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  1. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Popov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The objectives of this work was to assess the benefits of the application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK models in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours (NET who were treatedwith Lu-177 DOTATATE. The model utilises clinical data on biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs obtained by whole body scintigraphy (WBS of the patients.Methods: The blood flow restricted (perfusion rate limited type of the PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs in individual human organs is based on the multi-compartment approach, which takes into account the main physiological processes in the organism: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME. The approachcalibrates the PBPK model for each patient in order to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation. Datasets obtained using WBS in four patients have been used to obtain the unknown model parameters. The scintigraphic data were acquired using a double head gamma camera in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The activity administered to each patient was 7400MBq.Results: Satisfactory agreement of the model predictions with the data obtained from the WBS for each patient has been achieved. Conclusion: The study indicates that the PBPK model can be used for more accurate calculation of biodistribution and absorbed doses in patients. This approach is the first attempt of utilizing scintigraphic data in PBPK models, which was obtained during Lu-177 peptide therapy of patients with NET.

  2. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling and Simulation Approaches: A Systematic Review of Published Models, Applications, and Model Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Jennifer E; Yu, Jingjing; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and simulation of drug disposition has emerged as an important tool in drug development, clinical study design and regulatory review, and the number of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling related publications and regulatory submissions have risen dramatically in recent years. However, the extent of use of PBPK modeling by researchers, and the public availability of models has not been systematically evaluated. This review evaluates PBPK-related publications to 1) identify the common applications of PBPK modeling; 2) determine ways in which models are developed; 3) establish how model quality is assessed; and 4) provide a list of publically available PBPK models for sensitive P450 and transporter substrates as well as selective inhibitors and inducers. PubMed searches were conducted using the terms "PBPK" and "physiologically based pharmacokinetic model" to collect published models. Only papers on PBPK modeling of pharmaceutical agents in humans published in English between 2008 and May 2015 were reviewed. A total of 366 PBPK-related articles met the search criteria, with the number of articles published per year rising steadily. Published models were most commonly used for drug-drug interaction predictions (28%), followed by interindividual variability and general clinical pharmacokinetic predictions (23%), formulation or absorption modeling (12%), and predicting age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and disposition (10%). In total, 106 models of sensitive substrates, inhibitors, and inducers were identified. An in-depth analysis of the model development and verification revealed a lack of consistency in model development and quality assessment practices, demonstrating a need for development of best-practice guidelines.

  3. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model for multiple exposure routes for soman in multiple species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeney, R.E.; Langenberg, J.P.; Maxwell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model has been developed in advanced computer simulation language (ACSL) to describe blood and tissue concentration-time profiles of the C(±)P(-) stereoisomers of soman after inhalation, subcutaneous and intravenous exposures at low (0.8-1.0 × LD50), m

  4. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR PREDICTING THE DERMAL DOSE AND DISPOSITION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are particularly suited for interpretation of cumulative risk via the dermal route for which aggregate exposure must be assessed for chemicals having a common mechanism of toxicity. To this end, a quantita...

  5. Recent Advances in Development and Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models: a Transition from Academic Curiosity to Regulatory Acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Jamei, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    There is a renewed surge of interest in applications of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models by the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory agencies. Developing PBPK models within a systems pharmacology context allows separation of the parameters pertaining to the animal or human body (the system) from that of the drug and the study design which is essential to develop generic drug-independent models used to extrapolate PK/PD properties in various healthy and patient populations...

  6. Prediction of the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of levofloxacin in humans based on an extrapolated PBPK model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liqin; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Jianwei; Wang, Yongming; Zhang, Jianlei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Dong, Weilin

    2016-08-01

    This study developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model in intraabdominally infected rats and extrapolated it to humans to predict the levofloxacin pharmacokinetics and penetration into tissues. Twelve male rats with intraabdominal infections induced by Escherichia coli received a single dose of 50 mg/kg body weight of levofloxacin. Blood plasma was collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 and 1440 min after injection, respectively. A PBPK model was developed in rats and extrapolated to humans using GastroPlus software. The predictions were assessed by comparing predictions and observations. In the plasma concentration-versus-time profile of levofloxacin in rats, C max was 23.570 μg/ml at 5 min after intravenous injection, and t1/2 was 2.38 h. The plasma concentration and kinetics in humans were predicted and validated by the observed data. Levofloxacin penetrated and accumulated with high concentrations in the heart, liver, kidney, spleen, muscle and skin tissues in humans. The predicted tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios in abdominal viscera were between 1.9 and 2.3. When rat plasma concentrations were known, extrapolation of a PBPK model was a method to predict the drug pharmacokinetics and penetration in humans. Levofloxacin had good penetration into the liver, kidney and spleen as well as other tissues in humans. This pathological model extrapolation may provide a reference for the study of antiinfective PK/PD. In our study, levofloxacin penetrated well into abdominal organs. Also ADR monitoring should be implemented when using levofloxacin. PMID:25753830

  7. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR ESTIMATION OF CUMULATIVE RISK FROM EXPOSURE TO THREE N-METHYL CARBAMATES: CARBARYL, ALDICARB, AND CARBOFURAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for a mixture of N-methyl carbamate pesticides was developed based on single chemical models. The model was used to compare urinary metabolite concentrations to levels from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHA...

  8. Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.Evans, M.V., Sawyer, M.E., Isaacs, K.K, and Wambaugh, J.With the development of efficient high-throughput (HT) in ...

  9. Providing a theoretical basis for nanotoxicity risk analysis departing from traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dirk P.

    The same novel properties of engineered nanoparticles that make them attractive may also present unique exposure risks. But, the traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling assumption of instantaneous equilibration likely does not apply to nanoparticles. This simulation-based research begins with development of a model that includes diffusion, active transport, and carrier mediated transport. An eigenvalue analysis methodology was developed to examine model behavior to focus future research. Simulations using the physico-chemical properties of size, shape, surface coating, and surface charge were performed and an equation was determined which estimates area under the curve for arterial blood concentration, which is a surrogate of nanoparticle dose. Results show that the cellular transport processes modeled in this research greatly affect the biokinetics of nanoparticles. Evidence suggests that the equation used to estimate area under the curve for arterial blood concentration can be written in terms of nanoparticle size only. The new paradigm established by this research leverages traditional in vitro, in vivo, and PBPK modeling, but includes area under the curve to bridge animal testing results to humans. This new paradigm allows toxicologists and policymakers to then assess risk to a given exposure and assist in setting appropriate exposure limits for nanoparticles. This research provides critical understanding of nanoparticle biokinetics and allows estimation of total exposure at any toxicological endpoint in the body. This effort is a significant contribution as it highlights future research needs and demonstrates how modeling can be used as a tool to advance nanoparticle risk assessment.

  10. Life-Stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model Applications to Screen Environmental Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation discusses methods used to extrapolate from in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) toxicity data for an endocrine pathway to in vivo for early life stages in humans, and the use of a life stage PBPK model to address rapidly changing physiological parameters. A...

  11. Reproductive performance in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) may be affected by organohalogen contaminants as shown by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F.;

    2009-01-01

    quotient (RQ) evaluation to more quantitatively evaluate the effect risk on reproduction (embryotoxicity and teratogenicity) based on the critical body residue (CBR) concept and using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. We applied modelling approaches to PCBs, p,p′-DDE, dieldrin......RQs above 1 suggested risk for OHC additive effects. Thus, previous suggestions of possible adverse health effects in polar bears correlated to OHC exposure are supported by the present study. This study also indicates that PBPK models may be a supportive tool in the evaluation of possible OHC-mediated...... effects, including reproductive, were conducted during 1990–2006. However, it has been difficult to determine the nature of the effects induced by OHC exposures on wild caught polar bears using body burden data and associated changes in reproductive organs and systems. We therefore conducted a risk...

  12. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  13. Application of Bayesian population physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to pesticide kinetics studies in protected marine mammals: DDT, DDE, and DDD in harbor porpoises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Liesbeth; Yang, Raymond S H; Das, Krishna; Covaci, Adrian; Blust, Ronny

    2013-05-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in marine mammals is a challenge because of the lack of parameter information and the ban on exposure experiments. To minimize uncertainty and variability, parameter estimation methods are required for the development of reliable PBPK models. The present study is the first to develop PBPK models for the lifetime bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDD in harbor porpoises. In addition, this study is also the first to apply the Bayesian approach executed with Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations using two data sets of harbor porpoises from the Black and North Seas. Parameters from the literature were used as priors for the first "model update" using the Black Sea data set, the resulting posterior parameters were then used as priors for the second "model update" using the North Sea data set. As such, PBPK models with parameters specific for harbor porpoises could be strengthened with more robust probability distributions. As the science and biomonitoring effort progress in this area, more data sets will become available to further strengthen and update the parameters in the PBPK models for harbor porpoises as a species anywhere in the world. Further, such an approach could very well be extended to other protected marine mammals.

  14. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ( PBPK/PD ) MODEL FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE AND RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) is a PBPK/PD modeling system that was developed by EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). The ERDEM framework provides the flexibility either to use existing models and to build new PBPK and PBPK/PD models to address...

  15. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-v...

  16. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingtao Lu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models for chemicals can be resource-intensive, as neither chemical-specific parameters nor in vivo pharmacokinetic data are easily available for model construction. Previously developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be a great resource for the construction of models pertaining to new chemicals. A PBPK knowledgebase was compiled and developed from existing PBPK-related articles and used to develop new models. From 2,039 PBPK-related articles published between 1977 and 2013, 307 unique chemicals were identified for use as the basis of our knowledgebase. Keywords related to species, gender, developmental stages, and organs were analyzed from the articles within the PBPK knowledgebase. A correlation matrix of the 307 chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase was calculated based on pharmacokinetic-relevant molecular descriptors. Chemicals in the PBPK knowledgebase were ranked based on their correlation toward ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Next, multiple chemicals were selected to represent exact matches, close analogues, or non-analogues of the target case study chemicals. Parameters, equations, or experimental data relevant to existing models for these chemicals and their analogues were used to construct new models, and model predictions were compared to observed values. This compiled knowledgebase provides a chemical structure-based approach for identifying PBPK models relevant to other chemical entities. Using suitable correlation metrics, we demonstrated that models of chemical analogues in the PBPK knowledgebase can guide the construction of PBPK models for other chemicals.

  17. MEGen: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George D Loizou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are being used in an increasing number of different areas. These not only include the human safety assessment of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, biocides and environmental chemicals but also for food animal, wild mammal and avian risk assessment. The value of PBPK models is that they are tools for estimating tissue dosimetry by integrating in vitro and in vivo mechanistic, pharmacokinetic and toxicological information through their explicit mathematical description of important anatomical, physiological and biochemical determinants of chemical uptake, disposition and elimination. However, PBPK models are perceived as complex, data hungry, resource intensive and time consuming. In addition, model validation and verification are hindered by the relative complexity of the equations. To begin to address these issues a freely available web application for the rapid construction and documentation of bespoke PBPK models is under development. Here we present an overview of the current capabilities of MEGen, a model equation generator and parameter database and discuss future developments.

  18. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: approaches for enabling personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmanshenn, Clara; Scherholz, Megerle; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2016-10-01

    Personalized medicine strives to deliver the 'right drug at the right dose' by considering inter-person variability, one of the causes for therapeutic failure in specialized populations of patients. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a key tool in the advancement of personalized medicine to evaluate complex clinical scenarios, making use of physiological information as well as physicochemical data to simulate various physiological states to predict the distribution of pharmacokinetic responses. The increased dependency on PBPK models to address regulatory questions is aligned with the ability of PBPK models to minimize ethical and technical difficulties associated with pharmacokinetic and toxicology experiments for special patient populations. Subpopulation modeling can be achieved through an iterative and integrative approach using an adopt, adapt, develop, assess, amend, and deliver methodology. PBPK modeling has two valuable applications in personalized medicine: (1) determining the importance of certain subpopulations within a distribution of pharmacokinetic responses for a given drug formulation and (2) establishing the formulation design space needed to attain a targeted drug plasma concentration profile. This review article focuses on model development for physiological differences associated with sex (male vs. female), age (pediatric vs. young adults vs. elderly), disease state (healthy vs. unhealthy), and temporal variation (influence of biological rhythms), connecting them to drug product formulation development within the quality by design framework. Although PBPK modeling has come a long way, there is still a lengthy road before it can be fully accepted by pharmacologists, clinicians, and the broader industry. PMID:27647273

  19. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic knowledgebase and web-based interface for rapid model ranking and querying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific pa...

  20. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Methodology, Applications, and Limitations with a Focus on Its Role in Pediatric Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was introduced years ago, but it has not been practiced significantly. However, interest in and implementation of this modeling technique have grown, as evidenced by the increased number of publications in this field. This paper demonstrates briefly the methodology, applications, and limitations of PBPK modeling with special attention given to discuss the use of PBPK models in pediatric drug development and some examples described in detail. Although PBPK models do have some limitations, the potential benefit from PBPK modeling technique is huge. PBPK models can be applied to investigate drug pharmacokinetics under different physiological and pathological conditions or in different age groups, to support decision-making during drug discovery, to provide, perhaps most important, data that can save time and resources, especially in early drug development phases and in pediatric clinical trials, and potentially to help clinical trials become more “confirmatory” rather than “exploratory”.

  1. Characterizing uncertainty and population variability in the toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, rats, and humans using an updated database, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, and Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a comprehensive, Bayesian, PBPK model-based analysis of the population toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites in mice, rats, and humans, considering a wider range of physiological, chemical, in vitro, and in vivo data than any previously published analysis of TCE. The toxicokinetics of the 'population average,' its population variability, and their uncertainties are characterized in an approach that strives to be maximally transparent and objective. Estimates of experimental variability and uncertainty were also included in this analysis. The experimental database was expanded to include virtually all available in vivo toxicokinetic data, which permitted, in rats and humans, the specification of separate datasets for model calibration and evaluation. The total combination of these approaches and PBPK analysis provides substantial support for the model predictions. In addition, we feel confident that the approach employed also yields an accurate characterization of the uncertainty in metabolic pathways for which available data were sparse or relatively indirect, such as GSH conjugation and respiratory tract metabolism. Key conclusions from the model predictions include the following: (1) as expected, TCE is substantially metabolized, primarily by oxidation at doses below saturation; (2) GSH conjugation and subsequent bioactivation in humans appear to be 10- to 100-fold greater than previously estimated; and (3) mice had the greatest rate of respiratory tract oxidative metabolism as compared to rats and humans. In a situation such as TCE in which there is large database of studies coupled with complex toxicokinetics, the Bayesian approach provides a systematic method of simultaneously estimating model parameters and characterizing their uncertainty and variability. However, care needs to be taken in its implementation to ensure biological consistency, transparency, and objectivity.

  2. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR TOLUENE IN THE LONG EVANS RAT: BODY COMPOSITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhaled toluene was developed for Long-Evans rats as a component of an exposure-dose-response (EDR) model for volatile organic compounds. The PBPK model was needed to link airborne toluene exposure to its concentration in b...

  3. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for trichloroethylene and its oxidative metabolites.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, J W

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) pharmacokinetics have been studied in experimental animals and humans for over 30 years. Compartmental and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been developed for the uptake, distribution, and metabolism of TCE and the production, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of P450-mediated metabolites of TCE. TCE is readily taken up into systemic circulation by oral and inhalation routes of exposure and is rapidly metabolized by the hepatic P450 syst...

  5. Developing a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model Knowledgebase in Support of Provisional Model Construction - poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models requires a lot data, such as the chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data. Previously-developed, well-parameterized, and thoroughly-vetted models can be great resource for supporting the constr...

  6. EVALUATION OF ORAL AND INTRAVENOUS ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS, PLASMA PROTEIN BINDING AND UTERINE TISSUE DOSE METRICS OF BPA: A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC APPROACH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed t...

  7. Bayesian Uncertainty Analysis of PBPK Model Predictions for Permethrin in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncertainty analysis of human physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model predictions can pose a significant challenge due to data limitations. As a result of these limitations, human models are often derived from extrapolated animal PBPK models, for which there is usuall...

  8. A Workflow for Global Sensitivity Analysis of PBPK Models

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, Kevin; Cotton, Richard; Loizou, George D.

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have a potentially significant role in the development of a reliable predictive toxicity testing strategy. The structure of PBPK models are ideal frameworks into which disparate in vitro and in vivo data can be integrated and utilized to translate information generated, using alternative to animal measures of toxicity and human biological monitoring data, into plausible corresponding exposures. However, these models invariably include the de...

  9. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict Disposition of CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 Metabolized Drugs in Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Alice Ban; Nallani, Srikanth C.; Zhao, Ping; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Isoherranen, Nina; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2013-01-01

    Conducting pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in pregnant women is challenging. Therefore, we asked if a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model could be used to evaluate different dosing regimens for pregnant women. We refined and verified our previously published pregnancy PBPK model by incorporating cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 suppression (based on caffeine PK) and CYP2D6 induction (based on metoprolol PK) into the model. This model accounts for gestational age–dependent changes in materna...

  10. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for aldicarb and its metabolites in rats and human using exposure-related dose Estimating Model (ERDEM)%应用ERDEM模型为涕灭威及其代谢物构建大鼠和人的PBPK/PD模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巢迎妍; 张辉; 张晓菲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct the PBPK/PD models for aldicarb in rats and humans to help understandits disposition in both species in order to use the models for risk assessment purposes due to aldicarb exposure. MethodsThe PBPK/PD models were constructed using the ERDEM ( Exposure-related dose estimating model ) platform. Themodel structures for both species included a full gastrointestinal compartment, liver metabolism, urinary excretion, fecalelimination,and bimolecular acetylcholinesterase ( AChE ) inhibition by aldicarb and its two oxidized metabolites, aldi-carb sulfoxide and aldicarb sulfone. Experimentally reported values or estimation of physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical parameters were obtained from the open literature or optimized by fitting to the experimental data. Results The rat model simulation of oral exposure of 0. 4 mg/kg aldicarb indicated that aldicarb had an overall half-life of 1. 35 h,and 96. 6% of the dose was excreted in urine compared to the measured 91. 6% at 144 h after oral exposure. AChE activity in blood was inhibited to 31 % of the control level at 0. 35 h in the rat model compared to the measured 42. 5% at 0. 5 h after oral exposure of 0. 33 mg/kg aldicarb. In the human model,the simulation showed that the minimum blood AChE activity was 76. 9% at 1 h compared to the measured 75. 3% after a 0. 05 mg/kg dose of aldicarb. Conclusion The ERDEM model simulations for both species were consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, the models constructed in the ERDEM platform may be helpful in evaluating human health risk due to aldicarb exposure.%目的 为构建涕灭威在大鼠和人的生理药代动力学/药效学(PBPK/PD)模型,以进一步了解涕灭威在两物种体内的转化过程,从而用于其风险评估.方法 采用暴露相关的剂量估算模型(Exposure-related dose estimating model,ERDEM)的构建平台进行模型构建.两个物种的模型结构均包括完整的胃肠道、肝脏代谢、尿排泄

  11. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part II: Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Manganese Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a variety of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models have been developed for the essential element manganese. This paper reviews the development of PBPK models (e.g., adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal rats, nonhuman primates, and adult, pregnant, lactating, and neonatal humans and relevant risk assessment applications. Each PBPK model incorporates critical features including dose-dependent saturable tissue capacities and asymmetrical diffusional flux of manganese into brain and other tissues. Varied influx and efflux diffusion rate and binding constants for different brain regions account for the differential increases in regional brain manganese concentrations observed experimentally. We also present novel PBPK simulations to predict manganese tissue concentrations in fetal, neonatal, pregnant, or aged individuals, as well as individuals with liver disease or chronic manganese inhalation. The results of these simulations could help guide risk assessors in the application of uncertainty factors as they establish exposure guidelines for the general public or workers.

  12. Maximum Recommended Dosage of Lithium for Pregnant Women Based on a PBPK Model for Lithium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Horton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of bipolar disorder with lithium therapy during pregnancy is a medical challenge. Bipolar disorder is more prevalent in women and its onset is often concurrent with peak reproductive age. Treatment typically involves administration of the element lithium, which has been classified as a class D drug (legal to use during pregnancy, but may cause birth defects and is one of only thirty known teratogenic drugs. There is no clear recommendation in the literature on the maximum acceptable dosage regimen for pregnant, bipolar women. We recommend a maximum dosage regimen based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model. The model simulates the concentration of lithium in the organs and tissues of a pregnant woman and her fetus. First, we modeled time-dependent lithium concentration profiles resulting from lithium therapy known to have caused birth defects. Next, we identified maximum and average fetal lithium concentrations during treatment. Then, we developed a lithium therapy regimen to maximize the concentration of lithium in the mother’s brain, while maintaining the fetal concentration low enough to reduce the risk of birth defects. This maximum dosage regimen suggested by the model was 400 mg lithium three times per day.

  13. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  14. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses

  15. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics of Matrine in the Rat after Oral Administration of Pure Chemical and ACAPHA

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Guanghua; Law, Francis C. P.

    2009-01-01

    ACAPHA, a botanical drug for the treatment of human esophageal cancer in China, is under investigation as a lung cancer chemoprevention agent at the BC Cancer Agency (Vancouver, BC, Canada). Little or no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of ACAPHA in animals. The objectives of this study were as follows: to examine the disposition kinetics of matrine, a bioactive marker of ACAPHA in the rat; to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model...

  16. PKQuest_Java: free, interactive physiologically based pharmacokinetic software package and tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitt David G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK uses a realistic organ model to describe drug kinetics. The blood-tissue exchange of each organ is characterized by its volume, perfusion, metabolism, capillary permeability and blood/tissue partition coefficient. PBPK applications require both sophisticated mathematical modeling software and a reliable complete set of physiological parameters. Currently there are no software packages available that combine ease of use with the versatility that is required of a general PBPK program. Findings The program is written in Java and is available for free download at http://www.pkquest.com/. Included in the download is a detailed tutorial that discusses the pharmacokinetics of 6 solutes (D2O, amoxicillin, desflurane, propofol, ethanol and thiopental illustrated using experimental human pharmacokinetic data. The complete PBPK description for each solute is stored in Excel spreadsheets that are included in the download. The main features of the program are: 1 Intuitive and versatile interactive interface; 2 Absolute and semi-logarithmic graphical output; 3 Pre-programmed optimized human parameter data set (but, arbitrary values can be input; 4 Time dependent changes in the PBPK parameters; 5 Non-linear parameter optimization; 6 Unique approach to determine the oral "first pass metabolism" of non-linear solutes (e.g. ethanol; 7 Pulmonary perfusion/ventilation heterogeneity for volatile solutes; 8 Input and output of Excel spreadsheet data; 9 Antecubital vein sampling. Conclusion PKQuest_Java is a free, easy to use, interactive PBPK software routine. The user can either directly use the pre-programmed optimized human or rat data set, or enter an arbitrary data set. It is designed so that drugs that are classified as "extracellular" or "highly fat soluble" do not require information about tissue/blood partition coefficients and can be modeled by a minimum of user input parameters. PKQuest

  17. USE OF EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL ( ERDEM ) TO CONSTRUCT A PBPK /MODEL FOR CARBOFURAN WITH THE REPORTED EXPERIMENTAL DATA IN THE RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand the relationships among carbofuran exposure, dose, and effects, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed for the rat using the Exposure Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) framework.

  18. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Pediatric Oncology Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Nathalie; Waters, Nigel J

    2016-07-01

    Childhood cancer represents more than 100 rare and ultra-rare diseases, with an estimated 12,400 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. As such, this much smaller patient population has led to pediatric oncology drug development lagging behind that for adult cancers. Developing drugs for pediatric malignancies also brings with it a number of unique trial design considerations, including flexible enrollment approaches, age-appropriate formulation, acceptable sampling schedules, and balancing the need for age-stratified dosing regimens, given the smaller patient populations. The regulatory landscape for pediatric pharmacotherapy has evolved with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) legislation such as the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act. In parallel, regulatory authorities have recommended the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, for example, in the recently issued FDA Strategic Plan for Accelerating the Development of Therapies for Pediatric Rare Diseases. PBPK modeling provides a quantitative and systems-based framework that allows the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on drug exposure to be modeled in a mechanistic fashion. The application of PBPK modeling in drug development for pediatric cancers is relatively nascent, with several retrospective analyses of cytotoxic therapies, and latterly for targeted agents such as obatoclax and imatinib. More recently, we have employed PBPK modeling in a prospective manner to inform the first pediatric trials of pinometostat and tazemetostat in genetically defined populations (mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and integrase interactor-1-deficient sarcomas, respectively). In this review, we evaluate the application of PBPK modeling in pediatric cancer drug development and discuss the important challenges that lie ahead in this field. PMID:26936973

  19. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics joined with in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of ADME: a marriage under the arch of systems pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2012-07-01

    Classic pharmacokinetics (PK) rarely takes into account the full knowledge of physiology and biology of the human body. However, physiologically based PK (PBPK) is built mainly from drug-independent "system" information. PBPK is not a new concept, but it has shown a very rapid rise in recent years. This has been attributed to a greater connectivity to in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) techniques for predicting drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and their variability in humans. The marriage between PBPK and IVIVE under the overarching umbrella of "systems biology" has removed many constraints related to cutoff approaches on prediction of ADME. PBPK-IVIVE linked models have repeatedly shown their value in guiding decisions when predicting the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on PK of drugs. A review of the achievements and shortcomings of the models might suggest better strategies in extending the success of PBPK-IVIVE to pharmacodynamics (PD) and drug safety.

  20. Simulation of the pharmacokinetics of bisoprolol in healthy adults and patients with impaired renal function using whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-fu LI; Kun WANG; Rui CHEN; Hao-ru ZHAO; Jin YANG; Qing-shan ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To develop and evaluate a whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) model of bisoprolol and to simulate its exposure and disposition in healthy adults and patients with renal function impairment.Methods:Bisoprolol dispositions in 14 tissue compartments were described by perfusion-limited compartments.Based the tissue composition equations and drug-specific properties such as log P,permeability,and plasma protein binding published in literatures,the absorption and whole-body distribution of bisoprolol was predicted using the ‘Advanced Compartmental Absorption Transit’ (ACAT)model and the whole-body disposition model,respectively.Renal and hepatic clearances were simulated using empirical scaling methods followed by incorporation into the WB-PBPK model.Model refinements were conducted after a comparison of the simulated concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters with the observed data in healthy adults following intravenous and oral administration.Finally,the WB-PBPK model coupled with a Monte Carlo simulation was employed to predict the mean and variability of bisoprolol pharmacokinetics in virtual healthy subjects and patients.Results:The simulated and observed data after both intravenous and oral dosing showed good agreement for all of the dose levels in the reported normal adult population groups.The predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC,Cmax,and Tmax) were reasonably consistent (<1.3-fold error) with the observed values after single oral administration of doses ranging from of 5 to 20 mg using the refined WB-PBPK model.The simulated plasma profiles after multiple oral administration of bisoprolol in healthy adults and patient with renal impairment matched well with the observed profiles.Conclusion:The WB-PBPK model successfully predicts the intravenous and oral pharmacokinetics of bisoprolol across multiple dose levels in diverse normal adult human populations and patients with renal insufficiency.

  1. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models. PMID:26652678

  2. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  3. Estimating marbofloxacin withdrawal time in broiler chickens using a population physiologically based pharmacokinetics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Yang, Y R; Wang, L; Huang, X H; Qiao, G; Zeng, Z L

    2014-12-01

    Residue depletion of marbofloxacin in broiler chicken after oral administration at 5 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days was studied in this study. The areas under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to ∞ (AUC0-∞ s) of marbofloxacin in tissues and plasma were used to calculate tissue/plasma partition coefficients (PX s). Based on PX s and the other parameters derived from published studies, a flow-limited physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model was developed to predict marbofloxacin concentrations, which were then compared with those derived from the residue depletion study so as to validate this model. Considering individual difference in drug disposition, a Monte Carlo simulation included 1000 iterations was further incorporated into the validated model to generate a population PBPK model and to estimate the marbofloxacin residue withdrawal times in edible tissues. The withdrawal periods were compared to those derived from linear regression analysis. The PBPK model presented here successfully predicted the measured concentrations in all tissues. The withdrawal times in all edible tissues derived from the population PBPK model were longer than those from linear regression analysis, and based on the residues in kidney, a withdrawal time of 4 days was estimated for marbofloxacin after oral administration at 5 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days. It was shown that population PBPK model could be used to accurately predict marbofloxacin residue withdrawal time in edible tissues in broiler chickens.

  4. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiz Mumtaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling using microsoft excel and visual basic for applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Dale J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are mathematical descriptions depicting the relationship between external exposure and internal dose. These models have found great utility for interspecies extrapolation. However, specialized computer software packages, which are not widely distributed, have typically been used for model development and utilization. A few physiological models have been reported using more widely available software packages (e.g., Microsoft Excel), but these tend to include less complex processes and dose metrics. To ascertain the capability of Microsoft Excel and Visual Basis for Applications (VBA) for PBPK modeling, models for styrene, vinyl chloride, and methylene chloride were coded in Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL), Excel, and VBA, and simulation results were compared. For styrene, differences between ACSL and Excel or VBA compartment concentrations and rates of change were less than +/-7.5E-10 using the same numerical integration technique and time step. Differences using VBA fixed step or ACSL Gear's methods were generally Excel and VBA PBPK model dose metrics differed by no more than -0.013% or -0.23%, respectively, from ACSL results. These differences are likely attributable to different step sizes rather than different numerical integration techniques. These results indicate that Microsoft Excel and VBA can be useful tools for utilizing PBPK models, and given the availability of these software programs, it is hoped that this effort will help facilitate the use and investigation of PBPK modeling. PMID:20021074

  6. Pharmacokinetics and PBPK Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Richard A.

    2010-07-01

    Since the landmark report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (NRC 1993), children at all stages of development, from fertilization through postnatal maturation, have explicitly been identified as an area of emphasis in human health risk assessments. Exposure to drugs or chemicals at any point in development has the potential for causing irreversible changes that can be unique to each stage of development (Grabowski and Daston 1983; Rodier 1978; Wilson 1973). While exposures of a developing embryo or fetus are mediated by the mother, postnatal exposures consist of maternal influences via breastfeeding as well as environmental factors (Figure 1). As a result, risk assessments for developmental toxicity must consider the sources as well as timing of potential exposures to adequately protect children when they may be the most exposed or the most sensitive to adverse consequences (NRC 1993).

  7. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  8. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis. PMID:22577377

  9. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?-An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh-Delerme, Céline; Artigou, Catherine; Bodin, Laurent; Tardif, Robert; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Verdier, Cécile; Sater, Nessryne; Ould-Elhkim, Mostafa; Desmares, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0-35 mg/L) in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004). The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  10. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?—An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Huynh-Delerme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situation due to defective mechanical ventilation could increase the systemic exposure to ethanol via inhalation route, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling was used to predict ethanol blood levels. Under the worst case scenario, the simulation by PBPK modeling showed that the maximum blood ethanol concentration which can be predicted of 5.9 mg/l is of the same order of magnitude to endogenous ethanol concentration (mean = 1.1 mg/L; median = 0.4 mg/L; range = 0–35 mg/L in nondrinker humans (Al-Awadhi et al., 2004. The present study does not support the likelihood that EBHS leads to an increase in systemic ethanol concentration high enough to provoke an acute pancreatitis.

  11. A Workflow for Global Sensitivity Analysis of PBPK Models

    OpenAIRE

    GeorgeDLoizou

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have a potentially significant role in the development of a reliable predictive toxicity testing strategy. The structure of PBPK models are ideal frameworks into which disparate in vitro and in vivo data can be integrated and utilised to translate information generated, using alternative to animal measures of toxicity and human biological monitoring data, into plausible corresponding exposures. However, these models invariably include the descripti...

  12. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics Is Impacting Drug Development and Regulatory Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, M; Lesko, L J; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2015-06-01

    It is no coincidence that the reports of two meetings, one organized by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in March 2014, and the other by the UK Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory (MHRA), in collaboration with ABPI (the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry), in June 2014, have been published in tandem in CPT-PSP.12 Both reports deal with the same topic, namely, the impact of physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) in clinical drug development and the best practices for such applications. This reflects the transition of PBPK from academic curiosity to industrial norm, manifested by the regulatory agencies encouraging its use and receiving an increasing number of submissions containing PBPK models. The goal of both meetings was to help determine the need and facilitate the development of regulatory guidances on this subject within the conceptual framework of model informed drug development and regulatory decision-making. A further reflection of this intent is the publication by the European Medicines Agency of a Concept Paper on PBPK.3 One is reminded of a similar train of events surrounding the introduction of population PK/PD and nonlinear mixed effects modeling in the early-late 1990s, again with encouragement and receptivity of regulatory agencies leading to FDA guidance on the topic.4 Indeed, the intention of PBPK modeling and simulation is to complement other approaches, such as compartmental modeling, or, in some cases, replace them with a more mechanistic approach. PBPK models represent an important class of models that characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) processes and their underlying biological and physiological drivers. An increased understanding of these drivers and their unique interactions with drug substance and formulation factors provides critical insights into how drugs will behave in healthy volunteers and patients with disease. PMID:26225258

  13. Reconstructing Exposures from Biomarkers using Exposure-Pharmacokinetic Modeling - A Case Study with Carbaryl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sources of uncertainty involved in exposure reconstruction for a short half-life chemical, carbaryl, were characterized using the Cumulative and Aggregate Risk Evaluation System (CARES), an exposure model, and a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. CARES was...

  14. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in the development of microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determination of the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model-aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been considered, robust design criteria and steps to build such systems have not yet been defined mathematically. In this paper, we first discuss strategies for incorporating body-on-a-chip technology into the current PBPK modeling-based drug discovery to provide a conceptual model. We propose two types of platforms that can be involved in the different stages of PBPK modeling and drug development; these are μOrgans-on-a-chip and μHuman-on-a-chip. Then we establish the design principles for both types of systems and develop parametric design equations that can be used to determine dimensions and operating conditions. In addition, we discuss the availability of the critical parameters required to satisfy the design criteria, consider possible limitations for estimating such parameter values and propose strategies to address such limitations. This paper is intended to be a useful guide to the researchers focused on the design of microphysiological platforms for PBPK/PD based drug discovery. PMID:25739725

  15. Use of novel inhalation kinetic studies to refine physiologically-based-pharmacokinetic models for ethanol in non-pregnant and pregnant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol (EtOH) exposure induces a variety of concentration-dependent neurological and developmental effects in the rat. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to predict the inhalation exposure concentrations necessary to produce blood EtOH concentrat...

  16. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of POPs in Greenlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Krüger, Tanja; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2014-03-01

    Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the potential health impact in the Arctic far from the emission sources have been highlighted in numerous studies. As a supplement to human POP biomonitoring studies, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was set up to estimate the fate of POPs in Greenlandic Inuit's liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to traditional Greenlandic diet. The PBPK model described metabolism, excretion and POP accumulation on the basis of their physicochemical properties and metabolic rates in the organisms. Basic correlations between chemically analyzed blood POP concentrations and calculated daily POP intake from food questionnaire of 118 middle age (18-35years) Greenlandic Inuits from four cities in West Greenland (Qaanaaq: n=40; Qeqertarsuaq: n=36; Nuuk: n=20; Narsaq: n=22) taken during 2003 to 2006 were analyzed. The dietary items included were polar bear, caribou, musk oxen, several marine species such as whales, seals, bird and fish as well as imported food. The contaminant concentrations of the dietary items as well as their chemical properties, uptake, biotransformation and excretion allowed us to estimate the POP concentration in liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to the traditional Greenlandic diet using the PBPK model. Significant correlations were found between chemically analyzed POP blood concentrations and calculated daily intake of POPs for Qeqertarsuaq, Nuuk and Narsaq Inuit but not for the northernmost settlement Qaanaaq, probably because the highest blood POP level was found in this district which might mask the interview-based POP calculations. Despite the large variation in circulating blood POP concentrations, the PBPK model predicted blood concentrations of a factor 2-3 within the actual measured values. Moreover, the PBPK model showed that estimated blood POP concentration increased significantly after consumption of meals

  17. A Mechanistic Pharmacokinetic Model for Liver Transporter Substrates Under Liver Cirrhosis Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Barton, H A; Maurer, T S

    2015-06-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a disease characterized by the loss of functional liver mass. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to interpret and predict how the interplay among physiological changes in cirrhosis affects pharmacokinetics. However, previous PBPK models under cirrhotic conditions were developed for permeable cytochrome P450 substrates and do not directly apply to substrates of liver transporters. This study characterizes a PBPK model for liver transporter substrates in relation to the severity of liver cirrhosis. A published PBPK model structure for liver transporter substrates under healthy conditions and the physiological changes for cirrhosis are combined to simulate pharmacokinetics of liver transporter substrates in patients with mild and moderate cirrhosis. The simulated pharmacokinetics under liver cirrhosis reasonably approximate observations. This analysis includes meta-analysis to obtain system-dependent parameters in cirrhosis patients and a top-down approach to improve understanding of the effect of cirrhosis on transporter-mediated drug disposition under cirrhotic conditions. PMID:26225262

  18. Reduction of a Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Stabilise the Bayesian Analysis of Clinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Thierry; Tsamandouras, Nikolaos; Dumitras, Swati; Pigeolet, Etienne; Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly used in drug development for their ability to predict drug concentrations in clinically relevant tissues and to extrapolate across species, experimental conditions and sub-populations. A whole-body PBPK model can be fitted to clinical data using a Bayesian population approach. However, the analysis might be time consuming and numerically unstable if prior information on the model parameters is too vague given the complexity of the system. We suggest an approach where (i) a whole-body PBPK model is formally reduced using a Bayesian proper lumping method to retain the mechanistic interpretation of the system and account for parameter uncertainty, (ii) the simplified model is fitted to clinical data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques and (iii) the optimised reduced PBPK model is used for extrapolation. A previously developed 16-compartment whole-body PBPK model for mavoglurant was reduced to 7 compartments while preserving plasma concentration-time profiles (median and variance) and giving emphasis to the brain (target site) and the liver (elimination site). The reduced model was numerically more stable than the whole-body model for the Bayesian analysis of mavoglurant pharmacokinetic data in healthy adult volunteers. Finally, the reduced yet mechanistic model could easily be scaled from adults to children and predict mavoglurant pharmacokinetics in children aged from 3 to 11 years with similar performance compared with the whole-body model. This study is a first example of the practicality of formal reduction of complex mechanistic models for Bayesian inference in drug development.

  19. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for the antibiotic ertapenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michele L; Manning, Cammey C; Forbes, Whitney; Maiden, Michelle; Nikas, Ariel N

    2016-02-01

    Ertapenem is an antibiotic commonly used to treat a broad spectrum of infections, which is part of a broader class of antibiotics called carbapenem. Unlike other carbapenems, ertapenem has a longer half-life and thus only has to be administered once a day. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to investigate the uptake, distribution, and elimination of ertapenem following a single one gram dose. PBPK modeling incorporates known physiological parameters such as body weight, organ volumes, and blood flow rates in particular tissues. Furthermore, ertapenem is highly bound in human blood plasma; therefore, nonlinear binding is incorporated in the model since only the free portion of the drug can saturate tissues and, hence, is the only portion of the drug considered to be medicinally effective. Parameters in the model were estimated using a least squares inverse problem formulation with published data for blood concentrations of ertapenem for normal height, normal weight males. Finally, an uncertainty analysis of the parameter estimation and model predictions is presented. PMID:26776257

  20. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology.

  1. Reconstructing Organophosphorus Pesticide Doses Using the Reversed Dosimetry Approach in a Simple Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chensheng Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrated the development of a simple pharmacokinetic (SPK model aiming to estimate the absorbed chlorpyrifos doses using urinary biomarker data, 3,5,6-trichlorpyridinol as the model input. The effectiveness of the SPK model in the pesticide risk assessment was evaluated by comparing dose estimates using different urinary composite data. The dose estimates resulting from the first morning voids appeared to be lower than but not significantly different to those using before bedtime, lunch or dinner voids. We found similar trend for dose estimates using three different urinary composite data. However, the dose estimates using the SPK model for individual children were significantly higher than those from the conventional physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling using aggregate environmental measurements of chlorpyrifos as the model inputs. The use of urinary data in the SPK model intuitively provided a plausible alternative to the conventional PBPK model in reconstructing the absorbed chlorpyrifos dose.

  2. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Patrick M; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the clinical pharmacokinetics of new therapeutic entities facilitates decision making during drug discovery, and increases the probability of success for early clinical trials. Standard strategies employed for predicting the pharmacokinetics of small-molecule drugs (e.g., allometric scaling) are often not useful for predicting the disposition monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as mAbs frequently demonstrate species-specific non-linear pharmacokinetics that is related to mAb-target binding (i.e., target-mediated drug disposition, TMDD). The saturable kinetics of TMDD are known to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the sites of target expression (which determines the accessibility of target to mAb), the extent of target expression, the rate of target turnover, and the fate of mAb-target complexes. In most cases, quantitative information on the determinants of TMDD is not available during early phases of drug discovery, and this has complicated attempts to employ mechanistic mathematical models to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of mAbs. In this report, we introduce a simple strategy, employing physiologically-based modeling, to predict mAb disposition in humans. The approach employs estimates of inter-antibody variability in rate processes of extravasation in tissues and fluid-phase endocytosis, estimates for target concentrations in tissues derived through use of categorical immunohistochemical scores, and in vitro measures of the turnover of target and target-mAb complexes. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for four mAbs (cetuximab, figitumumab, dalotuzumab, trastuzumab) directed against three targets (epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). The proposed modeling strategy was able to predict well the pharmacokinetics of cetuximab, dalotuzumab, and trastuzumab at a range of doses, but trended towards underprediction of figitumumab concentrations

  3. Assessment of DCE-MRI parameters for brain tumors through implementation of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model approaches for Gd-DOTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, Marios; Kontopodis, Eleftherios; Van Cauter, Sophie; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Marias, Kostas

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used for detailed characterization of pathology of lesions sites, such as brain tumors, by quantitative analysis of tracer's data through the use of pharmacokinetic (PK) models. A key component for PK models in DCE-MRI is the estimation of the concentration-time profile of the tracer in a nearby vessel, referred as Arterial Input Function (AIF). The aim of this work was to assess through full body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model approaches the PK profile of gadoteric acid (Gd-DOTA) and explore potential application for parameter estimation in DCE-MRI based on PBPK-derived AIFs. The PBPK simulations were generated through Simcyp(®) platform and the predicted PK parameters for Gd-DOTA were compared with available clinical data regarding healthy volunteers and renal impairment patients. The assessment of DCE-MRI parameters was implemented by utilizing similar virtual profiles based on gender, age and weight to clinical profiles of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme. The PBPK-derived AIFs were then used to compute DCE-MRI parameters through the Extended Tofts Model and compared with the corresponding ones derived from image-based AIF computation. The comparison involved: (i) image measured AIF of patients vs AIF of in silico profile, and, (ii) population average AIF vs in silico mean AIFs. The results indicate that PBPK-derived AIFs allowed the estimation of comparable imaging biomarkers with those calculated from typical DCE-MRI image analysis. The incorporation of PBPK models and potential utilization of in silico profiles to real patient data, can provide new perspectives in DCE-MRI parameter estimation and data analysis. PMID:27647272

  4. Overview of Dioxin Kinetics and Application of Dioxin Physiologically Based Phannacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The available data on the pharmacokinetics of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in animals and humans have been thoroughly reviewed in literature. It is evident based on these reviews and other analyses that three distinctive features of TCDD play important roles in dete...

  5. The pharmacokinetics of the interstitial space in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics of extracellular solutes is determined by the blood-tissue exchange kinetics and the volume of distribution in the interstitial space in the different organs. This information can be used to develop a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model applicable to most extracellular solutes. Methods The human pharmacokinetic literature was surveyed to tabulate the steady state and equilibrium volume of distribution of the solutes mannitol, EDTA, morphi...

  6. Human Blood Concentrations of Cotinine, a Biomonitoring Marker for Tobacco Smoke, Extrapolated from Nicotine Metabolism in Rats and Humans and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kitajima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study defined a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for nicotine and its primary metabolite cotinine in humans, based on metabolic parameters determined in vitro using relevant liver microsomes, coefficients derived in silico, physiological parameters derived from the literature, and an established rat PBPK model. The model consists of an absorption compartment, a metabolizing compartment, and a central compartment for nicotine and three equivalent compartments for cotinine. Evaluation of a rat model was performed by making comparisons with predicted concentrations in blood and in vivo experimental pharmacokinetic values obtained from rats after oral treatment with nicotine (1.0 mg/kg, a no-observed-adverse-effect level for 14 days. Elimination rates of nicotine in vitro were established from data from rat liver microsomes and from human pooled liver microsomes. Human biomonitoring data (17 ng nicotine and 150 ng cotinine per mL plasma 1 h after smoking from pooled five male Japanese smokers (daily intake of 43 mg nicotine by smoking revealed that these blood concentrations could be calculated using a human PBPK model. These results indicate that a simplified PBPK model for nicotine/cotinine is useful for a forward dosimetry approach in humans and for estimating blood concentrations of other related compounds resulting from exposure to low chemical doses.

  7. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  8. A Novel Method for Assessing Drug Degradation Product Safety Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models and Stochastic Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Stamatis, Stephen D; Kirsch, Lee E

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety risk due to toxic degradation products is a potentially critical quality issue for a small group of useful drug substances. Although the pharmacokinetics of toxic drug degradation products may impact product safety, these data are frequently unavailable. The objective of this study is to incorporate the prediction capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models into a rational drug degradation product risk assessment procedure using a series of model drug degradants (substituted anilines). The PBPK models were parameterized using a combination of experimental and literature data and computational methods. The impact of model parameter uncertainty was incorporated into stochastic risk assessment procedure for estimating human safe exposure levels based on the novel use of a statistical metric called "PROB" for comparing probability that a human toxicity-target tissue exposure exceeds the rat exposure level at a critical no-observed-adverse-effect level. When compared with traditional risk assessment calculations, this novel PBPK approach appeared to provide a rational basis for drug instability risk assessment by focusing on target tissue exposure and leveraging physiological, biochemical, biophysical knowledge of compounds and species.

  9. A Novel Method for Assessing Drug Degradation Product Safety Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models and Stochastic Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Stamatis, Stephen D; Kirsch, Lee E

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety risk due to toxic degradation products is a potentially critical quality issue for a small group of useful drug substances. Although the pharmacokinetics of toxic drug degradation products may impact product safety, these data are frequently unavailable. The objective of this study is to incorporate the prediction capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models into a rational drug degradation product risk assessment procedure using a series of model drug degradants (substituted anilines). The PBPK models were parameterized using a combination of experimental and literature data and computational methods. The impact of model parameter uncertainty was incorporated into stochastic risk assessment procedure for estimating human safe exposure levels based on the novel use of a statistical metric called "PROB" for comparing probability that a human toxicity-target tissue exposure exceeds the rat exposure level at a critical no-observed-adverse-effect level. When compared with traditional risk assessment calculations, this novel PBPK approach appeared to provide a rational basis for drug instability risk assessment by focusing on target tissue exposure and leveraging physiological, biochemical, biophysical knowledge of compounds and species. PMID:25900395

  10. Enabling PBPK model development through the application of freely available techniques for the creation of a chemically-annotatedcollection of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    The creation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for a new chemical requires the selection of an appropriate model structure and the collection of a large amount of data for parameterization. Commonly, a large proportion of the needed information is collected ...

  11. The contribution of protein binding in the liver to the body burden of dibenzo-p-docins and dibenzo-p-furans: Analysis by means of PBPK modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; Fiolet DCM; Cuijpers CEJ; LBM

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study "Physiologically Based PharmacoKinetic" (PBPK) modeling was used to estimate the amount of dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-p-furans in mother's milk. This amount is considered to reflect the total amount of dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzo-p-furans in the body (body burden). In the PB

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics in Drug Development and Regulatory Science: A workshop report (Georgetown University, Washington, DC, May 29–30, 2002)

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Malcolm; Balant, Luc; Peck, Carl

    2004-01-01

    A 2-day workshop on “Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) in Drug Development and Regulatory Science” came to a successful conclusion on May 30, 2002, in Washington, DC. More than 120 international participants from the environmental and predominantly pharmaceutical industries, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and universities attended this workshop, organized by the Center for Drug Development Science, Georgetown University, Washington, DC. The first of its kind specifically devo...

  13. Concomitant use of tamoxifen and endoxifen in postmenopausal early breast cancer: prediction of plasma levels by physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Dickschen, Kristin; Eissing, Thomas; Mürdter, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Willmann, Stefan; Hempel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To overcome cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) mediated tamoxifen resistance in postmenopausal early breast cancer, CYP2D6 phenotype-adjusted tamoxifen dosing in patients with impaired CYP2D6 metabolism and/or the application of endoxifen, the most potent tamoxifen metabolite, are alternative treatment options. To elucidate both strategies comprehensively we used a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approach. Methods Firstly simulation of increasing tamoxifen dosages was ...

  14. Proposed mechanistic description of dose-dependent BDE-47 urinary elimination in mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@umontreal.ca [BioSimulation Consulting Inc., Newark, DE (United States); Departments of Environmental and Occupational Health, Medicine Faculty, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sanders, J. Michael, E-mail: sander10@mail.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wikoff, Daniele, E-mail: dwikoff@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Austin, TX (United States); Birnbaum, Linda S., E-mail: birnbaumls@niehs.nih.gov [National Cancer Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a wide variety of consumer applications as additive flame retardants. In North America, scientists have noted continuing increases in the levels of PBDE congeners measured in human serum. Some recent studies have found that PBDEs are associated with adverse health effects in humans, in experimental animals, and wildlife. This laboratory previously demonstrated that urinary elimination of 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is saturable at high doses in mice; however, this dose-dependent urinary elimination has not been observed in adult rats or immature mice. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to examine the mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in adult mice using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. To support this objective, additional laboratory data were collected to evaluate the predictions of the PBPK model using novel information from adult multi-drug resistance 1a/b knockout mice. Using the PBPK model, the roles of mouse major urinary protein (a blood protein carrier) and P-glycoprotein (an apical membrane transporter in proximal tubule cells in the kidneys, brain, intestines, and liver) were investigated in BDE-47 elimination. The resulting model and new data supported the major role of m-MUP in excretion of BDE-47 in the urine of adult mice, and a lesser role of P-gp as a transporter of BDE-47 in mice. This work expands the knowledge of BDE-47 kinetics between species and provides information for determining the relevancy of these data for human risk assessment purposes. - Highlights: • We report the first study on PBPK model on flame retardant in mice for BDE-47. • We examine mechanism of urinary elimination of BDE-47 in mice using a PBPK model. • We investigated roles of m-MUP and P-gp as transporters in urinary elimination.

  15. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of target-mediated drug disposition of bortezomib in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E

    2015-10-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 h, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment. PMID:26391023

  16. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min JS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jee Sun Min,1 Doyun Kim,1 Jung Bae Park,1 Hyunjin Heo,1 Soo Hyeon Bae,2 Jae Hong Seo,1 Euichaul Oh,1 Soo Kyung Bae1 1Integrated Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea Background: Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs is clinically important. Objective: To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenylethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino-2-propanol (M-1, in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods: The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results: The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol

  17. Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of BPA in rats at different life stages using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoxia, E-mail: Xiaoxia.Yang@fda.hhs.gov; Doerge, Daniel R.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has received considerable attention throughout the last decade due to its widespread use in consumer products. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed in neonatal and adult rats to quantitatively evaluate age-dependent pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II metabolites. The PBPK model was calibrated in adult rats using studies on BPA metabolism and excretion in the liver and gastrointestinal tract, and pharmacokinetic data with BPA in adult rats. For immature rats the hepatic and gastrointestinal metabolism of BPA was inferred from studies on the maturation of phase II enzymes coupled with serum time course data in pups. The calibrated model predicted the measured serum concentrations of BPA and BPA conjugates after administration of 100 μg/kg of d6-BPA in adult rats (oral gavage and intravenous administration) and postnatal days 3, 10, and 21 pups (oral gavage). The observed age-dependent BPA serum concentrations were partially attributed to the immature metabolic capacity of pups. A comparison of the dosimetry of BPA across immature rats and monkeys suggests that dose adjustments would be necessary to extrapolate toxicity studies from neonatal rats to infant humans. - Highlights: • A PBPK model predicts the kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA) in young and adult rats. • BPA metabolism within enterocytes is required for fitting of oral BPA kinetic data. • BPA dosimetry in young rats is different than adult rats and young monkeys.

  18. Human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen extrapolated from in vivo animal pharmacokinetics using in vitro human hepatic clearances and simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for radio-labeled microdose clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics of drug substances orally administered in humans from rat pharmacokinetic data using tolbutamide and acetaminophen as model compounds. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from rat studies based on reported plasma concentrations were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors. In this extrapolation, in vitro metabolic clearance data were obtained using liver preparations. Rates of tolbutamide elimination were roughly similar in rat and human liver microsome experiments, but acetaminophen elimination by rat liver microsomes and cytosolic preparations showed a tendency to be faster than those in humans. Using a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, estimated human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen were consistent with reported concentrations. Tolbutamide cleared in a roughly similar manner in humans and rats, but medical-dose levels of acetaminophen cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in rats. The data presented here illustrate how pharmacokinetic data in combination with a simple PBPK model can be used to assist evaluations of the pharmacological/toxicological potential of new drug substances and for estimating human radiation exposures from radio-labeled drugs when planning human studies. (author)

  19. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics using physiologically based modeling: a retrospective analysis of 26 clinically tested drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Fenu, Luca A; Nijsen, Marjoleen J; Mackie, Claire E; Gilissen, Ron A H J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different physiologically based modeling strategies for the prediction of human pharmacokinetics. Plasma profiles after intravenous and oral dosing were simulated for 26 clinically tested drugs. Two mechanism-based predictions of human tissue-to-plasma partitioning (P(tp)) from physicochemical input (method Vd1) were evaluated for their ability to describe human volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)). This method was compared with a strategy that combined predicted and experimentally determined in vivo rat P(tp) data (method Vd2). Best V(ss) predictions were obtained using method Vd2, providing that rat P(tp) input was corrected for interspecies differences in plasma protein binding (84% within 2-fold). V(ss) predictions from physicochemical input alone were poor (32% within 2-fold). Total body clearance (CL) was predicted as the sum of scaled rat renal clearance and hepatic clearance projected from in vitro metabolism data. Best CL predictions were obtained by disregarding both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL2, 74% within 2-fold), whereas strong bias was seen using both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL1, 53% within 2-fold). The physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model, which combined methods Vd2 and CL2 yielded the most accurate predictions of in vivo terminal half-life (69% within 2-fold). The Gastroplus advanced compartmental absorption and transit model was used to construct an absorption-disposition model and provided accurate predictions of area under the plasma concentration-time profile, oral apparent volume of distribution, and maximum plasma concentration after oral dosing, with 74%, 70%, and 65% within 2-fold, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that PBPK models can lead to reasonable predictions of human pharmacokinetics. PMID:17620347

  20. PBPK model of methotrexate in cerebrospinal fluid ventricles using a combined microdialysis and MRI acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhonneur, Nolwenn; Noury, Fanny; Bruyère, Arnaud; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Le Corre, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the distribution of methotrexate (MTX) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lateral ventricles and in cisterna magna after 3rd intraventricular CSF administration in a rabbit model. MTX or gadolinium chelate (Gd-DOTA) was administered in the 3rd ventricle with a local microdialysis to study the pharmacokinetics at the site of administration and with a simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition in the 3rd ventricle, the lateral ventricles and in the cisterna magna. A specific CSF Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was then extrapolated for MTX from Gd-DOTA data. The relative contribution of elimination and distribution processes to the overall disposition of MTX and Gd-DOTA in the 3rd ventricle was similar (i.e., around 60% for CLE and 40% for CLI) suggesting that Gd-DOTA was a suitable surrogate marker for MTX disposition in ventricular CSF. The PBPK predictions for MTX both in CSF of the 3rd ventricle and in plasma were in accordance with the in vivo results. The present study showed that the combination of local CSF microdialysis with MRI acquisition of the brain ventricles and a PBPK model could be a useful methodology to estimate the drug diffusion within CSF ventricles after direct brain CSF administration. Such a methodology would be of interest to clinicians for a rationale determination and optimization of drug dosing parameters in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. PMID:27142258

  1. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for Fentanyl in support of the development of Provisional Advisory Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankaran, Harish, E-mail: harish.shankaran@pnnl.gov [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Adeshina, Femi [National Homeland Security Research Center, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Teeguarden, Justin G. [Systems Toxicology Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Provisional Advisory Levels (PALs) are tiered exposure limits for toxic chemicals in air and drinking water that are developed to assist in emergency responses. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can support this process by enabling extrapolations across doses, and exposure routes, thereby addressing gaps in the available toxicity data. Here, we describe the development of a PBPK model for Fentanyl – a synthetic opioid used clinically for pain management – to support the establishment of PALs. Starting from an existing model for intravenous Fentanyl, we first optimized distribution and clearance parameters using several additional IV datasets. We then calibrated the model using pharmacokinetic data for various formulations, and determined the absorbed fraction, F, and time taken for the absorbed amount to reach 90% of its final value, t90. For aerosolized pulmonary Fentanyl, F = 1 and t90 < 1 min indicating complete and rapid absorption. The F value ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 for oral and various transmucosal routes. Oral Fentanyl was absorbed the slowest (t90 ∼ 300 min); the absorption of intranasal Fentanyl was relatively rapid (t90 ∼ 20–40 min); and the various oral transmucosal routes had intermediate absorption rates (t90 ∼ 160–300 min). Based on these results, for inhalation exposures, we assumed that all of the Fentanyl inhaled from the air during each breath directly, and instantaneously enters the arterial circulation. We present model predictions of Fentanyl blood concentrations in oral and inhalation scenarios relevant for PAL development, and provide an analytical expression that can be used to extrapolate between oral and inhalation routes for the derivation of PALs. - Highlights: • We develop a Fentanyl PBPK model for relating external dose to internal levels. • We calibrate the model to oral and inhalation exposures using > 50 human datasets. • Model predictions are in good agreement with the available

  2. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats.

  3. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Framework for Quantitative Prediction of an Herb–Drug Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S J; Gufford, B T; Dua, R; Fediuk, D J; Graf, T N; Scarlett, Y V; Frederick, K S; Fisher, M B; Oberlies, N H; Paine, M F

    2014-01-01

    Herb–drug interaction predictions remain challenging. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was used to improve prediction accuracy of potential herb–drug interactions using the semipurified milk thistle preparation, silibinin, as an exemplar herbal product. Interactions between silibinin constituents and the probe substrates warfarin (CYP2C9) and midazolam (CYP3A) were simulated. A low silibinin dose (160 mg/day × 14 days) was predicted to increase midazolam area under the curve (AUC) by 1%, which was corroborated with external data; a higher dose (1,650 mg/day × 7 days) was predicted to increase midazolam and (S)-warfarin AUC by 5% and 4%, respectively. A proof-of-concept clinical study confirmed minimal interaction between high-dose silibinin and both midazolam and (S)-warfarin (9 and 13% increase in AUC, respectively). Unexpectedly, (R)-warfarin AUC decreased (by 15%), but this is unlikely to be clinically important. Application of this PBPK modeling framework to other herb–drug interactions could facilitate development of guidelines for quantitative prediction of clinically relevant interactions. PMID:24670388

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of inhaled radon to calculate absorbed doses in mice, rats, and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first report to provide radiation doses, arising from inhalation of radon itself, in mice and rats. To quantify absorbed doses to organs and tissues in mice, rats, and humans, we computed the behavior of inhaled radon in their bodies on the basis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. It was assumed that radon dissolved in blood entering the gas exchange compartment is transported to any tissue by the blood circulation to be instantaneously distributed according to a tissue/blood partition coefficient. The calculated concentrations of radon in the adipose tissue and red bone marrow following its inhalation were much higher than those in the others, because of the higher partition coefficients. Compared with a previous experimental data for rats and model calculation for humans, the present calculation was proved to be valid. Absorbed dose rates to organs and tissues were estimated to be within the range of 0.04-1.4 nGy (Bqm-3)-1 day-1 for all the species. Although the dose rates are not so high, it may be better to pay attention to the dose to the red bone marrow from the perspective of radiation protection. For more accurate dose assessment, it is necessary to update tissue/blood partition coefficients of radon that strongly govern the result of the PBPK modeling. (author)

  5. Human biofluid concentrations of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in chimeric mice with humanized liver administered with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Koichiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a reproductive toxicant in male rodents. The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP, a primary metabolite of DEHP) in humans by using data from oral administration of DEHP to chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. MEHP and its glucuronide were detected in plasma from control mice and chimeric mice after single oral doses of 250mg DEHP/kg body weight. Biphasic plasma concentration-time curves of MEHP and its glucuronide were seen only in control mice. MEHP and its glucuronide were extensively excreted in urine within 24h in mice with humanized liver. In contrast, fecal excretion levels of MEHP glucuronide were high in control mice compared with those with humanized liver. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated urine MEHP concentrations in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. This research illustrates how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of the primary or secondary metabolites of DEHP.

  6. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict disposition of CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 metabolized drugs in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Alice Ban; Nallani, Srikanth C; Zhao, Ping; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Isoherranen, Nina; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2013-04-01

    Conducting pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in pregnant women is challenging. Therefore, we asked if a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model could be used to evaluate different dosing regimens for pregnant women. We refined and verified our previously published pregnancy PBPK model by incorporating cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 suppression (based on caffeine PK) and CYP2D6 induction (based on metoprolol PK) into the model. This model accounts for gestational age-dependent changes in maternal physiology and hepatic CYP3A activity. For verification, the disposition of CYP1A2-metabolized drug theophylline (THEO) and CYP2D6-metabolized drugs paroxetine (PAR), dextromethorphan (DEX), and clonidine (CLO) during pregnancy was predicted. Our PBPK model successfully predicted THEO disposition during the third trimester (T3). Predicted mean postpartum to third trimester (PP:T3) ratios of THEO area under the curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration, and minimum plasma concentration were 0.76, 0.95, and 0.66 versus observed values 0.75, 0.89, and 0.72, respectively. The predicted mean PAR steady-state plasma concentration (Css) ratio (PP:T3) was 7.1 versus the observed value 3.7. Predicted mean DEX urinary ratio (UR) (PP:T3) was 2.9 versus the observed value 1.9. Predicted mean CLO AUC ratio (PP:T3) was 2.2 versus the observed value 1.7. Sensitivity analysis suggested that a 100% induction of CYP2D6 during T3 was required to recover the observed PP:T3 ratios of PAR Css, DEX UR, and CLO AUC. Based on these data, it is prudent to conclude that the magnitude of hepatic CYP2D6 induction during T3 ranges from 100 to 200%. Our PBPK model can predict the disposition of CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A drugs during pregnancy. PMID:23355638

  7. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  8. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U-14C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up 14C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than Km (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments

  9. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaku, Tomoyuki, E-mail: takakut@sc.sumitomo-chem.co.jp; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U-{sup 14}C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up {sup 14}C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K{sub m} (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments.

  10. A Workflow for Global Sensitivity Analysis of PBPK Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eMcNally

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models have a potentially significant role in the development of a reliable predictive toxicity testing strategy. The structure of PBPK models are ideal frameworks into which disparate in vitro and in vivo data can be integrated and utilised to translate information generated, using alternative to animal measures of toxicity and human biological monitoring data, into plausible corresponding exposures. However, these models invariably include the description of well known non-linear biological processes such as, enzyme saturation and interactions between parameters such as, organ mass and body mass. Therefore, an appropriate sensitivity analysis technique is required which can quantify the influences associated with individual parameters, interactions between parameters and any non-linear processes. In this report we have defined a workflow for sensitivity analysis of PBPK models that is computationally feasible, accounts for interactions between parameters, and can be displayed in the form of a bar chart and cumulative sum line (Lowry plot, which we believe is intuitive and appropriate for toxicologists, risk assessors and regulators.

  11. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cas...

  12. Use of a PBPK model with dose-dependent elimination rates predicts higher peak dioxin exposures than previously estimated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emond, C. [NRC, NAS, WA, DC (United States); Michalek, J.E. [Air Force Research Lab., Brooks City-Base, TX (United States); Birnbaum, L.S.; DeVito, M.J. [PKB, ETD, ORD, NHEERL U.S. EPA, RTP, NC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is associated with increased risk for cancer, diabetes and reproductive toxicities in numerous epidemiological studies. Several of these studies base exposure estimates on measurements of blood levels years after the accidental or occupational exposures. Peak exposures have been estimated in these studies assuming a mono or biphasic elimination rate for TCDD, with estimates of half-life ranging from 5 to 12 years. Recent clinical studies suggest that the elimination rate of TCDD is dose dependent. To address this question a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model can be used to predict the concentration of TCDD with a dose-dependent elimination rate. The aims of this study were to validate a dose-dependent elimination rate by using a PBPK model and to adequately predict the concentration of TCDD shortly after the exposure.

  13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for ionic silver and silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachler G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gerald Bachler, Natalie von Goetz, Konrad Hungerbühler ETH Zurich, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Silver is a strong antibiotic that is increasingly incorporated into consumer products as a bulk, salt, or nanosilver, thus potentially causing side-effects related to human exposure. However, the fate and behavior of (nanosilver in the human body is presently not well understood. In order to aggregate the existing experimental information, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK was developed in this study for ionic silver and nanosilver. The structure of the model was established on the basis of toxicokinetic data from intravenous studies. The number of calibrated parameters was minimized in order to enhance the predictive capability of the model. We validated the model structure for both silver forms by reproducing exposure conditions (dermal, oral, and inhalation of in vivo experiments and comparing simulated and experimentally assessed organ concentrations. Therefore, the percutaneous, intestinal, or pulmonary absorption fraction was estimated based on the blood silver concentration of the respective experimental data set. In all of the cases examined, the model could successfully predict the biodistribution of ionic silver and 15–150 nm silver nanoparticles, which were not coated with substances designed to prolong the circulatory time (eg, polyethylene glycol. Furthermore, the results of our model indicate that: (1 within the application domain of our model, the particle size and coating had a minor influence on the biodistribution; (2 in vivo, it is more likely that silver nanoparticles are directly stored as insoluble salt particles than dissolve into Ag+; and (3 compartments of the mononuclear phagocytic system play a minor role in exposure levels that are relevant for human consumers. We also give an example of how the model can be used in exposure and risk assessments based on five

  14. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid in rats, extrapolation to pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Zhou, Y-F; Yu, Y; Zhao, D-H; Shi, W; Fang, B-H; Liu, Y-H

    2015-02-01

    A multi-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the disposition of cyadox (CYX) and its metabolite quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA) after a single oral administration was developed in rats (200 mg/kg b.w. of CYX). Considering interspecies differences in physiology and physiochemistry, the model efficiency was validated by pharmacokinetic data set in swine. The model included six compartments that were blood, muscle, liver, kidney, adipose, and a combined compartment for the rest of tissues. The model was parameterized using rat plasma and tissue concentration data that were generated from this study. Model simulations were achieved using a commercially available software program (ACSLXL ibero version 3.0.2.1). Results supported the validity of the model with simulated tissue concentrations within the range of the observations. The correlation coefficients of the predicted and experimentally determined values for plasma, liver, kidney, adipose, and muscles in rats were 0.98, 0.98, 0.98, 0.99, and 0.95, respectively. The rat model parameters were then extrapolated to pigs to estimate QCA disposition in tissues and validated by tissue concentration of QCA in swine. The correlation coefficients between the predicted and observed values were over 0.90. This model could provide a foundation for developing more reliable pig models once more data are available.

  15. Predicting lung dosimetry of inhaled particleborne benzo[a]pyrene using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jerry; Franzen, Allison; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Lumpkin, Michael; Crowell, Susan; Meredith, Clive; Loccisano, Anne; Gentry, Robinan; Clewell, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a by-product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and plant/wood products, including tobacco. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BaP for the rat was extended to simulate inhalation exposures to BaP in rats and humans including particle deposition and dissolution of absorbed BaP and renal elimination of 3-hydroxy benzo[a]pyrene (3-OH BaP) in humans. The clearance of particle-associated BaP from lung based on existing data in rats and dogs suggest that the process is bi-phasic. An initial rapid clearance was represented by BaP released from particles followed by a slower first-order clearance that follows particle kinetics. Parameter values for BaP-particle dissociation were estimated using inhalation data from isolated/ventilated/perfused rat lungs and optimized in the extended inhalation model using available rat data. Simulations of acute inhalation exposures in rats identified specific data needs including systemic elimination of BaP metabolites, diffusion-limited transfer rates of BaP from lung tissue to blood and the quantitative role of macrophage-mediated and ciliated clearance mechanisms. The updated BaP model provides very good prediction of the urinary 3-OH BaP concentrations and the relative difference between measured 3-OH BaP in nonsmokers versus smokers. This PBPK model for inhaled BaP is a preliminary tool for quantifying lung BaP dosimetry in rat and humans and was used to prioritize data needs that would provide significant model refinement and robust internal dosimetry capabilities. PMID:27569524

  16. Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models to Incorporate Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors into Cumulative Risk Assessment: A Case Study of Pesticide Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan I. Levy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative risk assessment has been proposed as an approach to evaluate the health risks associated with simultaneous exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD models can allow for the inclusion and evaluation of multiple stressors, including non-chemical stressors, but studies have not leveraged PBPK/PD models to jointly consider these disparate exposures in a cumulative risk context. In this study, we focused on exposures to organophosphate (OP pesticides for children in urban low-income environments, where these children would be simultaneously exposed to other pesticides (including pyrethroids and non-chemical stressors that may modify the effects of these exposures (including diet. We developed a methodological framework to evaluate chemical and non-chemical stressor impacts on OPs, utilizing an existing PBPK/PD model for chlorpyrifos. We evaluated population-specific stressors that would influence OP doses or acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, the relevant PD outcome. We incorporated the impact of simultaneous exposure to pyrethroids and dietary factors on OP dose through the compartments of metabolism and PD outcome within the PBPK model, and simulated combinations of stressors across multiple exposure ranges and potential body weights. Our analyses demonstrated that both chemical and non-chemical stressors can influence the health implications of OP exposures, with up to 5-fold variability in AChE inhibition across combinations of stressor values for a given OP dose. We demonstrate an approach for modeling OP risks in the presence of other population-specific environmental stressors, providing insight about co-exposures and variability factors that most impact OP health risks and contribute to children’s cumulative health risk from pesticides. More generally, this framework can be used to inform cumulative risk assessment for any compound impacted by

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of PLGA nanoparticles with varied mPEG content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avgoustakis K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mingguang Li1, Zoi Panagi2, Konstantinos Avgoustakis2, Joshua Reineke11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Rion, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Biodistribution of nanoparticles is dependent on their physicochemical properties (such as size, surface charge, and surface hydrophilicity. Clear and systematic understanding of nanoparticle properties' effects on their in vivo performance is of fundamental significance in nanoparticle design, development and optimization for medical applications, and toxicity evaluation. In the present study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was utilized to interpret the effects of nanoparticle properties on previously published biodistribution data. Biodistribution data for five poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle formulations prepared with varied content of monomethoxypoly (ethyleneglycol (mPEG (PLGA, PLGA-mPEG256, PLGA-mPEG153, PLGA-mPEG51, PLGA-mPEG34 were collected in mice after intravenous injection. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed and evaluated to simulate the mass-time profiles of nanoparticle distribution in tissues. In anticipation that the biodistribution of new nanoparticle formulations could be predicted from the physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, multivariate regression analysis was performed to build the relationship between nanoparticle properties (size, zeta potential, and number of PEG molecules per unit surface area and biodistribution parameters. Based on these relationships, characterized physicochemical properties of PLGA-mPEG495 nanoparticles (a sixth formulation were used to calculate (predict biodistribution profiles. For all five initial formulations, the developed model adequately simulates the experimental data indicating that the model is suitable for

  18. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling of distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of POPs in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Letcher, Robert J; Dietz, Rune

    2015-10-01

    We used PBPK (physiologically-based pharmacokinetic) modelling to investigate distribution, bioaccumulation and excretion of the seven POPs (persistent organic pollutants) CB-99, CB-153, HCB, oxychlordane, p,p'-DDE, BDE-47 and BDE-99 in 4 adult captive Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches fed minke whale (Balaenoptera acuterostrata) blubber for 500-635 days. The PBPK modelled POP concentrations in adipose tissue, liver, kidney and plasma were mostly within a factor 2 of actual measured tissue levels even for those at the lower concentration end. The excretion route for oxychlordane and CB-153 was modelled to be via faeces while lung alveolar excretion dominated for BDE-47, BDE-99, HCB, p,p'-DDE and CB-99. Furthermore the model suggested the retained mass of POPs after 500 and 635 days of exposure, respectively, to be relatively low despite these POPs being highly recalcitrant. The retention increased in the following order (% of total intake); p,p'-DDE (1%)tool in risk assessment of POPs in arctic mammals. PMID:26210746

  19. First dose in children: physiological insights into pharmacokinetic scaling approaches and their implications in paediatric drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Strougo, Ashley; Eissing, Thomas; Yassen, Ashraf; Willmann, Stefan; Danhof, Meindert; Freijer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Dose selection for “first in children” trials often relies on scaling of the pharmacokinetics from adults to children. Commonly used approaches are physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling (PBPK) and allometric scaling (AS) in combination with maturation of clearance for early life. In this investigation, a comparison of the two approaches was performed to provide insight into the physiological meaning of AS maturation functions and their interchangeability. The analysis focused on the ...

  20. An Age-Dependent Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model for the Organophosphorus Insecticide Chlorpyrifos in the Preweanling Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Poet, Torka S.

    2007-08-01

    Juvenile rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute toxicity of organophosphorus insecticides like chlorpyrifos (CPF). Age- and dose-dependent differences in metabolism may be responsible. Of importance is CYP450 activation and detoxification of CPF to chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon) and trichloropyridinol (TCP), as well as B-esterase (cholinesterase; ChE) and A-esterase (PON-1) detoxification of CPF-oxon to TCP. In the current study, a modified physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model incorporating age-dependent changes in CYP450, PON-1, and tissue ChE levels for rats was developed. In this model, age was used as a dependent function to estimate body weight which was then used to allometrically scale both metabolism and tissue ChE levels. Model simulations suggest that preweanling rats are particularly sensitive to CPF toxicity, with levels of CPF-oxon in blood and brain disproportionately increasing, relative to the response in adult rats. This age-dependent non-linear increase in CPF-oxon concentration may potentially result from the depletion of non-target B-esterases, and a lower PON-1 metabolic capacity in younger animals. These results indicate that the PBPK/PD model behaves consistently with the general understanding of CPF toxicity, pharmacokinetics and tissue ChE inhibition in neonatal and adult rats. Hence, this model represents an important starting point for developing a computational model to assess the neurotoxic potential of environmentally relevant organophosphate exposures in infants and children.

  1. A PBPK Model to Predict Disposition of CYP3A-Metabolized Drugs in Pregnant Women: Verification and Discerning the Site of CYP3A Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, A B; Nallani, S C; Zhao, P; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Unadkat, J D

    2012-01-01

    Besides logistical and ethical concerns, evaluation of safety and efficacy of medications in pregnant women is complicated by marked changes in pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs. For example, CYP3A activity is induced during the third trimester (T3). We explored whether a previously published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model could quantitatively predict PK profiles of CYP3A-metabolized drugs during T3, and discern the site of CYP3A induction (i.e., liver, intestine, or both). The model accounted for gestational age-dependent changes in maternal physiological function and hepatic CYP3A activity. For model verification, mean plasma area under the curve (AUC), peak plasma concentration (Cmax), and trough plasma concentration (Cmin) of midazolam (MDZ), nifedipine (NIF), and indinavir (IDV) were predicted and compared with published studies. The PBPK model successfully predicted MDZ, NIF, and IDV disposition during T3. A sensitivity analysis suggested that CYP3A induction in T3 is most likely hepatic and not intestinal. Our PBPK model is a useful tool to evaluate different dosing regimens during T3 for drugs cleared primarily via CYP3A metabolism.CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology (2012) 1, e3; doi:10.1038/psp.2012.2; advance online publication 26 September 2012. PMID:23835883

  2. Prediction of drug-drug interactions between various antidepressants and ritonavir using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Siccardi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression can impact on the treatment of HIV infection, and effective treatment of depressive conditions can have a beneficial effect improving adherence. However antidepressant treatment requires long-term maintenance, and is prone to pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDI with antiretrovirals. The aim of this study was to predict the magnitude of DDI between ritonavir (RTV and the most commonly prescribed antidepressants using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model simulating virtual clinical trials. In vitro data describing the physiochemical properties, absorption, metabolism, induction and inhibitory potential of RTV and five antidepressants were obtained from published literature. Interactions between RTV and antidepressants were evaluated using the full PBPK model implemented in the Simcyp Population-based Simulator (Version 11.1, Simcyp Limited, UK and virtual clinical studies were simulated on 50 Caucasian subjects receiving 100mg bid of RTV for 21 days plus sertraline (100mg qd, citalopram (40mg qd, fluoxetine (20mg qd, venlafaxine (25mg qd and then from day 14–21. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with observed values available in the literature. The simulated PK parameters of RTV, sertraline, citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazepine and venlafaxine given alone at standard dosage were similar to reference values obtain from published clinical studies. The effect of simulated RTV co-administration on sertaline, fluoxetine and venlaflaxine was an AUC decrease of 40%, 26% and 6%, respectively and on mirtazepine and citalopram, an AUC increase of 60% and 20% respectively. The magnitude of the simulated DDI between RTV and the antidepressants was overall weak to moderate according to the classification of the FDA. The modest magnitude of these drug-drug interactions could be explained by the fact that antidepressants are substrates of multiple isoforms thus metabolism can still occur through CYPs that are

  3. First principles pharmacokinetic modeling: A quantitative study on Cyclosporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mošat', Andrej; Lueshen, Eric; Heitzig, Martina;

    2013-01-01

    , require an effective methodology for solving parameter estimation challenges. This article solves the problem of rigorously estimating unknown biochemical reaction and transport parameters from in vivo datasets and identifying whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models.A rat blood...... circulation model was combined with biotransport, biochemical reactions and metabolism of the immunosuppressant Cyclosporin. We demonstrate the proposed methodology on a case study in Sprague-Dawley rats by bolus iv injections of 1.2, 6 and 30. mg/kg. Key pharmacokinetic parameters were determined, including...

  4. Incorporation of Therapeutic Interventions in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Human Clinical Case Reports of Accidental or Intentional Overdosing with Ethylene Glycol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corley, Rick A.; McMartin, K. E.

    2005-05-16

    Ethylene glycol is a high production volume chemical used in the manufacture of resins and fibers, antifreeze, deicing fluids, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids. Although occupational uses of ethylene glycol have not been associated with adverse effects, there are case reports where humans have either intentionally or accidentally ingested large quantities of ethylene glycol, primarily from antifreeze. The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol in humans and animals and can proceed through three stages, each associated with a different metabolite: central nervous system depression (ethylene glycol), cardiopulmonary effects associated with metabolic acidosis (glycolic acid) and ultimately renal toxicity (oxalic acid), depending upon the total amounts consumed and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed in a companion paper (Corley et al., 2004) was refined in this study to include clinically relevant treatment regimens for ethylene glycol poisoning such as hemodialysis or metabolic inhibition with either ethanol or fomepizole. Such modifications enabled the model to describe several human case reports which included analysis of ethylene glycol and/or glycolic acid. Such data and model simulations provide important confirmation that the PBPK model developed previously can adequately describe the pharmacokinetics of ethylene glycol in humans following low, occupational or environmentally relevant inhalation exposures, as well as massive oral doses even under conditions where treatments have been employed that markedly affect the disposition of ethylene glycol and glycolic acid. By integrating the case report data sets with controlled studies in this PBPK model, it was demonstrated that fomepizole, if administered early enough in a clinical situation, can be more effective than ethanol or hemodialysis in preventing the metabolism of ethylene glycol to more toxic metabolites. Hemodialysis remains an

  5. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for carbofuran in Sprague-Dawley rats using the exposure-related dose estimating model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Tsang, Andy M; Okino, Miles S; Power, Frederick W; Knaak, James B; Harrison, Lynda S; Dary, Curtis C

    2007-12-01

    Carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl-N-methylcarbamate), a broad spectrum N-methyl carbamate insecticide, and its metabolite, 3-hydroxycarbofuran, exert their toxicity by reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). To characterize AChE inhibition from carbofuran exposure, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed in the Exposure-Related Dose Estimating Model (ERDEM) platform for the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. Experimental estimates of physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical model parameters were obtained or based on data from the open literature. The PBPK/PD model structure included carbofuran metabolism in the liver to 16 known metabolites, enterohepatic circulation of glucuronic acid conjugates, and excretion in urine and feces. Bolus doses by ingestion of 50 microg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg carbofuran were simulated for the blood and brain AChE activity. The carbofuran ERDEM simulated a half-life of 5.2 h for urinary clearance, and the experimental AChE activity data were reproduced for the blood and brain. Thirty model parameters were found influential to the model outputs and were chosen for perturbation in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the impact of their variability on the model predictions. Results of the simulation runs indicated that the minimum AChE activity in the blood ranged from 29.3 to 79.0% (as 5th and 95th percentiles) of the control level with a mean of 55.9% (standard deviation = 15.1%) compared to an experimental value of 63%. The constructed PBPK/PD model for carbofuran in the SD rat provides a foundation for extrapolating to a human model that can be used for future risk assessment.

  6. Assessing drug distribution in tissues expressing P-glycoprotein through physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling: model structure and parameters determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression and activity of P-glycoproteins due to genetic or environmental factors may have a significant impact on drug disposition, drug effectiveness or drug toxicity. Hence, characterization of drug disposition over a wide range of conditions of these membrane transporters activities is required to better characterize drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. This work aims to improve our understanding of the impact of P-gp activity modulation on tissue distribution of P-gp substrate. Methods A PBPK model was developed in order to examine activity and expression of P-gp transporters in mouse brain and heart. Drug distribution in these tissues was first represented by a well-stirred (WS model and then refined by a mechanistic transport-based (MTB model that includes P-gp mediated transport of the drug. To estimate transport-related parameters, we developed an original three-step procedure that allowed extrapolation of in vitro measurements of drug permeability to the in vivo situation. The model simulations were compared to a limited set of data in order to assess the model ability to reproduce the important information of drug distributions in the considered tissues. Results This PBPK model brings insights into the mechanism of drug distribution in non eliminating tissues expressing P-gp. The MTB model accounts for the main transport mechanisms involved in drug distribution in heart and brain. It points out to the protective role of P-gp at the blood-brain barrier and represents thus a noticeable improvement over the WS model. Conclusion Being built prior to in vivo data, this approach brings an interesting alternative to fitting procedures, and could be adapted to different drugs and transporters. The physiological based model is novel and unique and brought effective information on drug transporters.

  7. More Power to OATP1B1: An Evaluation of Sample Size in Pharmacogenetic Studies Using a Rosuvastatin PBPK Model for Intestinal, Hepatic, and Renal Transporter-Mediated Clearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami Riedmaier, Ariane; Burt, Howard; Abduljalil, Khaled; Neuhoff, Sibylle

    2016-07-01

    Rosuvastatin is a substrate of choice in clinical studies of organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1- and OATP1B3-associated drug interactions; thus, understanding the effect of OATP1B1 polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin is crucial. Here, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was coupled with a power calculation algorithm to evaluate the influence of sample size on the ability to detect an effect (80% power) of OATP1B1 phenotype on pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin. Intestinal, hepatic, and renal transporters were mechanistically incorporated into a rosuvastatin PBPK model using permeability-limited models for intestine, liver, and kidney, respectively, nested within a full PBPK model. Simulated plasma rosuvastatin concentrations in healthy volunteers were in agreement with previously reported clinical data. Power calculations were used to determine the influence of sample size on study power while accounting for OATP1B1 haplotype frequency and abundance in addition to its correlation with OATP1B3 abundance. It was determined that 10 poor-transporter and 45 intermediate-transporter individuals are required to achieve 80% power to discriminate the AUC0-48h of rosuvastatin from that of the extensive-transporter phenotype. This number was reduced to 7 poor-transporter and 40 intermediate-transporter individuals when the reported correlation between OATP1B1 and 1B3 abundance was taken into account. The current study represents the first example in which PBPK modeling in conjunction with power analysis has been used to investigate sample size in clinical studies of OATP1B1 polymorphisms. This approach highlights the influence of interindividual variability and correlation of transporter abundance on study power and should allow more informed decision making in pharmacogenomic study design. PMID:27385171

  8. Inhalation exposure or body burden? Better way of estimating risk--An application of PBPK model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Dipanjali; Dutta, Chirasree; Sen, Subha

    2016-01-01

    We aim to establish a new way for estimating the risk from internal dose or body burden due to exposure of benzene in human subject utilizing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. We also intend to verify its applicability on human subjects exposed to different levels of benzene. We estimated personal inhalation exposure of benzene for two occupational groups namely petrol pump workers and car drivers with respect to a control group, only environmentally exposed. Benzene in personal air was pre-concentrated on charcoal followed by chemical desorption and analysis by gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). We selected urinary trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) as biomarker of benzene exposure and measured its concentration using solid phase extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Our estimated inhalation exposure of benzene was 137.5, 97.9 and 38.7 μg/m(3) for petrol pump workers, car drivers and environmentally exposed control groups respectively which resulted in urinary t,t-MA levels of 145.4±55.3, 112.6±63.5 and 60.0±34.9 μg g(-1) of creatinine, for the groups in the same order. We deduced a derivation for estimation of body burden from urinary metabolite concentration using PBPK model. Estimation of the internal dose or body burden of benzene in human subject has been made for the first time by the measurement of t,t-MA as a urinary metabolite using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model as a tool. The weight adjusted total body burden of benzene was estimated to be 17.6, 11.1 and 5.0 μg kg(-1) of body weight for petrol pump workers, drivers and the environmentally exposed control group, respectively using this method. We computed the carcinogenic risk using both the estimated internal benzene body burden and external exposure values using conventional method. Our study result shows that internal dose or body burden is not proportional to level of exposure rather have a

  9. Parameter optimization of pharmacokinetics based on artificial immune network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li; ZHOU Shao-dan; LU Hong-wen; XIE Fen; XU Wen-bo

    2008-01-01

    A new method for parameter optimization of pharmacokinetics based on an artificial immune network named PKAIN is proposed.To improve local searching ability of the artificial immune network,a partition-based concurrent simplex mutation is developed.By means of evolution of network cells in the PKAIN artificial immune network,an optimal set of parameters of a given pharmacokinetic model is obtained.The Laplace transform is applied to the pharmacokinetic difierential equations of remifentanil and its major metabolite,remifentanil acid.The PKAIN method is used to optimize parameters of the derived compartment models.Experimental results show that the twocompartment model is sufficient for the pharmacokinetic study of remifentanil acid for patients with mild degree of renal impairment.

  10. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates.

  11. Towards a Best Practice Approach in PBPK Modeling: Case Example of Developing a Unified Efavirenz Model Accounting for Induction of CYPs 3A4 and 2B6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, A; Barter, Z; Rowland-Yeo, K; Almond, L

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present efavirenz physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development as an example of our best practice approach that uses a stepwise approach to verify the different components of the model. First, a PBPK model for efavirenz incorporating in vitro and clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) data was developed to predict exposure following multiple dosing (600 mg q.d.). Alfentanil i.v. and p.o. drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies were utilized to evaluate and refine the CYP3A4 induction component in the liver and gut. Next, independent DDI studies with substrates of CYP3A4 (maraviroc, atazanavir, and clarithromycin) and CYP2B6 (bupropion) verified the induction components of the model (area under the curve [AUC] ratios within 1.0-1.7-fold of observed). Finally, the model was refined to incorporate the fractional contribution of enzymes, including CYP2B6, propagating autoinduction into the model (Racc 1.7 vs. 1.7 observed). This validated mechanistic model can now be applied in clinical pharmacology studies to prospectively assess both the victim and perpetrator DDI potential of efavirenz. PMID:27435752

  12. Towards a Best Practice Approach in PBPK Modeling: Case Example of Developing a Unified Efavirenz Model Accounting for Induction of CYPs 3A4 and 2B6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, A; Barter, Z; Rowland-Yeo, K; Almond, L

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we present efavirenz physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development as an example of our best practice approach that uses a stepwise approach to verify the different components of the model. First, a PBPK model for efavirenz incorporating in vitro and clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) data was developed to predict exposure following multiple dosing (600 mg q.d.). Alfentanil i.v. and p.o. drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies were utilized to evaluate and refine the CYP3A4 induction component in the liver and gut. Next, independent DDI studies with substrates of CYP3A4 (maraviroc, atazanavir, and clarithromycin) and CYP2B6 (bupropion) verified the induction components of the model (area under the curve [AUC] ratios within 1.0-1.7-fold of observed). Finally, the model was refined to incorporate the fractional contribution of enzymes, including CYP2B6, propagating autoinduction into the model (Racc 1.7 vs. 1.7 observed). This validated mechanistic model can now be applied in clinical pharmacology studies to prospectively assess both the victim and perpetrator DDI potential of efavirenz.

  13. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 μg d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Völkel et al., 2002). Völkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Völkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: ► A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. ► The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. ► Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. ► Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  14. Physiologically Based Modelling of Dioxins. I. Validation of a rodent toxicokinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; Slob W

    1993-01-01

    In this report a rodent Physiologically Based PharmacoKinetic (PBPK) model for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin is described. Validation studies, in which model simulations of TCDD disposition were compared with in vivo TCDD disposition in rodents exposed to TCDD, showed that the model adequately p

  15. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of tamoxifen and its metabolites in women of different CYP2D6 phenotypes provides new insight into the tamoxifen mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eDickschen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is a first-line endocrine agent in the mechanism-based treatment of estrogen receptor positive (ER+ mammary carcinoma and applied to breast cancer patients all over the world. Endoxifen is a secondary and highly active metabolite of tamoxifen that is formed among others by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6. It is widely accepted that CYP2D6 poor metabolizers (PM exert a pronounced decrease in endoxifen steady-state plasma concentrations compared to CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EM. Nevertheless, an in-depth understanding of the chain of cause and effect between CYP2D6 genotype, endoxifen steady-state plasma concentration, and subsequent tamoxifen treatment benefit still remains to be evolved.In this context, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK-modeling provides a useful tool to mechanistically investigate the impact of CYP2D6 phenotype on endoxifen formation in female breast cancer patients undergoing tamoxifen therapy.It has long been thought that only a minor percentage of endoxifen is formed via 4-hydroxytamoxifen. However, the current investigation supports very recently published data that postulates a contribution of 4-hydroxytamoxifen above 20 % to total endoxifen formation. The developed PBPK-model describes tamoxifen PK in rats and humans. Moreover, tamoxifen metabolism in dependence of CYP2D6 phenotype in populations of European female individuals is well described, thus providing a good basis to further investigate the linkage of PK, mode of action, and treatment outcome in dependence of factors such as phenotype, ethnicity or co-treatment with CYP2D6 inhibitors.

  16. The calculation of human toxicity thresholds of 2,3,7,8-TCDD; A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeilmaker MJ; van Eijkeren JCH; LBO

    1998-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft de toepassing van een 'Physiologically Based PharmacoKinetic' model (PBPK model) bij het berekenen van de verwachte 'No Adverse Effect Level' van 2,3,7,8-TetraChloroDibenzo-p-Dioxine (TCDD) bij de mens. Het model houdt rekening met variabiliteit en onzeker

  17. Update on a Pharmacokinetic-Centric Alternative Tier II Program for MMT—Part I: Program Implementation and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Dorman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised regarding environmental manganese exposure since high exposures have been associated with neurological disorders. The USA Environmental Protection Agency most recent human health risk assessment of inhaled manganese conducted in 1993 identified specific areas of uncertainty regarding manganese pharmacokinetics. This led to the development of a test rule under the USA Clean Air Act that required the generation of pharmacokinetic information on the inorganic manganese combustion products of the organometallic fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT. The Alternative Tier 2 testing program for MMT, described in this paper, has yielded substantial pharmacokinetic data and has enabled the generation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models for manganese. These models are capable of predicting tissue manganese concentrations across a variety of dose routes, levels, and durations while accounting for factors such as age, gender, and reproductive status, enabling the consideration of tissue dosimetry in future risk assessments.

  18. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in the prediction of drug-drug interactions mediated by transporters%生理药代动力学模型在预测转运体介导药物相互作用中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳; 刘晓培; 夏春华; 胡锦芳; 熊玉卿

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic ( PBPK ) models are built using a mathematic framework which is similar to these classic phar-macokinetic ( PK ) models, and are parameterized based on known physiology knowledge, and comprise many compartments corresponding to different organs and tissues in the body, which are connected by flow rates that parallel the circulating blood system.The values of PBPK models are gradually appreciated in the industry of drug development, especially in the field of drug -drug interaction due to their robust ability to predict drugs’ kinetic process in vivo.Then some basic concepts, advantages over classic models and their applications in drug-drug interaction fields asso-ciated with transporters of PBPK models are reviewed in the next context.%生理药代动力学模型通过与经典药代动力学模型类似的数学框架构建而成,并按已知的生理学知识设置参数,由大量分别对应于体内不同器官或组织的房室组成,并通过类似血液循环的系统而连接。因能较准确的预测药物在体内过程,故其在药物研发行业,尤其是药物相互作用领域,逐渐崭露头角。本文将从生理药代动力学模型的概念、与经典模型的优势比较及其在转运体介导的药物相互作用中的应用等方面进行综述。

  19. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of zinc oxide nanoparticles and zinc nitrate in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen WY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wei-Yu Chen,1 Yi-Hsien Cheng,2 Nan-Hung Hsieh,3 Bo-Chun Wu,2 Wei-Chun Chou,4 Chia-Chi Ho,4 Jen-Kun Chen,5 Chung-Min Liao,2,* Pinpin Lin4,* 1Department of Biomedical Science and Environmental Biology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 2Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 3Institute of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health, Ministry of Labor, New Taipei City, 4National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs have been widely used in consumer products, therapeutic agents, and drug delivery systems. However, the fate and behavior of ZnO NPs in living organisms are not well described. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to describe the dynamic interactions of 65ZnO NPs in mice. We estimated key physicochemical parameters of partition coefficients and excretion or elimination rates, based on our previously published data quantifying the biodistributions of 10 nm and 71 nm 65ZnO NPs and zinc nitrate (65Zn(NO32 in various mice tissues. The time-dependent partition coefficients and excretion or elimination rates were used to construct our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. In general, tissue partition coefficients of 65ZnO NPs were greater than those of 65Zn(NO32, particularly the lung partition coefficient of 10 nm 65ZnO NPs. Sensitivity analysis revealed that 71 nm 65ZnO NPs and 65Zn(NO32 were sensitive to excretion and elimination rates in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Although the partition coefficient of the brain was relative low, it increased time-dependently for 65ZnO NPs and 65Zn(NO32. The simulation of 65Zn(NO32 was well fitted with the experimental data. However, replacing partition coefficients of 65ZnO NPs with

  20. THE IMPORTANCE OF OBTAINING INFORMATION ON THE SPECIFIC CONTENT OF TISSUE ENZYMES METABOLIZING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES, PRIOR TO DETERMINE VMAX, KM VALUES FOR USE IN PBPK MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiological pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models require Vmax, Km values for the metabolism of OPs by tissue enzymes. Current literature values cannot be easily used in OP PBPK models (i.e., parathion and chlorpyrifos) because standard methodologies were not used in their ...

  1. THE IMPORTANCE OF OBTAINING INFORMATION ON THE SPECIFIC CONTENT OF TISSUE ENZYMES METABOLIZING ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES, PRIOR TO DETERMINING VMAX, KM VALUES FOR USE IN PBPK MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiological pharmacokinetic\\pharmacodynamic models require Vmax, Km values for the metabolism of OPs by tissue enzymes. Current literature values cannot be easily used in OP PBPK models (i.e., parathion and chlorpyrifos) because standard methodologies were not used in their ...

  2. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wang, Ran [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Institute of Food Safety, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data

  3. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data.

  4. Bioavailability of Organic Solvents in soils: Input into Biologically Based Dose-Response Models for Human Risk Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, Ronald C.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop methods to expose rats and humans percutaneously and to use PBPK modeling to assess the percutaneous permeability of volatile compounds from aqueous or soil exposures. To estimate dermal absorption under realistic environmental exposure conditions, a patch system was developed that allowed for the volatilization of the compounds from the soil without contamination of inhaled or exhaled breath. The end product for this research will be a tested framework for the rapid screening of real and potential exposures while simultaneously developing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to comprehensively evaluate and compare exposures to volatile chemicals from either contaminated soil or water.

  5. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  6. Prednisone has no effect on the pharmacokinetics of CYP3A4 metabolized drugs - midazolam and odanacatib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcantonio, Eugene E; Ballard, Jeanine; Gibson, Christopher R; Kassahun, Kelem; Palamanda, Jairam; Tang, Cuyue; Evers, Raymond; Liu, Chengcheng; Zajic, Stefan; Mahon, Chantal; Mostoller, Kate; Hreniuk, David; Mehta, Anish; Morris, Denise; Wagner, John A; Stoch, S Aubrey

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of prednisone on midazolam and odanacatib pharmacokinetics. In this open-label, 2-period crossover study in healthy male subjects, midazolam 2 mg was administered (Day -1) followed by odanacatib 50 mg (Day 1) during Part 1. In Period 2, prednisone 10 mg once daily (qd) was administered on Days 1-28; odanacatib was co-administered on Day 14 and midazolam 2 mg was co-administered on Days 1 and 28. Subjects were administered midazolam 2 mg on Days 42 and 56. Safety and tolerability were assessed throughout the study. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was also built. There were 15 subjects enrolled; mean age was 31 years. The odanacatib AUC(0- ∞) GMR (90% CI) [odanacatib + prednisone (Day 14, Period 2)/odanacatib alone (Day 1, Period 1] was 1.06 (0.96, 1.17). AUC(0-∞) GMR (90%CI) [midazolam + prednisone (Day 28, Period 2)/midazolam alone (Day -1, Period 1] was 1.08 (0.93,1.26). There were no serious AEs or AEs leading to discontinuation. PBPK modeling showed that prednisone does not cause significant effects on the exposure of sensitive CYP3A4 substrates in vivo at therapeutic doses. Co-administration of prednisone 10 mg qd had no effect on pharmacokinetics of either odanacatib 10 mg or midazolam 2 mg. PMID:24895078

  7. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PHYSIOLOGICAL BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR QUINOCETONE IN GRASS CARP (CTENOPHARYNGODON IDELLUS)%喹烯酮在草鱼体内生理药动模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥宁; 刘永涛; 杨秋红; 艾晓辉

    2015-01-01

    为了预测喹烯酮在草鱼体内药物残留, 建立其在草鱼体内生理药动学模型.通过搜集大量文献获得鱼的生理解剖参数, 采用已有的喹烯酮试验数据拟合得到药物特异性参数.基于 acslXtreme 生理药动学软件,进行模型假设、血流图设计、质量平衡方程的建立和模型拟合.喹烯酮为小分子药物, 其分布服从血流限速型, 在肝脏代谢, 从肾脏消除.喹烯酮通过口服进入肠道, 然后经肝脏代谢进入血液循环, 因此设定 5 个房室, 即肝、肾、肌肉、肠和其他组织.经过一系列的计算和调试, 最终建立喹烯酮在草体内5室生理药动模型, 成功拟合连续饲喂药物 60d之后的药物残留消除曲线, 其中肝脏中的预测结果比肾脏和肌肉高, 与实测数据一致.因此, 喹烯酮在鱼体内生理药动模型具有一定的应用价值, 将是药物残留检测的新亮点.%An effective physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model can be used to analogize and extrapolate the in vivo drug concentrations in different administrations and environments, as well as in different species of animals, hence it has become more and more popular in the drug residual prediction in aquatic animals. In order to predict drug residues of quinocetone in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), we established the PB-PK model of quinocetone in this study. We obtained the physiological and anatomical parameters of fish from literatures, and estimated the drug-specific parameters of quinocetone by fitting the existing data. We used the physiological pharmacokinetic soft-ware, asclXtreme, to make the model assumptions, to design the blood flow chart, to generate the mass balance equa-tions and to complete the model fitting. Quinocetone was a small molecule drug, and itsin vivo disposition was blood flow-limited. It was metabolized by the liver and excreted by the kidney. Quinocetone entered the intestine through oral administration and

  8. Population pharmacokinetics meets microdialysis: benefits, pitfalls and necessities of new analysis approaches for human microdialysis data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeftlein, André; Minichmayr, Iris K; Kloft, Charlotte

    2014-06-16

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) data originating from human microdialysis studies have by now most commonly been analysed using noncompartmental analysis or the standard two-stage population approach. During the last decades, additional modelling strategies for PK data have been developed, which also seem apt for the analysis of microdialysis data. The present opinion article gives an overview of the three approaches of nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) modelling, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and a combined population PBPK modelling approach (PPBPK) as well as their application within the field of microdialysis in humans. Potential benefits and pitfalls of the different approaches will be outlined and exemplified, complemented by modelling prerequisites to be met on the part of principal investigators, bioanalysts and documentalists involved in a microdialysis study. In summary, the combination of microdialysis as the method of choice for measuring unbound drug concentrations in peripheral tissues and the presented modelling strategies seems a promising way to enhance the understanding of drug disposition at the target site of drugs and might thus contribute to a more rational use of medicines. PMID:24246313

  9. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of cyclohexane as a tool for integrating animal and human test data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hissink, A.M.; Kulig, B.M.; Kruse, J.; Freidig, A.P.; Verwei, M.; Muijser, H.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Mckee, R.H.; Owen, D.E.; Sweeney, L.M.; Salmon, F.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for cyclohexane and its use in comparing internal doses in rats and volunteers following inhalation exposures. Parameters describing saturable metabolism of cyclohexane are measured in rats and used along with experimentally determi

  10. CONSTRUCTION OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC (PBPK/PD) MODEL FOR CARBOFURAN USING THE EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbofuran, known as 2, 3-dihydro-2, 2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl-N-methylcarbamate, is a broad spectrum N-methyl carbamate pesticide. Carbofuran and its metabolite, 3-hydroxycarbofuran, exert their toxicity by reversibly inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Carbofuran is widel...

  11. IN VITRO ESTIMATES OF METABOLIC PARAMETERS AND THEIR USE IN PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING (PBPK) OF THE TYPE I PYRETHROIDS PERMETHRIN AND BIFENTHRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic insecticides that are used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Hepatic clearance of the Type I pyrethroids permethrin and bifenthrin may be a critical determinant of their toxic effect. Rat LD50s reported in the literatur...

  12. Species Extrapolation of Life-Stage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Investigate the Developmental Toxicology of Ethanol Using In vitro to In vivo (IVIVE) Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide useful alternatives to in vivo animal studies, in vitro assays for dose-response assessments of xenobiotic chemicals must use concentrations in media and target tissues that are within biologically-plausible limits. Determining these concentrations is a complex matter,...

  13. Gender-based effects on methylprednisolone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Kim H.; Ludwig, Elizabeth A.; Milad, Mark A.; Donovan, Kathleen; Middleton, Elliott; Ferry, James J.; Jusko, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and selected pharmacodynamic responses to methylprednisolone were investigated in six men and six premenopausal women after a dose of 0.6 mg/kg ideal body weight. Women (luteal phase) exhibited a greater methylprednisolone clearance (0.45 versus 0.29 L/hr/kg) and shorter elimination half-life (1.7 versus 2.6 hours) than men. The volume of distribution of methylprednisolone was similar when normalized for ideal body weight. Pharmacodynamic models were used to examine the methylprednisolone suppressive effects on cortisol secretion and basophil and helper T lymphocyte trafficking. A significantly smaller 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value (0.1 versus 1.7 ng/ml) was seen in the women for suppression of cortisol secretion, indicating increased sensitivity. However, the area under the concentration-time curve of effect was similar for both groups. The IC50 values for effects of methylprednisolone on basophil trafficking related to estradiol concentrations in a log-linear fashion in women, with increased sensitivity found at higher estradiol concentrations. Men displayed a greater 24-hour net suppression in blood basophil numbers, but no difference was observed in net cortisol and helper T lymphocyte suppression between the sexes. These findings suggest that methylprednisolone dosages should be based on ideal body weight. Although women are more sensitive to methylprednisolone as measured by cortisol suppression, they eliminate the drug more quickly, generally producing a similar net response. PMID:8222483

  14. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmocokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in developing microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determining the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic model (PD) -aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been cons...

  15. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. PMID:24733631

  16. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics.

  17. The In Vivo Quantitation of Diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and Their Major Metabolites in Rat Blood for the Refinement of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, A.; Kousba, A.; Timchalk, C.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF)(O,O-diethyl-O-[3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl]-phosphorothioate, CAS 2921-88-2), and diazinon (DZN)(O,O-diethyl-O-2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-pyrimidyl thiophosphate, CAS 333-41-5) are commonly encountered organophosphorus insecticides whose oxon metabolites (CPF-oxon and DZN-oxon) have the ability to strongly inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme responsible for the breakdown of acetylcholine at nerve synapses. Chlorpyrifos-oxon and DZN-oxon are highly unstable compounds that degrade via hepatic, peripheral blood, and intestinal metabolism to the more stable metabolites, TCP (3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, CAS not assigned) and IMHP (2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol, CAS 2814-20-2), respectively. Studies have been performed to understand and model the chronic and acute toxic effects of CPF and DZN individually but little is known about their combined effects. The purpose of this study was to improve physiologically based pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) computational models by quantifying concentrations of CPF and DZN and their metabolites TCP and IMHP in whole rat blood, following exposure to the chemicals individually or as a mixture. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally dosed with 60 mg/kg of CPF, DZN, or a mixture of these two pesticides. When administered individually DZN and CPF were seen to reach their maximum concentration at ~3 hours post-dosing. When given as a mixture, both DZN and CPF peak blood concentrations were not achieved until ~6 hours post-dosing and the calculated blood area under the curve (AUC) for both chemicals exceeded those calculated following the single dose. Blood concentrations of IMHP and TCP correlated with these findings. It is proposed that the higher AUC obtained for both CPF and DZN as a mixture resulted from competition for the same metabolic enzyme systems.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  19. An overview of the pharmacokinetics of polymer-based nanoassemblies and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-He; Qiu, Li-Yan

    2013-10-01

    Advancements in the design and synthesis of polymer-based nanoassemblies and nanoparticles, combined with achievements in nanotechnology and medicine, have resulted in remarkable applications of polymer nanosystems in the areas of nanomedicine and pharmaceutical sciences. However, a complete understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) processes of such polymer nanosystems in living systems has not been achieved. The influences of the pharmacokinetic parameters of polymer nanomaterials on the ADME processes are reviewed in this article, with discussions of the absorption and transportation of polymer nanoparticles across biological barriers, the factors affecting the bodily distribution of polymer nanocarriers, the transformation of polymer nanomaterials in vivo, the elimination pathway of polymer nanoparticles from biological systems, and perspectives of future pharmacokinetics and safety investigations of polymer-based nanoassemblies. A full and better understanding of the pharmacokinetic parameters of polymer-based nanomaterials is of vital importance in developing polymer nanosystems with optimal pharmacokinetics and biological safety for applications in nanomedicine and the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:24016113

  20. Short Communication: Is Ethanol-Based Hand Sanitizer Involved in Acute Pancreatitis after Excessive Disinfection?—An Evaluation with the Use of PBPK Model

    OpenAIRE

    Céline Huynh-Delerme; Catherine Artigou; Laurent Bodin; Robert Tardif; Ginette Charest-Tardif; Cécile Verdier; Nessryne Sater; Mostafa Ould-Elhkim; Catherine Desmares

    2012-01-01

    An occupational physician reported to the French Health Products Safety Agency (Afssaps) a case of adverse effect of acute pancreatitis (AP) in a teaching nurse, after multiple demonstrations with ethanol-based hand sanitizers (EBHSs) used in a classroom with defective mechanical ventilation. It was suggested by the occupational physician that the exposure to ethanol may have produced a significant blood ethanol concentration and subsequently the AP. In order to verify if the confinement situ...

  1. Development and application of a human PBPK model for bromodichloromethane to investigate the impacts of multi-route exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Elaina M; Eklund, Christopher; Leavens, Teresa; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-09-01

    As a result of its presence in water as a volatile disinfection byproduct, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), which is mutagenic, poses a potential health risk from exposure via oral, dermal and inhalation routes. We developed a refined human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDCM (including new chemical-specific human parameters) to evaluate the impact of BDCM exposure during showering and bathing on important measures of internal dose compared with oral exposure. The refined model adequately predicted data from the published literature for oral, dermal and bathing/showering exposures. A liter equivalency approach (L-eq) was used to estimate BDCM concentration in a liter of water consumed by the oral route that would be required to produce the same internal dose of BDCM resulting from a 20-min bath or a 10-min shower in water containing 10 µg l(-1) BDCM. The oral liter equivalent concentrations for the bathing scenario were 605, 803 and 5 µg l(-1) BDCM for maximum venous blood concentration (Cmax), the area under the curve (AUCv) and the amount metabolized in the liver per hour (MBDCM), respectively. For a 10-min showering exposure, the oral L-eq concentrations were 282, 312 and 2.1 µg l(-1) for Cmax, AUC and MBDCM, respectively. These results demonstrate large contributions of dermal and inhalation exposure routes to the internal dose of parent chemical reaching the systemic circulation, which could be transformed to mutagenic metabolites in extrahepatic target tissues. Thus, consideration of the contribution of multiple routes of exposure when evaluating risks from water-borne BDCM is needed, and this refined human model will facilitate improved assessment of internal doses from real-world exposures. Published 2015. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26649444

  2. Justification of Drug Product Dissolution Rate and Drug Substance Particle Size Specifications Based on Absorption PBPK Modeling for Lesinurad Immediate Release Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Xavier J H; Flanagan, Talia R; Holt, David J; Eidelman, Anna; Treacy, Don; Rowlings, Colin E

    2016-09-01

    In silico absorption modeling has been performed, to assess the impact of in vitro dissolution on in vivo performance for ZURAMPIC (lesinurad) tablets. The dissolution profiles of lesinurad tablets generated using the quality control method were used as an input to a GastroPlus model to estimate in vivo dissolution in the various parts of the GI tract and predict human exposure. A model was set up, which accounts for differences of dosage form transit, dissolution, local pH in the GI tract, and fluid volumes available for dissolution. The predictive ability of the model was demonstrated by confirming that it can reproduce the Cmax observed for independent clinical trial. The model also indicated that drug product batches that pass the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min are anticipated to be bioequivalent to the clinical reference batch. To further explore the dissolution space, additional simulations were performed using a theoretical dissolution profile below the proposed specification. The GastroPlus modeling indicates that such a batch will also be bioequivalent to standard clinical batches despite having a dissolution profile, which would fail the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min. This demonstrates that the proposed dissolution specification sits comfortably within a region of dissolution performance where bioequivalence is anticipated and is not near an edge of failure for dissolution, providing additional confidence to the proposed specifications. Finally, simulations were performed using a virtual drug substance batch with a particle size distribution at the limit of the proposed specification for particle size. Based on these simulations, such a batch is also anticipated to be bioequivalent to clinical reference, demonstrating that the proposed specification limits for particle size distribution would give products bioequivalent to the pivotal clinical batches.

  3. A preliminary regional PBPK model of lung metabolism for improving species dependent descriptions of 1,3-butadiene and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jerry; Van Landingham, Cynthia; Crowell, Susan; Gentry, Robinan; Kaden, Debra; Fiebelkorn, Stacy; Loccisano, Anne; Clewell, Harvey

    2015-08-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD), a volatile organic chemical (VOC), is used in synthetic rubber production and other industrial processes. It is detectable at low levels in ambient air as well as in tobacco smoke and gasoline vapors. Inhalation exposures to high concentrations of BD have been associated with lung cancer in both humans and experimental animals, although differences in species sensitivity have been observed. Metabolically active lung cells such as Pulmonary Type I and Type II epithelial cells and club cells (Clara cells)(1) are potential targets of BD metabolite-induced toxicity. Metabolic capacities of these cells, their regional densities, and distributions vary throughout the respiratory tract as well as between species and cell types. Here we present a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BD that includes a regional model of lung metabolism, based on a previous model for styrene, to provide species-dependent descriptions of BD metabolism in the mouse, rat, and human. Since there are no in vivo data on BD pharmacokinetics in the human, the rat and mouse models were parameterized to the extent possible on the basis of in vitro metabolic data. Where it was necessary to use in vivo data, extrapolation from rat to mouse was performed to evaluate the level of uncertainty in the human model. A kidney compartment and description of downstream metabolism were also included in the model to allow for eventual use of available urinary and blood biomarker data in animals and humans to calibrate the model for estimation of BD exposures and internal metabolite levels. Results from simulated inhalation exposures to BD indicate that incorporation of differential lung region metabolism is important in describing species differences in pulmonary response and that these differences may have implications for risk assessments of human exposures to BD. PMID:26079054

  4. A cell-based pharmacokinetics assay for evaluating tubulin-binding drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels.

  5. Drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on pharmacokinetics in vivo in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lifei; Liu, Jiajun; Yu, Xin; Shi, Lei; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Heping; Huang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Moxifloxacin and rifampicin are all the first-line options for the treatment of active tuberculosis, which are often combined for the treatment of multidrug resistance pulmonary tuberculosis in clinic. However, the potential drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin were unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on their pharmacokinetics in vivo after oral administration of the single drug and both drugs, and reveal their mutual effects on their pharmacokinetics. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: moxifloxacin group, rifampicin group and moxifloxacin + rifampicin group. Plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin and rifampicin were determined using LC-MS at the designated time points after drug administration, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. In addition, effects of moxifloxacin and rifampicin on their metabolic rate and absorption were investigated using rat liver microsome incubation systems and Caco-2 cell transwell model. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin including Tmax , Cmax , t1/2 and AUC(0-t) increased more in the moxifloxacin + rifampicin group than in the moxifloxacin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of rifampicin, including peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve, half-life and the area under the first moment plasma concentration-time curve, increased significantly (p 0.05). The rat liver microsome incubation experiment indicated that moxifloxacin could increase the metabolic rate of rifampicin from 23.7 to 38.7 min. However, the Caco-2 cell transwell experiment showed that moxifloxacin could not affect the absorption rate of rifampicin. These changes could enhance the drug efficacy, but they could also cause drug accumulation, which might induce adverse effect, so it was suggested that the drug dosage

  6. APPLICATION OF A MULTIROUTE HUMAN PBPK MODEL FOR BROMODICHLOROMETHANE (BDCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to its presence in water as a volatile disinfection byproduct, BDCM poses a risk for exposure via multiple routes. Mechanistic data suggest target tissue metabolism could be important for some types of BDCM-induced toxicity. Utilizing our refined PBPK model for BDCM, the impa...

  7. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model of the Rat Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh Badhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS drug disposition is dictated by a drug’s physicochemical properties and its ability to permeate physiological barriers. The blood–brain barrier (BBB, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and centrally located drug transporter proteins influence drug disposition within the central nervous system. Attainment of adequate brain-to-plasma and cerebrospinal fluid-to-plasma partitioning is important in determining the efficacy of centrally acting therapeutics. We have developed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of the rat CNS which incorporates brain interstitial fluid (ISF, choroidal epithelial and total cerebrospinal fluid (CSF compartments and accurately predicts CNS pharmacokinetics. The model yielded reasonable predictions of unbound brain-to-plasma partition ratio (Kpuu,brain and CSF:plasma ratio (CSF:Plasmau using a series of in vitro permeability and unbound fraction parameters. When using in vitro permeability data obtained from L-mdr1a cells to estimate rat in vivo permeability, the model successfully predicted, to within 4-fold, Kpuu,brain and CSF:Plasmau for 81.5% of compounds simulated. The model presented allows for simultaneous simulation and analysis of both brain biophase and CSF to accurately predict CNS pharmacokinetics from preclinical drug parameters routinely available during discovery and development pathways.

  8. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models: Integration of In Silico Approaches with Micro Cell Culture Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, A.; Yarmush, M L; Maguire, T.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large emphasis within the pharmaceutical industry to provide tools that will allow early research and development groups to better predict dose ranges for and metabolic responses of candidate molecules in a high throughput manner, prior to entering clinical trials. These tools incorporate approaches ranging from PBPK, QSAR, and molecular dynamics simulations in the in silico realm, to micro cell culture analogue (CCAs)s in the in vitro realm. This paper will serve to review these a...

  9. Improved prediction of tacrolimus concentrations early after kidney transplantation using theory-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Størset, Elisabet; Holford, Nick; Hennig, Stefanie; Bergmann, Troels K; Bergan, Stein; Bremer, Sara; Åsberg, Anders; Midtvedt, Karsten; Staatz, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aim was to develop a theory-based population pharmacokinetic model of tacrolimus in adult kidney transplant recipients and to externally evaluate this model and two previous empirical models. Methods Data were obtained from 242 patients with 3100 tacrolimus whole blood concentrations. External evaluation was performed by examining model predictive performance using Bayesian forecasting. Results Pharmacokinetic disposition parameters were estimated based on tacrolimus plasma concentrations, predicted from whole blood concentrations, haematocrit and literature values for tacrolimus binding to red blood cells. Disposition parameters were allometrically scaled to fat free mass. Tacrolimus whole blood clearance/bioavailability standardized to haematocrit of 45% and fat free mass of 60 kg was estimated to be 16.1 l h−1 [95% CI 12.6, 18.0 l h−1]. Tacrolimus clearance was 30% higher (95% CI 13, 46%) and bioavailability 18% lower (95% CI 2, 29%) in CYP3A5 expressers compared with non-expressers. An Emax model described decreasing tacrolimus bioavailability with increasing prednisolone dose. The theory-based model was superior to the empirical models during external evaluation displaying a median prediction error of −1.2% (95% CI −3.0, 0.1%). Based on simulation, Bayesian forecasting led to 65% (95% CI 62, 68%) of patients achieving a tacrolimus average steady-state concentration within a suggested acceptable range. Conclusion A theory-based population pharmacokinetic model was superior to two empirical models for prediction of tacrolimus concentrations and seemed suitable for Bayesian prediction of tacrolimus doses early after kidney transplantation. PMID:25279405

  10. Prediction of Aortic Contrast-enhancement Curves in Coronary CTA Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model%冠脉CTA的主动脉处药物-时间曲线的生理药代动力学模型预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原媛; 赵丽琴; 贺文

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Our study focus on evaluating the accuracy of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model in simulation of enhancement at coronary CT angiography (CTA) Examination. Method and materials:80 patients (44 male, 36 female from 32 to 89 years old) underwent coronary CT angiography scan. A simulation software program was developed based on a pharmacokinetic model. For each patient, model parameters were adjusted according to patient age, sex, height, weight, scanning protocol, and contrast media administration protocol such as medium concentration and injection rate. Results:The simulated and actual CTA enhancement curves closely agreed in maximum enhancement and the average error is about 9.447±9.530%. 2 cases were excluded as invalid data. The simulated maximum enhancements of 59 cases were greater than their actual maximum enhancement and the average error was 7.86%. Meanwhile, 19 cases of simulation data were less than their actual data with the average error of 1.58%. The skewness of the whole data was α =-0.131. Conclusion:Our preliminary study suggests that PBPK model may predict the enhancement at coronary CTA with acceptable accuracy. Computer based PBPK model may be used in optimizing the coronary CTA scan protocol.%目的:建立生理药代动力学模型,预测冠脉CTA扫描过程中主动脉处造影剂的脉药物浓度-时间曲线,并对其准确性进行评估。方法:80例患者(年龄32~89岁,其中男44例,女36例)的扫描数据,将每位患者的体征参数(包括年龄、性别、身高、体重、心输出量、脏器血容量等)引入到上述药代动力学模型框架中,得到每位患者的个体化药代动力学模型,将模拟运算得到的主动脉处碘造影剂的药物浓度-时间曲线与实际扫描结果进行对比。结果:实际扫描中,排除两例无效数据后主动脉碘造影剂浓度峰值的误差为9.447±9.530%,其中模拟运算结果大于实际扫描结果的59例,均值为7

  11. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  12. Exploring flubendazole formulations for use in sheep. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a cyclodextrin-based solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceballos Laura

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flubendazole (FLBZ is a poor water solubility broad-spectrum BZD methylcarbamate anthelmintic compound. Cyclodextrins (CDs are usually used to increase aqueous solubility of poor hydrosoluble compounds. The comparative in vitro aqueous solubility of FLBZ and other BZD anthelmintics in the presence of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD was evaluated in the current work. Additionally, the comparative pharmacokinetic behaviour of FLBZ (and its metabolites administered by the intraruminal (i.r. or intraabomasal (i.a. routes to sheep as either an aqueous CDs-based solution or a conventional carboximethylcellulose (CMC suspension was assessed. Drug solubility studies involving albendazole, mebendazole, oxfendazole and FLBZ were performed in an aqueous solution (pH 1.2 or 7.4 with or without HPβCD (10%, w/v. The pharmacokinetic study involved two experiments. Experiment 1: In a crossover study, sheep received either a FLBZ-CDs solution (n = 3 or a FLBZ-CMC suspension (n = 3 by the i.r. route (3.8 mg/kg. The treatment Groups were reversed after a 21-days washout period. Experiment 2: sheep (n = 4 were treated by the i.a. route with the FLBZ-CDs solution (3.8 mg/kg. Plasma and abomasal fluid samples were collected between 0 and 72 h post-treatment. Samples were analysed by HPLC. Results Improvement of FLBZ aqueous solubility due to CDs resulted markedly higher than that observed for mebendazole and albendazole. However, oppositely to what was expected, the absorption-related pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any marked formulation-dependant effect. After the i.a. administration of FLBZ, the AUC and the Tmax of the parent compound were significantly (P Conclusion The administration of FLBZ as a CDs-based solution, does not seem to achieve great practical relevance for parasite control in sheep.

  13. Modelling the exposure to chemicals for risk assessment: a comprehensive library of multimedia and PBPK models for integration, prediction, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis - the MERLIN-Expo tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciffroy, P; Alfonso, B; Altenpohl, A; Banjac, Z; Bierkens, J; Brochot, C; Critto, A; De Wilde, T; Fait, G; Fierens, T; Garratt, J; Giubilato, E; Grange, E; Johansson, E; Radomyski, A; Reschwann, K; Suciu, N; Tanaka, T; Tediosi, A; Van Holderbeke, M; Verdonck, F

    2016-10-15

    MERLIN-Expo is a library of models that was developed in the frame of the FP7 EU project 4FUN in order to provide an integrated assessment tool for state-of-the-art exposure assessment for environment, biota and humans, allowing the detection of scientific uncertainties at each step of the exposure process. This paper describes the main features of the MERLIN-Expo tool. The main challenges in exposure modelling that MERLIN-Expo has tackled are: (i) the integration of multimedia (MM) models simulating the fate of chemicals in environmental media, and of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models simulating the fate of chemicals in human body. MERLIN-Expo thus allows the determination of internal effective chemical concentrations; (ii) the incorporation of a set of functionalities for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis, from screening to variance-based approaches. The availability of such tools for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis aimed to facilitate the incorporation of such issues in future decision making; (iii) the integration of human and wildlife biota targets with common fate modelling in the environment. MERLIN-Expo is composed of a library of fate models dedicated to non biological receptor media (surface waters, soils, outdoor air), biological media of concern for humans (several cultivated crops, mammals, milk, fish), as well as wildlife biota (primary producers in rivers, invertebrates, fish) and humans. These models can be linked together to create flexible scenarios relevant for both human and wildlife biota exposure. Standardized documentation for each model and training material were prepared to support an accurate use of the tool by end-users. One of the objectives of the 4FUN project was also to increase the confidence in the applicability of the MERLIN-Expo tool through targeted realistic case studies. In particular, we aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of building complex realistic exposure scenarios and the accuracy of the

  14. Meta-analysis of hepatic cytochrome P450 ontogeny to underwrite the prediction of pediatric pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Vijay V; Wahlstrom, Jan L

    2016-03-01

    The accurate prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) is fundamental to underwriting safety and efficacy in pediatric clinical trials; age-dependent PK may be observed with pediatrics because of the growth and maturation processes that occur during development. Understanding the ontogeny of drug-metabolizing enzymes is a critical enabler for pediatric PK prediction, as enzyme expression or activity may change with age. Although ontogeny functions for the cytochrome P450s (CYPs) have been developed, disconnects between ontogeny functions for the same CYP may exist, depending on whether the functions were derived from in vitro or in vivo data. This report describes the development of ontogeny functions for all the major hepatic CYPs based on in vitro or in vivo data; these ontogeny functions were subsequently incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and evaluated. Pediatric PK predictions based on in vivo-derived ontogeny functions performed markedly better than those developed from in vitro data for intravenous (100% versus 51% within 2-fold, respectively) and oral (98% versus 67%, respectively) dosing. The verified models were then applied to complex pediatric scenarios involving active metabolites, CYP polymorphisms and physiological changes because of critical illness; the models reasonably explained the observed age-dependent changes in pediatric PK. PMID:26139104

  15. Mode-of-Action Uncertainty for Dual-Mode Carcinogens: A Bounding Approach for Naphthalene-Induced Nasal Tumors in Rats Based on PBPK and 2-Stage Stochastic Cancer Risk Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K T

    2007-05-11

    A relatively simple, quantitative approach is proposed to address a specific, important gap in the appr approach recommended by the USEPA Guidelines for Cancer Risk Assessment to oach address uncertainty in carcinogenic mode of action of certain chemicals when risk is extrapolated from bioassay data. These Guidelines recognize that some chemical carcinogens may have a site-specific mode of action (MOA) that is dual, involving mutation in addition to cell-killing induced hyperplasia. Although genotoxicity may contribute to increased risk at all doses, the Guidelines imply that for dual MOA (DMOA) carcinogens, judgment be used to compare and assess results obtained using separate 'linear' (genotoxic) vs. 'nonlinear' (nongenotoxic) approaches to low low-level risk extrapolation. However, the Guidelines allow the latter approach to be used only when evidence is sufficient t to parameterize a biologically based model that reliably o extrapolates risk to low levels of concern. The Guidelines thus effectively prevent MOA uncertainty from being characterized and addressed when data are insufficient to parameterize such a model, but otherwise clearly support a DMOA. A bounding factor approach - similar to that used in reference dose procedures for classic toxicity endpoints - can address MOA uncertainty in a way that avoids explicit modeling of low low-dose risk as a function of administere administered or internal dose. Even when a 'nonlinear' toxicokinetic model cannot be fully validated, implications of DMOA uncertainty on low low-dose risk may be bounded with reasonable confidence when target tumor types happen to be extremely rare. This concept was i illustrated llustrated for a likely DMOA rodent carcinogen naphthalene, specifically to the issue of risk extrapolation from bioassay data on naphthalene naphthalene-induced nasal tumors in rats. Bioassay data, supplemental toxicokinetic data, and related physiologically based p

  16. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  17. Rational design of CPP-based drug delivery systems: considerations from pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickan, Arite; Sarko, Dikran; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutics are restricted from cellular internalization due to the biological barrier formed by the cell membrane. Especially for therapeutics with high molecular weight, strategies are required to enable delivery to intracellular targets. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) represent a powerful tool to mediate the entry of large cargos such as proteins, siRNA and nanoparticles. The high diversity of CPPs is the prerequisite to use this class of carriers for various applications. However, therapies based on CPPs are hampered by their unfavorable pharmacokinetics, mainly dominated by their rapid renal clearance and their lack of specificity. Rational design is required to overcome these disadvantages and thereby exploits the actual potential of CPPs. We summarize and highlight the current state of knowledge with special emphasis on pharmacokinetics. The unclear internalization pathways of CPPs remain one of the main obstacles and therefore have been in the focus of research. In this review, several promising strategies such as the combination with targeting sequences, activatable CPPs and adjustment of the molecular weight are described. In addition, new absorption pathways such as nasal, pulmonary or transdermal uptake expand the applicability of CPPs and may be a promising prospect for clinical application.

  18. A computer-aided framework for development, identification andmanagement of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitzig, Martina; Linninger, Andreas; Sin, Gürkan;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a generic computer-aided modelling framework to support the development of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models thereby increasing the efficiency and quality of the modelling process. In particular, the framework systematizes the modelling...... process by identifying the workflow involved and providing the required methods and tools for model documentation, construction, analysis, identification and discrimination. The application and benefits of the developed framework are demonstrated by a case study related to the whole-body physiologically...... physiologically-based scaling laws and identifying model parameters that can be re-fitted by the limited experimental data accessible for humans using sensitivity and identifiability analysis techniques....

  19. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Hissink, E.M.; Briggs, M.; Weaver, R.; Jochemsen, R.; Jackson, P.; Bertrand, M.; Bladeren, P. van

    2000-01-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver

  20. Mechanism-Based Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling of the Dopamine D-2 Receptor Occupancy of Olanzapine in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Martin; Kozielska, Magdalena; Reddy, Venkatesh Pilla; Vermeulen, An; Li, Cheryl; Grimwood, Sarah; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes H.

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism-based PK-PD model was developed to predict the time course of dopamine D-2 receptor occupancy (D2RO) in rat striatum following administration of olanzapine, an atypical antipsychotic drug. A population approach was utilized to quantify both the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ol

  1. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations.

  2. Development of ionic-complex-based nanostructured lipid carriers to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of breviscapine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei LI; Yong ZHENG; Feng-ying SHAN; Jing ZHOU; Tao GONG; Zhi-rong ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Breviscapine isolated from the Chinese herb Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz is widely used to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.The aim of this study was to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of breviscapine using nanostructured lipid carrier based on an ionic complex formation.Methods:Breviscapine nanostructured lipid carrier (Bre-NLC) was prepared using the thin film homogenization method.The morphology of Bre-NLCs was determined using transmission electron microscopy.The mean particle size,polydispersity index,zeta-potential analysis and entrapment efficiency were analized.In vitro release was studied using the dialysis method.In vitro stability was studied in fresh plasma and liver slurry of rats.In vivo pharmacokinetics was analyzed in rats after intravenous injection of a dose equivalent to breviscapine (10 mg/kg).Results:The Bre-NLCs were spherical with a mean particle size of ~170 nm,a zeta potential of ~20 mV and a high entrapment efficiency of ~89%.Compared with a commercially available solution,a substantial decrease in the cumulative release of breviscapine was found for the Bre-NLCs.The NLC has a significantly protective effect against the liver enzyme degradation of breviscapine.After intravenous administration in rats,the Bre-NLCs exhibited a 32 times increase in the AUC0-t and a 12 times increase in T1/2 as compared to the commercially available breviscapine solution.Conclusion:The results demonstrate that the NLC has great potential to use as a novel sustained release system for breviscapine.

  3. PROSPECTS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF ANTIDIABETIC POLYPHENOL-BASED DRUGS: MECHANISMS OF HYPOGLYCEMIC ACTION AND PHARMACOKINETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruban E. A.

    2015-12-01

    , activation of insulin receptors and glucose uptake in the insulin-sensitive tissues. On the other hand, most polyphenols are characterized by low bioavailability mostly due to intensive metabolism. Thus absorption of such polyphenols as anthocyanins, phenolcarboxylic acids and some others appears low, but it is supposed that it could have been underestimated because not all metabolites might have been considered. Besides the absorption rate of these compounds is very rapid and may take place already in stomach. In contrary, rutin and other quercetin glycosides are absorbed only after release of the aglycones by the intestinal microflora. The elimination half-lives of most polyphenols tend to be short, especially in the case of anthocyanins. However, some polyphenolic compounds such as quercetin glycosides may have longer half-lives, and even accumulate in plasma with repeated ingestion. Conclusions. Polyphenols have unique therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Nevertheless, the possibility to use polyphenols as hypoglycemic agents in clinical practice is limited by their low bioavailability. Taking into account information reported in the literature on the hypoglycemic mechanisms and pharmacokinetics of polyphenols, promising method of increasing their bioavailability is the development of prolonged-release dosage forms based on polyphenol substances. This approach would extend residence time of polyphenols in the small intestine – the main site of hypoglycemic action in their intact, non-metabolized form, and will help maintain a constant concentration of active substances in the blood plasma, the target organs and tissues

  4. Serum albumin 'camouflage' of plant virus based nanoparticles prevents their antibody recognition and enhances pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitek, Andrzej S; Jameson, Slater A; Veliz, Frank A; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Plant virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) are a novel class of nanocarriers with unique potential for biomedical applications. VNPs have many advantageous properties such as ease of manufacture and high degree of quality control. Their biocompatibility and biodegradability make them an attractive alternative to synthetic nanoparticles (NPs). Nevertheless, as with synthetic NPs, to be successful in drug delivery or imaging, the carriers need to overcome several biological barriers including innate immune recognition. Plasma opsonization can tag (V)NPs for clearance by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), resulting in shortened circulation half lives and non-specific sequestration in non-targeted organs. PEG coatings have been traditionally used to 'shield' nanocarriers from immune surveillance. However, due to broad use of PEG in cosmetics and other industries, the prevalence of anti-PEG antibodies has been reported, which may limit the utility of PEGylation in nanomedicine. Alternative strategies are needed to tailor the in vivo properties of (plant virus-based) nanocarriers. We demonstrate the use of serum albumin (SA) as a viable alternative. SA conjugation to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based nanocarriers results in a 'camouflage' effect more effective than PEG coatings. SA-'camouflaged' TMV particles exhibit decreased antibody recognition, as well as enhanced pharmacokinetics in a Balb/C mouse model. Therefore, SA-coatings may provide an alternative and improved coating technique to yield (plant virus-based) NPs with improved in vivo properties enhancing drug delivery and molecular imaging. PMID:26950168

  5. [Amikacin pharmacokinetics in adults: a variability that question the dose calculation based on weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Gérard, Cécile; Guillermet, Anne; Burdin de Saint Martin, Julie; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The use of amikacin is difficult because of its toxicity and its pharmacokinetic variability. This variability is almost ignored in adult standard dosage regimens since only the weight is used in the dose calculation. Our objective is to test if the pharmacokinetic of amikacin can be regarded as homogenous, and if the method for calculating the dose according to patients' weight is appropriate. From a cohort of 580 patients, five groups of patients were created by statistical data partitioning. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in each group. The adult population is not homogeneous in term of pharmacokinetics. The doses required to achieve a maximum concentration of 60 mg/L are strongly different (585 to 1507 mg) between groups. The exclusive use of the weight to calculate the dose of amikacine appears inappropriate for 80% of the patients, showing the limits of the formulae for calculating doses of aminoglycosides.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic MR images using a simulated annealing-based optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit R.; Reece, John H.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2000-04-01

    The aim of this work was to use dynamic contrast enhanced MR image (DEMRI) data to generate 'parameter images' which provide functional information about contrast agent access, in bone sarcoma. A simulated annealing based technique was applied to optimize the parameters of a pharmacokinetic model used to describe the kinetics of the tissue response during and after intravenous infusion of a paramagnetic contrast medium, Gd-DTPA. Optimization was performed on a pixel by pixel basis so as to minimize the sum of square deviations of the calculated values from the values obtained experimentally during dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging. A cost function based on a priori information was introduced during the annealing procedure to ensure that the values obtained were within the expected ranges. The optimized parameters were used in the model to generate parameter images, which reveal functional information that is normally not visible in conventional Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images. This functional information, during and upon completion of pre-operative chemotherapy, is useful in predicting the probability of disease free survival.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Interactions for Drugs with a Long Half-Life-Evidence for the Need of Model-Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Elin M.; Acharya, Chayan; Clauson, Björn; Dooley, Kelly E; Karlsson, Mats O

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can lead to undesired drug exposure, resulting in insufficient efficacy or aggravated toxicity. Accurate quantification of DDIs is therefore crucial but may be difficult when full concentration-time profiles are problematic to obtain. We have compared non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and model-based predictions of DDIs for long half-life drugs by conducting simulation studies and reviewing published trials, using antituberculosis drug bedaquiline ...

  8. Pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of SQ109, a new diamine-based antitubercular drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lee; Tomaszewski, Joseph E; Hanrahan, Colleen; Coward, Lori; Noker, Patricia; Gorman, Gregory; Nikonenko, Boris; Protopopova, Marina

    2005-01-01

    SQ109 is a novel [1,2]-diamine-based ethambutol (EMB) analog developed from high-throughput combinatorial screening. The present study aimed at characterizing its pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. The antimicrobial activity of SQ109 was confirmed in vitro (Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected murine macrophages) and in vivo (M. tuberculosis-infected C57BL/6 mice) and compared to isoniazid (INH) and EMB. SQ109 showed potency and efficacy in inhibiting intracellular M. tuberculosis that was similar to INH, but superior to EMB. In vivo oral administration of SQ109 (0.1-25 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) to the mice for 28 days resulted in dose-dependent reductions of mycobacterial load in both spleen and lung comparable to that of EMB administered at 100 mg kg(-1) day(-1), but was less potent than INH at 25 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Monitoring of SQ109 levels in mouse tissues on days 1, 14 and 28 following 28-day oral administration (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) revealed that lungs and spleen contained the highest concentration of SQ109, at least 10 times above its MIC. Pharmacokinetic profiles of SQ109 in mice following a single administration showed its C(max) as 1038 (intravenous (i.v.)) and 135 ng ml(-1) (p.o.), with an oral T(max) of 0.31 h. The elimination t(1/2) of SQ109 was 3.5 (i.v.) and 5.2 h (p.o.). The oral bioavailability was 4%. However, SQ109 displayed a large volume of distribution into various tissues. The highest concentration of SQ109 was present in lung (>MIC), which was at least 120-fold (p.o.) and 180-fold (i.v.) higher than that in plasma. The next ranked tissues were spleen and kidney. SQ109 levels in most tissues after a single administration were significantly higher than that in blood. High tissue concentrations of SQ109 persisted for the observation period (10 h). This study demonstrated that SQ109 displays promising in vitro and in vivo antitubercular activity with favorable targeted tissue distribution properties.

  9. ADMET evaluation in drug discovery. 11. PharmacoKinetics Knowledge Base (PKKB): a comprehensive database of pharmacokinetic and toxic properties for drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dongyue; Wang, Junmei; Zhou, Rui; Li, Youyong; Yu, Huidong; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-05-25

    Good and extensive experimental ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) data is critical for developing reliable in silico ADMET models. Here we develop a PharmacoKinetics Knowledge Base (PKKB) to compile comprehensive information about ADMET properties into a single electronic repository. We incorporate more than 10 000 experimental ADMET measurements of 1685 drugs into the PKKB. The ADMET properties in the PKKB include octanol/water partition coefficient, solubility, dissociation constant, intestinal absorption, Caco-2 permeability, human bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-plasma partitioning ratio, volume of distribution, metabolism, half-life, excretion, urinary excretion, clearance, toxicity, half lethal dose in rat or mouse, etc. The PKKB provides the most extensive collection of freely available data for ADMET properties up to date. All these ADMET properties, as well as the pharmacological information and the calculated physiochemical properties are integrated into a web-based information system. Eleven separated data sets for octanol/water partition coefficient, solubility, blood-brain partitioning, intestinal absorption, Caco-2 permeability, human oral bioavailability, and P-glycoprotein inhibitors have been provided for free download and can be used directly for ADMET modeling. The PKKB is available online at http://cadd.suda.edu.cn/admet.

  10. Fiber optic-based fluorescence detection system for in vivo studies of exogenous chromophore pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Daniel R.; Dunn, J. B.; Mitchell, W. L.; Dalton, Brian K.; Garbo, Greta M.; Warner, Jon A.

    1995-05-01

    The detection and quantification of the concentration of exogenous chromophores in-vivo by their fluorescence is complicated by many physical and geometrical parameters. Measurement of such signals is advantageous in determining the pharmacokinetics of photosensitizers such as those used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) or to assist in the diagnosis of tissue histological state. To overcome these difficulties a ratio based fiber optic contact fluorometer has been developed. This fluorescence detection system (FDS) uses the ratio of the fluorescence emission peak of the exogenous chromophore to that of endogenous chromophores, i.e. autofluorescence, to correct for a variety of parameters affecting the magnitude of the measured signals. By doing so it also minimizes the range of baseline measurements prior to exogenous drug injection, for various tissue types. Design of the FDS and results of its testing in animals and patients using the second generation photosensitizer Tin ethyletiopurpurin (SnET2) are presented. These results support the feasibility and usefulness of the Ratio FDS system.

  11. Model-Based Estimates of the Effects of Efavirenz on Bedaquiline Pharmacokinetics and Suggested Dose Adjustments for Patients Coinfected with HIV and Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Elin M.; Aweeka, Francesca; Park, Jeong-Gun; Marzan, Florence; Dooley, Kelly E; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-01-01

    Safe, effective concomitant treatment regimens for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection are urgently needed. Bedaquiline (BDQ) is a promising new anti-TB drug, and efavirenz (EFV) is a commonly used antiretroviral. Due to EFV's induction of cytochrome P450 3A4, the metabolic enzyme responsible for BDQ biotransformation, the drugs are expected to interact. Based on data from a phase I, single-dose pharmacokinetic study, a nonlinear mixed-effects model characterizing BDQ pharmacokinetics and int...

  12. The pharmacokinetic study of rutin in rat plasma based on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified sensor$

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Zhang a; Yu-Qiang Gou b; Xia Gao a; Rui-Bin Bai a; Wen-Xia Chen a; Bo-Lu Sun a; Fang-Di Hu a; n; Wang-Hong Zhao c

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical method based on a directly electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) film coated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was developed for the rapid and convenient determination of rutin in plasma. ERGO was modified on the surface of GCE by one-step electro-deposition method. Electrochemical behavior of rutin on ERGO/GCE indicated that rutin underwent a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process and the electrochemical parameters such as charge transfer coefficient (α), electron transfer number (n) and electrode reaction standard rate constant (ks) were 0.53, 2 and 3.4 s?1, respectively. The electrochemical sensor for rutin in plasma provided a wide linear response range of 4.70 ? 10 ? 7 ? 1.25 ? 10 ? 5 M with the detection limit (s/n ¼ 3) of 1.84 ? 10 ? 8 M. The assay was success-fully used to the pharmacokinetic study of rutin. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as elimination rate half-life (t1/2), area under curve (AUC), and plasma clearance (CL) were calculated to be 3.345 7 0.647 min, 5750 7 656.0 mg min/mL, and 5.891 7 0.458 mL/min/kg, respectively. The proposed method utilized a small sample volume of 10μL and had no complicated sample pretreatment (without deproteinization), which was simple, eco-friendly, and time-and cost-efficient for rutin pharmacokinetic studies.

  13. The relationship between the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of spinal opioids. Minireview based on a doctoral thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, S

    1988-01-01

    Spinal opioids have been used clinically since the late seventies to treat acute, traumatic, obstetric and chronic pain. In this article the influence of the pharmacokinetics on the dynamics of intrathecal and epidural opioid administration are discussed with reference to current knowledge. PMID:2905092

  14. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic-based optimization of levofloxacin administration in the treatment of MDR-TB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghimire, Samiksha; Van't Boveneind-Vrubleuskaya, Natasha; Akkerman, Onno W; de Lange, Wiel C M; van Soolingen, Dick; Kosterink, Jos G W; van der Werf, Tjip S; Wilffert, Bob; Touw, Daniel J; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB has complicated TB treatment success. Among many factors that contribute to the development of resistance, low drug exposure is not the least important. This review summarizes the available information on pharmacokinetic properties of levofloxacin in relation to mi

  15. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR INTRAVENOUS AND INHALATION-ROUTE PHARMACOKINETICS OF BUTYL ACETATE AND METABOLITES N-BUTANOL AND N-BUTYRIC ACID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk assessment for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) can be accomplished with limited toxicity data and pharmacokinetic data for each compound through application of the "family approach" (Barton et al., 2000). The necessary quantita...

  16. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  17. Fractal Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics (PK) has been traditionally dealt with under the homogeneity assumption. However, biological systems are nowadays comprehensively understood as being inherently fractal. Specifically, the microenvironments where drug molecules interact with membrane interfaces, metabolic enzymes or pharmacological receptors, are unanimously recognized as unstirred, space-restricted, heterogeneous and geometrically fractal. Therefore, classical Fickean diffusion and the notion of the compartme...

  18. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for a domain antibody in mice using the two-pore theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp, Armin; Berges, Alienor; Sanderson, Andrew; Meno-Tetang, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are the smallest antigen-binding fragments of immunoglobulins. To date, there is limited insight into the pharmacokinetics of dAbs, especially their distribution into tissues and elimination. The objective of this work was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to investigate the biodisposition of a non-specific dAb construct in mice. Following a single IV administration of 10 mg/kg dummy dAb protein to twenty four female mice, frequent blood samples were collected and whole body lateral sections were analyzed by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. The model is based on the two-pore hypothesis of extravasation where organ-specific isogravimetric flow rates (Jorg,ISO) and permeability-surface area products (PSorg) are expressed as linear functions of the lymph flow rate (Jorg) and the kidney compartment is modified to account for glomerular filtration of dAb. As a result, only Jorg, glomerular filtration coefficient and the combined volume of Bowman's capsule, proximal and distal renal tubules and loop of Henle were optimized by fitting simultaneously all blood and organ data to the model. Our model captures the pharmacokinetic profiles of dAb in blood and all organs and shows that extravasation into interstitial space is a predominantly diffusion-driven process. The parameter values were estimated with good precision (%RMSE ≈ 30) and low cross-correlation (R(2) < 0.2). We developed a flexible model with a limited parameter number that may be applied to other biotherapeutics after adapting for size-related effects on extravasation and renal elimination processes. PMID:25577033

  19. Exploring flubendazole formulations for use in sheep. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of a cyclodextrin-based solution

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos Laura; Moreno Laura; Torrado Juan J; Lanusse Carlos; Alvarez Luis

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Flubendazole (FLBZ) is a poor water solubility broad-spectrum BZD methylcarbamate anthelmintic compound. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are usually used to increase aqueous solubility of poor hydrosoluble compounds. The comparative in vitro aqueous solubility of FLBZ and other BZD anthelmintics in the presence of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) was evaluated in the current work. Additionally, the comparative pharmacokinetic behaviour of FLBZ (and its metabolites) administered by...

  20. Evaluation of an Innovative Population Pharmacokinetic-Based Design for Behavioral Pharmacodynamic Endpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Viberg, Anders; Martino, Giovanni; Lessard, Etienne; Laird, Jennifer M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-clinical behavioral pharmacology studies supporting indications like analgesia typically consist of at least three different studies; dose-finding, duration of effect, and tolerance-development studies. Pharmacokinetic (PK) plasma samples are generally taken from a parallel group of animals to avoid disruption of the behavioral pharmacodynamic (PD) endpoint. Our objective was to investigate if pre-clinical behavioral pharmacology studies in rats could be performed effectively by combining...

  1. The pharmacokinetic study of rutin in rat plasma based on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical method based on a directly electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO film coated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE was developed for the rapid and convenient determination of rutin in plasma. ERGO was modified on the surface of GCE by one-step electro-deposition method. Electrochemical behavior of rutin on ERGO/GCE indicated that rutin underwent a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process and the electrochemical parameters such as charge transfer coefficient (α, electron transfer number (n and electrode reaction standard rate constant (ks were 0.53, 2 and 3.4 s−1, respectively. The electrochemical sensor for rutin in plasma provided a wide linear response range of 4.70×10−7−1.25×10−5 M with the detection limit (s/n=3 of 1.84×10−8 M. The assay was successfully used to the pharmacokinetic study of rutin. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as elimination rate half-life (t1/2, area under curve (AUC, and plasma clearance (CL were calculated to be 3.345±0.647 min, 5750±656.0 µg min/mL, and 5.891±0.458 mL/min/kg, respectively. The proposed method utilized a small sample volume of 10 μL and had no complicated sample pretreatment (without deproteinization, which was simple, eco-friendly, and time- and cost-efficient for rutin pharmacokinetic studies.

  2. Drug-metabolism mechanism: Knowledge-based population pharmacokinetic approach for characterizing clobazam drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Dwain; Bekersky, Ihor; Chu, Hui-May; Ette, Ene I

    2016-03-01

    A metabolic mechanism-based characterization of antiepileptic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) was performed using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) approach. To characterize potential DDIs with clobazam, pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 153 patients with LGS in study OV-1012 (NCT00518713) and 18 healthy participants in bioavailability study OV-1017 were pooled. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were grouped based on their effects on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes responsible for the metabolism of clobazam and its metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB): CYP3A inducers (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), CYP2C19 inducers (valproic acid, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), or CYP2C19 inhibitors (felbamate, oxcarbazepine). CYP3A4 inducers-which did not affect the oral clearance of clobazam-significantly increased the formation of N-CLB by 9.4%, while CYP2C19 inducers significantly increased the apparent elimination rate of N-CLB by 10.5%, resulting in a negligible net change in the PK of the active metabolite. CYP2C19 inhibitors did not affect N-CLB elimination. Because concomitant use of AEDs that are either CYP450 inhibitors or inducers with clobazam in the treatment of LGS patients had negligible to no effect on clobazam PK in this study, dosage adjustments may not be required for clobazam in the presence of the AEDs investigated here.

  3. Oil based nanocarrier system for transdermal delivery of ropinirole: a mechanistic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Adnan; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Negi, Lalit M; Ahmad, Farhan J; Khar, Roop K; Iqbal, Zeenat

    2012-01-17

    Ropinirole, a recent introduction in the clinical treatment of Parkinson's disease, suffers with the problems of low oral bioavailability and frequent dosing. An effective transdermal nano-emulsion drug delivery system can however resolve these issues effectively with greater therapeutic benefits and clinical significance. Therefore, the present work focuses precisely on pharmacokinetic, biochemical and mechanistic assessment of transdermal nanoemulsion gel in rats induced with Parkinson lesioned brain by 6-OHDA. DSC and FT-IR studies showed that NEG affects the normal lipid packing of stratum corneum to enhance the drug permeation. Study of pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC, C(max), and T(max)) revealed a greater and more extended release of ropinirole from nanoemulsion gel compared to that from a conventional gel (RPG) and oral marketed tablet (Ropitor). The AUC(0→∞) for RPCNG and RPTNG was found to be 928.07 ± 206.5 and 1055.99 ± 251.7 ngh/mL, respectively in comparison to 137.25 ± 31.3 and 467.15 ± 106.1 ngh/mL for RPG and oral tablet, respectively. The relative bioavailability of ropinirole has been enhanced more than two fold by RPTNG. Furthermore, antiparkinson activity was evaluated in terms of estimating the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glutathione antioxidant enzymes and catalase in lesioned brain of rats. Formulations were also found to be non-toxic and non-irritant by histological investigations. PMID:22057087

  4. Pharmacokinetic Interactions for Drugs with a Long Half-Life—Evidence for the Need of Model-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Elin M; Acharya, Chayan; Clauson, Björn; Dooley, Kelly E; Karlsson, Mats O

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can lead to undesired drug exposure, resulting in insufficient efficacy or aggravated toxicity. Accurate quantification of DDIs is therefore crucial but may be difficult when full concentration-time profiles are problematic to obtain. We have compared non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and model-based predictions of DDIs for long half-life drugs by conducting simulation studies and reviewing published trials, using antituberculosis drug bedaquiline (BDQ) as a model compound. Furthermore, different DDI study designs were evaluated. A sequential design mimicking conducted trials and a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model of BDQ and the M2 metabolite were utilized in the simulations where five interaction scenarios from strong inhibition (clearance fivefold decreased) to strong induction (clearance fivefold increased) were evaluated. In trial simulations, NCA systematically under-predicted the DDIs’ impact. The bias in average exposure was 29–96% for BDQ and 20–677% for M2. The model-based analysis generated unbiased predictions, and simultaneous fitting of metabolite data increased precision in DDI predictions. The discrepancy between the methods was also apparent for conducted trials, e.g., lopinavir/ritonavir was predicted to increased BDQ exposure 22% by NCA and 188% by model-based methods. In the design evaluation, studies with parallel designs were considered and shown to generally be inferior to sequential/cross-over designs. However, in the case of low inter-individual variability and no informative metabolite data, a prolonged parallel design could be favored. Model-based analysis for DDI assessments is preferable over NCA for victim drugs with a long half-life and should always be used when incomplete concentration-time profiles are part of the analysis. PMID:26463060

  5. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of concentration-dependent hysteresis and biphasic electroencephalogram effects of alphaxalone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, S A G; Smulders, C J G M; Reijers, B P R; Van der Graaf, P H; Peletier, L A; Danhof, M

    2002-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid alphaxalone reveals a complex biphasic concentration-effect relationship using the 11.5 to 30 Hz frequency band of the electroencephalogram (EEG) as biomarker. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model to describe this observation. The proposed model is based on receptor theory and aims to separate the drug-receptor interaction from the transduction of the initial stimulus into the observed biphasic response. Individual concentration-time courses of alphaxalone were obtained in combination with continuous recording of the EEG parameter. Alphaxalone was administered intravenously in various dosages. The pharmacokinetics were described by a two-compartment model, and parameter estimates for clearance, intercompartmental clearance, volume of distribution 1 and 2 were 158 +/- 29 ml. min(-1). kg(-1), 143 +/- 31 ml. min(-1). kg(-1), 122 +/- 20 ml. kg(-1) and 606 +/- 48 ml. kg(-1), respectively. Concentration-effect relationships exhibited a biphasic pattern and delay in onset of effect. The hysteresis was described on the basis of an effect-compartment model with C(max) as covariate. The pharmacodynamic model consisted of a receptor model, featuring a monophasic saturable receptor activation model in combination with a biphasic stimulus-response model. The in vivo affinity (K(PD)) was estimated at 432 +/- 26 ng. ml(-1). Unique parameter estimates were obtained that were independent of the dose and the duration of the infusion. In conclusion, we have shown that this mechanism-based approach, which separates drug- and system-related properties in vivo, was successfully applied for the characterization of the biphasic effect versus time patterns of alphaxalone. The model should be of use in the characterization of other biphasic responses.

  6. Cationic drug-based self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex micelles: Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, and anticancer activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Ruttala, Himabindu; Choi, Ju Yeon; Hieu, Truong Duy; Umadevi, Kandasamy; Youn, Yu Seok; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-10-01

    Nanofabrication of polymeric micelles through self-assembly of an ionic block copolymer and oppositely charged small molecules has recently emerged as a promising method of formulating delivery systems. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the interaction of cationic drugs doxorubicin (DOX) and mitoxantrone (MTX) with the anionic block polymer poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-b-PAA) and to study the influence of these interactions on the pharmacokinetic stability and antitumor potential of the formulated micelles in clinically relevant animal models. To this end, individual DOX and MTX-loaded polyelectrolyte complex micelles (PCM) were prepared, and their physicochemical properties and pH-responsive release profiles were studied. MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM exhibited a different release profile under all pH conditions tested. MTX-PCM exhibited a monophasic release profile with no initial burst, while DOX-PCM exhibited a biphasic release. DOX-PCM showed a higher cellular uptake than that shown by MTX-PCM in A-549 cancer cells. Furthermore, DOX-PCM induced higher apoptosis of cancer cells than that induced by MTX-PCM. Importantly, both MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM showed prolonged blood circulation. MTX-PCM improved the AUCall of MTX 4-fold compared to a 3-fold increase by DOX-PCM for DOX. While a definite difference in blood circulation was observed between MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM in the pharmacokinetic study, both MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM suppressed tumor growth to the same level as the respective free drugs, indicating the potential of PEGylated polymeric micelles as effective delivery systems. Taken together, our results show that the nature of interactions of cationic drugs with the polyionic copolymer can have a tremendous influence on the biological performance of a delivery system. PMID:27318960

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  8. Pharmacokinetic and nephroprotective benefits of using Schisandra chinensis extracts in a cyclosporine A-based immune-suppressive regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Q

    2015-08-01

    the very same addition of SCE. SCE was also able to increase the systemic exposure of CsA in rats. The renoprotective effects of SCE were thought to be mediated by its antiapoptotic and antioxidant abilities, which caused the attenuation of CsA-induced autophagic cell death. All in all, these findings suggest the prospective use of SCE as an effective adjunct in a CsA-based immunosuppressive regimen.Keywords: Schisandra chinensis extracts, cyclosporine A, pharmacokinetics, nephroprotective, oxidative stress, apoptosis, autophagy

  9. Investigating the pharmacokinetics and biological distribution of silver-loaded polyphosphoester-based nanoparticles using (111) Ag as a radiotracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Zhang, Shiyi; Mupanomunda, Chiedza; Burkemper, Jennifer; Heo, Gyu Seong; Bandara, Nilantha; Lin, Mai; Cutler, Cathy S; Cannon, Carolyn L; Youngs, Wiley J; Wooley, Karen L; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-05-30

    Purified (111) Ag was used as a radiotracer to investigate silver loading and release, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution of polyphosphoester-based degradable shell crosslinked knedel-like (SCK) nanoparticles as a comparison to the previously reported small molecule, N-heterocyclic silver carbene complex analog (SCC1) for the delivery of therapeutic silver ions in mouse models. Biodistribution studies were conducted by aerosol administration of (111) Ag acetate, [(111) Ag]SCC1, and [(111) Ag]SCK doses directly into the lungs of C57BL/6 mice. Nebulization of the (111) Ag antimicrobials resulted in an average uptake of 1.07 ± 0.12% of the total aerosolized dose given per mouse. The average dose taken into the lungs of mice was estimated to be 2.6 ± 0.3% of the dose inhaled per mouse for [(111) Ag]SCC1 and twice as much dose was observed for the [(111) Ag]SCKs (5.0 ± 0.3% and 5.9 ± 0.8% for [(111) Ag]aSCK and [(111) Ag]zSCK, respectively) at 1 h post administration (p.a.). [(111) Ag]SCKs also exhibited higher dose retention in the lungs; 62-68% for [(111) Ag]SCKs and 43% for [(111) Ag]SCC1 of the initial 1 h dose were observed in the lungs at 24 h p.a.. This study demonstrates the utility of (111) Ag as a useful tool for monitoring the pharmacokinetics of silver-loaded antimicrobials in vivo. PMID:25952472

  10. Tolerability and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Inhaled Dry Powder Tobramycin Free Base in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Hoppentocht

    Full Text Available Bronchiectasis is a condition characterised by dilated and thick-walled bronchi. The presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in bronchiectasis is associated with a higher hospitalisation frequency and a reduced quality of life, requiring frequent and adequate treatment with antibiotics.To assess local tolerability and the pharmacokinetic parameters of inhaled excipient free dry powder tobramycin as free base administered with the Cyclops dry powder inhaler to participants with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. The free base and absence of excipients reduces the inhaled powder dose.Eight participants in the study were trained in handling the device and inhaling correctly. During drug administration the inspiratory flow curve was recorded. Local tolerability was assessed by spirometry and recording adverse events. Serum samples were collected before, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 min; 4, 8 and 12 h after inhalation.Dry powder tobramycin base was well tolerated and mild tobramycin-related cough was reported only once. A good drug dose-serum concentration correlation was obtained. Relatively small inhaled volumes were computed from the recorded flow curves, resulting in presumably substantial deposition in the central airways-i.e., at the site of infection.In this first study of inhaled dry powder tobramycin free base in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients, the free base of tobramycin and the administration with the Cyclops dry powder device were well tolerated. Our data support further clinical studies to evaluate safety and efficacy of this compound in this population.

  11. Exploration and Pharmacokinetic Profiling of Phenylalanine Based Carbamates as Novel Substance P 1–7 Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The bioactive metabolite of Substance P, the heptapeptide SP1–7 (H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH), has been shown to attenuate signs of hyperalgesia in diabetic mice, which indicate a possible use of compounds targeting the SP1–7 binding site as analgesics for neuropathic pain. Aiming at the development of drug-like SP1–7 peptidomimetics we have previously reported on the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a high affinity lead compound. Unfortunately, the pharmacophore of this compound was accompanied by a poor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Herein, further lead optimization of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 by substituting the N-terminal phenylalanine for a benzylcarbamate group giving a new type of SP1–7 analogues with good binding affinities is reported. Extensive in vitro as well as in vivo PK characterization is presented for this compound. Evaluation of different C-terminal functional groups, i.e., hydroxamic acid, acyl sulfonamide, acyl cyanamide, acyl hydrazine, and oxadiazole, suggested hydroxamic acid as a bioisosteric replacement for the original primary amide. PMID:25516784

  12. Exploration and pharmacokinetic profiling of phenylalanine based carbamates as novel substance p 1-7 analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Rebecca; Nordvall, Gunnar; Bylund, Johan; Carlsson-Jonsson, Anna; Kratz, Jadel M; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2014-12-11

    The bioactive metabolite of Substance P, the heptapeptide SP1-7 (H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH), has been shown to attenuate signs of hyperalgesia in diabetic mice, which indicate a possible use of compounds targeting the SP1-7 binding site as analgesics for neuropathic pain. Aiming at the development of drug-like SP1-7 peptidomimetics we have previously reported on the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a high affinity lead compound. Unfortunately, the pharmacophore of this compound was accompanied by a poor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Herein, further lead optimization of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 by substituting the N-terminal phenylalanine for a benzylcarbamate group giving a new type of SP1-7 analogues with good binding affinities is reported. Extensive in vitro as well as in vivo PK characterization is presented for this compound. Evaluation of different C-terminal functional groups, i.e., hydroxamic acid, acyl sulfonamide, acyl cyanamide, acyl hydrazine, and oxadiazole, suggested hydroxamic acid as a bioisosteric replacement for the original primary amide. PMID:25516784

  13. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extracts on pharmacokinetics and efficacy of atorvastatin based on plasma indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cheng-Xian; Pei, Qi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Peng, Xiang-Dong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Wu, Lan-Xiang; Meng, Xiang-Guang; Wang, Guo; Li, Qing; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2012-08-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) is one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the world. It is often administered in combination with statins to treat diseases, especially some nervous system disorders. We aimed to investigate the influences of GBE on pharmacokinetics and efficacy of atorvastatin, which are currently unclear. Sixteen volunteers received a single oral dose of 40 mg atorvastatin, followed by a wash-out period of at least 5 days. Then the volunteers took 360 mg GBE daily for 14 days, followed by a single dose of 40 mg atorvastatin. Serial blood samples obtained over a period of 48 h after atorvastatin ingestion were subjected to determination of atorvastatin plasma concentrations and markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and cholesterol absorption (sitosterol). With GBE administration, AUC₀₋₄₈, AUC(₀-∞) and C(max) of atorvastatin were reduced by 14.27% (p = 0.005), 10.00% (p = 0.03) and 28.93% (p = 0.002), respectively; Vd/F and CL/F of atorvastatin were increased by 31.95% (p = 0.017) and 6.48% (p = 0.044). After 14 days of treatment, GBE has no significant effects on cholesterol-lowering efficacy of atorvastatin. This study suggests that GBE slightly decreases the plasma atorvastatin concentrations, but has no meaningful effect on the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of atorvastatin. PMID:22381135

  14. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  15. Comparative activity of pradofloxacin and marbofloxacin against coagulase-positive staphylococci in a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model based on canine pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber-Irrgang, B; Wetzstein, H-G; Bagel-Trah, S; Hafner, D; Kresken, M

    2012-12-01

    Pradofloxacin (PRA), a novel veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone (FQ), is active against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, the primary cause of canine pyoderma. An in vitro pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to compare the activities of PRA and marbofloxacin (MAR) against three clinical isolates of S. pseudintermedius and reference strain Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. Experiments were performed involving populations of 10(10) CFU corresponding to an inoculum density of approximately 5 × 10(7) CFU/mL. The time course of free drug concentrations in canine serum was modelled, resulting from once daily standard oral dosing of 3 mg of PRA/kg and 2 mg of MAR/kg. In addition, experimentally high doses of 6 mg of PRA/kg and 16 mg of MAR/kg were tested against the least susceptible strain. Viable counts were monitored over 24 h. At concentrations associated with standard doses, PRA caused a faster and more sustained killing than MAR of all strains. The ratios of free drug under the concentration-time curve for 24 h over MIC and the maximum concentration of free drug over MIC were at least 90 and 26, and 8.5 and 2.1 for PRA and MAR, respectively. At experimentally high doses, PRA was superior to MAR in terms of immediate killing. Subpopulations with reduced susceptibility to either FQ did not emerge. We conclude that PRA is likely to be an efficacious therapy of canine staphylococcal infections.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Cytokines in Their Targeted Delivery Based on Autologous Erythrocyte Pharmacocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaxybay Zhumadilov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Using autologous erythrocytes as drug carriers for targeted delivery of cytokines to the sites of inflammation could potentially provide new opportunities for treatment of patients with purulent diseases. The targeted characteristic of erythrocytes is associated with the nature of purulent inflammation, where a large amount of erythrocytes is phagocytized and drugs encapsulated into the erythrocytes could be easily released. On the other hand, autologous erythrocytes meet all the criteria for the ideal drug carrier. They are nontoxic, not immunogenic, and able to bear a large number of drug molecules while preserving an original conformation of the drugs. Thus, in this study, we aimed to analyze pharmacokinetic profiles of IL-1β encapsulated into erythrocytes’ ghosts (pharmacocytes in comparison to intravenously injected free IL-1β.Material and methods. Albino rats were randomly divided into two groups, each group receiving a different kind of IV injection via the tail vein. Group A (control received 500 µg of free IL-1β, and group B received an injection of 1 ml of pharmacocytes loaded with 500 µg of test substance. At fixed time points after injection (15, 30, 60, 180, 540, 720, and 1,440 minutes serum samples were collected. Homogenates of liver, spleen, lung, heart, kidney, and adipose tissue were obtained 24 hours after injections. Concentration of the tested substance in the collected organs and blood plasma were measured by ELISA. Results. We have observed an increased half-life period (T1/2 for encapsulated IL-1β compared to the control. T1/2 for free IL-1β was one hour, while administration of loaded pharmacocytes allowed the half-life period to increase by more than 15 fold (1,043.40 ± 137.92 min preserving high level of IL-1β activity in the blood samples up to 24 hours. The increased time of IL-1β presence in the body when administered in the form of pharmacocytes could be explained by reduction of

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics evaluation of a thermosensitive chitosan based hydrogel containing liposomal doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shuangxia; Dai, Yu; Li, Cuiyun; Qiu, Zhixia; Wang, Xin; Tian, Fengjie; Zhou, Sufeng; Liu, Qi; Xing, Han; Lu, Yang; Chen, Xijing; Li, Ning

    2016-09-20

    In situ gelling thermosensitive hydrogel formulation has been reported to effectively sustain the release of macromolecules for a long time. However, the low-molecular-weight hydrophilic drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), are not suitable for intratumoral injection because the release will complete within one day. In this study, liposomal doxorubicin (LipDOX) was added into the hydrogel to form a novel thermosensitive formulation which prolonged the sustained release of DOX. DOX+C/GP (doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate) was prepared to compare with LipDOX+C/GP (liposomal doxorubicin in chitosan/β-glycerophosphate hydrogel). The particle size of DOX-loaded liposome was 94.2nm and the encapsulation efficiency of DOX was near 98%. In vitro release experiments, the release of DOX in both DOX+C/GP group and LipDOX+C/GP group increased along with the increasing pH of buffers. However, the LipDOX+C/GP group with lower initial burst release had a much longer releasing duration than DOX+C/GP group (21days vs. 24h). In vitro and in vivo antitumor experiments demonstrated that LipDOX+C/GP group had better antineoplastic effect and less toxicity than DOX+C/GP group. Pharmacokinetics study showed LipDOX+C/GP exhibited a higher AUC0-t and longer MRT than DOX+C/GP in blood and tumor, which indicated that LipDOX+C/GP obtained an enhanced antitumor activity compared with DOX+C/GP. In addition, the lower distribution index (the ratio of AUC of normal tissue/AUC of tumor tissue) of the LipDOX+C/GP implied it had lower toxicity to normal tissues than DOX+C/GP. Therefore, the novel thermosensitive hydrogel formulation was potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. PMID:27388491

  18. Moxifloxacin Population Pharmacokinetics and Model-Based Comparison of Efficacy between Moxifloxacin and Ofloxacin in African Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Denti, Paolo; Sirgel, Frederick A.; Chigutsa, Emmanuel; Hatherill, Mark; Charalambous, Salome; Mungofa, Stanley; Wiesner, Lubbe; Simonsson, Ulrika S. H.; Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas; McIlleron, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic exposure and the MIC of fluoroquinolones are important determinants of their efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Population modeling was used to describe the steady-state plasma pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in 241 tuberculosis (TB) patients in southern Africa. Monte Carlo simulations were applied to obtain the area under the unbound concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0–24) after daily doses of 400 mg or 800 mg moxifloxacin and 800 mg ofloxacin. The MIC d...

  19. Pharmacokinetic and nephroprotective benefits of using Schisandra chinensis extracts in a cyclosporine A-based immune-suppressive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qiao; Wei, Jiabao; Mahmoodurrahman, Mohammed; Zhang, Chenxue; Quan, Shijian; Li, Tongming; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug. However, nephrotoxicity resulting from its long-term usage has hampered its prolonged therapeutic usage. Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE) have previously been used in traditional Chinese medicine and more recently coadministered with Western medicine for the treatment of CsA-induced side effects in the People's Republic of China. This study aimed to investigate the possible effects of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA in rats and elucidate the potential mechanisms by which it hinders the development of CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for determining the effect of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA. Male Sprague Dawley rats, which were administered with CsA (25 mg/kg/d) alone or in combination with SCE (54 mg/kg/d and 108 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, were used to evaluate the nephroprotective effects of SCE. Our study showed that SCE increased the mean blood concentration of CsA. Furthermore, we found that the concomitant administration of SCE alongside CsA prevented the disruption of catalase activity and reduction in creatinine, urea, renal malondialdehyde, and glutathione peroxidase levels that would have otherwise occurred in the absence of SCE administration. SCE treatment markedly suppressed the expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase 3, and autophagy-related protein LC3 A/B. On the other hand, the expression of heme oxygenase-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and P-glycoprotein was enhanced by the very same addition of SCE. SCE was also able to increase the systemic exposure of CsA in rats. The renoprotective effects of SCE were thought to be mediated by its antiapoptotic and antioxidant abilities, which caused the attenuation of CsA-induced autophagic cell death. All in all, these findings suggest the prospective use of SCE as an effective adjunct in a CsA-based

  20. A mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CYP3A1/2 induction by dexamethasone in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang LI; Zai-quan LI; Chen-hui DENG; Miao-ran NING; Han-qing LI; Shan-shan BI; Tian-yan ZHOU; Wei LU

    2012-01-01

    To develop a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model describing the receptor/gene-mediated induction of CYP3A1/2 by dexamethasone (DEX) in rats.Methods:A group of male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving DEX (100 mg/kg,ip) were sacrificed at various time points up to 60 h post- treatment.Their blood sample and liver were collected.The plasma concentration of DEX was determined with a reverse phase HPLC method.CYP3A1/2 mRNA,protein levels and enzyme activity were measured using RT-PCR,ELISA and the testosterone substrate assay,respectively.Data analyses were performed using a first-order conditional estimate (FOCE) with INTERACTION method in NONMEM version 7.1.2.Results:A two-compartment model with zero-order absorption was applied to describe the pharmacokinetic characteristics of DEX.Systemic clearance,the apparent volume of distribution and the duration of zero-order absorption were calculated to be 172.7 mL·kg-1.h-1,657.4 mL/kg and 10.47 h,respectively.An indirect response model with a series of transit compartments was developed to describe the induction of CYP3A1/2 via PXR transactivation by DEX.The maximum induction of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 mRNA levels was achieved,showing nearly 21.29- and 8.67-fold increases relative to the basal levels,respectively.The CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 protein levels were increased by 8.02-fold and 2.49-fold,respectively.The total enzyme activities of CYP3A1/2 were shown to increase by up to 2.79-fold,with a lag time of 40 h from the Tmax of the DEX plasma concentration.The final PK/PD model was able to recapitulate the delayed induction of CYP3A1/2 mRNA,protein and enzyme activity by DEX.Conclusion:A mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed to characterize the complex concentration-induction response relationship between DEX and CYP3A1/2 and to resolve the drug- and system-specific PK/PD parameters for the course of induction.

  1. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for Substitutability Analysis of Venlafaxine Hydrochloride Extended-Release Formulations Using Different Release Mechanisms: Osmotic Pump Versus Openable Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ho-Pi; Sun, Dajun; Zhang, Xinyuan; Wen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    A Food and Drug Administration-approved generic oral product of venlafaxine hydrochloride (HCl) extended-release (ER) tablets has used a release mechanism based on an openable matrix, which is different from the push-pull osmotic pump system of its reference-listed drug. In an extreme case, a delay in the bursting of the openable matrix may be considered a product failure mode that alters the intended profile of systemic exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic absorption model was established and verified to simulate the pharmacokinetic profiles after a single-dose oral administration of ER venlafaxine HCl tablets based on an osmotic pump or openable matrix design. This model adequately predicted the observed human mean pharmacokinetic metrics with drug-release profiles under most dissolution conditions. The results indicated that a bioinequivalence risk is minimal for a delayed onset of drug release from the approved generic venlafaxine HCl ER tablets with an openable matrix design, supporting its substitutability to the reference product. PMID:27449228

  2. Tissue distribution model and pharmacokinetics of nuciferine based on UPLC-MS/MS and BP-ANN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanyan; Bao, Shihui; Tian, Weiqiang; Wen, Congcong; Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Chongliang

    2015-01-01

    Nuciferine has shown remarkable biological activities and been considered as a promising drug. In this study, a sensitive and selective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for determination of nuciferine in tissue and plasma. An electrospray ionization source was applied and operated in positive ion mode; multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode was used for quantification using target fragment ions m/z 296.0→265.1 for nuciferine, and m/z 322.0→307.0 for berberrubine internal standard (IS). Based on the UPLC-MS/MS method, the tissue distribution profile of nuciferine in mice and plasma pharmacokinetics in rat were studied. The results showed nuciferine was absorbed through intestinal tract and distributed into tissues rapidly. The bioavailability of nuciferine was identified at 17.9%. It can across through blood brain barrier, the concentrations in liver and kidney are highest, then followed by spleen, lung heart and brain. Nuciferine is eliminated quickly in the tissues and plasma, the t1/2 within 5 hour. The concentrations in these tissues are correlated to each other, and can be predicted by a back-propagation artificial neural network model. PMID:26770351

  3. Bayesian inference for generalized linear mixed model based on the multivariate t distribution in population pharmacokinetic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Rong Yan

    Full Text Available This article provides a fully bayesian approach for modeling of single-dose and complete pharmacokinetic data in a population pharmacokinetic (PK model. To overcome the impact of outliers and the difficulty of computation, a generalized linear model is chosen with the hypothesis that the errors follow a multivariate Student t distribution which is a heavy-tailed distribution. The aim of this study is to investigate and implement the performance of the multivariate t distribution to analyze population pharmacokinetic data. Bayesian predictive inferences and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm schemes are used to process the intractable posterior integration. The precision and accuracy of the proposed model are illustrated by the simulating data and a real example of theophylline data.

  4. uSIMPK. An Excel for Windows-based simulation program for instruction of basic pharmacokinetics principles to pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocks, Dion R

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics can be a challenging topic to teach due to the complex relationships inherent between physiological parameters, mathematical descriptors and equations, and their combined impact on shaping the blood fluid concentration vs. time curves of drugs. A computer program was developed within Microsoft Excel for Windows, designed to assist in the instruction of basic pharmacokinetics within an entry-to-practice pharmacy class environment. The program is composed of a series of spreadsheets (modules) linked by Visual Basic for Applications, intended to illustrate the relationships between pharmacokinetic and in some cases physiological parameters, doses and dose rates and the drug blood fluid concentration vs. time curves. Each module is accompanied by a simulation user's guide, prompting the user to change specific independent parameters and then observe the impact of the change(s) on the drug concentration vs. time curve and on other dependent parameters. "Slider" (or "scroll") bars can be selected to readily see the effects of repeated changes on the dependencies. Topics covered include one compartment single dose administration (iv bolus, oral, short infusion), intravenous infusion, repeated doses, renal and hepatic clearance, nonlinear elimination, two compartment model, plasma protein binding and the relationship between pharmacokinetics and drug effect. The program has been used in various forms in the classroom over a number of years, with positive ratings generally being received from students for its use in the classroom.

  5. Prediction of clinical response based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of 5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitors in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads; Smith, D. G.; Brennum, L. T.;

    2008-01-01

    Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) mod...

  6. Development of a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to characterize the thermoregulatory effects of serotonergic drugs in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Ling Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown recently that concurrent harmaline, a monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor (MAOI, potentiates serotonin (5-HT receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model to characterize and predict the thermoregulatory effects of such serotonergic drugs in mice. Physiological thermoregulation was described by a mechanism-based indirect-response model with adaptive feedback control. Harmaline-induced hypothermia and 5-MeO-DMT–elicited hyperthermia were attributable to the loss of heat through the activation of 5-HT1A receptor and thermogenesis via the stimulation of 5-HT2A receptor, respectively. Thus serotonergic 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia was readily distinguished from handling/injection stress-provoked hyperthermic effects. This PK/PD model was able to simultaneously describe all experimental data including the impact of drug-metabolizing enzyme status on 5-MeO-DMT and harmaline PK properties, and drug- and stress-induced simple hypo/hyperthermic and complex biphasic effects. Furthermore, the modeling results revealed a 4-fold decrease of apparent SC50 value (1.88–0.496 µmol/L for 5-MeO-DMT when harmaline was co-administered, providing a quantitative assessment for the impact of concurrent MAOI harmaline on 5-MeO-DMT–induced hyperthermia. In addition, the hyperpyrexia caused by toxic dose combinations of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT were linked to the increased systemic exposure to harmaline rather than 5-MeO-DMT, although the body temperature profiles were mispredicted by the model. The results indicate that current PK/PD model may be used as a new conceptual framework to define the impact of serotonergic agents and stress factors on thermoregulation.

  7. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  8. Computational Analysis of Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ďurišová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available orrespondence: Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Phone + 42-1254775928; Fax +421254775928; E-mail: maria.durisova@savba.sk 84 RESEARCH ARTICLE The objective of this study was to perform a computational analysis of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ampicillin, using data from the literature. A method based on the theory of dynamic systems was used for modeling purposes. The method used has been introduced to pharmacokinetics with the aim to contribute to the knowledge base in pharmacokinetics by including the modeling method which enables researchers to develop mathematical models of various pharmacokinetic processes in an identical way, using identical model structures. A few examples of a successful use of the modeling method considered here in pharmacokinetics can be found in full texts articles available free of charge at the website of the author, and in the example given in the this study. The modeling method employed in this study can be used to develop a mathematical model of the pharmacokinetic behavior of any drug, under the condition that the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug under study can be at least partially approximated using linear models.

  9. Pharmacokinetics in patients with chronic liver disease and hepatic safety of incretin-based therapies for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2014-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of chronic liver disease (CLD) such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis, and about one-third of cirrhotic patients have diabetes. However, the use of several antidiabetic agents, such as metformin and sulphonylureas, may be a concern in case of hepatic impairment (HI). New glucose-lowering agents targeting the incretin system are increasingly used for the management of type 2 diabetes. Incretin-based therapies comprise oral inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) (gliptins) or injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. This narrative review summarises the available data regarding the use of both incretin-based therapies in patients with HI. In contrast to old glucose-lowering agents, they were evaluated in specifically designed acute pharmacokinetic studies in patients with various degrees of HI and their hepatic safety was carefully analysed in large clinical trials. Only mild changes in pharmacokinetic characteristics of DPP-4 inhibitors were observed in patients with different degrees of HI, presumably without major clinical relevance. GLP-1 receptor agonists have a renal excretion rather than liver metabolism. Specific pharmacokinetic data in patients with HI are only available for liraglutide. No significant changes in liver enzymes were reported with DPP-4 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists, alone or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, in clinical trials up to 2 years in length. On the contrary, preliminary data suggested that incretin-based therapies may be beneficial in patients with CLD, more particularly in the presence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Nevertheless, caution should be recommended, especially in patients with advanced cirrhosis, because of a lack of clinical experience with incretin-based therapies in these vulnerable patients.

  10. Gadolinium MRI Contrast Agents Based on Triazine Dendrimers: Relaxivity and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jongdoo; Turkbey, Baris; Bernardo, Marcelino; Bryant, L. Henry; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L; Simanek, Eric E; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2012-01-01

    Four gadolinium (Gd)-based macromolecular contrast agents, G3-(Gd-DOTA)24, G5-(Gd-DOTA)96, G3-(Gd-DTPA)24, and G5-(Gd-DTPA)96, were prepared that varied in the size of dendrimer (generation three and five), the type of chelate group (DTPA or DOTA), and the theoretical number of metallated chelates (24 and 96). Synthesis relied on a dichlorotriazine derivatized with a DOTA or DTPA ligand that was incorporated into the dendrimer and ultimately metallated with Gd ions. Paramagnetic characteristi...

  11. Pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline;

    2010-01-01

    A human pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess the ability of a microdose to predict the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic dose of fexofenadine and to determine its absolute oral bioavailability. Fexofenadine was chosen to represent an unmetabolized transporter substrate (P-gP and OATP). F...

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Aminoglycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lokangu Lombo(Congo); HE Hua

    2004-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics informations of aminoglycosides, their monograph and clinical Pharmacokinetics parameters are reported in this review. The Aminoglycosides are highly polarity and in reserve for serious infections caused by aerobic gram-negative bacteria and some gram-positive bacteria but their toxicity are major limitations in clinical use.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and clinical use of incretin-based therapies in patients with chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of stages 3-5 (glomerular filtration rate [GFR] <60 mL/min) is about 25-30 % in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). While most oral antidiabetic agents have limitations in patients with CKD, incretin-based therapies are increasingly used for the management of T2DM. This review analyses (1) the influence of CKD on the pharmacokinetics of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists; and (2) the efficacy/safety profile of these agents in clinical practice when prescribed in patients with both T2DM and CKD. Most DPP-4 inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin) are predominantly excreted by the kidneys. Thereby, pharmacokinetic studies showed that total exposure to the drug is increased in proportion to the decline of GFR, leading to recommendations for appropriate dose reductions according to the severity of CKD. In these conditions, clinical studies reported a good efficacy and safety profile in patients with CKD. In contrast, linagliptin is eliminated by a predominantly hepatobiliary route. As a pharmacokinetic study showed only minimal influence of decreased GFR on total exposure, no dose adjustment of linagliptin is required in the case of CKD. The experience with GLP-1 receptor agonists in patients with CKD is more limited. Exenatide is eliminated by renal mechanisms and should not be given in patients with severe CKD. Liraglutide is not eliminated by the kidney, but it should be used with caution because of the limited experience in patients with CKD. Only limited pharmacokinetic data are also available for lixisenatide, exenatide long-acting release (LAR) and other once-weekly GLP-1 receptor agonists in current development. Several case reports of acute renal failure have been described with GLP-1 receptor agonists, probably triggered by dehydration resulting from gastrointestinal adverse events. However, increasing GLP-1 may

  14. Toxicokinetics and Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides an overview of arsenic toxicokinetics and physiologically-basedpharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling with particular emphasis on key 'actors needed fordevelopment of a model useful for dose-response analysis, applications of arsenicmodels, as well research needs.U...

  15. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  16. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  17. Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing the Knowledge Base Related to Drug Biotransformation and Pharmacokinetics during Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, J Steven; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    It is generally acknowledged that there is a need and role for informative pharmacokinetic models to improve predictions and simulation as well as individualization of drug therapy in pediatric populations of different ages and developmental stages. This special issue contains more than 20 papers responding to the challenge of providing new information on scaling factors, ontogeny functions for drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, the mechanisms underlying the observed developmental trajectories for these gene products, age-dependent changes in physiologic processes affecting drug disposition in children, as well as in vitro and in vivo studies describing the relative contribution of ontogeny and genetic factors as sources of variability in drug disposition in children. Considered together, these contributions serve to illustrate some of the current limitations regarding sample availability, number, and quality, but also provide a framework that allows for the potential value of the results of a given study to be interpreted within the context of these limitations. Among the challenges for the future are improving our understanding of the mechanisms regulating age-dependent changes in factors influencing drug disposition and response, thereby facilitating generalization to systems lacking detailed data, better integrating age-dependent changes in pharmacokinetics with age-dependent changes in pharmacodynamics, and allowing better predictability and individualization of drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum. PMID:27302933

  18. Allometric scaling of marbofloxacin pharmacokinetics: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, S; Hossain, Md Akil; Kim, J Y; Lee, S J; Kwak, D M; Suh, J W; Park, S C

    2014-01-01

    The association between physiologically dependent pharmacokinetic parameters (CL(B), T1/2beta, Vd(ss)) of marbofloxacin and body weight was studied in eight animal species based on allometric equation Y = aWb, where 'Y' is the pharmacokinetic parameter, 'W' is body weight, 'a' is allometric coefficient (intercept) and 'b' is the exponent that describes relation between pharmacokinetic parameter and body weight. The body clearance of marbofloxacin has shown significant (P marbofloxacin in animal species that have not been studied yet. However further study considering large sample size and other parameters influencing pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin is recommended.

  19. PBPK and population modelling to interpret urine cadmium concentrations of the French population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Béchaux, Camille, E-mail: Camille.bechaux@anses.fr [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France); Bodin, Laurent [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France); Clémençon, Stéphan [Telecom ParisTech, 46 rue Barrault, 75634 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Crépet, Amélie [ANSES, French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety, 27-31 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 94701 Maisons-Alfort (France)

    2014-09-15

    As cadmium accumulates mainly in kidney, urinary concentrations are considered as relevant data to assess the risk related to cadmium. The French Nutrition and Health Survey (ENNS) recorded the concentration of cadmium in the urine of the French population. However, as with all biomonitoring data, it needs to be linked to external exposure for it to be interpreted in term of sources of exposure and for risk management purposes. The objective of this work is thus to interpret the cadmium biomonitoring data of the French population in terms of dietary and cigarette smoke exposures. Dietary and smoking habits recorded in the ENNS study were combined with contamination levels in food and cigarettes to assess individual exposures. A PBPK model was used in a Bayesian population model to link this external exposure with the measured urinary concentrations. In this model, the level of the past exposure was corrected thanks to a scaling function which account for a trend in the French dietary exposure. It resulted in a modelling which was able to explain the current urinary concentrations measured in the French population through current and past exposure levels. Risk related to cadmium exposure in the general French population was then assessed from external and internal critical values corresponding to kidney effects. The model was also applied to predict the possible urinary concentrations of the French population in 2030 assuming there will be no more changes in the exposures levels. This scenario leads to significantly lower concentrations and consequently lower related risk. - Highlights: • Interpretation of urine cadmium concentrations in France • PBPK and Bayesian population modelling of cadmium exposure • Assessment of the historic time-trend of the cadmium exposure in France • Risk assessment from current and future external and internal exposure.

  20. Life-Stage PBPK Models for Multiple Routes of Ethanol Exposure in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol is commonly blended with gasoline (10% ethanol) in the US, and higher ethanol concentrations are being considered. While the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of orally-ingested ethanol are widely reported, comparable work is limited for inhalation exposure (IE), particularly...

  1. PBPK modeling of the cis- and trans-permethrin isomers and their major urinary metabolites in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Desmots, Sophie; Le Grand, Rozenn; Lestremau, François; Zeman, Florence A; Leclerc, Eric; Moesch, Christian; Brochot, Céline

    2016-03-01

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, is suspected to induce neuronal and hormonal disturbances in humans. The widespread exposure of the populations has been confirmed by the detection of the urinary metabolites of permethrin in biomonitoring studies. Permethrin is a chiral molecule presenting two forms, the cis and the trans isomers. Because in vitro studies indicated a metabolic interaction between the trans and cis isomers of permethrin, we adapted and calibrated a PBPK model for trans- and cis-permethrin separately in rats. The model also describes the toxicokinetics of three urinary metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and 4'OH-phenoxybenzoic acid (4'-OH-PBA). In vivo experiments performed in Sprague-Dawley rats were used to calibrate the PBPK model in a Bayesian framework. The model captured well the toxicokinetics of permethrin isomers and their metabolites including the rapid absorption, the accumulation in fat, the extensive metabolism of the parent compounds, and the rapid elimination of metabolites in urine. Average hepatic clearances in rats were estimated to be 2.4 and 5.7 L/h/kg for cis- and trans-permethrin, respectively. High concentrations of the metabolite 4'-OH-PBA were measured in urine compared to cis- and trans-DCCA and 3-PBA. The confidence in the extended PBPK model was then confirmed by good predictions of published experimental data obtained using the isomers mixture. The extended PBPK model could be extrapolated to humans to predict the internal dose of exposure to permethrin from biomonitoring data in urine.

  2. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onoue S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Satomi Onoue,1 Shizuo Yamada,1 Hak-Kim Chan2 1Department of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan; 2Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity, and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. Keywords: nanoparticles, nanotechnology, nanotoxicity, solubilization, targeted delivery

  3. Colorectal cancer targeted Irinotecan-Assam Bora rice starch based microspheres: a mechanistic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Akhter, Sohail; Anwar, Mohammed; Kumar, Atul; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Talasaz, Azita Hajhossein; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the colon-targeted Irinotecan Hydrochloride (ITC-HCl) loaded microspheres by pharmacokinetic and biochemical studies. The microspheres were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation method with natural polymer Assam Bora rice starch. The microspheres were characterized for their micromeritics properties, incorporation efficiency, in vitro and in vivo drug release studies. The release study confirmed the insignificant release of ITC-HCl in physiological condition of stomach and small intestine and major drug release in the caecal content. In vivo release study of the optimized microsphere was compared with immediate release (IR) ITC-HCl. ITC-HCl was distributed predominantly in the upper GI tract from the IR, whereas ITC-HCl was distributed primarily to the lower part of GI tract from the microspheres formulation. Enhanced levels of liver enzymes were found in animals given IR ITC-HCl as well as augmented levels of serum albumin, creatinine, leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia was also observed. In summary, Assam Bora rice starch microspheres exhibit slow and extended release of ITC-HCl over longer periods of time with reduced systemic side-effects. PMID:23013140

  4. Two cholesterol derivative-based PEGylated liposomes as drug delivery system, study on pharmacokinetics and drug delivery to retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Shengyong; Yang, Bin; Wang, Guowu; Qin, Geng; Wada, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2014-07-01

    In this study, two cholesterol derivatives, (4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N,N-triethylamine butyloxyl bromide) azobenzene (CAB) and 4-cholesterocarbonyl-4‧-(N,N-diethylamine butyloxyl) azobenzene (ACB), one of which is positively charged while the other is neutral, were synthesized and incorporated with phospholipids and cholesterol to form doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposomes. PEGylation was achieved by including 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatiylethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethylene glycol)-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Our results showed that PEGylated liposomes displayed significantly improved stability and the drug leakage was decreased compared to the non-PEGylated ones in vitro. The in vivo study with rats also revealed that the pharmacokinetics and circulation half-life of DOX were significantly improved when liposomes were PEGylated (p < 0.05). In particular, the neutral cholesterol derivative ACB played some role in improving liposomes’ stability in systemic circulation compared to the conventional PC liposome and the positively charged CAB liposome, with or without PEGylation. In addition, in the case of local drug delivery, the positively charged PEG-liposome not only delivered much more of the drug into the rats’ retinas (p < 0.001), but also maintained much longer drug retention time compared to the neutral PEGylated liposomes.

  5. Methodology developed for the simultaneous measurement of bone formation and bone resorption in rats based on the pharmacokinetics of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Maela; Brance, Maria Lorena; Fina, Brenda Lorena; Brun, Lucas Ricardo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the simultaneous estimation of bone formation (BF) and resorption (BR) in rats using fluoride as a nonradioactive bone-seeker ion. The pharmacokinetics of flouride have been extensively studied in rats; its constants have all been characterized. This knowledge was the cornerstone for the underlying mathematical model that we used to measure bone fluoride uptake and elimination rate after a dose of fluoride. Bone resorption and formation were estimated by bone fluoride uptake and elimination rate, respectively. ROC analysis showed that sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve were not different from deoxypiridinoline and bone alkaline phosphatase, well-known bone markers. Sprague-Dawley rats with modified bone remodelling (ovariectomy, hyper, and hypocalcic diet, antiresorptive treatment) were used to validate the values obtained with this methodology. The results of BF and BR obtained with this technique were as expected for each biological model. Although the method should be performed under general anesthesia, it has several advantages: simultaneous measurement of BR and BF, low cost, and the use of compounds with no expiration date.

  6. Neural network modelling of antifungal activity of a series of oxazole derivatives based on in silico pharmacokinetic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Strahinja Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the antifungal activity of a series of benzoxazole and oxazolo[ 4,5-b]pyridine derivatives was evaluated against Candida albicans by using quantitative structure-activity relationships chemometric methodology with artificial neural network (ANN regression approach. In vitro antifungal activity of the tested compounds was presented by minimum inhibitory concentration expressed as log(1/cMIC. In silico pharmacokinetic parameters related to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME were calculated for all studied compounds by using PreADMET software. A feedforward back-propagation ANN with gradient descent learning algorithm was applied for modelling of the relationship between ADME descriptors (blood-brain barrier penetration, plasma protein binding, Madin-Darby cell permeability and Caco-2 cell permeability and experimental log(1/cMIC values. A 4-6-1 ANN was developed with the optimum momentum and learning rates of 0.3 and 0.05, respectively. An excellent correlation between experimental antifungal activity and values predicted by the ANN was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.9536. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172012 i br. 172014

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the review was to provide an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of exogenous melatonin in humans and if possible, to provide recommendations for clinical use. METHODS: The review was conducted in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. A systematic literature search...... was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T1/2), area-under-the-curve plasma/serum concentrations (AUC), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (VD......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  8. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  9. Lecithin and PLGA-based self-assembled nanocomposite, Lecithmer: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Seby Elsy; Fariya, Mayur K; Rajawat, Gopal Singh; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the drug delivery potential of polymer lipid hybrid nanocomposites (Lecithmer®) composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and soya lecithin. Core-shell structure of Lecithmer was evident from cryo-TEM images. Daunorubicin (DNR) and lornoxicam (LNX)-incorporated Lecithmer nanocomposites were evaluated for anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. DNR- and LNX-loaded Lecithmer had mean particle size of ∼335 and ∼282.7 nm, respectively. Lecithmer formulated with different cationic lipids resulted in lower particle size (∼120 nm) and positive zeta potential. Entrapment efficiency of DNR and LNX was 93.16 and 88.59 %, respectively. In vitro release of DNR from Lecithmer was slower compared to PLGA nanoparticles. DNR release from Lecithmer was significantly higher at pH 5.5 (80.96 %) as compared to pH 7.4 (55.95 %), providing advantage for selective tumor therapy. Similarly, sustained release of LNX (30 % in 10 h) was observed at pH 7.4. DNR in Lecithmer showed superior cytotoxicity on human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pharmacokinetic study in Wistar rats with i.v. administered DNR-loaded Lecithmer showed higher volume of distribution, lower elimination rate constant, and longer half-life (81.68 L, 0.3535 h(-1), 1.96 h) as compared to DNR solution (57.46 L, 0.4237 h(-1), 1.635 h). Pharmacodynamic evaluation of orally administered LNX-loaded Lecithmer showed superior anti-inflammatory activity with maximum inhibition of 81.2 % vis-à-vis 53.57 % in case of LNX suspension. In light of these results, Lecithmer can be envisaged as a promising nanosystem for parenteral as well as oral drug delivery. PMID:27371394

  10. Lecithin and PLGA-based self-assembled nanocomposite, Lecithmer: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Seby Elsy; Fariya, Mayur K; Rajawat, Gopal Singh; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the drug delivery potential of polymer lipid hybrid nanocomposites (Lecithmer®) composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and soya lecithin. Core-shell structure of Lecithmer was evident from cryo-TEM images. Daunorubicin (DNR) and lornoxicam (LNX)-incorporated Lecithmer nanocomposites were evaluated for anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. DNR- and LNX-loaded Lecithmer had mean particle size of ∼335 and ∼282.7 nm, respectively. Lecithmer formulated with different cationic lipids resulted in lower particle size (∼120 nm) and positive zeta potential. Entrapment efficiency of DNR and LNX was 93.16 and 88.59 %, respectively. In vitro release of DNR from Lecithmer was slower compared to PLGA nanoparticles. DNR release from Lecithmer was significantly higher at pH 5.5 (80.96 %) as compared to pH 7.4 (55.95 %), providing advantage for selective tumor therapy. Similarly, sustained release of LNX (30 % in 10 h) was observed at pH 7.4. DNR in Lecithmer showed superior cytotoxicity on human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Pharmacokinetic study in Wistar rats with i.v. administered DNR-loaded Lecithmer showed higher volume of distribution, lower elimination rate constant, and longer half-life (81.68 L, 0.3535 h(-1), 1.96 h) as compared to DNR solution (57.46 L, 0.4237 h(-1), 1.635 h). Pharmacodynamic evaluation of orally administered LNX-loaded Lecithmer showed superior anti-inflammatory activity with maximum inhibition of 81.2 % vis-à-vis 53.57 % in case of LNX suspension. In light of these results, Lecithmer can be envisaged as a promising nanosystem for parenteral as well as oral drug delivery.

  11. Azithromycin maintenance therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis : A dose advice based on a review of pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, Erik B.; Touw, Daniel J.; Heijerman, Harry G.M.; Van Der Ent, Cornelis K.

    2012-01-01

    Azithromycin maintenance therapy results in improvement of respiratory function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In azithromycin maintenance therapy, several dosing schemes are applied. In this review, we combine current knowledge about azithromycin pharmacokinetics with the dosing schedules u

  12. Pharmacokinetic profile of zafirlukast.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Koopmans, P.P.

    2002-01-01

    Zafirlukast is a cysteinyl leukotriene type 1 receptor antagonist that causes bronchodilation and has anti-inflammatory properties. Clinical efficacy has been demonstrated when using oral doses of 20 to 40 mg twice daily. The pharmacokinetics of zafirlukast are best described by a two-compartment mo

  13. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  14. Human health and the environment: Predicting plasma protein binding and metabolic clearance rates of environmentally relevant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In silico methods provide a rapid, inexpensive means of screening a wide array of environmentally relevant pollutants, pesticides, fungicides and consumer products for further toxicity testing. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models bridge the gap between in vitro as...

  15. 4-Aminopyridyl-based CYP51 inhibitors as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drug leads with improved pharmacokinetic profile and in vivo potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Claudia M; Vieira, Debora F; Choi, Jun Yong; Kellar, Danielle; Cameron, Michael D; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Gut, Jiri; Johnston, Jonathan B; Lin, Li; Khan, Susan; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R; Podust, Larissa M

    2014-08-28

    CYP51 is a P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the sterol components of eukaryotic cell membranes. CYP51 inhibitors have been developed to treat infections caused by fungi, and more recently the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. To specifically optimize drug candidates for T. cruzi CYP51 (TcCYP51), we explored the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a N-indolyl-oxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based scaffold originally identified in a target-based screen. This scaffold evolved via medicinal chemistry to yield orally bioavailable leads with potent anti-T. cruzi activity in vivo. Using an animal model of infection with a transgenic T. cruzi Y luc strain expressing firefly luciferase, we prioritized the biaryl and N-arylpiperazine analogues by oral bioavailability and potency. The drug-target complexes for both scaffold variants were characterized by X-ray structure analysis. Optimization of both binding mode and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds led to potent inhibitors against experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25101801

  16. An assessment of dioxin exposure across gestation and lactation using a PBPK model and new data from Seveso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, C; DeVito, M; Warner, M; Eskenazi, B; Mocarelli, P; Birnbaum, L S

    2016-01-01

    On July 10, 1976, an explosion at a chemical plant in Seveso, Italy, released up to 30kg of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-the most potent dioxin congener. Twenty years later, the Seveso Women's Health Study (SWHS) initiated a follow-up assessment of a cohort of female Seveso residents. Researchers collected serial blood, measured for TCDD levels, and recorded information about the women's medical history after the explosion. The study's aims were to: 1) modify the human PBPK model for TCDD (Emond et al. 2004; Emond et al. 2005; NCEA-USEPA, 2010) to include repetitive gestation and lactation; 2) simulate TCDD blood concentrations during different life stages including pregnancy and lactation, under different exposure scenarios; and 3) use this PBPK model to compare the influence of gestation and lactation on elimination of TCDD. After optimization of the model, it was assessed using data from the SWHS cohort. The 23 women in Subcohort A, were 4-39years old and in Subcohort B, the 18 women were 3-17years old when the explosion occurred. The model accurately predicted the blood concentrations during the 20years post-exposure, including periods of pregnancy and lactation. The model was also used to analyze the contribution of gestation and lactation to the mother's elimination of TCDD. The results suggest that gestation and lactation do not significantly impact TCDD blood elimination. Future efforts will focus on using additional data to evaluate the PBPK model and improving the mathematical descriptions of lactation and multiple gestations. PMID:27045706

  17. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and molecular detoxication.

    OpenAIRE

    Cashman, J R; Perotti, B Y; Berkman, C E; J. Lin

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters used from in vivo and in vitro studies that are important in order to understand the major conceptual approaches of toxicokinetics and the disposition of environmental chemicals. In vitro biochemical information concerning the detoxication of environmental chemicals is also presented. The discussion leads to a more complete appreciation for the use of in vitro measurements for in vivo correlations. The concept of i...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    McGilveray, Iain J

    2005-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana). The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC) and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30%) leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability ...

  20. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety

    OpenAIRE

    Onoue S; Yamada S; Chan HK

    2014-01-01

    Satomi Onoue,1 Shizuo Yamada,1 Hak-Kim Chan2 1Department of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan; 2Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nan...

  1. Pharmacokinetics of rilmenidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genissel, P.; Bromet, N. (Biopharmacie Servier, Orleans (France))

    1989-09-18

    Rilmenidine is a novel antihypertensive agent related to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, used in the treatment of mild or moderate hypertension at the oral dose of 1 mg once a day or 1 mg twice a day. The pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated after single or repeated administration in healthy subjects, using labeled and unlabeled compounds. Rilmenidine was rapidly and extensively absorbed, with an absolute bioavailability close to one and a time to peak plasma concentration of two hours. Rilmenidine was not subjected to presystemic metabolism. Distribution was independent of the free fraction since rilmenidine was weakly bound to plasma proteins (less than 10 percent). The volume of distribution was approximately 5 liters/kg (315 liters). Elimination was rapid, with a total body plasma clearance of approximately 450 ml/minute and an elimination half-life of approximately eight hours. Renal excretion was the major elimination process (two thirds of the total clearance); the parent drug in urine accounted for about 65 percent of the dose administered. Metabolism was very poor; few metabolites were found in urine and no metabolites were detected in plasma. Linear pharmacokinetics was demonstrated for rilmenidine from 0.5 to 2 mg; at 3 mg, a slight deviation from linearity was observed. In repeated administration, the linearity with dose of the pharmacokinetics of rilmenidine was confirmed.

  2. Towards optimal design of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic studies.

    OpenAIRE

    White Nicholas J; Price Ric N; Jamsen Kris M; Simpson Julie A; Lindegardh Niklas; Tarning Joel; Duffull Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Characterization of anti-malarial drug concentration profiles is necessary to optimize dosing, and thereby optimize cure rates and reduce both toxicity and the emergence of resistance. Population pharmacokinetic studies determine the drug concentration time profiles in the target patient populations, including children who have limited sampling options. Currently, population pharmacokinetic studies of anti-malarial drugs are designed based on logistical, financial and ethi...

  3. Influence of scan duration on the estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters for breast lesions: a study based on CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST-VIBE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Wen; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Guangbin; Wang, Cuiyan [Shandong University, Department of MR Imaging, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu, Hui [Siemens Healthcare, MR Collaborations NE Asia, Shanghai (China)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of scan duration on pharmacokinetic parameters and their performance in differentiating benign from malignant breast lesions. Dynamic breast imaging was performed on a 3.0-T MR system using a prototype CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWISTVIBE (CDT-VIBE) sequence with a temporal resolution of 11.9 s. Enrolled in the study were 53 women with 55 lesions (26 benign and 29 malignant). Pharmacokinetic parameters (Ktrans, ve, kep and iAUC) were calculated for various scan durations from 1 to 7 min after injection of contrast medium using the Tofts model. Ktrans, kep and ve calculated from the 1-min dataset were significantly different from those calculated from the other datasets. In benign lesions, Ktrans, kep and ve were significantly different only between 1 min and 2 min (corrected P > 0.05), but in malignant lesions there were significant differences for any of the comparisons up to 6 min vs. 7 min (corrected P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in AUCs for any of the parameters (P > 0.05). In breast dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI the scan duration has a significant impact on pharmacokinetic parameters, but the diagnostic ability may not be significantly affected. A scan duration of 5 min after injection of contrast medium may be sufficient for calculation of Tofts model pharmacokinetic parameters. (orig.)

  4. Development and characterization of self-assembling lecithin-based mixed polymeric micelles containing quercetin in cancer treatment and an in vivo pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Chun; Chen, Ying-Chen; Su, Chia-Yu; Hong, Chung-Shu; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin (Que) is known to have biological benefits including an anticancer effect, but low water solubility limits its clinical application. The aim of this study was to develop a lecithin-based mixed polymeric micelle (LMPM) delivery system to improve the solubility and bioavailability of Que. The optimal Que-LMPM, composed of Que, lecithin, Pluronic(®) P123, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxy[poly(ethylene glycol)-2000] in a proportion of 3:1:17.5:2.5 (w/w), was prepared by a thin-film method. The average size, polydispersion index, encapsulating efficiency, and drug loading of Que-LMPM were 61.60 ± 5.02 nm, 0.589 ± 0.198, 96.87% ± 9.04%, and 12.18% ± 1.11%, respectively. The solubility of Que in the Que-LMPM system increased to 5.81 mg/mL, compared to that of free Que in water of 0.17-7.7 μg/mL. The Que-LMPM system presented a sustained-release property in vitro. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that the 50% inhibitory concentration values toward MCF-7 breast cancer cells for free Que, blank LMPMs, and Que-LMPMs were >200, >200, and 110 μM, respectively, indicating the nontoxicity of the LMPM carrier, but the LMPM formulation enhanced the cytotoxicity of Que against MCF-7 cells. A cellular uptake assay also confirmed the intake of Que-LMPM by MCF-7 cells. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that Que-LMPMs had higher area under the concentration-time curve and a longer half-life, leading to better bioavailability compared to a free Que injection. Due to their nanosize, core-shell structure, and solubilization potential, LMPMs were successfully developed as a drug delivery system for Que to improve its solubility and bioavailability.

  5. A Systematic Analysis of the Sensitivity of Plasma Pharmacokinetics to Detect Differences in the Pulmonary Performance of Inhaled Fluticasone Propionate Products Using a Model-Based Simulation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Benjamin; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    The role of plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) for assessing bioequivalence at the target site, the lung, for orally inhaled drugs remains unclear. A validated semi-mechanistic model, considering the presence of mucociliary clearance in central lung regions, was expanded for quantifying the sensitivity of PK studies in detecting differences in the pulmonary performance (total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics) between test (T) and reference (R) inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) products. PK bioequivalence trials for inhaled FP were simulated based on this PK model for a varying number of subjects and T products. The statistical power to conclude bioequivalence when T and R products are identical was demonstrated to be 90% for approximately 50 subjects. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrated that PK metrics (area under the concentration time curve (AUC) and C max) are capable of detecting differences between T and R formulations of inhaled FP products when the products differ by more than 20%, 30%, and 25% for total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics, respectively. These results were derived using a rather conservative risk assessment approach with an error rate of <10%. The simulations thus indicated that PK studies might be a viable alternative to clinical studies comparing pulmonary efficacy biomarkers for slowly dissolving inhaled drugs. PK trials for pulmonary efficacy equivalence testing should be complemented by in vitro studies to avoid false positive bioequivalence assessments that are theoretically possible for some specific scenarios. Moreover, a user-friendly web application for simulating such PK equivalence trials with inhaled FP is provided.

  6. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    of the currently published pharmacokinetic data of pemetrexed reviewing a number of different scenarios and patient populations. All the articles reviewed in this manuscript are from peer-reviewed English-spoken literature without any limitations to the time of publication. EXPERT OPINION: Pemetrexed's clearance......INTRODUCTION: Pemetrexed is a multi-targeted antifolate cytotoxic agent that has demonstrated activity in a number of very common cancer types including NSCLC in both first- and second-line settings and in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. AREAS COVERED: This article focuses on all...

  7. Microfluidic-Based Multi-Organ Platforms for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rezaei Kolahchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of predictive multi-organ models before implementing costly clinical trials is central for screening the toxicity, efficacy, and side effects of new therapeutic agents. Despite significant efforts that have been recently made to develop biomimetic in vitro tissue models, the clinical application of such platforms is still far from reality. Recent advances in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD modeling, micro- and nanotechnology, and in silico modeling have enabled single- and multi-organ platforms for investigation of new chemical agents and tissue-tissue interactions. This review provides an overview of the principles of designing microfluidic-based organ-on-chip models for drug testing and highlights current state-of-the-art in developing predictive multi-organ models for studying the cross-talk of interconnected organs. We further discuss the challenges associated with establishing a predictive body-on-chip (BOC model such as the scaling, cell types, the common medium, and principles of the study design for characterizing the interaction of drugs with multiple targets.

  8. Nevirapine Exposure with WHO Pediatric Weight Band Dosing: Enhanced Therapeutic Concentrations Predicted Based on Extensive International Pharmacokinetic Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikanjam, M.; Kabamba, D.; Cressey, T.R.; Burger, D.M.; Aweeka, F.T.; Acosta, E.P.; Spector, S.A.; Capparelli, E.V.

    2012-01-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) used worldwide as part of combination antiretroviral therapy in infants and children to treat HIV infection. Dosing based on either weight or body surface area has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

  9. Theranostic system for drug delivery and pharmacokinetic imaging based on nanosecond pulsed light-induced photomechanical and photoacoustic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Akutsu, Yusuke; Miyagawa, Yoshihiro; Araki, Koji; Shiotani, Akihiro; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    For efficient and side effects-free pharmacological treatment, we here propose a theranostic system that enables transvascular drug delivery by photomechanical waves (PMWs) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging of the drug distribution; both functions are based on nanosecond laser pulses and can therefore be integrated in one system. Through optical fibers arranged around an ultrasound sensor, low-energy and high-energy nanosecond light pulses were transmitted respectively for PA imaging and PMW-based drug delivery by temporal switching. With the system, we delivered a test drug (Evans blue) to tumors in mice and visualized distributions of both the blood vessels and drug in the tissue in vivo, showing the validity of the system.

  10. Theranostic system for drug delivery and pharmacokinetic imaging based on nanosecond pulsed light-induced photomechanical and photoacoustic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For efficient and side effects-free pharmacological treatment, we here propose a theranostic system that enables transvascular drug delivery by photomechanical waves (PMWs) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging of the drug distribution; both functions are based on nanosecond laser pulses and can therefore be integrated in one system. Through optical fibers arranged around an ultrasound sensor, low-energy and high-energy nanosecond light pulses were transmitted respectively for PA imaging and PMW-based drug delivery by temporal switching. With the system, we delivered a test drug (Evans blue) to tumors in mice and visualized distributions of both the blood vessels and drug in the tissue in vivo, showing the validity of the system. (author)

  11. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Roopenian, Derry C.; Low, Benjamin E.; Christianson, Gregory J.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J.; Wiles, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of app...

  12. Estimation of internal radiation dose in human based on animal data. Application of methodology in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before conducting human study on radiolabeled drug, internal radiation dose is evaluated based on the animal data. Generally, however, species difference in the elimination process of radioactivity, mostly in the hepatic metabolism, is ignored. The methodology of correction was described for drugs that are eliminated mostly by hepatic metabolism. We showed the validity of using the method where the hepatic clearance in animal and human are constructed by the hepatic blood flow, protein unbound fraction and metabolic rate in vitro, and the internal radiation exposure calculated is corrected by the animal/human ratio of the hepatic clearance. (author)

  13. Pharmacokinetic, residue and irritation aspects of chloramphenicol sodium succinate and a chloramphenicol base formulation following intramuscular administration to ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouws, J F; Vree, T B; Holtkamp, J; Baakman, M; Driessens, F; Guelen, P J

    1986-07-01

    The disposition of chloramphenicol (CAP) and of its glucuronide metabolite in plasma and milk was studied following a single intramuscular injection of a chloramphenicol base formulation (Amicol Forte; product A) and of chloramphenicol sodium succinate (product B) to dairy cows. The dose applied of both formulations was equivalent to 50 mg CAP base/kg body weight. The HPLC determined CAP concentrations were microbiologically active. Product A revealed 30% higher plasma CAP peak concentrations (13.0 vs 9.0 micrograms/ml) and 36% larger areas under the plasma concentration-time curves than product B, whereas their absorption and elimination half-lives were of the same order of magnitude. In the onset phase (during 4 h p.i.) unhydrolysed CAP sodium succinate could be detected in plasma and the glucuronide fraction was 26% of the parent drug. After 25 h p.i. the glucuronide fraction equalled that of the parent drug. The maximum CAP concentration in milk was for product B equal to, and for product A 80% of, the CAP plasma concentration. In milk no chloramphenicol glucuronide metabolites could be detected. HPLC methods for detecting ultra-trace CAP concentrations in edible tissues were developed by the employment of extraction with or without a clean-up procedure. Seven days after i.m. administration of product A and B to calves, the CAP residue concentrations in the kidney, liver, and muscle were less than 2 nanogram/g tissue. Traces of CAP residues could be still found at the injection site and in the urine. Chloramphenicol sodium succinate (product B) caused extensive tissue irritation at the injection site, while in the case of product A the irritation was limited.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3750804

  14. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) Indices of Antibiotics Predicted by a Semimechanistic PKPD Model: a Step toward Model-Based Dose Optimization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Elisabet I.; Cars, Otto; Friberg, Lena E.

    2011-01-01

    A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model that characterizes the full time course of in vitro time-kill curve experiments of antibacterial drugs was here evaluated in its capacity to predict the previously determined PK/PD indices. Six drugs (benzylpenicillin, cefuroxime, erythromycin, gentamicin, moxifloxacin, and vancomycin), representing a broad selection of mechanisms of action and PK and PD characteristics, were investigated. For each drug, a dose fractionation study was simulated, ...

  15. Use of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to simulate artemether dose adjustment for overcoming the drug-drug interaction with efavirenz

    OpenAIRE

    Siccardi, Marco; Olagunju, Adeniyi; Seden, Kay; Ebrahimjee, Farid; Rannard, Steve; Back, David; Owen, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To treat malaria, HIV-infected patients normally receive artemether (80 mg twice daily) concurrently with antiretroviral therapy and drug-drug interactions can potentially occur. Artemether is a substrate of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, antiretrovirals such as efavirenz induce these enzymes and have the potential to reduce artemether pharmacokinetic exposure. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach to model the interaction between efavirenz and ar...

  16. Feasibility of Using Limited-Population-Based Arterial Input Function for Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Osteosarcoma Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Data

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, YA; Huang, Wei; Panicek, David M.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Koutcher, Jason A

    2008-01-01

    For clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI studies, it is often not possible to obtain reliable arterial input function (AIF) in each measurement. Thus, it is important to find a representative AIF for pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data when individual AIF (Ind-AIF) measurements are not available. A total of 16 patients with osteosarcomas in the lower extremity (knee region) underwent multislice DCE-MRI. Reliable Ind-AIFs were obtained in five patients with a contrast injection ra...

  17. Maximum Recommended Dosage of Lithium for Pregnant Women Based on a PBPK Model for Lithium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Horton; Amalie Tuerk; Daniel Cook; Jiadi Cook; Prasad Dhurjati

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of bipolar disorder with lithium therapy during pregnancy is a medical challenge. Bipolar disorder is more prevalent in women and its onset is often concurrent with peak reproductive age. Treatment typically involves administration of the element lithium, which has been classified as a class D drug (legal to use during pregnancy, but may cause birth defects) and is one of only thirty known teratogenic drugs. There is no clear recommendation in the literature on the maximum acceptabl...

  18. Development and characterization of self-assembling lecithin-based mixed polymeric micelles containing quercetin in cancer treatment and an in vivo pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen LC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ling-Chun Chen,1,* Ying-Chen Chen,1,* Chia-Yu Su,1 Chung-Shu Hong,1 Hsiu-O Ho,1 Ming-Thau Sheu1,2 1School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, 2Clinical Research Center and Traditional Herbal Medicine Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Quercetin (Que is known to have biological benefits including an anticancer effect, but low water solubility limits its clinical application. The aim of this study was to develop a lecithin-based mixed polymeric micelle (LMPM delivery system to improve the solubility and bioavailability of Que. The optimal Que-LMPM, composed of Que, lecithin, Pluronic® P123, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxy[poly(ethylene glycol-2000] in a proportion of 3:1:17.5:2.5 (w/w, was prepared by a thin-film method. The average size, polydispersion index, encapsulating efficiency, and drug loading of Que-LMPM were 61.60±5.02 nm, 0.589±0.198, 96.87%±9.04%, and 12.18%±1.11%, respectively. The solubility of Que in the Que-LMPM system increased to 5.81 mg/mL, compared to that of free Que in water of 0.17–7.7 µg/mL. The Que-LMPM system presented a sustained-release property in vitro. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that the 50% inhibitory concentration values toward MCF-7 breast cancer cells for free Que, blank LMPMs, and Que-LMPMs were >200, >200, and 110 µM, respectively, indicating the nontoxicity of the LMPM carrier, but the LMPM formulation enhanced the cytotoxicity of Que against MCF-7 cells. A cellular uptake assay also confirmed the intake of Que-LMPM by MCF-7 cells. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that Que-LMPMs had higher area under the concentration–time curve and a longer half-life, leading to better bioavailability compared to a free Que injection. Due to their nanosize, core–shell structure, and solubilization potential, LMPMs were successfully developed as

  19. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  20. Clinical pharmacokinetics of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidberg, E F; Dam, M

    1976-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy was among the first areas to benefit from clinical pharmacokinetic studies. The most important advantage is that the frequent interindividual variation in the plasma level/dose ratio for these drugs can be circumvented by plasma level monitoring. For several anticonvulsants the brain concentration is shown to parallel the plasma concentration. Phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) is stil the most important anticonvulsant and the one for which kinetics have been thoroughly investigated in man. These investigations have revealed several reasons for the wellknown difficulties in using this drug clinically. The absorption rate and fraction are very much dependent on the pharmaceutical preparation, and changes of brand may alter the plasma level of phenytoin in spite of unaltered dose. The elimination capacity is saturable causing dose dependent kinetics, which again means disproportional changes in plasma level with changes in dose. Great individual variations exist in the rate of metabolism, and several pharmacokinetic drug interactions are known. As an optimum therapeutic plasma concentration range has been established monitoring plasma levels must be strongly advocated. Interpretation of plasma levels in uraemic patients must take into account decreased protein binding of the drug. Carbamazepine is probably as effective as phenytoin. The elimination is a first order process, but the rate of metabolism increases after a few weeks' treatment. An active metabolite (epoxide) may be the cause of some side-effects. Combined treatment with other anticonvulsant drugs decreases the half-life and more frequent dosing may be necessary. An optimum therapeutic concentration range has been suggested and plasma monitoring is advocated, along with that of the active metabolite, the epoxide. Phenobarbitone is still much used but its kinetics have been investigated to a lesser extent. The main problem is the variability in the rate of elimination. In children the half

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J McGilveray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30% leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level of 152±86.3 ng/mL occured approximately 10 min after inhalation. Oral THC, on the other hand, is only 4% to 12% bioavailable and absorption is highly variable. THC is eliminated from plasma in a multiphasic manner, with low amounts detectable for over one week after dosing. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20% and 100% of parent, respectively. THC is widely distributed, particularly to fatty tissues, but less than 1% of an administered dose reaches the brain, while the spleen and body fat are long-term storage sites. The elimination of THC and its many metabolites (from all routes occurs via the feces and urine. Metabolites persist in the urine and feces for severalweeks. Nabilone is well absorbed and the pharmacokinetics, although variable, appear to be linear from oral doses of 1 mg to 4 mg (these doses show a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 2 h. As with THC, there is a high first-pass effect, and the feces to urine ratio of excretion is similar to other cannabinoids. Pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic modelling with plasma THC versus cardiac and psychotropic effects show that after equilibrium is reached, the intensity of effect is proportional to the plasma THC profile. Clinical trials have found that nabilone produces less tachycardia and less euphoria than THC for a similar antiemetic response.

  2. Pharmacokinetic interactions with thiazolidinediones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease combining defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. New compounds called thiazolidinediones or glitazones have been developed for reducing insulin resistance. After the withdrawal of troglitazone because of liver toxicity, two compounds are currently used in clinical practice, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. These compounds are generally used in combination with other pharmacological agents. Because they are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP), glitazones are exposed to numerous pharmacokinetic interactions. CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 are the main isoenzymes catalysing biotransformation of pioglitazone (as with troglitazone), whereas rosiglitazone is metabolised by CYP2C9 and CYP2C8. For both rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, the most relevant interactions have been described in healthy volunteers with rifampicin (rifampin), which results in a significant decrease of area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] (54-65% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 54% for pioglitazone, p<0.001), and with gemfibrozil, which results in a significant increase of AUC (130% for rosiglitazone, p<0.001; 220-240% for pioglitazone, p<0.001). The relevance of such drug-drug interactions in patients with type 2 diabetes remains to be evaluated. However, in the absence of clinical data, it is prudent to reduce the dosage of each glitazone by half in patients treated with gemfibrozil. Conversely, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone do not seem to significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of other compounds. Although some food components have also been shown to potentially interfere with drugs metabolised with the CYP system, no published study deals specifically with these possible CYP-mediated food-drug interactions with glitazones.

  3. CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETIC STUDIES OF MIFEPRISTONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUNing; WUXi-Rui

    1989-01-01

    In ordcr to cxaminc thc pharmacokinetic charactcristics of mifcpristonc, manufactured by the Roussel-Uclaf Company, in Chincsee healthy volunteers and early pregnant womcn, the following two studies wcre carried out.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of clomipramine during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, P. G. J.; Proost, J. H.; Smit, J. P.; Vries, M. T.; Jong-van den Berg, de L. T. W.; Wilffert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Clomipramine is one of the drugs for depression during pregnancy; however, pharmacokinetic data of clomipramine and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine in this vulnerable period are lacking. In this study, we describe clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine concentrations including their rati

  5. Pharmacokinetics of clomipramine during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, P G J; Proost, J H; Smit, J P; Vries, M T; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Wilffert, B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Clomipramine is one of the drugs for depression during pregnancy; however, pharmacokinetic data of clomipramine and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine in this vulnerable period are lacking. In this study, we describe clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine concentrations including t

  6. The development of a quantitative and qualitative method based on UHPLC-QTOF MS/MS for evaluation paclitaxel-tetrandrine interaction and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Cao, Zhonglian; Liao, Xueling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Paclitaxel is a broad-spectrum anti-cancer drug by targeting microtubulin. However, multidrug resistant (MDR) makes its clinical application more difficult and results in failure of chemotherapy. Tetrandrine as a potential multidrug resistant modulator could be combined with other anti-cancer drugs. In this study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF) was applied to simultaneously qualitative and quantitative analysis of paclitaxel for the pharmacokinetic studies while combined with tetrandrine. This method was developed based on non-target screening mode IDA (Information Dependent Acquisition). As a result, the validated range was 0.25-64ng/ml (30µl plasma) for paclitaxel. Totally 33 metabolites of paclitaxel and tetrandine were identified in vivo and in vitro. The main metabolites of PTX were dose-dependent decreased with different amounts of tetrandine co-administration no matter in vivo and in vitro, the exposure of PTX increased in pharmacokinetic study. The verified method is sensitive accurate and effective for the simultaneous determination of paclitaxel and its metabolites in blood, urine and live microsome incubation samples and it was successfully applied to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction between paclitaxel and tetrandine. Furthermore, a biosensor technology, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis was applied to preliminary evaluate the competitive protein binding of multiple components. The SPR analysis indicated that the affinity between 6-hydroxy-paclitaxel and micotubulin is similar to that between paclitaxel and micotubulin, and tetrandrine also does not form a competitive combination with paclitaxel. For human, 6-hydroxy-paclitaxel is the one of main metabolites of paclitaxel, so the results suggested that tetrandine has an influence on the metabolite of paclitaxel, but tetrandine and the main metabolites of PTX probably do not affect PTX

  7. The development of a quantitative and qualitative method based on UHPLC-QTOF MS/MS for evaluation paclitaxel-tetrandrine interaction and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Cao, Zhonglian; Liao, Xueling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Paclitaxel is a broad-spectrum anti-cancer drug by targeting microtubulin. However, multidrug resistant (MDR) makes its clinical application more difficult and results in failure of chemotherapy. Tetrandrine as a potential multidrug resistant modulator could be combined with other anti-cancer drugs. In this study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF) was applied to simultaneously qualitative and quantitative analysis of paclitaxel for the pharmacokinetic studies while combined with tetrandrine. This method was developed based on non-target screening mode IDA (Information Dependent Acquisition). As a result, the validated range was 0.25-64ng/ml (30µl plasma) for paclitaxel. Totally 33 metabolites of paclitaxel and tetrandine were identified in vivo and in vitro. The main metabolites of PTX were dose-dependent decreased with different amounts of tetrandine co-administration no matter in vivo and in vitro, the exposure of PTX increased in pharmacokinetic study. The verified method is sensitive accurate and effective for the simultaneous determination of paclitaxel and its metabolites in blood, urine and live microsome incubation samples and it was successfully applied to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction between paclitaxel and tetrandine. Furthermore, a biosensor technology, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis was applied to preliminary evaluate the competitive protein binding of multiple components. The SPR analysis indicated that the affinity between 6-hydroxy-paclitaxel and micotubulin is similar to that between paclitaxel and micotubulin, and tetrandrine also does not form a competitive combination with paclitaxel. For human, 6-hydroxy-paclitaxel is the one of main metabolites of paclitaxel, so the results suggested that tetrandine has an influence on the metabolite of paclitaxel, but tetrandine and the main metabolites of PTX probably do not affect PTX

  8. Fully Bayesian Experimental Design for Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G. Ryan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Utility functions in Bayesian experimental design are usually based on the posterior distribution. When the posterior is found by simulation, it must be sampled from for each future dataset drawn from the prior predictive distribution. Many thousands of posterior distributions are often required. A popular technique in the Bayesian experimental design literature, which rapidly obtains samples from the posterior, is importance sampling, using the prior as the importance distribution. However, importance sampling from the prior will tend to break down if there is a reasonable number of experimental observations. In this paper, we explore the use of Laplace approximations in the design setting to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, we consider using the Laplace approximation to form the importance distribution to obtain a more efficient importance distribution than the prior. The methodology is motivated by a pharmacokinetic study, which investigates the effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in sheep. The design problem is to find 10 near optimal plasma sampling times that produce precise estimates of pharmacokinetic model parameters/measures of interest. We consider several different utility functions of interest in these studies, which involve the posterior distribution of parameter functions.

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, A; Wilson, J T

    1976-01-01

    Wide variations in drug dose recommendations for children of the same or different ages reflect the inadequacy of data on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in children. Selected aspects of available literature on pharmacokinetics of drugs used in older infants and children has been reviewed with special attention to calculation of an age-appropriate dose. During the neonatal period and early infancy the elimination of many drugs that are excreted in the urine in unchanged form is restricted by the immaturity of glomerular filtration and renal tubular secretion. On the other hand, in late infancy and/or in childhood, a similar or greater rate of elimination from plasma than in adults has been observed for many drugs, notably digoxin, phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, ethosuximide, diazoxide, clindamycin and propoxyphene. Consistent with this, it has been shown that some drugs exhibit a lower plasma level/dose ratio in infancy and early childhood as compared with the adult. This is true for phenobarbitone, phenytoin and ethosuximide. Some age groups of children remain uninvestigated with regard to pharmacokinetics, even for the drugs reviewed. Therefore, pediatric therapy remains empirically based for many drugs. PMID:1017153

  10. Prediction of oral absorption of cinnarizine--a highly supersaturating poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Mark; Przyklenk, Karl-Heinz; Richtberg, Annette; Baumann, Wolfgang; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-11-01

    Two important driving forces for oral absorption of active pharmaceutical ingredients are drug dissolution and permeability in the gastrointestinal tract. Poorly soluble weak bases typically exhibit high solubility under fasted gastric conditions. However, the solubility of such drugs usually decreases drastically in the fasted small intestine, constraining drug absorption. Since there is a discrepancy in solubility between the fasted state stomach and intestine, it is crucial to examine the influence of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation on the oral absorption of poorly soluble weak bases during and after fasted state gastric emptying. Cinnarizine is a poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability, exhibiting supersaturation and precipitation under simulated fasted state gastric emptying conditions. Interestingly, supersaturation and precipitation of cinnarizine under fed state conditions is not expected to occur, since the drug shows good solubility in fed state biorelevant media and exhibits a positive food effect in pharmacokinetic studies. The present work is aimed at investigating the dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation behavior of marketed cinnarizine tablets under fasted and fed state conditions using biorelevant dissolution and transfer methods. In order to predict the in vivo performance of these cinnarizine formulations, the in vitro results were then coupled with different physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which considered either only dissolution or a combination of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation kinetics. The results of the in silico predictions were then compared with in vivo observations. The study revealed that under fasting conditions, plasma profiles could be accurately predicted only when supersaturation and precipitation as well as dissolution were taken into account. It was concluded that for poorly soluble weak bases with moderate permeability, supersaturation and precipitation

  11. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Tucker A. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Twaddle, Nathan C. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Roegge, Cindy S. [Division of Neurotoxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Callicott, Ralph J. [U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Priority One Services Corp, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Doerge, Daniel R., E-mail: daniel.doerge@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ► Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ► Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ► BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ► BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ► Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements.

  12. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ► Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ► Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ► BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ► BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ► Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements

  13. Estimation of drug dosage regimens with a pharmacokinetic slide rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, A B; Cruze, C A; Meyer, M C

    1977-02-01

    A pharmacokinetic slide rule to facilitate the computations based on relatively simple pharmacokinetic principles involved in the development of individualized drug dosage regimens is described. The calculations are based on the assumption that the body can be conceived as a one-compartment open model with drug elimination proceeding by apparent first-order kinetics. Examples are presented (1) to illustrate the clinical application of a slide rule to compute the time-course of drug in the body, (2) to calculate steady-state maximum and minimum levels, and accumulation during multiple dosage and (3) to estimate appropriate maintenance doses and intravenous infusion rates. PMID:842548

  14. Intratumoral Pharmacokinetics: Challenges to Nanobiomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of solid tumors to treatment is significantly attributed to pharmacokinetic reasons at both cellular and multi-cellular levels. Anticancer agent must be bio-available at the site of action in a cytotoxic concentration to exert its proposed activity. Solid tumor tissue is characterized by high density of vascular bed however; the vast majority of these blood vessels are not functioning. The vast majority of solid tumors can be described as poorly perfused with blood; and anticancer agents need to penetrate/distribute avascularly within solid tumor micro-milieu. Classic pharmacokinetic parameters correlate drug status within central compartment (blood) to all perfused body tissues according to their degree of perfusion. Yet, these classic pharmacokinetic parameters cannot fully elucidate the intratumoral drug penetration/distribution status of anticancer drugs due to the great discrepancies in perfusion between normal and solid tumor tissues. Herein, we will discuss the recently proposed pharmacokinetic parameters that might accurately portray the distribution of anticancer agents within solid tumor micro-milieu. In addition, we will present the new challenges attributed to these new pharmacokinetic parameters towards designing nanobiomaterial drug delivery system. PMID:26027565

  15. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria ...

  16. Pharmacokinetics of BMEDA after Intravenous Administration in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsien Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of N,N-bis(2-mercapatoethly-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA, a molecule that can form a chelate with rhenium-188 (188Re to produce the 188Re-BMEDA-liposomes, was studied. In this work, beagles received a single injection of BMEDA, at doses of 1, 2, or 5 mg/kg; the concentration of BMEDA in the beagles’ plasma was then analyzed and determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters of BMEDA, we found that male and female animals shared similar patterns indicating that the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA is independent of gender differences. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA was seen to be non-linear because the increase of mean AUC0–t and AUC0–∞ values tend to be greater than dose proportional while the mean Vss and CL values of BMEDA appeared to be dose dependent. The information on the pharmacokinetics of BMEDA generated from this study will serve as a basis to design appropriate pharmacology and toxicology studies for future human use.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of doxycycline in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, R C; Kemp, D T; Kitzman, J V; Goetsch, D D

    1988-01-01

    Six adult dogs were given doxycycline hyclate at a dosage of 5 mg/kg of body weight intravenously so that pharmacokinetic parameters could be evaluated. Serum doxycycline concentrations were determined over a 48 h period using a modified agar well bioassay. Compartmental pharmacokinetic evaluation of the serum concentration time data indicated that doxycycline has a half-life of 10.36 h, a body clearance of 1.68 +/- 0.44 mL/min/kg, and a volume of distribution at steady state of 1.468 +/- 0.2...

  18. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus. PMID:18307504

  19. Pharmacokinetics of ricobendazole in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentini, E A; Mestorino, O N; Mariño, E L; Errecalde, J O

    2001-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ricobendazole (RBZ) and its major metabolite albendazole sulphone (ABZSO2) were studied in six calves, after administration of RBZ (7.5 mg/kg), using a 10% experimental solution by the intravenous (i.v.) route, a 10% commercial solution by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route, and a 10% experimental suspension by the intraruminal (i.r.) route. Blood samples were drawn during a 60-h period. Plasma drug and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic evaluation in each case was prepared by weighted least-squares nonlinear regression analysis. Ricobendazole i.v. data were best fitted by a two-compartment model. The best pharmacokinetic exponents and coefficients were estimated, and the pharmacokinetic variables for RBZ and ABZSO2 were calculated from them. Similar patterns of plasma disposition were found for RBZ after i.r. and s.c. administration, suggesting delayed release from the s.c. site resembling the slow release of the drug from the rumen. PMID:11442798

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of intravenous inotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Lasse A; Antila, Saila; Pentikäinen, Pertti J

    2004-01-01

    Positive inotropic drugs have various mechanisms of action. Long-term use of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent drugs has adverse effects on the prognosis of heart failure patients, whereas digoxin has neutral effect on mortality. There are, however, little data on the effects of intravenous inotropic drugs on the outcome of patients. Intravenous inotropic agents are used to treat cardiac emergencies and refractory heart failure. beta-Adrenergic agonists are rapid acting and easy to titrate, with short elimination half-life. However, they increase myocardial oxygen consumption and are thus hazardous during myocardial ischaemia. Furthermore they may promote myocyte apoptosis. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibiting drugs (amrinone, milrinone and enoximone) increase contractility by reducing the degradation of cAMP. In addition, they reduce both preload and afterload via vasodilation. Short-term use of intravenous milrinone is not associated with increased mortality, and some symptomatic benefit may be obtained when it is used in refractory heart failure. Furthermore, PDE III inhibitors facilitate weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass machine after cardiac surgery. Levosimendan belongs to a new group of positive inotropic drugs, the calcium sensitisers. It has complex pharmacokinetics and long-lasting haemodynamic effects as a result of its active metabolites. In comparative trials, it has been better tolerated than the most widely used beta-agonist inotropic drug, dobutamine. The pharmacokinetics of the intravenous inotropic drugs might sometimes greatly modify and prolong the response to the therapy, for example because of long-acting active metabolites. These drugs display considerable differences in their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and the selection of the most appropriate inotropic drug for each patient should be based on careful consideration of the clinical status of the patient and on the pharmacology of the drug.

  1. Abdominal irradiation modulates 5-Fluorouracil pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shueng Pei-Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely accepted for treatment of abdominal malignancy. Nonetheless, the interactions between radiation and 5-FU remain unclear. We evaluated the influence of abdominal irradiation on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in rats. Methods The radiation dose distributions of cholangiocarcinoma patients were determined for the low dose areas, which are generously deposited around the intrahepatic target volume. Then, corresponding single-fraction radiation was delivered to the whole abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats from a linear accelerator after computerized tomography-based planning. 5-FU at 100 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation. A high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a UV detector was used to measure 5-FU in the blood. Ultrafiltration was used to measure protein-unbound 5-FU. Results Radiation at 2 Gy, simulating the daily human treatment dose, reduced the area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve (AUC of 5-FU by 31.7% compared to non-irradiated controls. This was accompanied by a reduction in mean residence time and incremental total plasma clearance values, and volume of distribution at steady state. Intriguingly, low dose radiation at 0.5 Gy, representing a dose deposited in the generous, off-target area in clinical practice, resulted in a similar pharmacokinetic profile, with a 21.4% reduction in the AUC. This effect was independent of protein binding capacity. Conclusions Abdominal irradiation appears to significantly modulate the systemic pharmacokinetics of 5-FU at both the dose level for target treatment and off-target areas. This unexpected and unwanted influence is worthy of further investigation and might need to be considered in clinical practice.

  2. Reassessment of stiripentol pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigné, Sophie; Rey, Elisabeth; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Pons, Gerard; Jullien, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Because children who have been receiving stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet syndrome for more than 10 years are now becoming young adults, it is important to accurately characterize stiripentol pharmacokinetics in this age range. A double-blind placebo-controlled dose ranging study was therefore conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of stiripentol in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received 3 single doses of stiripentol (500, 1000, and 2000 mg) separated by a wash-out period of 1 week. Pharmacokinetics of stiripentol was analyzed for each dose by non-compartmental analysis. Median area under the curve (AUC), terminal elimination half-life (t1/2,z) and maximal concentration (Cmax) were calculated for between-dose comparison. Safety was evaluated based on both clinical and biological criteria. Oppositely to previous results, there was no concentration rebounds in the elimination phase, which could be the consequence of the food intake. A more than proportional increase in the AUC was observed, associated with a significant increase in the t1/2,z, for increasing doses (median AUC of 8.3, 31 and 88 mgh/L, and median t1/2,z of 2, 7.7 and 10h for the 500, 1000, and 2000 mg doses respectively), which confirmed the Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetics of Stiripentol. However, dose-normalized Cmax did not significantly vary between doses. Median Michaelis-Menten parameters were 117 mg/h for Vmax and 1.9 mg/L for Km. No safety concern was observed during the study. The present study allowed a better characterization of the disposition phase of stiripentol and confirmed its non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies would be useful to determine the optimal dose of stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet patients in adulthood. PMID:24725808

  3. Revised assessment of cancer risk to dichloromethane: part I Bayesian PBPK and dose-response modeling in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Dale J.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Gentry, P. Robinan; Covington, Tammie R.; Hack, C. Eric; David, Raymond M.; Morgott, David A.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Animals;Bayes Theorem;chemically induced;Carcinogens;Dose-Response Relationship,Drug;Environment;Inhalation Exposure;metabolism;methods;Markov Chains;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Methylene Chloride;Mice;Models,Biological;Monte Carlo Method;Neoplasms;pharmacokinetics;Risk Assessment;Safety.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Satariya Trakulsrichai,1,2 Korbtham Sathirakul,3,4 Saranya Auparakkitanon,5 Jatupon Krongvorakul,5 Jetjamnong Sueajai,5 Nantida Noumjad,5 Chonlaphat Sukasem,5 Winai Wananukul2,6 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 2Ramathibodi Poison Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center for Drug Research Discovery and Development, Thammasat Univerisity, Prathumthani, Thailand; 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth., is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users.Methods: Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: Ten male subjects completed

  5. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Burckhardt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3−4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II (ferrous salts or iron(III (ferric complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia.

  6. Prediction and monitoring of the response to chemoradiotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinomas using a pharmacokinetic analysis based on the dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikui, Toru; Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Yoshiura, Kazunori [Kyushu University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dental Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawano, Shintaro [Kyushu University, Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Hatakenaka, Masamitsu [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kyushu University, Radiology Center, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Koga, Syouzou; Ohga, Masahiro [Kyushu University, Radiology Center, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsuo, Yoshio; Sunami, Syunya [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Sugiura, Tsuyoshi [Kyushu University, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Kyushu University, Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Obara, Makoto [Philips Electronics Japan, Ltd 2-13-37, Konan Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate whether a pharmacokinetic analysis is useful for both predicting and monitoring the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in oral cancer. Patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated with preoperative CRT and surgery were enrolled. They underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI before (n = 23), and after CRT (n = 20). We estimated four parameters: arrival time of contrast medium (TA), exchange rate constant from the extracellular extravascular space (EES) to plasma (k{sub ep}), elimination of contrast medium from the central compartment (k{sub el}) and an amplitude scaling constant (AH) using the Brix model. The histological evaluation of the effects of CRT was performed according to Ohboshi and Shimosato's classification. We analysed the correlation between the parameters and the histological evaluation. The pre-CRT AH between the responders and non-responders was significantly different (P = 0.046), however, the three parameters (TA, K{sub ep}, K{sub el}) were not significantly different among the groups (P = 0.76, P = 0.60, P = 0.09). As AH decreased, the tumour response improved. The change in the AH between the pre- and post-CRT of responders was significantly higher than that of non-responders (P = 0.043). The AH, which is affected by the ratio of the EES, was an important parameter for predicting and monitoring the tumour response to CRT. (orig.)

  7. Semimechanistic cell-cycle type-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of chemotherapy-induced neutropenic effects of diflomotecan under different dosing schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas-Sanjuan, Víctor; Buil-Bruna, Núria; Garrido, María J; Soto, Elena; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2015-07-01

    The current work integrates cell-cycle dynamics occurring in the bone marrow compartment as a key element in the structure of a semimechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for neutropenic effects, aiming to describe, with the same set of system- and drug-related parameters, longitudinal data of neutropenia gathered after the administration of the anticancer drug diflomotecan (9,10-difluoro-homocamptothecin) under different dosing schedules to patients (n = 111) with advanced solid tumors. To achieve such an objective, the general framework of the neutropenia models was expanded, including one additional physiologic process resembling cell cycle dynamics. The main assumptions of the proposed model are as follows: within the stem cell compartment, proliferative and quiescent cells coexist, and only cells in the proliferative condition are sensitive to drug effects and capable of following the maturation chain. Cell cycle dynamics were characterized by two new parameters, FProl (the fraction of proliferative [Prol] cells that enters into the maturation chain) and kcycle (first-order rate constant governing cell cycle dynamics within the stem cell compartment). Both model parameters were identifiable as indicated by the results from a bootstrap analysis, and their estimates were supported by date from the literature. The estimates of FProl and kcycle were 0.58 and 1.94 day(-1), respectively. The new model could properly describe the neutropenic effects of diflomotecan after very different dosing scenarios, and can be used to explore the potential impact of dosing schedule dependencies on neutropenia prediction. PMID:25948593

  8. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  9. Pharmacokinetics and RC Circuit Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Mieke De; Janssen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Most introductory physics courses include a chapter on RC circuits in which the differential equations for the charging and discharging of a capacitor are derived. A number of papers in this journal describe lab experiments dealing with the measurement of different parameters in such RC circuits. In this contribution, we report on a lab experiment we developed for students majoring in pharmacy, using RC circuits to simulate a pharmacokinetic process.

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics of Cyclophosphamide and Metabolites in Children with Neuroblastoma: a Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    OpenAIRE

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Oglesby, Celeste; Blough, David K.; Park, Julie R.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide-based regimens are front-line treatment for numerous pediatric malignancies, however current dosing methods result in considerable interpatient variability in tumor response and toxicity. In this pediatric population, our objectives were to 1. quantify and explain the pharmacokinetic variability of cyclophosphamide, and two of its metabolites, hydroxycyclophosphamide (HCY) and carboxyethylphosphoramide mustard (CEPM); 2. apply a population pharmacokinetic model to describe th...

  11. Application of allometric principles for the prediction of pharmacokinetics in human and veterinary drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2007-09-30

    The concept of correlating pharmacokinetic parameters with body weight (termed as pharmacokinetic interspecies scaling) from different animal species has become a useful tool in drug development. Interspecies scaling is based on the power function, where the body weight of the species is plotted against the pharmacokinetic parameter of interest. Clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination half-life are the three most frequently extrapolated pharmacokinetic parameters. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameter clearance can be used for estimating a first-in-human dose. Over the years, many approaches have been suggested to improve the prediction of aforementioned pharmacokinetic parameters in humans from animal data. A literature review indicates that there are different degrees of success with different methods for different drugs. Interspecies scaling is also a very useful tool in veterinary medicine. The knowledge of pharmacokinetics in veterinary medicine is important for dosage selection, particularly in the treatment of large animals such as horses, camels, elephants, or other large zoo animals. Despite the potential for extrapolation error, the reality is that interspecies scaling is needed across many veterinary practice situations, and therefore will be used. For this reason, it is important to consider mechanisms for reducing the risk of extrapolation errors that can seriously affect animal safety and therapeutic response. Overall, although interspecies scaling requires continuous refinement and better understanding, the rationale approach of interspecies scaling has a lot of potential during the drug development process. PMID:17826864

  12. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  14. Compartmental analysis, imaging techniques and population pharmacokinetic. Experiences at CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In pharmacokinetic evaluation small rodents are used in a large extend. Traditional pharmacokinetic evaluations by the two steps approach can be replaced by the sparse data design which may also represent a complicated situation to evaluate satisfactorily from the statistical point of view. In this presentation different situations of sparse data sampling are analyzed based on practical consideration. Non linear mixed effect model was selected in order to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters in simulated data from real experimental results using blood sampling and imaging procedures. Materials and methods: Different scenarios representing several experimental designs of incomplete individual profiles were evaluated. Data sets were simulated based on real data from previous experiments. In all cases three to five blood samples were considered per time point. A combination of compartmental analysis with tumor uptake obtained by gammagraphy of radiolabeled drugs is also evaluated.All pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed by means of MONOLIX software version 4.2.3. Results: All sampling schedules yield the same results when computed using the MONOLIX software and the SAEM algorithm. Population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were accurately estimated with three or five determination per sampling point. According with the used methodology and software tool, it can be an expected result, but demonstrating the method performance in such situations, allow us to select a more flexible design using a very small number of animals in preclinical research. The combination with imaging procedures also allows us to construct a completely structured compartmental analysis. Results of real experiments are presented demonstrating the versatility of used methodology in different evaluations. The same sampling approach can be considered in phase I or II clinical trials. (author)

  15. A Population Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model Predicts Favorable HDL Cholesterol Changes Over the First 5 Years in Children Treated With Current Efavirenz-Based Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homkham, Nontiya; Cressey, Tim R; Ingsrisawang, Lily; Bouazza, Naïm; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Hongsiriwon, Suchat; Srirojana, Sakulrat; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Bhakeecheep, Sorakij; Coeur, Sophie Le; Salvadori, Nicolas; Treluyer, Jean Marc; Jourdain, Gonzague; Urien, Saik

    2016-09-01

    Efavirenz use is associated with changes in cholesterol concentrations, but it is unclear whether this effect is related to drug concentrations. Using efavirenz and cholesterol plasma concentrations measured in 87 antiretroviral-naive children in Thailand, we assessed indirect response models to describe the evolution of high- and low-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL) cholesterol concentrations in relation to efavirenz plasma concentrations over time where efavirenz was assumed to either stimulate cholesterol production or inhibit its elimination. Simulations of cholesterol evolution for children with different average efavirenz concentrations (Cav ) according to their assumed status of "fast" or "slow" metabolizers of efavirenz were performed. At treatment initiation, children's median (interquartile range, IQR) age was 8 years (5 to 10), body mass index z-score 0.01 (-1.05 to 1.44), HDL 31 mg/dL (24 to 44), and LDL 83 mg/dL (69 to 100). Median (IQR) efavirenz Cav was 1.7 mg/L (1.3 to 2.1) during the period of observation. The best model describing the evolution of HDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations over time assumed that efavirenz inhibited their elimination. HDL concentrations increase over 5 years, whereas LDL concentrations increased only during the first 4 months and then returned to baseline levels afterward. Simulations predicted that, after 3 years, HDL would increase to 63 mg/dL in "fast" metabolizers and 97 mg/dL in "slow" metabolizers of efavirenz. The population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model shows that favorable HDL cholesterol changes can be expected in children with current efavirenz dosing guidelines over 5 years of treatment. PMID:26749102

  16. Optimization of the process variables of tilianin-loaded composite phospholipid liposomes based on response surface-central composite design and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Jiang, Wen; Tan, Meie; Yang, Xiaoyi; He, Chenghui; Huang, Wei; Xing, Jianguo

    2016-03-31

    Tilianin is attracting considerable attention because of its antihypertensive, anti-atherogenic and anticonvulsive efficacy. However, tilianin has poor oral bioavailability. Thus, to improve the oral bioavailability of tilianin, composite phospholipid liposomes were adopted in this work as a novel nanoformulation. The aim was to develop and formulate tilianin composite phospholipid liposomes (TCPLs) through ethanol injection and to apply the response surface-central composite design to optimize the tilianin composite phospholipid liposome formulation. The independent variables were the amount of phospholipids (X1), amount of cholesterol (X2) and weight ratio of phospholipid to drug (X3); the depended variables were particle size (Y1) and encapsulation efficiency (EE) (Y2) of TCPLs. Results indicated that the optimum preparation conditions were as follows: phospholipid amount, 500 mg, cholesterol amount, 50mg and phospholipid/drug ratio, 25. These variables were also the major contributing variables for particle size (101.4 ± 6.1 nm), higher EE (90.28% ± 1.36%), zeta potential (-18.3 ± 2.6 mV) and PDI (0.122 ± 0.027). Subsequently, differential scanning calorimetry techniques were used to investigate the molecular interaction in TCPLs, and the in vitro drug release of tilianin and TCPLs was investigated by the second method of dissolution in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (Edition 2015). Furthermore, pharmacokinetics in Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated using a rat jugular vein intubation tube. Results demonstrated that the Cmax of TCPLs became 5.7 times higher than that of tilianin solution and that the area under the curve of TCPLs became about 4.6-fold higher than that of tilianin solution. Overall, our results suggested that the prepared tilianin composite phospholipid liposome formulations could be used to improve the bioavailability of tilianin after oral administration.

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of pyrazole-based small-molecule inhibitors of Mdm2/4-p53 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Susan M.; Clausen, Dana M.; Beumer, Jan H.; Parise, Robert A.; Guo, Jianxia; Huang, Yijun; Dömling, Alexander S; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The interaction of p53, with its negative regulators Mdm2/4 has been widely studied [1]. In p53+/+ cells, expression of Mdm2/4 leads to p53 turnover, inhibition of downstream transcription, decreasing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. We report in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of YH264, YH263 and WW751, three proposed small molecule inhibitors of the Mdm2/4-p53 interaction. Methods MTT cytotoxicity assays were performed and alterations in proteins were examined using Western blots. Mice were dosed 150 mg/kg YH264 or YH263 iv or po QDx5. Mice were iv dosed 88 mg/kg, 57 mg/kg, or 39 mg/kg WW751 for three, five, or five days. YH264, YH263 and WW751 and metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. Results IC50 values for YH264, YH263 and WW751 against p53 wild type HCT 116 cells after 72 h of incubation were 18.3 ± 2.3 μM, 8.9 ± 0.6 μM, and 3.1 ± 0.2 μM respectively. Only YH264 appeared to affect p53 expression in vitro. None of the compounds affected the growth of HCT 116 xenografts in C.B-17 SCID mice. YH264 plasma half-life was 147 min; YH263 plasma half-life was 263 min; and WW751 plasma half-life was less than 120 min. Conclusions Despite dosing the mice at the maximum soluble doses, we could not achieve tumor concentrations equivalent to the intracellular concentrations required to inhibit cell growth in vitro. YH263 and WW751 do not appear to affect p53/Mdm2 and none of the three were active in a subcutaneous HCT116 p53+/+ xenograft model. PMID:26050209

  18. Determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation therapy in Asian patients based on population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Ohara

    Full Text Available To clarify pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD factors associated with the over-anticoagulation response in Asians during warfarin induction therapy, population PK-PD analyses were conducted in an attempt to predict the time-courses of the plasma S-warfarin concentration, Cp(S, and coagulation and anti-coagulation (INR responses. In 99 Chinese patients we analyzed the relationships between dose and Cp(S to estimate the clearance of S-warfarin, CL(S, and that between Cp(S and the normal prothrombin concentration (NPT as a coagulation marker for estimation of IC50. We also analyzed the non-linear relationship between NPT inhibition and the increase in INR to derive the non-linear index λ. Population analyses accurately predicted the time-courses of Cp(S, NPT and INR. Multivariate analysis showed that CYP2C9*3 mutation and body surface area were predictors of CL(S, that VKORC1 and CYP4F2 polymorphisms were predictors of IC50, and that baseline NPT was a predictor of λ. CL(S and λ were significantly lower in patients with INR≥4 than in those with INR<4 (190 mL/h vs 265 mL/h, P<0.01 and 3.2 vs 3.7, P<0.01, respectively. Finally, logistic regression analysis revealed that CL(S, ALT and hypertension contributed significantly to INR≥4. All these results indicate that factors associated with the reduced metabolic activity of warfarin represented by CL(S, might be critical determinants of the over-anticoagulation response during warfarin initiation in Asians.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02065388.

  19. Comparative pharmacokinetics of intravenous fentanyl and buprenorphine in healthy Greyhound dogs

    OpenAIRE

    KuKanich, Butch; Allen, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of two highly protein bound, lipophilic opioid drugs. Fentanyl (10 μg/kg) and buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) were administered intravenously (IV) to six healthy Greyhound dogs (3 males and 3 females). The doses were based on clinically administered doses for dogs. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and noncompartmental pharmacokinetics were estimated with computer software. The v...

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabis in Cancer Cachexia-Anorexia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Stephanie E; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-07-01

    Anorexia can affect up to 90 % of people with advanced cancer. It is a complex symptom associated with changes in taste, lack of hunger at mealtimes and lack of food enjoyment. Associated weight loss is part of the physical decline that occurs as cancer worsens. Weight loss can also occur from cachexia, the increased metabolism of energy due to raised inflammatory cytokines, liver metastases and other factors seen in several advanced cancers. Independent of anorexia, although frequently associated (where it is referred to as the cachexia-anorexia syndrome), it accounts for a significant amount of morbidity and deaths in people with cancer. In particular, quality of life for the patient and the family is significantly affected with this syndrome as it causes anxiety and distress. Therefore, it is important that research into therapies is undertaken, particularly focusing on an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of compounds in this cachexic population. Cannabinoids are one such group of therapies that have received a large amount of media focus recently. However, there appears to be a lack on rigorous pharmacokinetic data of these complex and varied compounds in the cachexic population. Similarly, there is a lack of pharmacokinetic data in any population group for the non- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) cannabinoids (often due to the lack of analytical standards for quantification). This review will thus examine the pharmacokinetics of major cannabinoids i.e. THC and CBD in a cancer population. Overall, based on the current literature, evidence for the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome remains equivocal. A high-quality, rigorous, phase I/II study to elicit pharmacokinetic dose-concentration and concentration-response data, with a clinically acceptable mode of delivery to reduce intrapatient variability and enable more consistent bioavailability is needed in this population. PMID

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Busulfan in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplant: A Model-Based Dosing Algorithm for Personalized Therapy and Implementation into Routine Clinical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-Boyle, Janel; Savic, Rada; Yan, Shirley; Bartelink, Imke; Musick, Lisa; French, Deborah; Law, Jason; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton J.; Dvorak, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of busulfan in children have shown that individualized model-based algorithms provide improved targeted busulfan therapy when compared to conventional dosing. The adoption of population PK models into routine clinical practice has been hampered by the tendency of pharmacologists to develop complex models too impractical for clinicians to use. The authors aimed to develop a population PK model for busulfan in children that can reliably achieve therapeutic exposure (concentration-at-steady-state, Css) and implement a simple, model-based tool for the initial dosing of busulfan in children undergoing HCT. Patients and Methods Model development was conducted using retrospective data available in 90 pediatric and young adult patients who had undergone HCT with busulfan conditioning. Busulfan drug levels and potential covariates influencing drug exposure were analyzed using the non-linear mixed effects modeling software, NONMEM. The final population PK model was implemented into a clinician-friendly, Microsoft Excel-based tool and used to recommend initial doses of busulfan in a group of 21 pediatric patients prospectively dosed based on the population PK model. Results Modeling of busulfan time-concentration data indicates busulfan CL displays non-linearity in children, decreasing up to approximately 20% between the concentrations of 250–2000 ng/mL. Important patient-specific covariates found to significantly impact busulfan CL were actual body weight and age. The percentage of individuals achieving a therapeutic Css was significantly higher in subjects receiving initial doses based on the population PK model (81%) versus historical controls dosed on conventional guidelines (52%) (p = 0.02). Conclusion When compared to the conventional dosing guidelines, the model-based algorithm demonstrates significant improvement for providing targeted busulfan therapy in children and young adults. PMID:25162216

  2. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  3. Pharmacokinetics of oral gabapentin in Greyhound dogs

    OpenAIRE

    KuKanich, Butch; Cohen, Rachael L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of gabapentin in healthy Greyhound dogs after single oral doses targeted at 10 and 20 mg/kg PO. Six healthy Greyhounds were enrolled (3 males, 3 females). Blood was obtained at predetermined times for the measurement of gabapentin plasma concentrations by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined with computer software.

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics of Abacavir in Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Fauchet, Floris; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy.

  5. Clinical population pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics of linezolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, Lauren M; Rayner, Craig R; Grayson, M Lindsay; Paterson, David L; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; Bulitta, Jurgen B

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of <100 ×10(9)/liter. The risk for toxicity did not differ noticeably between 14 and 28 days of therapy and was significantly higher for patients with lower baseline platelet counts. Due to the increased risk of toxicity after longer durations of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  6. Alfentanil pharmacokinetics in preterm infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, N; Weindling, A M; Van Peer, A; Heykants, J.

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of alfentanil were studied during the first four days after birth in 22 ventilated preterm infants who were all receiving muscle relaxants. Five minutes after a single dose of 20 micrograms/kg alfentanil median serum concentration was 66 ng/ml (range: 20-606). The median clearance was 0.87 ml/kg/min (range: 0.4-9.62) and median elimination half life 321 mins (64-1251). There were wide differences in the manner in which individual infants handled the drug and transient dep...

  7. Methods for Addressing Uncertainty and Variability to Characterize Potential Health Risk from Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Ground Water at Beale Air Force Base in California:Integration of Uncertainty and Variability in Pharmacokinetics and Dose-Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K T

    2001-05-24

    Traditional estimates of health risk are typically inflated, particularly if cancer is the dominant endpoint and there is fundamental uncertainty as to mechanism(s) of action. Risk is more realistically characterized if it accounts for joint uncertainty and interindividual variability within a systematic probabilistic framework to integrate the joint effects on risk of distributed parameters of all (linear as well as nonlinear) risk-extrapolation models involved. Such a framework was used to characterize risks to potential future residents posed by trichloroethylene (TCE) in ground water at an inactive landfill site on Beale Air Force Base in California. Variability and uncertainty were addressed in exposure-route-specific estimates of applied dose, in pharmacokinetically based estimates of route-specific metabolized fractions of absorbed TCE, and in corresponding biologically effective doses estimated under a genotoxic/linear (MA{sub G}) vs. a cytotoxic/nonlinear (MA{sub c}) mechanistic assumption for TCE-induced cancer. Increased risk conditional on effective dose was estimated under MA{sub G} based on seven rodent-bioassay data sets, and under MA{sub c} based on mouse hepatotoxicity data. Mean and upper-bound estimates of combined risk calculated by the unified approach were <10{sup -6} and 10{sup -4}, respectively, while corresponding estimates based on traditional deterministic methods were >10{sup -5} and 10{sup -4}, respectively. It was estimated that no TCE-related harm is likely to occur due to any plausible residential exposure scenario involving the site. The systematic probabilistic framework illustrated is particularly suited to characterizing risks that involve uncertain and/or diverse mechanisms of action.

  8. Methods for Addressing Uncertainty and Variability to Characterize Potential Health Risk From Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Ground Water Beale Air Force Base in California: Integration of Uncertainty and Variability in Pharmacokinetics and Dose-Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, K.T.

    1999-09-29

    Traditional estimates of health risk are typically inflated, particularly if cancer is the dominant endpoint and there is fundamental uncertainty as to mechanism(s) of action. Risk is more realistically characterized if it accounts for joint uncertainty and interindividual variability after applying a unified probabilistic approach to the distributed parameters of all (linear as well as nonlinear) risk-extrapolation models involved. Such an approach was applied to characterize risks to potential future residents posed by trichloroethylene (TCE) in ground water at an inactive landfill site on Beale Air Force Base in California. Variability and uncertainty were addressed in exposure-route-specific estimates of applied dose, in pharmacokinetically based estimates of route-specific metabolized fractions of absorbed TCE, and in corresponding biologically effective doses estimated under a genotoxic/linear (MA{sub g}) vs. a cytotoxic/nonlinear (MA{sub c}) mechanistic assumption for TCE-induced cancer. Increased risk conditional on effective dose was estimated under MA{sub G} based on seven rodent-bioassay data sets, and under MA, based on mouse hepatotoxicity data. Mean and upper-bound estimates of combined risk calculated by the unified approach were <10{sup -6} and <10{sup -4}, respectively, while corresponding estimates based on traditional deterministic methods were >10{sup -5} and >10{sup -4}, respectively. It was estimated that no TCE-related harm is likely occur due any plausible residential exposure scenario involving the site. The unified approach illustrated is particularly suited to characterizing risks that involve uncertain and/or diverse mechanisms of action.

  9. Reconstruction of Exposure to m-Xylene from Human Biomonitoring Data Using PBPK Modelling, Bayesian Inference, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin McNally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous biomonitoring programs, both recent and ongoing, to evaluate environmental exposure of humans to chemicals. Due to the lack of exposure and kinetic data, the correlation of biomarker levels with exposure concentrations leads to difficulty in utilizing biomonitoring data for biological guidance values. Exposure reconstruction or reverse dosimetry is the retrospective interpretation of external exposure consistent with biomonitoring data. We investigated the integration of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling, global sensitivity analysis, Bayesian inference, and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a population estimate of inhalation exposure to m-xylene. We used exhaled breath and venous blood m-xylene and urinary 3-methylhippuric acid measurements from a controlled human volunteer study in order to evaluate the ability of our computational framework to predict known inhalation exposures. We also investigated the importance of model structure and dimensionality with respect to its ability to reconstruct exposure.

  10. The role of patient-based treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiansyah, Deni; Attarwala, Ali Asgar [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Maass, Christian; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Mueller, Berthold [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Kletting, Peter [Universitaet Ulm, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Accurate treatment planning is recommended in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) to minimize the toxicity to organs at risk while maximizing tumor cell sterilization. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of different degrees of individualization on the prediction accuracy of individual therapeutic biodistributions in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). A recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was fitted to the biokinetic data of 15 patients with NETs after pre-therapeutic injection of {sup 111}In-DTPAOC. Mathematical phantom patients (MPP) were defined using the assumed true (true MPP), mean (MPP 1A) and median (MPP 1B) parameter values of the patient group. Alterations of the degree of individualization were introduced to both mean and median patients by including patient-specific information as a priori knowledge: physical parameters and hematocrit (MPP 2A/2B). Successively, measurable individual biokinetic parameters were added: tumor volume V{sub tu} (MPP 3A/3B), glomerular filtration rate GFR (MPP 4A/4B), and tumor perfusion f{sub tu} (MPP 5A/5B). Furthermore, parameters of MPP 5A/5B and a simulated {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET measurement 60 min p.i. were used together with the population values used as Bayesian parameters (MPP 6A/6B). Therapeutic biodistributions were simulated assuming an infusion of {sup 90}Y-DOTATATE (3.3 GBq) over 30 min to all MPPs. Time-integrated activity coefficients were predicted for all MPPs and compared to the true MPPs for each patient in tumor, kidneys, spleen, liver, remainder, and whole body to obtain the relative differences RD. The large RD values of MPP 1A [RD{sub tumor} = (625 ± 1266)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 38)% ], and MPP 1B [RD{sub tumor} = (197 ± 505)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 39)% ] demonstrate that individual treatment planning is needed due to large physiological differences between patients. Although addition of individual patient parameters reduced the

  11. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  12. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg Michael; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design. PMID:21935441

  13. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  14. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics underlies the collaborated usage of lamivudine and oxymatrine in beagle dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Combinational therapy of lamivudine and oxymatrine has been employed in the battle against hepatitis B virus in clinical setting. However, the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug or active metabolism in intravenous/oral co-administration regime is poorly investigated. Herein, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic characteristic through a tailor-designed 3 way crossover-Latin square experiment in adult male beagle dogs. Six dogs were randomly treated by intravenous administration of lamivudine (2.5 mg/kg, oxymatrine (15 mg/kg and combinational dosage, named as intravenous regime. Meanwhile the other six dogs were orally administrated with lamivudine (2.5 mg/kg, oxymatrine (15 mg/kg and combinational dosage, named as oral regime. The pharmacokinetic feature in simultaneous oral treatment appeared to have no significant difference when compared with individual administration, even including matrine, the active metabolite of oxymatrine. In intravenous regime, the main pharmacokinetic parameters of simultaneous administration were nearly consistent with intravenous regime remedy. The collaborated application of lamivudine and oxymatrine contributed to non-distinctive pharmacokinetic fluctuations of beagle dogs in intravenous/oral regime, compared with individual employment, which established a vital base for the clinical co-administration against hepatitis B. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that the determination of pharmacokinetics between combinational and individual therapy might assist in the development of drug compatibility in clinical therapy.

  15. The Use of Spreadsheets for Pharmacokinetic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Chamberlain

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of simple spreadsheets is described to create simulations of complex pharmacokinetic phenomena. The basics of spreadsheets are first described and are developed to demonstrate classical pharmacokinetics without the use of differential or integral calculus. Using standard spreadsheet commands, the technique is shown to be applicable to the full range of advanced pharmacokinetic simulations. Demonstrations of the effect of a variety of physiological eventualities are included to show the versatility of the technique. The technique is very simple to use and is always in the complete control of the modeller.

  16. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  17. Development of a PBPK model of thiocyanate in rats with an extrapolation to humans: A computational study to quantify the mechanism of action of thiocyanate kinetics in thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Lumen, Annie

    2016-09-15

    Thyroid homeostasis can be disturbed due to thiocyanate exposure from the diet or tobacco smoke. Thiocyanate inhibits both thyroidal uptake of iodide, via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), and thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis in the thyroid, via thyroid peroxidase (TPO), but the mode of action of thiocyanate is poorly quantified in the literature. The characterization of the link between intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations and dose of exposure is crucial for assessing the risk of thyroid perturbations due to thiocyanate exposure. We developed a PBPK model for thiocyanate that describes its kinetics in the whole-body up to daily doses of 0.15mmol/kg, with a mechanistic description of the thyroidal kinetics including NIS, passive diffusion, and TPO. The model was calibrated in a Bayesian framework using published studies in rats. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, especially for intra-thyroidal thiocyanate concentrations. Thiocyanate kinetic processes were quantified in vivo, including the metabolic clearance by TPO. The passive diffusion rate was found to be greater than NIS-mediated uptake rate. The model captured the dose-dependent kinetics of thiocyanate after acute and chronic exposures. Model behavior was evaluated using a Morris screening test. The distribution of thiocyanate into the thyroid was found to be determined primarily by the partition coefficient, followed by NIS and passive diffusion; the impact of the latter two mechanisms appears to increase at very low doses. Extrapolation to humans resulted in good predictions of thiocyanate kinetics during chronic exposure. The developed PBPK model can be used in risk assessment to quantify dose-response effects of thiocyanate on TH. PMID:27445130

  18. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen;

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors...... genetic variants of CYP2D6, -2C9 and OATP1B1 explained only 39%, 2% and 39% of that variation. Comparable results for genetically explained variation in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been found for other substrates of these enzymes earlier. These findings indicate that a substantial fraction...... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  19. PHARMACOKINETICS OF RU486 IN RABBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGMing-Hua; CHUYun-Hong; LIQui; CHANGLi-Min; FANGZhen; JINGZuao-Ying

    1989-01-01

    Intravaginal release of contraceptive steroid by avoiding the first-pass effect may provide a suitable route of administration, thus leading to higher bioavailabilities. RU486 is significantly metabolizlcd by the first-pass metabolism. We have studied its pharmacokinetics

  20. An on-chip small intestine-liver model for pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Takashi; Nakayama, Hidenari; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fujii, Teruo

    2015-06-01

    Testing of drug effects and cytotoxicity by using cultured cells has been widely performed as an alternative to animal testing. However, the estimation of pharmacokinetics by conventional cell-based assay methods is difficult because of the inability to evaluate multiorgan effects. An important challenge in the field is to mimic the organ-to-organ network in the human body by using a microfluidic network connecting small-scale tissues based on recently emerging MicroTAS (Micro Total Analysis Systems) technology for prediction of pharmacokinetics. Here, we describe an on-chip small intestine-liver coupled model for pharmacokinetic studies. To construct an in vitro pharmacokinetic model that appropriately models in vivo conditions, physiological parameters such as the structure of internal circulation, volume ratios of each organ, and blood flow ratio of the portal vein to the hepatic artery were mimicked using microfluidic networks. To demonstrate interactions between organs in vitro in pharmacokinetic studies, Caco-2, HepG2, and A549 cell cultures were used as organ models of the small intestine, liver, and lung, respectively, and connected to each other through a microporous membrane and microchannels to prepare a simple model of a physiological organ-to-organ network. The on-chip organ model assay using three types of substrate-epirubicine (EPI), irinotecan (CPT-11), and cyclophosphamide (CPA)-were conducted to model the effects of orally administered or biologically active anticancer drugs. The result suggested that the device can replicate physiological phenomena such as activity of the anticancer drugs on the target cells. This microfluidic device can thus be used as an in vitro organ model to predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the human body and may thus provide not only an alternative to animal testing but also a method of obtaining parameters for in silico models of physiologically based pharmacokinetics. PMID:25385717

  1. Intra-herb pharmacokinetics interaction between quercetin and isorhamentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke LAN; Jian-lin HE; Yang TIAN; Fei TAN; Xue-hua JIANG; Ling WANG; Li-ming YE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Quercetin and isorhamnetin are common constituents of some herb extracts, such as extracts of gingko leaves and total flavones of Hippophae rhamnoides L. The intra-herb pharmacokinetics interactions between isorhamnetin and quercetin were investigated in the present study. Methods: Human MDR1 cDNA transfected MDCKII cells were used to validate whether isorhamnein interacted with P-gp. Caco-2 transport assays and a randomized, 3-way crossover pharmacokinetics study in rats were used to investigate the pharmacokinetics interactions. HPLC was used to determine cell transport samples. The total plasma concentrations of quercetinand isorhamnetin were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) by treatment with β-glucuronidase and sulfatase. Results: The permeability ratio (absorptive permeability/secretive permeability) of isorhamnetin across human MDR1 cDNA transfected MDCKII cells, Caco-2 cells and wild-type MDCKII cells are 0.25±0.02, 0.74±0.05, and 1.41±0.06, respectively. This result proved the role of P-gp in the cell efflux of isorhamnetin. While co-transporting with each other across Caco-2 cells monolayer, the permeability ratio of isorhamnetin and quercetin increased by 4.3 and 2.2 times. After coadministration with each other to rats,the Cmax, AUC0-72h, and AUC0-∞ of both isorhamnetin and quercetin significantly increased compared with single administration. Conclusion: The above results proved intra-herb pharmacokinetics interaction between quercetin and isorhamentin. P-gp might play an important role, whereas other drug efflux pumps, such as multi-drug resistance associate protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein, might be involved. Accordingly, besides the drug-herb interactions, intra-herb interaction might be brought into view with the wide use of herbal-based remedies.

  2. Comparative pharmacokinetics of some injectable preparations containing ivermectin in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Gökhan; Kanbur, Murat; Liman, Bilal Cem; Cam, Yücel; Karabacak, Mürsel; Altinordulu, Sule

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the kinetics of ivermectin formulations following subcutaneous administration in dogs. The vehicle components used in production may change the pharmacokinetics of the drug. The present study was aimed at the comparison of the pharmacokinetics of seven injectable ivermectin formulation of different brand names (A-G). The animals were allocated to seven groups, each comprising seven dogs. The dogs were administered ivermectin at a dose of 200 microg/kg bw by subcutaneous route and blood samples were collected from all groups up to 288h post-injection. Plasma ivermectin analyses were performed using a HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Compared to Group 1(A), it was determined that statistically significant differences existed in Groups 2(B), 3(C), 4(D), 5(E), and 7(G) for C(max) values; and in Groups 3(C), 4(D), 6(F), 7(G) for AUC(0-->288) and AUC(0-->infinity) values. These values were highest in Group 1(A) and lowest in Group 7(F). The results obtained in the present study demonstrated that, in cases which require subacute administration, optimal exposure is achieved with the preparation A. However, it must be noted that this evaluation was based on pharmacokinetic parameters and not antiparasitic efficacy. PMID:20488222

  3. Pharmacokinetics of oral amantadine in greyhound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; Warner, M; KuKanich, B

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in greyhound dogs after oral administration. Five healthy greyhound dogs were used. A single oral dose of 100 mg amantadine hydrochloride (mean dose 2.8 mg/kg as amantadine hydrochloride) was administered to nonfasted subjects. Blood samples were collected at predetermined time points from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma concentrations of amantadine were measured by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Amantadine was well tolerated in all dogs with no adverse effects observed. The mean (range) amantadine CMAX was 275 ng/mL (225-351 ng/mL) at 2.6 h (1-4 h) with a terminal half-life of 4.96 h (4.11-6.59 h). The results of this study can be used to design dosages to assess multidose pharmacokinetics and dosages designed to achieve targeted concentrations in order to assess the clinical effects of amantadine in a variety of conditions including chronic pain. Further studies should also assess the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in other dog breeds or using population pharmacokinetics studies including multiple dog breeds to assess potential breed-specific differences in the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in dogs. PMID:25427541

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-dynamic modelling of rocuronium in infants and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, J.MKH; Meretoja, O.A; Taivainen, T; Proost, Hans

    1997-01-01

    We have determined the pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of rocuronium in infants and children. We studied infants (n = 5, 0.1-0.8 yr) and children (n = 5, 2.3-8 yr), ASA II, in the ICU while undergoing artificial ventilation under i.v. anaesthesia with an arterial ca

  5. 4-Aminopyridyl-Based CYP51 Inhibitors as Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Leads with Improved Pharmacokinetic Profile and in Vivo Potency

    OpenAIRE

    Calvet, Claudia M.; Vieira, Debora F.; Choi, Jun Yong; Kellar, Danielle; Cameron, Michael D.; de Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Gut, Jiri; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Lin, Li; Khan, Susan; McKerrow, James H.; Roush, William R.; Larissa M. Podust

    2014-01-01

    CYP51 is a P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the sterol components of eukaryotic cell membranes. CYP51 inhibitors have been developed to treat infections caused by fungi, and more recently the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. To specifically optimize drug candidates for T. cruzi CYP51 (TcCYP51), we explored the structure–activity relationship (SAR) of a N-indolyl-oxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based scaffold originally identified in a target...

  6. Optimizing intravenous fosfomycin dosing in combination with carbapenems for treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in critically ill patients based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulation

    OpenAIRE

    O. Asuphon; P. Montakantikul; J. Houngsaitong; Kiratisin, P.; P. Sonthisombat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the optimal dosing regimen of intravenous fosfomycin for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) based on PK/PD targets. Method: A total of 120 PA isolates were recovered from various clinical specimens at university hospital in Thailand. Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of all the isolates were determined by the E-test method. PK parameters were obtained from a published study. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to calcul...

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the salicylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needs, C J; Brooks, P M

    1985-01-01

    -order kinetics. The serum half-life of salicylic acid is dose-dependent; thus, the larger the dose employed, the longer it will take to reach steady-state. There is also evidence that enzyme induction of salicyluric acid formation occurs. No significant differences exist between the pharmacokinetics of the salicylates in the elderly or in children when compared with young adults. Apart from differences in free versus albumin-bound salicylate in various disease states and physiological conditions associated with low serum albumin, pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, chronic renal failure or liver disease are essentially the same.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3888490

  8. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periti, P; Mazzei, T; Mini, E; Novelli, A

    1992-08-01

    The macrolide antibiotics include natural members, prodrugs and semisynthetic derivatives. These drugs are indicated in a variety of infections and are often combined with other drug therapies, thus creating the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions. Macrolides can both inhibit drug metabolism in the liver by complex formation and inactivation of microsomal drug oxidising enzymes and also interfere with microorganisms of the enteric flora through their antibiotic effects. Over the past 20 years, a number of reports have incriminated macrolides as a potential source of clinically severe drug interactions. However, differences have been found between the various macrolides in this regard and not all macrolides are responsible for drug interactions. With the recent advent of many semisynthetic macrolide antibiotics it is now evident that they may be classified into 3 different groups in causing drug interactions. The first group (e.g. troleandomycin, erythromycins) are those prone to forming nitrosoalkanes and the consequent formation of inactive cytochrome P450-metabolite complexes. The second group (e.g. josamycin, flurithromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, miocamycin and midecamycin) form complexes to a lesser extent and rarely produce drug interactions. The last group (e.g. spiramycin, rokitamycin, dirithromycin and azithromycin) do not inactivate cytochrome P450 and are unable to modify the pharmacokinetics of other compounds. It appears that 2 structural factors are important for a macrolide antibiotic to lead to the induction of cytochrome P450 and the formation in vivo or in vitro of an inhibitory cytochrome P450-iron-nitrosoalkane metabolite complex: the presence in the macrolide molecules of a non-hindered readily accessible N-dimethylamino group and the hydrophobic character of the drug. Troleandomycin ranks first as a potent inhibitor of microsomal liver enzymes, causing a significant decrease of the metabolism of methylprednisolone, theophylline

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetics of antibacterial drugs in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paap, C M; Nahata, M C

    1990-10-01

    . The need for serum vancomycin concentration monitoring may be limited, as with aminoglycosides, while safety concerns warrant the routine monitoring of serum chloramphenicol concentrations in neonates. Dosing guidelines are provided, based on the pharmacokinetics of the drugs and previously published recommendations. These dosing guidelines are intended for initial therapy, and close therapeutic monitoring is recommended for maintenance dose requirements to optimise patient outcome. There has been an enormous increase in our knowledge of neonatal physiology and drug disposition. Fortunately, many of the antibacterial drugs used in neonates (e.g. penicillins and cephalosporins) are relatively safe. It will be important to evaluate all newly developed antibiotics in neonates to assure their maximum efficacy and safety.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of propofol in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIYu-Hong; RUIJian-Zhong; ZHOUYong-Gang; WANGLi-Qin; FUSu-E; YANGJian-Jun; LIuFu-Kun; HUShu-Ya; WENQuan; XUJian-Guo

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To analyze population pharmacokinetics of propofol in Chinese surgical patients using a nonlinear mixedeffect model (NONMEM) program and to quantitate the effects of covariance of gender, age, and body weight. METHODS: The population pharmacokinetics of propofol was investigated in 76 selective surgical patients (37 males and 39 females aged 19-77a, weighing 39-86kg). A total of 1439 blood samples were analyzed using NONMEM(NONMEM Projeft Group, University of California, San Francisco, CA). Interindividual variability was estimated fro clearances and distribution volumes. The effects of age, body weight, and gender were in vestigated. RESULTS: The pharmacokinetics of propofol in Chinese patients was best described by a three-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Body weight was found to be a significant factor for the elimination clearance, the two inter-compartmental clearances, and the volume of the central compartment. The volumes of the shallow peripheral compartment and deep peripheral compartment remain constant for all individuals. The estimates of these parameters for a 60-kg adult were 1.56L/min, 0.737L/min, 0.360L/min, 12.1L, 43L, and 213L, respectively. For old patients, the elimination clearance and volume of the central compartment decreased. CONCLUSION:The pharmacokinetics of propofol in Chinese patients can be well described by a standard three-compartment pharmacokinetic model. Inclusion of age and body weight as covariances significantly improved the model. Adjusting pharmacokinetics to the individual patients should improve the precision of target-controlled infusion system.

  11. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. PMID:24721554

  12. Pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet-Melou, A; Bernard, S; Schneider, M; Toutain, P L

    2002-07-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic expected to be effective in the treatment of infections involving gram-negative and some gram-positive bacteria in horses. In order to design a rational dosage regimen for the substance in horses, the pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin were investigated in 6 horses after i.v., subcutaneous and oral administration of a single dose of 2 mg/kg bwt and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) assessed for bacteria isolated from equine infectious pathologies. The clearance of marbofloxacin was mean +/- s.d. 0.25 +/- 0.05 l/kg/h and the terminal half-life 756 +/- 1.99 h. The marbofloxacin absolute bioavailabilities after subcutaneous and oral administration were 98 +/- 11% and 62 +/- 8%, respectively. The MIC required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) was 0.027 microg/ml for enterobacteriaceae and 0.21 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. The values of surrogate markers of antimicrobial efficacy (AUIC, Cmax/MIC ratio, time above MIC90) were calculated and the marbofloxacin concentration profiles simulated for repeated administrations. These data were used to determine rational dosage regimens for target bacteria. Considering the breakpoint values of efficacy indices for fluoroquinolones, a marbofloxacin dosage regimen of 2 mg/kg bwt/24 h by i.v., subcutaneous or oral routes was more appropriate for enterobacteriaceae than for S. aureus.

  13. Pharmacokinetic modelling of microencapsulated metronidazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood AHMAD; Khalid PERVAIZ; Ghulam MURTAZA; Munaza RAMZAN

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present study is to develop a pharmacokinetic model for microencapsulated metronidazole to predict drug absorption pattern in healthy human and validate this model internally. Metronidazole was microencapsulated into ethylcellulose shells followed by the conversion of these microcapsules into tablets.tablets (T1: fast release, T2: moderate release, T3: slow release and reference) were administered to twenty four healthy human volunteers and serial blood samples were collected for 12 hours followed by their analysis using RP-HPLC. Drug release data were analyzed by various model dependent and independent approaches. Drug absorbed (%) was determined by Wagner-Nelson method from plasma concentration profile. Internal predictability was checked from Cmax and AUC. Optimum dissolution profile was observed in double distilled water and 50coefficient, R2 = 0.900 9, 0.942 6, 0.901 5 and 0.932 for T1, T2, T3 and reference, respectively). Internal predictability was found less than 10%. Good correlation coefficients and low prediction errors elaborate the validity of this mathematical in-vitro in-vivo correlation model as a predictive tool for the determination of pharmaenkinetics from dissolution data.

  14. Effects of Dose and Route of Administration on Pharmacokinetics of (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Michael H.; Zolkowska, Dorota; Kim, Insook; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Rothman, Richard B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Based on animal data, there is speculation that (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is neurotoxic to humans. Extrapolation of MDMA findings from animals to humans requires assessment of pharmacokinetics in various species, and low-dose administration data from rats are lacking. In this study, we examine MDMA pharmacokinetics in rats given low (2 mg/kg) and high (10 mg/kg) doses of racemic MDMA via intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and oral routes. Repeated blood specimens were collected...

  15. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  16. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of lithium carbonate in healthy subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, R.

    1988-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of lithium in six healthy volunteers stabilised on lithium were investigated and appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters calculated. 2. The results illustrate important differences in single and multiple dose lithium pharmacokinetics; the implications for minimising lithium-induced renal damage are discussed.

  17. Antimicrobial breakpoint estimation accounting for variability in pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Nekka Fahima; Li Jun; Bi Goue

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indices are increasingly being used in the microbiological field to assess the efficacy of a dosing regimen. In contrast to methods using MIC, PK/PD-based methods reflect in vivo conditions and are more predictive of efficacy. Unfortunately, they entail the use of one PK-derived value such as AUC or Cmax and may thus lead to biased efficiency information when the variability is large. The aim of the present work was to evaluate t...

  18. Use of a simulated annealing algorithm to fit compartmental models with an application to fractal pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Rebeccah E; Riauka, Terence A; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, fractals are being incorporated into pharmacokinetic models to describe transport and chemical kinetic processes occurring in confined and heterogeneous spaces. However, fractal compartmental models lead to differential equations with power-law time-dependent kinetic rate coefficients that currently are not accommodated by common commercial software programs. This paper describes a parameter optimization method for fitting individual pharmacokinetic curves based on a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, which always converged towards the global minimum and was independent of the initial parameter values and parameter bounds. In a comparison using a classical compartmental model, similar fits by the Gauss-Newton and Nelder-Mead simplex algorithms required stringent initial estimates and ranges for the model parameters. The SA algorithm is ideal for fitting a wide variety of pharmacokinetic models to clinical data, especially those for which there is weak prior knowledge of the parameter values, such as the fractal models. PMID:17706176

  19. An adaptive extended Kalman filter for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of tumor pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2014-03-01

    According to the morphological differences in the vascularization between healthy and diseased tissues, pharmacokinetic-rate images of fluorophore can provide diagnostic information for tumor differentiation, and especially have the potential for staging of tumors. In this paper, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography method is firstly used to acquire metabolism-related time-course images of the fluorophore concentration. Based on a two-compartment model comprised of plasma and extracelluar-extravascular space, we next propose an adaptive-EKF framework to estimate the pharmacokinetic-rate images. With the aid of a forgetting factor, the adaptive-EKF compensate the inaccuracy initial values and emphasize the effect of the current data in order to realize a better online estimation compared with the conventional EKF. We use simulate data to evaluate the performance of the proposed methodology. The results suggest that the adaptive-EKF can obtain preferable pharmacokinetic-rate images than the conventional EKF with higher quantitativeness and noise robustness.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Oral Taurine in Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadreza Ghandforoush-Sattari; Siminozar Mashayekhi; Krishna, Channarayapatna V.; Thompson, John P.; Routledge, Philipp A.

    2010-01-01

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, is a normal constituent of the human diet. Little is known of the pharmacokinetics of taurine in man after oral administration. We studied the pharmacokinetics of 4 g taurine in eight healthy male volunteers (median age 27.5, range 22–45) following orally administration in the fasting state in the morning. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals and plasma taurine concentration was measured by a modified HPLC method. Data were subjected to noncom...

  1. Bioelectrical impedance modelling of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarowitz, B J; Pilla, A M; Peterson, E L

    1989-10-01

    1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to develop descriptive models of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters in 30 adult in-patients receiving therapy with gentamicin. 2. Serial blood samples obtained from each subject at steady state were analyzed and used to derive gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters. 3. Multiple regression equations were developed for clearance, elimination rate constant and volume of distribution at steady state and were all statistically significant at P less than 0.05. 4. Clinical validation of this innovative technique is warranted before clinical use is recommended.

  2. Drug disposition and modelling before and after gastric bypass: immediate and controlled-release metoprolol formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gesquiere, Ina; Darwich, Adam S; Van der Schueren, Bart; de Hoon, Jan; Lannoo, Matthias; Matthys, Christophe; Rostami, Amin; Foulon, Veerle; Augustijns, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the disposition of metoprolol after oral administration of an immediate and controlled-release formulation before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery in the same individuals and to validate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for predicting oral bioavailability following RYGB.

  3. Pharmacokinetic of antimony in mice with cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borborema, Samanta E.T.; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular]. E-mails: samanta@usp.br; nnascime@ipen.br; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br; Osso Junior, Joao A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN/CNEN-SP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia]. E-mail: jaosso@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) remains a major world health problem, with about 1.5 million new cases each year. Caused by protozoa Leishmania, in South America, this infection can vary from a chronic skin ulcer, to an erosive mucosal disease and severe facial disfigurement. Pentavalent antimony (Sb{sup +5}) as sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam) or meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime) are main drugs for treating most forms of human leishmaniasis. For six decades, despite the recent developments, the effective therapy to cutaneous leishmaniasis has been based on long parenteral courses of such drugs, even though these are fairly costly, toxic and inconvenient to use, without adequate knowledge on their pharmacokinetics or mechanism of action. Pharmacokinetics studies could be based on bioactive traceable drugs, usually with radioactive isotopes, but antimony radioisotopes are unavailable commercially. Neutron irradiation is a powerful tool in the analysis of mineral content of samples, for antimony, there are at least two main isotopes that could be formed after neutron irradiation in nuclear reactor. The aim of the present study was to construct antimony salts with those radioisotopes to obtain tracers to compare the pharmacokinetic and the tissue distribution of neutron irradiated meglumine antimoniate in healthy and cutaneous leishmaniasis experimentally infected mice. Meglumine antimoniate, (Glucantime, Aventis, S.P, Brazil), was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (IPEN/CNEN-SP), producing two radioisotopes {sup 122}Sb and {sup 124}Sb. Its biodistribution was verified in BALB/c mice experimentally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) Amazonensis, which received a single intraperitoneal dose of the drug. At different times after injection, the tissues and blood were excised and activity measured in a NaI (Tl) scintillation counter. Compared with the healthy mice, experimentally infected mice had significantly lower maximum concentration of antimony

  4. Assessment of juvenile pigs to serve as human pediatric surrogates for preclinical formulation pharmacokinetic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by the various biological, clinical, and formulation challenges associated with age-based populations. A primary cause for this lack of development is the inability to accurately predict ontogenic changes that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in children using trad...

  5. Mixed-Effects Modeling of the Influence of Midazolam on Propofol Pharmacokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuyk, Jaap; Lichtenbelt, Bart Jan; Olofsen, Erik; van Kleef, Jack W.; Dahan, Albert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combined administration of anesthetics has been associated with pharmacokinetic interactions that induce concentration changes of up to 30%. Midazolam is often used as a preoperative sedative in advance of a propofol-based anesthetic. In this study, we identified the influence of mid

  6. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents : Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viby-Mogensen, J; Ostergaard, D; Donati, F; Fisher, D; Hunter, J; Kampmann, JP; Kopman, A; Proost, JH; Rasmussen, SN; Skovgaard, LT; Varin, F; Wright, PMC

    2000-01-01

    In September 1997, an international consensus conference on standardization of studies of neuromuscular blocking agents was held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Based on the conference, a set of guidelines fur good clinical research practice (GCRT) in pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents

  7. Pharmacokinetics Applications of Traditional Chinese Medicines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ju Li; Ai-Hua Zhang; Hui Sun; Xi-Jun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely used in many oriental countries for thousands of years and played an indispensable role in the prevention and treatment of diseases, especially the complicated and chronic ones. It is a very complex mixture containing hundreds or thousands of different components. Pharmacokinetic study on active constituents in TCM preparations is a good way for us to explain and predict a variety of events related to the efficacy and toxicity of TCM. In the drug discovery phases, pharmacokinetics is a key to guide medicinal chemists in the optimization process of a chemical series and to assist pharmacologists to design in vivo studies. To explore the potentially bioactive components in TCM, it is necessary to further study the in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics of multiple absorbed components and find out the optical time-course behavior to providing more substantial research for new leads in drug discovery. Pharmacokinetics screening method could provide a reliable means of prospecting natural products in the search for new leads in drug discovery. This review summarizes the research progress of PK on TCM in the search for suitable lead compounds in recent years.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of neurotensin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J H; Andersen, H O; Olsen, P S;

    1989-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics, arteriovenous extraction, and degradation sites of neurotensin (NT) in man during iv infusions of synthetic intact NT [NT-(1-13)] and the NH2-terminal metabolite NT-(1-8) during lipid ingestion and by catheterization of various vascular beds in normal subjects...

  9. Circadian variation in the pharmacokinetics of verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M; Frederiksen, M; Hansen, J F;

    1989-01-01

    greater bioavailability (AUC) and a prolonged time to peak concentration was found. During the night (24.00 h-06.00 h) the half-life of verapamil was significantly longer than during the day (16.00 h-22.00 h). These differences in pharmacokinetics may be due to reduced hepatic blood flow at night...

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Bioequivalence Evaluation of Cyclobenzaprine Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Maria de Lima Souza Brioschi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics and to evaluate bioequivalence between two different tablet formulations containing the drug. An open, randomized, crossover, single-dose, two-period, and two-sequence design was employed. Tablets were administered to 23 healthy subjects after an overnight fasting and blood samples were collected up to 240 hours after drug administration. Plasma cyclobenzaprine was quantified by means of an LC-MS/MS method. Pharmacokinetic parameters related to absorption, distribution, and elimination were calculated. Cyclobenzaprine plasma profiles for the reference and test products were similar, as well as absorption pharmacokinetic parameters AUC (reference: 199.4 ng∗h/mL; test: 201.6 ng∗h/mL, (reference: 7.0 ng/mL; test: 7.2 ng/mL, and (reference: 4.5 h; test: 4.6 h. Bioequivalence was evaluated by means of 90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC (93%–111% and (93%–112% values for test and reference products, which were within the 80%–125% interval proposed by FDA. Cyclobenzaprine pharmacokinetics can be described by a multicompartment open model with an average rapid elimination half-life ( of 3.1 hours and an average terminal elimination half-life ( of 31.9 hours.

  11. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A;

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...

  12. Pharmacokinetic comparison of seven 8-methoxypsoralen brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Larsen, E;

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of seven 8-MOP brands were evaluated in 7 volunteers using an incomplete bloc design. After a single oral dose the 8-MOP plasma level was followed for 3 hours. The plasma concentration was measured with a gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric method, using an isotopic dilu...... of joules required to clear the patients in various PUVA centers....

  13. A phase I study evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of an antibody-based tissue factor antagonist in subjects with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Peter E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue factor (TF-dependent extrinsic pathway has been suggested to be a central mechanism by which the coagulation cascade is locally activated in the lungs of patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS and thus represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. This study was designed to determine the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of ALT-836, an anti-TF antibody, in patients with ALI/ARDS. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial in adult patients who had suspected or proven infection, were receiving mechanical ventilation and had ALI/ARDS (PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 300 mm. Eighteen patients (6 per cohort were randomized in a 5:1 ratio to receive ALT-836 or placebo, and were treated within 48 hours after meeting screening criteria. Cohorts of patients were administered a single intravenously dose of 0.06, 0.08 or 0.1 mg/kg ALT-836 or placebo. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic and immunogenicity measurements. Safety was assessed by adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, laboratory, coagulation and pulmonary function parameters. Results Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a dose dependent exposure to ALT-836 across the infusion range of 0.06 to 0.1 mg/kg. No anti-ALT-836 antibody response was observed in the study population during the trial. No major bleeding episodes were reported in the ALT-836 treated patients. The most frequent adverse events were anemia, observed in both placebo and ALT-836 treated patients, and ALT-836 dose dependent, self-resolved hematuria, which suggested 0.08 mg/kg as an acceptable dose level of ALT-836 in this patient population. Conclusions Overall, this study showed that ALT-836 could be safely administered to patients with sepsis-induced ALI/ARDS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01438853

  14. Model-Based Meta-Analysis of Population Pharmacokinetic Models for Paclitaxel in Humans, Rats and Mice%紫杉醇种属间药动学相关性的荟萃分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张澍; 任宇鹏; 尚德为; 孙谊; 周田彦; 卢炜

    2013-01-01

    nonlinear mixed-effects model (NONMEM) was developed to describe the paclitaxel PK profiles for mice, rats and humans. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model fitted the data well, and consistent with the reported results. The models were evaluated by NDPE, the final model was accurate and reliable. The allometric scaling of CL and Vtotal among three different species for paclitaxel was r2= 0. 997 4 and r2 = 0. 937 2, respectively. CONCLUSION Take paclitaxel for example, established the model-based meta-analysis, successfully, and evaluated the correlation on the PK parameters of paclitaxel among different species quantitatively.

  15. Inferring biochemical reaction pathways: the case of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecca Paola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The representation of a biochemical system as a network is the precursor of any mathematical model of the processes driving the dynamics of that system. Pharmacokinetics uses mathematical models to describe the interactions between drug, and drug metabolites and targets and through the simulation of these models predicts drug levels and/or dynamic behaviors of drug entities in the body. Therefore, the development of computational techniques for inferring the interaction network of the drug entities and its kinetic parameters from observational data is raising great interest in the scientific community of pharmacologists. In fact, the network inference is a set of mathematical procedures deducing the structure of a model from the experimental data associated to the nodes of the network of interactions. In this paper, we deal with the inference of a pharmacokinetic network from the concentrations of the drug and its metabolites observed at discrete time points. Results The method of network inference presented in this paper is inspired by the theory of time-lagged correlation inference with regard to the deduction of the interaction network, and on a maximum likelihood approach with regard to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the network. Both network inference and parameter estimation have been designed specifically to identify systems of biotransformations, at the biochemical level, from noisy time-resolved experimental data. We use our inference method to deduce the metabolic pathway of the gemcitabine. The inputs to our inference algorithm are the experimental time series of the concentration of gemcitabine and its metabolites. The output is the set of reactions of the metabolic network of the gemcitabine. Conclusions Time-lagged correlation based inference pairs up to a probabilistic model of parameter inference from metabolites time series allows the identification of the microscopic pharmacokinetics and

  16. Quantitative Structure Pharmacokinetic Relationship Using Artificial Neural Network: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Singh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR has become a tool for designing in various areas like drugs, food additive, Pesticides, biochemical reactant, environmental pollutant and toxic products. In QSAR biological activity can be related with physicochemical properties and in QSPkR (Quantitative Structure Pharmacokinetic Relationship, pharmacokinetic properties can be related with physicochemical properties, relation found in terms of quantity. A number of literature and review article have been published on Quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship. But prediction of human pharmacokinetic properties of known and unknown is much difficult job in pharmaceutical industry. Pharmacokinetic data of animal cannot be put straightforward. Artificial neural network (ANN is used to predict the pharmacokinetic properties. Artificial neural network has basic structure like biological brain and compose of neurons which are interconnected to each other. The present review not only compiles the literature of QSPkR using ANN, but gives detail about the physicochemical properties and artificial neural network.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, J Y; Caillon, J; Malinowsky, J M; Lequerré, S; Cozian, A; Le Normand, Y; Potel, G; Drugeon, H; Baron, D

    1991-01-01

    9 elderly and 9 younger adult patients, with proven post-operative lower urinary tract infection were treated with 400 mg of norfloxacin twice daily for 5 days. Pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin were measured on days 1 and 5. Compared to the younger adult patients, the elderly showed a decreased creatinine clearance and, following the last dose on day 5, an increased maximum plasma concentration of norfloxacin, an increased area under the concentration-time curve and a decreased total body clearance of norfloxacin. These results confirm that in elderly, as in younger adult patients, the pharmacokinetics of norfloxacin can be described by a linear model and accumulation of the drug during repetitive multiple doses is predictable. The differences between the two groups cannot be considered as clinically significant so that no dose change would be required in elderly patients within the range of creatinine clearance studied.

  18. Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Levetiracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanin Clark Wright

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus and acute repetitive seizures still pose a management challenge despite the recent advances in the field of epilepsy. Parenteral formulations of old anticonvulsants are still a cornerstone in acute seizure management and are approved by the FDA. Intravenous levetiracetam, a second generation anticonvulsant, is approved by the FDA as an adjunctive treatment in patients 16 years or older when oral administration is not available. Data have shown that it has a unique mechanism of action, linear pharmacokinetics and no known drug interactions with other anticonvulsants. In this paper, we will review the current literature about the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of intravenous levetiracetam and the safety profile of this new anticonvulsant in acute seizure management of both adults and children.

  19. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Oral Magnesium Hydroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolberg, Mette Konow Bøgebjerg; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Dahl, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presumption of a beneficial effect of magnesium (Mg) supplementation on various diseases, little is known concerning the pharmacokinetics of Mg hydroxide. This study was designed to provide a pharmacokinetic profile of Mg hydroxide after a single oral dose. Ten healthy male adults...... participated in this cross-over study with three 24-hr study days. Interventions were: 1) none (baseline), 2) oral intake of three (3 x 360 mg) tablets of Mg hydroxide (Mablet(®) ) and 3) IV bolus infusion of 2 g Mg sulphate (index drug). Blood samples were collected before the single dose, after (i.e. post.......0) from baseline. No severe side effects. Mg hydroxide demonstrates a 15% bioavailability, and it constitutes a clinically relevant option for oral Mg supplementation. No severe side effects were seen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl in Greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KuKanich, Butch

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl (15μg/kg) in six healthy Greyhound dogs. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were determined by a liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was used. Fentanyl was rapidly absorbed with a mean peak concentration (C(MAX)) of 3.56ng/mL at 0.24h. The mean terminal half-life, volume of distribution per bioavailability, and clearance per bioavailability were 2.97h, 7.09L/kg, 27.60mL/min/kg, respectively. Pain occurred on injection in all six dogs, but addition of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (1mL per 20mL fentanyl) resulted in no pain on injection in 3/3 dogs but similar C(MAX) values. The subcutaneous route may be an alternative route of fentanyl administration if intravenous administration is not practical.

  1. Absence of a pharmacokinetic interaction of rilpivirine with the P-glycoprotein substrate digoxin in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Crauwels

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rilpivirine (RPV, TMC278, Edurant® is a next-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI, which demonstrated high virologic response rates and non-inferiority versus efavirenz in two Phase III trials in HIV-infected patients through 96 weeks [1,2]. RPV has been shown to inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp in vitro with an apparent IC50 of 9.2 µM (3.4 µg/mL. This study evaluated the in-vivo effect of steady-state RPV 25 mg once daily (qd on the single-dose pharmacokinetics of the probe P-gp substrate digoxin. This was a Phase I, open-label, randomised, crossover trial in 22 HIV-negative volunteers. Participants received in one session a single 0.5 mg dose of digoxin, and in another session RPV 25 mg qd for 16 days with a single 0.5 mg dose of digoxin in the morning of Day 11. All study drugs were taken with a breakfast. Pharmacokinetic profiles of digoxin in plasma and urine were determined over 144 hours after dosing in each session. Steady-state RPV 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles in plasma were determined on Day 11. Plasma and urine samples were analysed using validated LC-MS/MS methods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with non-compartmental methods. The least square (LS means and associated 90% confidence intervals (CI of treatment ratios were calculated based on log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters. Safety and tolerability were assessed throughout the trial. Digoxin pharmacokinetic parameters and statistical results are summarised in Table 1. The plasma and urine digoxin pharmacokinetics were unaffected by co-administration of steady-state RPV. The 90% CIs of the LS means ratios of the main pharmacokinetic parameters were contained within the 0.80-1.25 boundaries of no effect. The terminal elimination half-life of digoxin was similar in the absence or the presence of steady-state RPV. RPV pharmacokinetic parameters were comparable to those in previous clinical trials in healthy volunteers. Administration

  2. Change in Erythropoietin Pharmacokinetics Following Hematopoietic Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Widness, JA; Schmidt, RL; Hohl, RJ; Goldman, FD; Al-Huniti, NH; Freise, KJ; Veng-Pedersen, P.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that bone marrow ablation has a profound effect in decreasing erythropoietin (EPO) elimination. The study’s objective was to determine in humans if EPO pharmacokinetics (PKs) are perturbed following bone marrow ablation. EPO PK studies were performed in eight subjects, aged 4 to 61 years, undergoing fully myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Serial PK studies using intravenous injection of recombinant human EPO (92±2.0 U/kg) (mean±SEM) ...

  3. Influence of rifampin on fleroxacin pharmacokinetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schrenzel, J.; Dayer, P; Leemann, T; Weidekamm, E; Portmann, R; Lew, D P

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections have been successfully treated in animal models with the combination of fleroxacin and rifampin. We studied the influence of rifampin, a potent cytochrome P-450 inducer, on the pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of fleroxacin in 14 healthy young male volunteers. Subjects were given 400 mg of fleroxacin orally once a day for 3 days to reach steady state. After a wash-out period of 2 days, the same subjects received 600 mg of rifampin orally once daily for 7...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone in broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Watteyn, Anneleen; Wyns, Heidi; Plessers, Elke; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is a synthetic derivate of cortisol and is one of the most potent glucocorticoids in man and animal. It is well known as an anti-inflammatory drug in many species. In poultry, however, data on the use of DEX are scarce. DEX would be a possible candidate-drug to influence mediators like cytokines and acute phase proteins in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inflammation model. First of all, it is important to determine the pharmacokinetics to investigate the immunomodulating p...

  5. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of Coartem®

    OpenAIRE

    Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Lefèvre, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (AL), the active constituents of Coartem® exhibit complementary pharmacokinetic profiles. Artemether is absorbed quickly; peak concentrations of artemether and its main active metabolite, dihydroartemisinin (DHA) occur at approximately two hours post-dose, leading to a rapid reduction in asexual parasite mass and a prompt resolution of symptoms. Lumefantrine is absorbed and cleared more slowly (terminal elimination half-life 3-4 days in malaria patients), and accum...

  6. Pharmacokinetics of mercury from dental amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Sandborgh Englund, Gunilla

    1998-01-01

    PHARMACOKINETICS OF MERCURY FROM DENTAL AMALGAM Gunilla Sandborgh Englund Dept. of Basal Oral Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 04Huddinge The overall aim of the present work has been to obtain quantitative and qualitativedata on mercury from dental amalgam in humans. The influence of amalgam removal on mercury levels in blood, plasma and urine hasbeen studied in twelve volunteers. All amalgam fillings were removed during one dentalsession. A transient increase of...

  7. Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Telaprevir and Methadone

    OpenAIRE

    Van Heeswijk, Rolf; Verboven, Peter; Vandevoorde, Ann; Vinck, Petra; Snoeys, Jan; Boogaerts, Griet; De Paepe, Els; Van Solingen-Ristea, Rodica; Witek, James; Garg, Varun

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody is present in most patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs. Therefore, interactions between the HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir and methadone were investigated. The pharmacokinetics of R- and S-methadone were measured after administration of methadone alone and after 7 days of telaprevir (750 mg every 8 h [q8h]) coadministration in HCV-negative subjects on stable, individualized methadone therapy. Unbound R-methadone was measured in predose plasm...

  8. Pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup in small children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokki, H; Le Liboux, A; Jekunen, A; Montay, G; Heikkinen, M

    2000-04-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. Its pharmacokinetics has not been determined in small children. The objective here was to determine the pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup, 0.5 mg/kg, in two groups of 10 children. Group 1 was from ages 6 months up to 2 years (7/10 younger than 1 year), and Group 2 was from ages 2 to 7 years. Venous blood samples were collected before drug administration and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after. A validated HPLC method was used to determine plasma levels of ketoprofen. The lower limit of quantification was 0.02 microgram/ml of plasma. Ketoprofen syrup was absorbed rapidly, the plasma level reaching its maximum at 0.5 hours, with C0.5 hours = 3 micrograms/ml. The pharmacokinetics was similar between the two groups of children. The elimination half-life, 2.0 hours in Group 1 or 1.9 hours in Group 2, was similar to that reported in adults. PMID:10761162

  9. Theophylline Population Pharmacokinetics and Dosing in Children Following Congenital Heart Surgery With Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frymoyer, Adam; Su, Felice; Grimm, Paul C; Sutherland, Scott M; Axelrod, David M

    2016-09-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) frequently develop acute kidney injury due to renal ischemia. Theophylline, which improves renal perfusion via adenosine receptor inhibition, is a potential targeted therapy. However, children undergoing cardiac surgery and CPB commonly have alterations in drug pharmacokinetics. To help understand optimal aminophylline (salt formulation of theophylline) dosing strategies in this population, a population-based pharmacokinetic model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM) from 71 children (median age 5 months; 90% range 1 week to 10 years) who underwent cardiac surgery requiring CPB and received aminophylline as part of a previous randomized controlled trial. A 1-compartment model with linear elimination adequately described the pharmacokinetics of theophylline. Weight scaled via allometry was a significant predictor of clearance and volume. In addition, allometric scaled clearance increased with age implemented as a power maturation function. Compared to prior reports in noncardiac children, theophylline clearance was markedly reduced across age. In the final population pharmacokinetic model, optimized empiric dosing regimens were developed via Monte Carlo simulations. Doses 50% to 75% lower than those recommended in noncardiac children were needed to achieve target serum concentrations of 5 to 10 mg/L. PMID:26712558

  10. Comparative pharmacokinetics of intravenous fentanyl and buprenorphine in healthy greyhound dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KuKanich, B; Allen, P

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of two highly protein-bound, lipophilic opioid drugs. Fentanyl (10 μg/kg) and buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) were administered intravenously (IV) to six healthy greyhound dogs (three males and three females). The doses were based on clinically administered doses for dogs. Plasma drug concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetics were estimated with computer software. The volume of distribution (area) was larger for fentanyl (7.42 L/kg) compared to buprenorphine (3.54 L/kg). The plasma clearance of fentanyl (38.6 mL·min/kg) was faster than buprenorphine (10.3 mL·min/kg). The terminal half-life of fentanyl (2.22 h) was shorter than buprenorphine (3.96 h). Despite similar physicochemical properties including octanol-water partition coefficient and pKa, the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl and buprenorphine were not similar. Both fentanyl (84%) and buprenorphine (95-98%) are considered highly protein bound, but the differences in protein binding may contribute to the lack of similarity of pharmacokinetics in healthy dogs. PMID:24684621

  11. Pharmacokinetics of labelled compounds with technetium-99m and samarium-153

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to establish the different pharmacokinetics parameters of the main radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and samarium-153. These parameters could be subsequently used as reference to compare other products with the same use. Mathematical models and a computerized pharmacokinetic program were used to this purpose. A biodistribution study in quadruplicate and/or quintuplicate was conducted for each radiopharmaceutical, data was was obtained in injection dose percentages. The biodistribution study involved the injection of a predetermined dose of the radiopharmaceutical into animals (rats or mice), which were subsequently put away at different time intervals, removing the relevant organs. Activity in each organ was read by means of a well-type NaI scintillation counter, data obtained in activity counts was transformed into injection dose percentages. Based on these percentages, the mathematical model was constructed and the pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained using the computerized program Expo 2 v. 1, which is written in C language and works in windows. Analyzing the results obtained, we can conclude that the use of the Expo 2 v. 1 program for a bi compartmental analysis allowed us to obtain reliable pharmacokinetic parameters which describe what happens in the organism when the radiopharmaceutical passes from the central compartment to the peripheral one and vice versa

  12. Tenofovir induced Fanconi syndrome: A possible pharmacokinetic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar Kapadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tenofovir was introduced as a second line drug for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in India in December 2009. Although rare, renal toxicity is a recognized adverse drug reaction (ADR of this drug, especially when administered with boosted lopinavir-ritonavir. In this case, an HIV positive patient receiving tenofovir based antiretroviral therapy (ART for last 1 year developed albuminuria, glycosuria and hypophosphatemia. Renal function tests and random blood sugar were within normal limits. He was diagnosed as a case of tenofovir induced Fanconi syndrome. Tenofovir was discontinued and patient was prescribed an alternate regimen. Five months later clinical symptoms and renal functions returned to normal. A pharmacokinetic interaction between tenofovir and ritonavir may have resulted in the toxicity. A periodic monitoring of renal functions is desirable in patients on tenofovir based ART.

  13. Safety, pharmacokinetics and efficacy of artemisinins in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ades

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria in pregnancy can lead to serious maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Access to the most effective antimalarials in pregnancy is essential. Resistance to current therapies is high for all antimalarial therapies except artemisinins. Artemisinin-based combination therapy is current the first line of malaria treatment recommended by the WHO for children, adults and pregnant women in second or third trimester. Due to potential embryotoxicity of artemisinins identified in animal studies, artemisinins are not considered safe for use in first trimester of pregnancy. Artemisinins are more rapidly metabolized in pregnant women, but this does not seem to reduce efficacy. Most studies show very high cure rates for pregnant women. Areas for further research include the safety profile in first trimester of pregnancy, the effect of HIV infection on artemisinin use in pregnancy, the relationship between the pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy, and the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy.  

  14. The pharmacokinetics of 8-methoxypsoralen following i.v. administration in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, V; Gambus, P L; Barr, J; Minto, C F; Corash, L; Tessman, J W; Stickney, J L; Shafer, S L

    1995-10-01

    1. 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring photoreactive substance which, in the presence of u.v. light, forms covalent adducts with pyrimidine bases in nucleic acids. For many years, 8-MOP has been used in PUVA therapy for treatment of psoriasis. Recently, the drug has been found to inactivate effectively bacteria spiked into platelet concentrates. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of 8-MOP administered intravenously in the bactericidal dosage range. 2. Eighteen volunteers were divided into three treatment groups to receive, respectively, 5, 10, and 15 mg 8-MOP infused over 60 min. Frequent arterial samples were gathered, and the blood and plasma were assayed for 8-MOP concentration. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by moment and compartmental population analysis, the latter performed with the program NONMEM. Haemodynamics, ventilatory pattern, and subjective effects were recorded throughout the study. 3. The intravenously administered 8-MOP was well tolerated in all individuals, and no acute toxicity was observed. 4. The pharmacokinetics of 8-MOP were best described by a three-compartment mammillary model in which the volumes and clearances were proportional to weight. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the plasma concentrations were: V1 = 0.045 1 kg-1, V2 = 0.57 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.15 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.010 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.0067 1 kg-1 min-1, CL3 = 0.012 1 kg-1 min-1. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the blood concentrations were: V1 = 0.061 1 kg-1, V2 = 1.15 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.21 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.011 1 kg-1 min-1 and CL3 = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1. 5. The plasma pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 17%, and the blood pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 18%. Analysis of the relative concentration of 8-MOP between plasma and red blood cells suggested concentration

  15. Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic diversity of ranunculaceae medicinal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Cheng; Ge, Guang-Bo; Xiao, Pei-Gen; Wang, Ping; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The wide-reaching distributed angiosperm family Ranunculaceae has approximately 2200 species in around 60 genera. Chemical components of this family include several representative groups: benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA), ranunculin, triterpenoid saponin and diterpene alkaloid, etc. Their extensive clinical utility has been validated by traditional uses of thousands of years and current evidence-based medicine studies. Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) studies of plant-based natural products are an indispensable part of comprehensive medicinal plant exploration, which could facilitate conservation and sustainable utilization of Ranunculaceae pharmaceutical resources, as well as new chemical entity development with improved DMPK parameters. However, DMPK characteristics of Ranunculaceaederived medicinal compounds have not been summarized. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga) and goldenseal (Hydrastis) raise concerns of herbdrug interaction. DMPK studies of other Ranunculaceae genera, e.g., Nigella, Delphinium, Aconitum, Trollius, and Coptis, are also rapidly increasing and becoming more and more clinically relevant. In this contribution, we highlight the up-to-date awareness, as well as the challenges around the DMPK-related issues in optimization of drug development and clinical practice of Ranunculaceae compounds. Herb-herb interaction of Ranunculaceae herb-containing traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula could significantly influence the in vivo pharmacokinetic behavior of compounds thereof, which may partially explain the complicated therapeutic mechanism of TCM formula. Although progress has been made on revealing the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/T) of Ranunculaceae compounds, there is a lack of DMPK studies of traditional medicinal genera Aquilegia, Thalictrum and Clematis. Fluorescent probe compounds could be promising substrate, inhibitor and/or inducer in future DMPK studies of Ranunculaceae compounds. A better

  16. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 μg/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  17. Population pharmacokinetic study of methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Zhai, S; Yang, L; Wu, H; Zhang, J; Ke, X

    2010-01-01

    plasma concentration versus time curve AUC was 582.92 mg x h x l(-1) (CV = 55.9%). Our model combine Bayesian approach enabled a satisfactory estimation of MTX concentration in individual patients. The results of this study allowed clinicians to assess the MTX pharmacokinetic parameters based on the specific demographic characteristics of patients. PMID:20040335

  18. Grey-box modelling of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Jacobsen, Judith L; Pedersen, Oluf;

    2004-01-01

    Grey-box pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is presented as a promising way of modelling PK/PD systems. The concept behind grey-box modelling is based on combining physiological knowledge along with information from data in the estimation of model parameters. Grey-box modelling...... consists of using stochastic differential equations (SDEs) where the stochastic term in the differential equations represents unknown or incorrectly modelled dynamics of the system. The methodology behind the grey-box PK/PD modelling framework for systematic model improvement is illustrated using simulated...... data and furthermore applied to Bergman's minimal model of glucose kinetics using clinical data from an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). The grey-box estimates of the stochastic system noise parameters indicate that the glucose minimal model is too simple and should preferably be revised...

  19. Population pharmacokinetics and relationship between demographic and clinical variables and pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, L M L; Degraeuwe, P L J; Nieman, F H M; de Wolf, M C; de Boer, A

    2002-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were calculated from 725 routine plasma gentamicin concentrations obtained in 177 neonates of 24 to 42 weeks' gestational age in their first week of life. Kel increases and V/W decreases with increasing gestational age. Almost identical results were obt

  20. Next Generation of SiFAlin-Based TATE Derivatives for PET Imaging of SSTR-Positive Tumors: Influence of Molecular Design on In Vitro SSTR Binding and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litau, S; Niedermoser, S; Vogler, N; Roscher, M; Schirrmacher, R; Fricker, G; Wängler, B; Wängler, C

    2015-12-16

    The Silicon-Fluoride-Acceptor (SiFA)-(18)F-labeling strategy has been shown before to enable the straightforward and efficient (18)F-labeling of complex biologically active substances such as proteins and peptides. Especially in the case of peptides, the radiolabeling proceeds kit-like in short reaction times and without the need of complex product workup. SiFA-derivatized, (18)F-labeled Tyr(3)-octreotate (TATE) derivatives demonstrated, besides strong somatostatin receptor (SSTR) binding, favorable in vivo pharmacokinetics as well as excellent tumor visualization by PET imaging. In this study, we intended to determine the influence of the underlying molecular design and used molecular scaffolds of SiFAlin-TATE derivatives on SSTR binding as well as on the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the resulting (18)F-labeled peptides. For this purpose, new SiFAlin-(Asp)n-PEG1-TATE analogs (where n = 1-4) were synthesized, efficiently radiolabeled with (18)F in a kit-like manner and obtained in radiochemical yields of 70-80%, radiochemical purities of ≥97%, and nonoptimized specific activities of 20.1-45.2 GBq/μmol within 20-25 min starting from 0.7-1.5 GBq of (18)F. In the following, the radiotracer's lipophilicities and stabilities in human serum were determined. Furthermore, the SSTR-specific binding affinities were evaluated by a competitive displacement assay on SSTR-positive AR42J cells. The obtained in vitro results support the assumption that aspartic acids are able to considerably increase the radiotracer's hydrophilicity and that their number does not affect the SSTR binding potential of the TATE derivatives. The most promising tracer (18)F-SiFAlin-Asp3-PEG1-TATE [(18)F]6 (LogD = -1.23 ± 0.03, IC50 = 20.7 ± 2.5 nM) was further evaluated in vivo in AR42J tumor-bearing nude mice via PET/CT imaging against the clinical gold standard (68)Ga-DOTATATE as well as the previously developed SiFAlin-TATE derivative [(18)F]3. The results of these evaluations showed that [(18)F

  1. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  2. Tools to evaluate pharmacokinetics data for establishing maximum residue limits for approved veterinary drugs: examples from JECFA's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, P; Henri, J; Laurentie, M

    2016-05-01

    Maximum residue limits (MRLs) for residues of veterinary drugs are the maximum concentrations of residues permitted in or on a food by national or regional legislation. In the process of MRLs recommendations by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), analysis of pharmacokinetic data describing the ADME process (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) is a crucial step and requires the use of different pharmacokinetic tools. The results of animal metabolism studies are the prime determinants of the residue definition in food commodities. Substances labelled with radioactive isotopes are used so that the disposition of the residue can be followed as total residue and main metabolites concentrations. Residue depletion studies with radiolabelled parent drug will lead to the estimate of the time course of the total residue and to determine a marker residue. Depletion studies with an unlabelled drug provide more information on the time course of the marker residue in raw commodities after administration under approved practical conditions of use. By use of this information and after conversion with the total/residue marker ratio, MRLs are derived by comparison of the acceptable daily intake with the daily intakes calculated with different scenarios of dietary exposure. Progress in pharmacokinetic model such as physiologically based pharmacokinetics and population pharmacokinetics will drive the future research in this field to improved veterinary drug development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27443212

  3. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G;

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  4. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in horses and Greyhound dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Megan M.; Davis, Elizabeth G.; KuKanich, Butch

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine administered orally to horses and Greyhound dogs. A secondary objective was to assess terbinafine metabolites. Six healthy horses and six healthy Greyhound dogs were included in the pharmacokinetic data.

  5. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDIES ON VAGINALLY ADMINISTERED LEVONORGESTREL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEChang-Hai; XUJian-Qiu; ZHUYue-Hua; SHIYong-En

    1989-01-01

    Comparative studies on pharmacokinetics of vaginally and orally administered levonorgestrel (LNG) tablet (Postinor) in one single dose containing 0,75mg LNG were performed. The pharmacokinetics of LNG and its effects on ovarian functions werealso studied after repeated vaginal administration.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Moxifloxacin in an Infant with Mycoplasma hominis Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, Kevin M; Massaro, Matthew M; Smith, Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Laughon, Matthew M

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of Mycoplasma hominis meningitis in infants is limited by a lack of consensus regarding therapy and limited pharmacokinetic data for agents to which M. hominis is susceptible. We report the successful treatment of a premature infant with M. hominis meningitis with doxycycline and moxifloxacin and provide a pharmacokinetic profile of moxifloxacin.

  7. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Fluvoxamine in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder…

  8. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interaction Studies with Enzalutamide

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Jacqueline A; de Vries, Michiel; Krauwinkel, Walter; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Noukens, Jan; van der Walt, Jan-Stefan; Mol, Roelof; Mordenti, Joyce; Ouatas, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Two phase I drug interaction studies were performed with oral enzalutamide, which is approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Methods A parallel-treatment design (n = 41) was used to evaluate the effects of a strong cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 inhibitor (oral gemfibrozil 600 mg twice daily) or strong CYP3A4 inhibitor (oral itraconazole 200 mg once daily) on the pharmacokinetics of enzalutamide and its active metabolite N-de...

  9. A Review of Morphine and Morphine-6-Glucuronide's Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationships in Experimental and Clinical Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Olesen, Anne Estrup;

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is a widely used opioid for treatment of moderate to severe pain, but large interindividual variability in patient response and no clear guidance on how to optimise morphine dosage regimen complicates treatment strategy for clinicians. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models can...... provides a detailed overview of the published human population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies for morphine analgesia in addition to basic drug disposition and pharmacological properties of morphine and its analgesic active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide, that may help identify future...... covariates. Furthermore, based on simulations from key pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models, the contribution of morphine-6-glucuronide to the analgesic response in patients with renal insufficiency was investigated. Simulations were also used to examine the impact of effect-site equilibration half-life on...

  10. Morbid Obesity Alters Both Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Propofol: Dosing Recommendation for Anesthesia Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dong; Peng, Xuemei; Liu, Jie; Qian, Hao; Li, Jiayang; Wu, Baojian

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity has markedly increased worldwide. Obese patients pose significant challenges to anesthesiologists with regard to accurate dosing of anesthetics due to potentially altered pharmacokinetics (PK). Here we determined the PK and pharmacodynamics (PD) of propofol for anesthesia induction in morbidly obese (MO) subjects (body mass index >35 kg/m(2)) at two dosing regimens: dosing based on total body weight and lean body weight (LBW), respectively. The propofol pharmacokinetic profile was well fitted with a two-compartment model. Both elimination clearance (223%-243% of controls, who had a body mass index 0.05) between MO subjects and controls. Morbid obesity led to a significant decrease (37.9%-38.6%; P obesity significantly altered both PK and PD of propofol. LBW was a better weight-based dosing scalar for anesthesia induction with propofol in MO subjects. PMID:27481855

  11. Cross-validation of a mass spectrometric-based method for the therapeutic drug monitoring of irinotecan: implementation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in pharmacokinetic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Eleonora; Posocco, Bianca; Crotti, Sara; Marangon, Elena; Giodini, Luciana; Nitti, Donato; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Traldi, Pietro; Agostini, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Irinotecan is a widely used antineoplastic drug, mostly employed for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This drug is a feasible candidate for therapeutic drug monitoring due to the presence of a wide inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. In order to determine the drug concentration during the administration protocol, we developed a quantitative MALDI-MS method using CHCA as MALDI matrix. Here, we demonstrate that MALDI-TOF can be applied in a routine setting for therapeutic drug monitoring in humans offering quick and accurate results. To reach this aim, we cross validated, according to FDA and EMA guidelines, the MALDI-TOF method in comparison with a standard LC-MS/MS method, applying it for the quantification of 108 patients' plasma samples from a clinical trial. Standard curves for irinotecan were linear (R (2) ≥ 0.9842) over the concentration ranges between 300 and 10,000 ng/mL and showed good back-calculated accuracy and precision. Intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, determined on three quality control levels were always <12.8 % and between 90.1 and 106.9 %, respectively. The cross-validation procedure showed a good reproducibility between the two methods, the percentage differences within 20 % in more than 70 % of the total amount of clinical samples analysed. PMID:27235158

  12. Target-mediated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model based meta-analysis and dosing regimen optimization of a long-acting release formulation of exenatide in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hanqing; Xu, Jiayin; Fan, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    A hybrid pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model with extended-release (ER) process and target mediated drug disposition (TMDD) was developed for exenatide ER to account for its complex absorption process and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R)-mediated non-linear PK behaviors along with its influences to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Using hybrid PK/PD model, simulations were done to explore the potential dosing regimens which could achieve likelihood of more pharmacodynamic exposure with respect to FPG and HbA1c over a much shorter period compared with the currently used treatment protocol. The mean PK/PD data about exenatide ER for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were digitized from the publications, and the hybrid PK/PD model was performed using the Monolix 4.3 program. The plasma concentration-time and FPG/HbA1c-time profiles for exenatide ER subcutaneously administrated to patients with T2DM were well described by this hybrid model. Monte Carlo simulation was applied to mimic the PK profiles when higher loading dose 7.5 and 5.0 mg exenatide ER were subcutaneously administrated with different dosing intervals at the first 3 weeks of 30-week treatment. Two potentially optimizing schedules could improve the likelihood of achieving much more FPG and HbA1c exposures than currently used clinical treatment protocol.

  13. Etravirine Pharmacokinetics in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Nikki; Schalkwijk, Stein; Best, Brookie M.; Colbers, Angela; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Moltó, José; Stek, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Smith, Elizabeth; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Chakhtoura, Nahida; van Kasteren, Marjo; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Mirochnick, Mark; Burger, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study goal was to describe etravirine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum in HIV-infected women. Methods: IMPAACT P1026s and PANNA are on-going, non-randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center phase-IV prospective studies in HIV-infected pregnant women. Intensive steady-state 12-h pharmacokinetic profiles were performed from 2nd trimester through postpartum. Etravirine was measured at two labs using validated ultra performance liquid chromatography (detection limits: 0.020 and 0.026 mcg/mL). Results: Fifteen women took etravirine 200 mg twice-daily. Etravirine AUC0–12 was higher in the 3rd trimester compared to paired postpartum data by 34% (median 8.3 vs. 5.3 mcg*h/mL, p = 0.068). Etravirine apparent oral clearance was significantly lower in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy compared to paired postpartum data by 52% (median 24 vs. 38 L/h, p = 0.025). The median ratio of cord blood to maternal plasma concentration at delivery was 0.52 (range: 0.19–4.25) and no perinatal transmission occurred. Conclusion: Etravirine apparent oral clearance is reduced and exposure increased during the third trimester of pregnancy. Based on prior dose-ranging and safety data, no dose adjustment is necessary for maternal health but the effects of etravirine in utero are unknown. Maternal health and infant outcomes should be closely monitored until further infant safety data are available. Clinical Trial registration: The IMPAACT protocol P1026s and PANNA study are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT00042289 and NCT00825929.

  14. Etravirine Pharmacokinetics in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Nikki; Schalkwijk, Stein; Best, Brookie M.; Colbers, Angela; Wang, Jiajia; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Moltó, José; Stek, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Smith, Elizabeth; Hidalgo Tenorio, Carmen; Chakhtoura, Nahida; van Kasteren, Marjo; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Mirochnick, Mark; Burger, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study goal was to describe etravirine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum in HIV-infected women. Methods: IMPAACT P1026s and PANNA are on-going, non-randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center phase-IV prospective studies in HIV-infected pregnant women. Intensive steady-state 12-h pharmacokinetic profiles were performed from 2nd trimester through postpartum. Etravirine was measured at two labs using validated ultra performance liquid chromatography (detection limits: 0.020 and 0.026 mcg/mL). Results: Fifteen women took etravirine 200 mg twice-daily. Etravirine AUC0–12 was higher in the 3rd trimester compared to paired postpartum data by 34% (median 8.3 vs. 5.3 mcg*h/mL, p = 0.068). Etravirine apparent oral clearance was significantly lower in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy compared to paired postpartum data by 52% (median 24 vs. 38 L/h, p = 0.025). The median ratio of cord blood to maternal plasma concentration at delivery was 0.52 (range: 0.19–4.25) and no perinatal transmission occurred. Conclusion: Etravirine apparent oral clearance is reduced and exposure increased during the third trimester of pregnancy. Based on prior dose-ranging and safety data, no dose adjustment is necessary for maternal health but the effects of etravirine in utero are unknown. Maternal health and infant outcomes should be closely monitored until further infant safety data are available. Clinical Trial registration: The IMPAACT protocol P1026s and PANNA study are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT00042289 and NCT00825929. PMID:27540363

  15. Effects of Chungsinoryungsan, a polyherbal complex, on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril in rats

    OpenAIRE

    KANG, SEOK-BONG; Shon, Ho-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin; Song, Chang-Hyun; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    For sufficient antihypertension with less adverse effects, numerous clinical trials have recommended combination therapy using two or more hypertensive drugs. Chungsinoryungsan (CSORS) is a polyherbal complex based on oriental medicine, which has shown therapeutic potentials for antihypertension and additional renal improvement. Therefore, the affect of CSORS on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril, an antihypertensive drug, was analyzed as a novel combination of hypertensive drugs. Ra...

  16. Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Drug Selection and Loading for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekar N; Shobha Rani R

    2008-01-01

    Skin of an average adult body covers a surface of approximately 2 m2 and receives about one-third of the blood circulating through the body. The transdermal route of administration cannot be employed for a large number of drugs. The rationality of drug selection based on pharmacokinetic parameters and physicochemical properties of the drug are the important factors to be considered for deciding its suitability of drug for delivery by transdermal route.

  17. Dose Reconstruction of Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate Using a Simple Pharmacokinetic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lorber, Matthew; Calafat, Antonia M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), used primarily as a plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride, is found in a variety of products. Previous studies have quantified human exposure by back calculating intakes based on DEHP metabolite concentrations in urine and by determining concentrations of DEHP in exposure media (e.g., air, food, dust). Objectives: To better understand the timing and extent of DEHP exposure, we used a simple pharmacokinetic model to “reconstruct” the DEHP dose respon...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of rilmenidine in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genissel, P.; Bromet, N.; Fourtillan, J.B.; Mignot, A.; Albin, H.

    1988-02-24

    Rilmenidine is a novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, used in the treatment of mild or moderate hypertension at the oral dose of 1 mg once or twice daily. The pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated after single or repeated administration in healthy subjects, using labeled and unlabeled compounds. Rilmenidine was rapidly and extensively absorbed, with an absolute bioavailability factor close to 1 and a maximal plasma concentration achieved within 2 hours. Rilmenidine was not subject to presystemic metabolism. Distribution was independent of the free fraction because rilmenidine was weakly bound to plasma proteins (less than 10%). The volume of distribution was approximately 5 l.kg-1 (315 liters). Elimination was rapid with a total body plasma clearance of approximately 450 ml.min-1 and an elimination half-life of approximately 8 hours. Renal excretion was the major elimination process (two-thirds of the total clearance). Metabolism was very poor, with a renal elimination of rilmenidine as the parent drug (urinary fraction of rilmenidine was about 65% and no metabolite plasma levels were detected). Linear pharmacokinetics were demonstrated for rilmenidine from 0.5 to 2 mg but, at 3 mg, a slight deviation from linearity was observed. In repeated administration, the linear disposition of rilmenidine with dose was confirmed.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl in Greyhounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KuKanich, Butch

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl (15μg/kg) in six healthy Greyhound dogs. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were determined by a liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was used. Fentanyl was rapidly absorbed with a mean peak concentration (C(MAX)) of 3.56ng/mL at 0.24h. The mean terminal half-life, volume of distribution per bioavailability, and clearance per bioavailability were 2.97h, 7.09L/kg, 27.60mL/min/kg, respectively. Pain occurred on injection in all six dogs, but addition of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (1mL per 20mL fentanyl) resulted in no pain on injection in 3/3 dogs but similar C(MAX) values. The subcutaneous route may be an alternative route of fentanyl administration if intravenous administration is not practical. PMID:21388844

  20. Darunavir pharmacokinetics throughout pregnancy and postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lambert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy is recommended during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV. Physiological changes during pregnancy are known to affect the pharmacokinetics (PK of protease inhibitors (PIs, leading to lower exposures in pregnant women. Here we examine the PK of DRV/r 800/100 mg once daily (OD over the course of pregnancy and postpartum (PP. Material and Methods: In this prospective open-labelled study, HIV-positive pregnant women receiving darunavir/ritonavir as part of their routine maternity care were enrolled. DRV plasma trough concentrations [DRV] were determined in the first (T1 and/or second (T2 and/or third (T3 trimester and PP using a validated HPLC-MS/MS methodology (Lab21, Cambridge UK. Where possible paired maternal and cord blood samples were taken at delivery. Results: To date 20 women (12 black African, 8 Caucasian have been enrolled. Median (range baseline CD4 count was 338 cells/µL (108–715, and median baseline plasma viral load was 555 copies/mL (550 ng/ml during pregnancy. However, reduced DRV plasma concentrations in the second/third trimesters highlights the need for TDM in this population and warrants further study of pregnancy-associated changes in DRV pharmacokinetics. The low C/M ratios reported here are consistent with previous reports [1] and suggest low transplacental transfer of DRV.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M J; McCulloch, T J; Kennedy, R R; Baker, A B

    2004-12-01

    Two recent studies have examined the pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane in adults. Lu et al.(Pharmacokinetics of sevoflurane uptake into the brain and body, Anaesthesia 2003; 58: 951-6) observed that jugular bulb sevoflurane concentration initially rose unexpectedly rapidly and then approached arterial concentrations unexpectedly slowly, suggesting that a blood-brain diffusion barrier exists. They also observed a large alveolar-arterial sevoflurane gradient, suggesting that an alveolar-arterial diffusion barrier exists. Nakamura et al. (Predicted sevoflurane partial pressure in the brain with an uptake and distribution model: Comparison with the measured value in internal jugular vein blood. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 1999; 15: 299-305) found no diffusion barriers. We used a computer model to analyse both data sets and show that the observations of Lu et al. can be explained by contamination of jugular samples with extracerebral blood. It is possible that the alveolar-arterial gradients observed by Lu et al. are due to discrepancies in conversions between blood concentrations and gas partial pressures. Our study suggests that there is no blood-brain diffusion barrier for sevoflurane and that the data of Lu et al. must be interpreted with caution.

  2. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  3. Physiologic and pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantine, Maged M

    2014-01-01

    Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output, and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health. PMID:24772083

  4. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed

  5. Mefloquine pharmacokinetics and mefloquine-artesunate effectiveness in Peruvian patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quezada Wilmer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is recommended as a means of prolonging the effectiveness of first-line malaria treatment regimens. Different brands of mefloquine (MQ have been reported to be non-bioequivalent; this could result in sub-therapeutic levels of mefloquine with decreased efficacy. In 2002, mefloquine-artesunate (MQ-AS combination therapy was adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Amazon region of Peru. Although MQ resistance has yet to be reported from the Peruvian Amazon, it has been reported from other countries in the Amazon Region. Therefore, continuous monitoring is warranted to ensure that the first-line therapy remains efficacious. This study examines the in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic parameters through Day 56 of three commercial formulations of MQ (Lariam®, Mephaquin®, and Mefloquina-AC® Farma given in combination with artesunate. Methods Thirty-nine non-pregnant adults with P. falciparum mono-infection were randomly assigned to receive artesunate in combination with either (1 Lariam, (2 Mephaquin, or (3 Mefloquina AC. Patients were assessed on Day 0 (with blood samples for pharmacokinetics at 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours, 1, 2, 3, 7, and then weekly until day 56. Clinical and parasitological outcomes were based on the standardized WHO protocol. Whole blood mefloquine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis of concentration versus time data. Results By day 3, all patients had cleared parasitaemia except for one patient in the AC Farma arm; this patient cleared by day 4. No recurrences of parasitaemia were seen in any of the 34 patients. All three MQ formulations had a terminal half-life of 14–15 days and time to maximum plasma concentration of 45–52 hours. The maximal concentration (Cmax and interquartile range was 2,820 ng

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-ping; YANG Lu; BI Shan-shan; LU Wei; ZHANG Xian-hua; ZHAI Suo-di; DUAN Li-ping

    2009-01-01

    Backgroud Little is known about the influence of liver transplantation on the pharmacokinetics of most anesthetic drugs. The goal of this study was to study the population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in the different phases of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and the influence of relevant factors.Methods Thirteen adult patients undergoing OLT were enrolled. A single bolus infusion of remifentanil 5 μg/kg was administered during the preanhepatic, anhepatic and neohepatic phases of OLT. Arterial blood samples of 1.5 ml were collected at 0 (baseline), 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60 and 90 minutes after drug administration. Remifentanil concentration was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling (NONMEM).Results The pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing OLT was best described by a two-compartment open model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were not influenced by age, gender, operative phase, blood temperature, rehydration volume, or blood loss volume during sampling. The volume of distribution in the central compartment (V1) and the volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment (V2) were influenced by body weight. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetics of remifentanil in patients undergoing OLT can be well described by a two-compartment open model. The functional status of the liver does not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of remifentanil, but the body weight is an influential factor of V1 and V2.

  7. Nonparametric Bayes approach for a semi-mechanistic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan

    Both frequentist and Bayesian approaches have been used to characterize population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics(PK/PD) models. These methods focus on estimating the population parameters and assessing the association between the characteristics of PK/PD and the subject covariates. In this work, we propose a Dirichlet process mixture model to classify the patients based on their individualized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. Then we can predict the new patients' dose-response curves given their concentration-time profiles. Additionally, we implement a modern Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm for sampling inference of parameters. The detailed sampling procedures as well as the results are discussed in a simulation data and a real data example. We also evaluate an approximate solution of a system of nonlinear differential equations from Euler's method and compare the results with a general numerical solver, ode from R package, deSolve.

  8. Preliminary study of quinine pharmacokinetics in pregnant women with malaria-HIV co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayentao, Kassoum; Guirou, Etienne A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Venkatesan, Meera; Plowe, Christopher V; Parsons, Teresa L; Hendrix, Craig W; Nyunt, Myaing M

    2014-03-01

    Pregnant women bear the greatest burden of malaria-human immunodeficiency virus co-infection. Previous studies suggest that interaction with antiretroviral drugs may compromise antimalarial pharmacokinetics and treatment outcomes. We conducted a preliminary clinical study to assess quinine pharmacokinetics in Malian pregnant women with acute malaria who reported taking nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy. Of seven women, six had stable concentrations of nevirapine in the plasma and one had none. Quinine concentrations were lower, and its metabolite 3-hydroxyquinine higher, in the six women with nevirapine than in the one without, and quinine concentrations were below the recommended therapeutic range in 50% of the women. This preliminary observation warrants further research to understand the impact of long-term antiretroviral therapy on the treatment of acute malaria.

  9. PHARMACOKINETICS OF CEFTIOFUR CRYSTALLINE FREE ACID, A LONG-ACTING CEPHALOSPORIN, IN AMERICAN FLAMINGOS (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Jennifer J; Cox, Sherry K; Backues, Kay A

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic usage is a vital component of veterinary medicine but the unique anatomy of some species can make administration difficult. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA), a long-acting cephalosporin antibiotic, after parenteral administration in American flamingos ( Phoenicopterus ruber ). A dose of 10 mg/kg of CCFA was administered intramuscularly to 11 birds and blood was collected at various time points from 0 to 192 hr. Pharmacokinetic parameters for ceftiofur equivalents were determined and reached levels above minimum inhibitory concentrations of various bacterial organisms in other avian species through 96 hr in 9/11 birds. Based on these findings and comparison to other avian studies, ceftiofur crystalline free acid appears to be a long-acting antibiotic option for American flamingos. Administration of this antibiotic should be utilized in conjunction with culture and sensitivity of suspected pathogens. PMID:27468016

  10. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of recently-developed siRNA nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Park, Joonyoung; Pei, Yihua; Xu, Jun; Yeo, Yoon

    2016-09-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising drug candidate, expected to have broad therapeutic potentials toward various diseases including viral infections and cancer. With recent advances in bioconjugate chemistry and carrier technology, several siRNA-based drugs have advanced to clinical trials. However, most cases address local applications or diseases in the filtering organs, reflecting remaining challenges in systemic delivery of siRNA. The difficulty in siRNA delivery is in large part due to poor circulation stability and unfavorable pharmacokinetics and biodistribution profiles of siRNA. This review describes the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of siRNA nanomedicines, focusing on those reported in the past 5years, and their pharmacological effects in selected disease models such as hepatocellular carcinoma, liver infections, and respiratory diseases. The examples discussed here will provide an insight into the current status of the art and unmet needs in siRNA delivery. PMID:26686832

  11. Hypericum japonicum Thunb. ex Murray: Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, Quality Control and Pharmacokinetics of an Important Herbal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Sheng Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypericum japonicum Thunb. ex Murray is mainly distributed throughout Asia, Oceania and North America and is used as an important herbal medicine. H. japonicum contains many valuable secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids, phloroglucinols and xanthones and has hepatoprotective, anti-tumor, antibacterial, antiviral, and antioxidant activities and effects on the cardiovascular system and immunity. Coupled with phytochemical and pharmacological research, a series of analytical methods have been developed to evaluate the quality of H. japonicum based on its bioactive components. A pharmacokinetics study involved the absorption of two main flavonoids of H. japonicum in rats. This review aims to present an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the phytochemistry, pharmacology, quality control and pharmacokinetics of H. japonicum, which should be useful for the greater development of H. japonicum, especially in the development of new drugs and therapeutics for various diseases.

  12. Pharmacokinetics local model and Its application in nuclear medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹国宪; 李卫一; 等

    1996-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics local model for studying kinetic action of pharmaceuticals in the specific part of the body is established on the basis of the compartment model.A series of formulae is deduced,and with them the pharmacokinetic equation and several important parameters can be obtained.The local model successfully expanded the area of pharmacokinetics from the compartment model ,which is mainly dealing with kinetic action of pharmaceuticals in blood,to the local model,which can study kinetic action of pharmaceuticals in any organ,tissue or fluid.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie;

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...

  14. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  15. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, D J; Orme, M L

    1990-06-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids are used by an estimated 60 to 70 million women world-wide. Over the past 20 years there have been both case reports and clinical studies on the topic of drug interactions with these agents. Some of the interactions are of definite therapeutic relevance, whereas others can be discounted as being of no clinical significance. Pharmacological interactions between oral contraceptive steroids and other compounds may be of 2 kinds: (a) drugs may impair the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, leading to breakthrough bleeding and pregnancy (in a few cases, the activity of the contraceptive is enhanced); (b) oral contraceptive steroids may interfere with the metabolism of other drugs. A number of anticonvulsants (phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine) are enzyme-inducing agents and thereby increase the clearance of the oral contraceptive steroids. Valproic acid has no enzyme-inducing properties, and thus women on this anticonvulsant can rely on their low dose oral contraceptive steroids for contraceptive protection. Researchers are now beginning to unravel the molecular basis of this interaction, with evidence of specific forms of cytochrome P450 (P450IIC and IIIA gene families) being induced by phenobarbital. Rifampicin, the antituberculous drug, also induces a cytochrome P450 which is a product of the P450IIIA gene subfamily. This isozyme is one of the major forms involved in 2-hydroxylation of ethinylestradiol. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been implicated in causing pill failure; case reports document the interaction, and general practitioners are convinced that it is real. The problem remains that there is still no firm clinical pharmacokinetic evidence which indicates that blood concentrations of oral contraceptive steroids are altered by antibiotics. However, perhaps this should not be a surprise, given that the incidence of the interaction may be very low. It is suggested that an individual at risk will have a low bioavailability

  16. The influence of cardiovascular physiology on dose/pharmacokinetic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolino, Pietro; Eiraldi, Rosa; Vázquez, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Inter- and intraindividual variability in the relationship between dose and clinical--or pharmacodynamic--response of a drug can be analysed in two steps: firstly, by considering the plasma pharmacokinetic response to a given dose and, secondly, by the connection between both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses. As the cardiovascular system is the means of transport of endogenous and exogenous substances, blood flow fraction destined to each organ determines the relative mass of solute in plasma, which is constantly in contact with the tissue. Hence, not only the rate but also the extent of drug transfer would be increased when tissues are irrigated by a higher fraction of cardiac output. Aging and circadian rhythms present similar cardiac output distribution patterns when moving from young to aged adult and from nocturnal to diurnal hours. These two changes lead to an increased blood flow delivery to the extra-splanchnic-renal region in the elderly and in the morning, but with a decreased cardiac output in aged individuals and an increased one during the day. This scenario allows us to forecast substance concentrations outside the blood vessels, which are responsible for the extent of drug elimination and the intensity of drug effect. So available data on disposition and pharmacodynamics of drugs might be explained from another point of view that challenges current knowledge. Furthermore, the administration of cardiovascular active drugs might reverse the chronological sequence between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses, since they could modify blood flow distribution.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  18. Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Guardabassi, Luca; Papich, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs....... Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. ANIMALS: Six healthy dogs from a research colony were...... used in this study. METHODS: Dogs were administered 5 mg/kg intravenously and 10 mg/kg orally (p.o.) of minocycline hydrochloride in separate crossover experiments. In vivo drug concentrations in plasma and in ISF collected by ultrafiltration were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and residues of enrofloxacin in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anadón, A; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Díaz, M J; Bringas, P; Martínez, M A; Fernàndez-Cruz, M L; Fernández, M C; Fernández, R

    1995-04-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of enrofloxacin were determined in broiler chickens after single IV and orally administered doses of 10 mg/kg of body weight. After IV and oral administrations, the plasma concentration-time graph was characteristic of a two-compartment open model. The elimination half-life and the mean +/- SEM residence time of enrofloxacin for plasma were 10.29 +/- 0.45 and 9.65 +/- 0.48 hours, respectively, after IV administration and 14.23 +/- 0.46 and 15.30 +/- 0.53 hours, respectively, after oral administration. After single oral administration, enrofloxacin was absorbed slowly, with time to reach maximal plasma concentration of 1.64 +/- 0.04 hours. Maximal plasma concentration was 2.44 +/- 0.06 micrograms/ml. Oral bioavailability was found to be 64.0 +/- 0.2%. Statistically significant differences between the 2 routes of administration were found for the pharmacokinetic variables--half-lives of the distribution and elimination phase and apparent volume of distribution and volume of distribution at steady state. In chickens, enrofloxacin was extensively metabolized into ciprofloxacin. Residues of enrofloxacin and the major metabolite ciprofloxacin in fat, kidney, liver, lungs, muscles, and skin were measured in chickens that received an orally administered dose of 10 mg/kg once daily for 4 days. The results indicate that enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin residues were cleared slowly. Mean muscle, liver, and kidney concentrations of the metabolite ciprofloxacin ranging between 0.020 and 0.075 micrograms/g persisted on day 12 in chickens after dosing. However, at the time of slaughter (12 days), enrofloxacin residues were only detected in liver and mean +/- SEM concentration was 0.025 +/- 0.003 micrograms/g.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation (Inscop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Simmons, Rita; Buckey, Jay; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during early flight days of space missions. Orally administered scopolamine is commonly used by astronauts to prevent SMS. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent PO dose. Methods: To test the safety and reliability of INSCOP, two clinical studies were performed, a dose escalation study and a comparison study administering INSCOP during normal ambulation and head down tilt bedrest. Efficacy was evaluated by testing INSCOP with two, different motion sickness inducing paradigms. Results: Preliminary results indicate that INSCOP demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics and a low side effect profile. In head down tilt bedrest, relative bioavailability of INSCOP was increased for females at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) and for males at the higher dose (0.4 mg) but is reduced at the lower dose (0.2 mg) compared to normal ambulation. INSCOP displays gender specific differences during ABR. One of the treatment efficacy trials conducted at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center demonstrated that INSCOP is efficacious at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) in suppressing motion sickness symptoms as indicated by longer chair ride times with INSCOP administration than with placebo, and efficacy increases with dose. Similar results were seen using another motion sickness simulator, the motion simulator dome, at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, with significantly increased time in the dome in motion-susceptible subjects when using INSCOP compared to untreated controls. Conclusion: Higher bioavailability, linear pharmacokinetics, a low incidence of side effects, and a favorable efficacy profile make INSCOP a desirable formulation for prophylactic and rescue treatment of astronauts in space and military personnel on

  1. Relationship of quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics in fluoroquinolone antibacterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Die Cheng; Wei-Ren Xu; Chang-Xiao Liu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics (QSPkR) of fluoroquinolone antibacterials.METHODS: The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of oral fluoroquinolones were collected from the literature. These pharmacokinetic data were averaged, 19 compounds were used as the training set, and 3 served as the test set. Genetic function approximation (GFA)module of Cerius2 software was used in QSPkR analysis.RESULTS: A small volume and large polarizability and surface area of substituents at C-7 contribute to a large area under the curve (AUC) for fluoroquinolones. Large polarizability and small volume of substituents at N-1 contribute to a long half life elimination.CONCLUSION: QSPkR models can contribute to some fluoroquinolones antibacterials with excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of oral and intravenous melatonin in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette M;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin in healthy volunteers. METHODS: The study was performed as a cohort crossover study. The volunteers received either 10 mg oral melatonin or 10 mg intravenous melatonin on two separate study days. Blood samples were...... collected at different time points following oral administration and short iv infusion, respectively. Plasma melatonin concentrations were determined by RIA technique. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed by "the method of residuals" and compartmental analysis. The pharmacokinetic variables: k a, t 1...... max after short iv infusion of melatonin was 389,875.0 (174,775.0-440,362.5) pg ml(-1). Mean t 1/2 elimination was 39.4 (3.6) min, mean V d 1.2 (0.6) l kg(-1) and mean CL 0.0218 (0.0102) l min(-1) kg(-1). CONCLUSIONS: This cohort crossover study estimated pharmacokinetics of oral and iv melatonin...

  3. Dermal pharmacokinetics of microemulsion formulations determined by in vivo microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data....

  4. Application of pharmacokinetics local model to evaluate renal function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics local model was used to evaluate renal function.Some typical kinds of renal function cases, normal or disorder, were selected to be imaged with SPECT and those data measured were treated by the pharmacokinetics local model computer program (PLM).The results indicated that parameters, including peak value, peak time, inflexion time, half-excretion time, and kinetic equation played and importantrole in judging renal function.The fact confirms that local model isvery useful in evaluating renal function.

  5. The intravenous pharmacokinetics of diminazene in healthy dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Naidoo, V.; M.S.G. Mulders; Swan, G E

    2009-01-01

    Diminazene remains one of South Africa's most commonly used antiprotozoal agents for the management of babesiosis in dogs . Although the drug has been on the market for over 40 years, its intravenous pharmacokinetics are poorly known. To better understand the pharmacokinetics of the drug Berenil®, it was reconstituted in sterile water and administered intravenously to 6 adult German shepherd dogs. All 6 dogs demonstrated the previously described secondary peak in the plasma concentration vers...

  6. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of grapefruit flavanones in beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Mata Bilbao, María de Lourdes; Andrés Lacueva, Ma. Cristina; Roura, Elena; Jáuregui Pallarés, Olga; Escribano Ferrer, Elvira; Torre, Celina; Lamuela Raventós, Rosa Ma.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of three different grapefruit flavanone forms in dog plasma and demonstrated their absorption after an oral intake of a grapefruit extract; pharmacokinetic parameters of these forms were also determined. Ten healthy beagles were administered 70 mg citrus flavonoids as a grapefruit extract contained in capsules, while two additional dogs were used as controls and given an excipient. The grapefruit flavanone naringin, along with its metabolites n...

  7. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Li, Xiao; Chen, Mei-Ren; Qiao, Gui-Lin; Sun, Jian; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC) was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC) was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h⋅mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. PMID:27774090

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of a novel PDE5 inhibitor,SK-3530, in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye-hyun YOO; Nam-sun KIM; Guang-jin Im; Dong-hyun KIM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetic profile and tissue distribution of a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, 5-ethyl-2-{5-[4-(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-piperazine-1-sulfonyl]-2-propoxy-phenyl }-7-propyl-3,5-dihydro-pyrrolo(3,2-d)pyrimidin-4-one (SK-3530), in rats after administration of the 14C-labeled compound. Methods:The pharmacokinetic parameters of SK-3530 were measured based on the total radioactivity and parent SK-3530 concentration in rat plasma after intravenous and oral administration. The tissue distribution of total radioactivity after a single oral administration of [14C]SK-3530 at a dose of 40 mg/kg was assayed. The plasma protein binding rates of SK-3530 were assessed by in vitro and ex vivo assay. Results: The total radioactivity profiles showed linear pharmacokinetics.The maximum plasma concentration and area under the curve of the parent SK3530 were 10%-20% compared to those of the total radioactivity. After the oral admin-istration of [14C]SK-3530, the radioactivity was widely distributed in all tissues,and the tissue/plasma ratio of the radioactivity 1 h after administration was calcu-lated as 0.5-2.6 with the exception of excretory organs. A relatively high penetra-tion was shown in the adrenal glands, liver, and lung. In vitro and ex vivo plasma protein binding assay by ultrafiltration showed a considerably high binding rate of more than 97%. Conclusion: SK-3530 was relatively well absorbed in the gas-trointestinal tract and showed linear pharmacokinetics over the investigated dose range. SK-3530 had low oral bioavailability due to a high, first-pass metabolism.

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Penicillins, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides in the Neonate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Maria Pacifici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are common in the neonates and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Sixty percent of preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units received at least one antibiotic during the first week of life. Penicillins, aminoglycosides and cephalosporins comprised 53, 43 and 16%, respectively. Kinetic parameters such as the half-life (t1/2, clearance (Cl, and volume of distribution (Vd change with development, so the kinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides need to be studied in order to optimise therapy with these drugs. The aim of this study is to review the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate in a single article in order to provide a critical analysis of the literature and thus provide a useful tool in the hands of physicians. The bibliographic search was performed electronically using PubMed, as the search engine, until February 2nd, 2010. Medline search terms were as follows: pharmacokinetics AND (penicillins OR cephalosporins OR aminoglycosides AND infant, newborn, limiting to humans. Penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides are fairly water soluble and are mainly eliminated by the kidneys. The maturation of the kidneys governs the pharmacokinetics of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides in the neonate. The renal excretory function is reduced in preterms compared to term infants and Cl of these drugs is reduced in premature infants. Gestational and postnatal ages are important factors in the maturation of the neonate and, as these ages proceed, Cl of penicillins, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides increases. Cl and t1/2 are influenced by development and this must be taken into consideration when planning a dosage regimen with these drugs. More pharmacokinetic studies are required to ensure that the dose recommended for the treatment of sepsis in the neonate is evidence based.

  10. Preliminary single-dose pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Rob L; Isaza, Ramiro; Koch, David E; Pellerin, Marie A; Hunter, Robert P

    2006-03-01

    Pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in two male and four female adult ball pythons (Python regius) was determined after i.v. and p.o. administration of a single dose. Using a crossover design, each snake was given a single 10 mg/kg dose of marbofloxacin i.v. and p.o. Blood samples were collected prior to and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr after marbofloxacin administration. Marbofloxacin was quantitated by use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Following p.o. administration, marbofloxacin had a peak plasma concentration (Cmax) of 9.40 microg/ml and a time to Cmax (Tmax) of 9.0 hr. Based on the plasma pharmacokinetics generated in this study and pending any further studies to evaluate potential toxicity and multi-dose pharmacokinetics, we suggest a dosage for marbofloxacin in ball pythons of 10 mg/kg p.o. at least every 48 hr, depending on the sensitivity of the pathogen and as a basis for further research.

  11. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface. PMID:20176408

  12. Pharmacokinetic strategies to improve drug penetration and entrapment within solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Aljehani, Zekra K; Gazzaz, Rana W; Fakhri, Sarah H; Jabbad, Aisha H; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-12-10

    Despite the discovery of a large number of anticancer agents, cancer still remains among the leading causes of death since the middle of the twentieth century. Solid tumors possess a high degree of genetic instability and emergence of treatment resistance. Tumor resistance has emerged for almost all approved anticancer drugs and will most probably emerge for newly discovered anticancer agents as well. The use of pharmacokinetic approaches to increase anticancer drug concentrations within the solid tumor compartment and prolong its entrapment might diminish the possibility of resistance emergence at the molecular pharmacodynamic level and might even reverse tumor resistance. Several novel treatment modalities such as metronomic therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, vascular disrupting agents and tumor priming have been introduced to improve solid tumor treatment outcomes. In the current review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic aspect of these treatment modalities in addition to other older treatment modalities, such as extracellular matrix dissolving agents, extracellular matrix synthesis inhibitors, chemoembolization and cellular efflux pump inhibition. Many of these strategies showed variable degrees of success/failure; however, reallocating these modalities based on their influence on the intratumoral pharmacokinetics might improve their understanding and treatment outcomes. PMID:26342660

  13. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface.

  14. Modulation of pharmacokinetics of theophylline by antofloxacin, a novel 8-amino-fluoroquinolone, in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li LIU; Xian PAN; Hai-yan LIU; Xiao-dong LIU; Hui-wen YANG; Lin XIE; Jun-lin CHENG; Hong-wei FAN; Da-wei XIAO

    2011-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the pharmacokinetic interactions between theophylline and antofloxacin in vivo and in vitro.Methods:A randomized,5-day treatment and 3-way crossover design was documented in 12 healthy subjects.The subjects were orally administered with antofloxacin (400 mg on d 1 and 200 mg on d 2 to 5),theophylline (100 mg twice a day and morning dose 200 mg on d 1 and 5),or theophylline plus antofloxacin.The plasma and urinary pharmacokinetics of antofloxacin and theophylline were characterized after the first and last dose.The effect of antofioxacin on theophylline metabolism was also investigated in pooled human liver microsomes.Results:The 5-day treatment with antofioxacin significantly increased the area of the plasma concentration-time curve and peak plasma concentration of theophylline,accompanied by a decrease in the excretion of theophylline metabolites.On the contrary,theophylline did not affect the pharmacokinetics of antofloxacin.In vitro studies using pooled human hepatic microsomes demonstrated that antofloxacin was a weak reversible and mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP1A2.The clinical interaction between theophylline and antofloxacin was further validated by the in vitro results.Conclusion:The results showed that antofloxacin increases the plasma theophylline concentration,partly by acting as a mechanismbased inhibitor of CYP1A2.

  15. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of prodrugs of ibuprofen

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    Doshi Abha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of N-Mannich base derivatives of ibuprofenamide as prodrugs were performed on rabbits. Ibuprofen and both the prodrugs (IBMB-M and IBMB-P were administered orally and at different time intervals blood samples were collected and assayed for ibuprofen and ibuprofenamide by HPLC method. From the plasma concentration-time profile; (C p max , t max , AUC and the time required to achieve minimum effective concentration were calculated. N-Mannich base prodrugs first get hydrolyzed to ibuprofenamide which in turn gets hydrolyzed to ibuprofen by the enzyme amidase. The (C p max and AUC values of IBMB-M were found to be more compared to IBMB-P. In both the cases ibuprofen started appearing after 2 h and it required minimum 4 h to get the ibuprofen in therapeutic range. Both the prodrugs released ibuprofen slowly which gave sustained effect. IBMB-M provided ibuprofen in therapeutic range for 48 h and IBMB-P for 24 h.

  16. Determination of ifenprodil by LC–MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in healthy Chinese volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development and validation of an assay for ifenprodil based on liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study involving single and multiple intravenous infusions to healthy Chinese volunteers. After sample preparation of plasma by liquid–liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, the analyte and internal standard, urapidil, were separated by reversed phase chromatography in a run time of 4 min and detected by positive ion electrospray ionization followed by multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion transitions at m/z 326.2→308.1 for ifenprodil and m/z 388.4→205.3 for IS. The assay was linear in the concentration range 0.2–50.0 ng/mL with recovery >76.4%. In the pharmacokinetic study of single intravenous infusions of 5, 10 and 15 mg ifenprodil, peak plasma concentrations and areas under the plasma concentration–time curve were both linearly related to dose. In the pharmacokinetic study of multiple once daily intravenous infusions of 10 mg ifenprodil for 7 days, pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those after the single dose showing that ifenprodil does not accumulate on repeated administration.

  17. The effect of azithromycin on ivermectin pharmacokinetics--a population pharmacokinetic model analysis.

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    Ahmed El-Tahtawy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A recent drug interaction study reported that when azithromycin was administered with the combination of ivermectin and albendazole, there were modest increases in ivermectin pharmacokinetic parameters. Data from this study were reanalyzed to further explore this observation. A compartmental model was developed and 1,000 interaction studies were simulated to explore extreme high ivermectin values that might occur. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination and absorption was developed. The chosen final model had 7 fixed-effect parameters and 8 random-effect parameters. Because some of the modeling parameters and their variances were not distributed normally, a second mixture model was developed to further explore these data. The mixture model had two additional fixed parameters and identified two populations, A (55% of subjects, where there was no change in bioavailability, and B (45% of subjects, where ivermectin bioavailability was increased 37%. Simulations of the data using both models were similar, and showed that the highest ivermectin concentrations fell in the range of 115-201 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first pharmacokinetic model of ivermectin. It demonstrates the utility of two modeling approaches to explore drug interactions, especially where there may be population heterogeneity. The mechanism for the interaction was identified (an increase in bioavailability in one subpopulation. Simulations show that the maximum ivermectin exposures that might be observed during co-administration with azithromycin are below those previously shown to be safe and well tolerated. These analyses support further study of co-administration of azithromycin with the widely used agents ivermectin and albendazole, under field conditions in disease control programs.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol - Issues of Forensic Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A W

    2011-07-01

    A reliable method for the quantitative analysis of ethanol in microvolumes (50-100 μL) of blood became available in 1922, making it possible to investigate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of ethanol in healthy volunteers. The basic principles of ethanol pharmacokinetics were established in the 1930s, including the notion of zero-order elimination kinetics from blood and distribution of the absorbed dose into the total body water. The hepatic enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is primarily responsible for the oxidative metabolism of ethanol. This enzyme was purified and characterized in the early 1950s and shown to have a low Michaelis constant (km), being about ~0.1 g/L. Liver ADH is therefore saturated with substrate after the first couple of drinks and for all practical purposes the concentration-time (C-T) profiles of ethanol are a good approximation to zero-order kinetics. However, because of dose-dependent saturation kinetics, the entire postabsorptive declining part of the blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) curve looks more like a hockey stick rather than a straight line. A faster rate of ethanol elimination from blood in habituated individuals (alcoholics) is explained by participation of a high km microsomal enzyme (CYP2E1), which is inducible after a period of chronic heavy drinking. Owing to the combined influences of genetic and environmental factors, one expects a roughly threefold difference in elimination rates of ethanol from blood (0.1-0.3 g/L/h) between individuals. The volume of distribution (Vd) of ethanol, which depends on a person's age, gender, and proportion of fat to lean body mass, shows a twofold variation between individuals (0.4-0.8 L/kg). This forensic science review traces the development of forensic pharmacokinetics of ethanol from a historical perspective, followed by a discussion of important issues related to the disposition and fate of ethanol in the body, including (a) quantitative evaluation of

  19. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacokinetic analysis of intramuscular depots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Mareike; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Scheuch, Eberhard; Seidlitz, Anne; Hadlich, Stefan; Evert, Katja; Oswald, Stefan; Siegmund, Werner; Weitschies, Werner

    2016-04-10

    The present pilot study introduces a method that might give novel insights in drug absorption processes from intramuscularly administered depots. An oily suspension or an aqueous solution of paracetamol (6 mg/kg body mass), prednisolone or its hemisuccinate sodium salt for the aqueous solutions (10mg/kg body mass) or diclofenac (10mg/kg body mass) was injected into the muscle tissue of the hind leg of female Lewis-rats (n=47). For the oily suspensions the micronized particles were suspended in medium-chain triglycerides. The aqueous solutions were buffered to a pH of 7.4 ± 0.5. Polyethylene glycol was added as a cosolvent in the formulations containing paracetamol (acetaminophen) and diclofenac and sodium chloride was added to the aqueous solutions of prednisolone hemisuccinate sodium to achieve nearly isotonic formulations. The formed depot was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and characterized with regard to volume and surface area. A 7 T-small animal scanner was used and T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences including a fat saturation were performed. Simultaneously blood samples were taken and the drugs were quantitatively analyzed. The water based solvent and the oily dispersion agent were visible in the MRI images without the use of contrast agents. Since a free hand injection mostly led to an application directly into the fascia, resulting in a fast removal of the depot, MRI-guided injection was conducted. Comparing pharmacokinetic data with MRI data it was observed that maximal blood levels occurred before the solvent and the dispersion agent were removed from the muscle tissue. Thus, the drug is not absorbed together with the depot. Furthermore, no correlation was found between the shape of the depot and the rate of absorption. Consequently, a higher surface area or volume of the depot did not result in a faster release or absorption of the drugs from the tested formulations. In contrast to the paracetamol and prednisolone formulations the

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of olprinone in healthy male volunteers

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    Kunisawa T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Takayuki Kunisawa,1 Hidefumi Kasai,2 Makoto Suda,2 Manabu Yoshimura,3 Ami Sugawara,3 Yuki Izumi,3 Takafumi Iida,3 Atsushi Kurosawa,3 Hiroshi Iwasaki3 1Surgical Operation Department, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan; 2Clinical Study Management Division, Bell Medical Solutions Inc, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido, Japan Background: Olprinone decreases the cardiac preload and/or afterload because of its vasodilatory effect and increases myocardial contractility by inhibiting phosphodiesterase III. Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of olprinone after a single continuous infusion in healthy male volunteers. Methods: We used 500 plasma concentration data points collected from nine healthy male volunteers for the study. The population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the nonlinear mixed effect model (NONMEM® software. Results: The time course of plasma concentration of olprinone was best described using a two-compartment model. The final pharmacokinetic parameters were total clearance (7.37 mL/minute/kg, distribution volume of the central compartment (134 mL/kg, intercompartmental clearance (7.75 mL/minute/kg, and distribution volume of the peripheral compartment (275 mL/kg. The interindividual variability in the total clearance was 12.4%, and the residual error variability (exponential and additive were 22.2% and 0.129 (standard deviation. The final pharmacokinetic model was assessed using a bootstrap method and visual predictive check. Conclusion: We developed a population pharmacokinetic model of olprinone in healthy male adults. The bootstrap method and visual predictive check showed that this model was appropriate. Our results might be used to develop the population pharmacokinetic model in patients. Keywords: phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, men, pharmacokinetic model

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J

    2016-05-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and target concentration intervention (TCI) have significantly contributed to the success of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Compared with solid organ transplantation, alloHCT is unique because of the potential for bidirectional reactions (i.e. host-versus-graft and graft-versus-host). Postgraft immunosuppression typically includes a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and a short course of methotrexate after high-dose myeloablative conditioning, or a calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil after reduced-intensity conditioning. There are evolving roles for the antithymyocyte globulins (ATGs) and sirolimus as postgraft immunosuppression. A review of the pharmacokinetics and TCI of the main postgraft immunosuppressants is presented in this two-part review. All immunosuppressants are characterized by large intra- and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability and by narrow therapeutic indices. It is essential to understand immunosuppressants' pharmacokinetic properties and how to use them for individualized treatment incorporating TCI to improve outcomes. TCI, which is mandatory for the calcineurin inhibitors and sirolimus, has become an integral part of postgraft immunosuppression. TCI is usually based on trough concentration monitoring, but other approaches include measurement of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over the dosing interval or limited sampling schedules with maximum a posteriori Bayesian personalization approaches. Interpretation of pharmacodynamic results is hindered by the prevalence of studies enrolling only a small number of patients, variability in the allogeneic graft source and variability in postgraft immunosuppression. Given the curative potential of alloHCT, the pharmacodynamics of these immunosuppressants deserves to be explored in depth. Development of

  2. PKreport: report generation for checking population pharmacokinetic model assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Graphics play an important and unique role in population pharmacokinetic (PopPK model building by exploring hidden structure among data before modeling, evaluating model fit, and validating results after modeling. Results The work described in this paper is about a new R package called PKreport, which is able to generate a collection of plots and statistics for testing model assumptions, visualizing data and diagnosing models. The metric system is utilized as the currency for communicating between data sets and the package to generate special-purpose plots. It provides ways to match output from diverse software such as NONMEM, Monolix, R nlme package, etc. The package is implemented with S4 class hierarchy, and offers an efficient way to access the output from NONMEM 7. The final reports take advantage of the web browser as user interface to manage and visualize plots. Conclusions PKreport provides 1 a flexible and efficient R class to store and retrieve NONMEM 7 output, 2 automate plots for users to visualize data and models, 3 automatically generated R scripts that are used to create the plots; 4 an archive-oriented management tool for users to store, retrieve and modify figures, 5 high-quality graphs based on the R packages, lattice and ggplot2. The general architecture, running environment and statistical methods can be readily extended with R class hierarchy. PKreport is free to download at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/PKreport/index.html.

  3. Antimicrobial breakpoint estimation accounting for variability in pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekka Fahima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD indices are increasingly being used in the microbiological field to assess the efficacy of a dosing regimen. In contrast to methods using MIC, PK/PD-based methods reflect in vivo conditions and are more predictive of efficacy. Unfortunately, they entail the use of one PK-derived value such as AUC or Cmax and may thus lead to biased efficiency information when the variability is large. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment by adjusting classical breakpoint estimation methods to the situation of variable PK profiles. Methods and results We propose a logical generalisation of the usual AUC methods by introducing the concept of "efficiency" for a PK profile, which involves the efficacy function as a weight. We formulated these methods for both classes of concentration- and time-dependent antibiotics. Using drug models and in silico approaches, we provide a theoretical basis for characterizing the efficiency of a PK profile under in vivo conditions. We also used the particular case of variable drug intake to assess the effect of the variable PK profiles generated and to analyse the implications for breakpoint estimation. Conclusion Compared to traditional methods, our weighted AUC approach gives a more powerful PK/PD link and reveals, through examples, interesting issues about the uniqueness of therapeutic outcome indices and antibiotic resistance problems.

  4. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intranasal Scopolamine in Plasma Saliva and Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2015-01-01

    An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS). The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under IND (Investigational New Drug) guidelines. The aim of the project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationships among plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trial protocol with INSCOP. Twelve healthy human subjects were administered at three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min to 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. PK compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling time, were established using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL (i.e. log-likelihood ratio test)) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. The results: Predictable correlations among scopolamine concentrations in compartments of plasma, saliva and urine were established, and for the first time the model satisfactorily predicted the population and individual PK of INSCOP in plasma, saliva and urine. The model can be utilized to predict the INSCOP plasma concentration by saliva and urine data, and it will be useful for monitoring the PK of scopolamine in space and other remote environments using non-invasive sampling of saliva and/or urine.

  5. Validity of a two-point acetaminophen pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone, J M; Greenblatt, D J; Blyden, G T; Luna, B G; Harmatz, J S

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single 650-mg intravenous dose of acetaminophen were determined in 82 volunteers using multiple (13 or more) plasma acetaminophen concentrations measured by high pressure liquid chromatography during 24 h after dosage. Kinetic values from the complete study were compared with kinetic estimates based on only two data points: (a) the 2- and 6-h points only; and (b) the 3 and 6-h points only. For elimination half-life, values from the complete study (mean 2.42 h) were highly correlated (r = 0.87 and 0.84) with methods a and b (means 2.41 and 2.43 h), with regression slopes of 1.00 and 0.99, respectively. For clearance, the complete study values (mean 312 ml/min) were highly correlated (r = 0.97 and 0.97) with method a and b values, but both two-point methods significantly overestimated clearance (means 350 and 355 ml/min) by an average of 13 and 14%, respectively. Results for volume of distribution were similar to those for clearance. Although acetaminophen elimination half-life can be estimated with reasonable precision using a two-point blood-sampling procedure, clearance and volume of distribution values using the two-point method overestimate the actual values. PMID:2305419

  6. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of chitosan in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Han, Baoqin; Niu, Shuyi; Dong, Wen; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan, an excellent biomedical material, has received a widespread in vivo application. In contrast, its metabolism and distribution once being implanted were less documented. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and muscle implantation administrated chitosan in rats were investigated with fluorescence spectrophotometry, histological assay and gel chromatography. After implantation, chitosan was degraded gradually during its distribution to diverse organs. Among the tested organs, liver and kidney were found to be the first two highest in chitosan content, which was followed by heart, brain and spleen. Urinary excretion was believed to be the major pathway of chitosan elimination, yet 80% of chitosan administered to rats was not trackable in their urine. This indicated that the majority of chitosan was degraded in tissues. In average, the molecular weight of the degradation products of chitosan in diverse organs and urine was found to be <65 kDa. This further confirmed the in vivo degradation of chitosan. Our findings provided new evidences for the intensive and safe application of chitosan as a biomedical material.

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Bosutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Richat; Hsyu, Poe-Hirr

    2016-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative stem cell disorder. Bosutinib is an oral, once-daily SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with very potent inhibitory activity. Bosutinib is effective against all phases of intolerant or resistant Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML that do not harbor the T315I or V299LABL kinase domain mutations. Peak plasma concentrations of bosutinib occur at 4-6 h following oral administration, and dose-proportional increases in exposure are observed at doses ranging from 200 to 800 mg. Absorption of bosutinib increases with food. Bosutinib is distributed extensively into the tissues. It is highly plasma protein bound (94 %) and is primarily metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 3A4. Bosutinib is well tolerated overall and has a unique but manageable toxicity profile. This article provides a review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction data on bosutinib in healthy subjects, patients with CML, and special populations.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of eslicarbazepine acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialer, Meir; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2012-06-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel once-daily antiepileptic drug (AED) approved in Europe since 2009 that was found to be efficacious and well tolerated in a phase III clinical program in adult patients with partial onset seizures previously not controlled with treatment with one to three AEDs, including carbamazepine (CBZ). ESL shares with CBZ and oxcarbazepine (OXC) the dibenzazepine nucleus bearing the 5-carboxamide substitute, but is structurally different at the 10,11 position. This molecular variation results in differences in metabolism, preventing the formation of toxic epoxide metabolites such as carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. Unlike OXC, which is metabolized to both eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine, ESL is extensively converted to eslicarbazepine. The systemic exposure to eslicarbazepine after ESL oral administration is approximately 94% of the parent dose, with minimal exposure to (R)-licarbazepine and OXC. After ESL oral administration, the effective half-life (t(1/2,eff) ) of eslicarbazepine was 20-24 h, which is approximately two times longer than its terminal half-life (t(1/2)). At clinically relevant doses (400-1,600 mg/day) ESL has linear pharmacokinetics (PK) with no effects of gender or moderate liver impairment. However, because eslicarbazepine is eliminated primarily (66%) by renal excretion, dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment. Eslicarbazepine clearance is induced by phenobarbital, phenytoin, and CBZ and it dose-dependently decreases plasma exposure of oral contraceptive and simvastatin. PMID:22612290

  9. Pharmacokinetic interaction of intravenous fentanyl with ketoconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina S; Skopp, Gisela; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is primarily metabolized by CYP3A, but has also been suggested to act as a weak inhibitor of CYP3A. We investigated the influence of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered fentanyl and the effect of fentanyl on CYP3A activity. A prospective, open-label, randomized, monocentre, crossover study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers. They received fentanyl alone (5 microgram per kilogram) or fentanyl plus ketoconazole (200 milligram orally B.I.D. over 2 days). Naloxone (2 × 0.2 milligram i.v.) was given simultaneously with fentanyl to mitigate any opioid effect. Midazolam was administered as a CYP3A probe drug. Fentanyl and its metabolites were quantified by LC/MS/MS in blood and urine samples obtained over 24 hour. Exposure of fentanyl (AUC0- ∞ ) was significantly increased to 133% and systemic clearance was reduced to 78% by ketoconazole, norfentanyl formation was significantly delayed and partial metabolic clearance decreased to 18%. Fentanyl had no influence on midazolam exposure and CYP3A activity whereas ketoconazole decreased CYP3A activity to 13%. Although fentanyl N-dealkylation is substantially inhibited by ketoconazole, exposure of fentanyl itself increased by one third only. Clinically fentanyl dosage adjustments may become necessary when ketoconazole or other strong CYP3A inhibitors are given simultaneously. Fentanyl itself does not influence CYP3A activity.

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiem, Sungmin; Ryu, Sung-Mun; Lee, Yun-Mi; Schentag, Jerome J; Kim, Yang-Wook; Kim, Hyeon-Kuk; Jang, Hang-Jae; Joo, Yong-Don; Jin, Kyubok; Shin, Jae-Gook; Ghim, Jong-Lyul

    2016-08-01

    Levofloxacin (LVFX) has different effects depending on the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio. While AUC can be expressed as dose/clearance (CL), we measured serial concentrations of LVFX in Koreans and tried to set a Korean-specific equation, estimating the CL of the antibiotic. In total, 38 patients, aged 18-87 years, received once daily intravenous LVFX doses of 500 mg or 250 mg, depending on their renal function. Four plasma samples were obtained according to a D optimal sampling design. The population pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of LVFX were estimated using non-linear mixed-effect modeling (NONMEM, ver. 7.2). The CL of LVFX was dependent on creatinine clearance (CLCR) as a covariate. The mean population PK parameters of LVFX in Koreans were as follows: CL (l/hour) = 6.19 ×  (CLCR/75)(1.32). The CL of LVFX in Koreans is expected to be lower than that in Western people. PMID:25976699

  11. Pattern Recognition in Pharmacokinetic Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Meibohm, Bernd; Weiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a key element in pharmacokinetic data analyses when first selecting a model to be regressed to data. We call this process going from data to insight and it is an important aspect of exploratory data analysis (EDA). But there are very few formal ways or strategies that scientists typically use when the experiment has been done and data collected. This report deals with identifying the properties of a kinetic model by dissecting the pattern that concentration-time data reveal. Pattern recognition is a pivotal activity when modeling kinetic data, because a rigorous strategy is essential for dissecting the determinants behind concentration-time courses. First, we extend a commonly used relationship for calculation of the number of potential model parameters by simultaneously utilizing all concentration-time courses. Then, a set of points to consider are proposed that specifically addresses exploratory data analyses, number of phases in the concentration-time course, baseline behavior, time delays, peak shifts with increasing doses, flip-flop phenomena, saturation, and other potential nonlinearities that an experienced eye catches in the data. Finally, we set up a series of equations related to the patterns. In other words, we look at what causes the shapes that make up the concentration-time course and propose a strategy to construct a model. By practicing pattern recognition, one can significantly improve the quality and timeliness of data analysis and model building. A consequence of this is a better understanding of the complete concentration-time profile.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mivacurium in young adult and elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Doris; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen; Pedersen, N.A.;

    2002-01-01

    age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers......age factors; butyrylcholinesterase; cholinesterase; dose-response curves; enzymes; metabolites; mivacurium; neuromuscular relaxants; pharmacodynamics; pharmacokinetics; pharmacology; pseudocholinesterase; stereoisomers...

  13. Improving the pharmacokinetic and CYP inhibition profiles of azaxanthene-based glucocorticoid receptor modulators-identification of (S)-5-(2-(9-fluoro-2-(4-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-chromeno[2,3-b]pyridin-5-yl)-2-methylpropanamido)-N-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-carboxamide (BMS-341).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Michael G; Dhar, T G Murali; Xiao, Zili; Xiao, Hai-Yun; Duan, James J-W; Jiang, Bin; Galella, Michael A; Cunningham, Mark; Wang, Jinhong; Habte, Sium; Shuster, David; McIntyre, Kim W; Carman, Julie; Holloway, Deborah A; Somerville, John E; Nadler, Steven G; Salter-Cid, Luisa; Barrish, Joel C; Weinstein, David S

    2015-05-28

    An empirical approach to improve the microsomal stability and CYP inhibition profile of lead compounds 1a and 1b led to the identification of 5 (BMS-341) as a dissociated glucocorticoid receptor modulator. Compound 5 showed significant improvements in pharmacokinetic properties and, unlike compounds 1a-b, displayed a linear, dose-dependent pharmacokinetic profile in rats. When tested in a chronic model of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rat, the ED50 of 5 (0.9 mg/kg) was superior to that of both 1a and 1b (8 and 17 mg/kg, respectively). PMID:25905990

  14. The influence of morbid obesity on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adolescents and adults : focus on propofol and nadroparin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepstraten, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    For most commonly used drugs in morbidly obese patients evidence based dosing guidelines are not available. Therefore, current dosing is based on experience of the prescriber rather than on clinical evidence. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics data in non-obese patients are extrapolated without pr

  15. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an Abbreviated New Drug Application; Availability AGENCY: Food... Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an ANDA.'' This guidance provides recommendations to... Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an ANDA.'' The guidance is applicable...

  16. Study to Evaluate the Effect of Rifampicin, Ketoconazole, and Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Sativex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Known Inducer of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a Potent Inhibitor of CYP3A4; Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics of Sativex in the Absence and Presence of a CYP2C19 Inhibitor.

  17. Image-driven pharmacokinetics: nanomedicine concentration across space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dab A; MacKay, J Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) primarily measures the concentration of drugs in the blood. For nanomedicines it may be more relevant to determine concentration within a target tissue. The emerging field of image-driven PK, which utilizes clinically accepted molecular imaging technology, empirically and noninvasively, measures concentration in multiple tissues. Image-driven PK represents the intersection of PK and biodistribution, combining to provide models of concentration across space and time. Image-driven PK can be used both as a research tool and in the clinic. This review explores the history of pharmacokinetics, technologies used in molecular imaging (especially positron emission tomography) and research using image-driven pharmacokinetic analysis. When standardized, image-driven PK may have significant implications in preclinical development as well as clinical optimization of targeted nanomedicines.

  18. Cardiovascular Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics for the Clinical Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleder, Anna T; Kalus, James; Lanfear, David E

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical cardiovascular practice requires a clinician to have a strong foundation in multiple aspects of pharmacology. Modern cardiovascular regimens are complex, and optimal management, application of evolving guidelines, and adoption of new therapies build off a more basic understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In addition, it is likely time to add a third pillar into this discussion, the expanding field of pharmacogenomics referring to the genetic influences on drug response. This field has increasing applications in medicine and clearly holds significant promise for cardiovascular disease management. Awareness of pharmacogenomic advances and the fundamentals of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can help the clinician more easily deliver great care. Here we attempt to briefly summarize and simplify key concepts of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics relevant to the cardiovascular disease practitioner.

  19. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  20. Modeling in biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics homogeneous and heterogeneous approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Macheras, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art in Biopharmaceutics, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics Modeling is presented in this new second edition book. It shows how advanced physical and mathematical methods can expand classical models in order to cover heterogeneous drug-biological processes and therapeutic effects in the body. The book is divided into four parts; the first deals with the fundamental principles of fractals, diffusion and nonlinear dynamics; the second with drug dissolution, release, and absorption; the third with epirical, compartmental, and stochastic pharmacokinetic models, with two new chapters, one on fractional pharmacokinetics and one on bioequivalence; and the fourth mainly with classical and nonclassical aspects of pharmacodynamics. The classical models that have relevance and application to these sciences are also considered throughout. This second edition has new information on reaction limited models of dissolution, non binary biopharmaceutic classification system, time varying models, and interf...

  1. Pharmacokinetics of aerosol amphotericin B in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Y; Bernard, E M; Schmitt, H J; Tong, W P; Edwards, F F; Armstrong, D

    1990-01-01

    The distributions of amphotericin B (AmB) in tissue were compared after intraperitoneal or aerosol administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after receiving single or repeated daily doses; AmB concentrations in tissues were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. After intraperitoneal doses of 4 mg/kg of body weight per day for 7 days, mean concentrations of AmB were 122.7, 55.2, and 4.31 micrograms/g in the spleen, liver, and lung, respectively. After aerosol doses (aero-AmB) of 1.6 mg/kg per day, the mean concentrations of AmB in the lung were 2.79 micrograms/g after a single dose and 9.88 micrograms/g after four doses, while the drug was undetectable (less than 0.1 micrograms/g) in serum, spleen, liver, kidney, and brain. The half-life of elimination of AmB from the lungs was 4.8 days according to serial sacrifices done after a single dose of 3.2 mg of aero-AmB per kg. Treatment with 60 mg of aero-AmB per kg was well tolerated and produced no histopathologic changes in the lungs. The aerosol route was much more efficient than the systemic route in delivering AmB to the lungs, and it limited the accumulation of AmB in other organs. Because AmB is eliminated slowly, infrequent dosing schedules can be used. These pharmacokinetic characteristics and its proven effectiveness in an animal model make aero-AmB a highly promising new method for the prevention of pulmonary aspergillosis. Aero-AmB should also be considered for use as an adjunct to intravenous AmB for treatment of fungal pneumonias. PMID:2327759

  2. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007).

  3. A framework incorporating the impact of exposure scenarios and application conditions on risk assessment of chemicals applied to skin

    OpenAIRE

    Dancik, Yuri; Troutman, John A; Jaworska, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose 1. To develop a framework for exposure calculation via the dermal route to meet the needs of 21st century toxicity testing and refine current approaches; 2. To demonstrate the impact of exposure scenario and application conditions on the plasma concentration following dermal exposure. Method A workflow connecting a dynamic skin penetration model with a generic whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed. The impact of modifying exposure scenarios and ap...

  4. Advances in Studies on Chemistry,Pharmacological Effect,and Pharmacokinetics of Eurycoma longifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Wen-bin; XIAO Xue-feng; GUO Wei; ZHANG Tie-jun

    2011-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia,also known as Tongkat Ali in Malaysia,as one of traditional herbal medicines,is used for centuries in South-East Asia.With the discovery of anticancer and anti-HIV properties,this herbal medicine has attracted great attention recently.In this review,the following information on E.longifolia,including chemistry,bioactivities,pharmacokinetics,clinical studies,and side effects and safety,was introduced.Our results,to a certain extent,will provide scientific base for commercial utilization and clearance of the Tongkat Ali products with regard to consumers' safety.

  5. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of methadone in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Blemmer, T; Angelo, H R;

    1996-01-01

    Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported. The analge......Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported...

  6. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters.METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans...... with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps...... of model rate constants k₁, k₃ and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake.RESULTS: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k₁ (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer...

  7. Pharmacokinetic behavior and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration of marbofloxacin after subcutaneous administration in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dova, Samanta Waxman; San Andrés, M Dolores; González, Fernando; San Andrés, Manuel I; De Lucas, José J; Rodríguez, Casilda

    2007-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic behavior of marbofloxacin was studied in goats after single-dose subcutaneous (SC) administration of 2mg/kg bodyweight. Drug concentration in plasma was determined by high performance liquid chromatography and the data obtained were subjected to non-compartmental kinetic analysis. Marbofloxacin peak plasma concentration (C(max)=1.77+/-0.24microg/mL) was reached 1.25+/-0.50h (T(max)) after SC administration. The elimination half-life (t(1/2beta)) and area under curve (AUC) were 5.74+/-1.21h and 8.15 vs 2.33microg h/mL, respectively. Taking into account the values obtained for the efficacy indices, it was concluded that a SC dose of 2mg/kg/24h of marbofloxacin could be adequate to treat infections caused by high susceptible bacteria like Escherichia coli or Salmonella spp.

  8. Improving Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling to Investigate Anti-Infective Chemotherapy with Application to the Current Generation of Antimalarial Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Kay; Hastings, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling is the standard computational technique for simulating drug treatment of infectious diseases with the potential to enhance our understanding of drug treatment outcomes, drug deployment strategies, and dosing regimens. Standard methodologies assume only a single drug is used, it acts only in its unconverted form, and that oral drugs are instantaneously absorbed across the gut wall to their site of action. For drugs with short ha...

  9. Sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes significantly enhance the pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties of vincristine in murine and human tumour models.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M S; Harasym, T. O.; Masin, D.; Bally, M. B.; Mayer, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study reports on the development of a liposomal formulation of vincristine with significantly enhanced stability and biological properties. The in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic, tumour delivery and efficacy properties of liposomal vincristine formulations based on sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol were compared with liposomes composed of distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) and cholesterol. SM/cholesterol liposomes had significantly greater in vitro stability than did similar DSPC/c...

  10. The pharmacokinetic effect of coadministration of apremilast and methotrexate in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Nissel, James; Wu, Anfan; Lau, Henry; Palmisano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Apremilast is a novel agent for the treatment of inflammatory based autoimmune disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic effects of co administration of apremilast and methotrexate on both agents. This was an open-label, multi-center, 3-treatment period, sequential study conducted in otherwise healthy subjects with psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis who were receiving a stable oral dose of methotrexate between 7.5 to 20 mg once weekly. Subjects received...

  11. PKQuest: capillary permeability limitation and plasma protein binding – application to human inulin, dicloxacillin and ceftriaxone pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Background It is generally assumed that the tissue exchange of antibiotics is flow limited (complete equilibration between the capillary and the tissue water). This assumption may not be valid if there is a large amount of plasma protein binding because the effective capillary permeability depends on the product of the intrinsic capillary permeability (PS) and the fraction of solute that is free in the blood (fwB). PKQuest, a new generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic software routine ...

  12. Lopinavir/ritonavir significantly influences pharmacokinetic exposure of artemether/lumefantrine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

    OpenAIRE

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Lamorde, Mohammed; Okaba-Kayom, Violet; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Katabira, Elly; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Pakker, Nadine; Dorlo, Thomas P. C.; Tarning, Joel; Lindegardh, Niklas; de Vries, Peter J; Back, David; Khoo, Saye; Merry, Concepta

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of HIV/malaria-coinfected patients with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemisinin-based combination therapy has potential for drug interactions. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of artemether, dihydroartemisinin and lumefantrine after administration of a single dose of 80/480 mg of artemether/lumefantrine to HIV-infected adults, taken with and without lopinavir/ritonavir. Methods A two-arm parallel study of 13 HIV-infected ART-naive adults and 16 HIV-infected adult...

  13. Pharmacokinetic Study on Hyperoside in Beagle's Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Guo; HUANG Zheng-ming; LIU Chang-xiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a simple,rapid,sensitive,and reproducible HPLC method for determination of hyperoside in plasma of dogs and for the subsequent pharmacokinetic (PK) study.Methods An accurate and reproducible HPLC-UV method was developed and validated for the determination of hyperoside in plasma of dogs,using kaempferol as internal standard.The plasma samples of dogs following ig administration of hyperoside were analyzed for the detection of quercetin after enzymatic hydrolysis treatment with combined β-glucuronidase and sulphatase.The analytes were separated on a Diamonsil C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm,5 μm).The mobile phase consisted of methanol-buffer solution (0.1mol/L NH4Ac + 0.3 mmol/L EDTA-Na2)-acetic acid (60:40:1) and was delivered at a flow rate of 1mL/min.The UV detector was set at 370 nm and the column temperature was maintained at 35 ℃.The sample injection volume was 20 μL.Data were collected and analyzed using the ANASTAR software.PK parameters were calculated with DAS software (2.0).Results Linear relationships were validated over the range of 0.01-1μg/mL for hyperoside (r =0.9997).The intra-and inter-day precision values for all samples were within 10.0%,and the accuracies of intra-and inter-day assays were within the range of 92.4%-102.4%.The validated method was successfully used to determine the hyperoside concentration in plasma of dogs for up to 12 h,after a single ig administration (25 mg/kg).The mean PK parameters for male and female dogs were as follows:Cmax (0.18 ± 0.05) and (0.16 ± 0.05) μg/mL,AUC0-∞ (0.79 ± 0.34) and (0.86 ± 0.27) μg/(mL·h),t1/2(ka) (0.89 ± 0.41) and (0.88 ± 0.28) h,respectively.Statistical analysis on the PK of hyperoside in male and female groups showed that sex had no significant impact on the PK of hyperoside (P > 0.05).Conclusion The method is able and sufficient to be used in drug PK studies of hyperoside.

  14. Specific pharmacokinetic aspects of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, Cees; Krauwinkel, Walter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for "specific" pharmacokinetics playing a role in currently marketed drugs intended to treat lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms. Principles of drug targeting include intrinsic properties of drugs or organs as well as drug formulations to modify drug release or to create confinement of drug presence. Prodrugs and specific formulations to deliver high drug concentrations at the site(s) of action as well as other ways to manipulate drug distribution to achieve enrichment in target tissues are considered. In overactive bladder (OAB), specific formulations for oxybutynin have been introduced to reduce the level of side effects of the active drug. Extended release tablet formulations and a topical gel formulation have been introduced, with efficacy similar to immediate release (IR) tablets, but with a reduction in anticholinergic adverse effects. However, these modifications have not led to outstanding performance parameters compared to other anticholinergic drugs marketed as IR formulations. Urinary excretion is discussed as potential mechanism for targeting LUT symptoms, but no strong indications appear to exist that this mechanism would contribute for currently available drugs. Intravesical administration of drugs is not a preferred option and only considered for drugs like botulinum toxin, where the inconvenient application compensates for a reasonable degree of long-term efficacy in severe refractory OAB. Alpha acid glycoprotein binding is discussed as a potential factor to influence drug tissue distribution, and it is concluded that there is reasonable evidence that for tamsulosin this mechanism is responsible for the difference in free fraction of the drug observed in plasma and prostate, which could contribute to its relative absence of blood pressure effects in patients with LUT symptoms related to benign prostate hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). The principle of irreversible inhibition of type II 5α-reductase as a tool to develop drugs

  15. Clinical pharmacokinetics of vasodilators. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, R; Nelson, K; Kirsten, D; Heintz, B

    1998-07-01

    Stimulating cardiac beta 1-adrenoceptors with oxyfedrine causes dilatation of coronary vessels and positive inotropic effects on the myocardium. beta 1-adrenergic agonists increase coronary blood flow in nonstenotic and stenotic vessels. The main indication for the use of the phosphodiesterase inhibitors pamrinone, mirinone, enoximone and piroximone is acute treatment of severe congestive heart failure. Theophylline is indicated for the treatment of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, apnea in preterm infants ans sleep apnea syndrome. Severe arterial occlusive disease associated with atherosclerosis can be beneficially affected by elcosanoids. These drugs must be administered parenterally and have a half-life of only a few minutes. Sublingual or buccal preparations of nitrates are the only prompt method (within 1 or 2 min) of terminating anginal pain, except for biting nifedipine capsules. The short half-life (about 2.5 min) of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate) makes long term therapy impossible. Tolerance is a problem encountered with longer-acting nitric oxide donors. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetic properties of vasodilating drugs can prevent a too sudden and severe blood pressure decrease in patients with chronic hypertension. In considering the administration of a second dose, or another drug, the time necessary for the initially administered drug to reach maximal efficacy should be taken into account. In hypertensive emergencies urapidil, sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, hydralazine and phentolamine are the drugs of choice, with the addition of beta-blockers during catecholamine crisis or dissecting aortic aneurysm. Childhood hypertension is most often treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or calcium antagonists, primarily nifedipine. Because of the teratogenic risk involved with ACE inhibitors, extreme caution must be exercised when prescribing for adolescent females. The propagation of health benefits to breast

  16. Combined analysis of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data of preclinical studies with statins markedly improves translation of drug efficacy to human trialss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, E. van de; Kleemann, R.; Jansen, H.T.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Offerman, E.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; DeGroot, J.

    2013-01-01

    Correct prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and the safety and efficacy of novel compounds based on preclinical data, is essential but often fails. In the current study, we aimed to improve the predictive value of ApoE*3Leiden (E3L) trans-genic mice regarding the cholesterol-lowering efficacy

  17. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  18. Molecular pharmacokinetic determinants of anticancer kinase inhibitors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Scholler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the published data regarding the molecular determinants (drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and orphan nuclear receptors of approved anticancer kinase inhibitors pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition and drug–drug interactions is also discussed.

  19. In vitro metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies on methylone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Just; Petersen, Trine Hedebrink; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant designer drug methylone (methylenedioxymethcathinone) has been documented in most parts of the world. As with many of the new designer drugs that continuously appear in the illicit drug market, little is known about the pharmacokinetics of methylone. Using in vitro studies...

  20. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of intraperitoneal topotecan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, LS; de Vries, EGE; van der Zee, AGJ; Beijnen, JH; Rosing, H; Mulder, NH; Aalders, JG; Willemse, PHB

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pharmacology of intraperitoneal (IP) topotecan. Patients and methods: Fifteen patients with recurrent ovarian cancer in a phase I trial were treated with escalating IP topotecan doses (5-30 mg/m(2)) for pharmacokinetic analysis. Results: Dose limiting toxicit

  1. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorononanoic acid in Rats and Mice*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) is found at low concentrations in the environment, but is also detectable in humans and wildlife. Previous studies have examined the pharmacokinetics (PK) of lower carbon-chain PFAAs, such as perfluorobut...

  2. Pharmacokinetics of ruminally-dosed sodium chlorate in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recently recognized potential of sodium chlorate as a possible pre-harvest food safety tool in meat animals has spurred interest in the pharmacokinetics of intraruminally-dosed chlorate. Six Loala cattle were assigned (one heifer and one steer per treatment) to one of three intraruminal doses of...

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of abacavir in infants, toddlers and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, W.; Piana, C.; Danhof, M.; Burger, D.M.; Pasqua, O. Della; Jacqz-Aigrain, E.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To characterize the pharmacokinetics of abacavir in infants, toddlers and children and to assess the influence of covariates on drug disposition across these populations. METHODS: Abacavir concentration data from three clinical studies in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children (n = 69)

  4. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-junQIU; Guo-xinHU; Jian-gangWANG; Zong-shunDAI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers. METHODS:Twenty Chinese healthy male volunteers were involved in the study. Each subject received a single dose of 3 mg Lorazepam tested formulation (T, Hubei Zhongtian Airbeck Pharmaceutical Limited Company) or Lorazepam reference formulation (R, Thailand Atlatic Pharmaceutical Limited Company) with a random-

  5. Ibuprofen pharmacokinetics in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Overmeire, B; Touw, D; Schepens, P J; Kearns, G L; van den Anker, J N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study the pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in premature infants with patent ductus arteriosus on day 3 and day 5 after birth. METHODS: Ibuprofen was administered on days 3, 4, and 5 by a 15-minute intravenous infusion of 10, 5, and 5 mg/kg, respectively, with the aim of

  6. Population Pharmacokinetics of Abacavir in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Capparelli, Edmund V; Letendre, Scott L.; ELLIS, Ronald J.; Patel, Parul; Holland, Diane; MCCUTCHAN, J. Allen

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of abacavir into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was assessed by use of a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Plasma and CSF abacavir concentrations in 54 subjects were determined. The abacavir CSF/plasma ratio averaged 36% and increased throughout the dose interval. Abacavir penetrates into the CSF in adequate concentrations to inhibit local human immunodeficiency virus replication.

  7. Two-Compartment Pharmacokinetic Models for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneganti, Kumud; Simon, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The transport of potassium permanganate between two continuous-stirred vessels was investigated to help chemical and biomedical engineering students understand two-compartment pharmacokinetic models. Concepts of modeling, mass balance, parameter estimation and Laplace transform were applied to the two-unit process. A good agreement was achieved…

  8. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... animals. For pharmacokinetics testing and dermal studies, adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, 7 to 9 weeks of age, shall be used. For dermal studies, young adult mini-pigs shall also be used. The... substance. (b) Definitions. (1) Bioavailability refers to the rate and relative amount of administered...

  9. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpulainen, Elina; Välitalo, Pyry; Kokki, Merja; Lehtonen, Marko; Hooker, Andrew; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Kokki, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    AIMS This study was designed to characterize paediatric pharmacokinetics and central nervous system exposure of flurbiprofen. METHODS The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen were studied in 64 healthy children aged 3 months to 13 years, undergoing surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Children were administered preoperatively a single dose of flurbiprofen intravenously as prodrug (n = 27) or by mouth as syrup (n = 37). A single cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample (n = 60) was collected at the induction of anaesthesia, and plasma samples (n = 304) before, during and after the operation (up to 20 h after administration). A population pharmacokinetic model was built using the NONMEM software package. RESULTS Flurbiprofen concentrations in plasma were well described by a three compartment model. The apparent bioavailability of oral flurbiprofen syrup was 81%. The estimated clearance (CL) was 0.96 l h−1 70 kg−1. Age did not affect the clearance after weight had been included as a covariate. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 8.1 l 70 kg−1. Flurbiprofen permeated into the CSF, reaching concentrations that were seven-fold higher compared with unbound plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS Flurbiprofen pharmacokinetics can be described using only weight as a covariate in children above 6 months, while more research is needed in neonates and in younger infants. PMID:20840447

  10. Steady-State Pharmacokinetics of Bupropion SR in Juvenile Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviss, W. Burleson; Perel, James M.; Rudolph, George R.; Axelson, David A.; Gilchrist, Richard; Nuss, Sharon; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the steady-state pharmacokinetic properties of bupropion sustained release (SR) and their potential developmental differences in youths. Method: Eleven boys and eight girls aged 11 to 17 years old were prescribed bupropion SR monotherapy for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (n = 16) and/or depressive disorders (n =…

  11. Pharmacokinetic behaviors and oral bioavailability of oridonin in rat plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen XU; Jin SUN; Ting-ting ZHANG; Bo MA; Sheng-miao GUI; Da-wei CHEN; Zhong-gui HE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the intravenous and oral pharmacokinetic behavior of oridonin and its extent of absolute oral bioavailability in rats. Methods: Oridonin was administered to rats via iv (5,10 and 15 mg/kg), po (20,40 and 80 mg/kg) or ip administration (10 mg/kg). The concentrations of oridonin in rat plasma were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spec-trometric detection (HPLC/ESI-MS) method and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by non-compartmental analysis. Results: The plasma concentration of oridonin after intravenous administration decreased poly exponentially, and the pharmacokinetic parameters of oridonin were dose-independent within the examined range. Oridonin was absorbed rapidly after oral gavage with a pharmacokinetics were observed for oridonin within the range of iv doses, while the extent of absolute oral bioavailability was rather low and dose-dependent. The low and dose-dependent extent of oral bioavailability may be due to the saturation of first-pass effects.

  12. Factors Controlling Nanoparticle Pharmacokinetics: An Integrated Analysis and Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Hunter, A.C.; Andresen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array of interrel...

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ; DESMET, PAGM

    1994-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are very commonly prescribed, especially in the elderly population. In many countries more than 10 different NSAIDs are available. As the older pyrazole compounds like phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and azapropazone are most prone to pharmacokinetic

  14. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed TA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tarek A Ahmed1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD. Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful

  15. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health. Part I: Moving beyond pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J E; Gabrielsson, J; Fink, M; Mochel, J

    2016-06-01

    The application of mathematical modeling to problems in animal health has a rich history in the form of pharmacokinetic modeling applied to problems in veterinary medicine. Advances in modeling and simulation beyond pharmacokinetics have the potential to streamline and speed-up drug research and development programs. To foster these goals, a series of manuscripts will be published with the following goals: (i) expand the application of modeling and simulation to issues in veterinary pharmacology; (ii) bridge the gap between the level of modeling and simulation practiced in human and veterinary pharmacology; (iii) explore how modeling and simulation concepts can be used to improve our understanding of common issues not readily addressed in human pharmacology (e.g. breed differences, tissue residue depletion, vast weight ranges among adults within a single species, interspecies differences, small animal species research where data collection is limited to sparse sampling, availability of different sampling matrices); and (iv) describe how quantitative pharmacology approaches could help understanding key pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of a drug candidate, with the goal of providing explicit, reproducible, and predictive evidence for optimizing drug development plans, enabling critical decision making, and eventually bringing safe and effective medicines to patients. This study introduces these concepts and introduces new approaches to modeling and simulation as well as clearly articulate basic assumptions and good practices. The driving force behind these activities is to create predictive models that are based on solid physiological and pharmacological principles as well as adhering to the limitations that are fundamental to applying mathematical and statistical models to biological systems.

  16. The influence of different long-circulating materials on the pharmacokinetics of liposomal vincristine sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yingchong; Li, Xiang; Liang, Xinli; Luo, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to improve the in vivo pharmacokinetics of long-circulating vincristine sulfate (VS)-loaded liposomes; three different long-circulating materials, chitosan, poly(ethylene glycol)-1,2-distearoyl sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE), and poly(ethylene glycol)-poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA), were evaluated at the same coating molar ratio with the commercial product Marqibo® (vincristine sulfate liposome injection [VSLI]). Materials and methods VS-loaded liposomes were prepared by a pH gradient method and were then coated with chitosan, PEG-DSPE, or PEG-PLGA. Physicochemical properties, including the morphology, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency (EE%), pH, drug loading, and in vitro release, were determined. Preservation stability and pharmacokinetic studies were performed to compare the membrane-coated liposomes with either commercially available liposomes or the VS solution. Results The sphere-like morphology of the vesicles was confirmed by transmission electron microscope. Increased particle size, especially for the chitosan formulation, was observed after the coating process. However, the EE% was ~99.0% with drug loading at 2.0 mg/mL, which did not change after the coating process. The coating of long-circulation materials, except for chitosan, resulted in negatively charged and stable vesicles at physiological pH. The near-zero zeta potential exhibited by the PEG-DSPE formulation leads to a longer circulation lifetime and improved absorption for VS, when compared with the PEG-PLGA formulation. Compared with the commercial product, PEG was responsible for a higher plasma VS concentration and a longer half-life. Conclusion PEG-DSPE coating may be related to better absorption, based on the stability and a pharmacokinetic improvement in the blood circulation time. PMID:27616886

  17. Pharmacokinetics of medroxyprogesterone acetate after single and multiple injection of Cyclofem in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X F; Shao, Q X; Han, X J; Weng, L J; Sang, G W

    1998-06-01

    To provide pharmacokinetic data for safety evaluation on prolonged treatment with Cyclofem, which contains 25 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 5 mg estradiol cypionate in 0.5 mL microcrystalline aqueous suspension, the pharmacokinetic profiles of MPA after single and multiple administration of this monthly injectable contraceptive were investigated in Chinese women. Nine healthy fertile women received Cyclofem based on a once-a-month regiment for up to 1 year. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to drug administration and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injection. After the 1st, 6th, and 12th injection, the maximum serum concentrations (Cmax) of MPA were observed on days 3.4 +/- 0.9, 4.3 +/- 2.2, and 3.7 +/- 2.6, respectively. Cmax of serum MPA during the 1st, 6th, and 12th treatment cycles were 3.75 +/- 1.27, 5.54 +/- 1.79, and 5.55 +/- 1.80 nmol/L, whereas the areas under the curve (AUC0-28 days) were 55.84 +/- 28.15, 95.45 +/- 26.56, and 98.81 +/- 21.84 nmol/L.day, respectively. There was significant interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics of MPA after intramuscular injection of Cyclofem. No significant change was demonstrated in mean residence time (MRT) of MPA after single and multiple injection. There was a tendency of increase in Cmax and AUC0-28 days of MPA during the first 6 months of treatment, whereas no further enhancement was found between the 6th and 12th injection (p > 0.05). Peak levels of estradiol (E2) observed in Cyclofem users were within the normal range of the preovulatory phase. Results of this long-term study suggest that no drug accumulation occurred after repeated administration of Cyclofem in the Chinese women. PMID:9693401

  18. Single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of etizolam in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracasso, C; Confalonieri, S; Garattini, S; Caccia, S

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of etizolam, a new thienodiazepine derivative, has been examined after single and multiple (0.5 mg tablet) (0.5 mg b.d for 1 week) oral therapeutic doses in healthy volunteers. The single-dose kinetic profile of etizolam suggested that absorption after oral dosage was reasonably rapid, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) being attained within 0.5-2 h in all subjects. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) averaged 3.4 h. Consistent with this, steady-state concentration were rapidly achieved and accumulation was extremely limited. Predicted average plasma concentrations (Cp) did not differ significantly from those actually measured at steady-state, suggesting that the kinetics of etizolam was linear, at least at therapeutic doses. The mean wash-out t1/2 was comparable to the elimination t1/2 of the single dose, which means that the drug probably has no effect on hepatic microsomal enzymes and other kinetic variables after repeated dosing. At steady state plasma concentrations of the main metabolite, alpha-hydroxyetizolam, were higher and disappeared more slowly (mean t1/2 8.2 h) than those of the parent compound. Taken with the fact that in animals the metabolite shows almost the same potency of pharmacological action as etizolam, this suggests that it may contribute significantly to the clinical effects of the parent compound. Based on the kinetic characteristics of the parent drug and its metabolite, etizolam can be regarded as a short-acting benzodiazepine, with elimination kinetics between those of short-intermediate derivatives and ultra-rapidly eliminated benzodiazepines. PMID:2065698

  19. Lunelle monthly contraceptive injection (medroxyprogesterone acetate and estradiol cypionate injectable suspension): effects of body weight and injection sites on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimy, M H; Cromie, M A; Hopkins, N K; Tong, D M

    1999-10-01

    A new contraceptive option, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and estradiol cypionate (E2C) (MPA/E2C, Lunelle Monthly Contraceptive Injection), will soon be available for women in the US. This article reports the results of a US trial that assessed the effects of body weight and injection site on the pharmacokinetics of MPA, the progestin mediating contraceptive efficacy. This assessment was part of a nonrandomized, open-label, multicenter US study in healthy women receiving a monthly injection of MPA/E2C for 60 weeks. A total of 77 women (aged 18-47 years) at four centers participated in the pharmacokinetics assessment during the sixth or the seventh injection. For determination of serum MPA concentration-time profiles, blood samples were collected before the sixth and seventh injections (day 0) and on days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after the sixth and seventh monthly administrations. For effects of injection site, MPA pharmacokinetics were compared at injection sites of the arm, hip, and leg. The pharmacokinetics of MPA, determined at the sixth and seventh injection, were not significantly affected by injection sites. The mean area under the curve (AUC0-28), however, was different between the arm and the leg injection sites; the difference was 38, n = 6). There were no significant differences in the pharmacokinetics of MPA among the three BMI categories. The only significant difference (p = 0.0387) was the AUC0-28 between BMI 18-28 and BMI 29-38. Because of the small sample size in the highly obese group, a reanalysis was performed by pooling subjects of the obese and highly obese groups. Results of the pooled statistical analysis remained the same. In summary, these results suggest that minor differences observed in the MPA pharmacokinetics--whether due to injection site or body weight or both--have no impact on the contraceptive efficacy of MPA/E2C, as trough concentrations (Cmin) are well above the threshold levels required to suppress ovulation. No dose adjustment

  20. Amitriptyline pharmacokinetics in experimental spinal cord injury in the rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihanikermani H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that pharmacokinetic behavior of several drugs such as paracetamol, theophylline, and aminoglycosides are significantly altered in spinal cord injured patients. No pharmacokinetic study of amitriptyline has been performed in patients and experimental models of spinal cord injury. Pharmacokinetic parameters of amitriptyline in orally treated rabbits subjected to laminectomy and spinal cord injury compared with those underwent laminectomy alone. Among twenty four male rabbits were included in this study, nine of them subjected to spinal cord injury at the 8 th thoracic level by knife severance method and six rabbits underwent laminectomy alone (sham group and nine rabbits treated as control. All received a single oral dose of amitriptyline (20 mg/kg 24 h after injury. Blood sampling were done at predetermined times to 36 h after drug administration. Amitriptyline concentration in serum samples was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters including maximum concentration (C max , time to reach maximum concentration (T max , half life, and the area under the curve to last detectable concentration time point (AUC 0-t were directly determined from the concentration-time curve. Maximum concentration was observed at 6.5 h after administration in sham group with a concentration of 439.6 ng/ml, whereas in SCI group T max was at 2.7 h with a concentration of 2763.9 ng/ml. In control group it was 3.3 h and 396 ng/ml, respectively. In SCI group, AUC was 9465.6 ng.h/ml and half life was 6 h and for control group it was 2817.4 ng.h/ml and 6.4 h, respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed that SCI didn′t induce significant changes in amitriptyline pharmacokinetic parameters.