker panel from the lab into the clinic. Among the many biofluids (urine, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva) commonly used for disease diagnosis and prognosis, urine has several advantages. It is abundant, sterile, easily obtained, needs little sample preparation and does not require any invasive medical procedures for collection. Furthermore, urine captures and concentrates many “unwanted” or “undesirable” compounds throughout the body, thereby providing a rich source of potentially useful disease biomarkers. However, the incredible variation in urine chemical concentrations due to effects such as gender, age, diet, life style, health conditions, and physical activity make the analysis of urine and the identification of useful urinary biomarkers by NMR quite challenging. In this review, we discuss a number of the most significant issues regarding NMR-based urinary metabolomics with a specific emphasis on metabolite quantification for disease biomarker applications. We also propose a number of data collection and instrumental recommendations regarding NMR pulse sequences, acceptable acquisition parameter ranges, relaxation effects on quantitation, proper handling of instrumental differences, as well as recommendations regarding sample preparation and biomarker assessment.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics reveals that dairy protein fractions affect urinary urea excretion differently in overweight adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian Clement; Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup

    2015-01-01

    Dairy proteins are an important part of our diet, and recently, there is considerable focus on understanding the effects of the two major dairy proteins fractions constituted by casein and whey. In the present study, the impact of a dietary intervention with casein, whey, and skim milk...... was investigated by using NMR-based urine metabolomics. Overweight adolescents (n = 192; age = 12–15 years; BMI = 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to 1 L/day of casein (citrate content: 3.27 mol/L), whey (citrate content: 0.04 mol/L), skim milk, or water for 12 weeks. A significant increase in the urinary...... excretion of urea was found after the 12-week casein and skim milk interventions, while the 12-week whey intervention had no significant effect on the urea excretion. In addition, NMR-based metabolomics revealed a decreased urinary citrate excretion in the whey group and thereby demonstrated its potential...

  9. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics reveals sex-specific metabolic changes of gastrodin intervention in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Yuan-Wei Jia; Jun-Song Wang; Ming-Hua Yang; Kelvin D G Wang; Ling-Yi Kong

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics on sex-specific metabolic changes of gastrodin intervention in rats.Methods:In this research,1HNMR-based metabolomics was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes following chronic intervention with gastrodin in rats.Results:24 endogenous metabolites were identified.Body weight, daily diet and the total volume of urine in in each day of each rat were measured synchronously.Modifications in12 metabolites were observed following gastrodin intervention, indicating gastrodin-induced alterations in carbohydrate and energy metabolism.Interestingly, these metabolic changes were not totally identical in female and male rats.Some metabolic changes arising from gastrodin intervention showed sexual dimorphism includingLDL/VLDL and lactate which were on the decrease in the female but on the increase in the male, together with arginine/ornithine, creatine, and glycerol which were on the increase in the female but on the decrease in the male.While the decrease in pyruvate, succinate and glutamate was only shown in the male and the increase in valine,α-ketoglutarate, glycine and glucose was only in the female. Conclusions:This research shows the sex-specific metabolic response toGAS intervention, weatherGAS is a healthy dietary supplement for the male merits further investigation.

  10. NMR-based metabolomic studies on the toxicological effects of cadmium and copper on green mussels Perna viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Huifeng [Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-11-15

    Traditional toxicology studies have focused on selected biomarkers to characterize the biological stress induced by metals in marine organisms. In this study, a system biology tool, metabolomics, was applied to the marine mussel Perna viridis to investigate changes in the metabolic profiles of soft tissue as a response to copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), both as single metal and as a mixture. The major metabolite changes corresponding to metal exposure are related to amino acids, osmolytes, and energy metabolites. Following metal exposure for 1 week, there was a significant increase in the levels of branched chain amino acids, histidine, glutamate, glutamine, hypotaurine, dimethylglycine, arginine and ATP/ADP. For the Cu + Cd co-exposed mussels, the levels of lactate, branched chain amino acid, succinate, and NAD increased, whereas the levels of glucose, glycogen, and ATP/ADP decreased, indicating a different metabolic profile for the single metal exposure groups. After 2 weeks of exposure, the mussels showed acclimatization to Cd exposure based on the recovery of some metabolites. However, the metabolic profile induced by the metal mixture was very similar to that from Cu exposure, suggesting that Cu dominantly induced the metabolic disturbances. Both Cu and Cd may lead to neurotoxicity, disturbances in energy metabolism, and osmoregulation changes. These results demonstrate the high applicability and reliability of NMR-based metabolomics in interpreting the toxicological mechanisms of metals using global metabolic biomarkers.

  11. Metabolomics and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    metabolism reviews. Feb 2010;42(1):45-54. 6. Hill VK, Ricketts C, Bieche I, Vacher S, Gentle D, Lewis C, Maher ER, Latif F. Genome-wide DNA methylation...Sansone SA, Fan T, Goodacre R, Griffin JL, Hardy NW, Kaddurah-Daouk R, Kristal BS, Lindon J, Mendes P, Morrison N, Nikolau B, Robertson D, Sumner LW...identification confidence based on metabolomics standards initiative recommendations ( Sumner et al. 2007). Specifically, level 1 refers to confident

  12. ¹H NMR-based metabolomics studies on the effect of sesamin in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Liane; Trattner, Sofia; Pickova, Jana; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Moazzami, Ali A

    2014-03-15

    A (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach was used to explore the impact of dietary sesamin on the liver and white muscle metabolic profile of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Fish were fed diets containing different n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratios (V0.5 or V1) and sesamin contents [without (S0), low (SL) 1.16 g/kg feed, and high (SH) 5.8 g/kg feed] for 4 months. Liver and white muscle extracts of aqueous polar and chloroform lipid phases were collected. Multivariate data analyses (PCA and OPLS-DA) of liver chloroform phase showed that high levels of sesamin affected the metabolic profile impartially of the n-6/n-3 ratio. In the aqueous phase, the metabolome of liver and white muscle were affected in fish fed an n-6/n-3 ratio of 1.0 and 0.5, respectively. With high inclusion of sesamin, the levels of several metabolites (e.g. glucose, glycogen, leucine, valine, creatine, carnitine, lactate, nucleosides) were increased. These metabolites are mainly associated with energy metabolism, suggesting that high sesamin inclusion affects liver and white muscle metabolism in fish. This is consistent with lower body weights found in fish fed high sesamin content.

  13. 2D NMR-based metabolomics uncovers interactions between conserved biochemical pathways in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrayelit, Yevgeniy; Robinette, Steven L; Bose, Neelanjan; von Reuss, Stephan H; Schroeder, Frank C

    2013-02-15

    Ascarosides are small-molecule signals that play a central role in C. elegans biology, including dauer formation, aging, and social behaviors, but many aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. Using automated 2D NMR-based comparative metabolomics, we identified ascaroside ethanolamides as shunt metabolites in C. elegans mutants of daf-22, a gene with homology to mammalian 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases predicted to function in conserved peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation. Two groups of ethanolamides feature β-keto functionalization confirming the predicted role of daf-22 in ascaroside biosynthesis, whereas α-methyl substitution points to unexpected inclusion of methylmalonate at a late stage in the biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids in C. elegans. We show that ascaroside ethanolamide formation in response to defects in daf-22 and other peroxisomal genes is associated with severe depletion of endocannabinoid pools. These results indicate unexpected interaction between peroxisomal lipid β-oxidation and the biosynthesis of endocannabinoids, which are major regulators of lifespan in C. elegans. Our study demonstrates the utility of unbiased comparative metabolomics for investigating biochemical networks in metazoans.

  14. Exo-metabolome of some fungal isolates growing on cork-based medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, M. C.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld;

    2011-01-01

    are produced by the studied fungal species, both in cork medium or in cork medium added with C. sitophila extracts. However, the addition of C. sitophila extract to the cork medium enhanced the growth of the other studied fungal isolates and altered the respective exo-metabolome profile, leading...... they can be dependent of the remains of former colonizers. In fact, the production of the exo-metabolites by the studied fungal isolates suggests that, under the used experimental conditions, they appear to play an important role in fungal interactions amongst the cork mycoflora....

  15. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions.

  16. Standardizing the experimental conditions for using urine in NMR-based metabolomic studies with a particular focus on diagnostic studies: a review

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2014-11-21

    The metabolic composition of human biofluids can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Among the biofluids most commonly analyzed in metabolomic studies, urine appears to be particularly useful. It is abundant, readily available, easily stored and can be collected by simple, noninvasive techniques. Moreover, given its chemical complexity, urine is particularly rich in potential disease biomarkers. This makes it an ideal biofluid for detecting or monitoring disease processes. Among the metabolomic tools available for urine analysis, NMR spectroscopy has proven to be particularly well-suited, because the technique is highly reproducible and requires minimal sample handling. As it permits the identification and quantification of a wide range of compounds, independent of their chemical properties, NMR spectroscopy has been frequently used to detect or discover disease fingerprints and biomarkers in urine. Although protocols for NMR data acquisition and processing have been standardized, no consensus on protocols for urine sample selection, collection, storage and preparation in NMR-based metabolomic studies have been developed. This lack of consensus may be leading to spurious biomarkers being reported and may account for a general lack of reproducibility between laboratories. Here, we review a large number of published studies on NMR-based urine metabolic profiling with the aim of identifying key variables that may affect the results of metabolomics studies. From this survey, we identify a number of issues that require either standardization or careful accounting in experimental design and provide some recommendations for urine collection, sample preparation and data acquisition.

  17. Metabolomics: moving towards personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reniero Fabiano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In many fields of medicine there is a growing interest in characterizing diseases at molecular level with a view to developing an individually tailored therapeutic approach. Metabolomics is a novel area that promises to contribute significantly to the characterization of various disease phenotypes and to the identification of personal metabolic features that can predict response to therapies. Based on analytical platforms such as mass spectrometry or NMR-based spectroscopy, the metabolomic approach enables a comprehensive overview of the metabolites, leading to the characterization of the metabolic fingerprint of a given sample. These metabolic fingerprints can then be used to distinguish between different disease phenotypes and to predict a drug's effectiveness and/or toxicity. Several studies published in the last few years applied the metabolomic approach in the field of pediatric medicine. Being a highly informative technique that can be used on samples collected non-invasively (e.g. urine or exhaled breath condensate, metabolomics has appeal for the study of pediatric diseases. Here we present and discuss the pediatric clinical studies that have taken the metabolomic approach.

  18. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics of time-dependent responses of Eisenia fetida to sub-lethal phenanthrene exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankadurai, Brian P.; Wolfe, David M.; Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 Canada (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 Canada (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolomics was used to examine the response of the earthworm Eisenia fetida after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of phenanthrene over time. Earthworms were exposed to 0.025 mg/cm{sup 2} of phenanthrene (1/64th of the LC{sub 50}) via contact tests over four days. Earthworm tissues were extracted using a mixture of chloroform, methanol and water, resulting in polar and non-polar fractions that were analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR after one, two, three and four days. NMR-based metabolomic analyses revealed heightened E. fetida responses with longer phenanthrene exposure times. Amino acids alanine and glutamate, the sugar maltose, the lipids cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine emerged as potential indicators of phenanthrene exposure. The conversion of succinate to fumarate in the Krebs cycle was also interrupted by phenanthrene. Therefore, this study shows that NMR-based metabolomics is a powerful tool for elucidating time-dependent relationships in addition to the mode of toxicity of phenanthrene in earthworm exposure studies. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the mode of action of phenanthrene is presented. > The earthworm species E. fetida were exposed to sub-lethal phenanthrene concentrations. > Both polar and non-polar metabolites of E. fetida tissue extracts were analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. > Longer phenanthrene exposure times resulted in heightened earthworm responses. > An interruption of the Krebs cycle was also observed due to phenanthrene exposure. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics is used to determine the relationship between phenanthrene exposure and the metabolic response of the earthworm E. fetida over time and also to elucidate the phenanthrene mode of toxicity.

  19. Nutritional Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde

    of the crucial steps is data preprocessing, which is particularly cumbersome for complex liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data. Accordingly, in PAPER I, different LC-MS data preprocessing tools, MarkerLynx, MZmine, XCMS and a customised method (spectral binning and chromatographic collapsing) were......Lynx, MZmine and XCMS) and 16 to 40 % were specific to each tool. Two reasons for these differences were pointed out: (1) changing the parameter settings of each software tool has a great impact on the number of detected features; (2) each software tool employs different methods in their peak detection...... and alignment algorithms, such that each has pros and cons. Thus, the use of more than one software tool and/or the use of several parameter settings during data preprocessing are likely to decrease the risk of failing to detect features (potential marker candidates) in untargeted metabolomics. On the other...

  20. Metabolomics-based prediction models of yeast strains for screening of metabolites contributing to ethanol stress tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Z.; Fukusaki, E.

    2016-06-01

    The increased demand for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources has driven the development of various microbial systems to produce biofuels. One of such systems is the ethanol-producing yeast. Although yeast produces ethanol naturally using its native pathways, production yield is low and requires improvement for commercial biofuel production. Moreover, ethanol is toxic to yeast and thus ethanol tolerance should be improved to further enhance ethanol production. In this study, we employed metabolomics-based strategy using 30 single-gene deleted yeast strains to construct multivariate models for ethanol tolerance and screen metabolites that relate to ethanol sensitivity/tolerance. The information obtained from this study can be used as an input for strain improvement via metabolic engineering.

  1. Proteomics and Metabolomics: two emerging areas for legume improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami eRamalingam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important source of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signalling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signalling in legumes. In

  2. A metabolomic study in oats (Avena sativa) highlights a drought tolerance mechanism based upon salicylate signalling pathways and the modulation of carbon, antioxidant and photo-oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Javier; Heald, Jim; Kingston-Smith, Alison; Winters, Ana; Rubiales, Diego; Sanz, Mariluz; Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Although a wealth of information is available on the induction of one or several drought-related responses in different species, little is known of how their timing, modulation and crucially integration influence drought tolerance. Based upon metabolomic changes in oat (Avena sativa L.), we have defined key processes involved in drought tolerance. During a time course of increasing water deficit, metabolites from leaf samples were profiled using direct infusion-electrospray mass spectroscopy (DI-ESI-MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ESI-MS/MS and analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The involvement of metabolite pathways was confirmed through targeted assays of key metabolites and physiological experiments. We demonstrate an early accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) influencing stomatal opening, photorespiration and antioxidant defences before any change in the relative water content. These changes are likely to maintain plant water status, with any photoinhibitory effect being counteracted by an efficient antioxidant capacity, thereby representing an integrated mechanism of drought tolerance in oats. We also discuss these changes in relation to those engaged at later points, consequence of the different water status in susceptible and resistant genotypes.

  3. Blood-based diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using fingerprinting metabolomics based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Tsuchiya, Hirofumi; Takayama, Takahiro; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2015-01-01

    Early and definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can lead to a better and more-targeted treatment and/or prevention for patients. In the diagnostic biomarkers of AD, the blood sample represents a more non-invasive, inexpensive and acceptable sources for repeated measurements than the cerebrospinal fluid. In this study, the fingerprinting metabolomics was proposed for the challenge of the blood-based diagnosis of defined AD by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HILIC/MS). These plasma samples were selected from postmortem specimens based on these pathological examinations. Firstly, we compared these HILIC columns for the non-targeted metabolic assay using pooled plasma. The principal component analysis plot of these seven columns was performed using the repeatability of these chromatograms, and can be used to visualize trends in data sets by three-dimensional dispersion, contributory standard deviation and the number of detections. Based on these results, TSK-Amide 80 and TSKgel-NH₂ columns are used as a reliable HILIC/MS assay of blood-based AD metabolomics that showed metabolic profiling of the AD pathology in MS chromatograms that ranged from 1182 to 2284 compounds. A total of 54 peaks were evaluated in order to identify useful ion signal candidates using an orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis. These peaks were then specifically analyzed using the HILIC-tandem MS assay by a receiver operating characteristic curve and linear discriminant analysis for the diagnosis of the defined AD. The fingerprinting metabolomics can overcome the limitations of previous challenging blood-based diagnosis of AD, and directly evaluates the specific comparative statistical values from the raw data.

  4. Metabolomics in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan Manuel; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics, the newest member of the omics techniques, has become an important tool in agriculture, pharmacy, and environmental sciences. Advances in compound extraction, separation, detection, identification, and data analysis have allowed metabolomics applications in food sciences including food processing, quality, and safety. This chapter discusses recent advances and applications of metabolomics in food science.

  5. Impact of environmental pollution on caged mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Tiziana; Mauceri, Angela; Corsaro, Carmelo; Maisano, Maria; Parrino, Vincenzo; Lo Paro, Giuseppe; Messina, Giuseppe; Fasulo, Salvatore

    2013-12-15

    Metabolic responses to environmental pollution, mainly related to Hg and PAHs, were investigated in mussels. Specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis, sedentary filter-feeders, were caged in anthropogenic-impacted and reference sites along the Augusta coastline (Sicily, Italy). The gills, mainly involved in nutrient uptake, digestion and gas exchange, were selected as target organ being the first organ to be affected by pollutants. Severe alterations in gill tissue were observed in mussels from the industrial area compared with control, while gill metabolic profiles, obtained by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and analyzed by multivariate statistics, exhibited significant changes in amino acids, energy metabolites, osmolytes and neurotransmitters. Overall, the morphological changes and metabolic disturbance detected in gill tissues may suggest that the mussels transplanted to the contaminated field site were suffering from adverse environmental condition. The concurrent morphological and metabolomic investigations as applied here result effective in assessing the environmental influences on health status of aquatic organisms.

  6. Metabolomics techniques in nanotoxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; Beger, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth in the development of nanoparticles for uses in a variety of applications including targeted drug delivery, cancer therapy, imaging, and as biological sensors has led to questions about potential toxicity of such particles to humans. High-throughput methods are necessary to evaluate the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The omics technologies are particularly well suited to evaluate toxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Metabolomics, specifically, can rapidly screen for biomarkers related to predefined pathways or processes in biofluids and tissues. Specifically, oxidative stress has been implicated as a potential mechanism of toxicity in nanoparticles and is generally difficult to measure by conventional methods. Furthermore, metabolomics can provide mechanistic insight into nanotoxicity. This chapter focuses on the application of both LC/MS and NMR-based metabolomics approaches to study the potential toxicity of nanoparticles.

  7. 1H NMR-based metabolomics investigation of copper-laden rat: a model of Wilson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xu

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease (WD, also known as hepatoleticular degeneration (HLD, is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder of copper metabolism, which causes copper to accumulate in body tissues. In this study, rats fed with copper-laden diet are used to render the clinical manifestations of WD, and their copper toxicity-induced organ lesions are studied. To investigate metabolic behaviors of 'decoppering' process, penicillamine (PA was used for treating copper-laden rats as this chelating agent could eliminate excess copper through the urine. To date, there has been limited metabolomics study on WD, while metabolic impacts of copper accumulation and PA administration have yet to be established.A combination of 1HNMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis was applied to examine the metabolic profiles of the urine and blood serum samples collected from the copper-laden rat model of WD with PA treatment.Copper accumulation in the copper-laden rats is associated with increased lactate, creatinine, valine and leucine, as well as decreased levels of glucose and taurine in the blood serum. There were also significant changes in p-hydroxyphenylacetate (p-HPA, creatinine, alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG, dimethylamine, N-acetylglutamate (NAG, N-acetylglycoprotein (NAC in the urine of these rats. Notably, the changes in p-HPA, glucose, lactate, taurine, valine, leucine, and NAG were found reversed following PA treatment. Nevertheless, there were no changes for dimethylamine, α-KG, and NAC as a result of the treatment. Compared with the controls, the concentrations of hippurate, formate, alanine, and lactate were changed when PA was applied and this is probably due to its side effect. A tool named SMPDB (Small Molecule Pathway Database is introduced to identify the metabolic pathway influenced by the copper-laden diet.The study has shown the potential application of NMR-based metabolomic analysis in providing further insights into the molecular

  8. Discrimination of leaves of Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius by ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qian; Bai, Min; Xu, Jin-Di; Kong, Ming; Zhu, Lin-Yin; Zhu, He; Wang, Qiang; Li, Song-Lin

    2014-08-01

    In present study, an ultra high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) based metabolomics approach was established to investigate the metabolic profiles and characteristic chemical markers for distinguishing between leaves of Panax ginseng (LPG) and Panax quinquefolius (LPQ). The UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS data were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squared discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA) to rapidly find the potential characteristic components of LPG and LPQ, and the identities of detected peaks including the potential characteristic components were elucidated. Totally, 86 components were identified from these 2 kinds of leaf samples, in which 9 ginsenosides could be regarded as the characteristic chemical markers for the discrimination of LPG from LPQ. These results suggested that UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS based metabolomics approach is a powerful tool to rapidly find characteristic markers for the quality control of LPG.

  9. Effect of Genotype and Environment on Salvia miltiorrhiza Roots Using LC/MS-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza (S. miltiorrhiza Bunge is broadly used as herbal medicine for the clinical treatments of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Despite its commercial and medicinal values, few systematic studies on the metabolome of S. miltiorrhiza roots have been carried out so far. We systematically described the metabolic profiles of S. miltiorrhiza using high pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS in conjunction with multivariate statistical analyses, aimed at monitoring their biological variations of secondary metabolites related to three locations and four S. miltiorrhiza genotypes. A total of 40 bioactive constituents were putatively annotated in S. miltiorrhiza root samples. This study found that both the same S. miltiorrhiza genotype growing at three different locations and four S. miltiorrhiza genotypes growing at the same location had significant metabonomic differences identified by the principal component analysis (PCA approach. By using orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA, 16 and 14 secondary metabolites can be used as potential location-specific and genotype-specific markers in S. miltiorrhiza, respectively. The specificity of LC/MS profiles offered a powerful tool to discriminate S. miltiorrhiza samples according to genotypes or locations.

  10. NMR-based metabolomics Reveals Alterations of Electro-acupuncture Stimulations on Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Zheng, Xujuan; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Chang, Xiaorong; Shen, Guiping; Liu, Mi; Wang, Yadong; Shen, Jiacheng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Qida; Dong, Jiyang; Yang, Zongbao

    2017-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a common gastrointestinal disease which has been considered as precancerous lesions of gastric carcinoma. Previously, electro-acupuncture stimulation has been shown to be effective in ameliorating symptoms of CAG. However the underlying mechanism of this beneficial treatment is yet to be established. In the present study, an integrated histopathological examination along with molecular biological assay, as well as 1H NMR analysis of multiple biological samples (urine, serum, stomach, cortex and medulla) were employed to systematically assess the pathology of CAG and therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulation at Sibai (ST 2), Liangmen (ST 21), and Zusanli (ST 36) acupoints located in the stomach meridian using a rat model of CAG. The current results showed that CAG caused comprehensive metabolic alterations including the TCA cycle, glycolysis, membrane metabolism and catabolism, gut microbiota-related metabolism. On the other hand, electro-acupuncture treatment was found able to normalize a number of CAG-induced metabolomics changes by alleviating membrane catabolism, restoring function of neurotransmitter in brain and partially reverse the CAG-induced perturbation in gut microbiota metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the biochemistry of CAG and mechanism of the therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture stimulations. PMID:28358020

  11. The mzTab data exchange format: communicating mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics experimental results to a wider audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griss, Johannes; Jones, Andrew R; Sachsenberg, Timo; Walzer, Mathias; Gatto, Laurent; Hartler, Jürgen; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Salek, Reza M; Steinbeck, Christoph; Neuhauser, Nadin; Cox, Jürgen; Neumann, Steffen; Fan, Jun; Reisinger, Florian; Xu, Qing-Wei; Del Toro, Noemi; Pérez-Riverol, Yasset; Ghali, Fawaz; Bandeira, Nuno; Xenarios, Ioannis; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning

    2014-10-01

    The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed several standardized data formats to facilitate data sharing in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. These allow researchers to report their complete results in a unified way. However, at present, there is no format to describe the final qualitative and quantitative results for proteomics and metabolomics experiments in a simple tabular format. Many downstream analysis use cases are only concerned with the final results of an experiment and require an easily accessible format, compatible with tools such as Microsoft Excel or R. We developed the mzTab file format for MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results to meet this need. mzTab is intended as a lightweight supplement to the existing standard XML-based file formats (mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML), providing a comprehensive summary, similar in concept to the supplemental material of a scientific publication. mzTab files can contain protein, peptide, and small molecule identifications together with experimental metadata and basic quantitative information. The format is not intended to store the complete experimental evidence but provides mechanisms to report results at different levels of detail. These range from a simple summary of the final results to a representation of the results including the experimental design. This format is ideally suited to make MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results available to a wider biological community outside the field of MS. Several software tools for proteomics and metabolomics have already adapted the format as an output format. The comprehensive mzTab specification document and extensive additional documentation can be found online.

  12. Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis for Metabolomic Data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyamundanda, Gift

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background Data from metabolomic studies are typically complex and high-dimensional. Principal component analysis (PCA) is currently the most widely used statistical technique for analyzing metabolomic data. However, PCA is limited by the fact that it is not based on a statistical model. Results Here, probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) which addresses some of the limitations of PCA, is reviewed and extended. A novel extension of PPCA, called probabilistic principal component and covariates analysis (PPCCA), is introduced which provides a flexible approach to jointly model metabolomic data and additional covariate information. The use of a mixture of PPCA models for discovering the number of inherent groups in metabolomic data is demonstrated. The jackknife technique is employed to construct confidence intervals for estimated model parameters throughout. The optimal number of principal components is determined through the use of the Bayesian Information Criterion model selection tool, which is modified to address the high dimensionality of the data. Conclusions The methods presented are illustrated through an application to metabolomic data sets. Jointly modeling metabolomic data and covariates was successfully achieved and has the potential to provide deeper insight to the underlying data structure. Examination of confidence intervals for the model parameters, such as loadings, allows for principled and clear interpretation of the underlying data structure. A software package called MetabolAnalyze, freely available through the R statistical software, has been developed to facilitate implementation of the presented methods in the metabolomics field.

  13. Metabolomics in neonatology: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanos, V; Van den Anker, J; Noto, A; Mussap, M; Atzori, L

    2013-02-01

    The newest 'omics' science is metabolomics, the latest offspring of genomics, considered the most innovative of the 'omics' sciences. Metabolomics, also called the 'new clinical biochemistry', is an approach based on the systematic study of the complete set of metabolites in a biological sample. The metabolome is considered the most predictive phenotype and is capable of considering epigenetic differences. It is so close to the phenotype that it can be considered the phenotype itself. In the last three years about 5000 papers have been listed in PubMed on this topic, but few data are available in the newborn. The aim of this review, after a description of background and technical procedures, is to analyse the clinical applications of metabolomics in neonatology, covering the following points: gestational age, postnatal age, type of delivery, zygosity, perinatal asphyxia, intrauterine growth restriction, prenatal inflammation and brain injury, respiratory, cardiovascular renal, metabolic diseases; sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis and antibiotic treatment; nutritional studies on maternal milk and formula, pharma-metabolomics, long-term diseases. Pros and cons of metabolomics are also discussed. All this comes about with the non-invasive collection of a few drops of urine (exceptionally important for the neonate, especially those of low birth weight). Only time and large-scale studies to validate initial results will place metabolomics within neonatology. In any case, it is important for perinatologists to learn and understand this new technology to offer their patients the utmost in diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

  14. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomic approach for optimization and toxicity evaluation of earthworm sub-lethal responses to carbofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Ch, Ratnasekhar; Saxena, Prem Narain

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals) for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil). Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies.

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomic approach for optimization and toxicity evaluation of earthworm sub-lethal responses to carbofuran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Krishna Reddy Mudiam

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil. Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies.

  16. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna J. Simpson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS, betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA of contaminants is not clearly defined.

  17. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics for comparison of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and its implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai Lun; Ho, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Findings from epidemiology, preclinical and clinical studies indicate that consumption of coffee could have beneficial effects against dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The benefits appear to come from caffeinated coffee, but not decaffeinated coffee or pure caffeine itself. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use metabolomics approach to delineate the discriminant metabolites between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, which could have contributed to the observed therapeutic benefits. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to characterize the metabolic differences between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed distinct separation between the two types of coffee (cumulative Q(2) = 0.998). A total of 69 discriminant metabolites were identified based on the OPLS-DA model, with 37 and 32 metabolites detected to be higher in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. These metabolites include several benzoate and cinnamate-derived phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids. Our study successfully established GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics approach as a highly robust tool in discriminant analysis between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee samples. Discriminant metabolites identified in this study are biologically relevant and provide valuable insights into therapeutic research of coffee against AD. Our data also hint at possible involvement of gut microbial metabolism to enhance therapeutic potential of coffee components, which represents an interesting area for future research.

  18. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS-based metabolomics for comparison of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and its implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Lun Chang

    Full Text Available Findings from epidemiology, preclinical and clinical studies indicate that consumption of coffee could have beneficial effects against dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD. The benefits appear to come from caffeinated coffee, but not decaffeinated coffee or pure caffeine itself. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use metabolomics approach to delineate the discriminant metabolites between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, which could have contributed to the observed therapeutic benefits. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS-based metabolomics approach was employed to characterize the metabolic differences between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA showed distinct separation between the two types of coffee (cumulative Q(2 = 0.998. A total of 69 discriminant metabolites were identified based on the OPLS-DA model, with 37 and 32 metabolites detected to be higher in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. These metabolites include several benzoate and cinnamate-derived phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids. Our study successfully established GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics approach as a highly robust tool in discriminant analysis between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee samples. Discriminant metabolites identified in this study are biologically relevant and provide valuable insights into therapeutic research of coffee against AD. Our data also hint at possible involvement of gut microbial metabolism to enhance therapeutic potential of coffee components, which represents an interesting area for future research.

  19. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankadurai, Brian P; Furdui, Vasile I; Reiner, Eric J; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2013-08-27

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that were comprised of two separate modes of action: a non-polar narcosis type mechanism after two days of exposure and increased fatty acid oxidation after seven and fourteen days of exposure. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that 2-hexyl-5-ethyl-3-furansulfonate (HEFS), betaine, leucine, arginine, glutamate, maltose and ATP are potential indicators of PFOS exposure, as the concentrations of these metabolites fluctuated significantly. Overall, NMR-based metabolomic analysis suggests elevated fatty acid oxidation, disruption in energy metabolism and biological membrane structure and a possible interruption of ATP synthesis. These conclusions obtained from analysis of the metabolic profile in response to sub-lethal PFOS exposure indicates that NMR-based metabolomics is an excellent discovery tool when the mode of action (MOA) of contaminants is not clearly defined.

  20. GC/MS-based metabolomic studies reveal key roles of glycine in regulating silk synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanmei; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinjie; Xiong, Ying; Xu, Guowang; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-02-01

    Metabolic profiling of silkworm, especially the factors that affect silk synthesis at the metabolic level, is little known. Herein, metabolomic method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to identify key metabolic changes in silk synthesis deficient silkworms. Forty-six differential metabolites were identified in Nd group with the defect of silk synthesis. Significant changes in the levels of glycine and uric acid (up-regulation), carbohydrates and free fatty acids (down-regulation) were observed. The further metabolomics of silk synthesis deficient silkworms by decreasing silk proteins synthesis using knocking out fibroin heavy chain gene or extirpating silk glands operation showed that the changes of the metabolites were almost consistent with those of the Nd group. Furthermore, the increased silk yields by supplying more glycine or its related metabolite confirmed that glycine is a key metabolite to regulate silk synthesis. These findings provide important insights into the regulation between metabolic profiling and silk synthesis.

  1. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices.

  2. ¹H-NMR and MS based metabolomics study of the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ze-Yun; Ding, Li-Li; Li, Jin-Mei; Xu, Bao-Li; Yang, Li; Bi, Kai-Shun; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a principle bioactive component of Curcuma longa L, is well known for its anti-hyperlipidemia effect. However, no holistic metabolic information of curcumin on hyperlipidemia models has been revealed, which may provide us an insight into the underlying mechanism. In the present work, NMR and MS based metabolomics was conducted to investigate the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet (HFD) feeding for 12 weeks. The HFD induced animals were orally administered with curcumin (40, 80 mg/kg) or lovastatin (30 mg/kg, positive control) once a day during the inducing period. Serum biochemistry assay of TC, TG, LDL-c, and HDL-c was conducted and proved that treatment of curcumin or lovastatin can significantly improve the lipid profiles. Subsequently, metabolomics analysis was carried out for urine samples. Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was employed to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemia effect of curcumin and to detect related potential biomarkers. Totally, 35 biomarkers were identified, including 31 by NMR and nine by MS (five by both). It turned out that curcumin treatment can partially recover the metabolism disorders induced by HFD, with the following metabolic pathways involved: TCA cycle, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, synthesis of ketone bodies and cholesterol, ketogenesis of branched chain amino acid, choline metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. Besides, NMR and MS based metabolomics proved to be powerful tools in investigating pharmacodynamics effect of natural products and underlying mechanisms.

  3. ¹H-NMR and MS based metabolomics study of the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Yun Li

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a principle bioactive component of Curcuma longa L, is well known for its anti-hyperlipidemia effect. However, no holistic metabolic information of curcumin on hyperlipidemia models has been revealed, which may provide us an insight into the underlying mechanism. In the present work, NMR and MS based metabolomics was conducted to investigate the intervention effect of curcumin on hyperlipidemia mice induced by high-fat diet (HFD feeding for 12 weeks. The HFD induced animals were orally administered with curcumin (40, 80 mg/kg or lovastatin (30 mg/kg, positive control once a day during the inducing period. Serum biochemistry assay of TC, TG, LDL-c, and HDL-c was conducted and proved that treatment of curcumin or lovastatin can significantly improve the lipid profiles. Subsequently, metabolomics analysis was carried out for urine samples. Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA was employed to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemia effect of curcumin and to detect related potential biomarkers. Totally, 35 biomarkers were identified, including 31 by NMR and nine by MS (five by both. It turned out that curcumin treatment can partially recover the metabolism disorders induced by HFD, with the following metabolic pathways involved: TCA cycle, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, synthesis of ketone bodies and cholesterol, ketogenesis of branched chain amino acid, choline metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. Besides, NMR and MS based metabolomics proved to be powerful tools in investigating pharmacodynamics effect of natural products and underlying mechanisms.

  4. A potential tool for diagnosis of male infertility: Plasma metabolomics based on GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyi; Wang, Yang; Yun, Yonghuan; Xia, Zian; Lu, Hongmei; Luo, Jiekun; Liang, Yizeng

    2016-01-15

    Male infertility has become an important public health problem worldwide. Nowadays the diagnosis of male infertility frequently depends on the results of semen quality or requires more invasive surgical intervention. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel approach for early diagnosis of male infertility. According to the presence or absence of normal sexual function, the male infertility is classified into two phenotypes, erectile dysfunction (ED) and semen abnormalities (SA). The aim of this study was to investigate the GC-MS plasma profiles of infertile male having erectile dysfunction (ED) and having semen abnormalities (SA) and discover the potential biomarkers. The plasma samples from healthy controls (HC) (n=61) and infertility patients with ED (n=26) or with SA (n=44) were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for discrimination and screening potential biomarkers. The partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on GC-MS dataset. The results showed that HC could be discriminated from infertile cases having SA (AUC=86.96%, sensitivity=78.69%, specificity=84.09%, accuracy=80.95%) and infertile cases having ED (AUC=94.33%, sensitivity=80.33%, specificity=100%, accuracy=87.36%). Some potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by two commonly used variable selection methods, variable importance on projection (VIP) and original coefficients of PLS-DA (β). 1,5-Anhydro-sorbitol and α-hydroxyisovaleric acid were identified as the potential biomarkers for distinguishing HC from the male infertility patients. Meanwhile, lactate, glutamate and cholesterol were the found to be the important variables to distinguish between patients with erectile dysfunction from those with semen abnormalities. The plasma metabolomics may be developed as a novel approach for fast, noninvasive, and acceptable diagnosis and characterization of male infertility.

  5. Global mass spectrometry based metabolomics profiling of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore R Sana

    data acquisition. Untargeted and targeted data mining workflows, when used together to perform pathway-inferred metabolomics, have the benefit of obviating MS/MS confirmation for every detected compound.

  6. [Exploring the mechanism of rhizoma coptidis in treating type II diabetes mellitus based on metabolomics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yuan, Zimin; Kong, Hongwei; Li, Yong; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics was used to explore the mechanism of Rhizoma coptidis in treating type II diabetes mellitus. The rat model of type II diabetes mellitus was constructed by an injection of streptozocin (40 mg/kg), along with diets of fat emulsion. The rats were divided into four groups, the control group, the model group, the Rhizoma coptidis group (10 g/kg) and the metformin group (0.08 g/kg). After the treatment for 30 d, blood samples were collected to test biomedical indexes, and 24 h urine samples were collected for the metabolomics experiment. In the Rhizoma coptidis group, fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol (TC) and total plasma triglycerides (TG) were significantly decreased by 59.26%, 58.66% and 42.18%, respectively, compared with those in the model group. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, a urinary metabolomics method was used to study the mechanism of Rhizoma coptidis in treating diabetes mellitus. Based on the principal component analysis, it was found that the model group and control group were separated into two different clusters. The Rhizoma coptidis group was located between the model group and the control group, closer to the control group. Twelve significantly changed metabolites of diabetes mellitus were detected and identified, including 4-methyl phenol, benzoic acid, aminomalonic acid, and so on. After diabetic rats were administered with Rhizoma coptidis, 7 metabolites were significantly changed, and L-ascorbic acid and aminomalonic acid which related with the oxidative stress were significantly regulated to normal. The pharmacological results showed that Rhizoma coptidis could display anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic effects. The Rhizoma coptidis had antioxidation function in preventing the occurrence of complications with diabetes mellitus to some extent. The work illustrates that the metabolomics method is a useful tool to study the treatment mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine.

  7. Toxicological effects induced by cadmium in gills of Manila clam ruditapes philippinarum using NMR-based metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Linbao; Liu, Xiaoli; You, Liping; Zhou, Di [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Junbao; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, CAS, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Zone Environment Processes, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai (China); Feng, Jianghua [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2011-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) has become an important heavy metal contaminant in the sediment and seawater along the Bohai Sea and been of great ecological risk due to its toxic effects to marine organisms. In this work, the toxicological effects caused by environmentally relevant concentrations (10 and 40 {mu}g L{sup -1}) of Cd were studied in the gill tissues of Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure for 24, 48, and 96 h. Both low (10 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and high (40 {mu}g L{sup -1}) doses of Cd caused the disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation and neurotoxicity based on the metabolic biomarkers such as succinate, alanine, branched chain amino acids, betaine, hypotaurine, and glutamate in clam gills after 24 h of exposure. However, the recovery of toxicological effects of Cd after exposure for 96 h was obviously observed in clam to Cd exposures. Overall, these results indicated that NMR-based metabolomics was applicable to elucidate the toxicological effects of heavy metal contaminants in the marine bioindicator. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis of Yukon Thellungiella plants grown in cabinets and their natural habitat show phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara David R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella salsuginea is an important model plant due to its natural tolerance to abiotic stresses including salt, cold, and water deficits. Microarray and metabolite profiling have shown that Thellungiella undergoes stress-responsive changes in transcript and organic solute abundance when grown under controlled environmental conditions. However, few reports assess the capacity of plants to display stress-responsive traits in natural habitats where concurrent stresses are the norm. Results To determine whether stress-responsive changes observed in cabinet-grown plants are recapitulated in the field, we analyzed leaf transcript and metabolic profiles of Thellungiella growing in its native Yukon habitat during two years of contrasting meteorological conditions. We found 673 genes showing differential expression between field and unstressed, chamber-grown plants. There were comparatively few overlaps between genes expressed under field and cabinet treatment-specific conditions. Only 20 of 99 drought-responsive genes were expressed both in the field during a year of low precipitation and in plants subjected to drought treatments in cabinets. There was also a general pattern of lower abundance among metabolites found in field plants relative to control or stress-treated plants in growth cabinets. Nutrient availability may explain some of the observed differences. For example, proline accumulated to high levels in cold and salt-stressed cabinet-grown plants but proline content was, by comparison, negligible in plants at a saline Yukon field site. We show that proline accumulated in a stress-responsive manner in Thellungiella plants salinized in growth cabinets and in salt-stressed seedlings when nitrogen was provided at 1.0 mM. In seedlings grown on 0.1 mM nitrogen medium, the proline content was low while carbohydrates increased. The relatively higher content of sugar-like compounds in field plants and seedlings on low nitrogen

  9. Nephron Toxicity Profiling via Untargeted Metabolome Analysis Employing a High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Experimental and Computational Pipeline*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranninger, Christina; Rurik, Marc; Limonciel, Alice; Ruzek, Silke; Reischl, Roland; Wilmes, Anja; Jennings, Paul; Hewitt, Philip; Dekant, Wolfgang; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Huber, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics has the potential to improve the predictivity of in vitro toxicity models and therefore may aid the replacement of expensive and laborious animal models. Here we describe a long term repeat dose nephrotoxicity study conducted on the human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line, RPTEC/TERT1, treated with 10 and 35 μmol·liter−1 of chloroacetaldehyde, a metabolite of the anti-cancer drug ifosfamide. Our study outlines the establishment of an automated and easy to use untargeted metabolomics workflow for HPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry data. Automated data analysis workflows based on open source software (OpenMS, KNIME) enabled a comprehensive and reproducible analysis of the complex and voluminous metabolomics data produced by the profiling approach. Time- and concentration-dependent responses were clearly evident in the metabolomic profiles. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the mode of action, transcriptomics and proteomics data were also integrated. For toxicity profiling of chloroacetaldehyde, 428 and 317 metabolite features were detectable in positive and negative modes, respectively, after stringent removal of chemical noise and unstable signals. Changes upon treatment were explored using principal component analysis, and statistically significant differences were identified using linear models for microarray assays. The analysis revealed toxic effects only for the treatment with 35 μmol·liter−1 for 3 and 14 days. The most regulated metabolites were glutathione and metabolites related to the oxidative stress response of the cells. These findings are corroborated by proteomics and transcriptomics data, which show, among other things, an activation of the Nrf2 and ATF4 pathways. PMID:26055719

  10. Blood Transcriptomics and Metabolomics for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-31

    progress in human immunology , where transcriptomics of isolated cell populations provided necessary information [15–17]. Nonetheless, a review on “blood...databases are biased towards cancer , under- representing the immunology in white blood cells. Second, many path- ways are based on tissues other than blood...metabolomics in oncology: a review . Clin Cancer Res 2009;15. [52] Armitage EG. Metabolomics in cancer biomarker discovery: current trends and fu- ture

  11. Development of urinary pseudotargeted LC-MS-based metabolomics method and its application in hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yaping; Zhu, Bin; Zheng, Ruiyin; Zhao, Xinjie; Yin, Peiyuan; Lu, Xin; Jiao, Binghua; Xu, Guowang; Yao, Zhenzhen

    2015-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the pestilent malignancies leading to cancer-related death. Discovering effective biomarkers for HCC diagnosis is an urgent demand. To identify potential metabolite biomarkers, we developed a urinary pseudotargeted method based on liquid chromatography-hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-QTRAP MS). Compared with nontargeted method, the pseudotargeted method can achieve better data quality, which benefits differential metabolites discovery. The established method was applied to cirrhosis (CIR) and HCC investigation. It was found that urinary nucleosides, bile acids, citric acid, and several amino acids were significantly changed in liver disease groups compared with the controls, featuring the dysregulation of purine metabolism, energy metabolism, and amino metabolism in liver diseases. Furthermore, some metabolites such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate, glutamine, and short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines were the differential metabolites of HCC and CIR. On the basis of binary logistic regression, butyrylcarnitine (carnitine C4:0) and hydantoin-5-propionic acid were defined as combinational markers to distinguish HCC from CIR. The area under curve was 0.786 and 0.773 for discovery stage and validation stage samples, respectively. These data show that the established pseudotargeted method is a complementary one of targeted and nontargeted methods for metabolomics study.

  12. Application of Holistic Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Based Urinary Metabolomics for Prostate Cancer Detection and Biomarker Discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available Human exhibit wide variations in their metabolic profiles because of differences in genetic factors, diet and lifestyle. Therefore in order to detect metabolic differences between individuals robust analytical methods are required. A protocol was produced based on the use of Liquid Chromatography- High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS in combination with orthogonal Hydrophilic Interaction (HILIC and Reversed Phase (RP liquid chromatography methods for the analysis of the urinary metabolome, which was then evaluated as a diagnostic tool for prostate cancer (a common but highly heterogeneous condition. The LC-HRMS method was found to be robust and exhibited excellent repeatability for retention times (0.9. In addition, using the receiver operator characteristics (ROC test, the area under curve (AUC for the combination of the four best characterised biomarker compounds was 0.896. The four biomarker compounds were also found to differ significantly (P<0.05 between an independent patient cohort and controls. This is the first time such a rigorous test has been applied to this type of model. If validated, the established protocol provides a robust approach with a potentially wide application to metabolite profiling of human biofluids in health and disease.

  13. Evaluation of drug-induced neurotoxicity based on metabolomics, proteomics and electrical activity measurements in complementary CNS in vitro models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Luise; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Culot, Maxime; da Costa, Anaelle; Landry, Christophe; Bellwon, Patricia; Kristl, Theresa; Hörmann, Katrin; Ruzek, Silke; Aiche, Stephan; Reinert, Knut; Bielow, Chris; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Huber, Christian G; Schroeder, Olaf H-U; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Bal-Price, Anna

    2015-12-25

    The present study was performed in an attempt to develop an in vitro integrated testing strategy (ITS) to evaluate drug-induced neurotoxicity. A number of endpoints were analyzed using two complementary brain cell culture models and an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model after single and repeated exposure treatments with selected drugs that covered the major biological, pharmacological and neuro-toxicological responses. Furthermore, four drugs (diazepam, cyclosporine A, chlorpromazine and amiodarone) were tested more in depth as representatives of different classes of neurotoxicants, inducing toxicity through different pathways of toxicity. The developed in vitro BBB model allowed detection of toxic effects at the level of BBB and evaluation of drug transport through the barrier for predicting free brain concentrations of the studied drugs. The measurement of neuronal electrical activity was found to be a sensitive tool to predict the neuroactivity and neurotoxicity of drugs after acute exposure. The histotypic 3D re-aggregating brain cell cultures, containing all brain cell types, were found to be well suited for OMICs analyses after both acute and long term treatment. The obtained data suggest that an in vitro ITS based on the information obtained from BBB studies and combined with metabolomics, proteomics and neuronal electrical activity measurements performed in stable in vitro neuronal cell culture systems, has high potential to improve current in vitro drug-induced neurotoxicity evaluation.

  14. Metabolite Variation in Lean and Obese Streptozotocin (STZ)-Induced Diabetic Rats via (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar Sajak, Azliana; Mediani, Ahmed; Maulidiani; Ismail, Amin; Abas, Faridah

    2016-12-19

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is considered as a complex metabolic disease because it affects the metabolism of glucose and other metabolites. Although many diabetes studies have been conducted in animal models throughout the years, the pathogenesis of this disease, especially between lean diabetes (ND + STZ) and obese diabetes (OB + STZ), is still not fully understood. In this study, the urine from ND + STZ, OB + STZ, lean/control (ND), and OB + STZ rats were collected and compared by using (1)H NMR metabolomics. The results from multivariate data analysis (MVDA) showed that the diabetic groups (ND + STZ and OB + STZ) have similarities and dissimilarities for a certain level of metabolites. Differences between ND + STZ and OB + STZ were particularly noticeable in the synthesis of ketone bodies, branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), and sensitivity towards the oral T2DM diabetes drug metformin. This finding suggests that the ND + STZ group was more similar to the T1DM model and OB + STZ to the T2DM model. In addition, we also managed to identify several pathways and metabolism aspects shared by obese (OB) and OB + STZ. The results from this study are useful in developing drug target-based research as they can increase understanding regarding the cause and effect of DM.

  15. An improved pseudotargeted metabolomics approach using multiple ion monitoring with time-staggered ion lists based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Fang; Li, Peng; He, Chengwei; Wang, Ruibing; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo, E-mail: jbwan@umac.mo

    2016-07-13

    Pseudotargeted metabolomics is a novel strategy integrating the advantages of both untargeted and targeted methods. The conventional pseudotargeted metabolomics required two MS instruments, i.e., ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time- of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/Q-TOF MS) and UHPLC/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/QQQ-MS), which makes method transformation inevitable. Furthermore, the picking of ion pairs from thousands of candidates and the swapping of the data between two instruments are the most labor-intensive steps, which greatly limit its application in metabolomic analysis. In the present study, we proposed an improved pseudotargeted metabolomics method that could be achieved on an UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument operated in the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) mode with time-staggered ion lists (tsMIM). Full scan-based untargeted analysis was applied to extract the target ions. After peak alignment and ion fusion, a stepwise ion picking procedure was used to generate the ion lists for subsequent single MIM and tsMIM. The UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted approach exhibited better repeatability and a wider linear range than the UHPLC/Q-TOF MS-based untargeted metabolomics method. Compared to the single MIM mode, the tsMIM significantly increased the coverage of the metabolites detected. The newly developed method was successfully applied to discover plasma biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury in mice, which indicated its practicability and great potential in future metabolomics studies. - Highlights: • An UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted metabolomics was proposed. • Compared to full scan, the improved method exhibits better repeatability and a wider linear range. • The proposed method could achieve pseudotargeted analysis on one UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument. • The developed method was successfully used to discover biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury.

  16. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Arthur S.; Hall, Robert D.; Junot, Christophe; Karp, Peter D.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Mistrik, Robert; Reed, Laura K.; Saito, Kazuki; Salek, Reza M.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research. PMID:26891337

  17. The Time Is Right to Focus on Model Organism Metabolomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur S. Edison

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model organisms are an essential component of biological and biomedical research that can be used to study specific biological processes. These organisms are in part selected for facile experimental study. However, just as importantly, intensive study of a small number of model organisms yields important synergies as discoveries in one area of science for a given organism shed light on biological processes in other areas, even for other organisms. Furthermore, the extensive knowledge bases compiled for each model organism enable systems-level understandings of these species, which enhance the overall biological and biomedical knowledge for all organisms, including humans. Building upon extensive genomics research, we argue that the time is now right to focus intensively on model organism metabolomes. We propose a grand challenge for metabolomics studies of model organisms: to identify and map all metabolites onto metabolic pathways, to develop quantitative metabolic models for model organisms, and to relate organism metabolic pathways within the context of evolutionary metabolomics, i.e., phylometabolomics. These efforts should focus on a series of established model organisms in microbial, animal and plant research.

  18. An eco-metabolomic study of host plant resistance to Western flower thrips in cultivated, biofortified and wild carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, Kirsten A; Cristofori, Gabriele; van Steenis, Rosalinda; Verpoorte, Robert; Klinkhamer, Peter G L

    2013-09-01

    Domestication of plants and selection for agronomic traits may reduce plant secondary defence metabolites relative to their ancestors. Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an economically important vegetable. Recently, carrot was developed as a functional food with additional health-promoting functions. Biofortified carrots contain increased concentrations of chlorogenic acid as an antioxidant. Chlorogenic acid is involved in host plant resistance to Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis), one of the key agri- and horticultural pests worldwide. The objective of this study was to investigate quantitative host plant resistance to thrips in carrot and to identify candidate compounds for constitutive resistance. As such we explored whether cultivated carrot is more vulnerable to herbivore attack compared to wild carrot. We subjected a set of 14 biofortified, cultivated and wild carrot genotypes to thrips infestation. We compared morphological traits and leaf metabolic profiles of the three most resistant and susceptible carrots using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). In contrast to our expectation, wild carrots were not more resistant to thrips than cultivated ones. The most thrips resistant carrot was the cultivar Ingot which is known to be tolerant against carrot root fly (Psila rosae). Biofortified carrots were not resistant to thrips. Plant size, leaf area and number of leaf hairs did not differ between resistant and susceptible carrots. The metabolic profiles of the leaves of resistant carrots were significantly different from those of susceptible carrots. The leaves of resistant carrots contained higher amounts of the flavanoid luteolin, the phenylpropanoid sinapic acid and the amino acid β-alanine. The negative effect of these compounds on thrips was confirmed using in-vitro bioassays. Our results have potential implications for carrot breeders. The natural variation of metabolites present in cultivated carrots can be used for improvement of

  19. Metabolomics and dereplication strategies in natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfike, Ahmed Fares; Viegelmann, Christina; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic methods can be utilized to screen diverse biological sources of potentially novel and sustainable sources of antibiotics and pharmacologically-active drugs. Dereplication studies by high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-HRFTMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can establish the chemical profile of endophytic and/or endozoic microbial extracts and their plant or animal sources. Identifying the compounds of interest at an early stage will aid in the isolation of the bioactive components. Therefore metabolite profiling is important for functional genomics and in the search for new pharmacologically active compounds. Using the tools of metabolomics through the employment of LC-HRFTMS as well as high resolution NMR will be a very efficient approach. Metabolomic profiling has found its application in screening extracts of macroorganisms as well as in the isolation and cultivation of suspected microbial producers of bioactive natural products.Metabolomics is being applied to identify and biotechnologically optimize the production of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites. The links between metabolome evolution during optimization and processing factors can be identified through metabolomics. Information obtained from a metabolomics dataset can efficiently establish cultivation and production processes at a small scale which will be finally scaled up to a fermenter system, while maintaining or enhancing synthesis of the desired compounds. MZmine (BMC Bioinformatics 11:395-399, 2010; http://mzmine.sourceforge.net/download.shtml ) and SIEVE ( http://www.vastscientific.com/resources/index.html ; Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 22:1912-1918, 2008) softwares are utilized to perform differential analysis of sample populations to find significant expressed features of complex biomarkers between parameter variables. Metabolomes are identified with the aid of existing high resolution MS and NMR

  20. GC-MS-based metabolomic study on the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zihong; Bai, Shunjie; Shen, Peng; Hu, Qingchuan; Wang, Xingfa; Dong, Meixue; Wang, Wei; Li, Juan; Cheng, Ke; Zhang, Shuxiao; Zou, Dezhi; Han, Yu; Wang, Haiyang; Xie, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE), including EGb-761, have been suggested to have antidepressant activity based on previous behavioral and biochemical analyses. However, because GBE contain many constituents, the mechanisms underlying this suggested antidepressant activity are unclear. Here, we investigated the antidepressant-like effects of diterpene ginkgolides (DG), an important class of constituents in GBE, and studied their effects in the mouse hippocampus using a GC-MS-based metabolomics approach. Mice were randomly divided into five groups and injected daily until testing with 0.9% NaCl solution, one of three doses of DG (4.06, 12.18, and 36.54mg/kg), or venlafaxine. Sucrose preference (SPT) and tail suspension (TST) tests were then performed to evaluate depressive-like behaviors in mice. DG (12.18 and 36.54mg/kg) and venlafaxine (VLX) administration significantly increased hedonic behavior in mice in the SPT. DG (12.18mg/kg) treatment also shortened immobility time in the TST, suggestive of antidepressant-like effects. Significant differences in the metabolic profile in the DG (12.18mg/kg) compared with the control or VLX group indicative of an antidepressant-like effect were observed using multivariate analysis. Eighteen differential hippocampal metabolites were identified that discriminated the DG (12.18mg/kg) and control groups. These biochemical changes involved neurotransmitter metabolism, oxidative stress, glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, and kynurenic acid, providing clues to the therapeutic mechanisms of DG. Thus, this study showed that DG has antidepressant-like activities in mice and shed light on the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of diterpene ginkgolides on behavior, providing an important drug candidate for the treatment of depression.

  1. Systems rebalancing of metabolism in response to sulfur deprivation, as revealed by metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforova, Victoria J; Kopka, Joachim; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Fiehn, Oliver; Hopkins, Laura; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Hesse, Holger; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2005-05-01

    Sulfur is an essential macro-element in plant and animal nutrition. Plants assimilate inorganic sulfate into two sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Low supply of sulfate leads to decreased sulfur pools within plant tissues. As sulfur-related metabolites represent an integral part of plant metabolism with multiple interactions, sulfur deficiency stress induces a number of adaptive responses, which must be coordinated. To reveal the coordinating network of adaptations to sulfur deficiency, metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis has been undertaken. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques revealed the response patterns of 6,023 peaks of nonredundant ion traces and relative concentration levels of 134 nonredundant compounds of known chemical structure. Here, we provide a catalogue of the detected metabolic changes and reconstruct the coordinating network of their mutual influences. The observed decrease in biomass, as well as in levels of proteins, chlorophylls, and total RNA, gives evidence for a general reduction of metabolic activity under conditions of depleted sulfur supply. This is achieved by a systemic adjustment of metabolism involving the major metabolic pathways. Sulfur/carbon/nitrogen are partitioned by accumulation of metabolites along the pathway O-acetylserine to serine to glycine, and are further channeled together with the nitrogen-rich compound glutamine into allantoin. Mutual influences between sulfur assimilation, nitrogen imbalance, lipid breakdown, purine metabolism, and enhanced photorespiration associated with sulfur-deficiency stress are revealed in this study. These responses may be assembled into a global scheme of metabolic regulation induced by sulfur nutritional stress, which optimizes resources for seed production.

  2. Potential of human saliva for nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and for health-related biomarker identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Eggers, Nina; Eller, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    in intensities of several metabolites including trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), choline, propionate, alanine, methanol, and N-acetyl groups. No effects of gender and body mass index (BMI) on the salivary metabolite profile were detected. The relationships between the salivary metabolome and glycated hemoglobin...

  3. An NMR-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of supplementation with glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Hu, Jiayu; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Tiejun

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has various toxicological effects in humans and pigs that result from the ingestion of contaminated cereal products. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of dietary supplementation with glutamic acid on piglets challenged with DON. A total of 20 piglets weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (5 piglets/treatment): 1) basal diet, negative control (NC); 2) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON (DON); 3) basal diet +2% (g/g) glutamic acid (GLU); 4) basal diet +4 mg/kg DON +2% glutamic acid (DG). A 7-d adaptation period was followed by 30 days of treatment. A metabolite analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR)-based metabolomic technology and the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities for plasma, as well as the activity of Caspase-3 and the proliferation of epithelial cells were conducted. The results showed that contents of low-density lipoprotein, alanine, arginine, acetate, glycoprotein, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine, lactate, and urea, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio were higher but high-density lipoprotein, proline, citrate, choline, unsaturated lipids and fumarate were lower in piglets of DON treatment than that of NC treatment (Pglutamic acid increased the plasma concentrations of proline, citrate, creatinine, unsaturated lipids, and fumarate, and decreased the concentrations of alanine, glycoprotein, TMAO, glycine, and lactate, as well as the glutamate/creatinine ratio (Pglutamic acid to DON treatment increased the plasma activities of SOD and GSH-Px and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labeling indexes for the jejunum and ileum (Pglutamic acid has the potential to repair the injuries associated with oxidative stress as well as the disturbances of energy and amino acid metabolism induced by DON.

  4. 1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Sub-Lethal Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Exposure to the Earthworm, Eisenia fetida, in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    SIMPSON, Myrna J.; André J. Simpson; Reiner, Eric J.; Brian P. Lankadurai; Furdui, Vasile I.

    2013-01-01

    1H NMR-based metabolomics was used to measure the response of Eisenia fetida earthworms after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in soil. Earthworms were exposed to a range of PFOS concentrations (five, 10, 25, 50, 100 or 150 mg/kg) for two, seven and fourteen days. Earthworm tissues were extracted and analyzed by 1H NMR. Multivariate statistical analysis of the metabolic response of E. fetida to PFOS exposure identified time-dependent responses that wer...

  5. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  6. The human serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Psychogios

    Full Text Available Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca.

  7. Lipidome and metabolome analysis of fresh tobacco leaves in different geographical regions using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Lu, Xin; Zhao, Jieyu; Zhang, Junjie; Zhao, Yanni; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang

    2015-07-01

    The combination of the lipidome and the metabolome can provide much more information in plant metabolomics studies. A method for the simultaneous extraction of the lipidome and the metabolome of fresh tobacco leaves was developed. Method validation was performed on the basis of the optimal ratio of methanol to methyl tert-butyl ether to water (37:45:68) from the design of experiments. Good repeatability was obtained. We found that 92.2% and 91.6% of the peaks for the lipidome and the metabolome were within a relative standard deviation of 20%, accounting for 94.6% and 94.6% of the total abundance, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were also satisfactory. A total of 230 metabolites, including 129 lipids, were identified. Significant differences were found in lipidomic and metabolomic profiles of fresh tobacco leaves in different geographical regions. Highly unsaturated galactolipids, phosphatidylethanolamines, predominant phosphatidylcholines, most of the polyphenols, amino acids, and polyamines had a higher content in Yunnan province, and low-unsaturation-degree galactolipids, triacylglycerols, glucosylceramides with trihydroxy long-chain bases, acylated sterol glucosides, and some organic acids were more abundant in Henan province. Correlation analysis between differential metabolites and climatic factors indicated the vital importance of temperature. The fatty acid unsaturation degree of galactolipids could be influenced by temperature. Accumulation of polyphenols and decreases in the ratios of stigmasterols to sitosterols and glucosylstigmasterols to glucosylsitosterols were also correlated with lower temperature in Yunnan province. Furthermore, lipids were more sensitive to climatic variations than other metabolites.

  8. NMR-based metabolomics and hyphenated NMR techniques – a perfect match in natural products research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Joachim Møllesøe; Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Stærk, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacology is one of the world’s fastest-growing scientific disciplines encompassing a diverse range of subjects. It links natural sciences research on medicinal, aromatic and toxic plants with socio-cultural studies and has often been associated with the development of new drugs....... The Editors of Ethnopharmacology have assembled an international team of renowned contributors to provide a critical synthesis of the substantial body of new knowledge and evidence on the subject that has emerged over the past decade. Divided into three parts, the book begins with an overview of the subject...... including a brief history, ethnopharmacological methods, the role of intellectual property protection, key analytical approaches, the role of ethnopharmacology in primary/secondary education and links to biodiversity and ecological research. Part two looks at ethnopharmacological contributions to modern...

  9. Metabolomics data normalization with EigenMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Karpievitch

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated. Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05 as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data.

  10. Advances in understanding the mechanisms of mercury toxicity in wild golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) by (1)H NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Tiziana; Pereira, Patrícia; Maisano, Maria; Mauceri, Angela; Pacheco, Mário; Fasulo, Salvatore

    2016-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is recognized as a dangerous contaminant due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification within trophic levels, leading to serious health risks to aquatic biota. Therefore, there is an urgent need to unravel the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of Hg. To this aim, a metabolomics approach based on protonic nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), coupled with chemometrics, was performed on the gills of wild golden grey mullets L. aurata living in an Hg-polluted area in Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). Gills were selected as target organ due to their direct and continuous interaction with the surrounding environment. As a consequence of accumulated inorganic Hg and methylmercury, severe changes in the gill metabolome were observed, indicating a compromised health status of mullets. Numerous metabolites, i.e. amino acids, osmolytes, carbohydrates, and nucleotides, were identified as potential biomarkers of Hg toxicity in fish gills. Specifically, decrease of taurine and glycerophosphocholine, along with increased creatine level, suggested Hg interference with the ion-osmoregulatory processes. The rise of lactate indicated anaerobic metabolism enhancement. Moreover, the increased levels of amino acids suggested the occurrence of protein catabolism, further supported by the augmented alanine, involved in nitrogenous waste excretion. Increased level of isobutyrate, a marker of anoxia, was suggestive of onset of hypoxic stress at the Hg contaminated site. Moreover, the concomitant reduction in glycerophosphocholine and phosphocholine reflected the occurrence of membrane repair processes. Finally, perturbation in antioxidant defence system was revealed by the depletion in glutathione and its constituent amino acids. All these data were also compared to the differential Hg-induced metabolic responses previously observed in liver of the same mullets (Brandão et al., 2015). Overall, the environmental metabolomics approach demonstrated its effectiveness in the

  11. Investigation of the therapeutic effectiveness of active components in Sini decoction by a comprehensive GC/LC-MS based metabolomics and network pharmacology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Wu, Si; Li, Wuhong; Chen, Xiaofei; Dong, Xin; Tan, Guangguo; Zhang, Hai; Hong, Zhanying; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2014-12-01

    As a classical formula, Sini decoction (SND) has been fully proved to be clinically effective in treating doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy. Current chemomics and pharmacology proved that the total alkaloids (TA), total gingerols (TG), total flavones and total saponins (TFS) are the major active ingredients of Aconitum carmichaelii, Zingiber officinale and Glycyrrhiza uralensis in SND respectively. Our animal experiments in this study demonstrated that the above active ingredients (TAGFS) were more effective than formulas formed by any one or two of the three individual components and nearly the same as SND. However, very little is known about the action mechanisms of TAGFS. Thus, this study aimed to use for the first time the combination of GC/LC-MS based metabolomics and network pharmacology for solving this problem. By metabolomics, it was found that TAGFS worked by regulating six primary pathways. Then, network pharmacology was applied to search for specific targets. 17 potential cardiovascular related targets were found through molecular docking, 11 of which were identified by references, which demonstrated the therapeutic effectiveness of TAGFS using network pharmacology. Among these targets, four targets, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma, insulin receptor, ornithine aminotransferase and glucokinase, were involved in the TAGFS regulated pathways. Moreover, phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma, insulin receptor and glucokinase were proved to be targets of active components in SND. In addition, our data indicated TA as the principal ingredient in the SND formula, whereas TG and TFS served as adjuvant ingredients. We therefore suggest that dissecting the mode of action of clinically effective formulae with the combination use of metabolomics and network pharmacology may be a good strategy.

  12. The food metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according...... to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food...... by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still...

  13. Metabolomics and protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, Timothy; Haroune, Nicolas; Bagchi, Sushmita; Jarroll, Edward

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we examine the state-of-the-art technologies (gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.) in the well-established area of metabolomics especially as they relate to protozoan parasites.

  14. Current metabolomics: technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Sastia P; Yamamoto, Shinya; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomics, the global quantitative assessment of metabolites in a biological system, has played a pivotal role in various fields of science in the post-genomic era. Metabolites are the result of the interaction of the system's genome with its environment and are not merely the end product of gene expression, but also form part of the regulatory system in an integrated manner. Therefore, metabolomics is often considered a powerful tool to provide an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology of a cell. The power of metabolomics lies on the acquisition of analytical data in which metabolites in a cellular system are quantified, and the extraction of the most meaningful elements of the data by using various data analysis tool. In this review, we discuss the latest development of analytical techniques and data analyses methods in metabolomics study.

  15. Fecal metabolome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers: a host-microbiome integrative view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turroni, Silvia; Fiori, Jessica; Rampelli, Simone; Schnorr, Stephanie L.; Consolandi, Clarissa; Barone, Monica; Biagi, Elena; Fanelli, Flaminia; Mezzullo, Marco; Crittenden, Alyssa N.; Henry, Amanda G.; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The recent characterization of the gut microbiome of traditional rural and foraging societies allowed us to appreciate the essential co-adaptive role of the microbiome in complementing our physiology, opening up significant questions on how the microbiota changes that have occurred in industrialized urban populations may have altered the microbiota-host co-metabolic network, contributing to the growing list of Western diseases. Here, we applied a targeted metabolomics approach to profile the fecal metabolome of the Hadza of Tanzania, one of the world’s few remaining foraging populations, and compared them to the profiles of urban living Italians, as representative of people in the post-industrialized West. Data analysis shows that during the rainy season, when the diet is primarily plant-based, Hadza are characterized by a distinctive enrichment in hexoses, glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and acylcarnitines, while deplete in the most common natural amino acids and derivatives. Complementary to the documented unique metagenomic features of their gut microbiome, our findings on the Hadza metabolome lend support to the notion of an alternate microbiome configuration befitting of a nomadic forager lifestyle, which helps maintain metabolic homeostasis through an overall scarcity of inflammatory factors, which are instead highly represented in the Italian metabolome. PMID:27624970

  16. Pattern Recognition and Pathway Analysis with Genetic Algorithms in Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A robust and complete workflow for metabolic profiling and data mining was described in detail. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling were applied: hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC–LC–ESI–MS, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP–LC–ESI–MS, and gas chromatography (GC–TOF–MS all coupled to mass spectrometry (MS. Unsupervised methods, such as principle component analysis (PCA and clustering, and supervised methods, such as classification and PCA-DA (discriminatory analysis were used for data mining. Genetic Algorithms (GA, a multivariate approach, was probed for selection of the smallest subsets of potentially discriminative predictors. From thousands of peaks found in total, small subsets selected by GA were considered as highly potential predictors allowing discrimination among groups. It was found that small groups of potential top predictors selected with PCA-DA and GA are different and unique. Annotated GC–TOF–MS data generated identified feature metabolites. Metabolites putatively detected with LC–ESI–MS profiling require further elemental composition assignment with accurate mass measurement by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS and structure elucidation by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR. GA was also used to generate correlated networks for pathway analysis. Several case studies, comprising groups of plant samples bearing different genotypes and groups of samples of human origin, namely patients and healthy volunteers’ urine samples, demonstrated that such a workflow combining comprehensive metabolic profiling and advanced data mining techniques provides a powerful approach for pattern recognition and biomarker discovery

  17. Metabolic discrimination of Swertia mussotii and Swertia chirayita known as "Zangyinchen" in traditional Tibetan medicine by (1)H NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Gang; Luo, Wei-Zao; Luo, Shang-Hua; Li, Yan; Meng, Xian-Li; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Swertia mussotii Franch. and Swertia chirayita Buch.-Ham. have been commonly used under the same name "Zangyinchen" for the treatment of liver and gallbladder diseases in traditional Tibetan medicine. Detailed characterization and comparison of the complete set of metabolites of these two species are critical for their objective identification and quality control. In this study, a rapid, simple and comprehensive (1)H NMR-based metabolomics method was first developed to differentiate the two species. A broad range of metabolites, including iridoid glycosides, xanthones, triterpenoids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, and amino acids, were identified. Statistical analysis showed evident differences between the two species, and the major markers responsible for the differences were screened. In addition, quantitative (1)H NMR method (qHNMR) was used for the target analysis of the discriminating metabolites. The results showed that S. mussotii had significantly higher contents of gentiopicrin, isoorientin, glucose, loganic acid, and choline, whereas S. chirayita exhibited higher levels of swertiamarin, oleanolic acid, valine, and fatty acids. These findings indicate that (1)H NMR-based metabolomics is a reliable and effective method for the metabolic profiling and discrimination of the two Swertia species, and can be used to verify the genuine origin of Zangyinchen.

  18. Development of a metabolomic approach based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry to screen for clenbuterol abuse in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Frédérique; Pinel, Gaud; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Monteau, Fabrice; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    Beta-agonist compounds can be misused in food-producing animals for growth promoting purposes. Efficient methods based on mass spectrometry detection have been developed to ensure the control of such veterinary drug residues. Nevertheless, the use of "cocktails" composed of mixtures of low amounts of several substances as well as the synthesis of new compounds of unknown structure prevent efficient prevention. To circumvent those problems, new analytical tools able to detect such abuse are today mandatory. In this context, metabolomics may represent a new emerging strategy for investigating the global physiological effects associated to a family of substances and therefore, to suspect the administration of beta-agonists (either "cocktails" or unknown compounds). As a first demonstration of feasibility, an untargeted metabolomic approach based on liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry measurements was developed and made it possible to highlight metabolic modifications in urine consecutively to a clenbuterol administration. By the means of chemometrics, those metabolic differences were used to build predictive models able to suspect clenbuterol administration in calves. This new approach may be considered of valuable interest to overcome current limitations in the control of growth promoters' abuse, with promising perspectives in terms of screening.

  19. Mass spectrometry–based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry–based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites. PMID:20701590

  20. Application of a novel metabolomic approach based on atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry using flow injection analysis for the study of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure photoionization is not widespread in metabolomics, despite its considerable potential for the simultaneous analysis of compounds with diverse polarities. This work considers the development of a novel analytical approach based on flow injection analysis and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for rapid metabolic screening of serum samples. Several experimental parameters were optimized, such as type of dopant, flow injection solvent, and their flows, given that a careful selection of these variables is mandatory for a comprehensive analysis of metabolites. Toluene and methanol were the most suitable dopant and flow injection solvent, respectively. Moreover, analysis in negative mode required higher solvent and dopant flows (100 µl min(-1) and 40 µl min(-1), respectively) compared to positive mode (50 µl min(-1) and 20 µl min(-1)). Then, the optimized approach was used to elucidate metabolic alterations associated with Alzheimer's disease. Thereby, results confirm the increase of diacylglycerols, ceramides, ceramide-1-phosphate and free fatty acids, indicating membrane destabilization processes, and reduction of fatty acid amides and several neurotransmitters related to impairments in neuronal transmission, among others. Therefore, it could be concluded that this metabolomic tool presents a great potential for analysis of biological samples, considering its high-throughput screening capability, fast analysis and comprehensive metabolite coverage.

  1. Discovery, screening and evaluation of a plasma biomarker panel for subjects with psychological suboptimal health state using 1H-NMR-based metabolomics profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-sheng; Xia, Xiao-tao; Wu, Yan-fei; Zhao, Lei; Xiang, Huan; Du, Guan-hua; Zhang, Xiang; Qin, Xue-mei

    2016-01-01

    Individuals in the state of psychological suboptimal health keep increasing, only scales and questionnaires were used to diagnose in clinic under current conditions, and symptoms of high reliability and accuracy are destitute. Therefore, the noninvasive and precise laboratory diagnostic methods are needed. This study aimed to develop an objective method through screen potential biomarkers or a biomarker panel to facilitate the diagnosis in clinic using plasma metabolomics. Profiles were based on H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) metabolomics techniques combing with multivariate statistical analysis. Furthermore, methods of correlation analysis with Metaboanalyst 3.0 for selecting a biomarker panel, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) drug intervention for validating the close relations between the biomarker panel and the state and the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC curves) analysis for evaluation of clinical diagnosis ability were carried out. 9 endogenous metabolites containing trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), glutamine, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, citrate, tyrosine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, valine and glucose were identified and considered as potential biomarkers. Then a biomarker panel consisting of phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, citrate, N-acetyl-glycoproteins and TMAO was selected, which exhibited the highest area under the curve (AUC = 0.971). This study provided critical insight into the pathological mechanism of psychological suboptimal health and would supply a novel and valuable diagnostic method. PMID:27650680

  2. Bisphenol A alters n-6 fatty acid composition and decreases antioxidant enzyme levels in rat testes: a LC-QTOF-based metabolomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjian Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male reproductive toxicity induced by exposure to bisphenol A (BPA has been widely reported. The testes have proven to be a major target organ of BPA toxicity, so studying testicular metabolite variation holds promise for the discovery of mechanisms linked to the toxic effects of BPA on reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered doses of BPA at the levels of 0, 50 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks. We used an unbiased liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight (LC-QTOF-based metabolomics approach to discover, identify, and analyze the variation of testicular metabolites. Two n-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA and arachidonic acid (AA were identified as potential testicular biomarkers. Decreased levels of LA and increased levels of AA as well as AA/LA ratio were observed in the testes of the exposed group. According to these suggestions, testicular antioxidant enzyme levels were detected. Testicular superoxide dismutase (SOD declined significantly in the exposed group compared with that in the non-exposed group, and the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px as well as catalase (CAT also showed a decreasing trend in BPA treated group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BPA caused testicular n-6 fatty acid composition variation and decreased antioxidant enzyme levels. This study emphasizes that metabolomics brings the promise of biomarkers identification for the discovery of mechanisms underlying reproductive toxicity.

  3. Novel Approach to Classify Plants Based on Metabolite-Content Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites are bioactive substances with diverse chemical structures. Depending on the ecological environment within which they are living, higher plants use different combinations of secondary metabolites for adaptation (e.g., defense against attacks by herbivores or pathogenic microbes. This suggests that the similarity in metabolite content is applicable to assess phylogenic similarity of higher plants. However, such a chemical taxonomic approach has limitations of incomplete metabolomics data. We propose an approach for successfully classifying 216 plants based on their known incomplete metabolite content. Structurally similar metabolites have been clustered using the network clustering algorithm DPClus. Plants have been represented as binary vectors, implying relations with structurally similar metabolite groups, and classified using Ward’s method of hierarchical clustering. Despite incomplete data, the resulting plant clusters are consistent with the known evolutional relations of plants. This finding reveals the significance of metabolite content as a taxonomic marker. We also discuss the predictive power of metabolite content in exploring nutritional and medicinal properties in plants. As a byproduct of our analysis, we could predict some currently unknown species-metabolite relations.

  4. Untargeted Metabolomics Strategies—Challenges and Emerging Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Sherrod, Stacy D.; McLean, John A.

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are building blocks of cellular function. These species are involved in enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions and are essential for cellular function. Upstream biological disruptions result in a series of metabolomic changes and, as such, the metabolome holds a wealth of information that is thought to be most predictive of phenotype. Uncovering this knowledge is a work in progress. The field of metabolomics is still maturing; the community has leveraged proteomics experience when applicable and developed a range of sample preparation and instrument methodology along with myriad data processing and analysis approaches. Research focuses have now shifted toward a fundamental understanding of the biology responsible for metabolomic changes. There are several types of metabolomics experiments including both targeted and untargeted analyses. While untargeted, hypothesis generating workflows exhibit many valuable attributes, challenges inherent to the approach remain. This Critical Insight comments on these challenges, focusing on the identification process of LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics studies—specifically in mammalian systems. Biological interpretation of metabolomics data hinges on the ability to accurately identify metabolites. The range of confidence associated with identifications that is often overlooked is reviewed, and opportunities for advancing the metabolomics field are described.

  5. Untargeted Metabolomics Strategies—Challenges and Emerging Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Sherrod, Stacy D.; McLean, John A.

    2016-12-01

    Metabolites are building blocks of cellular function. These species are involved in enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions and are essential for cellular function. Upstream biological disruptions result in a series of metabolomic changes and, as such, the metabolome holds a wealth of information that is thought to be most predictive of phenotype. Uncovering this knowledge is a work in progress. The field of metabolomics is still maturing; the community has leveraged proteomics experience when applicable and developed a range of sample preparation and instrument methodology along with myriad data processing and analysis approaches. Research focuses have now shifted toward a fundamental understanding of the biology responsible for metabolomic changes. There are several types of metabolomics experiments including both targeted and untargeted analyses. While untargeted, hypothesis generating workflows exhibit many valuable attributes, challenges inherent to the approach remain. This Critical Insight comments on these challenges, focusing on the identification process of LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics studies—specifically in mammalian systems. Biological interpretation of metabolomics data hinges on the ability to accurately identify metabolites. The range of confidence associated with identifications that is often overlooked is reviewed, and opportunities for advancing the metabolomics field are described.

  6. Environmental metabolomics: a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marion G

    2007-02-01

    Metabolomic approaches have the potential to make an exceptional contribution to understanding how chemicals and other environmental stressors can affect both human and environmental health. However, the application of metabolomics to environmental exposures, although getting underway, has not yet been extensively explored. This review will use a SWOT analysis model to discuss some of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that are apparent to an investigator venturing into this relatively new field. SWOT has been used extensively in business settings to uncover new outlooks and identify problems that would impede progress. The field of environmental metabolomics provides great opportunities for discovery, and this is recognized by a high level of interest in potential applications. However, understanding the biological consequence of environmental exposures can be confounded by inter- and intra-individual differences. Metabolomic profiles can yield a plethora of data, the interpretation of which is complex and still being evaluated and researched. The development of the field will depend on the availability of technologies for data handling and that permit ready access metabolomic databases. Understanding the relevance of metabolomic endpoints to organism health vs adaptation vs variation is an important step in understanding what constitutes a substantive environmental threat. Metabolomic applications in reproductive research are discussed. Overall, the development of a comprehensive mechanistic-based interpretation of metabolomic changes offers the possibility of providing information that will significantly contribute to the protection of human health and the environment.

  7. Systematic Applications of Metabolomics in Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Dromms

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The goals of metabolic engineering are well-served by the biological information provided by metabolomics: information on how the cell is currently using its biochemical resources is perhaps one of the best ways to inform strategies to engineer a cell to produce a target compound. Using the analysis of extracellular or intracellular levels of the target compound (or a few closely related molecules to drive metabolic engineering is quite common. However, there is surprisingly little systematic use of metabolomics datasets, which simultaneously measure hundreds of metabolites rather than just a few, for that same purpose. Here, we review the most common systematic approaches to integrating metabolite data with metabolic engineering, with emphasis on existing efforts to use whole-metabolome datasets. We then review some of the most common approaches for computational modeling of cell-wide metabolism, including constraint-based models, and discuss current computational approaches that explicitly use metabolomics data. We conclude with discussion of the broader potential of computational approaches that systematically use metabolomics data to drive metabolic engineering.

  8. Xenobiotic metabolomics: major impact on the metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H; Patterson, Andrew D; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Xenobiotics are encountered by humans on a daily basis and include drugs, environmental pollutants, cosmetics, and even components of the diet. These chemicals undergo metabolism and detoxication to produce numerous metabolites, some of which have the potential to cause unintended effects such as toxicity. They can also block the action of enzymes or receptors used for endogenous metabolism or affect the efficacy and/or bioavailability of a coadministered drug. Therefore, it is essential to determine the full metabolic effects that these chemicals have on the body. Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of small molecules in a biofluid, can reveal biologically relevant perturbations that result from xenobiotic exposure. This review discusses the impact that genetic, environmental, and gut microflora variation has on the metabolome, and how these variables may interact, positively and negatively, with xenobiotic metabolism.

  9. Biomarker identification and pathway analysis of preeclampsia based on serum metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingting; He, Ping; Tan, Yong; Xu, Dongying

    2017-02-07

    Preeclampsia presents serious risk of both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Biomarkers for the detection of preeclampsia are critical for risk assessment and targeted intervention. The goal of this study is to screen potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of preeclampsia and to illuminate the pathogenesis of preeclampsia development based on the differential expression network. Two groups of subjects, including healthy pregnant women, subjects with preeclampsia, were recruited for this study. The metabolic profiles of all of the subjects' serum were obtained by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Correlation between metabolites was analyzed by bioinformatics technique. Results showed that the PC(14:0/00), proline betaine and proline were potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for preeclampsia diagnosis and prognosis. Perturbation of corresponding biological pathways, such as iNOS signaling, nitric oxide signaling in the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial dysfunction were responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study indicated that the metabolic profiling had a good clinical significance in the diagnosis of preeclampsia as well as in the study of its pathogenesis.

  10. NMR-based metabolomic profiling of overweight adolescents – an elucidation of the effects of inter-/intra-individual differences, gender, pubertal development and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian Clement; Arnberg, Karina

    2014-01-01

    in the metabolome are being commenced already in childhood. The relationship between Tanner stage and the metabolome showed that pubertal development stage was positively related to urinary creatinine excretion and negatively related to urinary citrate content. No relations between physical activity...... and the metabolome could be identified. The present study for the first time provides comprehensive information about associations between the metabolome and gender, pubertal development, and physical activity in overweight adolescents, which is an important subject group to approach in the prevention of obesity...

  11. Bio-effectors from waste materials as growth promoters, an agronomic and metabolomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwanney, Deaa; Chami, Ziad Al; Angelica De Pascali, Sandra; Cavoski, Ivana; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays, improving plant performance by providing growth promoters is a main concern of the organic agriculture. As a consequence of increased food demands, more efficient and alternatives of the current plant nutrition strategies are becoming urgent. Recently, a novel concept "bio-effectors" raised on to describe a group of products that are able to improve plant performance and do not belong to fertilizers or pesticides. Agro-Food processing residues are promising materials as bio-effector. Three plant-derived materials: brewers' spent grain (BSG), fennel processing residues (FPR) and lemon processing residues (LPR) were chosen as bio-effector candidates. Plant-derived materials were characterized in term of total macro and micronutrients content. Green extraction methodology and solvent choice (aqueous; ethanol; and aqueous: ethanol mixture 1:1) was based on the extraction yield as main factor. Optimum extracts, to be used on the tomato test plant, were determined using phytotoxicity test (seed germination test) as main constraint. Thereafter, selected extracts were characterized and secondary metabolites profiling were detected by NMR technique. Selected extracts were applied on tomato in a growth chamber at different doses in comparison to humic-like substances as positive control (Ctrl+) and to a Hoagland solution as negative control (Ctrl-). At the end of the experiment, agronomical parameters were determined and NMR-metabolomic profiling were conducted on tomato seedlings. Results are summarized as follow: (i) raw showed an interesting content, either at nutritional or biological level; (ii) aqueous extraction resulted higher yield than other used solvent; (iii) at high extraction ratio (1:25 for BSG; 1:100 for FPR; and 1:200 for LPR) aqueous extracts were not phytotoxic on the tomato test plant; (iv) all aqueous extract are differently rich in nutrients, aminoacids, sugars and low molecular weight molecules; (v) all extract exhibited a growth promotion at

  12. Development of Ground-Based Plant Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    plants in response to different strains of Pseudomonas syringae. Planta . 217:767-775. De Moraes CM, Schultz JC, Mescher MC, Tumlinson JH. (2004...09-30-2004 Final Technical _ April 2001 - April 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Developing Plants as Ground-based Sentinels 5b. GRANT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 9 "Z Plants emit volatile mixes characteristic of exposure to both plant and animal (insect) pathogens (bacteria and fungi). The

  13. Robustness of NMR-based metabolomics to generate comparable data sets for olive oil cultivar classification. An inter-laboratory study on Apulian olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinonna, Sara; Ragone, Rosa; Stocchero, Matteo; Del Coco, Laura; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a powerful technique in olive oil fingerprinting, but its analytical robustness has to be proved. Here, we report a comparative study between two laboratories on olive oil (1)H NMR fingerprinting, aiming to demonstrate the robustness of NMR-based metabolomics in generating comparable data sets for cultivar classification. Sample preparation and data acquisition were performed independently in two laboratories, equipped with different resolution spectrometers (400 and 500 MHz), using two identical sets of mono-varietal olive oils. Partial Least Squares (PLS)-based techniques were applied to compare the data sets produced by the two laboratories. Despite differences in spectrum baseline, and in intensity and shape of peaks, the amount of shared information was significant (almost 70%) and related to cultivar (same metabolites discriminated between cultivars). In conclusion, regardless of the variability due to operator and machine, the data sets from the two participating units were comparable for the purpose of classification.

  14. From models to crop species: caveats and solutions for translational metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eTohge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although plant metabolomics is largely carried out on Arabidopsis it is essentially genome-independent, and thus potentially applicable to a wide range of species. However, transfer of between species, or even between different tissues of the same species, is not facile. This is because the reliability of protocols for harvesting, handling and analysis depends on the biological features and chemical composition of the plant tissue. In parallel with the diversification of model species it is important to establish good handling and analytic practice, in order to augment computational comparisons between tissues and species. LC-MS-based metabolomics is one of the powerful approaches for metabolite profiling. By using a combination of different extraction methods, separation columns and ion detection, a very wide range of metabolites can be analysed. However, its application requires careful attention to exclude potential pitfalls, including artifactual changes in metabolite levels during sample preparation and analytic errors due to ion-suppression. Here we provide case studies with two different LC-MS-based metabolomics platforms and four species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Solanum lycopersicum and Oryza sativa that illustrate how such dangers can be detected and circumvented.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis of serum and saliva from neurodegenerative dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Mayuko; Hara, Junko; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Shankle, William R; Tomita, Masaru

    2013-10-01

    Despite increasing global prevalence, the precise pathogenesis and terms for objective diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias remain controversial, and comprehensive understanding of the disease remains lacking. Here, we conducted metabolomic analysis of serum and saliva obtained from patients with neurodegenerative dementias (n = 10), including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobe dementia, and Lewy body disease, as well as from age-matched healthy controls (n = 9). Using CE-TOF-MS, six metabolites in serum (β-alanine, creatinine, hydroxyproline, glutamine, iso-citrate, and cytidine) and two in saliva (arginine and tyrosine) were significantly different between dementias and controls. Using multivariate analysis, serum was confirmed as a more efficient biological fluid for diagnosis compared to saliva; additionally, 45 metabolites in total were identified as candidate markers that could discriminate at least one pair of diagnostic groups from the healthy control group. These metabolites possibly provide an objective method for diagnosing dementia-type by multiphase screening. Moreover, diagnostic-type-dependent differences were observed in several tricarboxylic acid cycle compounds detected in serum, indicating that some pathways in glucose metabolism may be altered in dementia patients. This pilot study revealed novel alterations in metabolomic profiles between various neurodegenerative dementias, which would contribute to etiological investigations.

  16. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based study on urine metabolomics in rats chronically poisoned with hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S-) poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology.

  17. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Based Study on Urine Metabolomics in Rats Chronically Poisoned with Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S- poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology.

  18. GC-MS Based Plasma Metabolomics for Identification of Candidate Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Egyptian Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R Nezami Ranjbar

    Full Text Available This study evaluates changes in metabolite levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cases vs. patients with liver cirrhosis by analysis of human blood plasma using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Untargeted metabolomic analysis of plasma samples from participants recruited in Egypt was performed using two GC-MS platforms: a GC coupled to single quadruple mass spectrometer (GC-qMS and a GC coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GC-TOFMS. Analytes that showed statistically significant changes in ion intensities were selected using ANOVA models. These analytes and other candidates selected from related studies were further evaluated by targeted analysis in plasma samples from the same participants as in the untargeted metabolomic analysis. The targeted analysis was performed using the GC-qMS in selected ion monitoring (SIM mode. The method confirmed significant changes in the levels of glutamic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, valine, isoleucine, leucine, alpha tocopherol, cholesterol, and sorbose in HCC cases vs. patients with liver cirrhosis. Specifically, our findings indicate up-regulation of metabolites involved in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA metabolism. Although BCAAs are increasingly used as a treatment for cancer cachexia, others have shown that BCAA supplementation caused significant enhancement of tumor growth via activation of mTOR/AKT pathway, which is consistent with our results that BCAAs are up-regulated in HCC.

  19. Plant-based remediation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Dharmendra Kumar (ed.) [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Mol (Belgium). Radiological Impact and Performance Assessment Division

    2013-11-01

    A valuable source of information for scientists in the field of environmental pollution and remediation. Describes the latest biotechnological methods for the treatment of contaminated soils. Includes case studies and protocols. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Basic and applied research have unequivocally demonstrated that selected plant species possess the genetic potential to accumulate, degrade, metabolize and immobilize a wide range of contaminants. The main focus of this volume is on the recent advances of technologies using green plants for remediation of various metals and metalloids. Topics include biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution, amendments of higher uptake of toxic metals, transport of heavy metals in plants, and toxicity mechanisms. Further chapters discuss agro-technological methods for minimizing pollution while improving soil quality, transgenic approaches to heavy metal remediation and present protocols for metal remediation via in vitro root cultures.

  20. NMR-based metabolomic profiling of overweight adolescents – an elucidation of the effects of inter-/intra-individual differences, gender, pubertal development and physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian Clement; Arnberg, Karina;

    2014-01-01

    The plasma and urine metabolome of 192 overweight 12-15-year-old adolescents (BMI of 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m(2)) were examined in order to elucidate gender, pubertal development measured as Tanner stage, physical activity measured as number of steps taken daily, and intra-/interindividual differences...... in the metabolome are being commenced already in childhood. The relationship between Tanner stage and the metabolome showed that pubertal development stage was positively related to urinary creatinine excretion and negatively related to urinary citrate content. No relations between physical activity...... and the metabolome could be identified. The present study for the first time provides comprehensive information about associations between the metabolome and gender, pubertal development, and physical activity in overweight adolescents, which is an important subject group to approach in the prevention of obesity...

  1. Variations in gut microbiota and fecal metabolic phenotype associated with depression by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and LC/MS-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meng; Jia, Hongmei; Zhou, Chao; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Maohua; Zou, Zhongmei

    2017-05-10

    As a prevalent, life-threatening and highly recurrent psychiatric illness, depression is characterized by a wide range of pathological changes; however, its etiology remains incompletely understood. Accumulating evidence supports that gut microbiota affects not only gastrointestinal physiology but also central nervous system (CNS) function and behavior through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. To assess the impact of gut microbiota on fecal metabolic phenotype in depressive conditions, an integrated approach of 16S rRNA gene sequencing combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) based metabolomics was performed in chronic variable stress (CVS)-induced depression rat model. Interestingly, depression led to significant gut microbiota changes, at the phylum and genus levels in rats treated with CVS compared to controls. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Marvinbryantia, Corynebacterium, Psychrobacter, Christensenella, Lactobacillus, Peptostreptococcaceae incertae sedis, Anaerovorax, Clostridiales incertae sedis and Coprococcus were significantly decreased, whereas Candidatus Arthromitus and Oscillibacter were markedly increased in model rats compared with normal controls. Meanwhile, distinct changes in fecal metabolic phenotype of depressive rats were also found, including lower levels of amino acids, and fatty acids, and higher amounts of bile acids, hypoxanthine and stercobilins. Moreover, there were substantial associations of perturbed gut microbiota genera with the altered fecal metabolites, especially compounds involved in the metabolism of tryptophan and bile acids. These results showed that the gut microbiota was altered in association with fecal metabolism in depressive conditions. These findings suggest that the 16S rRNA gene sequencing and LC-MS based metabolomics approach can be further applied to assess pathogenesis of depression.

  2. Unintended effects in genetically modified crops: revealed by metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischer, Heiko; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2006-03-01

    In Europe the commercialization of food derived from genetically modified plants has been slow because of the complex regulatory process and the concerns of consumers. Risk assessment is focused on potential adverse effects on humans and the environment, which could result from unintended effects of genetic modifications: unintended effects are connected to changes in metabolite levels in the plants. One of the major challenges is how to analyze the overall metabolite composition of GM plants in comparison to conventional cultivars, and one possible solution is offered by metabolomics. The ultimate aim of metabolomics is the identification and quantification of all small molecules in an organism; however, a single method enabling complete metabolome analysis does not exist. Given a comprehensive extraction method, a hierarchical strategy--starting with global fingerprinting and followed by complementary profiling attempts--is the most logical and economic approach to detect unintended effects in GM crops.

  3. Vitroprocines, new antibiotics against Acinetobacter baumannii, discovered from marine Vibrio sp. QWI-06 using mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Chen, Pei-Chin; Shih, Chao-Jen; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Lai, Ying-Mi; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Yang, Yu-Liang

    2015-08-01

    A robust and convenient research strategy integrating state-of-the-art analytical techniques is needed to efficiently discover novel compounds from marine microbial resources. In this study, we identified a series of amino-polyketide derivatives, vitroprocines A-J, from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QWI-06 by an integrated approach using imaging mass spectroscopy and molecular networking, as well as conventional bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation. The structure-activity relationship of vitroprocines against Acinetobacter baumannii is proposed. In addition, feeding experiments with 13C-labeled precursors indicated that a pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate-dependent mechanism is involved in the biosynthesis of vitroprocines. Elucidation of amino-polyketide derivatives from a species of marine bacteria for the first time demonstrates the potential of this integrated metabolomics approach to uncover marine bacterial biodiversity.

  4. Metabolomics in the identification of biomarkers of dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Aoife; Gibbons, Helena; Brennan, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods for assessing dietary exposure can be unreliable, with under reporting one of the main problems. In an attempt to overcome such problems there is increasing interest in identifying biomarkers of dietary intake to provide a more accurate measurement. Metabolomics is an analytical technique that aims to identify and quantify small metabolites. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the application of metabolomics coupled with statistical analysis for the identification of dietary biomarkers, with a number of putative biomarkers identified. This minireview focuses on metabolomics based approaches and highlights some of the key successes.

  5. A signal filtering method for improved quantification and noise discrimination in fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Tristan G; Southam, Andrew D; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Viant, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Direct-infusion electrospray-ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (DI ESI FT-ICR MS) is increasingly being utilized in metabolomics, including the high sensitivity selected ion monitoring (SIM)-stitching approach. Accurate signal quantification and the discrimination of real signals from noise remain major challenges for this approach, with both adversely affected by factors including ion suppression during electrospray, ion-ion interactions in the detector cell, and thermally-induced white noise. This is particularly problematic for complex mixture analysis where hundreds of metabolites are present near the noise level. Here we address relative signal quantification and noise discrimination issues in SIM-stitched DI ESI FT-ICR MS-based metabolomics. Using liver tissue, we first optimized the number of scans (n) acquired per SIM window to address the balance between quantification accuracy versus acquisition time (and thus sample throughput); a minimum of n = 5 is recommended. Secondly, we characterized and computationally-corrected an effect whereby an ion's intensity is dependent upon its location within a SIM window, exhibiting a 3-fold higher intensity at the high m/z end. This resulted in significantly improved quantification accuracy. Finally, we thoroughly characterized a three-stage filter to discriminate noise from real signals, which comprised a signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) hard threshold, then a "replicate" filter (retaining only peaks in r-out-of-3 replicate analyses), and then a "sample" filter (retaining only peaks in >s% of biological samples). We document the benefits of three-stage filtering versus one- and two-stage filters, and show the importance of selecting filter parameters that balance the confidence that a signal is real versus the total number of peaks detected.

  6. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins.

  7. A Generic Multiple Reaction Monitoring Based Approach for Plant Flavonoids Profiling Using a Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhixiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang; Wang, Yitao; Yan, Ru

    2014-06-01

    Flavonoids are one of the largest classes of plant secondary metabolites serving a variety of functions in plants and associating with a number of health benefits for humans. Typically, they are co-identified with many other secondary metabolites using untargeted metabolomics. The limited data quality of untargeted workflow calls for a shift from the breadth-first to the depth-first screening strategy when a specific biosynthetic pathway is focused on. Here we introduce a generic multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based approach for flavonoids profiling in plants using a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap (QTrap) mass spectrometer. The approach includes four steps: (1) preliminary profiling of major aglycones by multiple ion monitoring triggered enhanced product ion scan (MIM-EPI); (2) glycones profiling by precursor ion triggered EPI scan (PI-EPI) of major aglycones; (3) comprehensive aglycones profiling by combining MIM-EPI and neutral loss triggered EPI scan (NL-EPI) of major glycone; (4) in-depth flavonoids profiling by MRM-EPI with elaborated MRM transitions. Particularly, incorporation of the NH3 loss and sugar elimination proved to be very informative and confirmative for flavonoids screening. This approach was applied for profiling flavonoids in Astragali radix ( Huangqi), a famous herb widely used for medicinal and nutritional purposes in China. In total, 421 flavonoids were tentatively characterized, among which less than 40 have been previously reported in this medicinal plant. This MRM-based approach provides versatility and sensitivity that required for flavonoids profiling in plants and serves as a useful tool for plant metabolomics.

  8. Model-based explanation of plant knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuskonen, P.J. [VTT Electronics, Oulu (Finland). Embedded Software

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with computer explanation of knowledge related to design and operation of industrial plants. The needs for explanation are motivated through case studies and literature reviews. A general framework for analysing plant explanations is presented. Prototypes demonstrate key mechanisms for implementing parts of the framework. Power plants, steel mills, paper factories, and high energy physics control systems are studied to set requirements for explanation. The main problems are seen to be either lack or abundance of information. Design knowledge in particular is found missing at plants. Support systems and automation should be enhanced with ways to explain plant knowledge to the plant staff. A framework is formulated for analysing explanations of plant knowledge. It consists of three parts: 1. a typology of explanation, organised by the class of knowledge (factual, functional, or strategic) and by the target of explanation (processes, automation, or support systems), 2. an identification of explanation tasks generic for the plant domain, and 3. an identification of essential model types for explanation (structural, behavioural, functional, and teleological). The tasks use the models to create the explanations of the given classes. Key mechanisms are discussed to implement the generic explanation tasks. Knowledge representations based on objects and their relations form a vocabulary to model and present plant knowledge. A particular class of models, means-end models, are used to explain plant knowledge. Explanations are generated through searches in the models. Hypertext is adopted to communicate explanations over dialogue based on context. The results are demonstrated in prototypes. The VICE prototype explains the reasoning of an expert system for diagnosis of rotating machines at power plants. The Justifier prototype explains design knowledge obtained from an object-oriented plant design tool. Enhanced access mechanisms into on-line documentation are

  9. UPLC-QTOFMS based metabolomics followed by stepwise partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) explore the possible relation between the variations in secondary metabolites and the phylogenetic divergences of the genus Panax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Truong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Won Jun; Lee, GwangJin; Yoon, Sang Jun; Shin, Byong-Kyu; Nguyen, Minh Duc; Park, Jeong Hill; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won

    2016-02-15

    Phylogenetic and metabolomic approaches have long been employed to study evolutionary relationships among plants. Nonetheless, few studies have examined the difference in metabolites within a clade and between clades of the phylogenetic tree. We attempted to relate phylogenetic studies to metabolomics using stepwise partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for the genus Panax. Samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOFMS) to obtain metabolite profiles. Initially, conventional principal component analysis was subsequently applied to the metabolomic data to show the limitations in relating the expression of metabolites to divisions in the phylogenetic tree. Thereafter, we introduced stepwise PLS-DA with optimized scaling methods, which were properly applied according to the branches of the phylogenetic tree of the four species. Our approach highlighted metabolites of interest by elucidating the directions and degrees of metabolic alterations in each clade of the phylogenetic tree. The results revealed the relationship between metabolic changes in the genus Panax and its species' evolutionary adaptations to different climates. We believe our method will be useful to help understand the metabolite-evolution relationship.

  10. The use of genomics and metabolomics methods to quantify fungal endosymbionts and alkaloids in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Lane, Geoffrey A; Mace, Wade; Parsons, Anthony J; Fraser, Karl; Xue, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The association of plants with endosymbiotic micro-organisms poses a particular challenge to metabolomics studies. The presence of endosymbionts can alter metabolic profiles of plant tissues by introducing non-plant metabolites such as fungal specific alkaloids, and by metabolic interactions between the two organisms. An accurate quantification of the endosymbiont and its metabolites is therefore critical for studies of interactions between the two symbionts and the environment.Here, we describe methods that allow the quantification of the ryegrass Neotyphodium lolii fungal endosymbiont and major alkaloids in its host plant Lolium perenne. Fungal concentrations were quantified in total genomic DNA (gDNA) isolated from infected plant tissues by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using primers specific for chitinase A from N. lolii. To quantify the fungal alkaloids, we describe LC-MS based methods which provide coverage of a wide range of alkaloids of the indolediterpene and ergot alkaloid classes, together with peramine.

  11. Metabolomics in the Rhizosphere: Tapping into Belowground Chemical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Nicole M; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2016-03-01

    The rhizosphere is densely populated with a variety of organisms. Interactions between roots and rhizosphere community members are mostly achieved via chemical communication. Root exudates contain an array of primary and secondary plant metabolites that can attract, deter, or kill belowground insect herbivores, nematodes, and microbes, and inhibit competing plants. Metabolomics of root exudates can potentially help us to better understand this chemical dialogue. The main limitations are the proper sampling of the exudate, the sensitivity of the metabolomics platforms, and the multivariate data analysis to identify causal relations. Novel technologies may help to generate a spatially explicit metabolome of the root and its exudates at a scale that is relevant for the rhizosphere community.

  12. FT-ICR/MS and GC-EI/MS Metabolomics Networking Unravels Global Potato Sprout's Responses to Rhizoctonia solani Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Suha Jabaji

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their dissection a challenging task for metabolomics studies. Here we are reporting on an integrated metabolomics networking approach combining gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance/mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS) and bioinformatics analyses for the study of interactions in the potato sprout-Rhizoctonia solani pathosystem and the fluctuations in the global metabolome of sprouts. The develop...

  13. Serum metabolomics study and eicosanoid analysis of childhood atopic dermatitis based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Guoyou; Liu, Xinyu; Shao, Yaping; Gao, Peng; Xin, Chenchen; Cui, Zhenze; Zhao, Xinjie; Xu, Guowang

    2014-12-05

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in children. In the study, ultra high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to investigate serum metabolic abnormalities of AD children. Two batch fasting sera were collected from AD children and healthy control; one of them was for nontargeted metabolomics analysis, the other for targeted eicosanoids analysis. AD children were divided into high immunoglobulin E (IgE) group and normal IgE group. On the basis of the two analysis approaches, it was found that the differential metabolites of AD, leukotriene B4, prostaglandins, conjugated bile acids, etc., were associated with inflammatory response and bile acids metabolism. Carnitines, free fatty acids, lactic acid, etc., increased in the AD group with high IgE, which revealed energy metabolism disorder. Amino acid metabolic abnormalities and increased levels of Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase metabolites were found in the AD group with normal IgE. The results provided a new perspective to understand the mechanism and find potential biomarkers of AD and may provide a new reference for personalized treatment.

  14. Gas Chromatography Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-Based Metabolomics for Comparison of Caffeinated and Decaffeinated Coffee and Its Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai Lun; Ho, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from epidemiology, preclinical and clinical studies indicate that consumption of coffee could have beneficial effects against dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The benefits appear to come from caffeinated coffee, but not decaffeinated coffee or pure caffeine itself. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use metabolomics approach to delineate the discriminant metabolites between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, which could have contributed to the observed therapeutic benefits. Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to characterize the metabolic differences between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) showed distinct separation between the two types of coffee (cumulative Q2 = 0.998). A total of 69 discriminant metabolites were identified based on the OPLS-DA model, with 37 and 32 metabolites detected to be higher in caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. These metabolites include several benzoate and cinnamate-derived phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugar, fatty acids, and amino acids. Our study successfully established GC-TOF-MS based metabolomics approach as a highly robust tool in discriminant analysis between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee samples. Discriminant metabolites identified in this study are biologically relevant and provide valuable insights into therapeutic research of coffee against AD. Our data also hint at possible involvement of gut microbial metabolism to enhance therapeutic potential of coffee components, which represents an interesting area for future research. PMID:25098597

  15. Comparative metabolomics in Glycine max and Glycine soja under salt stress to reveal the phenotypes of their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghai; Lam, Honming; Pi, Erxu; Zhan, Qinglei; Tsai, Sauna; Wang, Chunmei; Kwan, Yiuwa; Ngai, Saiming

    2013-09-11

    Metabolomics is developing as an important functional genomics tool for understanding plant systems' response to genetic and environmental changes. Here, we characterized the metabolic changes of cultivated soybean C08 (Glycine max L. Merr) and wild soybean W05 (Glycine soja Sieb.et Zucc.) under salt stress using MS-based metabolomics, in order to reveal the phenotypes of their eight hybrid offspring (9H0086, 9H0124, 9H0391, 9H0736, 9H0380, 9H0400, 9H0434, and 9H0590). Total small molecule extracts of soybean seedling leaves were profiled by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LC-FT/MS). We found that wild soybean contained higher amounts of disaccharides, sugar alcohols, and acetylated amino acids than cultivated soybean, but with lower amounts of monosaccharides, carboxylic acids, and unsaturated fatty acids. Further investigations demonstrated that the ability of soybean to tolerate salt was mainly based on synthesis of compatible solutes, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, cell membrane modifications, and induction of plant hormones. On the basis of metabolic phenotype, the salt-tolerance abilities of 9H0086, 9H0124, 9H0391, 9H0736, 9H0380, 9H0400, 9H0434, and 9H0590 were discriminated. Our results demonstrated that MS-based metabolomics provides a fast and powerful approach to discriminate the salt-tolerance characteristics of soybeans.

  16. The human urine metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhaila Bouatra

    Full Text Available Urine has long been a "favored" biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS, direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify a total of: 209 (209 by NMR, 179 (85 by GC-MS, 127 (127 by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40 by ICP-MS and 10 (10 by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database

  17. Metabolomics protocols for filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummer, Joel P A; Krill, Christian; Du Fall, Lauren; Waters, Ormonde D C; Trengove, Robert D; Oliver, Richard P; Solomon, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and transcriptomics are established functional genomics tools commonly used to study filamentous fungi. Metabolomics has recently emerged as another option to complement existing techniques and provide detailed information on metabolic regulation and secondary metabolism. Here, we describe broad generic protocols that can be used to undertake metabolomics studies in filamentous fungi.

  18. Analysis of longitudinal metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.J.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Boelens, H.F.M.; Greef, J. van der; Smilde, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Motivation: Metabolomics datasets are generally large and complex. Using principal component analysis (PCA), a simplified view of the variation in the data is obtained. The PCA model can be interpreted and the processes underlying the variation in the data can be analysed. In metabolomics, often a p

  19. Model-Based Power Plant Master Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Katarina; Thomas, Jean; Funkquist, Jonas

    2010-08-15

    The main goal of the project has been to evaluate the potential of a coordinated master control for a solid fuel power plant in terms of tracking capability, stability and robustness. The control strategy has been model-based predictive control (MPC) and the plant used in the case study has been the Vattenfall power plant Idbaecken in Nykoeping. A dynamic plant model based on nonlinear physical models was used to imitate the true plant in MATLAB/SIMULINK simulations. The basis for this model was already developed in previous Vattenfall internal projects, along with a simulation model of the existing control implementation with traditional PID controllers. The existing PID control is used as a reference performance, and it has been thoroughly studied and tuned in these previous Vattenfall internal projects. A turbine model was developed with characteristics based on the results of steady-state simulations of the plant using the software EBSILON. Using the derived model as a representative for the actual process, an MPC control strategy was developed using linearization and gain-scheduling. The control signal constraints (rate of change) and constraints on outputs were implemented to comply with plant constraints. After tuning the MPC control parameters, a number of simulation scenarios were performed to compare the MPC strategy with the existing PID control structure. The simulation scenarios also included cases highlighting the robustness properties of the MPC strategy. From the study, the main conclusions are: - The proposed Master MPC controller shows excellent set-point tracking performance even though the plant has strong interactions and non-linearity, and the controls and their rate of change are bounded. - The proposed Master MPC controller is robust, stable in the presence of disturbances and parameter variations. Even though the current study only considered a very small number of the possible disturbances and modelling errors, the considered cases are

  20. Discovery of safety biomarkers for atorvastatin in rat urine using mass spectrometry based metabolomics combined with global and targeted approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Bhowmik Salil [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Joo; Yi, Hong Jae [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Bong Chul [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Byung Hwa, E-mail: jbhluck@kist.re.kr [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    In order to develop a safety biomarker for atorvastatin, this drug was orally administrated to hyperlipidemic rats, and a metabolomic study was performed. Atorvastatin was given in doses of either 70 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} or 250 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} for a period of 7 days (n = 4 for each group). To evaluate any abnormal effects of the drug, physiological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured and histopathological tests were carried out. Safety biomarkers were derived by comparing these parameters and using both global and targeted metabolic profiling. Global metabolic profiling was performed using liquid chromatography/time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) with multivariate data analysis. Several safety biomarker candidates that included various steroids and amino acids were discovered as a result of global metabolic profiling, and they were also confirmed by targeted metabolic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS). Serum biochemical and histopathological tests were used to detect abnormal drug reactions in the liver after repeating oral administration of atorvastatin. The metabolic differences between control and the drug-treated groups were compared using PLS-DA score plots. These results were compared with the physiological and plasma biochemical parameters and the results of a histopathological test. Estrone, cortisone, proline, cystine, 3-ureidopropionic acid and histidine were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related with the liver toxicity of atorvastatin. These results indicate that the combined application of global and targeted metabolic profiling could be a useful tool for the discovery of drug safety biomarkers.

  1. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  2. NMR-Based Metabolomic Investigations on the Differential Responses in Adductor Muscles from Two Pedigrees of Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum to Cadmium and Zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbao Yu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the most important economic species in shellfishery in China due to its wide geographic distribution and high tolerance to environmental changes (e.g., salinity, temperature. In addition, Manila clam is a good biomonitor/bioindicator in “Mussel Watch Programs” and marine environmental toxicology. However, there are several pedigrees of R. philippinarum distributed in the marine environment in China. No attention has been paid to the biological differences between various pedigrees of Manila clams, which may introduce undesirable biological variation in toxicology studies. In this study, we applied NMR-based metabolomics to detect the biological differences in two main pedigrees (White and Zebra of R. philippinarum and their differential responses to heavy metal exposures (Cadmium and Zinc using adductor muscle as a target tissue to define one sensitive pedigree of R. philippinarum as biomonitor for heavy metals. Our results indicated that there were significant metabolic differences in adductor muscle tissues between White and Zebra clams, including higher levels of alanine, glutamine, hypotaurine, phosphocholine and homarine in White clam muscles and higher levels of branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine, succinate and 4-aminobutyrate in Zebra clam muscles, respectively. Differential metabolic responses to heavy metals between White and Zebra clams were also found. Overall, we concluded that White pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator/biomonitor in marine toxicology studies and for marine heavy metals based on the relatively high sensitivity to heavy metals.

  3. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  4. Metabolomics: current state and evolving methodologies and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldiges, Marco; Lütz, Stephan; Pflug, Simon; Schroer, Kirsten; Stein, Nadine; Wiendahl, Christiane

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, metabolomics developed to an accepted and valuable tool in life sciences. Substantial improvements of analytical hardware allow metabolomics to run routinely now. Data are successfully used to investigate genotype-phenotype relations of strains and mutants. Metabolomics facilitates metabolic engineering to optimise mircoorganisms for white biotechnology and spreads to the investigation of biotransformations and cell culture. Metabolomics serves not only as a source of qualitative but also quantitative data of intra-cellular metabolites essential for the model-based description of the metabolic network operating under in vivo conditions. To collect reliable metabolome data sets, culture and sampling conditions, as well as the cells' metabolic state, are crucial. Hence, application of biochemical engineering principles and method standardisation efforts become important. Together with the other more established omics technologies, metabolomics will strengthen its claim to contribute to the detailed understanding of the in vivo function of gene products, biochemical and regulatory networks and, even more ambitious, the mathematical description and simulation of the whole cell in the systems biology approach. This knowledge will allow the construction of designer organisms for process application using biotransformation and fermentative approaches making effective use of single enzymes, whole microbial and even higher cells.

  5. A positive/negative ion-switching, targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomics platform for bodily fluids, cells, and fresh and fixed tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Min; Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yang, Xuemei; Asara, John M

    2012-04-12

    The revival of interest in cancer cell metabolism in recent years has prompted the need for quantitative analytical platforms for studying metabolites from in vivo sources. We implemented a quantitative polar metabolomics profiling platform using selected reaction monitoring with a 5500 QTRAP hybrid triple quadrupole mass spectrometer that covers all major metabolic pathways. The platform uses hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with positive/negative ion switching to analyze 258 metabolites (289 Q1/Q3 transitions) from a single 15-min liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry acquisition with a 3-ms dwell time and a 1.55-s duty cycle time. Previous platforms use more than one experiment to profile this number of metabolites from different ionization modes. The platform is compatible with polar metabolites from any biological source, including fresh tissues, cancer cells, bodily fluids and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Relative quantification can be achieved without using internal standards, and integrated peak areas based on total ion current can be used for statistical analyses and pathway analyses across biological sample conditions. The procedure takes ∼12 h from metabolite extraction to peak integration for a data set containing 15 total samples (∼6 h for a single sample).

  6. Pea fiber and wheat bran fiber show distinct metabolic profiles in rats as investigated by a 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangmang Liu

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effect of pea fiber (PF and wheat bran fiber (WF supplementation in rat metabolism. Rats were assigned randomly to one of three dietary groups and were given a basal diet containing 15% PF, 15% WF, or no supplemental fiber. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics. PF significantly increased the plasma levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and myo-inositol as well as the urine levels of alanine, hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetyglycine, and α-ketoglutarate. However, PF significantly decreased the plasma levels of isoleucine, leucine, lactate, and pyruvate as well as the urine levels of allantoin, bile acids, and trigonelline. WF significantly increased the plasma levels of acetone, isobutyrate, lactate, myo-inositol, and lipids as well as the urine levels of alanine, lactate, dimethylglycine, N-methylniconamide, and α-ketoglutarate. However, WF significantly decreased the plasma levels of amino acids, and glucose as well as the urine levels of acetate, allantoin, citrate, creatine, hippurate, hydroxyphenylacetate, and trigonelline. Results suggest that PF and WF exposure can promote antioxidant activity and can exhibit common systemic metabolic changes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, glycogenolysis and glycolysis metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and gut microbiota metabolism. PF can also decrease bile acid metabolism. These findings indicate that different fiber diet may cause differences in the biofluid profile in rats.

  7. Automated resolution of chromatographic signals by independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution in comprehensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Almenara, Xavier; Perera, Alexandre; Ramírez, Noelia; Brezmes, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) provides a different perspective in metabolomics profiling of samples. However, algorithms for GC×GC-MS data processing are needed in order to automatically process the data and extract the purest information about the compounds appearing in complex biological samples. This study shows the capability of independent component analysis-orthogonal signal deconvolution (ICA-OSD), an algorithm based on blind source separation and distributed in an R package called osd, to extract the spectra of the compounds appearing in GC×GC-MS chromatograms in an automated manner. We studied the performance of ICA-OSD by the quantification of 38 metabolites through a set of 20 Jurkat cell samples analyzed by GC×GC-MS. The quantification by ICA-OSD was compared with a supervised quantification by selective ions, and most of the R(2) coefficients of determination were in good agreement (R(2)>0.90) while up to 24 cases exhibited an excellent linear relation (R(2)>0.95). We concluded that ICA-OSD can be used to resolve co-eluted compounds in GC×GC-MS.

  8. Pea fiber and wheat bran fiber show distinct metabolic profiles in rats as investigated by a 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangmang; Xiao, Liang; Fang, Tingting; Cai, Yimin; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Jing; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of pea fiber (PF) and wheat bran fiber (WF) supplementation in rat metabolism. Rats were assigned randomly to one of three dietary groups and were given a basal diet containing 15% PF, 15% WF, or no supplemental fiber. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by NMR-based metabolomics. PF significantly increased the plasma levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, and myo-inositol as well as the urine levels of alanine, hydroxyphenylacetate, phenylacetyglycine, and α-ketoglutarate. However, PF significantly decreased the plasma levels of isoleucine, leucine, lactate, and pyruvate as well as the urine levels of allantoin, bile acids, and trigonelline. WF significantly increased the plasma levels of acetone, isobutyrate, lactate, myo-inositol, and lipids as well as the urine levels of alanine, lactate, dimethylglycine, N-methylniconamide, and α-ketoglutarate. However, WF significantly decreased the plasma levels of amino acids, and glucose as well as the urine levels of acetate, allantoin, citrate, creatine, hippurate, hydroxyphenylacetate, and trigonelline. Results suggest that PF and WF exposure can promote antioxidant activity and can exhibit common systemic metabolic changes, including lipid metabolism, energy metabolism, glycogenolysis and glycolysis metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and gut microbiota metabolism. PF can also decrease bile acid metabolism. These findings indicate that different fiber diet may cause differences in the biofluid profile in rats.

  9. Investigation on the antidepressant effect of sea buckthorn seed oil through the GC-MS-based metabolomics approach coupled with multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-sheng; Liu, Cai-chun; Xiang, Huan; Zheng, Xiao-fen; Peng, Guo-jiang; Zhang, Xiang; Du, Guan-hua; Qin, Xue-mei

    2015-11-01

    Depression is one of the prevalent and serious mental disorders and the number of depressed patients has been on the rise globally during the recent decades. Sea buckthorn seed oil from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is edible and has been widely used for treatment of different diseases for a long time. However, there are few published reports on the antidepressant effect of sea buckthorn seed oil. With the objective of finding potential biomarkers of the therapeutic response of sea buckthorn seed oil in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, urine metabolomics based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with multivariate analysis was applied. In this study, we discovered a higher level of pimelic acid as well as palmitic acid and a lower level of suberic acid, citrate, phthalic acid, cinnamic acid and Sumiki's acid in urine of rats exposed to CUMS procedures after sea buckthorn seed oil was administered. These changes of metabolites are involved in energy metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and other metabolic pathways as well as in the synthesis of neurotransmitters and it is helpful to facilitate the efficacy evaluation and mechanism elucidating the effect of sea buckthorn seed oil for depression management.

  10. Plant-Based Vaccines: Production and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Laere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based vaccine technologies involve the integration of the desired genes encoding the antigen protein for specific disease into the genome of plant tissues by various methods. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer and transformation via genetically modified plant virus are the common methods that have been used to produce effective vaccines. Nevertheless, with the advancement of science and technology, new approaches have been developed to increase the efficiency of former methods such as biolistic, electroporation, agroinfiltration, sonication, and polyethylene glycol treatment. Even though plant-based vaccines provide many benefits to the vaccine industry, there are still challenges that limit the rate of successful production of these third-generation vaccines. Even with all the limitations, continuous efforts are still ongoing in order to produce efficient vaccine for many human and animals related diseases owing to its great potentials. This paper reviews the existing conventional methods as well as the development efforts by researchers in order to improve the production of plant-based vaccines. Several challenges encountered during and after the production process were also discussed.

  11. Plant viral vectors based on tobamoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibov, V; Shivprasad, S; Turpen, T H; Dawson, W; Koprowski, H

    1999-01-01

    The potential of plant virus-based transient expression vectors is substantial. One objective is the production of large quantities of foreign peptides or proteins. At least one commercial group (Biosource Technologies) is producing large quantities of product in the field, has built factories to process truck-loads of material and soon expects to market virus-generated products. In the laboratory, large amounts of protein have been produced for structural or biochemical analyses. An important aspect of producing large amounts of a protein or peptide is to make the product easily purifiable. This has been done by attaching peptides or proteins to easily purified units such as virion particles or by exporting proteins to the apoplast so that purification begins with a highly enriched product. For plant molecular biology, virus-based vectors have been useful in identifying previously unknown genes by overexpression or silencing or by expression in different genotypes. Also, foreign peptides fused to virions are being used as immunogens for development of antisera for experimental use or as injected or edible vaccines for medical use. As with liposomes and microcapsules, plant cells and plant viruses are also expected to provide natural protection for the passage of antigen through the gastrointestinal tract. Perhaps the greatest advantage of plant virus-based transient expression vectors is their host, plants. For the production of large amounts of commercial products, plants are one of the most economical and productive sources of biomass. They also present the advantages of lack of contamination with animal pathogens, relative ease of genetic manipulation and the presence eukaryotic protein modification machinery.

  12. Metabolomics of cocaine: implications in toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the most commonly used illicit drug among those seeking care in Emergency Departments or drug detoxification centers. Cocaine, chemically known as benzoylmethylecgonine, is a naturally occurring substance found in the leaves of the Erythroxylum coca plant. The pharmacokinetics of cocaine is dependent on multiple factors, such as physical/chemical form, route of administration, genetics and concurrent consumption of alcohol. This review aims to discuss metabolomics of cocaine, namely by presenting all known metabolites of cocaine and their roles in the cocaine-mediated toxic effects.

  13. A Market-Based Virtual Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Træholt, Chresten; Poulsen, Bjarne

    2009-01-01

    The fast growing penetration of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and the continuing trend towards a more liberalized electricity market requires more efficient energy management strategies to handle both emerging technical and economic issues. In this paper, a market-based Virtual Power Plant...

  14. Metabolomics technologies applied to the identification of compounds in plants : a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry - nuclear magnetic resonance perspective over the tomato fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moco, S.I.A.

    2007-01-01

    A new era of plant biochemistry at the systems level is emerging in which the detailed description of biochemical phenomena, at the cellular level, is important for a better understanding of physiological, developmental, and biomolecular processes in plants. This emerging field is oriented towards t

  15. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  16. Effects of MeJA on Arabidopsis metabolome under endogenous JA deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jingjing; Li, Mengya; Chen, Jian; Liu, Pei; Li, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in plant growth, development and defense. Comprehensive metabolomics profiling of plants under JA treatment provides insights into the interaction and regulation network of plant hormones. Here we applied high resolution mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach on Arabidopsis wild type and JA synthesis deficiency mutant opr3. The effects of exogenous MeJA treatment on the metabolites of opr3 were investigated. More than 10000 ion signals were detected and more than 2000 signals showed significant variation in different genotypes and treatment groups. Multivariate statistic analyses (PCA and PLS-DA) were performed and a differential compound library containing 174 metabolites with high resolution precursor ion-product ions pairs was obtained. Classification and pathway analysis of 109 identified compounds in this library showed that glucosinolates and tryptophan metabolism, amino acids and small peptides metabolism, lipid metabolism, especially fatty acyls metabolism, were impacted by endogenous JA deficiency and exogenous MeJA treatment. These results were further verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of 21 related genes involved in the metabolism of glucosinolates, tryptophan and α-linolenic acid pathways. The results would greatly enhance our understanding of the biological functions of JA.

  17. Metabolomics Workbench (MetWB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Metabolomics Program's Data Repository and Coordinating Center (DRCC), housed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), University of California, San Diego,...

  18. Metabolomics Analysis of Health Functions of Physalis Pubescens L. using by Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization Quadruple Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang Chu; Hui Sun; Guang-Li Yan; Ai-Hua Zhang; Chang Liu; Hui Dong; Xiang-Cai Meng; Xi-Jun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicines may benefit from metabolomics studies, and applying metabolomics may provide answers about which herbal interventions may be effective for individuals, which metabolic processes are triggered, and the subsequent chemical pathways of activity. Physalis pubescens L (PPL) is an herbal fruit for one year living plant and has been developed into healthy function’s food. However, the mechanisms of health functions are still unclear. To comprehensively and holistically assess its anti-fatigue and antioxidant effects, a novel integrative metabolomics approach was applied. In this study, we present metabolomics analysis applying ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q/TOF-MS) to determine metabolite alterations after oral administration PPL to rats. Fifteen metabolites in urine were identified as potential biomarkers. Pattern analysis of the UPLC-Q/TOF-MS data disclosed that PPL could relieve fatigue rats by ameliorating the disturbance in amino acids metabolism and energy metabolism, alleviating the oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory damage, and recovering the destructed regulation. Based on these results, we demonstrated that PPL is a promising source of natural anti-fatigue and antioxidants material for use in functional foods and medicines.

  19. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; de Armas, Evaldo; Tong, Zhaohui; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs) are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs) represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus) to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-). Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids), and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids) as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  20. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswapriya B Misra

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-. Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids, and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  1. Non-target effects of GM potato : an eco-metabolomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plischke, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, patterns of variation in plant metabolomes and insect communities were described in GM and non-GM potato plants in both laboratory and field experiments. Differences between plant genotypes in insect abundances were small when compared to year-to-year differences, location effects an

  2. Systematic metabolomic analysis of eicosanoids after omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation by a highly specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Yang, Nan; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2015-04-03

    Omega-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have beneficial effects in many pathological processes, especially cardiovascular disease, and their protective eicosanoid metabolites are thought to play important roles. However, how ω-3 PUFAs affect the eicosanoid profile has not been elucidated comprehensively. Here, we systematically analyzed the eicosanoid metabolites induced by ω-3 PUFA supplementation. We developed an LC-MS/MS-based method covering 32 arachidonic acid (ARA) metabolites and 37 ω-3 PUFA-derived products. The limits of detection for eicosanoids were between 0.0625 and 1 pg and the detection specificity was optimized. We then quantified eicosanoids in mouse and human plasma and mouse aorta samples after ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Levels of EPA hydroxyl products, 4-HDoHE, 17,18-EEQ, 17,18-DiHETE, TXB2, and LXA4 were significantly changed in both mouse samples, and those of 2-series PGs, EDPs and DHA hydroxyl products were changed in aorta samples. Correlation network analysis of mouse plasma data revealed that some eicosanoids had higher connection degree or betweenness centrality score than others after ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Eicosanoids in human plasma were profiled across five time points after ω-3 PUFA supplementation. Fuzzy c-mean clustering algorithm suggested that the time curves of eicosanoid activity could be described with three kinetic patterns: sustained upregulation, short-term upregulation, and downregulation. This is the first systematic profiling of eicosanoids with ω-3 PUFA supplementation. The highly specific eicosanoid metabolomic and related data analysis methods would be powerful tools for comprehensive eicosanoid study.

  3. NMR-based metabolomics and LC-MS/MS quantification reveal metal-specific tolerance and redox homeostasis in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Li, Sam F Y

    2014-01-01

    Live green algae are promising candidates for phytoremediation, but a suitable algal species which bio-accumulates high concentrations of heavy metals, and survives well in industrial water is yet to be identified. Potential metabolic engineering may be applied to improve algal phytoremediation performance, but the metal tolerance and bioaccumulation mechanisms in green algae have to be first fully understood. In this study, NMR-based metabolomics was used to study the effect of different metal species (copper, cadmium and lead) and metal concentrations in green microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris. High Cu concentrations influenced substantial decrease in organic osmolytes (betaine and glycerophosphocholine), which indicated Cu-induced redox imbalance. Accompanying redox imbalance, growth inhibition and photosynthesis impairments in Cu-spiked C. vulgaris revealed a clear relationship between Cu toxicity and redox homeostasis. As these metabolic changes were less prominent in Cd and Pb-spiked cultures, we inferred metal-specific toxicity in C. vulgaris, where redox active Cu(2+) is more potent than non-redox active Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in causing redox imbalance. Subsequently, ICP-MS and LC-MS/MS quantification shed light on the metal-specific bioaccumulation and detoxification mechanisms. The metal bioconcentration factor (BCF) correlated well with the phytochelatin (PC) content in Cu and Cd-spiked C. vulgaris biomass. High BCF and PC levels with increasing Cu and Cd exposure concentrations indicated that PCs played a significant role in Cu and Cd bioaccumulation and detoxification. In contrast, the undetectable PC levels in Pb-spiked cultures despite high Pb BCF suggest an alternative detoxification mechanism for Pb: either by passive absorption to the algal cell wall or interaction with glutathione (GSH).

  4. A 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach to evaluate the geographical authenticity of herbal medicine and its application in building a model effectively assessing the mixing proportion of intentional admixtures: A case study of Panax ginseng: Metabolomics for the authenticity of herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Truong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Choi, Young-Geun; Min, Jung-Eun; Yoon, Sang Jun; Yu, Yun-Hyun; Lim, Johan; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Jeong Hill

    2016-05-30

    Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng has long been the subject of adulteration, especially regarding its origins. Here, 60 ginseng samples from Korea and China initially displayed similar genetic makeup when investigated by DNA-based technique with 23 chloroplast intergenic space regions. Hence, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics with orthogonal projections on the latent structure-discrimination analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied and successfully distinguished between samples from two countries using seven primary metabolites as discrimination markers. Furthermore, to recreate adulteration in reality, 21 mixed samples of numerous Korea/China ratios were tested with the newly built OPLS-DA model. The results showed satisfactory separation according to the proportion of mixing. Finally, a procedure for assessing mixing proportion of intentionally blended samples that achieved good predictability (adjusted R(2)=0.8343) was constructed, thus verifying its promising application to quality control of herbal foods by pointing out the possible mixing ratio of falsified samples.

  5. Topsoil depth substantially influences the responses to drought of the foliar metabolomes of Mediterranean forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Barbeta, Adrià; Sardans, Jordi; Guenther, Alex; Ogaya, Romà; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Soils provide physical support, water, and nutrients to terrestrial plants. Upper soil layers are crucial for forest dynamics, especially under drought conditions, because many biological processes occur there and provide support, water and nutrients to terrestrial plants. We postulated that tree size and overall plant function manifested in the metabolome composition, the total set of metabolites, were dependent on the depth of upper soil layers and on water availability. We sampled leaves for stoichiometric and metabolomic analyses once per season from differently sized Quercus ilex trees under natural and experimental drought conditions as projected for the coming decades. Different sized trees had different metabolomes and plots with shallower soils had smaller trees. Soil moisture of the upper soil did not explain the tree size and smaller trees did not show higher concentrations of biomarker metabolites related to drought stress. However, the impact of drought treatment on metabolomes was higher in smaller trees in shallower soils. Our results suggested that tree size was more dependent on the depth of the upper soil layers, which indirectly affect the metabolomes of the trees, than on the moisture content of the upper soil layers. Metabolomic profiling of Q. ilex supported the premise that water availability in the upper soil layers was not necessarily correlated with tree size. The higher impact of drought on trees growing in shallower soils nevertheless indicates a higher vulnerability of small trees to the future increase in frequency, intensity, and duration of drought projected for the Mediterranean Basin and other areas. Metabolomics has proven to be an excellent tool detecting significant metabolic changes among differently sized individuals of the same species and it improves our understanding of the connection between plant metabolomes and environmental variables such as soil depth and moisture content.

  6. Human urinary biomarkers of dioxin exposure: Analysis by metabolomics and biologically driven data dimensionality reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanneret, Fabienne; Boccard, Julien; Badoud, Flavia; Sorg, Olivier; Tonoli, David; Pelclova, Daniela; Vlckova, Stepanka; Rutledge, Douglas N; Samer, Caroline Flora; Hochstrasser, Denis; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire; Rudaz, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomic approaches offer new opportunities for a deeper understanding of the molecular events related to toxic exposure. This study proposes a metabolomic investigation of biochemical alterations occurring in urine as a result of dioxin toxicity. Urine samples were collected from Czech chemical workers submitted to severe dioxin occupational exposure in a herbicide production plant in the late 1960s. Experiments were carried out with ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (U...

  7. A Conversation on Data Mining Strategies in LC-MS Untargeted Metabolomics: Pre-Processing and Pre-Treatment Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugizimana, Fidele; Steenkamp, Paul A; Piater, Lizelle A; Dubery, Ian A

    2016-11-03

    Untargeted metabolomic studies generate information-rich, high-dimensional, and complex datasets that remain challenging to handle and fully exploit. Despite the remarkable progress in the development of tools and algorithms, the "exhaustive" extraction of information from these metabolomic datasets is still a non-trivial undertaking. A conversation on data mining strategies for a maximal information extraction from metabolomic data is needed. Using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based untargeted metabolomic dataset, this study explored the influence of collection parameters in the data pre-processing step, scaling and data transformation on the statistical models generated, and feature selection, thereafter. Data obtained in positive mode generated from a LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomic study (sorghum plants responding dynamically to infection by a fungal pathogen) were used. Raw data were pre-processed with MarkerLynx(TM) software (Waters Corporation, Manchester, UK). Here, two parameters were varied: the intensity threshold (50-100 counts) and the mass tolerance (0.005-0.01 Da). After the pre-processing, the datasets were imported into SIMCA (Umetrics, Umea, Sweden) for more data cleaning and statistical modeling. In addition, different scaling (unit variance, Pareto, etc.) and data transformation (log and power) methods were explored. The results showed that the pre-processing parameters (or algorithms) influence the output dataset with regard to the number of defined features. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that the pre-treatment of data prior to statistical modeling affects the subspace approximation outcome: e.g., the amount of variation in X-data that the model can explain and predict. The pre-processing and pre-treatment steps subsequently influence the number of statistically significant extracted/selected features (variables). Thus, as informed by the results, to maximize the value of untargeted metabolomic data, understanding

  8. Nutritional metabolomics: progress in addressing complexity in diet and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P; Park, Youngja; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2012-08-21

    Nutritional metabolomics is rapidly maturing to use small-molecule chemical profiling to support integration of diet and nutrition in complex biosystems research. These developments are critical to facilitate transition of nutritional sciences from population-based to individual-based criteria for nutritional research, assessment, and management. This review addresses progress in making these approaches manageable for nutrition research. Important concept developments concerning the exposome, predictive health, and complex pathobiology serve to emphasize the central role of diet and nutrition in integrated biosystems models of health and disease. Improved analytic tools and databases for targeted and nontargeted metabolic profiling, along with bioinformatics, pathway mapping, and computational modeling, are now used for nutrition research on diet, metabolism, microbiome, and health associations. These new developments enable metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) and provide a foundation for nutritional metabolomics, along with genomics, epigenomics, and health phenotyping, to support the integrated models required for personalized diet and nutrition forecasting.

  9. Serum Metabolomics in Rats after Acute Paraquat Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyi; Ma, Jianshe; Zhang, Meiling; Wen, Congcong; Huang, Xueli; Sun, Fa; Wang, Shuanghu; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and is highly toxic to humans and animals. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on GC/MS to evaluate the effects of acute paraquat poisoning on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminate analysis revealed that acute paraquat poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, the level of octadecanoic acid, L-serine, L-threonine, L-valine, and glycerol in the acute paraquat poisoning group (36 mg/kg) increased, while the levels of hexadecanoic acid, D-galactose, and decanoic acid decreased. These findings provide an overview of systematic responses to paraquat exposure and metabolomic insight into the toxicological mechanism of paraquat. Our results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC/MS may be useful to elucidate the mechanism of acute paraquat poisoning through the exploration of biomarkers.

  10. Maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and induction of cytoprotectants and secondary metabolites in alachlor-treated GmGSTU4-overexpressing tobacco plants, as resolved by metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, Christos; Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Madesis, Panagiotis; Labrou, N.E.; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Nianiou-Obeidat, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are an invaluable tool for agricultural production scaling up. However, their continuous and intensive use has led to an increased incidence of herbicide resistant weeds and environmental pollution. Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) are tightly connected with crop and weed herbicid

  11. MetaboLights: towards a new COSMOS of metabolomics data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Christoph; Conesa, Pablo; Haug, Kenneth; Mahendraker, Tejasvi; Williams, Mark; Maguire, Eamonn; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L

    2012-10-01

    Exciting funding initiatives are emerging in Europe and the US for metabolomics data production, storage, dissemination and analysis. This is based on a rich ecosystem of resources around the world, which has been build during the past ten years, including but not limited to resources such as MassBank in Japan and the Human Metabolome Database in Canada. Now, the European Bioinformatics Institute has launched MetaboLights, a database for metabolomics experiments and the associated metadata (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/metabolights). It is the first comprehensive, cross-species, cross-platform metabolomics database maintained by one of the major open access data providers in molecular biology. In October, the European COSMOS consortium will start its work on Metabolomics data standardization, publication and dissemination workflows. The NIH in the US is establishing 6-8 metabolomics services cores as well as a national metabolomics repository. This communication reports about MetaboLights as a new resource for Metabolomics research, summarises the related developments and outlines how they may consolidate the knowledge management in this third large omics field next to proteomics and genomics.

  12. Metabolomic analysis reveals a common pattern of metabolic re-programming during invasion of three host plant species by Magnaporthe grisea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David; Beckmann, Manfred; Zubair, Hassan; Enot, David P; Caracuel-Rios, Zaira; Overy, David P; Snowdon, Stuart; Talbot, Nicholas J; Draper, John

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms by which biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungal pathogens simultaneously subdue plant defences and sequester host nutrients are poorly understood. Using metabolite fingerprinting, we show that Magnaporthe grisea, the causal agent of rice blast disease, dynamically re-programmes host metabolism during plant colonization. Identical patterns of metabolic change occurred during M. grisea infections in barley, rice and Brachypodium distachyon. Targeted metabolite profiling by GC-MS confirmed the modulation of a conserved set of metabolites. In pre-symptomatic tissues, malate and polyamines accumulated, rather than being utilized to generate defensive reactive oxygen species, and the levels of metabolites associated with amelioration of redox stress in various cellular compartments increased dramatically. The activity of NADP-malic enzyme and generation of reactive oxygen species were localized to pathogen penetration sites, and both appeared to be suppressed in compatible interactions. Early diversion of the shikimate pathway to produce quinate was observed, as well as accumulation of non-polymerized lignin precursors. These data are consistent with modulation of defensive phenylpropanoid metabolism by M. grisea and the inability of susceptible hosts to mount a hypersensitive reaction or produce lignified papillae (both involving reactive oxygen species) to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid proliferation of M. grisea hyphae in plant tissue after 3 days was associated with accelerated nutrient acquisition and utilization by the pathogen. Conversion of photoassimilate into mannitol and glycerol for carbon sequestration and osmolyte production appear to drive hyphal growth. Taken together, our results suggest that fungal pathogens deploy a common metabolic re-programming strategy in diverse host species to suppress plant defence and colonize plant tissue.

  13. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells.

  14. Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162874.html Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss ... row, U.S. News & World Report has named the plant-based eating plan as the best choice overall, ...

  15. Quality Evaluation of Panax ginseng Roots Using a Rapid Resolution LC-QTOF/MS-Based Metabolomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Young Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer contains several types of ginsenosides, which are considered the major active medicinal components of ginseng. The types and quantities of ginsenosides found in ginseng may differ, depending on the location of cultivation, making it necessary to establish a reliable method for distinguishing cultivation locations of ginseng roots. P. ginseng roots produced in different regions of Korea, China, and Japan have been unintentionally confused in herbal markets owing to their complicated plant sources. PCA and PLS-DA using RRLC-QTOF/MS data was able to differentiate between ginsengs cultivated in Korea, China, and Japan. The chemical markers accountable for such variations were identified through a PCA loadings plot, tentatively identified by RRLC-QTOF/MS and partially verified by available reference standards. The classification result can be used to identify P. ginseng origin.

  16. A Metabolomic Perspective on Coeliac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabrò, A.; Gralka, E.; Luchinat, C.; Saccenti, E.; Tenori, L.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is an “omic” science that is now emerging with the purpose of elaborating a comprehensive analysis of the metabolome, which is the complete set of metabolites (i.e., small molecules intermediates) in an organism, tissue, cell, or biofluid. In the past decade, metabolomics has already pr

  17. The next wave in metabolome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Oliver, S.

    2005-01-01

    to the genome makes it difficult to interpret metabolomic data. Nevertheless, functional genomics has produced examples of the use of metabolomics to elucidate the phenotypes of otherwise silent mutations. Despite several successes, we believe that future metabolomic studies must focus on the accurate...

  18. Mass-Spectrometry-Based Serum Metabolomics of a C57BL/6J Mouse Model of High-Fat-Diet-Induced Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Kuo, Tien-Chueh; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tseng, Yufeng J; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-09-09

    Obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation are key clinical risk factors for the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Currently, there is no comprehensive metabolic profile of a well-established animal model that effectively mimics the etiology and pathogenesis of NAFLD in humans. Here, we report the pathophysiological and metabolomic changes associated with NAFLD development in a C57BL/6J mouse model in which NAFLD was induced by feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) for 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Serum metabolomic analysis was conducted using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to establish a metabolomic profile. Analysis of the metabolomic profile in combination with principal component analysis revealed marked differences in metabolites between the control and HFD group depending upon NAFLD severity. A total of 30 potential biomarkers were strongly associated with the development of NAFLD. Among these, 11 metabolites were mainly related to carbohydrate metabolism, hepatic biotransformation, collagen synthesis, and gut microbial metabolism, which are characteristics of obesity, as well as significantly increased serum glucose, total cholesterol, and hepatic triglyceride levels during the onset of NAFLD (4 weeks). At 8 weeks, 5 additional metabolites that are chiefly involved in perturbation of lipid metabolism and insulin secretion were found to be associated with hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis in the mid-term of NAFLD progression. At the end of 12 and 16 weeks, 14 additional metabolites were predominantly correlated to abnormal bile acid synthesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation, representing hepatic inflammatory infiltration during NAFLD development. These results provide potential biomarkers for early risk assessment of NAFLD and further insights into NAFLD

  19. Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Comparison of Liver Grafts from Donors after Circulatory Death (DCD) and Donors after Brain Death (DBD) Used in Human Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Hrydziuszko, Olga; Perera, M. Thamara P. R; Laing, Richard; Kirwan, Jennifer; Silva, Michael A; Richards, Douglas A.; Murphy, Nick; Mirza, Darius F; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Use of marginal liver grafts, especially those from donors after circulatory death (DCD), has been considered as a solution to organ shortage. Inferior outcomes have been attributed to donor warm ischaemic damage in these DCD organs. Here we sought to profile the metabolic mechanisms underpinning donor warm ischaemia. Non-targeted Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry metabolomics was applied to biopsies of liver grafts from donors after brain death (DBD; n = 27...

  20. Using NMR-Based Metabolomics to Evaluate Postprandial Urinary Responses Following Consumption of Minimally Processed Wheat Bran or Wheat Aleurone by Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ramandeep Garg; Lorraine Brennan; Price, Ruth K.; Wallace, Julie M.W.; Strain, J. J.; Gibney, Mike J.; Shewry, Peter R.; Ward, Jane L.; Lalit Garg; Welch, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat bran, and especially wheat aleurone fraction, are concentrated sources of a wide range of components which may contribute to the health benefits associated with higher consumption of whole-grain foods. This study used NMR metabolomics to evaluate urine samples from baseline at one and two hours postprandially, following the consumption of minimally processed bran, aleurone or control by 14 participants (7 Females; 7 Males) in a randomized crossover trial. The methodology discriminated b...

  1. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based comprehensive metabolomics combined with pattern recognition and network analysis methods for characterization of metabolites and metabolic pathways from biological data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Han, Ying; Yan, Guang-li; Yuan, Ye; Song, Gao-chen; Yuan, Xiao-xia; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-08-06

    Metabolomics is the study of metabolic changes in biological systems and provides the small molecule fingerprints related to the disease. Extracting biomedical information from large metabolomics data sets by multivariate data analysis is of considerable complexity. Therefore, more efficient and optimizing metabolomics data processing technologies are needed to improve mass spectrometry applications in biomarker discovery. Here, we report the findings of urine metabolomic investigation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients by high-throughput ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) coupled with pattern recognition methods (principal component analysis, partial least-squares, and OPLS-DA) and network pharmacology. A total of 20 urinary differential metabolites (13 upregulated and 7 downregulated) were identified and contributed to HCV progress, involve several key metabolic pathways such as taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, histidine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and so forth. Metabolites identified through metabolic profiling may facilitate the development of more accurate marker algorithms to better monitor disease progression. Network analysis validated close contact between these metabolites and implied the importance of the metabolic pathways. Mapping altered metabolites to KEGG pathways identified alterations in a variety of biological processes mediated through complex networks. These findings may be promising to yield a valuable and noninvasive tool that insights into the pathophysiology of HCV and to advance the early diagnosis and monitor the progression of disease. Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the UPLC-MS platform combined with the pattern recognition and network analysis methods that can engender new insights into HCV pathobiology.

  2. Connecting extracellular metabolomic measurements to intracellular flux states in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrgård Markus J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful tool in the quantitative identification of physiological and disease-induced biological states. Extracellular metabolome or metabolic profiling data, in particular, can provide an insightful view of intracellular physiological states in a noninvasive manner. Results We used an updated genome-scale metabolic network model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, iMM904, to investigate how changes in the extracellular metabolome can be used to study systemic changes in intracellular metabolic states. The iMM904 metabolic network was reconstructed based on an existing genome-scale network, iND750, and includes 904 genes and 1,412 reactions. The network model was first validated by comparing 2,888 in silico single-gene deletion strain growth phenotype predictions to published experimental data. Extracellular metabolome data measured in response to environmental and genetic perturbations of ammonium assimilation pathways was then integrated with the iMM904 network in the form of relative overflow secretion constraints and a flux sampling approach was used to characterize candidate flux distributions allowed by these constraints. Predicted intracellular flux changes were consistent with published measurements on intracellular metabolite levels and fluxes. Patterns of predicted intracellular flux changes could also be used to correctly identify the regions of the metabolic network that were perturbed. Conclusion Our results indicate that integrating quantitative extracellular metabolomic profiles in a constraint-based framework enables inferring changes in intracellular metabolic flux states. Similar methods could potentially be applied towards analyzing biofluid metabolome variations related to human physiological and disease states.

  3. Emerging applications of metabolomics in studying chemopreventive phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Chi

    2013-10-01

    Phytochemicals from diet and herbal medicines are under intensive investigation for their potential use as chemopreventive agents to block and suppress carcinogenesis. Chemical diversity of phytochemicals, together with complex metabolic interactions between phytochemicals and biological system, can overwhelm the capacity of traditional analytical platforms, and thus pose major challenges in studying chemopreventive phytochemicals. Recent progresses in metabolomics have transformed it to become a robust systems biology tool, suitable for examining both chemical and biochemical events that contribute to the cancer prevention activities of plant preparations or their bioactive components. This review aims to discuss the technical platform of metabolomics and its existing and potential applications in chemoprevention research, including identifying bioactive phytochemicals in plant extracts, monitoring phytochemical exposure in humans, elucidating biotransformation pathways of phytochemicals, and characterizing the effects of phytochemicals on endogenous metabolism and cancer metabolism.

  4. Preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euceda, Leslie R; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-05-01

    Metabolomics involves the large scale analysis of metabolites and thus, provides information regarding cellular processes in a biological sample. Independently of the analytical technique used, a vast amount of data is always acquired when carrying out metabolomics studies; this results in complex datasets with large amounts of variables. This type of data requires multivariate statistical analysis for its proper biological interpretation. Prior to multivariate analysis, preprocessing of the data must be carried out to remove unwanted variation such as instrumental or experimental artifacts. This review aims to outline the steps in the preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data and describe some of the methods to perform these. Since using different preprocessing methods may produce different results, it is important that an appropriate pipeline exists for the selection of the optimal combination of methods in the preprocessing workflow.

  5. Metabolomic application in toxicity evaluation and toxicological biomarker identification of natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan-Qian; Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Tang, Dan-Dan; Miao, Hua; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-05-25

    Natural product plays a vital role in disease prevention and treatment since the appearance of civilization, but the toxicity severely hinders its wide use. In order to avoid toxic effect as far as possible and use natural product safely, more comprehensive understandings of toxicity are urgently required. Since the metabolome represents the physiological or pathological status of organisms, metabolomics-based toxicology is of significance to observe potential injury before toxins have caused physiological or pathological damages. Metabolomics-based toxicology can evaluate toxicity and identify toxicological biomarker of natural product, which is helpful to guide clinical medication and reduce adverse drug reactions. In the past decades, dozens of metabolomic researches have been implemented on toxicity evaluation, toxicological biomarker identification and potential mechanism exploration of nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and central nervous system toxicity induced by pure compounds, extracts and compound prescriptions. In this paper, metabolomic technology, sample preparation, data process and analysis, and metabolomics-based toxicological research of natural product are reviewed, and finally, the potential problems and further perspectives in toxicological metabolomic investigations of natural product are discussed.

  6. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by 1H NMR-based plasma me...

  7. Genetic and metabolomic approaches for coronary heart disease risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, Anika Antoinette Maria

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is currently based on traditional risk factors (TRFs) like age, sex, lipid levels, blood pressure. Here we investigated, using the CAREMA cohort, whether this prediction can potentially be improved by applying a metabolomics approach and by includi

  8. Probabilistic assignment of formulas to mass peaks in metabolomics experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, Simon; Scheltema, Richard A.; Girolami, Mark; Breitling, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: High-accuracy mass spectrometry is a popular technology for high-throughput measurements of cellular metabolites (metabolomics). One of the major challenges is the correct identification of the observed mass peaks, including the assignment of their empirical formula, based on the measure

  9. An evaluation of acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning in rats through serum metabolomics based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiling; Deng, Mingjie; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianqin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the second leading cause of toxin-related deaths in the operational site. Its main target organs of toxic effects are the central nervous system and respiratory system. In this study, we developed a serum metabonomic method, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to evaluate the effect of acute poisoning by hydrogen sulfide on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA), revealed that acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning induced metabolic perturbations. Compared to the control group, the level of urea, glucose, glyceryl stearate in rat serum of the poisoning group increased after two hours, and the level of glucose, docosahexaenoic acid, glyceryl stearate and arachidonic acid in rat serum of the poisoning group increased after 48 h, while the L-valine, galactose, L-tyrosine levels decreased. Our results indicate that metabonomic methods based on GC/MS may be useful to elucidate acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning through the exploration of biomarkers.

  10. Early Effect of Amyloid β-Peptide on Hippocampal and Serum Metabolism in Rats Studied by an Integrated Method of NMR-Based Metabolomics and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yao; Zheng, Hong; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the early effect of Aβ deposition on metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, thus, we explored the metabolic changes in the hippocampus and serum during first 2 weeks of Aβ25-35 injection in rats by using an integrated method of NMR-based metabolomics and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). Our results show that Aβ25-35 injection, time, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the hippocampus and serum metabolome. Furthermore, we identified key metabolites that mainly contributed to these effects. After Aβ25-35 injection from 1 to 2 weeks, the levels of lactate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and taurine were decreased in rat hippocampus, while an increase in lactate and decreases in LDL/VLDL and glucose were observed in rat serum. Therefore, we suggest that the reduction in energy and lipid metabolism as well as an increase in anaerobic glycolysis may occur at the early stage of Aβ25-35 deposition.

  11. Early Effect of Amyloid β-Peptide on Hippocampal and Serum Metabolism in Rats Studied by an Integrated Method of NMR-Based Metabolomics and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yao; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the early effect of Aβ deposition on metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, thus, we explored the metabolic changes in the hippocampus and serum during first 2 weeks of Aβ25–35 injection in rats by using an integrated method of NMR-based metabolomics and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). Our results show that Aβ25–35 injection, time, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the hippocampus and serum metabolome. Furthermore, we identified key metabolites that mainly contributed to these effects. After Aβ25–35 injection from 1 to 2 weeks, the levels of lactate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and taurine were decreased in rat hippocampus, while an increase in lactate and decreases in LDL/VLDL and glucose were observed in rat serum. Therefore, we suggest that the reduction in energy and lipid metabolism as well as an increase in anaerobic glycolysis may occur at the early stage of Aβ25–35 deposition.

  12. Application of metabolomics based on direct mass spectrometry analysis for the elucidation of altered metabolic pathways in serum from the APP/PS1 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-03-25

    Metabolomic analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease has demonstrated a great potential for the study of pathological mechanisms and the development of new therapies and biomarkers for diagnosis. However, in order to translate these investigations to the clinical practice it is necessary to corroborate these findings in peripheral samples. To this end, this work considers the application of a novel metabolomic platform based on the combination of a two-steps extraction procedure with complementary analysis by direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry and flow infusion atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry for a holistic investigation of metabolic abnormalities in serum samples from APP/PS1 mice. A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in this mouse model, including increased levels of di- and tri-acylglycerols, eicosanoids, inosine, choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine; reduced content of cholesteryl esters, free fatty acids, lysophosphocholines, amino acids, energy-related metabolites, phosphoethanolamine and urea, as well as abnormal distribution of phosphocholines depending on the fatty acid linked to the molecular moiety. This allowed the elucidation of possible pathways disturbed underlying to disease (abnormal homeostasis of phospholipids leading to membrane breakdown, energy-related failures, hyperammonemia and hyperlipidemia, among others), thus demonstrating the utility of peripheral samples to investigate pathology in the APP/PS1 model.

  13. Investigation on biochemical compositional changes during the microbial fermentation process of Fu brick tea by LC-MS based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Hu, Feng-Lin; Wang, Wei; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Bao, Guan-Hu

    2015-11-01

    Fu brick tea (FBT) is a unique post-fermented tea product which is fermented with fungi during the manufacturing process. In this study, we investigated the biochemical compositional changes occurring during the microbial fermentation process (MFP) of FBT based on non-targeted LC-MS, which was a comprehensive and unbiased methodology. Our data analysis took a two-phase approach: (1) comparison of FBT with other tea products using PCA analysis to exhibit the characteristic effect of MFP on the formation of Fu brick tea and (2) comparison of tea samples throughout the MFP of FBT to elucidate the possible key metabolic pathways produced by the fungi. Non-targeted LC-MS analysis clearly distinguished FBT with other tea samples and highlighted some interesting metabolic pathways during the MFP including B ring fission catechin. Our study demonstrated that those fungi had a significant influence on the biochemical profiles in the FBT and consequently contributed to its unique quality.

  14. NMR-based metabolomic investigation of bioactivity of chemical constituents in black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) fruit extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Liladhar; Wyzgoski, Faith J; Giusti, M Monica; Johnson, Jodee L; Rinaldi, Peter L; Scheerens, Joseph C; Chanon, Ann M; Bomser, Joshua A; Miller, A Raymond; Hardy, James K; Reese, R Neil

    2014-02-26

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) (BR) fruit extracts with differing compound profiles have shown variable antiproliferative activities against HT-29 colon cancer cell lines. This study used partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis to develop a high-resolution (1)H NMR-based multivariate statistical model for discerning the biological activity of BR constituents. This model identified specific bioactive compounds and ascertained their relative contribution against cancer cell proliferation. Cyanidin 3-rutinoside and cyanidin 3-xylosylrutinoside were the predominant contributors to the extract bioactivity, but salicylic acid derivatives (e.g., salicylic acid glucosyl ester), quercetin 3-glucoside, quercetin 3-rutinoside, p-coumaric acid, epicatechin, methyl ellagic acid derivatives (e.g., methyl ellagic acetyl pentose), and citric acid derivatives also contributed significantly to the antiproliferative activity of the berry extracts. This approach enabled the identification of new bioactive components in BR fruits and demonstrates the utility of the method for assessing chemopreventive compounds in foods and food products.

  15. Metabolomic Assessment of Induced and Activated Chemical Defence in the Invasive Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Göran M.; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  16. Metabolomic assessment of induced and activated chemical defence in the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran M Nylund

    Full Text Available In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible

  17. Biological variation of Vanilla planifolia leaf metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Fock, Isabelle; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2010-04-01

    The metabolomic analysis of Vanilla planifolia leaves collected at different developmental stages was carried out using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis in order to evaluate their variation. Ontogenic changes of the metabolome were considered since leaves of different ages were collected at two different times of the day and in two different seasons. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square modeling discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) of (1)H NMR data provided a clear separation according to leaf age, time of the day and season of collection. Young leaves were found to have higher levels of glucose, bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-isopropyltartrate (glucoside A) and bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-(2-butyl)-tartrate (glucoside B), whereas older leaves had more sucrose, acetic acid, homocitric acid and malic acid. Results obtained from PLS-DA analysis showed that leaves collected in March 2008 had higher levels of glucosides A and B as compared to those collected in August 2007. However, the relative standard deviation (RSD) exhibited by the individual values of glucosides A and B showed that those compounds vary more according to their developmental stage (50%) than to the time of day or the season in which they were collected (19%). Although morphological variations of the V. planifolia accessions were observed, no clear separation of the accessions was determined from the analysis of the NMR spectra. The results obtained in this study, show that this method based on the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis has a great potential for further applications in the study of vanilla leaf metabolome.

  18. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Discovers Purine Endogenous Associations with Low-Dose Salbutamol in Urine Collected for Antidoping Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoyao; Caldwell, Richard; Cowan, David A; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2016-02-16

    Current antidoping analytical methods are tailored mainly to the targeting of known drugs and endogenous molecules. This causes difficulties in rapidly reacting to emerging threats, such as designer drugs, biological therapeutic agents, and technologies. Biomarkers are considered as a promising approach for the fight against these threats to sport. The main purpose of this study was to find surrogate biomarkers induced by the intake of small amounts of the model compound salbutamol and explore a sensitive approach to help screen for possible drug misuse. Urine samples (91) from athletes with detectable salbutamol (30) and negative samples (61) were analyzed using a UHPLC-MS. A third group (30) was created by spiking salbutamol into negative samples to eliminate confounding effects. Data were then analyzed in XCMS to extract metabolic features. Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis was performed to select features correlated with detectable salbutamol (p(corr) > 0.5) and ROC analysis was performed to measure the predictive potential of the markers. Univariate analysis including Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation was conducted on selected markers. A total of 7000 metabolic features were parsed, one feature identified as hypoxanthine increased with salbutamol (p salbutamol (r = 0.415, p salbutamol administration. This surrogate discovery approach needs further PK studies but in the meantime can be used as an intelligence-based complementary approach for targeting of athletes to be further tested.

  19. Seasonal changes in the metabolic fingerprint of 21 grass and legume cultivars studied by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Jensen, Christian S; Pedersen, Morten Greve; Didion, Thomas; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ø; Larsen, Mette K; Nielsen, Jacob Holm

    2010-04-14

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based approach was introduced for metabolic fingerprinting of 21 grass and legume cultivars in the present study. Applying principal component analysis (PCA) on the fingerprints obtained on water extracts, it was possible to elucidate the variation between cultivars and the magnitude of changes in the metabolic fingerprint between the spring growth and the second regrowth. Consequently, the potential of the method for tracking differences and changes related to cultivar and season was demonstrated. In addition, partial least-squares (PLS) regressions revealed correlations between the NMR fingerprints and the value of the grasses as animal feed evaluated as concentration of sugars, neutral detergent fibres (NDF) (R = 0.82), indigestible neutral detergent fibres (iNDF) (R = 0.90), and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) (R = 0.75). The correlations between these parameters and the NMR fingerprint could mainly be ascribed to differences in spectral intensities from signals assigned to malic acid (2.40 and 4.70 ppm), choline (3.27 ppm), and glucose (5.24 ppm), and the biochemical rationale for this relation is discussed.

  20. Serum Metabolomics of Burkitt Lymphoma Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengmin; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hong; Ruan, Guorui; Xiang, Junfeng; Wang, Lixia; Sun, Hongxia; Guan, Aijiao; Shen, Gang; Liu, Yan; Guo, Xiaomeng; Li, Qian; Tang, Yalin

    2017-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a rare and highly aggressive type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mortality rate of BL patients is very high due to the rapid growth rate and frequent systemic spread of the disease. A better understanding of the pathogenesis, more sensitive diagnostic tools and effective treatment methods for BL are essential. Metabolomics, an important aspect of systems biology, allows the comprehensive analysis of global, dynamic and endogenous biological metabolites based on their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). It has already been used to investigate the pathogenesis and discover new biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we analyzed differences of serum metabolites in BL mice and normal mice by NMR-based metabolomics. We found that metabolites associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and choline phospholipid metabolism were altered in BL mice. The diagnostic potential of the metabolite differences was investigated in this study. Glutamate, glycerol and choline had a high diagnostic accuracy; in contrast, isoleucine, leucine, pyruvate, lysine, α-ketoglutarate, betaine, glycine, creatine, serine, lactate, tyrosine, phenylalanine, histidine and formate enabled the accurate differentiation of BL mice from normal mice. The discovery of abnormal metabolism and relevant differential metabolites may provide useful clues for developing novel, noninvasive approaches for the diagnosis and prognosis of BL based on these potential biomarkers. PMID:28129369

  1. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Prokisch, Holger; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the ‘human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface’ (BMTI). Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease. PMID:26086077

  2. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bartel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI. Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease.

  3. Alterations of the exo- and endometabolite profiles in breast cancer cell lines: A mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Hirschfeld, Marc; Erbes, Thalia; Neubauer, Hans; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2016-06-21

    In recent years, knowledge about metabolite changes which are characteristic for the physiologic state of cancer cells has been acquired by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Distinct molecularly characterized breast cancer cell lines provide an unbiased and standardized in vitro tumor model reflecting the heterogeneity of the disease. Tandem mass spectrometry is a widely applied analytical platform and highly sensitive technique for analysis of complex biological samples. Endo- and exometabolite analysis of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, -453 and BT-474 as well as the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A has been performed using two different analytical platforms: UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF based on a scheduled precursor list has been applied for highlighting of significant differences between cell lines and HPLC-ESI-QqQ using multiple reaction monitoring has been utilized for a targeted approach focusing on RNA metabolism and interconnected pathways, respectively. Statistical analysis enabled a clear discrimination of the breast epithelial from the breast cancer cell lines. As an effect of oxidative stress, a decreased GSH/GSSG ratio has been detected in breast cancer cell lines. The triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 showed an elevation in nicotinamide, 1-ribosyl-nicotinamide and NAD+ reflecting the increased energy demand in triple negative breast cancer, which has a more aggressive clinical course than other forms of breast cancer. Obtained distinct metabolite pattern could be correlated with distinct molecular characteristics of breast cancer cells. Results and methodology of this preliminary in vitro study could be transferred to in vivo studies with breast cancer patients.

  4. Analysis of the correlation between dipeptides and taste differences among soy sauces by using metabolomics-based component profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Shiga, Kazuki; Kodama, Yukako; Imamura, Miho; Uchida, Riichiro; Obata, Akio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing the relationships between the components and taste differences among soy sauces can help evaluate and improve the quality of soy sauces. Although previous studies have reported that certain taste-active dipeptides, the relationships between taste differences and dipeptides of soy sauces are unknown. Therefore, our objective in this study was to investigate the correlations between the dipeptides and the taste differences among soy sauces. To analyze the dipeptides, we constructed an analytical method using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Based on this method, we detected 237 dipeptides, the largest number ever detected in soy sauce research. Next, orthogonal projections to latent structures regressions were performed. The data matrix of components, including dipeptides and other low-molecular-weight hydrophilic components obtained from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), served as explanatory variables (366 in total), whereas a sensory data matrix obtained using quantitative descriptive analysis served as the response variable. The accuracy of models for the sweetness and saltiness differences constructed using the LC/MS/MS and GC/MS data matrix were higher than did models constructed using only the GC/MS data matrix. As a result of investigation of the correlation between the dipeptides and taste differences among soy sauces by using variable importance in the projection (VIP) score, many dipeptides showed the high correlation with taste differences. Specifically, Ile-Gln, Pro-Lys, Ile-Glu, Thr-Phe, and Leu-Gln showed the high VIP score on sweet differences. This study is the first report that reveals the correlations between the dipeptides and taste differences among soy sauces.

  5. Exceptional evolutionary divergence of human muscle and brain metabolomes parallels human cognitive and physical uniqueness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng;

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite concentrations reflect the physiological states of tissues and cells. However, the role of metabolic changes in species evolution is currently unknown. Here, we present a study of metabolome evolution conducted in three brain regions and two non-neural tissues from humans, chimpanzees......, macaque monkeys, and mice based on over 10,000 hydrophilic compounds. While chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse metabolomes diverge following the genetic distances among species, we detect remarkable acceleration of metabolome evolution in human prefrontal cortex and skeletal muscle affecting neural and energy...

  6. Metabolic pathway engineering based on metabolomics confers acetic and formic acid tolerance to a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Jun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of novel yeast strains with increased tolerance toward inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is highly desirable for the production of bio-ethanol. Weak organic acids such as acetic and formic acids are necessarily released during the pretreatment (i.e. solubilization and hydrolysis of lignocelluloses, which negatively affect microbial growth and ethanol production. However, since the mode of toxicity is complicated, genetic engineering strategies addressing yeast tolerance to weak organic acids have been rare. Thus, enhanced basic research is expected to identify target genes for improved weak acid tolerance. Results In this study, the effect of acetic acid on xylose fermentation was analyzed by examining metabolite profiles in a recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites involved in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP [e.g. sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, ribulose-5-phosphate, ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate] were significantly accumulated by the addition of acetate, indicating the possibility that acetic acid slows down the flux of the pathway. Accordingly, a gene encoding a PPP-related enzyme, transaldolase or transketolase, was overexpressed in the xylose-fermenting yeast, which successfully conferred increased ethanol productivity in the presence of acetic and formic acid. Conclusions Our metabolomic approach revealed one of the molecular events underlying the response to acetic acid and focuses attention on the non-oxidative PPP as a target for metabolic engineering. An important challenge for metabolic engineering is identification of gene targets that have material importance. This study has demonstrated that metabolomics is a powerful tool to develop rational strategies to confer tolerance to stress through genetic engineering.

  7. Pharma-metabolomics in neonatology: is it a dream or a fact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanos, Vassilios; Barberini, Luigi; Antonucci, Roberto; Atzori, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The 'omics' technologies represent analytical approaches that have a holistic view on molecules such as genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites constituting a cell, tissue or organism. The profiling of genes, transcripts and proteins has been referred to as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Finally, there is the youngest and most rapidly increasing of the "omics" disciplines: metabolomics. Metabolomics appears to be a new, very useful tool in neonatology, especially in the fields of pharma-metabolomics and nutri- metabolomics. Since it appears to be predictive and preventive, it can be considered the 'new clinical chemistry' for personalized neonatal medicine. At present, the use of metabolomics in neonatology is still in the pioneering phase. In clinical practice, only a limited number of metabolites are routinely measured in the biofluids of newborns by conventional analytical methods to study the metabolic status of the organism. However, the management of sick or preterm newborns might be improved if more information on perinatal/ neonatal maturational processes and their metabolic background were available. The aim of this review, after a general introduction on pharma-metabolomics, is to present the potential of NMR-based metabolomic analysis of newbom urine in neonatology in the field of pharmacology.

  8. 基于代谢组学的杀菌剂作用机理研究%Study on Antifungal Modes-of-Action Based on Metabolomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈溪; 纪明山

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics had so far been a valuable high-throughput screening tool for bioactive substances, and it was widely applied to life science and showed a promising perspective. The concept, empirical method, analytical method, data processing, application of metabolomics was summarized, and its potentials in biology, medicine, pesticide sphere were prospected. In this foundation, the development direction through the studies on antifungal metabolomics was rised. Through high-throughput screening and data processing as device, metabolic fingerprint library was established, and a method which can quickly screen unknown modes-of-action antifungal was set up. Metabolomics has important future trends in new drug research, drug toxicology analysis and assessment, and it might be a important breakthrough in pesticide study.%目前代谢组学是生物活性物质高效筛选的重要工具,在生命科学领域得到了越来越广泛的应用并展现出良好的前景.综述了代谢组学的概念、实验方法、分析方法、数据处理以及在生物、医药领域的应用及农药学领域的研究前景.并在此基础上,提出了利用代谢组学研究杀菌剂作用机理可能的发展方向.以高通量检测和数据处理为手段,建立代谢指纹图谱库,创建一个可以快速筛查未知杀菌剂作用机理的方法,在新型农药的研制、毒理学分析、安全评价等领域具有广阔的前景,将成为农药现代研究的一个重要突破口.

  9. LC-MS based Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magdenoska, Olivera

    with only 12C or 13C carbons were very low or even not measurable and showed minimal or no interference to the spiked amount of nonlabeled standards and their stable isotope-labeled internal standards (SIL-IS). Finally the developed IP-RP LC-MS method was coupled to a quadrupole time of flight (QTOF) MS....... The analytical tools applied for analysis of intracellular metabolites should be capable to cope with the large number of metabolites to be analyzed and the complex matrix in the samples. Therefore the combination of separation and detection techniques is commonly applied for analysis of intracellular...... and optimization of the chromatographic separation and iii) optimization of the sample preparation. A substantial part of the thesis was focused on the development of the LC-MS method. For quantitative targeted analysis of a group of defined metabolites, triple quadrupole (QqQ) MS was used. The optimization...

  10. Global GPP based on Plant Functional Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroustraete, Frank; Balzarolo, Manuela

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation variables like Gross Primary productivity (GPP) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) are key variables in vegetation carbon exchange studies. Field measurements of the NDVI are time consuming due to landscape heterogeneity across time. Typically a sampling protocol adopted during field campaigns is based on the VALERI protocol in that case toe estimate LAI. Field campaign GPP or NDVI measurements can be scaled up to using in-situ FLUXNET radiation raster maps. Regression analysis can then be applied to construct transfer functions for the determination of GPP raster maps raster imagery from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) raster maps derived from in-situ FLUXNET radiation raster maps. Subsequently, in the VALERI approach the scaling up of raster maps is performed by aggregation of high resolution in-situ FLUXNET radiation raster maps data into high resolution raster maps and subsequently aggregating these to 1x1 km MODIS NDVI raster maps by calculating average NDVI values for the low resolution data. The up-scaled 1x1 km pixels are then used to validate the MODIS GPP and NVI products. Hence up scaling based on in-situ FLUXNET radiation measurements are not a luxury for large and heterogeneous sites. Therefore this paper tackles the problem of up scaling using in-situ FLUXNET radiation measurements. Key Words: FLUXNET, GPP, Plant Functional Types, Up-scaling

  11. Editorial: from plant biotechnology to bio-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöger, Eva

    2013-10-01

    From plant biotechnology to bio-based products - this Special Issue of Biotechnology Journal is dedicated to plant biotechnology and is edited by Prof. Eva Stöger (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria). The Special Issue covers a wide range of topics in plant biotechnology, including metabolic engineering of biosynthesis pathways in plants; taking advantage of the scalability of the plant system for the production of innovative materials; as well as the regulatory challenges and society acceptance of plant biotechnology.

  12. Toxic Markers of Matrine Determined Using 1H-NMR-Based Metabolomics in Cultured Cells In Vitro and Rats In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghuang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrine is one of the main bioactive alkaloids of Sophora flavescens Aiton, which has been widely used to treat various diseases in China. These diseases include viral hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, skin diseases, and tumors. However, matrine is also the main toxic compound of this herb, and the available biomarkers are not reliable in detecting or quantifying matrine risk. Metabolomics is a powerful tool used to identify early toxicity biomarkers that are specific indicators of damage to biosystems. This study aimed to find the potential biomarkers of the matrine-induced toxic effects in rats and HepG2 cells. The toxicological effects of rats induced by matrine could be derived from the elevated taurine and trimethylamine N-oxide levels and the depletion in hippurate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, such as 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, and succinate in the urine. Cell metabolomics revealed that the levels of alanine, choline, glutathione, lactate, phosphocholine, and cholesterol showed dose-dependent decreases, whereas the levels of taurine, fatty acid, and unsaturated fatty acid showed dose-dependent increases. Overall, a significant perturbation of metabolites in response to high dose of matrine was observed both in vivo and in vitro, and the selected metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for matrine-induced toxicity.

  13. Toxic Markers of Matrine Determined Using (1) H-NMR-Based Metabolomics in Cultured Cells In Vitro and Rats In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghuang; Zheng, Liang; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Guiyu; Lu, Linlin; Zhu, Lijun; Zhang, Jiajie; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-01-01

    Matrine is one of the main bioactive alkaloids of Sophora flavescens Aiton, which has been widely used to treat various diseases in China. These diseases include viral hepatitis, liver fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, skin diseases, and tumors. However, matrine is also the main toxic compound of this herb, and the available biomarkers are not reliable in detecting or quantifying matrine risk. Metabolomics is a powerful tool used to identify early toxicity biomarkers that are specific indicators of damage to biosystems. This study aimed to find the potential biomarkers of the matrine-induced toxic effects in rats and HepG2 cells. The toxicological effects of rats induced by matrine could be derived from the elevated taurine and trimethylamine N-oxide levels and the depletion in hippurate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, such as 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, and succinate in the urine. Cell metabolomics revealed that the levels of alanine, choline, glutathione, lactate, phosphocholine, and cholesterol showed dose-dependent decreases, whereas the levels of taurine, fatty acid, and unsaturated fatty acid showed dose-dependent increases. Overall, a significant perturbation of metabolites in response to high dose of matrine was observed both in vivo and in vitro, and the selected metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for matrine-induced toxicity.

  14. Effect of storage time on metabolite profile and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity of Cosmos caudatus leaves – GCMS based metabolomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Javadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cosmos caudatus, which is a commonly consumed vegetable in Malaysia, is locally known as “Ulam Raja”. It is a local Malaysian herb traditionally used as a food and medicinal herb to treat several maladies. Its bioactive or nutritional constituents consist of a wide range of metabolites, including glucosinolates, phenolics, amino acids, organic acids, and sugars. However, many of these metabolites are not stable and easily degraded or modified during storage. In order to investigate the metabolomics changes occurring during post-harvest storage, C. caudatus samples were subjected to seven different storage times (0 hours, 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, 8 hours, 10 hours, and 12 hours at room temperature. As the model experiment, the metabolites identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS were correlated with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity analyzed with multivariate data analysis (MVDA to find out the variation among samples and metabolites contributing to the activity. Orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS analysis was applied to investigate the metabolomics changes. A profound chemical alteration, both in primary and secondary metabolites, was observed. The α-tocopherol, catechin, cyclohexen-1-carboxylic acid, benzoic acid, myo-inositol, stigmasterol, and lycopene compounds were found to be the discriminating metabolites at early storage; however, sugars such as sucrose, α-d-galactopyranose, and turanose were detected, which was attributed to the discriminating metabolites for late storage. The result shows that the MVDA method is a promising technique to identify biomarker compounds relative to storage at different times.

  15. Electroacupuncture at Acupoints Reverses Plasma Glutamate, Lipid, and LDL/VLDL in an Acute Migraine Rat Model: A1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers of electroacupuncture (EA on relieving acute migraine through metabolomic study. Methods. EA treatments were performed on both acupoints and nonacupoints on the nitroglycerin (NTG-induced migraine rat model. NMR experiments and multivariate analysis were used for metabolomic analysis. Results. The number of head-scratching, the main ethology index of migraine rat model, was significantly increased P<0.01 after NTG injection. The plasma metabolic profile of model group was distinct from that of the control group. Glutamate was significantly increased P<0.01, whereas lipids were significantly decreased P<0.01 in model rats. After EA at acupoints, the metabolic profile of model rats was normalized, with decreased glutamate P<0.05 and increased lipids P<0.01. In contrast, EA at nonacupoints did not restore the metabolic profile, but with six metabolites significantly different from acupoints group. Interestingly, the number of head-scratching and glutamate level were significantly decreased P<0.05 after receiving EA at both acupoints and nonacupoints. Conclusions. EA at acupoints may relieve acute migraine by restoring the plasma metabolic profile and plasma glutamate, while EA at nonacupoints may modestly relieve acute migraine by decreasing plasma glutamate.

  16. GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomic strategy for combined toxicity effects of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone on murine macrophage ANA-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Zhu, Pei; Pi, Fuwei; Sun, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Sun, Jiadi; Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-09-15

    The actual health risk from exposure to combined mycotoxins is unknown, and few studies have focused on changes to cellular biological systems (e.g., metabolomics) caused by combined mycotoxic effects. To evaluate the combined mycotoxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) on the level of cellular biological systems, gas chromatographic, time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (GC-TOF/MS) of the complete murine macrophage ANA-1 cell metabolome was implemented in this study. Using optimized chromatography and mass spectrometry parameters, the metabolites detected by GC-TOF/MS were identified and processed using multivariate statistical analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection on latent-structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The metabolite sets were screened for further pathway analysis under rules of t-test (P) value  1, and similarity value > 500. The mainly interfered metabolism pathways were categorized into two dominant types: amino acid metabolism and glycometabolism. Four metabolites, palmitic acid, 1-monopalmitin, ribose-5-phosphate and 2-deoxy-D-galactose, occur only under combined "DON + ZEN" treatment, indicating abnormal metabolism in ANA-1 cells. The metabolic state of ANA-1 cells under induction by combined "DON + ZEN" illustrates that DON may inhibit the estrogenic effects of ZEN. Thus, the combined effect of "DON + ZEN" may exacerbate toxicity in the pentose phosphate pathway, while palmitic acid metabolism is likely a new pathway effected by the combination, "DON + ZEN."

  17. Using NMR-Based Metabolomics to Evaluate Postprandial Urinary Responses Following Consumption of Minimally Processed Wheat Bran or Wheat Aleurone by Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Garg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat bran, and especially wheat aleurone fraction, are concentrated sources of a wide range of components which may contribute to the health benefits associated with higher consumption of whole-grain foods. This study used NMR metabolomics to evaluate urine samples from baseline at one and two hours postprandially, following the consumption of minimally processed bran, aleurone or control by 14 participants (7 Females; 7 Males in a randomized crossover trial. The methodology discriminated between the urinary responses of control, and bran and aleurone, but not between the two fractions. Compared to control, consumption of aleurone or bran led to significantly and substantially higher urinary concentrations of lactate, alanine, N-acetylaspartate acid and N-acetylaspartylglutamate and significantly and substantially lower urinary betaine concentrations at one and two hours postprandially. There were sex related differences in urinary metabolite profiles with generally higher hippurate and citrate and lower betaine in females compared to males. Overall, this postprandial study suggests that acute consumption of bran or aleurone is associated with a number of physiological effects that may impact on energy metabolism and which are consistent with longer term human and animal metabolomic studies that used whole-grain wheat diets or wheat fractions.

  18. Using NMR-Based Metabolomics to Evaluate Postprandial Urinary Responses Following Consumption of Minimally Processed Wheat Bran or Wheat Aleurone by Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ramandeep; Brennan, Lorraine; Price, Ruth K; Wallace, Julie M W; Strain, J J; Gibney, Mike J; Shewry, Peter R; Ward, Jane L; Garg, Lalit; Welch, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Wheat bran, and especially wheat aleurone fraction, are concentrated sources of a wide range of components which may contribute to the health benefits associated with higher consumption of whole-grain foods. This study used NMR metabolomics to evaluate urine samples from baseline at one and two hours postprandially, following the consumption of minimally processed bran, aleurone or control by 14 participants (7 Females; 7 Males) in a randomized crossover trial. The methodology discriminated between the urinary responses of control, and bran and aleurone, but not between the two fractions. Compared to control, consumption of aleurone or bran led to significantly and substantially higher urinary concentrations of lactate, alanine, N-acetylaspartate acid and N-acetylaspartylglutamate and significantly and substantially lower urinary betaine concentrations at one and two hours postprandially. There were sex related differences in urinary metabolite profiles with generally higher hippurate and citrate and lower betaine in females compared to males. Overall, this postprandial study suggests that acute consumption of bran or aleurone is associated with a number of physiological effects that may impact on energy metabolism and which are consistent with longer term human and animal metabolomic studies that used whole-grain wheat diets or wheat fractions.

  19. Metabolomic approach for improving ethanol stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Erika; Nakayama, Yasumune; Mukai, Yukio; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2016-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for brewing and ethanol production. The ethanol sensitivity of yeast cells is still a serious problem during ethanol fermentation, and a variety of genetic approaches (e.g., random mutant screening under selective pressure of ethanol) have been developed to improve ethanol tolerance. In this study, we developed a strategy for improving ethanol tolerance of yeast cells based on metabolomics as a high-resolution quantitative phenotypic analysis. We performed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify and quantify 36 compounds on 14 mutant strains including knockout strains for transcription factor and metabolic enzyme genes. A strong relation between metabolome of these mutants and their ethanol tolerance was observed. Data mining of the metabolomic analysis showed that several compounds (such as trehalose, valine, inositol and proline) contributed highly to ethanol tolerance. Our approach successfully detected well-known ethanol stress related metabolites such as trehalose and proline thus, to further prove our strategy, we focused on valine and inositol as the most promising target metabolites in our study. Our results show that simultaneous deletion of LEU4 and LEU9 (leading to accumulation of valine) or INM1 and INM2 (leading to reduction of inositol) significantly enhanced ethanol tolerance. This study shows the potential of the metabolomic approach to identify target genes for strain improvement of S. cerevisiae with higher ethanol tolerance.

  20. Image-Based Modeling of Plants and Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Sing Bang

    2009-01-01

    Plants and trees are among the most complex natural objects. Much work has been done attempting to model them, with varying degrees of success. In this book, we review the various approaches in computer graphics, which we categorize as rule-based, image-based, and sketch-based methods. We describe our approaches for modeling plants and trees using images. Image-based approaches have the distinct advantage that the resulting model inherits the realistic shape and complexity of a real plant or tree. We use different techniques for modeling plants (with relatively large leaves) and trees (with re

  1. Identification of Ornamental Plant Functioned as Medicinal Plant Based on Redundant Discrete Wavelet Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human has a duty to preserve the nature. One of the examples is preserving the ornamental plant. Huge economic value of plant trading, escalating esthetical value of one space and medicine efficacy that contained in a plant are some positive values from this plant. However, only few people know about its medicine efficacy. Considering the easiness to obtain and the medicine efficacy, this plant should be an initial treatment of a simple disease or option towards chemical based medicines. In order to let people get acquaint, we need a system that can proper identify this plant. Therefore, we propose to build a system based on Redundant Discrete Wavelet Transformation (RDWT through its leaf. Since its character is translation invariant that able to produce some robust features to identify ornamental plant. This system was successfully resulting 95.83% of correct classification rate.

  2. Fast Visual Modeling for Plant Based on Real Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-feng; ZHU Qing-sheng; CAO Yu-kun; LIU Yin-bin; HE Xi-ping

    2004-01-01

    Structures of natural plants are complex and difficult to model. This paper proposes a fast visual modeling for plants based on a small set of images, and establishes a reasonable plant model.Based on knowledge about growth patterns of the plant, image segmentation and 3D reconstruction are first performed to construct the plant skeleton (trunk and major branches), from which the remainder of the plant grows. Then the system produces the realistic plant model images based on image synthesis and validation. It is unnecessary to acquire the complex structure (such as the complex production rules of L-systems). The method provides a high degree of control over the final shape by image validation,resulting in realistic reconstruction.

  3. Metabolomics-driven nutraceutical evaluation of diverse green tea cultivars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Fujimura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Green tea has various health promotion effects. Although there are numerous tea cultivars, little is known about the differences in their nutraceutical properties. Metabolic profiling techniques can provide information on the relationship between the metabolome and factors such as phenotype or quality. Here, we performed metabolomic analyses to explore the relationship between the metabolome and health-promoting attributes (bioactivity of diverse Japanese green tea cultivars. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of leaf extracts from 43 Japanese green tea cultivars to inhibit thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. This thrombin-induced phosphorylation is a potential hallmark of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Among the tested cultivars, Cha Chuukanbohon Nou-6 (Nou-6 and Sunrouge (SR strongly inhibited MRLC phosphorylation. To evaluate the bioactivity of green tea cultivars using a metabolomics approach, the metabolite profiles of all tea extracts were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Multivariate statistical analyses, principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA, revealed differences among green tea cultivars with respect to their ability to inhibit MRLC phosphorylation. In the SR cultivar, polyphenols were associated with its unique metabolic profile and its bioactivity. In addition, using partial least-squares (PLS regression analysis, we succeeded in constructing a reliable bioactivity-prediction model to predict the inhibitory effect of tea cultivars based on their metabolome. This model was based on certain identified metabolites that were associated with bioactivity. When added to an extract from the non-bioactive cultivar Yabukita, several metabolites enriched in SR were able to transform the extract into a bioactive

  4. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yingrong Chen; Zhihong Ma; Lishan Min; Hongwei Li; Bin Wang; Jing Zhong; Licheng Dai

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top...

  5. Meta-Analysis of Untargeted Metabolomic Data: Combining Results from Multiple Profiling Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Patti, Gary J.; Tautenhahn, Ralf; Siuzdak, Gary

    2012-01-01

    metaXCMS is a software program for the analysis of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomic data that is designed to identify differences in metabolic profiles across multiple sample groups (e.g., “healthy” versus “active disease” versus “inactive disease”). By performing second-order (“meta”) analysis, the software facilitates prioritization of interesting metabolite features from large untargeted metabolomic datasets prior to the rate-limiting step of structural ...

  6. Functional metabolomics reveals novel active products in the DHA metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu eShinohara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous mechanisms for successful resolution of an acute inflammatory response and the local return to homeostasis are of interest because excessive inflammation underlies many human diseases. In this review, we provide an update and overview of functional metabolomics that identified a new bioactive metabolome of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Systematic studies revealed that DHA was converted to DHEA-derived novel bioactive products as well as aspirin-triggered (AT forms of protectins. The new oxygenated DHEA derived products blocked PMN chemotaxis, reduced P-selectin expression and platelet-leukocyte adhesion, and showed organ protection in ischemia/reperfusion injury. These products activated cannabinoid receptor (CB2 receptor and not CB1 receptors. The AT-PD1 reduced neutrophil (PMN recruitment in murine peritonitis. With human cells, AT-PD1 decreased transendothelial PMN migration as well as enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic human PMN by macrophages. The recent findings reviewed here indicate that DHEA oxidative metabolism and aspirin-triggered conversion of DHA produce potent novel molecules with anti-inflammatory and organ-protective properties, opening the DHA metabolome functional roles.

  7. Metabolomics investigation of whey intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan

    interest since it has been shown that it is possible to achieve greater weight loss on a high protein diet as oppose to a high carbohydrate diet. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that specifically milk-derived whey proteins have certain biological properties that might be beneficial in the treatment...... and prevention of the metabolic syndrome related to obesity and diabetes. In this thesis the effects of whey intake on the human metabolome was investigated using a metabolomics approach. We demonstrated that intake of whey causes a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to other protein sources....... This is in contrast to previous findings suggesting that whey is cleared faster than other proteins. Paradoxically, we also find disproportionately elevated levels of some amino acids (AAs) following the whey meal. This suggests that whey affects absorption of AAs in a way independent from, or at least not wholly...

  8. Visualization of Multivariate Metabolomic Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun; CAO Bei; ZHENG Tian; LIU Lin-sheng; GUO Sheng; DUAN Jin-ao; AA Ji-ye; WANG Guang-ji; ZHANG Feng-yi; GU Rong-rong; WANG Xin-wen; ZHAO Chun-yan; LI Meng-jie; SHI Jian

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although principal components analysis profiles greatly facilitate the visualization and interpretation of the multivariate data,the quantitative concepts in both scores plot and loading plot are rather obscure.This article introduced three profiles that assisted the better understanding of metabolomic data.Methods The discriminatory profile,heat map,and statistic profile were developed to visualize the multivariate data obtained from high-throughput GC-TOF-MS analysis.Results The discriminatory profile and heat map obviously showed the discriminatory metabolites between the two groups,while the statistic profile showed the potential markers of statistic significance.Conclusion The three types of profiles greatly facilitate our understanding of the metabolomic data and the identification of the potential markers.

  9. Variable selection in the explorative analysis of several data blocks in metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaman, İbrahim; Nørskov, Natalja; Yde, Christian Clement

    highly correlated data sets in one integrated approach. Due to the high number of variables in data sets from metabolomics (both raw data and after peak picking) the selection of important variables in an explorative analysis is difficult, especially when different data sets of metabolomics data need...... to be related. Tools for the handling of mental overflow minimising false discovery rates both by using statistical and biological validation in an integrative approach are needed. In this paper different strategies for variable selection were considered with respect to false discovery and the possibility...... for biological validation. The data set used in this study is metabolomics data from an animal intervention study. The aim of the metabolomics study was to investigate the metabolic profile in pigs fed various cereal fractions with special attention to the metabolism of lignans using NMR and LC-MS based...

  10. Metabolomics in the Rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Nicole M.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2016-01-01

    The rhizosphere is densely populated with a variety of organisms. Interactions between roots and rhizosphere community members are mostly achieved via chemical communication. Root exudates contain an array of primary and secondary plant metabolites that can attract, deter, or kill belowground ins

  11. Evaluation of extracts of Piper sarmentosum for accelerated stability by metabolomic fingerprint profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Hussain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike pharmaceuticals, precise stability assessment of herbal products is challenging because of their complex nature. A new trend in natural products is that the extract is considered active as a whole whether active constituents are known or not. Hence, the stability of all the constituents must be taken into account, which is possible by analyzing metabolomic fingerprint profiles. Therefore, present study aimed to evaluate ethanol extracts of fruit of Piper sarmentosum, an important medicinal plant, for accelerated stability using metabolomic fingerprint profiling. The extract was exposed to three storage conditions of different temperature and humidity and analyzed at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 months by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC to get metabolomic fingerprints. FTIR fingerprints in combination with chemometrics indicated the changes in metabolomics, stirring with the passage of time at all storage conditions. Visual inspection of HPTLC densitograms revealed metabolomic changes in the extracts stored for 6 months at 60 °C and 85% relative humidity. The results of the study indicate that the products made from this plant ought to be stored at room temperature, below 30 °C and 45% relative humidity, and excessive heating must be avoided during manufacturing process. Moreover, the method may be used by natural product industry as a tool of identification, classification and discrimination (ICD.

  12. Statistical analysis of proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics data using mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Bart

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an overview of computational and statistical design and analysis of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, metabolomics, and lipidomics data. This contributed volume provides an introduction to the special aspects of statistical design and analysis with mass spectrometry data for the new omic sciences. The text discusses common aspects of design and analysis between and across all (or most) forms of mass spectrometry, while also providing special examples of application with the most common forms of mass spectrometry. Also covered are applications of computational mass spectrometry not only in clinical study but also in the interpretation of omics data in plant biology studies. Omics research fields are expected to revolutionize biomolecular research by the ability to simultaneously profile many compounds within either patient blood, urine, tissue, or other biological samples. Mass spectrometry is one of the key analytical techniques used in these new omic sciences. Liquid chromatography mass ...

  13. Integrated pathway-based and network-based analysis of GC-MS rice metabolomics data under diazinon stress to infer affected biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Vahideh; Ghanati, Faezeh; Ghassempour, Alireza

    2016-02-01

    Diazinon insecticide is widely applied in rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in Iran. However, concerns are now being raised about its potential adverse impacts on rice. In this study, a time-course metabolic change in rice plants was investigated after diazinon treatment using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and subsequently three different methods, MetaboAnalyst, MetaboNetwork, and analysis of reporter reactions, as a potential multivariate method were used to find the underlying changes in metabolism with stronger evidence in order to link differentially expressed metabolites to biological pathways. Results clearly showed the similarity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of rice plants to that of animals in terms of its inhibitability by diazinon and emphasized that subsequent accumulation of AChE mainly affects the metabolism of osmolites and tricarboxylic acid intermediates subsequent accumulation of ACh mainly affects the metabolism of osmolites and TCA intermediates.

  14. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cseke Leland J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. Results We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. Conclusions The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  15. Comparative Metabolome Profile between Tobacco and Soybean Grown under Water-Stressed Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Rushton, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how plants respond to water deficit is important in order to develop crops tolerant to drought. In this study, we compare two large metabolomics datasets where we employed a nontargeted metabolomics approach to elucidate metabolic pathways perturbed by progressive dehydration in tobacco and soybean plants. The two datasets were created using the same strategy to create water deficit conditions and an identical metabolomics pipeline. Comparisons between the two datasets therefore reveal common responses between the two species, responses specific to one of the species, responses that occur in both root and leaf tissues, and responses that are specific to one tissue. Stomatal closure is the immediate response of the plant and this did not coincide with accumulation of abscisic acid. A total of 116 and 140 metabolites were observed in tobacco leaves and roots, respectively, while 241 and 207 were observed in soybean leaves and roots, respectively. Accumulation of metabolites is significantly correlated with the extent of dehydration in both species. Among the metabolites that show increases that are restricted to just one plant, 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid (KHG) in tobacco roots and coumestrol in soybean roots show the highest tissue-specific accumulation. The comparisons of these two large nontargeted metabolomics datasets provide novel information and suggest that KHG will be a useful marker for drought stress for some members of Solanaceae and coumestrol for some legume species.

  16. Comparative Metabolome Profile between Tobacco and Soybean Grown under Water-Stressed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel C. Rabara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how plants respond to water deficit is important in order to develop crops tolerant to drought. In this study, we compare two large metabolomics datasets where we employed a nontargeted metabolomics approach to elucidate metabolic pathways perturbed by progressive dehydration in tobacco and soybean plants. The two datasets were created using the same strategy to create water deficit conditions and an identical metabolomics pipeline. Comparisons between the two datasets therefore reveal common responses between the two species, responses specific to one of the species, responses that occur in both root and leaf tissues, and responses that are specific to one tissue. Stomatal closure is the immediate response of the plant and this did not coincide with accumulation of abscisic acid. A total of 116 and 140 metabolites were observed in tobacco leaves and roots, respectively, while 241 and 207 were observed in soybean leaves and roots, respectively. Accumulation of metabolites is significantly correlated with the extent of dehydration in both species. Among the metabolites that show increases that are restricted to just one plant, 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutaric acid (KHG in tobacco roots and coumestrol in soybean roots show the highest tissue-specific accumulation. The comparisons of these two large nontargeted metabolomics datasets provide novel information and suggest that KHG will be a useful marker for drought stress for some members of Solanaceae and coumestrol for some legume species.

  17. 76 FR 65165 - Importation of Plants for Planting; Risk-Based Sampling and Inspection Approach and Propagative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... plant part) for or capable of propagation, including a tree, a tissue culture, a plantlet culture... articles (other than seeds, bulbs, or sterile cultures of orchid plants) from any country or locality... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Importation of Plants for Planting; Risk-Based Sampling...

  18. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-03-24

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools.

  19. Mass spectrometry for high-throughput metabolomics analysis of urine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrazig, Salah M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (direct ESI-MS), by omitting the chromatographic step, has great potential for application as a high-throughput approach for untargeted urine metabolomics analysis compared to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The rapid development and technical innovations revealed in the field of ambient ionisation MS such as nanoelectrospray ionisation (nanoESI) chip-based infusion and liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA...

  20. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Alterations in Mouse Plasma and Liver in Response to Fava Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Man; Du, Guankui; Zhong, Guobing; Yan, Dongjing; Zeng, Huazong; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-01-01

    Favism is a life-threatening hemolytic anemia resulting from the intake of fava beans by susceptible individuals with low erythrocytic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity. However, little is known about the metabolomic changes in plasma and liver after the intake of fava beans in G6PD normal and deficient states. In this study, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to analyze the plasma and liver metabolic alterations underlying the effects of fava beans in C3H- and G6PD-deficient (G6PDx) mice, and to find potential biomarkers and metabolic changes associated with favism. Our results showed that fava beans induced oxidative stress in both C3H and G6PDx mice. Significantly, metabolomic differences were observed in plasma and liver between the control and fava bean treated groups of both C3H and G6PDx mice. The levels of 7 and 21 metabolites in plasma showed significant differences between C3H-control (C3H-C)- and C3H fava beans-treated (C3H-FB) mice, and G6PDx-control (G6PDx-C)- and G6PDx fava beans-treated (G6PDx-FB) mice, respectively. Similarly, the levels of 7 and 25 metabolites in the liver showed significant differences between C3H and C3H-FB, and G6PDx and G6PDx-FB, respectively. The levels of oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine were significantly increased in the plasma of both C3H-FB and G6PDx-FB mice. In the liver, more metabolic alterations were observed in G6PDx-FB mice than in C3H-FB mice, and were involved in a sugar, fatty acids, amino acids, cholesterol biosynthesis, the urea cycle, and the nucleotide metabolic pathway. These findings suggest that oleic acid, linoleic acid, and creatinine may be potential biomarkers of the response to fava beans in C3H and G6PDx mice and therefore that oleic acid and linoleic acid may be involved in oxidative stress induced by fava beans. This study demonstrates that G6PD activity in mice can affect their metabolic pathways in response to fava beans.

  1. Use of Rhizosphere Metabolomics to Investigate Exudation of Phenolics by Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jian; Rai, Amit; Reuben, Sheela; Nesati, Victor; Almeida, Reinaldo; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    and anthocyanin metabolites. We describe here the metabolites present in the root exudates using high resolution accurate mass (HRAM) metabolomics approach. Using this approach, biased rhizosphere for another class of PGPR strains can now be created. In this case, lignin- and anthocyanin- utilizing strains will be selectively preferred. We have set up a platform to perform metabolomics of exudates at the root surface. This has allowed us to use the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) system using a Thermo Velos Pro Orbitrap-MS to identify differences in exudate profiles along the root system of Arabidopsis. This platform enables direct sampling and measurement from plant roots grown aeroponically. As the metabolites are extracted from root surface and directly injected into the mass spectrometer, there is minimal loss of sample in this process. This method will now allow us to further dissect rhizosphere properties from places such as young root apex, as well as from the more mature base of roots. Taken together, these resources of altered rhizosphere, nutrient utilization pathways in microbes and surface analysis technology will help in extending our understanding of the processes in the plant rhizosphere.

  2. Proteomics and Metabolomics of Arabidopsis Responses to Perturbation of Glucosinolate Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-zhou Chen; Qiu-Ying Pang; Yan He; Ning Zhu; Isabel Branstrom; Xiu-Feng Yan; Sixue Chen

    2012-01-01

    To understand plant molecular networks of glucosinolate metabolism,perturbation of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was established using inducible RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis.Two RNAi lines were chosen for examining global protein and metabolite changes using complementary proteomics and metabolomics approaches.Proteins involved in metabolism including photosynthesis and hormone metabolism,protein binding,energy,stress,and defense showed marked responses to glucosinolate perturbation.In parallel,metabolomics revealed major changes in the levels of amino acids,carbohydrates,peptides,and hormones.The metabolomics data were correlated with the proteomics results and revealed intimate molecular connections between cellular pathways/processes and glucosinolate metabolism.This study has provided an unprecedented view of the molecular networks of glucosinolate metabolism and laid a foundation towards rationale glucosinolate engineering for enhanced defense and quality.

  3. Automated production of plant-based vaccines and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Holger; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F; Briggs, John; Sharpe, Aaron; Shu, Sudong; Sharon, Andre

    2012-12-01

    A fully automated "factory" was developed that uses tobacco plants to produce large quantities of vaccines and other therapeutic biologics within weeks. This first-of-a-kind factory takes advantage of a plant viral vector technology to produce specific proteins within the leaves of rapidly growing plant biomass. The factory's custom-designed robotic machines plant seeds, nurture the growing plants, introduce a viral vector that directs the plant to produce a target protein, and harvest the biomass once the target protein has accumulated in the plants-all in compliance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines (e.g., current Good Manufacturing Practices). The factory was designed to be time, cost, and space efficient. The plants are grown in custom multiplant trays. Robots ride up and down a track, servicing the plants and delivering the trays from the lighted, irrigated growth modules to each processing station as needed. Using preprogrammed robots and processing equipment eliminates the need for human contact, preventing potential contamination of the process and economizing the operation. To quickly produce large quantities of protein-based medicines, we transformed a laboratory-based biological process and scaled it into an industrial process. This enables quick, safe, and cost-effective vaccine production that would be required in case of a pandemic.

  4. 1H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Metabolomic Assessment of Uremic Toxicity, with Toxicological Outcomes, in Male Rats Following an Acute, Mid-Life Insult from Ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Shockcor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Overt response to a single 6.25 mg dose of ochratoxin A (OTA by oral gavage to 15 months male rats was progressive loss of weight during the following four days. Lost weight was restored within one month and animals had a normal life-span without OTA-related terminal disease. Decline in plasma OTA concentration only commenced four days after dosing, while urinary excretion of OTA and ochratoxin alpha was ongoing. During a temporary period of acute polyuria, a linear relationship between urine output and creatinine concentration persisted. Elimination of other common urinary solutes relative to creatinine was generally maintained during the polyuria phase, except that phosphate excretion increased temporarily. 1H NMR metabolomic analysis of urine revealed a progressive cyclic shift in the group principal components data cluster from before dosing, throughout the acute insult phase, and returning almost completely to normality when tested six months later. Renal insult by OTA was detected by 1H NMR within a day of dosing, as the most sensitive early indicator. Notable biomarkers were trimethylamine N-oxide and an aromatic urinary profile dominated by phenylacetylglycine. Tolerance of such a large acute insult by OTA, assessed by rat natural lifetime outcomes, adds a new dimension to toxicology of this xenobiotic.

  5. Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Comparison of Liver Grafts from Donors after Circulatory Death (DCD) and Donors after Brain Death (DBD) Used in Human Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrydziuszko, Olga; Perera, M Thamara P R; Laing, Richard; Kirwan, Jennifer; Silva, Michael A; Richards, Douglas A; Murphy, Nick; Mirza, Darius F; Viant, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Use of marginal liver grafts, especially those from donors after circulatory death (DCD), has been considered as a solution to organ shortage. Inferior outcomes have been attributed to donor warm ischaemic damage in these DCD organs. Here we sought to profile the metabolic mechanisms underpinning donor warm ischaemia. Non-targeted Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry metabolomics was applied to biopsies of liver grafts from donors after brain death (DBD; n = 27) and DCD (n = 10), both during static cold storage (T1) as well as post-reperfusion (T2). Furthermore 6 biopsies from DBD donors prior to the organ donation (T0) were also profiled. Considering DBD and DCD together, significant metabolic differences were discovered between T1 and T2 (688 peaks) that were primarily related to amino acid metabolism, meanwhile T0 biopsies grouped together with T2, denoting the distinctively different metabolic activity of the perfused state. Major metabolic differences were discovered between DCD and DBD during cold-phase (T1) primarily related to glucose, tryptophan and kynurenine metabolism, and in the post-reperfusion phase (T2) related to amino acid and glutathione metabolism. We propose tryptophan/kynurenine and S-adenosylmethionine as possible biomarkers for the previously established higher graft failure of DCD livers, and conclude that the associated pathways should be targeted in more exhaustive and quantitative investigations.

  6. Mass Spectrometry Based Metabolomics Comparison of Liver Grafts from Donors after Circulatory Death (DCD) and Donors after Brain Death (DBD) Used in Human Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Richard; Kirwan, Jennifer; Silva, Michael A.; Richards, Douglas A.; Murphy, Nick; Mirza, Darius F.; Viant, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Use of marginal liver grafts, especially those from donors after circulatory death (DCD), has been considered as a solution to organ shortage. Inferior outcomes have been attributed to donor warm ischaemic damage in these DCD organs. Here we sought to profile the metabolic mechanisms underpinning donor warm ischaemia. Non-targeted Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry metabolomics was applied to biopsies of liver grafts from donors after brain death (DBD; n = 27) and DCD (n = 10), both during static cold storage (T1) as well as post-reperfusion (T2). Furthermore 6 biopsies from DBD donors prior to the organ donation (T0) were also profiled. Considering DBD and DCD together, significant metabolic differences were discovered between T1 and T2 (688 peaks) that were primarily related to amino acid metabolism, meanwhile T0 biopsies grouped together with T2, denoting the distinctively different metabolic activity of the perfused state. Major metabolic differences were discovered between DCD and DBD during cold-phase (T1) primarily related to glucose, tryptophan and kynurenine metabolism, and in the post-reperfusion phase (T2) related to amino acid and glutathione metabolism. We propose tryptophan/kynurenine and S-adenosylmethionine as possible biomarkers for the previously established higher graft failure of DCD livers, and conclude that the associated pathways should be targeted in more exhaustive and quantitative investigations. PMID:27835640

  7. RNA-Seq-based transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis reveal stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yachen; Hu, Jingjin; Fan, Linlin; Chen, Qihe

    2017-01-01

    As a typical harmful inhibitor in cellulosic hydrolyzates, acetic acid not only hinders bioethanol production, but also induces cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Herein, we conducted both transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses to investigate the global responses under acetic acid stress at different stages. There were 295 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated genes identified at more than two time points during acetic acid treatment (150 mM, pH 3.0). These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were mainly involved in intracellular homeostasis, central metabolic pathway, transcription regulation, protein folding and stabilization, ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolic process, vesicle-mediated transport, protein synthesis, MAPK signaling pathways, cell cycle, programmed cell death, etc. The interaction network of all identified DEGs was constructed to speculate the potential regulatory genes and dominant pathways in response to acetic acid. The transcriptional changes were confirmed by metabolic profiles and phenotypic analysis. Acetic acid resulted in severe acidification in both cytosol and mitochondria, which was different from the effect of extracellular pH. Additionally, the imbalance of intracellular acetylation was shown to aggravate cell death under this stress. Overall, this work provides a novel and comprehensive understanding of stress responses and programmed cell death induced by acetic acid in yeast. PMID:28209995

  8. Selection of candidate radiation biomarkers in the serum of rats exposed to gamma-rays by GC/TOFMS-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiang; Wang, Zhidong; Zhang, Xueqing; Qiao, Yulei; Wu, Shengming; Dong, Fangting; Chen, Ying

    2013-04-01

    In the study, gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOFMS) techniques coupled with principal components analysis (PCA) were used to investigate metabolite perturbations in the serum of the rats exposed to 0.75, 3 or 8 Gy gamma rays. Male standard deviation rats were gamma-irradiated at doses of 0.75, 3 and 8 Gy (1.9 Gy min(-1)) or sham-irradiated. Serum samples were collected over the first 24 h under the exposure to irradiation in order to analyse the samples by GC/TOFMS. And multivariate data were analysed by PCA. The composition of metabolites in serum yielded distinct metabolomic phenotypes for 0.75, 3 and 8 Gy at 24 h after irradiation. Nine serum metabolites were significantly altered as a result of radiation exposure. Up-regulated metabolites included inositol, serine, lysine, glycine, threonine and glycerol; down-regulated metabolites included isocitrate, gluconic acid and stearic acid. The nine metabolites were significantly altered after ionising radiation for they may be the potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of radiation injury.

  9. Metabolic Effects of the pksCT Gene on Monascus aurantiacus Li As3.4384 Using Gas Chromatography--Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhibing; Zhang, Shuyun; Xu, Yang; Li, Laisheng; Li, Yanping

    2016-02-24

    Monascus spp. have been used for the production of natural pigments and bioactive compounds in China for several centuries. Monascus can also produce the mycotoxin citrinin, restricting its use. Disruption of the pksCT gene in Monascus aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 reduces citrinin production capacity of this strain (Monascus PHDS26) by over 98%. However, it is unclear how other metabolites of M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 (the wild-type strain) are affected by the pksCT gene. Here, we used metabolomic analyses to compare red yeast rice (RYR) metabolite profiles of the wild-type strain and Monascus PHDS26 at different stages of solid-state fermentation. A total of 18 metabolites forming components within the glycolysis, acetyl-CoA, amino acid, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolic processes were found to be altered between the wild-type strain and Monascus PHDS26 at different stages of solid-state fermentation. Thus, these findings provide important insights into the metabolic pathways affected by the pksCT gene in M. aurantiacus.

  10. Reconstruction of Insulin Signal Flow from Phosphoproteome and Metabolome Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Yugi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is regulated by signals through multiple molecular networks that include protein phosphorylation and metabolites. However, where and when the signal flows through a network and regulates homeostasis has not been explored. We have developed a reconstruction method for the signal flow based on time-course phosphoproteome and metabolome data, using multiple databases, and have applied it to acute action of insulin, an important hormone for metabolic homeostasis. An insulin signal flows through a network, through signaling pathways that involve 13 protein kinases, 26 phosphorylated metabolic enzymes, and 35 allosteric effectors, resulting in quantitative changes in 44 metabolites. Analysis of the network reveals that insulin induces phosphorylation and activation of liver-type phosphofructokinase 1, thereby controlling a key reaction in glycolysis. We thus provide a versatile method of reconstruction of signal flow through the network using phosphoproteome and metabolome data.

  11. Metabolomic analysis of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darghouth, D; Koehl, B; Junot, C; Roméo, P-H

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic signatures of specialized circulating hematopoietic cells in physiological or human hematological diseases start to be described. We use a simple and highly reproductive extraction method of erythrocytes metabolites coupled with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolites profiling method to determine metabolomes of normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. Sickle cell erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes metabolomes display major differences in glycolysis, in glutathione, in ascorbate metabolisms and in metabolites associated to membranes turnover. In addition, the amounts of metabolites derived from urea cycle and NO metabolism that partly take place within erythrocyte were different between normal and sickle cell erythrocytes. These results show that metabolic profiling of red blood cell diseases can now be determined and might indicate new biomarkers that can be used for the follow-up of sickle cell patients.

  12. Cyclotron-based effects on plant gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E.; Sobol, M.; Kalinina, Ia.; Bogatina, N.; Kondrachuk, A.

    Primary roots exhibit positive gravitropism and grow in the direction of the gravitational vector, while shoots respond negatively and grow opposite to the gravitational vector. We first demonstrated that the use of a weak combined magnetic field (CMF), which is comprised of a permanent magnetic field and an alternating magnetic field with the frequency resonance of the cyclotron frequency of calcium ions, can change root gravitropism from a positive direction to negative direction. Two-day-old cress seedlings were gravistimulated in a chamber that was placed into a μ-metal shield where this CMF was created. Using this "new model" of a root gravitropic response, we have studied some of its components including the movement of amyloplasts-statoliths in root cap statocytes and the distribution of Ca 2+ ions in the distal elongation zone during gravistimulation. Unlike results from the control, amyloplasts did not sediment in the distal part of a statocyte, and more Ca 2+ accumulation was observed in the upper side of a gravistimulated root for seedlings treated with the CMF. For plants treated with the CMF, it appears that a root gravitropic reaction occurs by a normal physiological process resulting in root bending although in the opposite direction. These results support the hypothesis that both the amyloplasts in the root cap statocytes and calcium are important signaling components in plant gravitropism.

  13. Color and Edge Histograms Based Medicinal Plants' Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj S. Anami

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a methodology for color and edge histogram based medicinal plants image retrieval. The medicinal plants are divided into herbs, shrubs and trees. The medicinal plants are used in ayurvedic medicines. Manual identification of medicinal plants requires a priori knowledge. Automatic recognition of medicinal plants is useful. We have considered medicinal plant species, such as Papaya, Neem, Tulasi and Aloevera are considered for identification and retrieval. The color histograms are obtained in RGB, HSV and YCbCr color spaces. The number of valleys and peaks in the color histograms are used as features. But, these features alone are not helpful in discriminating plant images, since majority plant images are green in color. We have used edge and edge direction histograms in the work to get edges in the stem and leafy parts. Finally, these features are used in retrieval of medicinal plant images. Absolute distance, Euclidean distance and mean square error, similarity distance measures are deployed in the work. The results show an average retrieval efficiency of 94% and 98% for edge and edge direction features respectively.

  14. Metal-based nanotoxicity and detoxification pathways in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuanxin; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-06-16

    The potential risks from metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) in the environment have increased with the rapidly rising demand for and use of nanoenabled consumer products. Plant's central roles in ecosystem function and food chain integrity ensure intimate contact with water and soil systems, both of which are considered sinks for NPs accumulation. In this review, we document phytotoxicity caused by metal-based NPs exposure at physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels. Although the exact mechanisms of plant defense against nanotoxicity are unclear, several relevant studies have been recently published. Possible detoxification pathways that might enable plant resistance to oxidative stress and facilitate NPs detoxification are reviewed herein. Given the importance of understanding the effects and implications of metal-based NPs on plants, future research should focus on the following: (1) addressing key knowledge gaps in understanding molecular and biochemical responses of plants to NPs stress through global transcriptome, proteome, and metablome assays; (2) designing long-term experiments under field conditions at realistic exposure concentrations to investigate the impact of metal-based NPs on edible crops and the resulting implications to the food chain and to human health; and (3) establishing an impact assessment to evaluate the effects of metal-based NPs on plants with regard to ecosystem structure and function.

  15. Possible Future SOFC - ST Based Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Scappin, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid systems consisting Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) on the top of a Steam Turbine (ST) are investigated. The plants are fired by natural gas. A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the NG while a pre-reformer break down the heavier hydrocarbons. The pre-treated fuel enters...... then into the anode side of the SOFC. The gases from the SOFC stacks enter into a burner to burn the rest of the fuel. The off-gases now enter into a heat recovery steam generator to produce steam for a Rankine cycle. Different system setups are considered. Cyclic efficiencies up to 67% are achieved which...... is considerably more than the conventional combined cycles (CC). Both ASR (Adiabatic Steam Reformer) and CPO (Catalytic Partial Oxidation) fuel reformer reactors are considered in this study....

  16. Antihypertensive Properties of Plant-Based Prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tze Liong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although various drugs for its treatment have been synthesized, the occurring side effects have generated the need for natural interventions for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. Dietary intervention such as the administration of prebiotics has been seen as a highly acceptable approach. Prebiotics are indigestible food ingredients that bypass digestion and reach the lower gut as substrates for indigenous microflora. Most of the prebiotics used as food adjuncts, such as inulin, fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and gums, are derived from plants. Experimental evidence from recent studies has suggested that prebiotics are capable of reducing and preventing hypertension. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms involved, the evidence generated from both in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials and some controversial findings that are raised.

  17. Antihypertensive properties of plant-based prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Siok-Koon; Ooi, Lay-Gaik; Lim, Ting-Jin; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-08-10

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although various drugs for its treatment have been synthesized, the occurring side effects have generated the need for natural interventions for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. Dietary intervention such as the administration of prebiotics has been seen as a highly acceptable approach. Prebiotics are indigestible food ingredients that bypass digestion and reach the lower gut as substrates for indigenous microflora. Most of the prebiotics used as food adjuncts, such as inulin, fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and gums, are derived from plants. Experimental evidence from recent studies has suggested that prebiotics are capable of reducing and preventing hypertension. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms involved, the evidence generated from both in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials and some controversial findings that are raised.

  18. Effects of a flavonoid-rich juice on inflammation, oxidative stress, and immunity in elite swimmers: a metabolomics-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Amy M; Nieman, David C; Gillitt, Nicholas D; Shanely, R Andrew; Cialdella-Kam, Lynn; Henson, Dru A; Sha, Wei

    2013-04-01

    The effects of a flavonoid-rich fresh fruit and vegetable juice (JUICE) on chronic resting and postexercise inflammation, oxidative stress, immune function, and metabolic profiles (metabolomics analysis, gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry platform) in elite sprint and middle-distance swimmers were studied. In a randomized, crossover design with a 3-wk washout period, swimmers (n = 9) completed 10-d training with or without 16 fl oz of JUICE (230 mg flavonoids) ingested pre- and postworkout. Blood samples were taken presupplementation, post-10-d supplementation, and immediately postexercise, with data analyzed using a 2 × 3 repeated-measures ANOVA. Prestudy blood samples were also acquired from nonathletic controls (n = 7, age- and weight-matched) and revealed higher levels of oxidative stress in the swimmers, no differences in inflammation or immune function, and a distinct separation in global metabolic scores (R2Y [cum] = .971). Swim workouts consisted of high-intensity intervals (1:1, 1:2 swim-to-rest ratio) and induced little inflammation, oxidative stress, or immune changes. A distinct separation in global metabolic scores was found pre- to postexercise (R2Y [cum] = .976), with shifts detected in a small number of metabolites related to substrate utilization. No effect of 10-d JUICE was found on chronic resting levels or postexercise inflammation, oxidative stress, immune function, and shifts in metabolites. In conclusion, sprint and middle-distance swimmers had a slight chronic elevation in oxidative stress compared with nonathletic controls, experienced a low magnitude of postworkout perturbations in the biomarkers included in this study, and received no apparent benefit other than added nutrient intake from ingesting JUICE pre- and postworkout for 10 days.

  19. Amino Acid and Biogenic Amine Profile Deviations in an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Comparison between Healthy and Hyperlipidaemia Individuals Based on Targeted Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Gu, Wenbo; Ma, Xuan; Liu, Yuxin; Jiang, Lidan; Feng, Rennan; Liu, Liyan

    2016-06-21

    Hyperlipidemia (HLP) is characterized by a disturbance in lipid metabolism and is a primary risk factor for the development of insulin resistance (IR) and a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the changes in postprandial amino acid and biogenic amine profiles provoked by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in HLP patients using targeted metabolomics. We used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze the serum amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of 35 control and 35 HLP subjects during an OGTT. The amino acid and biogenic amine profiles from 30 HLP subjects were detected as independent samples to validate the changes in the metabolites. There were differences in the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles between the HLP individuals and the healthy controls at baseline and after the OGTT. The per cent changes of 13 metabolites from fasting to the 2 h samples during the OGTT in the HLP patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls. The lipid parameters were associated with the changes in valine, isoleucine, creatine, creatinine, dimethylglycine, asparagine, serine, and tyrosine (all p < 0.05) during the OGTT in the HLP group. The postprandial changes in isoleucine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during the OGTT were positively associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; all p < 0.05) in the HLP group. Elevated oxidative stress and disordered energy metabolism during OGTTs are important characteristics of metabolic perturbations in HLP. Our findings offer new insights into the complex physiological regulation of metabolism during the OGTT in HLP.

  20. Multi-well fungal co-culture for de novo metabolite-induction in time-series studies based on untargeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Samuel; Azzollini, Antonio; Schumpp, Olivier; Bohni, Nadine; Schrenzel, Jacques; Monod, Michel; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2014-07-29

    The induction of fungal metabolites by fungal co-cultures grown on solid media was explored using multi-well co-cultures in 2 cm diameter Petri dishes. Fungi were grown in 12-well plates to easily and rapidly obtain the large number of replicates necessary for employing metabolomic approaches. Fungal culture using such a format accelerated the production of metabolites by several weeks compared with using the large-format 9 cm Petri dishes. This strategy was applied to a co-culture of a Fusarium and an Aspergillus strain. The metabolite composition of the cultures was assessed using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation and time-of-flight mass spectrometry, followed by automated data mining. The de novo production of metabolites was dramatically increased by nutriment reduction. A time-series study of the induction of the fungal metabolites of interest over nine days revealed that they exhibited various induction patterns. The concentrations of most of the de novo induced metabolites increased over time. However, interesting patterns were observed, such as with the presence of some compounds only at certain time points. This result indicates the complexity and dynamic nature of fungal metabolism. The large-scale production of the compounds of interest was verified by co-culture in 15 cm Petri dishes; most of the induced metabolites of interest (16/18) were found to be produced as effectively as on a small scale, although not in the same time frames. Large-scale production is a practical solution for the future production, identification and biological evaluation of these metabolites.

  1. Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

  2. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, L-citrulline, L-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases.

  3. An exome array study of the plasma metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Eugene P.; Yang, Qiong; Yu, Bing; Liu, Xuan; Cheng, Susan; Deik, Amy; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bullock, Kevin; Ho, Jennifer E.; Levy, Daniel; Florez, Jose C.; Kathiresan, Sek; Larson, Martin G.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Clish, Clary B.; Wang, Thomas J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Gerszten, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The study of rare variants may enhance our understanding of the genetic determinants of the metabolome. Here, we analyze the association between 217 plasma metabolites and exome variants on the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip in 2,076 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, with replication in 1,528 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. We identify an association between GMPS and xanthosine using single variant analysis and associations between HAL and histidine, PAH and phenylalanine, and UPB1 and ureidopropionate using gene-based tests (P<5 × 10−8 in meta-analysis), highlighting novel coding variants that may underlie inborn errors of metabolism. Further, we show how an examination of variants across the spectrum of allele frequency highlights independent association signals at select loci and generates a more integrated view of metabolite heritability. These studies build on prior metabolomics genome wide association studies to provide a more complete picture of the genetic architecture of the plasma metabolome. PMID:27453504

  4. Neonatal Metabolomic Profiles Related to Prenatal Arsenic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Jessica E; Bailey, Kathryn A; Olshan, Andrew F; Smeester, Lisa; Drobná, Zuzana; Stýblo, Miroslav; Douillet, Christelle; García-Vargas, Gonzalo; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela; Pathmasiri, Wimal; McRitchie, Susan; Sumner, Susan J; Fry, Rebecca C

    2017-01-03

    Prenatal inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure is associated with health effects evident at birth and later in life. An understanding of the relationship between prenatal iAs exposure and alterations in the neonatal metabolome could reveal critical molecular modifications, potentially underpinning disease etiologies. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based metabolomic analysis was used to identify metabolites in neonate cord serum associated with prenatal iAs exposure in participants from the Biomarkers of Exposure to ARsenic (BEAR) pregnancy cohort, in Gómez Palacio, Mexico. Through multivariable linear regression, ten cord serum metabolites were identified as significantly associated with total urinary iAs and/or iAs metabolites, measured as %iAs, %monomethylated arsenicals (MMAs), and %dimethylated arsenicals (DMAs). A total of 17 metabolites were identified as significantly associated with total iAs and/or iAs metabolites in cord serum. These metabolites are indicative of changes in important biochemical pathways such as vitamin metabolism, the citric acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. These data highlight that maternal biotransformation of iAs and neonatal levels of iAs and its metabolites are associated with differences in neonate cord metabolomic profiles. The results demonstrate the potential utility of metabolites as biomarkers/indicators of in utero environmental exposure.

  5. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Hajduk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18 and a matched control group (n = 13. The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44% and specificity (84.62%, as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32% calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases.

  6. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  7. OPTIMAS-DW: A comprehensive transcriptomics, metabolomics, ionomics, proteomics and phenomics data resource for maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colmsee Christian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maize is a major crop plant, grown for human and animal nutrition, as well as a renewable resource for bioenergy. When looking at the problems of limited fossil fuels, the growth of the world’s population or the world’s climate change, it is important to find ways to increase the yield and biomass of maize and to study how it reacts to specific abiotic and biotic stress situations. Within the OPTIMAS systems biology project maize plants were grown under a large set of controlled stress conditions, phenotypically characterised and plant material was harvested to analyse the effect of specific environmental conditions or developmental stages. Transcriptomic, metabolomic, ionomic and proteomic parameters were measured from the same plant material allowing the comparison of results across different omics domains. A data warehouse was developed to store experimental data as well as analysis results of the performed experiments. Description The OPTIMAS Data Warehouse (OPTIMAS-DW is a comprehensive data collection for maize and integrates data from different data domains such as transcriptomics, metabolomics, ionomics, proteomics and phenomics. Within the OPTIMAS project, a 44K oligo chip was designed and annotated to describe the functions of the selected unigenes. Several treatment- and plant growth stage experiments were performed and measured data were filled into data templates and imported into the data warehouse by a Java based import tool. A web interface allows users to browse through all stored experiment data in OPTIMAS-DW including all data domains. Furthermore, the user can filter the data to extract information of particular interest. All data can be exported into different file formats for further data analysis and visualisation. The data analysis integrates data from different data domains and enables the user to find answers to different systems biology questions. Finally, maize specific pathway information is

  8. Annual Plant Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    analysing other organisms. This volume aims to highlight the ways in which proteome analysis has been used to probe the complexities of plant biochemistry and physiology. It is aimed at researchers in plant biochemistry, genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics who wish to gain an up-to-date insight...

  9. Development of quantitative metabolomics for Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnicer,, M.; Canelas, A.B.; Ten Pierick, A.; Zeng, Z.; Van Dam, J.; Albiol, J.; Ferrer, P.; Heijnen, J.J.; Van Gulik, W.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and reproducible measurement of intracellular metabolite levels has become important for metabolic studies of microbial cell factories. A first critical step for metabolomic studies is the establishment of an adequate quenching and washing protocol, which ensures effective arrest

  10. Metabolomics application in maternal-fetal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanos, Vassilios; Atzori, Luigi; Makarenko, Karina; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics in maternal-fetal medicine is still an "embryonic" science. However, there is already an increasing interest in metabolome of normal and complicated pregnancies, and neonatal outcomes. Tissues used for metabolomics interrogations of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns are amniotic fluid, blood, plasma, cord blood, placenta, urine, and vaginal secretions. All published papers highlight the strong correlation between biomarkers found in these tissues and fetal malformations, preterm delivery, premature rupture of membranes, gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, neonatal asphyxia, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to summarize and comment on original data available in relevant published works in order to emphasize the clinical potential of metabolomics in obstetrics in the immediate future.

  11. Using metabolomics to evaluate food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manach, Claudine; Brennan, Lorraine; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2015-01-01

    Improving dietary assessment is essential for modern nutritional epidemiology. This chapter discusses the potential of metabolomics for the identification of new biomarkers of intake and presents the first candidate biomarkers discovered using this approach. It then describes the challenges that ...

  12. MEASURING VARIABILITY SOURCES IN NMR METABOLOMIC STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    Rozet, Eric; de Tullio, Pascal; Hubert, Philippe; Govaerts., B.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the huge amount of information available in NMR spectra obtained from the analysis of metabolomic experiments, multivariate analysis such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are required to understand the influence of treatments over the metabolites [1]. However, many experiments in metabolomics studies have more complexes variability structures than simply comparing several treatments: they may include time effects, biological effects such as diet or hormonal status, and other bloc...

  13. ECMDB: the E. coli Metabolome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, An Chi; Jewison, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Liu, Yifeng; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Lo, Patrick; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Wishart, David S

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Metabolome Database (ECMDB, http://www.ecmdb.ca) is a comprehensively annotated metabolomic database containing detailed information about the metabolome of E. coli (K-12). Modelled closely on the Human and Yeast Metabolome Databases, the ECMDB contains >2600 metabolites with links to ∼1500 different genes and proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in the ECMDB has been collected from dozens of textbooks, journal articles and electronic databases. Each metabolite entry in the ECMDB contains an average of 75 separate data fields, including comprehensive compound descriptions, names and synonyms, chemical taxonomy, compound structural and physicochemical data, bacterial growth conditions and substrates, reactions, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data and numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. The ECMDB also includes an extensive collection of intracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from our own work as well as other published metabolomic studies. This information is further supplemented with thousands of fully assigned reference nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry spectra obtained from pure E. coli metabolites that we (and others) have collected. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of E. coli's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers but also to molecular biologists, systems biologists and individuals in the biotechnology industry.

  14. Discrimination of Three Panax Species Based on Differences in Volatile Organic Compounds Using a Static Headspace GC-MS-Based Metabolomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi-Tao; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng (Asian ginseng), Panax quinquefolium (American ginseng) and Panax notoginseng (notoginseng) are highly valuable tonic herbs derived from the Panax genus that have similar morphological appearances and odors but different pharmacological activities and clinical indications. Thus, the authentication of these three Panax species is crucial for ensuring the quality, safety and efficacy of medication. In the present study, a static headspace gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) followed by a multivariate statistical analysis was developed to globally characterize the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles in P. ginseng, P. quinquefolium, and P. notoginseng, and subsequently to discover differentiating chemical markers. Under the optimized conditions, the headspace VOCs of a total of 49 batches of Panax herbs derived from the three Panax species were profiled, and the dataset of sample code, [Formula: see text]-m/z pair and ion intensity was processed by unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) and by supervised partial least squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to comprehensively compare the chemical differences in Panax across the species. The results demonstrated that Panax herbs derived from three species possess obviously diverse chemical characteristics of VOCs, PCA, and PLS-DA. According to their VOC profiles, 49 tested samples could be clearly differentiated according to species. Chemomarker 1, 2, and 4 might be used as unique chemical markers of P. ginseng, P. notoginseng and P. quinquefolium, respectively. Our findings indicate that static headspace GC-MS-based VOC profiling, combined with multivariate statistical analysis, provide a reliable tool to discriminate between the three Panax species and to identify their differentiation markers, which will be helpful for ensuring their quality, safety and efficacy.

  15. Fault Diagnosis Strategies for SOFC-Based Power Generation Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Costamagna

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The success of distributed power generation by plants based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs is hindered by reliability problems that can be mitigated through an effective fault detection and isolation (FDI system. However, the numerous operating conditions under which such plants can operate and the random size of the possible faults make identifying damaged plant components starting from the physical variables measured in the plant very difficult. In this context, we assess two classical FDI strategies (model-based with fault signature matrix and data-driven with statistical classification and the combination of them. For this assessment, a quantitative model of the SOFC-based plant, which is able to simulate regular and faulty conditions, is used. Moreover, a hybrid approach based on the random forest (RF classification method is introduced to address the discrimination of regular and faulty situations due to its practical advantages. Working with a common dataset, the FDI performances obtained using the aforementioned strategies, with different sets of monitored variables, are observed and compared. We conclude that the hybrid FDI strategy, realized by combining a model-based scheme with a statistical classifier, outperforms the other strategies. In addition, the inclusion of two physical variables that should be measured inside the SOFCs can significantly improve the FDI performance, despite the actual difficulty in performing such measurements.

  16. Fault Diagnosis Strategies for SOFC-Based Power Generation Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamagna, Paola; De Giorgi, Andrea; Gotelli, Alberto; Magistri, Loredana; Moser, Gabriele; Sciaccaluga, Emanuele; Trucco, Andrea

    2016-08-22

    The success of distributed power generation by plants based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is hindered by reliability problems that can be mitigated through an effective fault detection and isolation (FDI) system. However, the numerous operating conditions under which such plants can operate and the random size of the possible faults make identifying damaged plant components starting from the physical variables measured in the plant very difficult. In this context, we assess two classical FDI strategies (model-based with fault signature matrix and data-driven with statistical classification) and the combination of them. For this assessment, a quantitative model of the SOFC-based plant, which is able to simulate regular and faulty conditions, is used. Moreover, a hybrid approach based on the random forest (RF) classification method is introduced to address the discrimination of regular and faulty situations due to its practical advantages. Working with a common dataset, the FDI performances obtained using the aforementioned strategies, with different sets of monitored variables, are observed and compared. We conclude that the hybrid FDI strategy, realized by combining a model-based scheme with a statistical classifier, outperforms the other strategies. In addition, the inclusion of two physical variables that should be measured inside the SOFCs can significantly improve the FDI performance, despite the actual difficulty in performing such measurements.

  17. Effects of boiling duration in processing of White Paeony Root on its overall quality evaluated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry based metabolomics analysis and high performance liquid chromatography quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Kong; Xu, Jun; Liu, Huan-Huan; Xu, Jin-Di; Li, Xiu-Yang; Lu, Min; Wang, Chun-Ru; Chen, Hu-Biao; Li, Song-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Boiling processing is commonly used in post-harvest handling of White Paeony Root (WPR), in order to whiten the herbal materials and preserve the bright color, since such WPR is empirically considered to possess a higher quality. The present study was designed to investigate whether and how the boiling processing affects overall quality of WPR. First, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was developed to compare the holistic quality of boiled and un-boiled WPR samples. Second, ten major components in WPR samples boiled for different durations were quantitatively determined using high performance liquid chromatography to further explore the effects of boiling time on the holistic quality of WPR, meanwhile the appearance of the processed herbal materials was observed. The results suggested that the boiling processing conspicuously affected the holistic quality of WPR by simultaneously and inconsistently altering the chemical compositions and that short-time boiling processing between 2 and 10 min could both make the WPR bright-colored and improve the contents of major bioactive components, which were not achieved either without boiling or with prolonged boiling. In conclusion, short-term boiling (2-10 min) is recommended for post-harvest handling of WPR.

  18. Influence of different processing times on the quality of Polygoni Multiflora Radix by metabolomics based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xie-An; Ge, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Lu; Li, Jin; An, Mingrui; Cao, Jun; He, Jun; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Chang, Yan-Xu

    2017-03-20

    A metabolomics method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed to evaluate the influence of processing times on the quality of raw and processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to screen the potential maker metabolites that were contributed to the quality changes. Then these marker metabolites were selected as variables in Fisher's discriminant analysis to establish the models that were used to distinguish the raw and processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix in the markets. Additionally, 36 compounds were identified. 12 raw Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples and 23 processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples were distinguished. The results showed that the 12 raw Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples belonged to the group of processing time of 0 h, and two processed Polygoni Multiflora Radix samples were part of the group of processing times of 4 h, 12 samples belonged to group of processing times of 8 to 16 h, and nine samples were the group of processing times of 24 to 48 h. The results demonstrated that the method could provide scientific support for the processing standardization of Polygoni Multiflora Radix. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolomics continues to flourish: highlights from the 2014 Metabolomics Society Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, U.; Hall, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The Metabolomics Society has now been organising its annual meetings for 10 years! The 10th annual conference returned, in June, to Tsuruoka, Japan where the very first meeting was also held in 2005—just shortly after our society had been formally established and our journal Metabolomics had brought

  20. Biochemical studies of Piper betle L leaf extract on obese treated animal using 1H-NMR-based metabolomic approach of blood serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Ghani, Zuleen Delina Fasya; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Rashid, Ahmad Hazri Ab; Shaari, Khozirah; Chik, Zamri

    2016-12-24

    Piper betle L. (PB) belongs to the Piperaceae family. The presence of a fairly large quantity of diastase in the betel leaf is deemed to play an important role in starch digestion and calls for the study of weight loss activities and metabolite profile from PB leaf extracts using metabolomics approach to be performed. PB dried leaves were extracted with 70% ethanol and the extracts were subjected to five groups of rats fed with high fat (HF) and standard diet (SD). They were then fed with the extracts in two doses and compared with a negative control group given water only according to the study protocol. The body weights and food intakes were monitored every week. At the end of the study, blood serum of the experimental animal was analysed to determine the biochemical and metabolite changes. PB treated group demonstrated inhibition of body weight gain without showing an effect on the food intake. In serum bioassay, the PB treated group (HF/PB (100mg/kg and 500mg/kg) showed an increased in glucose and cholesterol levels compared to the Standard Diet (SD/WTR) group, a decrease in LDL level and increase in HDL level when compared with High Fat Diet (HF/WTR) group. For metabolite analysis, two separation models were made to determine the metabolite changes via group activities. The best separation of PCA serum in Model 1 and 2 was achieved in principle component 1 and principle component 2. SUS-Plot model showed that HF group was characterized by high-level of glucose, glycine and alanine. Increase in the β-hydroxybutyrate level similar with SD group animals was evident in the HF/PB(500mg/kg) group. This finding suggested that the administration of 500mg/kg PB extracts leads to increase in oxidation process in the body thus maintaining the body weight and without giving an effect on the appetite even though HF was continuously consumed by the animals until the end of the studies and also a reduction in food intake, thus maintaining their body weight although they

  1. Remote sensing of plant trait responses to field-based plant-soil feedback using UAV-based optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Bob; Kooistra, Lammert; Suomalainen, Juha; Barel, Janna M.; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.

    2017-02-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic legacies left in soil by preceding plants is known as plant-soil feedback (PSF). PSF is an important mechanism to explain plant community dynamics and plant performance in natural and agricultural systems. However, most PSF studies are short-term and small-scale due to practical constraints for field-scale quantification of PSF effects, yet field experiments are warranted to assess actual PSF effects under less controlled conditions. Here we used unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based optical sensors to test whether PSF effects on plant traits can be quantified remotely. We established a randomized agro-ecological field experiment in which six different cover crop species and species combinations from three different plant families (Poaceae, Fabaceae, Brassicaceae) were grown. The feedback effects on plant traits were tested in oat (Avena sativa) by quantifying the cover crop legacy effects on key plant traits: height, fresh biomass, nitrogen content, and leaf chlorophyll content. Prior to destructive sampling, hyperspectral data were acquired and used for calibration and independent validation of regression models to retrieve plant traits from optical data. Subsequently, for each trait the model with highest precision and accuracy was selected. We used the hyperspectral analyses to predict the directly measured plant height (RMSE = 5.12 cm, R2 = 0.79), chlorophyll content (RMSE = 0.11 g m-2, R2 = 0.80), N-content (RMSE = 1.94 g m-2, R2 = 0.68), and fresh biomass (RMSE = 0.72 kg m-2, R2 = 0.56). Overall the PSF effects of the different cover crop treatments based on the remote sensing data matched the results based on in situ measurements. The average oat canopy was tallest and its leaf chlorophyll content highest in response to legacy of Vicia sativa monocultures (100 cm, 0.95 g m-2, respectively) and in mixture with Raphanus sativus (100 cm, 1.09 g m-2, respectively), while the lowest values (76 cm, 0.41 g m-2, respectively

  2. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-07-29

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  3. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Tuong Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement. This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  4. Plant Viruses as Nanoparticle-Based Vaccines and Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ève Lebel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines are considered one of the greatest medical achievements in the battle against infectious diseases. However, the intractability of various diseases such as hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and cancer poses persistent hurdles given that traditional vaccine-development methods have proven to be ineffective; as such, these challenges have driven the emergence of novel vaccine design approaches. In this regard, much effort has been put into the development of new safe adjuvants and vaccine platforms. Of particular interest, the utilization of plant virus-like nanoparticles and recombinant plant viruses has gained increasing significance as an effective tool in the development of novel vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer. The present review summarizes recent advances in the use of plant viruses as nanoparticle-based vaccines and adjuvants and their mechanism of action. Harnessing plant-virus immunogenic properties will enable the design of novel, safe, and efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against disease.

  5. Photoprotection in Plants Optical Screening-based Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Solovchenko, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    Optical screening of excessive and potentially harmful solar radiation is an important photoprotective mechanism, though it has received much less attention in comparison with other systems preventing photooxidative damage to photoautotrophic organisms. This photoprotection in the form of screening appears to be especially important for juvenile and senescing plants as well as under environmental stresses—i.e. in situations where the efficiency of enzymatic ROS elimination, DNA repair and other ‘classical’ photoprotective systems could be impaired. This book represents an attempt to develop an integral view of optical screening-based photoprotection in microalgae and higher plants. Towards this end, the key groups of pigments involved in the screening of ultraviolet and visible components of solar radiation in microalgae and higher plants, and the patterns of their accumulation and distribution within plant cells and tissues, are described. Special attention is paid to the manifestations of screening pi...

  6. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hans

    ) spectroscopy (Paper II), fluorescence spectroscopy (Paper III) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The principles of the three data acquisition techniques have been briefly described and the methods have been compared. The techniques complement each other, which makes room for data...... analysis (PCA), parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), PARAFAC2 and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) all being described in depth. It can be a challenge to determine the appropriate number of components in PARAFAC2, since no specific tools have been developed for this purpose. Paper I...

  7. PlantID – DNA-based identification of multiple medicinal plants in complex mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Caroline

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An efficient method for the identification of medicinal plant products is now a priority as the global demand increases. This study aims to develop a DNA-based method for the identification and authentication of plant species that can be implemented in the industry to aid compliance with regulations, based upon the economically important Hypericum perforatum L. (St John’s Wort or Guan ye Lian Qiao. Methods The ITS regions of several Hypericum species were analysed to identify the most divergent regions and PCR primers were designed to anneal specifically to these regions in the different Hypericum species. Candidate primers were selected such that the amplicon produced by each species-specific reaction differed in size. The use of fluorescently labelled primers enabled these products to be resolved by capillary electrophoresis. Results Four closely related Hypericum species were detected simultaneously and independently in one reaction. Each species could be identified individually and in any combination. The introduction of three more closely related species to the test had no effect on the results. Highly processed commercial plant material was identified, despite the potential complications of DNA degradation in such samples. Conclusion This technique can detect the presence of an expected plant material and adulterant materials in one reaction. The method could be simply applied to other medicinal plants and their problem adulterants.

  8. Tools and databases of the KOMICS web portal for preprocessing, mining, and dissemination of metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Nozomu; Ara, Takeshi; Enomoto, Mitsuo; Motegi, Takeshi; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Iijima, Yoko; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Nakajima, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    A metabolome--the collection of comprehensive quantitative data on metabolites in an organism--has been increasingly utilized for applications such as data-intensive systems biology, disease diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and assessment of food quality. A considerable number of tools and databases have been developed to date for the analysis of data generated by various combinations of chromatography and mass spectrometry. We report here a web portal named KOMICS (The Kazusa Metabolomics Portal), where the tools and databases that we developed are available for free to academic users. KOMICS includes the tools and databases for preprocessing, mining, visualization, and publication of metabolomics data. Improvements in the annotation of unknown metabolites and dissemination of comprehensive metabolomic data are the primary aims behind the development of this portal. For this purpose, PowerGet and FragmentAlign include a manual curation function for the results of metabolite feature alignments. A metadata-specific wiki-based database, Metabolonote, functions as a hub of web resources related to the submitters' work. This feature is expected to increase citation of the submitters' work, thereby promoting data publication. As an example of the practical use of KOMICS, a workflow for a study on Jatropha curcas is presented. The tools and databases available at KOMICS should contribute to enhanced production, interpretation, and utilization of metabolomic Big Data.

  9. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  10. Metabolomics analysis of colorectal cancer based on GC-TOF-MS%基于GC-TOF-MS的结直肠癌代谢组学差异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于斐; 刘少壮; 仲明惟; 黄鑫; 焦杰; 胡三元; 于文滨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the metabolic differences of cancer tissues,adjacent mucosa and normal mucosa in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC).Methods A total of 25 CRC patients were selected and the 3 kinds of tissues were taken from each patient.Gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS)platform was used for metabolomics analysis.The tissues were compared among each other,and principal components analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA)were used to analyze the data.Differential me-tabolites were mapped in the KEGG database to search for the related metabolic pathways.Results Compared with the normal mucosa,47 metabolites were found different (P<0.05,q<0.05)in cancer tissues,and galactose metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway,glutamate and glutamine metabolism,glutamate,alanine and aspartate metabolism changed significantly (P<0.05).In the adjacent mucosa,3 metabolites were found different (P<0.05,q<0.05),and galac-tose metabolism changed significantly (P<0.05).A total of 34 metabolites were found different (P<0.05,q<0.05) between the cancer tissues and the adjacent mucosa,and pentose phosphate pathway,glutamate and glutamine metabo-lism,glutamate,alanine and aspartate metabolism changed significantly (P<0.05).Conclusion The glucose metab-olism and amino acid metabolism are changed in CRC tissues.%目的:探讨结直肠癌(CRC)患者癌组织、癌旁黏膜及正常黏膜的代谢差异。方法选取25例CRC患者,分别取癌组织、癌旁黏膜和正常黏膜各1份,采用气相色谱-飞行时间-质谱(GC-TOF-MS)分析平台对组织样本进行代谢组学检测,3种组织间相互比较并采用主成分分析和正交偏最小二乘判别分析对数据建模,分析差异代谢物并在KEGG数据库中映射,找出相关代谢通路。结果与正常黏膜相比,癌组织中有47种差异代谢物(P<0.05,q<0.05),其半乳糖代谢、磷酸戊糖途径

  11. Plant Electrical Signal Classification Based on Waveform Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Plant electrical signals are important physiological traits which reflect plant physiological state. As a kind of phenotypic data, plant action potential (AP evoked by external stimuli—e.g., electrical stimulation, environmental stress—may be associated with inhibition of gene expression related to stress tolerance. However, plant AP is a response to environment changes and full of variability. It is an aperiodic signal with refractory period, discontinuity, noise, and artifacts. In consequence, there are still challenges to automatically recognize and classify plant AP; (2 Methods: Therefore, we proposed an AP recognition algorithm based on dynamic difference threshold to extract all waveforms similar to AP. Next, an incremental template matching algorithm was used to classify the AP and non-AP waveforms; (3 Results: Experiment results indicated that the template matching algorithm achieved a classification rate of 96.0%, and it was superior to backpropagation artificial neural networks (BP-ANNs, supported vector machine (SVM and deep learning method; (4 Conclusion: These findings imply that the proposed methods are likely to expand possibilities for rapidly recognizing and classifying plant action potentials in the database in the future.

  12. Exceptional evolutionary divergence of human muscle and brain metabolomes parallels human cognitive and physical uniqueness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite concentrations reflect the physiological states of tissues and cells. However, the role of metabolic changes in species evolution is currently unknown. Here, we present a study of metabolome evolution conducted in three brain regions and two non-neural tissues from humans, chimpanzees......, macaque monkeys, and mice based on over 10,000 hydrophilic compounds. While chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse metabolomes diverge following the genetic distances among species, we detect remarkable acceleration of metabolome evolution in human prefrontal cortex and skeletal muscle affecting neural and energy...... metabolism pathways. These metabolic changes could not be attributed to environmental conditions and were confirmed against the expression of their corresponding enzymes. We further conducted muscle strength tests in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The results suggest that, while humans are characterized...

  13. Assessing the impact of transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics on fungal phytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kar-Chun; Ipcho, Simon V S; Trengove, Robert D; Oliver, Richard P; Solomon, Peter S

    2009-09-01

    SUMMARY Peer-reviewed literature is today littered with exciting new tools and techniques that are being used in all areas of biology and medicine. Transcriptomics, proteomics and, more recently, metabolomics are three of these techniques that have impacted on fungal plant pathology. Used individually, each of these techniques can generate a plethora of data that could occupy a laboratory for years. When used in combination, they have the potential to comprehensively dissect a system at the transcriptional and translational level. Transcriptomics, or quantitative gene expression profiling, is arguably the most familiar to researchers in the field of fungal plant pathology. Microarrays have been the primary technique for the last decade, but others are now emerging. Proteomics has also been exploited by the fungal phytopathogen community, but perhaps not to its potential. A lack of genome sequence information has frustrated proteomics researchers and has largely contributed to this technique not fulfilling its potential. The coming of the genome sequencing era has partially alleviated this problem. Metabolomics is the most recent of these techniques to emerge and is concerned with the non-targeted profiling of all metabolites in a given system. Metabolomics studies on fungal plant pathogens are only just beginning to appear, although its potential to dissect many facets of the pathogen and disease will see its popularity increase quickly. This review assesses the impact of transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics on fungal plant pathology over the last decade and discusses their futures. Each of the techniques is described briefly with further reading recommended. Key examples highlighting the application of these technologies to fungal plant pathogens are also reviewed.

  14. Clinical application of metabolomics in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanos, Vassilios; Antonucci, Roberto; Barberini, Luigi; Noto, Antonio; Atzori, Luigi

    2012-04-01

    The youngest and more rapidly increasing "omic" discipline, called metabolomics, is the process of describing the phenotype of a cell, tissue or organism through the full complement of metabolites present. Metabolomics measure global sets of low molecular weight metabolites (including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, fatty acids, lipids, steroids, small peptides, vitamins, etc.), thus providing a "snapshot" of the metabolic status of a cell, tissue or organism in relation to genetic variations or external stimuli. The use of metabolomics appears to be a promising tool in neonatology. The management of sick newborns might improve if more information on perinatal/neonatal maturational processes and their metabolic background were available. Urine ("a window on the organism") is a biofluid particularly suitable for metabolomic analysis in neonatology because it may be collected by using simple, noninvasive techniques and because it may provide valuable diagnostic information. In this review, the authors report the few literature data on neonatal metabolomics, including their personal experience, in the following fields: intrauterine growth restriction, perinatal transition, asphyxia, brain injury and hypothermia, maternal milk evaluation, postnatal maturation, bronchiolitis, sepsis, patent ductus arteriosus, respiratory distress syndrome, nephrouropathies, metabolic diseases, antibiotic treatment, perinatal programming and long-term outcome in extremely low birth-weight infants.

  15. Metabolomics: a novel approach to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers and pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Hua Xu; Yue Huang; Gang Wang; Sheng-Di Chen

    2012-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still not fully understood,it is acknowledged that intervention should be made at the early stage.Therefore,identifying biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis is critical.Metabolomics,a novel "omics",uses methods based on low-molecular-weight molecules,with high-throughput evaluation of a large number of metabolites that may lead to the identification of new disease-specific biomarkers and the elucidation of pathophysiological mechanisms.This review discusses metabolomics investigations of AD and potential future developments in this field.

  16. 基于核磁和质谱分析技术的代谢组学在癌症诊断中的应用%Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolomics for Cancer Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾海巍; 亓云鹏; 许柠; 丁健桦; 安艳波; 陈焕文

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we aim to introduce a relatively new approach, metabolomics, and explore its potential for cancer diagnosis. We will briefly introduce the concept of metabolomics and its rela?tionship with other omics studies in systems biology for cancer detection. The field of metabolomics focuses on the parallel measurement of hundreds of small molecule metabolites in biological samples such as blood, urine, and biopsied tissue. Since metabolite levels are sensitive to subtle changes in the pathological status, metabolomics promises novel avenues for early cancer detection and a better understanding of cancer processes. In fact, many previous metabolomics studies have clearly demons?trated the promises of metabolomics not only for the diagnosis of various kinds of cancer, but also for therapeutic monitoring as well as for drug development. In addition, in this review we will discuss the challenges and future directions for developing metabolomics methods towards clinical applications for cancer diagnosis.%本文对近年来用于癌症诊断的新方法——代谢组学及其在该领域内的应用进行了简要介绍.代谢组学通过定性与定量测量生物样本(血液、尿液、组织等)中数以千计的小分子代谢物,可灵敏地反映代谢组中与病理状态有关的细微变化,从而可为癌症的早期诊断及更好地理解癌变过程提供一种新颖的思路.本文还讨论了代谢组学与系统生物学中其它一些组学在癌症检测上的关联,介绍了一些用代谢组学进行不同癌症的诊断、治疗监测以及药物开发的前期研究工作,并探讨了用于临床癌症诊断的代谢组学方法所面临的机遇、挑战与未来发展方向.

  17. Laser Vision-Based Plant Geometries Computation in Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth statuses are important parameters in the greenhouse environment control system. It is time-consumed and less accuracy that measuring the plant geometries manually in greenhouses. To find a portable method to measure the growth parameters of plants portably and automatically, a laser vision-based measurement system was developed in this paper, consisting of a camera and a laser sheet that scanned the plant vertically. All equipments were mounted on a metal shelf in size of 30cm*40cm*100cm. The 3D point cloud was obtained with the laser sheet scanning the plant vertically, while the camera videoing the laser lines which projected on the plant. The calibration was conducted by a two solid boards standing together in an angle of 90. The camera’s internal and external parameters were calibrated by Image toolbox in MatLab®. It is useful to take a reference image without laser light and to use difference images to obtain the laser line. Laser line centers were extracted by improved centroid method. Thus, we obtained the 3D point cloud structure of the sample plant. For leaf length measurement, iteration method for point clouds was used to extract the axis of the leaf point cloud set. Start point was selected at the end of the leaf point cloud set as the first point of the leaf axis. The points in a radian of certain distance around the start point were chosen as the subset. The centroid of the subset of points was calculated and taken as the next axis point. Iteration was continued until all points in the leaf point cloud set were selected. Leaf length was calculated by curve fitting on these axis points. In order to increase the accuracy of curve fitting, bi-directional start point selection was useful. For leaf area estimation, exponential regression model was used to describe the grown leaves for sampled plant (water spinach in this paper. To evaluate the method in a sample of 18 water spinaches, planted in the greenhouse (length 16

  18. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81

  19. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Doerfler

    Full Text Available The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012

  20. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  1. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  2. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  3. Metabolomic change precedes apple superficial scald symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudell, David R; Mattheis, James P; Hertog, Maarten L A T M

    2009-09-23

    Untargeted metabolic profiling was employed to characterize metabolomic changes associated with 'Granny Smith' apple superficial scald development following 1-MCP or DPA treatment. Partial least-squares discriminant analyses were used to link metabolites with scald, postharvest treatments, and storage duration. Models revealed metabolomic differentiation between untreated controls and fruit treated with DPA or 1-MCP within 1 week following storage initiation. Metabolic divergence between controls and DPA-treated fruit after 4 weeks of storage preceded scald symptom development by 2 months. alpha-Farnesene oxidation products with known associations to scald, including conjugated trienols, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol, were associated with presymptomatic as well as scalded control fruit. Likewise, a large group of putative triterpenoids with mass spectral features similar to those of ursolic acid and beta-sitosterol were associated with control fruit and scald. Results demonstrate that extensive metabolomic changes associated with scald precede actual symptom development.

  4. [Metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huifang; Ding, Mingzhu; Yuan, Yingjin

    2014-02-01

    In order to study the inherent difference among terpenes producing yeasts from the point of metabolomics, we selected taxadiene producing yeasts as the model system. The changes of cellular metabolites during fermentation log phase of artificial functional yeasts were determined using metabolomics methods. The results represented that compared to W303-1A as a blank control, the metabolites in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle and several amino acids were influenced. And due to the changes of metabolites, the growth of cells was inhibited to a certain extent. Among the metabolites identified, citric acid content in taxadiene producing yeasts changed the most, the decreasing amplitude reached 90% or more. Therefore, citric acid can be a marker metabolite for the future study of artificial functional yeasts. The metabolomics analysis of taxadiene producing yeasts can provide more information in further studies on optimization of terpenes production in heterologous chassis.

  5. Plant based phosphorus recovery from wastewater via algae and macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Andrew N; Powell, Nicola; Guieysse, Benoit

    2012-12-01

    At present, resource recovery by irrigation of wastewater to plants is usually driven by the value of the water resource rather than phosphorus recovery. Expanded irrigation for increased phosphorus recovery may be expected as the scarcity and price of phosphorus increases, but providing the necessary treatment, storage and conveyance comes at significant expense. An alternative to taking the wastewater to the plants is instead to take the plants to the wastewater. Algal ponds and macrophyte wetlands are already in widespread use for wastewater treatment and if harvested, would require less than one-tenth of the area to recover phosphorus compared to terrestrial crops/pastures. This area could be further decreased if the phosphorus content of the macrophytes and algae biomass was tripled from 1% to 3% via luxury uptake. While this and many other opportunities for plant based recovery of phosphorus exist, e.g. offshore cultivation, much of this technology development is still in its infancy. Research that enhances our understanding of how to maximise phosphorus uptake and harvest yields; and further add value to the biomass for reuse would see the recovery of phosphorus via plants become an important solution in the future.

  6. Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchaeus Omogbadegun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databases. Unified Modelling Language, Microsoft-Visual-Studio.Net, C#3.0, Microsoft-Jet-Engine4.0, MySQL, Loquendo Multilingual Text-to-Speech Software, YouTube, and VLC Media Player were used.

  7. Network Marker Selection for Untargeted LC-MS Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qingpo; Alvarez, Jessica A; Kang, Jian; Yu, Tianwei

    2017-02-17

    Untargeted metabolomics using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is becoming one of the major areas of high-throughput biology. Functional analysis, that is, analyzing the data based on metabolic pathways or the genome-scale metabolic network, is critical in feature selection and interpretation of metabolomics data. One of the main challenges in the functional analyses is the lack of the feature identity in the LC-MS data itself. By matching mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) values of the features to theoretical values derived from known metabolites, some features can be matched to one or more known metabolites. When multiple matchings occur, in most cases only one of the matchings can be true. At the same time, some known metabolites are missing in the measurements. Current network/pathway analysis methods ignore the uncertainty in metabolite identification and the missing observations, which could lead to errors in the selection of significant subnetworks/pathways. In this paper, we propose a flexible network feature selection framework that combines metabolomics data with the genome-scale metabolic network. The method adopts a sequential feature screening procedure and machine learning-based criteria to select important subnetworks and identify the optimal feature matching simultaneously. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has a much higher sensitivity than the commonly used maximal matching approach. For demonstration, we apply the method on a cohort of healthy subjects to detect subnetworks associated with the body mass index (BMI). The method identifies several subnetworks that are supported by the current literature, as well as detects some subnetworks with plausible new functional implications. The R code is available at http://web1.sph.emory.edu/users/tyu8/MSS.

  8. NMR and pattern recognition methods in metabolomics: From data acquisition to biomarker discovery: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: A.Smolinska@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blanchet, Lionel [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buydens, Lutgarde M.C.; Wijmenga, Sybren S. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Procedures for acquisition of different biofluids by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent developments in metabolic profiling of different biofluids by NMR are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crucial steps involved in data preprocessing and multivariate chemometric analysis are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emphasis is given on recent findings on Multiple Sclerosis via NMR and pattern recognition methods. - Abstract: Metabolomics is the discipline where endogenous and exogenous metabolites are assessed, identified and quantified in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of biological system and highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to functional endpoints and to the organism's phenotypes. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, next to Mass Spectrometry (MS), is one of the main metabolomics analytical platforms. The technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy have enabled the identification and quantitative measurement of the many metabolites in a single sample of biofluids in a non-targeted and non-destructive manner. Combination of NMR spectra of biofluids and pattern recognition methods has driven forward the application of metabolomics in the field of biomarker discovery. The importance of metabolomics in diagnostics, e.g. in identifying biomarkers or defining pathological status, has been growing exponentially as evidenced by the number of published papers. In this review, we describe the developments in data acquisition and multivariate analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data, with particular emphasis on the metabolomics of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and biomarker discovery in Multiple Sclerosis (MScl).

  9. Metabolomic applications in nutritional research: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Aoife; Brennan, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Metabolomics focuses on the global study of metabolites in cells, tissues and biofluids. Analytical technologies such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and hyphenated mass spectrometry (MS) combined with advanced multivariate statistical methods allow us to study perturbations in metabolism. The close link between metabolism and nutrition has seen the application of metabolomics in nutritional research increase in recent times. Such applications can be divided into three main categories, namely (1) the area of dietary biomarker identification, (2) diet-related diseases and (3) nutritional interventions. The present perspective gives an overview of these applications and an outlook to the future.

  10. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic approaches dissect the effect of metal-resistant bacteria on maize biomass and copper uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Shaik, Rafi; Datta, Rupali; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2014-01-21

    Marginal soils arise due to various industrial and agricultural practices reducing crop productivity. Pseudomonas sp. TLC 6-6.5-4 is a free-living multiple-metal-resistant plant-growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) isolated from Torch Lake sediment that promotes maize growth and nutrient uptake. In this study, we examined both PGPB-soil and PGPB-plant interactions. PGPB inoculation resulted in significant increase in maize biomass. Soil inoculation before sowing seeds and coating seeds with the PGPB resulted in higher copper uptake by maize compared to other methods. The PGPB-soil interaction improved phosphorus uptake by maize and led to significant decrease in organic bound copper in marginal soil and a notable increase in exchangeable copper. PGPB improved soil health based on soil enzyme activities. Metabolomic analysis of maize revealed that PGPB inoculation upregulated photosynthesis, hormone biosynthesis, and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites. Proteomic analysis identified upregulation of proteins related to plant development and stress response. Further, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and total phenolics decreased in plants grown in marginal soil suggesting alleviation of metal stress in presence of PGPB. The ability of PGPB to modulate interconnected biochemical pathways could be exploited to increase crop productivity in marginal soils, phytoremediation of metal contaminated soils, and organic agriculture.

  11. Variable selection in PLSR and extensions to a multi-block setting for metabolomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaman, İbrahim; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    When applying LC-MS or NMR spectroscopy in metabolomics studies, high-dimensional data are generated and effective tools for variable selection are needed in order to detect the important metabolites. Methods based on sparsity combined with PLSR have recently attracted attention in the field...

  12. Optimization of cold methanol quenching for quantitative metabolomics of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, L.P.; Douma, R.D.; Heijnen, J.J.; Van Gulik, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A sampling procedure for quantitative metabolomics in Penicillium chrysogenum based on cold aqueous methanol quenching was re-evaluated and optimized to reduce metabolite leakage during sample treatment. The optimization study included amino acids and intermediates of the glycolysis and the TCA-cycl

  13. Metabolomics Approach to Anabolic Steroid Urine Profiling of Bovines Treated with Prohormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, J.C.W.; Lommen, A.; Essers, M.L.; Groot, M.J.; Hende, van J.; Doeswijk, T.G.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2009-01-01

    In livestock production, illegal use of natural steroids is hard to prove because metabolites are either unknown or not significantly above highly fluctuating endogenous levels. In this work we outlined for the first time a metabolomics based strategy for anabolic steroid urine profiling. Urine prof

  14. Distinctive Metabolism of Flavonoid between Cultivated and Semiwild Soybean Unveiled through Metabolomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dae-Yong; Kang, Young-Gyu; Yun, Bohyun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoyeon; Park, Jun Seong; Lee, John Hwan; Hong, Young-Shick

    2016-07-27

    Soybeans are an important crop for agriculture and food, resulting in an increase in the range of its application. Recently, soybean leaves have been used not only for food products but also in the beauty industry. To provide useful and global metabolite information on the development of soy-based products, we investigated the metabolic evolution and cultivar-dependent metabolite variation in the leaves of cultivated (Glycine max) and semiwild (G. gracilis) soybean, through a (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach, as they grew from V (vegetative) 1 to R (reproductive) 7 growth stages. The levels of primary metabolites, such as sucrose, amino acids, organic acids, and fatty acids, were decreased both in the G. gracilis and G. max leaves. However, the secondary metabolites, such as pinitol, rutin, and polyphenols, were increased while synthesis of glucose was elevated as the leaves grew. When metabolite variations between G. gracilis and G. max are compared, it was noteworthy that rutin and its precursor, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, were found only in G. gracilis but not in G. max. Furthermore, levels of pinitol, proline, β-alanine, and acetic acid, a metabolite related to adaptation toward environmental stress, were different between the two soybean cultivars. These results highlight their distinct metabolism for adaptation to environmental conditions and their intrinsic metabolic phenotype. This study therefore provides important information on the cultivar-dependent metabolites of soybean leaves for better understanding of plant physiology toward the development of soy-based products.

  15. Transportable Hydrogen Research Plant Based on Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikel Fernandez; Carlos Madina; Asier Gil de Muro [LABEIN, Parque Tecnologico, edificio 700, 48160 Derio, Bizkaia (Spain); Jose Angel Alzolab; Iker Marino; Javier Garcia-Tejedor [ROBOTIKER, Parque Tecnologico, edificio 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia, (Spain); Juan Carlos Mugica; Inaki Azkkrate; Jose Angel Alzola [INASMET, Mikeletegi Pasalekua, Parque Tecnologico, E-20009 San Sebastian, Guipuzcoa (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Efficiency and cost are nowadays the most important barriers for the penetration of systems based on hydrogen and renewable energies. According to this background, TECNALIA Corporation has started in 2004 the HIDROTEC project: 'Hydrogen Technologies for Renewable Energy Applications'. The ultimate aim of this project is the implementation of a multipurpose demonstration and research plant in order to explore diverse options for sustainable energetic solutions based on hydrogen. The plant is conceived as an independent system that can be easily transported and assembled. Research and demonstration activities can thus be carried out at very different locations, including commercial renewable facilities. Modularity and scalability have also been taken into account for an optimised exploitation. (authors)

  16. Exergoeconomic evaluation of a KRW-based IGCC power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsaronis, G.; Lin, L.; Tawfik, T.; Gallaspy, D. T.

    1994-04-01

    In a study supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, several design configurations of Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW)-based Integrated Gasification-Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power plants were developed. One of these configurations was analyzed from the exergoeconomic (thermoeconomic) viewpoint. This design configuration uses an air-blown KRW gasifier, hot gas cleanup, and two General Electric MS7001F advanced combustion turbines. Operation at three different gasification temperatures was considered. The detailed exergoeconomic evaluation identified several changes for improving the cost effectiveness of this IGCC design configuration. These changes include the following: decreasing the gasifier operating temperature, enhancing the high-pressure steam generation in the gasification island, improving the efficiency of the steam cycle, and redesigning the entire heat exchanger network. Based on the cost information supplied by the M. W. Kellogg Company, an attempt was made to calculate the economically optimal exergetic efficiency for some of the most important plant components.

  17. Sustainability of plant-based diets: back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté, Joan; Soret, Sam

    2014-07-01

    Plant-based diets in comparison to diets rich in animal products are more sustainable because they use many fewer natural resources and are less taxing on the environment. Given the global population explosion and increase in wealth, there is an increased demand for foods of animal origin. Environmental data are rapidly accumulating on the unsustainability of current worldwide food consumption practices that are high in meat and dairy products. Natural nonrenewable resources are becoming scarce, and environmental degradation is rapidly increasing. At the current trends of food consumption and environmental changes, food security and food sustainability are on a collision course. Changing course (to avoid the collision) will require extreme downward shifts in meat and dairy consumption by large segments of the world's population. Other approaches such as food waste reduction and precision agriculture and/or other technological advances have to be simultaneously pursued; however, they are insufficient to make the global food system sustainable. For millennia, meatless diets have been advocated on the basis of values, and large segments of the world population have thrived on plant-based diets. "Going back" to plant-based diets worldwide seems to be a reasonable alternative for a sustainable future. Policies in favor of the global adoption of plant-based diets will simultaneously optimize the food supply, health, environmental, and social justice outcomes for the world's population. Implementing such nutrition policy is perhaps one of the most rational and moral paths for a sustainable future of the human race and other living creatures of the biosphere that we share.

  18. Life management of power plant based on structural damage testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Arras, V. [Eesti Energia, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    Life management system is based on the valid nowadays in Estonian power plants regulation documentation. The system allows to estimate stress distribution in components, find computational assessment of cumulated creep damage, determine when and where it is necessary to cut off the particular number of microsamples or take replicas. Finally, the real metal condition may be assessed on the basis of metallographic specimen research and reasonable 3-R decision - run, repair, replacement - made on further component use. (orig.) 6 refs.

  19. Plant based dietary supplement increases urinary pH

    OpenAIRE

    Rao A Venket; Logan Alan C; Berardi John M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Research has demonstrated that the net acid load of the typical Western diet has the potential to influence many aspects of human health, including osteoporosis risk/progression; obesity; cardiovascular disease risk/progression; and overall well-being. As urinary pH provides a reliable surrogate measure for dietary acid load, this study examined whether a plant-based dietary supplement, one marketed to increase alkalinity, impacts urinary pH as advertised. Methods Using pH...

  20. Plant based dietary supplement increases urinary pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao A Venket

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has demonstrated that the net acid load of the typical Western diet has the potential to influence many aspects of human health, including osteoporosis risk/progression; obesity; cardiovascular disease risk/progression; and overall well-being. As urinary pH provides a reliable surrogate measure for dietary acid load, this study examined whether a plant-based dietary supplement, one marketed to increase alkalinity, impacts urinary pH as advertised. Methods Using pH test strips, the urinary pH of 34 healthy men and women (33.9 +/- 1.57 y, 79.3 +/- 3.1 kg was measured for seven days to establish a baseline urinary pH without supplementation. After this initial baseline period, urinary pH was measured for an additional 14 days while participants ingested the plant-based nutritional supplement. At the end of the investigation, pH values at baseline and during the treatment period were compared to determine the efficacy of the supplement. Results Mean urinary pH statistically increased (p = 0.03 with the plant-based dietary supplement. Mean urinary pH was 6.07 +/- 0.04 during the baseline period and increased to 6.21 +/- 0.03 during the first week of treatment and to 6.27 +/- 0.06 during the second week of treatment. Conclusion Supplementation with a plant-based dietary product for at least seven days increases urinary pH, potentially increasing the alkalinity of the body.

  1. Metabolomic changes in fatty liver can be modified by dietary protein and calcium during energy restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taru K Pilvi; Tuulikki Sepp(a)nen-Laakso; Helena Simolin; Piet Finckenberg; Anne Huotari; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Riitta Korpela; Matej Ore(s)i(c); Eero M Mervaala

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the effect of energy restriction (ER) on liver lipid and primary metabolite profile by using metabolomic approach. We also investigated whether the effect of energy restriction can be further enhanced by modification of dietary protein source and calcium.METHODS: Liver metabolomic profile of lean and obese C57BI/6] mice (n = 10/group) were compared with two groups of weight-reduced mice. ER was performed on control diet and whey protein-based high-calcium diet (whey + Ca). The metabolomic an alyses were performed using the UPLC/MS based lipidomic platform and the HPLC/MS/MS based primary metabolite platform.RESULTS: ER on both diets significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation and lipid droplet size, while only whey + Ca diet significantly decreased blood glucose (P 0.05, vs lean). These changes were accompanied with up-regulated TCA cycle and pentose phosphate pathway metabolites.CONCLUSION: ER-induced changes on hepatic metabolomic profile can be significantly affected by dietary protein source. The therapeutic potential of whey protein and calcium should be further studied.

  2. Another lesson from plants: the forward osmosis-based actuator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Sinibaldi

    Full Text Available Osmotic actuation is a ubiquitous plant-inspired actuation strategy that has a very low power consumption but is capable of generating effective movements in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In light of these features, we aimed to develop a novel, low-power-consumption actuator that is capable of generating suitable forces during a characteristic actuation time on the order of a few minutes. Based on the analysis of plant movements and on osmotic actuation modeling, we designed and fabricated a forward osmosis-based actuator with a typical size of 10 mm and a characteristic time of 2-5 minutes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest osmotic actuator developed so far. Moreover, the achieved timescale can be compared to that of a typical plant cell, thanks to the integrated strategy that we pursued by concurrently addressing and solving design and material issues, as paradigmatically explained by the bioinspired approach. Our osmotic actuator produces forces above 20 N, while containing the power consumption (on the order of 1 mW. Furthermore, based on the agreement between model predictions and experimental observations, we also discuss the actuator performance (including power consumption, maximum force, energy density and thermodynamic efficiency in relation to existing actuation technologies. In light of the achievements of the present study, the proposed osmotic actuator holds potential for effective exploitation in bioinspired robotics systems.

  3. Another lesson from plants: the forward osmosis-based actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Edoardo; Argiolas, Alfredo; Puleo, Gian Luigi; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic actuation is a ubiquitous plant-inspired actuation strategy that has a very low power consumption but is capable of generating effective movements in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In light of these features, we aimed to develop a novel, low-power-consumption actuator that is capable of generating suitable forces during a characteristic actuation time on the order of a few minutes. Based on the analysis of plant movements and on osmotic actuation modeling, we designed and fabricated a forward osmosis-based actuator with a typical size of 10 mm and a characteristic time of 2-5 minutes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest osmotic actuator developed so far. Moreover, the achieved timescale can be compared to that of a typical plant cell, thanks to the integrated strategy that we pursued by concurrently addressing and solving design and material issues, as paradigmatically explained by the bioinspired approach. Our osmotic actuator produces forces above 20 N, while containing the power consumption (on the order of 1 mW). Furthermore, based on the agreement between model predictions and experimental observations, we also discuss the actuator performance (including power consumption, maximum force, energy density and thermodynamic efficiency) in relation to existing actuation technologies. In light of the achievements of the present study, the proposed osmotic actuator holds potential for effective exploitation in bioinspired robotics systems.

  4. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer.

  5. Data fusion in metabolomic cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Rasmus; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Savorani, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of plasma samples has promising abilities regarding early detection of colorectal cancer. In the present paper, these results were further developed by combining fluorescence with the biomarkers, CEA and TIMP-1 and traditional metabolomic...

  6. Analysis of metabolomics data from twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draisma, Hermanus Henricus Maria

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive analysis of small molecules involved in metabolism, on the basis of samples that have been obtained from organisms in a given physiological state. Data obtained from measurements of trait levels in twin families can be used to elucidate the importance of genetic and

  7. Analytical metabolomics: nutritional opportunities for personalized health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiven, Elizabeth M S; German, J Bruce; Slupsky, Carolyn M

    2011-11-01

    Nutrition is the cornerstone of health; survival depends on acquiring essential nutrients, and dietary components can both prevent and promote disease. Metabolomics, the study of all small molecule metabolic products in a system, has been shown to provide a detailed snapshot of the body's processes at any particular point in time, opening up the possibility of monitoring health and disease, prevention and treatment. Metabolomics has the potential to fundamentally change clinical chemistry and, by extension, the fields of nutrition, toxicology and medicine. Technological advances, combined with new knowledge of the human genome and gut microbiome, have made and will continue to make possible earlier, more accurate, less invasive diagnoses, all while enhancing our understanding of the root causes of disease and leading to a generation of dietary recommendations that enable optimal health. This article reviews the recent contributions of metabolomics to the fields of nutrition, toxicology and medicine. It is expected that these fields will eventually blend together through development of new technologies in metabolomics and genomics into a new area of clinical chemistry: personalized medicine.

  8. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Layla J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Wang, Clay C. C.; Beebe, David J.; Keller, Nancy P.; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid–liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  9. Metabolomics in the fight against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Salinas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide a chemical fingerprint of thousands of metabolites present in cells, tissues or body fluids. Such metabolic phenotyping has been successfully used to study various biologic processes and disease states. High-resolution metabolomics can shed new light on the intricacies of host-parasite interactions in each stage of the Plasmodium life cycle and the downstream ramifications on the host’s metabolism, pathogenesis and disease. Such data can become integrated with other large datasets generated using top-down systems biology approaches and be utilised by computational biologists to develop and enhance models of malaria pathogenesis relevant for identifying new drug targets or intervention strategies. Here, we focus on the promise of metabolomics to complement systems biology approaches in the quest for novel interventions in the fight against malaria. We introduce the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC, a new systems biology research coalition. A primary goal of the MaHPIC is to generate systems biology datasets relating to human and non-human primate (NHP malaria parasites and their hosts making these openly available from an online relational database. Metabolomic data from NHP infections and clinical malaria infections from around the world will comprise a unique global resource.

  10. Reinforcing loose foundation stones in trait-based plant ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Bill; De Bello, Francesco; Cornelissen, J Hans C; Laliberté, Etienne; Laughlin, Daniel C; Reich, Peter B

    2016-04-01

    The promise of "trait-based" plant ecology is one of generalized prediction across organizational and spatial scales, independent of taxonomy. This promise is a major reason for the increased popularity of this approach. Here, we argue that some important foundational assumptions of trait-based ecology have not received sufficient empirical evaluation. We identify three such assumptions and, where possible, suggest methods of improvement: (i) traits are functional to the degree that they determine individual fitness, (ii) intraspecific variation in functional traits can be largely ignored, and (iii) functional traits show general predictive relationships to measurable environmental gradients.

  11. Metabolomic tools for secondary metabolite discovery from marine microbial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Lynsey; Zhang, Tong; Viegelmann, Christina; Martinez, Ignacio Juarez; Cheng, Cheng; Dowdells, Catherine; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadam; Gernert, Christine; Hentschel, Ute; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2014-06-05

    Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR 1H and correlation spectroscopy (COSY) were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening.

  12. Metabolomic Tools for Secondary Metabolite Discovery from Marine Microbial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey Macintyre

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR 1H and correlation spectroscopy (COSY were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening.

  13. Mass spectrometric signatures of the blood plasma metabolome for disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhov, Petr G; Balashova, Elena E; Voskresenskaya, Anna A; Trifonova, Oxana P; Maslov, Dmitry L; Archakov, Alexander I

    2016-01-01

    In metabolomics, a large number of small molecules can be detected in a single run. However, metabolomic data do not include the absolute concentrations of each metabolite. Generally, mass spectrometry analyses provide metabolite concentrations that are derived from mass peak intensities, and the peak intensities are strictly dependent on the type of mass spectrometer used, as well as the technical characteristics, options and protocols applied. To convert mass peak intensities to actual concentrations, calibration curves have to be generated for each metabolite, and this represents a significant challenge depending on the number of metabolites that are detected and involved in metabolome-based diagnostics. To overcome this limitation, and to facilitate the development of diagnostic tests based on metabolomics, mass peak intensities may be expressed in quintiles. The present study demonstrates the advantage of this approach. The examples of diagnostic signatures, which were designed in accordance to this approach, are provided for lung and prostate cancer (leading causes of mortality due to cancer in developed countries) and impaired glucose tolerance (which precedes type 2 diabetes, the most common endocrinology disease worldwide).

  14. Urinary metabolomic fingerprinting after consumption of a probiotic strain in women with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa; Llorach, Rafael; Marinic, Jelena; Tulipani, Sara; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Jiménez, Esther; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Infectious mastitis is a common condition among lactating women, with staphylococci and streptococci being the main aetiological agents. In this context, some lactobacilli strains isolated from breast milk appear to be particularly effective for treating mastitis and, therefore, constitute an attractive alternative to antibiotherapy. A (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach was applied to detect metabolomic differences after consuming a probiotic strain (Lactobacillus salivarius PS2) in women with mastitis. 24h urine of women with lactational mastitis was collected at baseline and after 21 days of probiotic (PB) administration. Multivariate analysis (OSC-PLS-DA and hierarchical clustering) showed metabolome differences after PB treatment. The discriminant metabolites detected at baseline were lactose, and ibuprofen and acetaminophen (two pharmacological drugs commonly used for mastitis pain), while, after PB intake, creatine and the gut microbial co-metabolites hippurate and TMAO were detected. In addition, a voluntary desertion of the pharmacological drugs ibuprofen and acetaminophen was observed after probiotic administration. The application of NMR-based metabolomics enabled the identification of the overall effects of probiotic consumption among women suffering from mastitis and highlighted the potential of this approach in evaluating the outcomes of probiotics consumption. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been applied in women with mastitis during lactation.

  15. Nuclear Power Plant Operator Reliability Research Based on Fuzzy Math

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes use of the concept and theory of fuzzy number in fuzzy mathematics, to research for the response time of operator in accident of Chinese nuclear power plant. Through the quantitative analysis for the performance shape factors (PSFs which influence the response time of operators, the formula of the operator response time is obtained based on the possibilistic fuzzy linear regression model which is used for the first time in this kind of research. The research result shows that the correct research method can be achieved through the analysis of the information from a small sample. This method breaks through the traditional research method and can be used not only for the reference to the safe operation of nuclear power plant, but also in other areas.

  16. Metabolomics of Clostridial Biofuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Aristilde, Ludmilla [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Amador-Noguez, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Members of the genus Clostridium collectively have the ideal set of the metabolic capabilities for fermentative biofuel production: cellulose degradation, hydrogen production, and solvent excretion. No single organism, however, can effectively convert cellulose into biofuels. Here we developed, using metabolomics and isotope tracers, basic science knowledge of Clostridial metabolism of utility for future efforts to engineer such an organism. In glucose fermentation carried out by the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum, we observed a remarkably ordered series of metabolite concentration changes as the fermentation progressed from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In general, high-energy compounds decreased while low-energy species increased during solventogenesis. These changes in metabolite concentrations were accompanied by large changes in intracellular metabolic fluxes, with pyruvate directed towards acetyl-CoA and solvents instead of oxaloacetate and amino acids. Thus, the solventogenic transition involves global remodeling of metabolism to redirect resources from biomass production into solvent production. In contrast to C. acetobutylicum, which is an avid fermenter, C. cellulolyticum metabolizes glucose only slowly. We find that glycolytic intermediate concentrations are radically different from fast fermenting organisms. Associated thermodynamic and isotope tracer analysis revealed that the full glycolytic pathway in C. cellulolyticum is reversible. This arises from changes in cofactor utilization for phosphofructokinase and an alternative pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. The net effect is to increase the high-energy phosphate bond yield of glycolysis by 150% (from 2 to 5) at the expense of lower net flux. Thus, C. cellulolyticum prioritizes glycolytic energy efficiency over speed. Degradation of cellulose results in other sugars in addition to glucose. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled pentose sugars

  17. LC-MS metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana plant leaves and cell cultures: optimization of pre-LC-MS procedure parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    t'Kindt, Ruben; De Veylder, Lieven; Storme, Michael; Deforce, Dieter; Van Bocxlaer, Jan

    2008-08-01

    This study treats the optimization of methods for homogenizing Arabidopsis thaliana plant leaves as well as cell cultures, and extracting their metabolites for metabolomics analysis by conventional liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS). Absolute recovery, process efficiency and procedure repeatability have been compared between different pre-LC-MS homogenization/extraction procedures through the use of samples fortified before extraction with a range of representative metabolites. Hereby, the magnitude of the matrix effect observed in the ensuing LC-MS based metabolomics analysis was evaluated. Based on relative recovery and repeatability of key metabolites, comprehensiveness of extraction (number of m/z-retention time pairs) and clean-up potential of the approach (minimum matrix effects), the most appropriate sample pre-treatment was adopted. It combines liquid nitrogen homogenization for plant leaves with thermomixer based extraction using MeOH/H(2)O 80/20. As such, an efficient and highly reproducible LC-MS plant metabolomics set-up is achieved, as illustrated by the obtained results for both LC-MS (8.88%+/-5.16 versus 7.05%+/-4.45) and technical variability (12.53%+/-11.21 versus 9.31%+/-6.65) data in a comparative investigation of A. thaliana plant leaves and cell cultures, respectively.

  18. Metabolome of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) and related species under Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Grisoni, Michel; Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Jade, Katia; Bartet, Laetitia; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2012-11-01

    The genus Vanilla which belongs to the Orchidaceae family comprises more than 110 species of which two are commercially cultivated (Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla xtahitensis). The cured pods of these species are the source of natural vanilla flavor. In intensive cultivation systems the vines are threatened by viruses such as Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). In order to investigate the effect of CymMV on the growth and metabolome of vanilla plants, four accessions grown in intensive cultivation systems under shadehouse, CR01 (V. planifolia), CR17 (V. xtahitensis), CR03 (V. planifolia × V. xtahitensis) and CR18 (Vanilla pompona), were challenged with an isolate of CymMV. CymMV infected plants of CR01, CR03 and CR17 had a reduced growth compared to healthy plants, while there was no significant difference in the growth of CR18 vines. Interestingly, CR18 had qualitatively more phenolic compounds in leaves and a virus titre that diminished over time. No differences in the metabolomic profiles of the shadehouse samples obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were observed between the virus infected vs. healthy plants. However, using in- vitro V. planifolia plants, the metabolomic profiles were affected by virus infection. Under these controlled conditions the levels of amino acids and sugars present in the leaves were increased in CymMV infected plants, compared to uninfected ones, whereas the levels of phenolic compounds and malic acid were decreased. The metabolism, growth and viral status of V. pompona accession CR18 contrasted from that of the other species suggesting the existence of partial resistance to CymMV in the vanilla germplasm.

  19. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A.; Li, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation...... was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation......Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes...

  20. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: Compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Hekman, M.; Vries de- Weij, J.van der; Coulier, L.; Ramaker, R.; Kleemann, R.; Kooistra, T.; Rubingh, C.; Freidig, A.; Verheij, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatograp

  1. Present and foreseeable future of metabolomics in forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Peinado, L S; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-06-21

    The revulsive publications during the last years on the precariousness of forensic sciences worldwide have promoted the move of major steps towards improvement of this science. One of the steps (viz. a higher involvement of metabolomics in the new era of forensic analysis) deserves to be discussed under different angles. Thus, the characteristics of metabolomics that make it a useful tool in forensic analysis, the aspects in which this omics is so far implicit, but not mentioned in forensic analyses, and how typical forensic parameters such as the post-mortem interval or fingerprints take benefits from metabolomics are critically discussed in this review. The way in which the metabolomics-forensic binomial succeeds when either conventional or less frequent samples are used is highlighted here. Finally, the pillars that should support future developments involving metabolomics and forensic analysis, and the research required for a fruitful in-depth involvement of metabolomics in forensic analysis are critically discussed.

  2. Metabolomics and its application to studying metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Weljie, Aalim M; Turner, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Here we explain the omics approach of metabolomics and how it can be applied to study a physiological response to toxic metal exposure. This review aims to educate the metallomics field to the tool of metabolomics. Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly used tool to compare natural and challenged states of various organisms, from disease states in humans to toxin exposure to environmental systems. This approach is key to understanding and identifying the cellular or biochemical targets of metals and the underlying physiological response. Metabolomics steps are described and overviews of its application to metal toxicity to organisms are given. As this approach is very new there are yet only a small number of total studies and therefore only a brief overview of some metal metabolomics studies is described. A frank critical evaluation of the approach is given to provide newcomers to the method a clear idea of the challenges and the rewards of applying metabolomics to their research.

  3. The future of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolic profiling and metabolomic studies for biomarker discovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Zhang, Qibin; Page, Jason S.; Shen, Yufeng; Callister, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    The future utility of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in metabolic profiling and metabolomic studies for biomarker discover will be discussed, beginning with a brief description of the evolution of metabolomics and the utilization of the three most popular analytical platforms in such studies: NMR, GC-MS, and LC-MS. Emphasis is placed on recent developments in high-efficiency LC separations and sensitive electrospray ionization approaches and the benefits to incorporating both in LC-MS-based approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of various quantitative approaches are reviewed, followed by the current LC-MS-based tools available for candidate biomarker characterization and identification. Finally, a brief prediction on the future path of LC-MS-based methods in metabolic profiling and metabolomic studies is given.

  4. Flux analysis and metabolomics for systematic metabolic engineering of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-11-01

    Rational engineering of metabolism is important for bio-production using microorganisms. Metabolic design based on in silico simulations and experimental validation of the metabolic state in the engineered strain helps in accomplishing systematic metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is a method for the prediction of metabolic phenotype, and many applications have been developed using FBA to design metabolic networks. Elementary mode analysis (EMA) and ensemble modeling techniques are also useful tools for in silico strain design. The metabolome and flux distribution of the metabolic pathways enable us to evaluate the metabolic state and provide useful clues to improve target productivity. Here, we reviewed several computational applications for metabolic engineering by using genome-scale metabolic models of microorganisms. We also discussed the recent progress made in the field of metabolomics and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis techniques, and reviewed these applications pertaining to bio-production development. Because these in silico or experimental approaches have their respective advantages and disadvantages, the combined usage of these methods is complementary and effective for metabolic engineering.

  5. Characterization and Discrimination of Ancient Grains: A Metabolomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Righetti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hulled, or ancient, wheats were the earliest domesticated wheats by mankind and the ancestors of current wheats. Their cultivation drastically decreased during the 1960s; however, the increasing demand for a healthy and equilibrated diet led to rediscovering these grains. Our aim was to use a non-targeted metabolomic approach to discriminate and characterize similarities and differences between ancient Triticum varieties. For this purpose, 77 hulled wheat samples from three different varieties were collected: Garfagnana T. turgidum var. dicoccum L. (emmer, ID331 T. monococcum L. (einkorn and Rouquin T. spelta L. (spelt. The ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF metabolomics approach highlighted a pronounced sample clustering according to the wheat variety, with an excellent predictability (Q2, for all the models built. Fifteen metabolites were tentatively identified based on accurate masses, isotopic pattern, and product ion spectra. Among these, alkylresorcinols (ARs were found to be significantly higher in spelt and emmer, showing different homologue composition. Furthermore, phosphatidylcholines (PC and lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPC levels were higher in einkorn variety. The results obtained in this study confirmed the importance of ARs as markers to distinguish between Triticum species and revealed their values as cultivar markers, being not affected by the environmental influences.

  6. MetaboAnalyst 3.0--making metabolomics more meaningful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianguo; Sinelnikov, Igor V; Han, Beomsoo; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    MetaboAnalyst (www.metaboanalyst.ca) is a web server designed to permit comprehensive metabolomic data analysis, visualization and interpretation. It supports a wide range of complex statistical calculations and high quality graphical rendering functions that require significant computational resources. First introduced in 2009, MetaboAnalyst has experienced more than a 50X growth in user traffic (>50 000 jobs processed each month). In order to keep up with the rapidly increasing computational demands and a growing number of requests to support translational and systems biology applications, we performed a substantial rewrite and major feature upgrade of the server. The result is MetaboAnalyst 3.0. By completely re-implementing the MetaboAnalyst suite using the latest web framework technologies, we have been able substantially improve its performance, capacity and user interactivity. Three new modules have also been added including: (i) a module for biomarker analysis based on the calculation of receiver operating characteristic curves; (ii) a module for sample size estimation and power analysis for improved planning of metabolomics studies and (iii) a module to support integrative pathway analysis for both genes and metabolites. In addition, popular features found in existing modules have been significantly enhanced by upgrading the graphical output, expanding the compound libraries and by adding support for more diverse organisms.

  7. Metabolomic insight into soy sauce through (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bong-Kuk; Ahn, Hyuk-Jin; van den Berg, Frans; Lee, Cherl-Ho; Hong, Young-Shick

    2009-08-12

    Soy sauce, a well-known seasoning in Asia and throughout the world, consists of many metabolites that are produced during fermentation or aging and that have various health benefits. However, their comprehensive assessment has been limited due to targeted or instrumentally specific analysis. This paper presents for the first time a metabolic characterization of soy sauce, especially that aged up to 12 years, to obtain a global understanding of the metabolic variations through (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate pattern recognition techniques. Elevated amino acids and organic acids and the consumption of carbohydrate were associated with continuous involvement of microflora in aging for 12 years. In particular, continuous increases in the levels of betaine were found during aging for up to 12 years, demonstrating that microbial- or enzyme-related metabolites were also coupled with osmotolerant or halophilic bacteria present during aging. This work provides global insights into soy sauce through a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach that enhances the current understanding of the holistic metabolome and allows assessment of soy sauce quality.

  8. Metabolomics to Detect Response of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) to Cu(OH)2 Nanopesticides: Oxidative Stress Response and Detoxification Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lijuan; Ortiz, Cruz; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Hu, Qirui; Zhou, Hongjun; Huang, Yuxiong; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-09-06

    There has been an increasing influx of nanopesticides into agriculture in recent years. Understanding the interaction between nanopesticides and edible plants is crucial in evaluating the potential impact of nanotechnology on the environment and agriculture. Here we exposed lettuce plants to Cu(OH)2 nanopesticides (1050-2100 mg/L) through foliar spray for one month. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results indicate that 97-99% (1353-2501 mg/kg) of copper was sequestered in the leaves and only a small percentage (1-3%) (17.5-56.9 mg/kg) was translocated to root tissues through phloem loading. Gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolomics combined with partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) multivariate analysis revealed that Cu(OH)2 nanopesticides altered metabolite levels of lettuce leaves. Tricarboxylic (TCA) cycle and a number of amino acid-related biological pathways were disturbed. Some antioxidant levels (cis-caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, dehydroascorbic acid) were significantly decreased compared to the control, indicating that oxidative stress and a defense response occurred. Nicotianamine, a copper chelator, increased by 12-27 fold compared to the control, which may represent a detoxification mechanism. The up-regulation of polyamines (spermidine and putrescine) and potassium may mitigate oxidative stress and enhance tolerance. The data presented here provide a molecular-scale perspective on the response of plants to copper nanopesticides.

  9. Tools and Databases of the KOMICS Web Portal for Preprocessing, Mining, and Dissemination of Metabolomics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomu Sakurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A metabolome—the collection of comprehensive quantitative data on metabolites in an organism—has been increasingly utilized for applications such as data-intensive systems biology, disease diagnostics, biomarker discovery, and assessment of food quality. A considerable number of tools and databases have been developed to date for the analysis of data generated by various combinations of chromatography and mass spectrometry. We report here a web portal named KOMICS (The Kazusa Metabolomics Portal, where the tools and databases that we developed are available for free to academic users. KOMICS includes the tools and databases for preprocessing, mining, visualization, and publication of metabolomics data. Improvements in the annotation of unknown metabolites and dissemination of comprehensive metabolomic data are the primary aims behind the development of this portal. For this purpose, PowerGet and FragmentAlign include a manual curation function for the results of metabolite feature alignments. A metadata-specific wiki-based database, Metabolonote, functions as a hub of web resources related to the submitters' work. This feature is expected to increase citation of the submitters' work, thereby promoting data publication. As an example of the practical use of KOMICS, a workflow for a study on Jatropha curcas is presented. The tools and databases available at KOMICS should contribute to enhanced production, interpretation, and utilization of metabolomic Big Data.

  10. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach.

  11. High Aerobic Capacity Mitigates Changes in the Plasma Metabolomic Profile Associated with Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falegan, Oluyemi S; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hepple, Russ T; Shearer, Jane

    2017-02-03

    Advancing age is associated with declines in maximal oxygen consumption. Declines in aerobic capacity not only contribute to the aging process but also are an independent risk factor for morbidity, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Although statistically convincing, the relationships between aerobic capacity, aging, and disease risk remain largely unresolved. To this end, we employed sensitive, system-based metabolomics approach to determine whether enhanced aerobic capacity could mitigate some of the changes seen in the plasma metabolomic profile associated with aging. Metabolomic profiles of plasma samples obtained from young (13 month) and old (26 month) rats bred for low (LCR) or high (HCR) running capacity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) were examined. Results demonstrated strong profile separation in old and low aerobic capacity rats, whereas young and high aerobic capacity rat models were less predictive. Significantly differential metabolites between the groups include taurine, acetone, valine, and trimethylamine-N-oxide among other metabolites, specifically citrate, succinate, isovalerate, and proline, were differentially increased in older HCR animals compared with their younger counterparts. When interactions between age and aerobic capacity were examined, results demonstrated that enhanced aerobic capacity could mitigate some but not all age-associated alterations in the metabolomic profile.

  12. Metabolomic applications to decipher gut microbial metabolic influence in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Pierre eMartin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary preferences and nutrients composition have been shown to influence human and gut microbial metabolism, which ultimately has specific effects on health and diseases’ risk. Increasingly, results from molecular biology and microbiology demonstrate the key role of the gut microbiota metabolic interface to the overall mammalian host’s health status. There is therefore raising interest in nutrition research to characterize the molecular foundations of the gut microbial mammalian cross-talk at both physiological and biochemical pathway levels. Tackling these challenges can be achieved through systems biology approaches, such as metabolomics, to underpin the highly complex metabolic exchanges between diverse biological compartments, including organs, systemic biofluids and microbial symbionts. By the development of specific biomarkers for prediction of health and disease, metabolomics is increasingly used in clinical applications as regard to disease aetiology, diagnostic stratification and potentially mechanism of action of therapeutical and nutraceutical solutions. Surprisingly, an increasing number of metabolomics investigations in pre-clinical and clinical studies based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS provided compelling evidence that system wide and organ-specific biochemical processes are under the influence of gut microbial metabolism. This review aims at describing recent applications of metabolomics in clinical fields where main objective is to discern the biochemical mechanisms under the influence of the gut microbiota, with insight into gastrointestinal health and diseases diagnostics and improvement of homeostasis metabolic regulation.

  13. A metabolomics-driven elucidation of the anti-obesity mechanisms of xanthohumol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Jay S; Legette, LeeCole L; Miranda, Cristobal L; Jiang, Yuan; Stevens, Jan F

    2013-06-28

    Mild, mitochondrial uncoupling increases energy expenditure and can reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Activation of cellular, adaptive stress response pathways can result in an enhanced capacity to reduce oxidative damage. Together, these strategies target energy imbalance and oxidative stress, both underlying factors of obesity and related conditions such as type 2 diabetes. Here we describe a metabolomics-driven effort to uncover the anti-obesity mechanism(s) of xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid from hops. Metabolomics analysis of fasting plasma from obese, Zucker rats treated with XN revealed decreases in products of dysfunctional fatty acid oxidation and ROS, prompting us to explore the effects of XN on muscle cell bioenergetics. At low micromolar concentrations, XN acutely increased uncoupled respiration in several different cell types, including myocytes. Tetrahydroxanthohumol also increased respiration, suggesting electrophilicity did not play a role. At higher concentrations, XN inhibited respiration in a ROS-dependent manner. In myocytes, time course metabolomics revealed acute activation of glutathione recycling and long term induction of glutathione synthesis as well as several other changes indicative of short term elevated cellular stress and a concerted adaptive response. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that XN may ameliorate metabolic syndrome, at least in part, through mitochondrial uncoupling and stress response induction. In addition, time course metabolomics appears to be an effective strategy for uncovering metabolic events that occur during a stress response.

  14. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  15. A targeted metabolomics approach toward understanding metabolic variations in rice under pesticide stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Vahideh; Farimani, Mahdi Moridi; Fathi, Fariba; Ghassempour, Alireza

    2015-06-01

    Diazinon insecticide is widely applied throughout rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in Iran. However, concerns are now being raised about its potential adverse impacts on rice fields. In this study, a time-course metabolic change in rice plants was investigated after diazinon treatment using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and subsequently the statistical strategy of random forest (RF) was performed in order to find the stress-associated effects. According to the results, a wide range of metabolites were dynamically varied as a result of the plant response to diazinon such as biosynthesis and metabolism of sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenylpropanoids, all correlating with the exposure time. Plant response was involved in multiple metabolic pathways, most of which were correlated with the exposure time. In this study, RF was explored as a potential multivariate method for GC-MS analysis of metabolomics data of rice (O. sativa L.) plants under diazinon stress; more than 31 metabolites were quantitatively determined, and time-course metabolic response of the plant during different days after treatment was measured. Results demonstrated RF as a potential multivariate method for GC-MS analysis of changes in plant metabolome under insecticide stress.

  16. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    metabolomic profiling of women with and without post- traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to derive a signature of chronic stress and then apply that metabolomic...noted that phobic anxiety and social isolation were suggestively associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer (hazard ratios of 1.14 and 1.24...TERMS ovarian cancer, psychosocial stress, depression, anxiety , social support, metabolomics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  17. Infection by a foliar endophyte elicits novel arabidopside-based plant defence reactions in its host, Cirsium arvense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Susan E; Eschen, Rene; Horwood, Julia M; Gange, Alan C; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi live asymptomatically within plants. They are usually regarded as nonpathogenic or even mutualistic, but whether plants respond antagonistically to their presence remains unclear, particularly in the little-studied associations between endophytes and nongraminoid herbaceous plants. We investigated the effects of the endophyte Chaetomium cochlioides on leaf chemistry in Cirsium arvense. Plants were sprayed with spores; leaf material from both subsequent new growth and the sprayed leaves was analysed 2 wk later. Infection frequency was 91% and 63% for sprayed and new growth, respectively, indicating that C. cochlioides rapidly infects new foliage. Metabolomic analyses revealed marked changes in leaf chemistry with infection, especially in new growth. Changes in several novel oxylipin metabolites were detected, including arabidopsides reported here for the first time in a plant species other than Arabidopsis thaliana, and a jasmonate-containing galactolipid. The production of these metabolites in response to endophyte presence, particularly in newly infected foliage, suggests that endophytes elicit similar chemical responses in plants to those usually produced following wounding, herbivory and pathogen invasion. Whether endophytes benefit their hosts may depend on a complex series of chemically mediated interactions between the plant, the endophyte, other microbial colonists and natural enemies.

  18. Metabolomics of Oxidative Stress in Recent Studies of Endogenous and Exogenously Administered Intermediate Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G. Pelton

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic metabolism occurs in a background of oxygen radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS that originate from the incomplete reduction of molecular oxygen in electron transfer reactions. The essential role of aerobic metabolism, the generation and consumption of ATP and other high energy phosphates, sustains a balance of approximately 3000 essential human metabolites that serve not only as nutrients, but also as antioxidants, neurotransmitters, osmolytes, and participants in ligand-based and other cellular signaling. In hypoxia, ischemia, and oxidative stress, where pathological circumstances cause oxygen radicals to form at a rate greater than is possible for their consumption, changes in the composition of metabolite ensembles, or metabolomes, can be associated with physiological changes. Metabolomics and metabonomics are a scientific disciplines that focuse on quantifying dynamic metabolome responses, using multivariate analytical approaches derived from methods within genomics, a discipline that consolidated innovative analysis techniques for situations where the number of biomarkers (metabolites in our case greatly exceeds the number of subjects. This review focuses on the behavior of cytosolic, mitochondrial, and redox metabolites in ameliorating or exacerbating oxidative stress. After reviewing work regarding a small number of metabolites—pyruvate, ethyl pyruvate, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate—whose exogenous administration was found to ameliorate oxidative stress, a subsequent section reviews basic multivariate statistical methods common in metabolomics research, and their application in human and preclinical studies emphasizing oxidative stress. Particular attention is paid to new NMR spectroscopy methods in metabolomics and metabonomics. Because complex relationships connect oxidative stress to so many physiological processes, studies from different disciplines were reviewed. All, however, shared the common goal of ultimately

  19. A metabolomic approach to animal vitreous humor topographical composition: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Locci

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a (1H-NMR-based metabolomic approach to explore the metabolomic signature of different topographical areas of vitreous humor (VH in an animal model. Five ocular globes were enucleated from five goats and immediately frozen at -80 °C. Once frozen, three of them were sectioned, and four samples corresponding to four different VH areas were collected: the cortical, core, and basal, which was further divided into a superior and an inferior fraction. An additional two samples were collected that were representative of the whole vitreous body. (1H-NMR spectra were acquired for twenty-three goat vitreous samples with the aim of characterizing the metabolomic signature of this biofluid and identifying whether any site-specific patterns were present. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVA of the spectral data were carried out, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA, and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA. A unique metabolomic signature belonging to each area was observed. The cortical area was characterized by lactate, glutamine, choline, and its derivatives, N-acetyl groups, creatine, and glycerol; the core area was characterized by glucose, acetate, and scyllo-inositol; and the basal area was characterized by branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, betaine, alanine, ascorbate, lysine, and myo-inositol. We propose a speculative approach on the topographic role of these molecules that are mainly responsible for metabolic differences among the as-identified areas. (1H-NMR-based metabolomic analysis has shown to be an important tool for investigating the VH. In particular, this approach was able to assess in the samples here analyzed the presence of different functional areas on the basis of a different metabolite distribution.

  20. PeroxisomeDB 2.0: an integrative view of the global peroxisomal metabolome