WorldWideScience

Sample records for based molecular dynamics

  1. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics Based on Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Franco de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Performing molecular dynamics in electronically excited states requires the inclusion of nonadiabatic effects to properly describe phenomena beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This article provides a survey of selected nonadiabatic methods based on quantum or classical trajectories. Among these techniques, trajectory surface hopping constitutes an interesting compromise between accuracy and efficiency for the simulation of medium- to large-scale molecular systems. This approach is, however, based on non-rigorous approximations that could compromise, in some cases, the correct description of the nonadiabatic effects under consideration and hamper a systematic improvement of the theory. With the help of an in principle exact description of nonadiabatic dynamics based on Bohmian quantum trajectories, we will investigate the origin of the main approximations in trajectory surface hopping and illustrate some of the limits of this approach by means of a few simple examples.

  2. Towards the molecular bases of polymerase dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One aspect of the strong relationship that is known to exist between the processes of DNA replication and transcription is manifest in the coupling of the rates of movement of the replication fork (rf) and RNA polymerase (rt). We address two issues concerning the largely unexplored area of polymerase dynamics: (i) The validity of an approximate kinematic formula linking rf and rt suggested by experiments in which transcription is initiated in some prokaryotes with the antibiotic streptolydigin, and (ii) What are the molecular bases of the kinematic formula? An analysis of the available data suggests possible molecular bases for polymerase dynamics. In particular, we are led to a hypothesis: In active chromatin rt may depend on the length (λt) of the transcript of the primary messenger RNA (pre-mRNA). This new effect is subject to experimental verification. We discuss possible experiments that may be performed in order to test this prediction. (author). Refs, 6 tabs

  3. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel®  Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  4. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... the influence of spectral properties and dimensionality of the molecular system on the algorithm efficiency. We test two algorithms, the MinMax and Lanczos, for spectral estimation from an MD trajectory, and use this to derive a practical scheme of time step adaptation in MD relaxation algorithms to...

  5. Classical molecular dynamics investigations of biphenyl-based carbon nanomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Mrugalla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free-standing carbon nanomembranes (CNM with molecular thickness and macroscopic size are fascinating objects both for fundamental reasons and for applications in nanotechnology. Although being made from simple and identical precursors their internal structure is not fully known and hard to simulate due to the large system size that is necessary to draw definite conclusions.Results: We performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics investigations of biphenyl-based carbon nanomembranes. We show that one-dimensional graphene-like stripes constitute a highly symmetric quasi one-dimensional energetically favorable ground state. This state does not cross-link. Instead cross-linked structures are formed from highly excited precursors with a sufficient amount of broken phenyls.Conclusion: The internal structure of the CNM is very likely described by a disordered metastable state which is formed in the energetic initial process of electron irradiation and depends on the process of relaxation into the sheet phase.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of surfactant-like peptide based nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes

    2014-10-23

    Surfactant-like peptide (SLP) based nanostructures are investigated using all-atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We report structure properties of nanostructures belonging to the ANK peptide group. In particular, the mathematical models for the two A3K membranes, A6K nanotube, and A9K nanorod were developed. Our MD simulation results are consistent with the experimental data, indicating that A3K membranes are stable in two different configurations: (1) SLPs are tilted relative to the normal membrane plane; (2) SLPs are interdigitated. The former configuration is energetically more stable. The cylindrical nanostructures feature a certain order of the A6K peptides. In turn, the A9K nanorod does not exhibit any long-range ordering. Both nanotube and nanorod structure contain large amounts of water inside. Consequently, these nanostructures behave similar to hydrogels. This property may be important in the context of biotechnology. Binding energy analysis-in terms of Coulomb and van der Waals contributions-unveils an increase as the peptide size increases. The electrostatic interaction constitutes 70-75% of the noncovalent attraction energy between SLPs. The nanotubular structures are notably stable, confirming that A6K peptides preferentially form nanotubes and A9K peptides preferentially form nanorods. PMID:25264942

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  8. Molecular dynamics computer simulations based on NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work described in this thesis atom-atom distance information obtained from two-dimensional cuclear magnetic resonance is combined with molecular dynamics simulaitons. The simulation is used to improve the accuracy of a structure model constructed on the basis of NMR data. During the MD refinement the crude NMR structure is simultaneously optimized with respect to the atomic interaction function and to the set of atom-atom distances or other NMR information. This means that insufficient experimental data is completed with theoretical knowledge and the combination will lead to more reliable structures than would be obtained from one technique alone. (author). 191 refs.; 17 figs.; 12 schemes; 22 tabs

  9. Molecular dynamics-based refinement of nanodiamond size measurements obtained with dynamic light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Koniakhin, S V; Terterov, I N; Shvidchenko, A V; Eidelman, E D; Dubina, M V

    2016-01-01

    The determination of particle size by dynamic light scattering uses the Stokes-Einstein relation, which can break down for nanoscale objects. Here we employ a molecular dynamics simulation of fully solvated 1-5 nm carbon nanoparticles for the refinement of the experimental data obtained for nanodiamonds in water by using dynamic light scattering. We performed molecular dynamics simulations in differently sized boxes and calculated nanoparticles diffusion coefficients using the velocity autocorrelation function and mean-square displacement. We found that the predictions of the Stokes-Einstein relation are accurate for nanoparticles larger than 3 nm while for smaller nanoparticles the diffusion coefficient should be corrected and different boundary conditions should be taken into account.

  10. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  11. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation study on capacitive nano-accelerometers based on telescoping carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the characteristics of a capacitive nano-accelerometer based on a telescoping carbon nanotube by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The position of the telescoping nanotube was controlled by an externally applied force, and feedback sensing was based on the capacitance change. The capacitance variations, which were almost linearly proportional to the applied acceleration, were monitored within an error tolerance

  13. Molecular diagnostics based on clustering dynamics of magnetic nanobeads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Bejhed, Rebecca S.; de la Torre, Teresa Zardán Gómez;

    2014-01-01

    polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [1]. In this work we demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio Cholerae DNA target at pM concentrations using a novel opto-magnetic approach exploiting the dynamic collective behavior of magnetic nanobeads. The technique relies on measurements of the light...... isothermal rolling circle amplification from Vibrio cholerae DNA. The detection method is shown in Figure 1. MNBs which specifically bind to the micrometric sized DNA coil cannot rotate under the field action as free beads and form chains; this results in a strongly modified opto-magnetic signal. As a core...

  14. Dynamic load balancing algorithm for molecular dynamics based on Voronoi cells domain decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattebert, J.-L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Richards, D.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glosli, J.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-01

    We present a new algorithm for automatic parallel load balancing in classical molecular dynamics. It assumes a spatial domain decomposition of particles into Voronoi cells. It is a gradient method which attempts to minimize a cost function by displacing Voronoi sites associated with each processor/sub-domain along steepest descent directions. Excellent load balance has been obtained for quasi-2D and 3D practical applications, with up to 440·106 particles on 65,536 MPI tasks.

  15. Molecular group dynamics study on slip flow of thin fluid film based on the Hamaker hypotheses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The thin fluid film was assumed to consist of a number of spherical fluid molecular groups and the attractive forces of molecular group pairs were calculated by the derived equation according to the three Hamaker homogeneous material hypotheses. Regarding each molecular group as a dynamics individual, the simulation method for the shearing motion of multilayer fluid molecular groups, which was initiated by two moving walls, was proposed based on the Verlet velocity iterative algorithm. The simulations reveal that the velocities of fluid molecular groups change about their respective mean velocities within a narrow range in steady state. It is also found that the velocity slips occur at the wall boundary and in a certain number of fluid film layers close to the wall. Because the dimension of molecular group and the number of group layers are not restricted, the hypothetical thickness of fluid film model can be enlarged from nanometer to micron by using the proposed simulation method.

  16. Ab initio based force field and molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Richard H; Roszak, Szczepan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2004-04-15

    An all-atom force field for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) is presented. The classical intermolecular interaction potential for TATB is based on single-point energies determined from high-level ab initio calculations of TATB dimers. The newly developed potential function is used to examine bulk crystalline TATB via molecular dynamics simulations. The isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressures obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experiment. The calculated volume-temperature expansion is almost one dimensional along the c crystallographic axis, whereas under compression, all three unit cell axes participate, albeit unequally. PMID:15267608

  17. Trajectory-based solution of the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics equations: an on-the-fly approach for molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F E; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2011-02-28

    The non-relativistic quantum dynamics of nuclei and electrons is solved within the framework of quantum hydrodynamics using the adiabatic representation of the electronic states. An on-the-fly trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics algorithm is derived, which is also able to capture nuclear quantum effects that are missing in the traditional trajectory surface hopping approach based on the independent trajectory approximation. The use of correlated trajectories produces quantum dynamics, which is in principle exact and computationally very efficient. The method is first tested on a series of model potentials and then applied to study the molecular collision of H with H(2) using on-the-fly TDDFT potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic coupling vectors. PMID:21264437

  18. Orbital free molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  19. Modeling of Car-Following Required Safe Distance Based on Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Dayi Qu; Xiufeng Chen; Wansan Yang; Xiaohua Bian

    2014-01-01

    In car-following procedure, some distances are reserved between the vehicles, through which drivers can avoid collisions with vehicles before and after them in the same lane and keep a reasonable clearance with lateral vehicles. This paper investigates characters of vehicle operating safety in car following state based on required safe distance. To tackle this problem, we probe into required safe distance and car-following model using molecular dynamics, covering longitudinal and lateral safe...

  20. Kinetic Energy-Based Temperature Computation in Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Ran; He, Xiaoqiao

    2009-01-01

    The average kinetic energy is widely used to characterize temperature in molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In this letter, the applicability of three types of average kinetic energy as measures of temperature is investigated, i.e., the total kinetic energy, kinetic energy without the centroid translation part, and thermal disturbance kinetic energy. Our MD simulations indicate that definitions of temperature based on the kinetic energy including rigid translational or rotational motion may ...

  1. Hydration of methanol in water. A DFT-based molecular dynamics study

    CERN Document Server

    Van Erp, T S; Erp, Titus S. van; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2000-01-01

    We studied the hydration of a single methanol molecule in aqueous solution by first-principle DFT-based molecular dynamics simulation. The calculations show that the local structural and short-time dynamical properties of the water molecules remain almost unchanged by the presence of the methanol, confirming the observation from recent experimental structural data for dilute solutions. We also see, in accordance with this experimental work, a distinct shell of water molecules that consists of about 15 molecules. We found no evidence for a strong tangential ordering of the water molecules in the first hydration shell.

  2. Accelerating Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, M. A.; Kennedy, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    We consider how to accelerate fermionic molecular dynamics algorithms by introducing n pseudofermion fields coupled with the nth root of the fermionic kernel. This reduces the maximum pseudofermionic force, and thus allows a larger molecular dynamics integration step size without hitting an instability in the integrator.

  3. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  4. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to ...

  5. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmyshov, Konstantin B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular simulations can provide a detailed picture of a desired chemical, physical, or biological process. It has been developed over last 50 years and is being used now to solve a large variety of problems in many different fields. In particular, quantum calculations are very helpful to study small systems at a high resolution where electronic structure of compounds is accounted for. Molecular dynamics simulations, in turn, are employed to study development of a certain molecular ensemble ...

  7. Polymer friction Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force....

  8. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  9. Labyrinthine water flow across multilayer graphene-based membranes: molecular dynamics versus continuum predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the hydrodynamic permeance of water through graphene-based membranes, inspired by recent experimental findings on graphene-oxide membranes. We consider the flow across multiple graphene layers having nanoslits in a staggered alignment, with an inter-layer distance ranging from sub- nanometer to a few nanometers. We compare results for the permeability obtained by means of molecular dynamics simulations to continuum predictions obtained by using the lattice Boltzmann calculations and hydrodynamic modelization. This highlights that, in spite of extreme confinement, the permeability across the graphene-based membrane is quantitatively predicted on the basis of a continuum expression, taking properly into account entrance and slippage effects of the confined water flow. Our predictions refute the breakdown of hydrodynamics at small scales in these membrane systems. They constitute a benchmark to which we compare published experimental data.

  10. Prediction of transport properties of new functional lanthanum-strontium cuprates based materials: molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics method is used for the properties prediction of new lanthanum-strontium cuprates La2-xSrxCuO4-δ based functional materials. The most interesting phases have been synthesized, and electrophysical and thermomechanical properties have been investigated for the verification of acquired calculated data. High values of oxygen diffusion constants is demonstrated to be occurred in solid solutions La2-xSrxCuO4-δ with fine degree of substitution Sr→La (to x=1). Values of lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients and oxygen diffusion constants are agree with experimental data. Observed anisotropy of anion transport for all studied compositions is responsible for peculiarities of crystal structure of complex oxides. Applied molecular dynamics method permits to reveal the contribution of separate kinds of oxygen ions (equatorial and apical) in ionic transport at microscopic level, as well as really prove that the oxygen diffusion happens in the ordinary jump mechanism, mainly in (CuO2)-layers

  11. MOLECULAR REPLICATOR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    BÄRBEL M. R. STADLER; Stadler, Peter F

    2003-01-01

    Template-dependent replication at the molecular level is the basis of reproduction in nature. A detailed understanding of the peculiarities of the chemical reaction kinetics associated with replication processes is therefore an indispensible prerequisite for any understanding of evolution at the molecular level. Networks of interacting self-replicating species can give rise to a wealth of different dynamical phenomena, from competitive exclusion to permanent coexistence, from global stability...

  12. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  13. Molecular dynamics for fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent variational principle for many-body trial states is used to discuss the relation between the approaches of different molecular dynamics models to describe indistinguishable fermions. Early attempts to include effects of the Pauli principle by means of nonlocal potentials as well as more recent models which work with antisymmetrized many-body states are reviewed under these premises. (orig.)

  14. Detection of molecular charge dynamics through current noise in a GaAs-based nanowire FET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shinya; Kuroda, Ryota; Yin, Xiang; Sato, Masaki; Kasai, Seiya

    2015-04-01

    The detection of static and dynamic molecular charge states using a GaAs-based nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) was investigated. Tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) was put on the device as target molecules. After coating TPP on the FET, the drain current clearly decreased. On the other hand, the current largely increased by 405-nm light irradiation, indicating that TPP worked as a photo-excited donor. The light irradiation on the FET also induced a Lorentzian noise component, which was superimposed onto conventional 1/f noise. These behaviors were not seen in the gateless nanowire even with TPP. The obtained results indicated that electrical interaction between TPP and the nanowire was enhanced when a metal gate existed, although the channel was protected from TPP by the gate metal. We discuss the observed behaviors on the basis of a model where only TPP in the gate periphery modulated the channel potential and the drain current.

  15. Deformation characteristics of various grain boundary angles on AFM-based nanolithography using molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to verify the deformation characteristics of grain boundaries on the AFM-based nanolithography. The model used has about 750,000 (Cu) atoms and is composed of two different crystal orientations. The grain boundaries are located in the center of model and have 45, 90, 135, and -135 degree angles in the xz-plane. The tool is made of rigid diamond-like carbon and is in the shape of the Berkovich indenter. The simulation has four different stages: relaxation, indentation, re-relaxation, and lithography. The simulation results reveal that the lithography deforms the grain boundary shape by the tool. The deformation of grain boundary's angle proceeds to minimize the total potential energy of whole system. Consequently, the grain boundary angle is changed about 90 degrees

  16. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  17. Molecular Dynamics of Acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, T Y.; Tai, Kaihsu; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2002-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are leading to a deeper understanding of the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Simulations have shown how breathing motions in the enzyme facilitate the displacement of substrate from the surface of the enzyme to the buried active site. The most recent work points to the complex and spatially extensive nature of such motions and suggests possible modes of regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics and Motors: A View from Classical and Quantum Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The tubular forms of fullerenes popularly known as carbon nanotubes are experimentally produced as single-, multiwall, and rope configurations. The nanotubes and nanoropes have shown to exhibit unusual mechanical and electronic properties. The single wall nanotubes exhibit both semiconducting and metallic behavior. In short undefected lengths they are the known strongest fibers which are unbreakable even when bent in half. Grown in ropes their tensile strength is approximately 100 times greater than steel at only one sixth the weight. Employing large scale classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations we will explore the use of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube junctions in 2-, 3-, and 4-point molecular electronic device components, dynamic strength characterization for compressive, bending and torsional strains, and chemical functionalization for possible use in a nanoscale molecular motor. The above is an unclassified material produced for non-competitive basic research in the nanotechnology area.

  19. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Study of Stability and Diffusion of Graphene-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiunan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial with unique biomedical properties, has attracted great attention due to its potential applications in graphene-based drug delivery systems (DDS. In this work graphene sheets with various sizes and graphene oxide functionalized with polyethylene glycol (GO-PEG are utilized as nanocarriers to load anticancer drug molecules including CE6, DOX, MTX, and SN38. We carried out molecular dynamics calculations to explore the energetic stabilities and diffusion behaviors of the complex systems with focuses on the effects of the sizes and functionalization of graphene sheets as well as the number and types of drug molecules. Our study shows that the binding of graphene-drug complex is favorable when the drug molecules and finite graphene sheets become comparable in sizes. The boundaries of finite sized graphene sheets restrict the movement of drug molecules. The double-side loading often slows down the diffusion of drug molecules compared with the single-side loading. The drug molecules bind more strongly with GO-PEG than with pristine graphene sheets, demonstrating the advantages of functionalization in improving the stability and biocompatibility of graphene-based DDS.

  1. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation based on the multi-component molecular orbital method: Application to H5O2+,D5O2+,andT5O2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Molecular dynamics method based on multi-component molecular orbital method was applied to basic hydrogen bonding systems, H5O2+, and its isotopomers (D5O2+andT5O2+). Highlights: ► Molecular dynamics method with nuclear quantum effect was developed. ► Multi-component molecular orbital method was used as ab initio MO calculation. ► Developed method applied to basic hydrogen bonding system, H5O2+, and isotopomers. ► O⋯O vibrational stretching reflected to the distribution of protonic wavefunctions. ► H/D/T isotope effect was also analyzed. - Abstract: We propose a molecular dynamics (MD) method based on the multi-component molecular orbital (MCMO) method, which takes into account the quantum effect of proton directly, for the detailed analyses of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding system. The MCMO based MD (MCMO-MD) method is applied to the basic structures, H5O2+ (called “Zundel ion”), and its isotopomers (D5O2+andT5O2+). We clearly demonstrate the geometrical difference of hydrogen bonded O⋯O distance induced by H/D/T isotope effect because the O⋯O in H-compound was longer than that in D- or T-compound. We also find the strong relation between stretching vibration of O⋯O and the distribution of hydrogen bonded protonic wavefunction because the protonic wavefunction tends to delocalize when the O⋯O distance becomes short during the dynamics. Our proposed MCMO-MD simulation is expected as a powerful tool to analyze the proton dynamics in hydrogen bonding systems.

  3. From Molecular Dynamics to Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Flekkoy, Eirik G.; Coveney, Peter V.

    1999-01-01

    A procedure is introduced for deriving a coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics from molecular dynamics. The rules of the dissipative particle dynamics are derived from the underlying molecular interactions, and a Langevin equation is obtained that describes the forces experienced by the dissipative particles and specifies the associated canonical Gibbs distribution for the system.

  4. Elastic properties of amorphous boron suboxide based solids studied using ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the correlation between chemical composition, structure, chemical bonding and elastic properties of amorphous B6O based solids using ab initio molecular dynamics. These solids are of different chemical compositions, but the elasticity data appear to be a function of density. This is in agreement with previous experimental observations. As the density increases from 1.64 to 2.38 g cm-3, the elastic modulus increases from 74 to 253 GPa. This may be understood by analyzing the cohesive energy and the chemical bonding of these compounds. The cohesive energy decreases from -7.051 to -7.584 eV/atom in the elastic modulus range studied. On the basis of the electron density distributions, Mulliken analysis and radial distribution functions, icosahedral bonding is the dominating bonding type. C and N promote cross-linking of icosahedra and thus increase the density, while H hinders the cross-linking by forming OH groups. The presence of icosahedral bonding is independent of the density

  5. Study of AFM-based nanometric cutting process using molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to investigate the atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanometric cutting process of copper using diamond tool. The effects of tool geometry, cutting depth, cutting velocity and bulk temperature are studied. It is found that the tool geometry has a significant effect on the cutting resistance. The friction coefficient (cutting resistance) on the nanoscale decreases with the increase of tool angle as predicted by the macroscale theory. However, the friction coefficients on the nanoscale are bigger than those on the macroscale. The simulation results show that a bigger cutting depth results in more material deformation and larger chip volume, thus leading to bigger cutting force and bigger normal force. It is also observed that a higher cutting velocity results in a larger chip volume in front of the tool and bigger cutting force and normal force. The chip volume in front of the tool increases while the cutting force and normal force decrease with the increase of bulk temperature.

  6. An Evaluation of Neutron Energy Spectrum Effects in Iron Based on Molecular Dynamics Displacement Cascade Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of molecular dynamics (MD) displacement cascade simulations in bcc iron have been used to obtain effective cross sections for two measures of primary damage production: (1) the number of surviving point defects expressed as a fraction of the displacements calculated using the standard secondary displacement model of Norgett, Robinson, and Torrens (NRT), and (2) the fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters that formed during the cascade event. Primary knockon atom spectra for iron obtained from the SPECTER code have been used to weight these MD-based damage production cross sections in order to obtain spectrally-averaged values for several locations in commercial fission reactors and materials test reactors. An evaluation of these results indicates that neutron energy spectrum differences between the various enviromnents do not lead to significant differences between the average primary damage formation parameters. In particular, the defect production cross sections obtained for PWR and BWR neutron spectra were not significantly different. The variation of the defect production cross sections as a function of depth into the reactor pressure vessel wall is used as a sample application of the cross sections. A slight difference between the attenuation behavior of the PWR and BWR was noted; this difference could be explained by a subtle difference in the energy dependence of the neutron spectra. Overall, the simulations support the continued use of dpa as a damage correlation parameter

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of edge dislocation piled at cuboidal precipitate in Ni-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashiro, Kisaragi; Naito, Masato; Tomita, Yoshihiro [Kobe Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    In order to clarify the fundamental mechanism of dislocations in the {gamma}/{gamma}' microstructure of Ni-based superalloy, three molecular dynamics simulations are conducted on the behavior of edge dislocations nucleated from a free surface and proceeding in the pure Ni matrix ({gamma}) toward cuboidal Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates ({gamma}') under shear force. One involves dislocations near the apices of two precipitates adjoining each other with the distance of 0.04 {mu}m, as large as the width of the {gamma} channel in real superalloys. Others simulate dislocations piled at the precipitates as well, however, the scale of the microstructure is smaller than that in real superalloys by one order of magnitude, and one of them have precipitates with atomistically sharp edge. Dislocations are pinned at precipitates and bowed-out in the {gamma} channel, then they begin to penetrate into the precipitate at the edge in both the real-scale and smaller microstructures when the precipitates have blunt edges. On the other hand, an edge dislocation splits into a superpartial in the {gamma}' precipitate and a misfit screw dislocation bridging between two adjacent precipitates at the atomistically sharp edge of {gamma}' precipitates. It is also observed that two superpartials glide in the precipitate as a superdislocation with anti-phase boundary (APB), of which the width is evaluated to be about 4 nm. (author)

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of edge dislocation piled at cuboidal precipitate in Ni-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the fundamental mechanism of dislocations in the γ/γ' microstructure of Ni-based superalloy, three molecular dynamics simulations are conducted on the behavior of edge dislocations nucleated from a free surface and proceeding in the pure Ni matrix (γ) toward cuboidal Ni3Al precipitates (γ') under shear force. One involves dislocations near the apices of two precipitates adjoining each other with the distance of 0.04 μm, as large as the width of the γ channel in real superalloys. Others simulate dislocations piled at the precipitates as well, however, the scale of the microstructure is smaller than that in real superalloys by one order of magnitude, and one of them have precipitates with atomistically sharp edge. Dislocations are pinned at precipitates and bowed-out in the γ channel, then they begin to penetrate into the precipitate at the edge in both the real-scale and smaller microstructures when the precipitates have blunt edges. On the other hand, an edge dislocation splits into a superpartial in the γ' precipitate and a misfit screw dislocation bridging between two adjacent precipitates at the atomistically sharp edge of γ' precipitates. It is also observed that two superpartials glide in the precipitate as a superdislocation with anti-phase boundary (APB), of which the width is evaluated to be about 4 nm. (author)

  9. Interactive molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in HTML5 and JavaScript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  10. Interactive molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  11. Efficient molecular quantum dynamics in coordinate and phase space using pruned bases

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Henrik R; Tannor, David J

    2016-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of dynamically pruned quantum dynamics, both in coordinate space and in phase space. We combine the ideas behind the biorthogonal von Neumann basis (PvB) with the orthogonalized momentum-symmetrized Gaussians (Weylets) to create a new basis, projected Weylets, that takes the best from both methods. We benchmark pruned dynamics using phase-space-localized PvB, projected Weylets, and coordinate-space-localized DVR bases, with real-world examples in up to six dimensions. We show that coordinate-space localization is most important for efficient pruning and that pruned dynamics is much faster compared to unpruned, exact dynamics. Phase-space localization is useful for more demanding dynamics where many basis functions are required. There, projected Weylets offer a more compact representation than pruned DVR bases.

  12. The nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS has been generalized in order to simulate a variety of NONEQUILIBRIUM systems. This generalization has been achieved by adopting microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress. Some of the problems already treated include rapid plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, strong shockwaves simulation, and far-from-equilibrium phase transformations. Continuing advances in technique and in the modeling of interatomic forces, coupled with qualitative improvements in computer hardware, are enabling such simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  13. Drug design based on x-ray diffraction and steered molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Vondráčková, Eva; Zimmermann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2005), s. 208-210. ISSN 1211-5894. [VUFB Conference on Modern Methods in Synthesis and Analysis of Active Pharmaceutical Substances /5./. Praha, 23.11.2005-24.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : drug design * X-ray diffraction * steered molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  14. Quasi-classical description of molecular dynamics based on Egorov's theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov's theorem on the classical propagation of quantum observables is related to prominent quasi-classical descriptions of quantum molecular dynamics as the linearized semiclassical initial value representation, the Wigner phase space method, or the statistical quasiclassical method. The error estimates show that different accuracies are achievable for the computation of expectation values and position densities. Numerical experiments for a Morse model of diatomic iodine and confined Henon–Heiles systems in various dimensions illustrate the theoretical results

  15. Molecular-dynamics Simulation-based Cohesive Zone Representation of Intergranular Fracture Processes in Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    A traction-displacement relationship that may be embedded into a cohesive zone model for microscale problems of intergranular fracture is extracted from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations. A molecular-dynamics model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions is developed to analyze intergranular fracture along a flat 99 [1 1 0] symmetric tilt grain boundary in aluminum. Under hydrostatic tensile load, the simulation reveals asymmetric crack propagation in the two opposite directions along the grain boundary. In one direction, the crack propagates in a brittle manner by cleavage with very little or no dislocation emission, and in the other direction, the propagation is ductile through the mechanism of deformation twinning. This behavior is consistent with the Rice criterion for cleavage vs. dislocation blunting transition at the crack tip. The preference for twinning to dislocation slip is in agreement with the predictions of the Tadmor and Hai criterion. A comparison with finite element calculations shows that while the stress field around the brittle crack tip follows the expected elastic solution for the given boundary conditions of the model, the stress field around the twinning crack tip has a strong plastic contribution. Through the definition of a Cohesive-Zone-Volume-Element an atomistic analog to a continuum cohesive zone model element - the results from the molecular-dynamics simulation are recast to obtain an average continuum traction-displacement relationship to represent cohesive zone interaction along a characteristic length of the grain boundary interface for the cases of ductile and brittle decohesion. Keywords: Crack-tip plasticity; Cohesive zone model; Grain boundary decohesion; Intergranular fracture; Molecular-dynamics simulation

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation by atomic mass weighting

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Boryeu; Friedman, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    A molecular dynamics-based simulation method in which atomic masses are weighted is described. Results from this method showed that the capability for conformation search in molecular dynamics simulation of a short peptide (FMRF-amide) is significantly increased by mass weighting.

  18. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  20. Indentation Behavior of Zr-Based Metallic-Glass Films via Molecular-Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Wu, Chun-Yi; Chu, Jinn P.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) models of the Zr-based metallic-glass film (Zr47Cu31Al13Ni9, in atomic percent) were constructed by simulating sputter depositions on the titanium substrate. The as-deposited films were used as initial structures for subsequent nanoindentation simulations. For the deposition simulations, a many-body, tight-binding (TB) potential was adopted for interatomic interactions among the multiple species of atoms. The interactions between the metallic atoms and working gas (Ar+) were modeled with the pairwise Moliere potential. The TB potential parameters for unlike atoms were chosen to be the algebraic average of those for like ones, and hence, the MD simulations provide qualitative information. The deposition simulations revealed an amorphous morphology in the as-deposited films. Indentation simulations with a right-angle conical indenter tip showed a homogeneous flow to form pileups on the surface of the metallic glass around the indent. The pileup index calculated from MD is consistent with that obtained from the experiment. Moreover, our MD results show that the pileup index exhibits anomalies, which are defined as unusual changes in the values of the pileup index, around the experimentally found glass-transformation temperature through in situ indentation simulations at elevated temperatures. From indentation load-displacement curves at various temperatures, indentation modulus and hardness obtained from MD simulations were in qualitative agreement with experimental findings in terms of their decreasing rates with respect to the temperature. Three-dimensional atomic-strain calculations revealed strain localization and propagation of shear bands under the indenter tip at their initial evolution stages after the formation of shear transformation zones. In addition, higher loading rates decrease hardness, cause larger disturbed regions under the indent, and enlarge shear-banding patterns.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs

  2. Ferroelectric molecular field-switch based on double proton transfer process: Static and dynamical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Michał F.; Jankowska, Joanna; Sobolewski, Andrzej L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a reversible ferroelectric molecular switch controlled by an external electric field. The studied (2Z)-1-(6-((Z)-2-hydroxy-2-phenylvinyl)pyridin-3-yl)-2-(pyridin-2(1H)-ylidene)ethanone (DSA) molecule is polarized by two uniaxial intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Two protons can be transferred along hydrogen bonds upon an electric field applied along the main molecular axis. The process results in reversion of the dipole moment of the system. Static ab initio and on-the-fly dynamical simulations of the DSA molecule placed in an external electric field give insight into the mechanism of the double proton transfer (DPT) in the system and allow for estimation of the time scale of this process. The results indicate that with increasing strength of the electric field, the step-wise mechanism of DPT changes into the downhill barrierless process in which the synchronous and asynchronous DPTs compete with each other.

  3. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution

  4. From Molecular Dynamics to Brownian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analyzing multiscale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane.

  5. Optimizing Water Transport through Graphene-Based Membranes: Insights from Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Jordan; Jaeger, Frederike; Matar, Omar K; Müller, Erich A

    2016-05-18

    Recent experimental results suggest that stacked layers of graphene oxide exhibit strong selective permeability to water. To construe this observation, the transport mechanism of water permeating through a membrane consisting of layered graphene sheets is investigated via nonequilibrium and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of sheet geometry is studied by changing the offset between the entrance and exit slits of the membrane. The simulation results reveal that the permeability is not solely dominated by entrance effects; the path traversed by water molecules has a considerable impact on the permeability. We show that contrary to speculation in the literature, water molecules do not pass through the membrane as a hydrogen-bonded chain; instead, they form well-mixed fluid regions confined between the graphene sheets. The results of the present work are used to provide guidelines for the development of graphene and graphene oxide membranes for desalination and solvent separation. PMID:27121070

  6. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics for nuclear dynamics and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hasnaoui, K H O; Gulminelli, F

    2008-01-01

    A new Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model based on a Skyrme functional is proposed in this paper. After introducing the basic formalism, some first applications to nuclear structure and nuclear thermodynamics are presented

  7. A solution algorithm for the fluid dynamic equations based on a stochastic model for molecular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a stochastic model is presented to simulate the flow of gases, which are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, like in rarefied or micro situations. For the interaction of a particle with others, statistical moments of the local ensemble have to be evaluated, but unlike in molecular dynamics simulations or DSMC, no collisions between computational particles are considered. In addition, a novel integration technique allows for time steps independent of the stochastic time scale. The stochastic model represents a Fokker-Planck equation in the kinetic description, which can be viewed as an approximation to the Boltzmann equation. This allows for a rigorous investigation of the relation between the new model and classical fluid and kinetic equations. The fluid dynamic equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier are fully recovered for small relaxation times, while for larger values the new model extents into the kinetic regime. Numerical studies demonstrate that the stochastic model is consistent with Navier-Stokes in that limit, but also that the results become significantly different, if the conditions for equilibrium are invalid. The application to the Knudsen paradox demonstrates the correctness and relevance of this development, and comparisons with existing kinetic equations and standard solution algorithms reveal its advantages. Moreover, results of a test case with geometrically complex boundaries are presented.

  8. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. PMID:27304951

  9. A fast-moving copper-based molecular shuttle: synthesis and dynamic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durola, Fabien; Lux, Jacques; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Fast-track changes: The synthesis of a new copper-based molecular shuttle is described, with a coordinating macrocycle based on a nonhindering but endocyclic ligand (see scheme), which makes the ligand exchange easier, and thus the motions of the ring along the thread faster.The present report deals with the synthesis of a two-station [2]rotaxane consisting of a dpbiiq-incorporating macrocycle (dpbiiq: 8,8'-diphenyl-3,3'-biisoquinoline) threaded by a coordinating fragment whose complexing units are a dpp and a terpy ligand (dpp: 2,9-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline; terpy: 2,2',6',2"-terpyridine). The [2]rotaxane was prepared in 11 steps from commercially available or easy-to-make molecules, without taking into account the preparation of the dpbiiq-containing 39-membered ring, which was available in our group. The ring-incorporated bidentate chelate is at the same time endocyclic and sterically nonhindering, which is a specific property of the dpbiiq-coordinating unit. This unique feature has a profound influence on the rate of the ring-and-copper translation motion between the two stations of the axle. Based on an analogous multistep strategy, a related molecular shuttle has also been prepared that contains exactly the same axle and stoppers as the first compound but whose threaded ring incorporates the sterically hindering dpp chelate. The translation motions of this other system are several orders of magnitude slower than the corresponding movements of the dpbiiq-based compound. The motion corresponding to the rearrangement of the unstable five-coordinate copper(I) form of the compounds is relatively fast for both shuttles; the half lifetime of the five-coordinate Cu(I) species being below 20 ms for the dpbiiq-containing system and below 1 s for the dpp-based molecule. The reverse motion corresponding to the rearrangement of the four-coordinate copper(II) complexes is much slower, especially for the dpp-based system. It is of the order of several hours for the dpp-based

  10. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  11. Studies of base pair sequence effects on DNA solvation based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surjit B Dixit; Mihaly Mezei; David L Beveridge

    2012-07-01

    Detailed analyses of the sequence-dependent solvation and ion atmosphere of DNA are presented based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on all the 136 unique tetranucleotide steps obtained by the ABC consortium using the AMBER suite of programs. Significant sequence effects on solvation and ion localization were observed in these simulations. The results were compared to essentially all known experimental data on the subject. Proximity analysis was employed to highlight the sequence dependent differences in solvation and ion localization properties in the grooves of DNA. Comparison of the MD-calculated DNA structure with canonical A- and B-forms supports the idea that the G/C-rich sequences are closer to canonical A- than B-form structures, while the reverse is true for the poly A sequences, with the exception of the alternating ATAT sequence. Analysis of hydration density maps reveals that the flexibility of solute molecule has a significant effect on the nature of observed hydration. Energetic analysis of solute–solvent interactions based on proximity analysis of solvent reveals that the GC or CG base pairs interactmore strongly with watermolecules in the minor groove of DNA that the AT or TA base pairs, while the interactions of the AT or TA pairs in the major groove are stronger than those of the GC or CG pairs. Computation of solvent-accessible surface area of the nucleotide units in the simulated trajectories reveals that the similarity with results derived from analysis of a database of crystallographic structures is excellent. The MD trajectories tend to follow Manning’s counterion condensation theory, presenting a region of condensed counterions within a radius of about 17 Å from the DNA surface independent of sequence. The GC and CG pairs tend to associate with cations in the major groove of the DNA structure to a greater extent than the AT and TA pairs. Cation association is more frequent in the minor groove of AT than the GC pairs. In general

  12. Physical adsorption and molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of noble gases adsorption (except He) on graphite substracts are reviewed. Experimental results from this adsorption are analyzed and compared with molecular dynamics calculations. (L.C.)

  13. A study of internal energy relaxation in shocks using molecular dynamics based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the N2 + N and N2 + N2 systems are used in molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate rates of vibrational and rotational relaxations for conditions that occur in hypersonic flows. For both chemical systems, it is found that the rotational relaxation number increases with the translational temperature and decreases as the rotational temperature approaches the translational temperature. The vibrational relaxation number is observed to decrease with translational temperature and approaches the rotational relaxation number in the high temperature region. The rotational and vibrational relaxation numbers are generally larger in the N2 + N2 system. MD-quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) with the PESs is also used to calculate the V-T transition cross sections, the collision cross section, and the dissociation cross section for each collision pair. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for hypersonic flow over a blunt body with the total collision cross section from MD/QCT simulations, Larsen-Borgnakke with new relaxation numbers, and the N2 dissociation rate from MD/QCT show a profile with a decreased translational temperature and a rotational temperature close to vibrational temperature. The results demonstrate that many of the physical models employed in DSMC should be revised as fundamental potential energy surfaces suitable for high temperature conditions become available

  14. A study of internal energy relaxation in shocks using molecular dynamics based models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng, E-mail: zul107@psu.edu; Parsons, Neal, E-mail: neal.parsons@cd-adapco.com [Department of Aerospace Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Levin, Deborah A., E-mail: deblevin@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801-2935 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Recent potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the N{sub 2} + N and N{sub 2} + N{sub 2} systems are used in molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate rates of vibrational and rotational relaxations for conditions that occur in hypersonic flows. For both chemical systems, it is found that the rotational relaxation number increases with the translational temperature and decreases as the rotational temperature approaches the translational temperature. The vibrational relaxation number is observed to decrease with translational temperature and approaches the rotational relaxation number in the high temperature region. The rotational and vibrational relaxation numbers are generally larger in the N{sub 2} + N{sub 2} system. MD-quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) with the PESs is also used to calculate the V-T transition cross sections, the collision cross section, and the dissociation cross section for each collision pair. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for hypersonic flow over a blunt body with the total collision cross section from MD/QCT simulations, Larsen-Borgnakke with new relaxation numbers, and the N{sub 2} dissociation rate from MD/QCT show a profile with a decreased translational temperature and a rotational temperature close to vibrational temperature. The results demonstrate that many of the physical models employed in DSMC should be revised as fundamental potential energy surfaces suitable for high temperature conditions become available.

  15. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method for thermal conductivities based on thermal noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Takamichi; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2005-02-22

    We developed a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) method for calculating thermal conductivities. In contrast to other NEMD algorithms, here only the heat sink is localized, whereas the heat source can be uniformly distributed throughout the system. The noise due to cutting off the pair forces or to integration errors is such a uniform heat source. In traditional NEMD methods it is normally considered a nuisance factor. The new algorithm accounts for it and uses it. The algorithm is easy to derive, analyse and implement. Moreover, it circumvents the need to calculate energy fluxes. It is tested on the enhanced simple-point charge model for liquid water and reproduces the known thermal conductivity of this model liquid of 0.81 W m(-1) K(-1). It can be generalized to situations, where the thermal noise is replaced by another uniform heat source, or to the inverse situation, where the heat source is localized but the heat sink extends over the entire system. PMID:15836013

  16. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt. PMID:27115043

  17. Molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of AFM-based nanoscratching process with water-layer lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiaqi; Zhao, Jinsheng; Dong, Zeguang; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-08-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) based direct nanoscratching has been thoroughly studied but the mechanism of nanoscratching with water-layer lubrication is yet to be well understood. In current study, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the effects of the water-layer lubrication on the AFM-based nanoscratching process on monocrystalline copper. Comparisons of workpiece deformation, scratching forces, and friction coefficients are made between the water-lubricated and dry scratching under various thickness of water layer, scratching depth and scratching velocity. Simulation results reveal that the water layer has positive impact on the surface quality and significant influence on the scratching forces (normal forces and tangential forces). The friction coefficients of the tip in water-lubricated nanoscratching are significantly bigger than those in the dry process. Our simulation results shed lights on a promising AFM-based nanofabrication method, which can assist to get nanoscale surface morphologies with higher quality than traditional approaches.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium bulk properties of Pd are examined using molecular dynamics technique based on the embedded atom potential. We calculate the total energy and the lattice parameter as a function of temperature. Melting temperature is determined from the discontinuous transition in the energy and lattice parameter. Specific heat and linear coefficient of thermal expansion are calculated from the energy and lattice parameters respectively and results show good agreement with experimental values. Finally the mean square displacements of thermal expansion are calculated form the energy and lattice parameters respectively and results show good agreement with the experimental values. Finally the mean square displacements of the atoms in bulk Pd are compared with the mean square displacements on the three low-index faces (100), (110) and (III). (author)

  19. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. I. From space Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    Probing detailed spectral dependence of phonon transport properties in bulk materials is critical to improve the function and performance of structures and devices in a diverse spectrum of technologies. Currently, such information can only be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently, time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD), but has not been realized in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) so far. In this paper we generate a scheme directly based on NEMD and lattice dynamics theory, called the time domain direct decomposition method (TDDDM), to predict the phonon mode specific thermal conductivity. Two benchmark cases of Lennard-Jones (LJ) argon and Stillinger-Weber (SW) Si are studied by TDDDM to characterize contributions of individual phonon modes to overall thermal conductivity and the results are compared with that predicted using SED and TDNMA. Similar trends are found for both cases, which indicate that our TDDDM approach captures the major phonon properties in NEMD run. The biggest advantage of TDDDM is that it can be used to investigate the size effect of individual phonon modes in NEMD simulations, which cannot be tackled by SED and TDNMA in EMD simulations currently. We found that the phonon modes with mean free path larger than the system size are truncated in NEMD and contribute little to the overall thermal conductivity. The TDDDM provides direct physical origin for the well-known strong size effects in thermal conductivity prediction by NEMD. Moreover, the well-known common sense of the zero thermal conductivity contribution from the Γ point is rigorously proved by TDDDM. Since TDDDM inherently possesses the nature of both NEMD simulations and lattice dynamics, we anticipate that TDDDM is particularly useful for offering a deep understanding of phonon behaviors in nanostructures or under strong confinement, especially when the

  20. Galilei invariant molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct a C*-dynamical model for a chemical reaction. Galilei invariance of our nonrelativistic model is demonstrated by defining it directly on a Galilean space-time fibrebundle with C*-algebra valued fibre, i.e. without reference to any coordinate system. The existence of equilibrium states in this model is established and some of their properties are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Effect of H impurity on misfit dislocation in Ni-based single-crystal superalloy: molecular dynamic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of H impurity on the misfit dislocation in Ni-based single-crystal superalloy is investigated using the molecular dynamic simulation. It includes the site preferences of H impurity in single crystals Ni and Ni3Al, the interaction between H impurity and the misfit dislocation and the effect of H impurity on the moving misfit dislocation. The calculated energies and simulation results show that the misfit dislocation attracts H impurity which is located at the γ/γ' interface and Ni3Al and H impurity on the glide plane can obstruct the glide of misfit dislocation, which is beneficial to improving the mechanical properties of Ni based superalloys. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  2. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations and molecular dynamics in particular, is a very powerful method to provide detailed and essentially exact informations of classical many-body problems. With the advent of \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method as well as novel hybrid scheme that unifies best of either approach are discussed. The predictive power is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from insulators to semiconductors and even metals in condensed phases.

  3. State-Dependent Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciann-Dong Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new mixed quantum mechanics (QM—molecular mechanics (MM approach, where MM is replaced by quantum Hamilton mechanics (QHM, which inherits the modeling capability of MM, while preserving the state-dependent nature of QM. QHM, a single mechanics playing the roles of QM and MM simultaneously, will be employed here to derive the three-dimensional quantum dynamics of diatomic molecules. The resulting state-dependent molecular dynamics including vibration, rotation and spin are shown to completely agree with the QM description and well match the experimental vibration-rotation spectrum. QHM can be incorporated into the framework of a mixed quantum-classical Bohmian method to enable a trajectory interpretation of orbital-spin interaction and spin entanglement in molecular dynamics.

  4. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

  5. Quantum and Classical Molecular Dynamics of Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Na/Li-based Batteries: Molecular Origins of the Conductivity Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent-Luna, Jose Manuel; Ortiz-Roldan, Jose Manuel; Hamad, Said; Tena-Zaera, Ramon; Calero, Sofia; Anta, Juan Antonio

    2016-08-18

    Compositional effects on the charge-transport properties of electrolytes for batteries based on room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are well-known. However, further understanding is required about the molecular origins of these effects, in particular regarding the replacement of Li by Na. In this work, we investigate the use of RTILs in batteries, by means of both classical molecular dynamics (MD), which provides information about structure and molecular transport, and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), which provides information about structure. The focus has been placed on the effect of adding either Na(+) or Li(+) to 1-methyl-1-butyl-pyrrolidinium [C4 PYR](+) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [Tf2 N](-) . Radial distribution functions show excellent agreement between MD and AIMD, which ensures the validity of the force fields used in the MD. This is corroborated by the MD results for the density, the diffusion coefficients, and the total conductivity of the electrolytes, which reproduce remarkably well the experimental observations for all studied Na/Li concentrations. By extracting partial conductivities, it is demonstrated that the main contribution to the conductivity is that of [C4 PYR](+) and [Tf2 N](-) . However, addition of Na(+) /Li(+) , although not significant on its own, produces a dramatic decrease in the partial conductivities of the RTIL ions. The origin of this indirect effect can be traced to the modification of the microscopic structure of the liquid as observed from the radial distribution functions, owing to the formation of [Na(Tf2 N)n ]((n-1)-) and [Li(Tf2 N)n ]((n-1)-) clusters at high concentrations. This formation hinders the motion of the large ions, hence reducing the total conductivity. We demonstrate that this clustering effect is common to both Li and Na, showing that both ions behave in a similar manner at a microscopic level in spite of their distinct ionic radii. This is an interesting finding for extending Li-ion and Li

  6. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  7. Molecular dynamics-based triangulation algorithm of free-form parametric surfaces for computer-aided engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheleznyakova, A. L.

    2015-05-01

    A new computational approach for automated triangulation of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) surface models, applicable to various CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) problems of practical interest is proposed. The complex shaped product configurations are represented by a set of Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) surface patches. The suggested technique is based on the molecular dynamics method. The main idea of the approach is that the mesh nodes are considered as similarly charged interacting particles which move within the region to be meshed under the influence of internal (such as particle-particle interaction forces) and external forces as well as optional additional forces. Moreover, the particles experience a medium resistance due to which the system comes to equilibrium within a relatively short period of time. The proposed 3D surface mesh generation algorithm uses a parametric NURBS representation as initial definition of the domain boundary. This method first distributes the interacting nodes into optimal locations in the parametric domain of the NURBS surface patch using molecular dynamics simulation. Then, the well-shaped triangles can be created after connecting the nodes by Delaunay triangulation. Finally, the mapping from parametric space to 3D physical space is performed. Since the presented interactive algorithm allows to control the distance between a pair of nodes depending on the curvature of the NURBS surface, the method generates high quality triangular mesh. The algorithm enables to produce uniform mesh, as well as anisotropic adaptive mesh with refinement in the large gradient regions. The mesh generation approach has the abilities to preserve the representation accuracy of the input geometry model, create a close relationship between geometry modeling and grid generation process, be automated to a large degree. Some examples are considered in order to illustrate the method's ability to generate a surface mesh for a complicated CAD model.

  8. A Concurrent Multiscale Micromorphic Molecular Dynamics. Part I. Theoretical Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shaofan

    2014-01-01

    Based on a novel concept of multiplicative multiscale decomposition, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD)to extent the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and macroscale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale particle dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale particle dynamics of micromorphic medium, and a coarse scale nonlocal particle dynamics of nonlinear continuum. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and it is a special case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. The discovered mutiscale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition channel from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling relation among them, and it can be used to solve finite size nanoscale sc...

  9. Nano-scale Interfacial Friction Behavior between Two Kinds of Materials in MEMS Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; LIAO Linbo; DING Jianning; YANG Jichang; LI Changsheng; FAN Zen; LIN Zhiyong

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article was to provide a systematic method to perform molecular dynamics simulation or evaluation for nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials in MEMS design. Friction is an important factor affecting the performance and reliability of MEMS. The model of the nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials was presented based on the Newton's equations of motion. The Morse potential function was selected for the model. The improved Verlet algorithm was employed to resolve the model, the atom trajectories and the law of the interfacial friction behavior. Comparisons with experimental data in other paper confirm the validity of the model. Using the model it is possible to simulate or evaluate the importance of different factors for designing of the nano-scale interfacial friction behavior between two kinds of materials in MEMS.

  10. Base Flip in DNA Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulationsof Differently-Oxidized Forms of Methyl-Cytosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bagherpoor Helabad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Distortions in the DNA sequence, such as damage or mispairs, are specifically recognized and processed by DNA repair enzymes. Many repair proteins and, in particular, glycosylases flip the target base out of the DNA helix into the enzyme’s active site. Our molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with intact and damaged (oxidized methyl-cytosine show that the probability of being flipped is similar for damaged and intact methyl-cytosine. However, the accessibility of the different 5-methyl groups allows direct discrimination of the oxidized forms. Hydrogen-bonded patterns that vary between methyl-cytosine forms carrying a carbonyl oxygen atom are likely to be detected by the repair enzymes and may thus help target site recognition.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juanfang LIU; Danling ZENG; Qin LI; Hong GAO

    2008-01-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was performed on water to calculate its diffusivity by adopting different potential models. The results show that the potential models have great influence on the simulated results. In addition, the diffusivities obtained by the SPCE model conform well to the experimental values.

  12. Progress in quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a microscopic simulation method of the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and its extensions to high- and low-energy regions are reported. Combined with the statistical decay calculation, QMD can reproduce experimental data with fixed and very few parameters. (J.P.N.)

  13. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation. PMID:26688211

  14. Novel Readout Method for Molecular Diagnostic Assays Based on Optical Measurements of Magnetic Nanobead Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donolato, Marco; Antunes, Paula Soares Martins; Bejhed, Rebecca S.;

    2015-01-01

    behavior. We prove that the optical transmission spectra are highly sensitive to the formation of permanent MNB clusters and, thereby to the target analyte concentration. As a specific clinically relevant diagnostic case, we detect DNA coils formed via padlock probe recognition and isothermal rolling......We demonstrate detection of DNA coils formed from a Vibrio cholerae DNA target at picomolar concentrations using a novel optomagnetic approach exploiting the dynamic behavior and optical anisotropy of magnetic nanobead (MNB) assemblies. We establish that the complex second harmonic optical...... transmission spectra of MNB suspensions measured upon application of a weak uniaxial AC magnetic field correlate well with the rotation dynamics of the individual MNBs. Adding a target analyte to the solution leads to the formation of permanent MNB clusters, namely, to the suppression of the dynamic MNB...

  15. The Application of Molecular Dynamics in Fullerene-Based Journal Bearing Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kornaev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to modeling of the molecular microscopic journal bearing. The walls and the lubricant of the bearing are fullerene-like molecules. On the basis of similarity theory and analysis of the dimensions, the similarity criterion is proposed. This criterion characterizes the convergence of a numerical solution. The test calculation is also made to evaluate the quality of the proposed criterion.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the binding of purine bases to the aptamer domain of the guanine sensing riboswitch

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Alessandra; Wöhnert, Jens; Stock, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Riboswitches are a novel class of genetic control elements that function through the direct interaction of small metabolite molecules with structured RNA elements. The ligand is bound with high specificity and affinity to its RNA target and induces conformational changes of the RNA's secondary and tertiary structure upon binding. To elucidate the molecular basis of the remarkable ligand selectivity and affinity of one of these riboswitches, extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in...

  17. Quantitatively analyzing phonon spectral contribution of thermal conductivity based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. II. From time Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2015-11-01

    From a nanoscale heat transfer point of view, currently one of the most interesting and challenging tasks is to quantitatively analyze phonon mode specific transport properties in solid materials, which plays a vital role in many emerging and diverse technological applications. It has not been long that such information can be provided by the phonon spectral energy density (SED) or equivalently time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) methods in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. However, few methods have been developed for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations [Phys. Rev. B 91, 115426 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.115426], the other widely used computational method for calculating thermal transport of materials in addition to EMD. In this work, a computational scheme based on time Fourier transform of atomistic heat current, called the frequency domain direct decomposed method (FDDDM), is proposed to analyze the contributions of frequency dependent thermal conductivity in NEMD simulations. The FDDDM results of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber Si are compared with the TDNMA method from EMD simulation. Similar trends are found for both cases, which confirm the validity of our FDDDM approach. Benefiting from the inherent nature of NEMD and the theoretical formula that does not require any temperature assumption, the FDDDM can be directly used to investigate the size and temperature effect. Moreover, the unique advantage of FDDDM prior to previous methods (such as SED and TDNMA) is that it can be straightforwardly used to characterize the phonon frequency dependent thermal conductivity of disordered systems, such as amorphous materials. The FDDDM approach can also be a good candidate to be used to understand the phonon behaviors and thus provides useful guidance for designing efficient structures for advanced thermal management.

  18. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  19. Structure Based Docking and Molecular Dynamic Studies of Plasmodial Cysteine Proteases against a South African Natural Compound and its Analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musyoka, Thommas M; Kanzi, Aquillah M; Lobb, Kevin A; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential drug targets as well as development of novel antimalarial chemotherapies with unique mode of actions due to drug resistance by Plasmodium parasites are inevitable. Falcipains (falcipain-2 and falcipain-3) of Plasmodium falciparum, which catalyse the haemoglobin degradation process, are validated drug targets. Previous attempts to develop peptide based drugs against these enzymes have been futile due to the poor pharmacological profiles and susceptibility to degradation by host enzymes. This study aimed to identify potential non-peptide inhibitors against falcipains and their homologs from other Plasmodium species. Structure based virtual docking approach was used to screen a small non-peptidic library of natural compounds from South Africa against 11 proteins. A potential hit, 5α-Pregna-1,20-dien-3-one (5PGA), with inhibitory activity against plasmodial proteases and selectivity on human cathepsins was identified. A 3D similarity search on the ZINC database using 5PGA identified five potential hits based on their docking energies. The key interacting residues of proteins with compounds were identified via molecular dynamics and free binding energy calculations. Overall, this study provides a basis for further chemical design for more effective derivatives of these compounds. Interestingly, as these compounds have cholesterol-like nuclei, they and their derivatives might be well tolerated in humans. PMID:27030511

  20. A comprehensive molecular dynamics study on the self-assembly and properties of SiC based cage structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congyan; Xin, Zihua; Yu, Ming; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Shanghai University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    A molecular dynamics study to investigate a plausible way of fabricating SiC based cage structures has been performed. In this work, the existence of the stable SiC based cage nanostructures SimCn with the size up to about 2.05nm in diameter and the compositions n/(n +m) from 0.4 to 0.6 has been demonstrated using an efficient semi-empirical Hamiltonian method (SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. The structural properties are analyzed in terms of the composition, the bonding nature, the surface environment, the local strain, and types of ring structures. It is found that the sp2 bonding nature between Si and C atoms and the environmental mediation are two key factors for the self-assembly of the stable SiC based cage structures. In particular, the transition from one stable cage structure to another of similar composition might occur due to the mending process in the self-assembly. The first and second authors acknowledge the support from the NSFC (grant No.: 61176118) and 085 project of Shanghai University (China) for this work.

  1. Molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of AFM-based nanoscratching process with water-layer lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MD simulations are conducted to study the water-lubricated nanoscratching process. • The water layer has positive impact on the surface quality. • Comparisons are made in aspects of deformation, forces, and fricion coefficients. • Effects of water thickness, scratching depth and velocity are thoroughly studied. - Abstract: The atomic force microscopy (AFM) based direct nanoscratching has been thoroughly studied but the mechanism of nanoscratching with water-layer lubrication is yet to be well understood. In current study, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the effects of the water-layer lubrication on the AFM-based nanoscratching process on monocrystalline copper. Comparisons of workpiece deformation, scratching forces, and friction coefficients are made between the water-lubricated and dry scratching under various thickness of water layer, scratching depth and scratching velocity. Simulation results reveal that the water layer has positive impact on the surface quality and significant influence on the scratching forces (normal forces and tangential forces). The friction coefficients of the tip in water-lubricated nanoscratching are significantly bigger than those in the dry process. Our simulation results shed lights on a promising AFM-based nanofabrication method, which can assist to get nanoscale surface morphologies with higher quality than traditional approaches

  2. Color Molecular-Dynamics for High Density Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo

    1999-01-01

    We propose a microscopic simulation for quark many-body system based on molecular dynamics. Using color confinement and one-gluon exchange potentials together with the meson exchange potentials between quarks, we construct nucleons and nuclear/quark matter. Statistical feature and the dynamical change between confinement and deconfinement phases are studied with this molecular dynamics simulation.

  3. Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the `Classical Wigner' approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this `Matsubara dynamics' gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by disc...

  4. Identification of potent inhibitors for -secretase through structure based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mobeen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder in elderly persons aged above 65 years. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP by -secretase generates peptide fragment A42, the main cause of memory and cognitive defects in AD. Therefore, elevated level of -secretase results in accumulation of insoluble form of A peptides (senile plaques representing the protein as an attractive drug target of AD. Methods: Five recently reported -secretase antagonist (thiazolidinediones, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, SC7 and tartaric acid structural analogs were searched from ligand info database and prepared using LigPrep. The crystal structure of -secretase was optimized using Maestro v9.2 protein preparation wizard applying optimized potential for liquid simulations (OPLS-2005 force field. Structure based virtual screening was performed for -secretase from prepared ligands using virtual screening workflow of Maestro v9.2 and was ranked based on XP Gscore. Results: Eight lead molecules were identified to have better binding affinity (lower XP Gscore compared to five existing -secretase antagonists and appear to have good pharmacological properties. Binding orientations of the lead molecules were in well agreement with existing inhibitors. Lead1 showed lowest XP Gscore (-10.72 Kcal/mol. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of -secretase-lead1 complex was stable in all trajectories. Conclusion: Lead1 is proposed as potent inhibitor of -secretase and thus could be considered for rational drug design against AD.

  5. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  6. Molecular Dynamics for Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called the quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to the neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions on the nuclear structure. First we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that the pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With increase of density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei change to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we dis...

  7. Nanopore Analysis of Nucleic Acids: Single-Molecule Studies of Molecular Dynamics, Structure, and Base Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasagasti, Felix; Deamer, David W.

    Nucleic acids are linear polynucleotides in which each base is covalently linked to a pentose sugar and a phosphate group carrying a negative charge. If a pore having roughly the crosssectional diameter of a single-stranded nucleic acid is embedded in a thin membrane and a voltage of 100 mV or more is applied, individual nucleic acids in solution can be captured by the electrical field in the pore and translocated through by single-molecule electrophoresis. The dimensions of the pore cannot accommodate anything larger than a single strand, so each base in the molecule passes through the pore in strict linear sequence. The nucleic acid strand occupies a large fraction of the pore's volume during translocation and therefore produces a transient blockade of the ionic current created by the applied voltage. If it could be demonstrated that each nucleotide in the polymer produced a characteristic modulation of the ionic current during its passage through the nanopore, the sequence of current modulations would reflect the sequence of bases in the polymer. According to this basic concept, nanopores are analogous to a Coulter counter that detects nanoscopic molecules rather than microscopic [1,2]. However, the advantage of nanopores is that individual macromolecules can be characterized because different chemical and physical properties affect their passage through the pore. Because macromolecules can be captured in the pore as well as translocated, the nanopore can be used to detect individual functional complexes that form between a nucleic acid and an enzyme. No other technique has this capability.

  8. Effects of temperature and isotopic substitution on electron attachment dynamics of guanine-cytosine base pair: Ring-polymer and classical molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Yusuke; Seki, Yusuke; Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical process of electron attachment to a guanine-cytosine pair in the normal (h-GC) and deuterated (d-GC) forms has been studied theoretically by semiclassical ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) simulations using the empirical valence bond model. The initially formed dipole-bound anion is converted rapidly to the valence-bound anion within about 0.1 ps in both h-GC and d-GC. However, the subsequent proton transfer in h-GC occurs with a rate five times greater than the deuteron transfer in d-GC. The change of rates with isotopic substitution and temperature variation in the RPMD simulations are quantitatively and qualitatively different from those in the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, demonstrating the importance of nuclear quantum effects on the dynamics of this system.

  9. Reactive molecular dynamics study of Mo-based alloys under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenkov, Alex; Newsome, David; Verners, Osvalds; Russo, Michael F.; Zaharieva, Roussislava; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-07-01

    Structural metal alloys are of vital importance for a clean energy economy, but the current trial-and-error alloy development methodology is expensive and time consuming. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of the ReaxFF force field model to predict mechanical properties and provide a fully dynamic description of oxidation and sulfidation of Mo-based alloys under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. The advantage of the ReaxFF approach is in its ability to model the formation and breaking of chemical bonds within the quantum framework but several orders of magnitude faster than the traditional density functional theory models. ReaxFF-MD predictions were compared to the literature Mo shock compression measurements at 300 K and 1673 K in the pressure range of 0-350 Pa, and densities and Young's modulus in the temperature range of 300-1500 K. Analysis of oxidation of Mo and Ni clusters and surface slabs showed that Mo oxidation proceeded at a significantly higher rate than the Ni oxidation and involved oxygen transport inside the metal cluster coupled to large heat release that caused extensive surface melting. The oxidation simulations of Mo3Ni clusters showed high production of Mo oxides and a low concentration of Ni-oxides in the gas phase. This was attributed to the higher chemical stability of Mo-oxide gas phase species. Modeling of H2S interactions with Mo slab demonstrated that sulfur atoms increasingly agglomerated in the surfaces layers of the slab as the simulation proceeded, diffusing deeper into the slab in their atomic forms. A combined ReaxFF Mo/Ni/C/O/N/S/H parameter set enabled us to obtain a detailed atomistic analysis of complex physical and chemical events during the combustion of a complex fuel molecule on a reactor surface.

  10. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference

  11. Rheology via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, W.G.

    1982-10-01

    The equilibrium molecular dynamics formulated by Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton has been modified in order to simulate rheologial molecular flows with fast computers. This modified Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) has been applied to fluid and solid deformations, under both homogeneous and shock conditions, as well as to the transport of heat. The irreversible heating associated with dissipation could be controlled by carrying out isothermal NEMD calculations. The new isothermal NEMD equations of motion are consistent with Gauss' 1829 Least-Constraint principle as well as certain microscopic equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical formulations due to Gibbs and Boltzmann. Application of isothermal NEMD revealed high-frequency and high-strain-rate behavior for simple fluids which resembled the behavior of polymer solutions and melts at lower frequencies and strain rates. For solids NEMD produces plastic flows consistent with experimental observations at much lower strain rates. The new nonequilibrium methods also suggest novel formulations of thermodynamics in nonequilibrium systems and shed light on the failure of the Principle of Material Frame Indifference.

  12. Research on structures, mechanical properties, and mechanical responses of TKX-50 and TKX-50 based PBX with molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Song; Li, Yajin; Li, Yang; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-02-01

    To improve the practicality and safety of a novel explosive dihydroxylamm onium 5,5'-bis (tetrazole)-1,1'-diolate (TKX-50), polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and polychlorotrifluoroe-thylene (PCTFE) were respectively added to the TKX-50, forming the polymer-bonded explosives (PBX). Interfacial and mechanical properties of PBX were investigated through molecular dynamics (MD) method, desensitizing mechanisms of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 were researched by compression and bulk shear simulations. Results show that the binding energies (E bind ) between polymers (PVDF or PCTFE) and TKX-50 surfaces all rank in order of (011) > (100) > (010), shorter interatomic distance and the resulted higher potentials lead to higher E bind on TKX-50/PVDF interfaces than that on PCTFE/TKX-50 interfaces. Compared with TKX-50, the ductility of PBX is improved due to the isotropic mechanical property and flexibility of fluorine-polymers especially the PCTFE. Desensitizing effect of fluorine-polymers for TKX-50 is found under loading condition, which is attributed to the enhanced compressibility and buffer capacity against external pressure in compression, as well as the improved lubricity to reduce the sliding potentials in bulk shear process. Graphical Abstract Comparisons of the internal stress and slide potentials of the novel explosive,TKX-50 and its based PBX. Desensitizing effects can be found by the adding of fluorine-polymers, it owes to their better flexibility and lubricity as well as the amorphous nature. PMID:26809515

  13. Identification of dengue viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor using computational fragment-based approaches and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusuya, Shanmugam; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-07-01

    Dengue is a major public health concern in tropical and subtropical countries of the world. There are no specific drugs available to treat dengue. Even though several candidates targeted both viral and host proteins to overcome dengue infection, they have not yet entered into the later stages of clinical trials. In order to design a drug for dengue fever, newly emerged fragment-based drug designing technique was applied. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, which is essential for dengue viral replication is chosen as a drug target for dengue drug discovery. A cascade of methods, fragment screening, fragment growing, and fragment linking revealed the compound [2-(4-carbamoylpiperidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]8-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)naphthalene-1-carboxylate as a potent dengue viral polymerase inhibitor. Both strain energy and binding free energy calculations predicted that this could be a better inhibitor than the existing ones. Molecular dynamics simulation studies showed that the dengue polymerase-lead complex is stable and their interactions are consistent throughout the simulation. The hydrogen-bonded interactions formed by the residues Arg792, Thr794, Ser796, and Asn405 are the primary contributors for the stability and the rigidity of the polymerase-lead complex. This might keep the polymerase in closed conformation and thus inhibits viral replication. Hence, this might be a promising lead molecule for dengue drug designing. Further optimization of this lead molecule would result in a potent drug for dengue. PMID:26262439

  14. Characterization of the viscoelastic behavior of a simplified collagen micro-fibril based on molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, Hossein; Darvish, Kurosh

    2016-10-01

    Collagen fibril is a major component of connective tissues such as bone, tendon, blood vessels, and skin. The mechanical properties of this highly hierarchical structure are greatly influenced by the presence of covalent cross-links between individual collagen molecules. This study investigates the viscoelastic behavior of a collagen lysine-lysine cross-link based on creep simulations with applied forces in the range or 10 to 2000pN using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). The viscoelastic model of the cross-link was combined with a system composed by two segments of adjacent collagen molecules hence representing a reduced viscoelastic model for a simplified micro-fibril. It was found that the collagen micro-fibril assembly had a steady-state Young׳s modulus ranging from 2.24 to 3.27GPa, which is in agreement with reported experimental measurements. The propagation of longitudinal force wave along the molecule was implemented by adding a delay element to the model. The force wave speed was found to be correlated with the speed of one-dimensional elastic waves in rods. The presented reduced model with three degrees of freedom can serve as a building block for developing models of the next level of hierarchy, i.e., a collagen fibril. PMID:27341288

  15. Optimal control theory for quantum-classical systems: Ehrenfest molecular dynamics based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive the fundamental equations of an optimal control theory for systems containing both quantum electrons and classical ions. The system is modeled with Ehrenfest dynamics, a non-adiabatic variant of molecular dynamics. The general formulation, that needs the fully correlated many-electron wavefunction, can be simplified by making use of time-dependent density-functional theory. In this case, the optimal control equations require some modifications that we will provide. The abstract general formulation is complemented with the simple example of the H2+ molecule in the presence of a laser field. (paper)

  16. Laser Controlled Molecular Orientation Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular orientation is a challenging control issue covering a wide range of applications from reactive collisions, high order harmonic generation, surface processing and catalysis, to nanotechnologies. The laser control scenario rests on the following three steps: (i) depict some basic mechanisms producing dynamical orientation; (ii) use them both as computational and interpretative tools in optimal control schemes involving genetic algorithms; (iii) apply what is learnt from optimal control to improve the basic mechanisms. The existence of a target molecular rotational state combining the advantages of efficient and post-pulse long duration orientation is shown. A strategy is developed for reaching such a target in terms of a train of successive short laser pulses applied at predicted time intervals. Each individual pulse imparts a kick to the molecule which orients. Transposition of such strategies to generic systems is now under investigation

  17. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  18. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  19. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation of dynamic crack stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of molecular-dynamics simulations has been performed in order to evaluate the effects of several physical factors on dynamic crack stability. These factors are the crystalline structure and the interatomic interaction modeled by various empirical potentials. For brittle crack propagation at low temperature we find that steady-state crack velocities are limited to a band of accessible values. Increasing the overload beyond KIc, the crack can propagate with a steady-state velocity, which quickly reaches the terminal velocity of about 0.4 of the Rayleigh wave speed. The magnitude of the terminal velocity can be related to the nonlinearity of the interatomic interaction. Further increasing the overload does not change the steady-state velocity dramatically, but significantly increases the amplitude of acoustic emission from the crack tip. Loading the crack even further leads to instabilities which take the form of cleavage steps, dislocation emission, or branching. The instability is closely related to the buildup of a localized coherent, phononlike field generated by the bond-breaking events. The form of the instability depends critically on crystal structure and on the crystallographic orientation of the crack system but can also be correlated with the relative ease of dislocation generation (and motion). copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  2. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X1Σ+ and a3Σ+ states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X2Σ+ states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm-1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 5000K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  3. Evaluation of neutron energy spectrum effects and RPV thru-wall attenuation based on molecular dynamics cascade simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Displacement cascade formation in iron has been investigated by the method of molecular dynamics (MD) for cascade energies up to 40 keV. The results of these simulations have been used in the specomp code to obtain effective, energy-dependent cross sections for two measures of primary damage production: (1) the number of surviving point defects expressed as a fraction of the those predicted by the standard secondary displacement model by Norgett et al., 1975 [M.J. Norgett, M.T. Robinson, and I.M. Torrens (1975)] and (2) the fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters that formed during the cascade event. The primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectra for iron obtained from the specter code have been used to weight these MD-based damage production cross sections in order to obtain spectrally-averaged values for several locations in commercial fission reactors and test reactors. An evaluation of these results indicates that neutron energy spectrum differences between the various environments do not lead to significant differences between the average primary damage formation parameters. In particular, spectrum-averaged defect production cross sections obtained for PWR and BWR neutron spectra were not significantly different. A representative application of the new defect production cross sections is provided by examining how they vary as a function of depth into the reactor pressure vessel wall. A slight difference was noted between the damage attenuation in a PWR vessel and a BWR vessel. This observation could be explained by a subtle difference in the energy dependence of the neutron spectra. Overall, the simulations indicate that spectrum-averaged defect production cross sections do not vary much among the various environments in light-water moderated fission reactors

  4. Enhanced Conformational Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvated Peptides: Fragment-Based Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Halvor S; Daura, Xavier; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, fragment-based local elevation umbrella sampling (FB-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the conformational sampling in explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of solvated polymers. The method is derived from the local elevation umbrella sampling (LEUS) method [ Hansen and Hünenberger , J. Comput. Chem. 2010 , 31 , 1 - 23 ], which combines the local elevation (LE) conformational searching and the umbrella sampling (US) conformational sampling approaches into a single scheme. In LEUS, an initial (relatively short) LE build-up (searching) phase is used to construct an optimized (grid-based) biasing potential within a subspace of conformationally relevant degrees of freedom, which is then frozen and used in a (comparatively longer) US sampling phase. This combination dramatically enhances the sampling power of MD simulations but, due to computational and memory costs, is only applicable to relevant subspaces of low dimensionalities. As an attempt to expand the scope of the LEUS approach to solvated polymers with more than a few relevant degrees of freedom, the FB-LEUS scheme involves an US sampling phase that relies on a superposition of low-dimensionality biasing potentials optimized using LEUS at the fragment level. The feasibility of this approach is tested using polyalanine (poly-Ala) and polyvaline (poly-Val) oligopeptides. Two-dimensional biasing potentials are preoptimized at the monopeptide level, and subsequently applied to all dihedral-angle pairs within oligopeptides of 4,  6,  8, or 10 residues. Two types of fragment-based biasing potentials are distinguished: (i) the basin-filling (BF) potentials act so as to "fill" free-energy basins up to a prescribed free-energy level above the global minimum; (ii) the valley-digging (VD) potentials act so as to "dig" valleys between the (four) free-energy minima of the two-dimensional maps, preserving barriers (relative to linearly interpolated free-energy changes) of a prescribed magnitude

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation for modelling plasma spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Talin, B; Calisti, A; Gigosos, M A; González, M A; Gaztelurrutia, T R; Dufty, J W

    2003-01-01

    The ion-electron coupling properties for an ion impurity in an electron gas and for a two-component plasma are carried out on the basis of a regularized electron-ion potential removing the short-range Coulomb divergence. This work is largely motivated by the study of radiator dipole relaxation in plasmas which makes a real link between models and experiments. Current radiative property models for plasmas include single electron collisions neglecting charge-charge correlations within the classical quasi-particle approach commonly used in this field. The dipole relaxation simulation based on electron-ion molecular dynamics proposed here will provide a means to benchmark and improve model developments. Benefiting from a detailed study of a single ion embedded in an electron plasma, the challenging two-component ion-electron molecular dynamics simulations are proved accurate. They open new possibilities of obtaining reference lineshape data.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  7. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic Mole...

  8. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic...

  9. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD); Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  10. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of 15N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S2) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S2) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S2 values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S2 parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S2 calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S2) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models

  11. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  12. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. → Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. → Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  13. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossis, Fabrizio [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical Biology and Medical Physics (DIBIFIM), University of Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy); Palese, Luigi L., E-mail: palese@biochem.uniba.it [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medical Biology and Medical Physics (DIBIFIM), University of Bari ' Aldo Moro' , Bari (Italy)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  14. Modelling self trapping and trap mutation in tungsten using DFT and Molecular Dynamics with an empirical potential based on DFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density Functional Theory calculations and Molecular Dynamics with a recently developed potential for W–He were used to evaluate the thermal stability of helium–vacancy clusters (nHe.mv) as well as pure interstitial helium clusters in tungsten. The stability of such objects results from a competitive process between thermal emission of vacancies, self interstitial atoms (SIAs) and helium, depending on the helium-to-vacancy ratio in mixed clusters or helium number in pure interstitial helium clusters. We investigated in particular the thermodynamics and kinetics of self trapping and trap mutation, i.e. the emission of one SIA along with the creation of one vacancy from a vacancy–helium or pure helium object

  15. Performance metrics in a hybrid MPI-OpenMP based molecular dynamics simulation with short-range interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Anirban; Raha, Soumyendu; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the computational bottlenecks in molecular dynamics (MD) and describe the challenges in parallelizing the computation intensive tasks. We present a hybrid algorithm using MPI (Message Passing Interface) with OpenMP threads for parallelizing a generalized MD computation scheme for systems with short range interatomic interactions. The algorithm is discussed in the context of nanoindentation of Chromium films with carbon indenters using the Embedded Atom Method potential for Cr Cr interaction and the Morse potential for Cr C interactions. We study the performance of our algorithm for a range of MPIthread combinations and find the performance to depend strongly on the computational task and load sharing in the multicore processor. The algorithm scaled poorly with MPI and our hybrid schemes were observed to outperform the pure message passing scheme, despite utilizing the same number of processors or cores in the cluster. Speed-up achieved by our algorithm compared favourably with that achieved by stan...

  16. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  17. Insight into interaction mechanism of the inhibitor pDI5W with MDM2 based on molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p53-MDM2 interaction has been an important target of drug design curing cancers. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation coupled with molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area method (MM-PBSA) was performed to calculate the binding free energy of peptide inhibitor pDI6W to MDM2. The results show that van der Waals energy is the dominant factor of the pDI6W— MDM2 interaction. Cross-correlation matrix calculated suggests that the main motion of the residues in MMDM2 induced by the inhibitor binding is anti-correlation motion. The calculations of residue-residue interactions between pDI6W and MDM2 not only prove that five residues Phe19', Trp22', Trp23', Leu26' and Thr27' from pDI6W can produce strong interaction with MDM2, but also show that CH-π, CH-CH and π-π interactions drive the binding of pDI6W in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2. This study can provide theoretical helps for anti-cancer drug designs. (authors)

  18. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics: A Virtual Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbi Mobarhan, Milad

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the Hartree-Fock level, where the forces are computed on-the-fly using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The theory behind the Hartree-Fock method is discussed in detail and an implementation of this method based on Gaussian basis functions is explained. We also demonstrate how to calculate the analytic energy derivatives needed for obtaining the forces acting on the nuclei. Hartree-Fock calculations on the ground s...

  19. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav, E-mail: gtom@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in; Shukla, Ratnesh K., E-mail: ratnesh@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  20. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  1. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation (GLE), which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection (LP) technique. Within this framework a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here we discuss that this task is most naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importa...

  2. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled by th...

  3. Dynamics of Ag clusters on complex surfaces: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkis, S.; Krause, J. L.; Fry, J. N.; Cheng, H.-P.

    2009-03-01

    We study the diffusion of silver nanoparticles on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Silver clusters Agn of sizes n=55 , 147, and 1289 were evolved in contact with an alkanethiol (12 carbon, dodecanethiol) SAM deposited on a gold (111) surface. Analysis based on classical molecular dynamics simulations reveals that these systems exhibit a rich variety of behaviors, from superdiffusive for the lightest cluster to pinned for the heaviest, evolution self-similar in lengths and times for the lightest cluster but with characteristic time scales and directional anisotropies emerging for the heavier clusters.

  4. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  5. Insights into mechanism of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as DYRK1A inhibitors based on molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Tian, Yue Li; Zhai, Hong Lin; Lv, Min; Zhang, Xiao Yun

    2016-08-01

    DYRK1A is characterized by the early development and regulation of neuronal proliferation, and its over expression gives rise to neurological abnormalities. As the promising DYRK1A inhibitors, the binding mechanism between DYRK1A and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines derivatives at molecular level are still veiled. In this article, it was achieved to get the structural insights into pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines derivatives as DYRK1A inhibitors by means of comprehensive computational approaches involving molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, free energy calculation, and energy decomposition analysis. The calculated energy values were highly consistent with the experimental activities. Based on the individual energy terms analysis, the van der Waals interaction was the major leading force in the DYRK1A-ligand interaction. Lys188 was the important residue that formed the hydrogen bond, which improved the inhibitory activity. Furthermore, four novel inhibitors with higher predicted activity were designed based on the obtained findings and confirmed by molecular simulations. Our study is expected to provide significant drug design strategy for the development of more promising DYRK1A inhibitors. Proteins 2016; 84:1108-1123. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27119584

  6. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out

  7. A parallel molecular dynamics code based on the liked-cell method and its application to liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Many problems in the Statistical Mechanics of materials may be solved by use of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) technique involving the numerical solution of Newton's equations of motion for a few hundred interacting particles. However, some problems require many thousands to millions of atoms in order to accurately represent the length and/or time scales involved. Examples of such problems are nucleation, phase separation, extended defects and crack propagation. Such large numbers of atoms cannot be treated using existing serial computers and computer codes. Thus, new methods must be sought to tackle such problems. One such method is the use of parallel computers which involves the development of MD codes which will work on computers with parallel architectures. Here we discuss one such implementation of the MD method which uses the linked cells method of Hockney and Eastwood. As an illustration we show how this method performs on a TRANSPUTER array and discuss some applications to problems in liquid state physics

  8. Structure of alkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids at the interface with vacuum and water--a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczny, Jan K; Szefczyk, Borys

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquid (IL) interfaces with vacuum and water are studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. Five ILs are compared: [C2mim][TfO], [C12mim][TfO], [C2mim][NTf2], [C8mim][NTf2] and [C12mim][NTf2], where [C2mim], [C8mim] and [C12mim] stand for 1-ethyl-, 1-octyl- and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cation. Physical properties-density, thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, surface tension, heat of vaporization, self-diffusion coefficient, electric conductivity and viscosity-are calculated and validated against experimental values. The structure of the interfaces is compared in terms of the orientation of the molecules and segregation into layers. It is observed that ILs with short alkyl chains orient at the surface; however, there is no single preferred orientation. ILs with longer chains, on the other hand, orient with alkyl chains protruding into the vacuum at the IL/vacuum interface and into the bulk IL, at the IL/water interface. Anions and water molecules tend to associate with polar imidazolium groups. PMID:25674908

  9. Algorithms for GPU-based molecular dynamics simulations of complex fluids: Applications to water, mixtures, and liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Sergey; Giovinazzo, Mark; Hall, Kyle Wm; Cann, Natalie M

    2015-09-15

    A custom code for molecular dynamics simulations has been designed to run on CUDA-enabled NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). The double-precision code simulates multicomponent fluids, with intramolecular and intermolecular forces, coarse-grained and atomistic models, holonomic constraints, Nosé-Hoover thermostats, and the generation of distribution functions. Algorithms to compute Lennard-Jones and Gay-Berne interactions, and the electrostatic force using Ewald summations, are discussed. A neighbor list is introduced to improve scaling with respect to system size. Three test systems are examined: SPC/E water; an n-hexane/2-propanol mixture; and a liquid crystal mesogen, 2-(4-butyloxyphenyl)-5-octyloxypyrimidine. Code performance is analyzed for each system. With one GPU, a 33-119 fold increase in performance is achieved compared with the serial code while the use of two GPUs leads to a 69-287 fold improvement and three GPUs yield a 101-377 fold speedup. PMID:26174435

  10. Length-scale dependent mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy: Molecular dynamics based model and its experimental verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwary, C. S., E-mail: cst.iisc@gmail.com; Chattopadhyay, K. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chakraborty, S.; Mahapatra, D. R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-05-28

    This paper attempts to gain an understanding of the effect of lamellar length scale on the mechanical properties of two-phase metal-intermetallic eutectic structure. We first develop a molecular dynamics model for the in-situ grown eutectic interface followed by a model of deformation of Al-Al{sub 2}Cu lamellar eutectic. Leveraging the insights obtained from the simulation on the behaviour of dislocations at different length scales of the eutectic, we present and explain the experimental results on Al-Al{sub 2}Cu eutectic with various different lamellar spacing. The physics behind the mechanism is further quantified with help of atomic level energy model for different length scale as well as different strain. An atomic level energy partitioning of the lamellae and the interface regions reveals that the energy of the lamellae core are accumulated more due to dislocations irrespective of the length-scale. Whereas the energy of the interface is accumulated more due to dislocations when the length-scale is smaller, but the trend is reversed when the length-scale is large beyond a critical size of about 80 nm.

  11. Length-scale dependent mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy: Molecular dynamics based model and its experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper attempts to gain an understanding of the effect of lamellar length scale on the mechanical properties of two-phase metal-intermetallic eutectic structure. We first develop a molecular dynamics model for the in-situ grown eutectic interface followed by a model of deformation of Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectic. Leveraging the insights obtained from the simulation on the behaviour of dislocations at different length scales of the eutectic, we present and explain the experimental results on Al-Al2Cu eutectic with various different lamellar spacing. The physics behind the mechanism is further quantified with help of atomic level energy model for different length scale as well as different strain. An atomic level energy partitioning of the lamellae and the interface regions reveals that the energy of the lamellae core are accumulated more due to dislocations irrespective of the length-scale. Whereas the energy of the interface is accumulated more due to dislocations when the length-scale is smaller, but the trend is reversed when the length-scale is large beyond a critical size of about 80 nm.

  12. Quantum dynamics of complex molecular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, William H.

    2005-01-01

    This Perspective presents a broad overview of the present status of theoretical capabilities for describing quantum dynamics in molecular systems with many degrees of freedom, e.g., chemical reactions in solution, clusters, solids, or biomolecular environments.

  13. Dynamical processes in atomic and molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogurtsov, Gennadi

    2012-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics underlie a basis for our knowledge of fundamental processes in nature and technology and in such applications as solid state physics, chemistry and biology. In recent years, atomic and molecular physics has undergone a revolutionary change due to great achievements in computing and experimental techniques. As a result, it has become possible to obtain information both on atomic and molecular characteristics and on dynamics of atomic and molecular processes. This e-book highlights the present state of investigations in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Rece

  14. Ab initio mass tensor molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchida, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Mass tensor molecular dynamics was first introduced by Bennett [J. Comput. Phys. 19, 267 (1975)] for efficient sampling of phase space through the use of generalized atomic masses. Here, we show how to apply this method to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with minimal computational overhead. Test calculations on liquid water show a threefold reduction in computational effort without making the fixed geometry approximation. We also present a simple recipe for estimating the optimal ato...

  15. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Y.; Feixas, F; Eun, C; McCammon, JA

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native ...

  16. Molecular Dynamic Simulation on High Performance Infrastrucutres

    OpenAIRE

    Bergant, Anže

    2016-01-01

    This thesis covers comparison between different computer platforms of high performance computing while performing molecular dynamics simulations, which falls under very complex problems and needs lots of processing power. Our goal was to critically evaluate different platforms while solving molecular dynamics, so we used 1 to 16 processor cores on a computer cluster and one and two graphics processing units (GPU) for simulations. The results will be used while planning on buying new computer ...

  17. Atomic dynamics of alumina melt: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn, S.; P. A. Madden

    2008-01-01

    The atomic dynamics of Al2O3 melt are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The particle interactions are described by an advanced ionic interaction model that includes polarization effects and ionic shape deformations. The model has been shown to reproduce accurately the static structure factors S(Q) from neutron and x-ray diffraction and the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) from inelastic x-ray scattering. Analysis of the partial dynamic structure factors shows inelastic features in the ...

  18. Structural Determinants of Improved Fluorescence in a Family of Bacteriophytochrome-Based Infrared Fluorescent Proteins: Insights from Continuum Electrostatic Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Lafaye, Céline; Shu, Xiaokun; Royant, Antoine; Field, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray crystallography, continuum electrostatic calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structure, protonation behavior, and dynamics of the biliverdin chromophore and its molecular environment in a series of genetically engineered infrared fluorescent proteins (IFPs) based on the chromophore-binding domain of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome. Our study suggests that the experimentally observed enhancement of fluorescent properties results from the improved rigidity and planarity of the biliverdin chromophore, in particular of the first two pyrrole rings neighboring the covalent linkage to the protein. We propose that the increases in the levels of both motion and bending of the chromophore out of planarity favor the decrease in fluorescence. The chromophore-binding pocket in some of the studied proteins, in particular the weakly fluorescent parent protein, is shown to be readily accessible to water molecules from the solvent. These waters entering the chromophore region form hydrogen bond networks that affect the otherwise planar conformation of the first three rings of the chromophore. On the basis of our simulations, the enhancement of fluorescence in IFPs can be achieved either by reducing the mobility of water molecules in the vicinity of the chromophore or by limiting the interactions of the nearby protein residues with the chromophore. Finally, simulations performed at both low and neutral pH values highlight differences in the dynamics of the chromophore and shed light on the mechanism of fluorescence loss at low pH. PMID:27471775

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  20. Multiple branched adaptive steered molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Gungor; Keyes, Thomas; Quirk, Stephen; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-08-01

    Steered molecular dynamics, SMD, [S. Park and K. Schulten, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5946 (2004)] combined with Jarzynski's equality has been used widely in generating free energy profiles for various biological problems, e.g., protein folding and ligand binding. However, the calculated averages are generally dominated by "rare events" from the ensemble of nonequilibrium trajectories. The recently proposed adaptive steered molecular dynamics, ASMD, introduced a new idea for selecting important events and eliminating the non-contributing trajectories, thus decreasing the overall computation needed. ASMD was shown to reduce the number of trajectories needed by a factor of 10 in a benchmarking study of decaalanine stretching. Here we propose a novel, highly efficient "multiple branching" (MB) version, MB-ASMD, which obtains a more complete enhanced sampling of the important trajectories, while still eliminating non-contributing segments. Compared to selecting a single configuration in ASMD, MB-ASMD offers to select multiple configurations at each segment along the reaction coordinate based on the distribution of work trajectories. We show that MB-ASMD has all benefits of ASMD such as faster convergence of the PMF even when pulling 1000 times faster than the reversible limit while greatly reducing the probability of getting trapped in a non-significant path. We also analyze the hydrogen bond breaking within the decaalanine peptide as we force the helix into a random coil and confirm ASMD results with less noise in the numerical averages.

  1. Carbon and other light element contents in the Earth's core based on first-principles molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yigang; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2012-11-27

    Carbon (C) is one of the candidate light elements proposed to account for the density deficit of the Earth's core. In addition, C significantly affects siderophile and chalcophile element partitioning between metal and silicate and thus the distribution of these elements in the Earth's core and mantle. Derivation of the accretion and core-mantle segregation history of the Earth requires, therefore, an accurate knowledge of the C abundance in the Earth's core. Previous estimates of the C content of the core differ by a factor of ∼20 due to differences in assumptions and methods, and because the metal-silicate partition coefficient of C was previously unknown. Here we use two-phase first-principles molecular dynamics to derive this partition coefficient of C between liquid iron and silicate melt. We calculate a value of 9 ± 3 at 3,200 K and 40 GPa. Using this partition coefficient and the most recent estimates of bulk Earth or mantle C contents, we infer that the Earth's core contains 0.1-0.7 wt% of C. Carbon thus plays a moderate role in the density deficit of the core and in the distribution of siderophile and chalcophile elements during core-mantle segregation processes. The partition coefficients of nitrogen (N), hydrogen, helium, phosphorus, magnesium, oxygen, and silicon are also inferred and found to be in close agreement with experiments and other geochemical constraints. Contents of these elements in the core derived from applying these partition coefficients match those derived by using the cosmochemical volatility curve and geochemical mass balance arguments. N is an exception, indicating its retention in a mantle phase instead of in the core. PMID:23150591

  2. Structural requirements for potential HIV-integrase inhibitors identified using pharmacophore-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Ataul; Pillay, Tahir S

    2016-02-23

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disease which is a collection of symptoms and infections caused by a retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is currently no curative treatment and therapy is reliant on the use of existing anti-retroviral drugs. Pharmacoinformatics approaches have already proven their pivotal role in the pharmaceutical industry for lead identification and optimization. In the current study, we analysed the binding preferences and inhibitory activity of HIV-integrase inhibitors using pharmacoinformatics. A set of 30 compounds were selected as the training set of a total 540 molecules for pharmacophore model generation. The final model was validated by statistical parameters and further used for virtual screening. The best mapped model (R = 0.940, RMSD = 2.847, Q(2) = 0.912, se = 0.498, Rpred(2) = 0.847 and rm(test)(2) = 0.636) explained that two hydrogen bond acceptor and one aromatic ring features were crucial for the inhibition of HIV-integrase. From virtual screening, initial hits were sorted using a number of parameters and finally two compounds were proposed as promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. Drug-likeness properties of the final screened compounds were compared to FDA approved HIV-integrase inhibitors. HIV-integrase structure in complex with the most active and final screened compounds were subjected to 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies to check comparative stability of the complexes. The study suggested that the screened compounds might be promising HIV-integrase inhibitors. The new chemical entities obtained from the NCI database will be subjected to experimental studies to confirm potential inhibition of HIV integrase. PMID:26809073

  3. Insights into the inhibition and mechanism of compounds against LPS-induced PGE2 production: a pathway network-based approach and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhuang; Gu, Jiangyong; Cao, Liang; Ma, Yimin; Su, Zhenzhen; Luo, Fang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Li, Na; Yuan, Gu; Chen, Lirong; Xu, Xiaojie; Xiao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In comparison to the current target-based screening approach, it is increasingly evident that active lead compounds based on disease-related phenotypes are more likely to be translated to clinical trials during drug development. That is, because human diseases are in essence the outcome of the abnormal function of multiple genes, especially in complex diseases. Therefore, as a conventional technology in the early phase of active lead compound discovery, computational methods that can connect molecular interactions and disease-related phenotypes to evaluate the efficacy of compounds are in urgently required. In this work, a computational approach that integrates molecular docking and pathway network analysis (network efficiency and network flux) was developed to evaluate the efficacy of a compound against LPS-induced Prostaglandin E2(PGE2) production. The predicted results were then validated in vitro, and a correlation with the experimental results was analyzed using linear regression. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to explore the molecular mechanism of the most potent compounds. There were 12 hits out of 28 predicted ingredients separated from Reduning injection (RDN). The predicted results have a good agreement with the experimental inhibitory potency (IC50) (correlation coefficient = 0.80). The most potent compounds could target several proteins to regulate the pathway network. This might partly interpret the molecular mechanism of RDN on fever. Meanwhile, the good correlation of the computational model with the wet experimental results might bridge the gap between molecule-target interactions and phenotypic response, especially for multi-target compounds. Therefore, it would be helpful for active lead compound discovery, the understanding of the multiple targets and synergic essence of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). PMID:25228393

  4. Stability analysis of carbon nanotubes based on a novel beam model and Its comparison with Sanders Shell Model and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effects of small-scale parameter on the buckling loads and strains of nanobeams, based on nonlocal Timoshenko beam model. However, the lack of higher order boundary conditions leads to inconsistencies in critical buckling loads. In this paper, we apply a novel approach based on nonlocal Timoshenko kinematics, strain gradient approach and variational methods for deriving all classical and higher-order boundary conditions as well as governing equations. Therefore, closed-form and exact critical buckling loads of nanobeams with various end conditions are investigated. Moreover, the dependence of buckling loads on the small-scale parameter as well as shear deformation coefficient is studied using these new boundary conditions. Then, numerical results from this new beam model are presented for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They illustrate a more accurate buckling response as compared to the previous works. Furthermore, the critical strains are compared with results obtained from molecular dynamic simulations as well as Sanders shell theory and are found to be in good agreement. Results show that unlike the other beam theories, this model can capture correctly the small-scale effects on buckling strains of short CNTs for the shell-type buckling. Moreover, the value of nonlocal constant is calculated for CNTs using molecular dynamic simulation results. (author)

  5. A fermionic molecular dynamics technique to model nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: At sub-nuclear densities of about 1014 g/cm3, nuclear matter arranges itself in a variety of complex shapes. This can be the case in the crust of neutron stars and in core-collapse supernovae. These slab like and rod like structures, designated as nuclear pasta, have been modelled with classical molecular dynamics techniques. We present a technique, based on fermionic molecular dynamics, to model nuclear matter at sub-nuclear densities in a semi classical framework. The dynamical evolution of an antisymmetric ground state is described making the assumption of periodic boundary conditions. Adding the concepts of antisymmetry, spin and probability distributions to classical molecular dynamics, brings the dynamical description of nuclear matter to a quantum mechanical level. Applications of this model vary from investigation of macroscopic observables and the equation of state to the study of fundamental interactions on the microscopic structure of the matter. (author)

  6. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Failure of Ettringite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettringite is an important component in the hydration products of cement paste. To better understand the failure modes under tensile loading of cement-based materials, mechanical properties of each individual hydration product needs to be evaluated at atomic scale. This paper presents a molecular dynamic (MD) method to characterize and understand the mechanical properties of ettringite and its failure modes. The molecular structure of ettringite is established using ReaxFF force field package in LAMMPS. To characterize the atomic failure modes of cement paste, MD simulations were conducted by applying tensile strain load and shear strain load, respectively. In each MD failure simulation, the stress-strain relationship was plotted to quantify the mechanical properties at atomic scale. Then elastic constants of the ettringite crystal structure were calculated from these stress-strain relationships. MD simulations were validated by comparing the mechanical properties calculated from LAMMPS and those acquired from experiments. Future research should be performed on bridging-relationships of mechanical properties between atomic scale and macroscale to provide insights into further understanding the influence of mechanical properties at atomic scale on the performance of cement-based materials at macroscale.

  7. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Failure of Ettringite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Wang, D.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Ettringite is an important component in the hydration products of cement paste. To better understand the failure modes under tensile loading of cement-based materials, mechanical properties of each individual hydration product needs to be evaluated at atomic scale. This paper presents a molecular dynamic (MD) method to characterize and understand the mechanical properties of ettringite and its failure modes. The molecular structure of ettringite is established using ReaxFF force field package in LAMMPS. To characterize the atomic failure modes of cement paste, MD simulations were conducted by applying tensile strain load and shear strain load, respectively. In each MD failure simulation, the stress-strain relationship was plotted to quantify the mechanical properties at atomic scale. Then elastic constants of the ettringite crystal structure were calculated from these stress-strain relationships. MD simulations were validated by comparing the mechanical properties calculated from LAMMPS and those acquired from experiments. Future research should be performed on bridging-relationships of mechanical properties between atomic scale and macroscale to provide insights into further understanding the influence of mechanical properties at atomic scale on the performance of cement-based materials at macroscale.

  8. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, NIST

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  9. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  10. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  11. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    to their microscopic size, molecular motors are governed by principles fundamentally different from those describing the operation of man-made motors such as car engines. In this dissertation the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of molecular machines are studied using the tools of nonequilibrium......Molecular machines, or molecular motors, are small biophysical devices that perform a variety of essential metabolic processes such as DNA replication, protein synthesis and intracellular transport. Typically, these machines operate by converting chemical energy into motion and mechanical work. Due...... statistical mechanics. The first part focuses on noninteracting molecular machines described by a paradigmatic continuum model with the aim of comparing and contrasting such a description to the one offered by the widely used discrete models. Many molecular motors, for example, kinesin involved in cellular...

  12. Advances in molecular vibrations and collision dynamics molecular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bacic, Zatko

    1998-01-01

    This volume focuses on molecular clusters, bound by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds. Twelve chapters review a wide range of recent theoretical and experimental advances in the areas of cluster vibrations, spectroscopy, and reaction dynamics. The authors are leading experts, who have made significant contributions to these topics.The first chapter describes exciting results and new insights in the solvent effects on the short-time photo fragmentation dynamics of small molecules, obtained by combining heteroclusters with femtosecond laser excitation. The second is on theoretical work on effects of single solvent (argon) atom on the photodissociation dynamics of the solute H2O molecule. The next two chapters cover experimental and theoretical aspects of the energetics and vibrations of small clusters. Chapter 5 describes diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations and non additive three-body potential terms in molecular clusters. The next six chapters deal with hydrogen-bonded clusters, refle...

  13. Fast dynamics of molecular bridges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špička, Václav; Kalvová, Anděla; Velický, B.

    T151, č. 1 (2012), s. 1-17. ISSN 0031-8949 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0897 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : time quantum dynamics * nonequilibrium Green-functions * Kadanoff-Baym equations * initial correlations * transportequations * mesoscopic systems Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2012

  14. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  15. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom

  16. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps−1, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps−1. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction

  17. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  18. Methane in carbon nanotube - molecular dynamics simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bartuś, Katarzyna; Bródka, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The behaviour of methane molecules inside carbon nanotube at room temperature is studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A methane molecule is represented either by a shapeless super-atom or by rigid set of 5 interaction centres localised on atoms. Different loadings of methane molecules ranging from the dense gas density to the liquid density, and the influence of flexibility of the CNT on structural and dynamics properties of confined molecules are consid...

  19. Neutron Star Crust and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J; Schneider, A; Berry, D K

    2011-01-01

    In this book chapter we review plasma crystals in the laboratory, in the interior of white dwarf stars, and in the crust of neutron stars. We describe a molecular dynamics formalism and show results for many neutron star crust properties including phase separation upon freezing, diffusion, breaking strain, shear viscosity and dynamics response of nuclear pasta. We end with a summary and discuss open questions and challenges for the future.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  1. Scattering of a proton with the Li4 cluster: Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics description based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Two trajectories for the collision of a proton with the Lithium tetramer. On the left, the proton is scattered away, and a Li2 molecule plus two isolated Lithium atoms result. On the right, the proton is captured and a LiH molecule is created. Highlights: ► Scattering of a proton with Lithium clusters described from first principles. ► Description based on non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. ► The electronic structure is described with time-dependent density-functional theory. ► The method allows to discern reaction channels depending on initial parameters. - Abstract: We have employed non-adiabatic molecular dynamics based on time-dependent density-functional theory to characterize the scattering behavior of a proton with the Li4 cluster. This technique assumes a classical approximation for the nuclei, effectively coupled to the quantum electronic system. This time-dependent theoretical framework accounts, by construction, for possible charge transfer and ionization processes, as well as electronic excitations, which may play a role in the non-adiabatic regime. We have varied the incidence angles in order to analyze the possible reaction patterns. The initial proton kinetic energy of 10 eV is sufficiently high to induce non-adiabatic effects. For all the incidence angles considered the proton is scattered away, except in one interesting case in which one of the Lithium atoms captures it, forming a LiH molecule. This theoretical formalism proves to be a powerful, effective and predictive tool for the analysis of non-adiabatic processes at the nanoscale.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of impact test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahoshi, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan); Schmauder, S.; Ludwig, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an impact test by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to evaluate embrittlement of bcc Fe at different temperatures. A new impact test model is developed for MD simulation. The typical fracture behaviors show transition from brittle to ductile fracture, and a history of the impact loads also demonstrates its transition. We conclude that the impact test by MD could be feasible. (orig.)

  3. Molecular dynamic simulation of directional crystal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, B. V.; Coura, P. Z.; Mesquita, O. N.

    1999-01-01

    We use molecular dynamic to simulate the directional growth of binary mixtures. our results compare very well with analitical and experimental results. This opens up the possibility to probe growth situations which are difficult to reach experimentally, being an important tool for further experimental and theoretical developments in the area of crystal growth.

  4. Molecular dynamics - NMR experiments and simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dračínský, Martin; Hodgkinson, P.; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    Brno : Masaryk University Press, 2015 - (Sklenář, V.). s. 277-278 ISBN 978-80-210-7890-1. [EUROMAR 2015. 05.07.2015-10.07.2015, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics * NMR spectroscopy * MD simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  6. Tracing the molecular basis of transcriptional dynamics in noisy data by using an experiment-based mathematical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybakova, K.N.; Tomaszewska, A.; Mourik, S. van; Blom, J.G.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Carlberg, C.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels, epigenetic status, splicing kinetics and mRNA degradation can each contribute to changes in the mRNA dynamics of a gene. We present a novel method to identify which of these processes is changed in cells in response to external signals or as a result of a dise

  7. Tracing the molecular basis of transcriptional dynamics in noisy data by using an experiment based mathematical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybakova, K.N.; Tomaszewska, A.; Mourik, van S.; Blom, Joke; Westerhoff, H.V.; Carlberg, C.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels, epigenetic status, splicing kinetics and mRNA degradation can each contribute to changes in the mRNA dynamics of a gene. We present a novel method to identify which of these processes is changed in cells in response to external signals or as a result of a dise

  8. Tracing the molecular basis of transcriptional dynamics in noisy data by using an experiment-based mathematical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.N. Rybakova; A. Tomaszewska; S. van Mourik; J. Blom; H.V. Westerhoff; C. Carlberg; F.J. Bruggeman

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels, epigenetic status, splicing kinetics and mRNA degradation can each contribute to changes in the mRNA dynamics of a gene. We present a novel method to identify which of these processes is changed in cells in response to external signals or as a result of a dise

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal. PMID:22304055

  10. Environmental Phosphorus Recovery Based on Molecular Bioscavengers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix

    technology based on biological phosphorus scavengers, to examine fundamental molecular system aspects relevant for such a technology, and to motivate the use of computational techniques throughout an iterative design process of such a technology. A wide spectrum of computational methods, from atomic...... characteristic amino acid distributions of the binding sites. Quantum mechanical methods are used to investigate how phosphate moieties are described using electronic structure methods, and molecular dynamics in combination with quantum mechanics are used to show how the dynamical interaction between phosphates......-scale quantum calculations to macro-scale fluid simulations, are employed to hint at the potential of a recovery technology based on molecular bioscavengers. As a first approach, data mining is used to obtain statistical information about how proteins in nature interact with phosphate groups, thereby revealing...

  11. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  12. Investigation of nuclear multifragmentation using molecular dynamics and restructured aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the stability of excited 197 Au nuclei with respect to multifragmentation. For that we use a dynamical simulation based on molecular dynamics and restructured aggregation. A particular attention is paid to check the stability of the ground state nuclei generated by the simulation. Four kinds of excitations are considered: heat, compression, rotation and a geometrical instability created when a projectile drills a hole in a 197 Au nucleus

  13. THE REFINEMENT OF NMR STRUCTURES BY MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TORDA, AE; VANGUNSTEREN, WF

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the use of molecular dynamics simulations as a tool for the refinement of structures based on NMR data. The procedure always involves the construction of a pseudo-energy term to model the experimental data and we consider the various approaches to this problem. We detail recent work where

  14. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, C; Wehner, J; Hausner, J; Wenzel, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  15. A molecular dynamics simulation code ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulation based on the molecular dynamics (MD) method has become an important tool complementary to experiments and theoretical calculations in a wide range of scientific fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and so on. In the MD method, the Newtonian equations-of-motion of classical particles are integrated numerically to reproduce a phase-space trajectory of the system. In the 1980's, several new techniques have been developed for simulation at constant-temperature and/or constant-pressure in convenient to compare result of computer simulation with experimental results. We first summarize the MD method for both microcanonical and canonical simulations. Then, we present and overview of a newly developed ISIS (Isokinetic Simulation of Soft-spheres) code and its performance on various computers including vector processors. The ISIS code has a capability to make a MD simulation under constant-temperature condition by using the isokinetic constraint method. The equations-of-motion is integrated by a very accurate fifth-order finite differential algorithm. The bookkeeping method is also utilized to reduce the computational time. Furthermore, the ISIS code is well adopted for vector processing: Speedup ratio ranged from 16 to 24 times is obtained on a VP2600/10 vector processor. (author)

  16. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e -ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts : structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts: Structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties. In this work computer simulations of the model glass formers SiO2 and B2O3 are presented, using the techniques of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory (DFT). The latter limits the system size to about 100−200 atoms. SiO2 and B2O3 are the two most important network formers for industri...

  18. Watching coherent molecular structural dynamics during photoreaction: beyond kinetic description

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Henrik T; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Nielsen, Martin M; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of molecular photo-transformations occurring is challenging because of the complex interaction between electronic and nuclear structure. The initially excited electronic energy dissipates into electronic and structural reconfigurations often in less than a billionth of a second. Molecular dynamics induced by photoexcitation have been very successfully studied with femtosecond optical spectroscopies, but electronic and nuclear dynamics are often very difficult to disentangle. X-ray based spectroscopies can reduce the ambiguity between theoretical models and experimental data, but it is only with the recent development of bright ultrafast X-ray sources, that key information during transient molecular processes can be obtained on their intrinsic timescale. We use Free Electron Laser (FEL) based time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements around the Iron K-edge of a spin crossover prototypical compound. We reveal its transformation from the ligand-located electroni...

  19. Open quantum system parameters from molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wüster, Sebastian; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We extract the site energies and spectral densities of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment protein complex of green sulphur bacteria from simulations of molecular dynamics combined with energy gap calculations. Comparing four different combinations of methods, we investigate the origin of quantitative differences regarding site energies and spectral densities obtained previously in the literature. We find that different forcefields for molecular dynamics and varying local energy minima found by the structure relaxation yield significantly different results. Nevertheless, a picture averaged over these variations is in good agreement with experiments and some other theory results. Throughout, we discuss how vibrations external- or internal to the pigment molecules enter the extracted quantities differently and can be distinguished. Our results offer some guidance to set up more computationally intensive calculations for a precise determination of spectral densities in the future. These are required to determ...

  20. Molecular dynamics study of cyclohexane interconversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Chandler, David

    1990-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics calculations are reported for one C 6H 12 molecule in a bath of 250 CS 2 molecules at roomtemperature and liquid densities of 1.0, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 g/cm 3. The solvent contribution to the free energy of activation for the chair-boat isomerization has been determined to high accuracy. The transmission coefficient and reactive flux correlation functions have also been computed. The results obtained agree with earlier conclusions drawn from RISM integral equation calculations and stochastic molecular dynamics calculations. Namely, the solvent effect on the rate manifests a qualitative breakdown of transition state theory and the RRKM picture of unimolecular kinetics. Analysis of the activated trajectories indicate a significant degree of quasiperiodicity.

  1. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  2. Molecular quantum dynamics. From theory to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An educational and accessible introduction to the field of molecular quantum dynamics. Illustrates the importance of the topic for broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes. Presents chosen examples of striking applications, highlighting success stories, summarized by the internationally renowned experts. Including a foreword by Lorenz Cederbaum (University Heidelberg, Germany). This book focuses on current applications of molecular quantum dynamics. Examples from all main subjects in the field, presented by the internationally renowned experts, illustrate the importance of the domain. Recent success in helping to understand experimental observations in fields like heterogeneous catalysis, photochemistry, reactive scattering, optical spectroscopy, or femto- and attosecond chemistry and spectroscopy underline that nuclear quantum mechanical effects affect many areas of chemical and physical research. In contrast to standard quantum chemistry calculations, where the nuclei are treated classically, molecular quantum dynamics can cover quantum mechanical effects in their motion. Many examples, ranging from fundamental to applied problems, are known today that are impacted by nuclear quantum mechanical effects, including phenomena like tunneling, zero point energy effects, or non-adiabatic transitions. Being important to correctly understand many observations in chemical, organic and biological systems, or for the understanding of molecular spectroscopy, the range of applications covered in this book comprises broad areas of science: from astrophysics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, over elementary processes in chemistry, to biological processes (such as the first steps of photosynthesis or vision). Nevertheless, many researchers refrain from entering this domain. The book ''Molecular Quantum Dynamics'' offers them an accessible introduction. Although the

  3. Simulation of Abrasive Machining Using Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwajobi, Akinjide O.; Chen, Xun

    2009-01-01

    The development of ultra–precision processes which can achieve excellent surface finish and tolerance at nanometre level is now a critical requirement for many applications in medical, electronics and energy industry. Presently, it is very difficult to observe the diverse microscopic physical phenomena occurring in nanometric machining through experiments. The use of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be an effective tool for the prediction and the analysis ...

  4. Modelling abrasive machining techniques using molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Oluwajobi, Akinjide O.; Chen, Xun

    2008-01-01

    The development of ultra–precision processes which can achieve nanometre surface finishes and tolerances is now a critical requirement for many applications in medical, electronics and energy industry. Presently, it is very difficult to observe the diverse microscopic physical phenomena occurring in nanometric machining through experiments. The use Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be an effective tool for the prediction and the analysis of these processes at the nanometre scal...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  6. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of expanding infinite matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-fragmentation occurred in an expanding infinite system is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. To evaluate the secondary decay effect, the time evolution of expanding system is proceeded till all fragments are stabilized completely. The fragment mass distribution from the expansion is compared with a percolation model and the cause of the exponential shape is clarified. The cause of small critical temperature is also discussed. (author)

  8. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559. ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  9. Implementation of Accelerated Molecular Dynamics in NAMD

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Harrison, Christopher B.; Schulten, Klaus; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is an enhanced-sampling method that improves the conformational space sampling by reducing energy barriers separating different states of a system. Here we present the implementation of aMD in the parallel simulation program NAMD. We show that aMD simulations performed with NAMD have only a small overhead compared with classical MD simulations. Through example applications to the alanine dipeptide, we discuss the choice of acceleration parameters, the inte...

  10. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Coura, P Z; Costa, B V

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  11. Simulating granular flow with molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ristow, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    We investigate by means of Molecular Dynamics simulations an assembly of spheres to model a granular medium flowing from an upper rectangular chamber through a hole into a lower chamber. Two different two dimensional models are discussed one of them including rotations of the individual spheres. The outflow properties are investigated and compared to experimental data. The qualitative agreement suggests that our models contain the necessary ingredients to describe the outflow properties of gr...

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations using graphics processing units

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, J.A.; Hirst, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly easy to develop software that exploits Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The molecular dynamics simulation community has embraced this recent opportunity. Herein, we outline the current approaches that exploit this technology. In the context of biomolecular simulations, we discuss some of the algorithms that have been implemented and some of the aspects that distinguish the GPU from previous parallel environments. The ubiquity of GPUs and the ingenuity of the simulation com...

  13. Growth of a-axis ZnO films on the defective substrate with different O/Zn ratios: A reactive force field based molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.L. [Institute of Materials Physics and Chemistry, School of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Shahzad, M. Babar [Institute of Materials Physics and Chemistry, School of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Institute of Metals Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qi, Y., E-mail: qiyang@imp.neu.edu.cn [Institute of Materials Physics and Chemistry, School of Sciences, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The O/Zn effect on the non-polar a-axis film growth is studied at the atomic scale. • The optimized film quality is achieved through a series of ReaxFF based MD study. • A film growth mode (singular atom → cluster → chains → continue film) is revealed. • The transformed way of the defective substrate to the perfect stacking is revealed. - Abstract: The understanding of the growth process and formation mechanism of non-polar ZnO films in atomic-scale is crucial in adjusting and controlling the film deposition conditions. Using the advanced reactive force field based molecular dynamics method, we theoretically studied the effect of O/Zn ratios (8/10–10/8) on the quality of ZnO films. The comprehensive investigation of energy and temperature fluctuation profile, radial distribution function, the sputtering and injecting phenomenon, and layer coverage indicated that the film grown under stoichiometric conditions possesses the optimized quality. Furthermore, the auto-transformation ability of the substrate from defective to perfect stacking was presented and discussed by comparing to the perfect structure. The instant film growth configurations, atomic layer snapshots, and the interfacial morphology evolution were provided step-by-step to reveal the defect type and initial film nucleation and growth mechanism.

  14. The mechanism by which P250L mutation impairs flavivirus-NS1 dimerization: an investigation based on molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Edson R A; de Alencastro, Ricardo B; Horta, Bruno A C

    2016-09-01

    The flavivirus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein with as yet undefined biological function. This protein dimerizes when inside infected cells or associated to cell membranes but also forms lipid-associated hexamers when secreted to the extracellular space. A single amino acid substitution (P250L) is capable of preventing the dimerization of NS1 resulting in lower virulence and slower virus replication. In this work, based on molecular dynamics simulations of the dengue-2 virus NS1 [Formula: see text]-ladder monomer as a core model, we found that this mutation can induce several conformational changes that importantly affect critical monomer-monomer interactions. Based on additional simulations, we suggest a mechanism by which a highly orchestrated sequence of events propagate the local perturbations around the mutation site towards the dimer interface. The elucidation of such a mechanism could potentially support new strategies for rational production of live-attenuated vaccines and highlights a step forward in the development of novel anti-flavivirus measures. PMID:27324799

  15. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Nanofluidic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano Rodriguez, Harvey Alexander

    of transport mechanism to drive fluids and solids at the nanoscale. Specifically, we present the results of three different research projects. Throughout the first part of this thesis, we include a comprenhensive introduction to computational nanofluidics and to molecular simulations, and describe...... the molecular dynamics methodology. In the second part of this thesis, we present the results of three different research projects. Fristly, we present a computational study of thermophoresis as a suitable mechanism to drive water droplets confined in different types of carbon nanotubes. We observe a...... motion of the water droplet in opposite direction to the imposed thermal gradient also we measure higher velocities as higher thermal gradients are imposed. Secondly, we present an atomistic analysis of a molecular linear motor fabricated of coaxial carbon nanotubes and powered by thermal gradients. The...

  16. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  17. Control Volume Representation of Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, E R; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2012-01-01

    A Molecular Dynamics (MD) parallel to the Control Volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of [1] Irving and Kirkwood, J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950) over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds' Transport Theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-Control-Volume (LCV) conversion function \\vartheta_{i}, for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the Volume Average (VA, [2] Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys 64, 1152 (1988)) techniques and the Method of Planes (MOP, [3] Todd et al, Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)) emerges natu...

  18. Atomic dynamics of alumina melt: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Jahn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The atomic dynamics of Al2O3 melt are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The particle interactions are described by an advanced ionic interaction model that includes polarization effects and ionic shape deformations. The model has been shown to reproduce accurately the static structure factors S(Q from neutron and x-ray diffraction and the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω from inelastic x-ray scattering. Analysis of the partial dynamic structure factors shows inelastic features in the spectra up to momentum transfers, Q, close to the principal peaks of partial static structure factors. The broadening of the Brillouin line widths is discussed in terms of a frequency dependent viscosity η(ω.

  19. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-01

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results.To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are

  20. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Initiation in Energetic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Haskins, P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper an overview of Molecular Dynamics simulations of chemically reacting systems is described. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of shock initiation in a model energetic material are reported. The use of Molecular Dynamics to model thermal initiation and determine reactions rates in energetic materials is also discussed. Finally, the future potential of MD techniques for energetic materials applications is considered.

  1. Dynamical structure of fluid mercury: Molecular-dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Kozo; Tanaka, Shunichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out molecular-dynamics simulations for nonmetallic fluid mercury in liquid and vapor phases using a Lennard-Jones type effective potential and shown that the structure factors S(Q) and the dynamic structure factors S(Q, omega) of nonmetallic fluid mercury obtained by our MD simulations are in good agreement with recent X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. We conclude from these results that, though the fluid mercury which shows a metal-nonmetal transit...

  2. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata De Paris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand.

  3. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to

  4. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  5. Stability and instability of the isoelectronic UO22+ and PaO2+ actinyl oxo-cations in aqueous solution from density functional theory based molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, Pa(V) mono-cations have been studied in liquid water by means of density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamic simulations (CPMD) and compared with their U(VI) isoelectronic counterparts to understand the peculiar chemical behavior of Pa(V) in aqueous solution. Four different Pa(V) monocationic isomers appear to be stable in liquid water from our simulations: [PaO2(H2O)5]+(aq), [Pa(OH)4(H2O)2]+(aq), [PaO(OH)2(H2O)4]+(aq), and [Pa(OH)4(H2O)3]+(aq). On the other hand, in the case of U(VI) only the uranyl, [UO2(H2O)5]2+(aq), is stable. The other species containing hydroxyl groups replacing one or two oxo bonds are readily converted to uranyl. The Pa-OH bond is stable, while it is suddenly broken in U-OH. This makes possible the formation of a broad variety of Pa(V) species in water and participates to its unique chemical behavior in aqueous solution. Further, the two actinyl oxo-cations in water are different in the ability of the oxygen atoms to form stable and extended H-bond networks for Pa(V) contrary to U(VI). In particular, prot-actinyl is found to have between 2 and 3 hydrogen bonds per oxygen atom while uranyl has between zero and one. (authors)

  6. Large scale atomistic simulation of single-layer graphene growth on Ni(111) surface: molecular dynamics simulation based on a new generation of carbon-metal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-14

    To explore the mechanism of graphene chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on a catalyst surface, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of carbon atom self-assembly on a Ni(111) surface based on a well-designed empirical reactive bond order potential was performed. We simulated single layer graphene with recorded size (up to 300 atoms per super-cell) and reasonably good quality by MD trajectories up to 15 ns. Detailed processes of graphene CVD growth, such as carbon atom dissolution and precipitation, formation of carbon chains of various lengths, polygons and small graphene domains were observed during the initial process of the MD simulation. The atomistic processes of typical defect healing, such as the transformation from a pentagon into a hexagon and from a pentagon-heptagon pair (5|7) to two adjacent hexagons (6|6), were revealed as well. The study also showed that higher temperature and longer annealing time are essential to form high quality graphene layers, which is in agreement with experimental reports and previous theoretical results. PMID:26658834

  7. Molecular Dynamics Study of Ionic Liquid Film Based on [emim][Tf2N] and [emim][TfO] Adsorbed on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Xiang-gui; ZHAO Li; L(U) Zhong-yuan; QIAN Hu-iun

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to study the ionic liquid(IL) crystalline film based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[trifluoromethylsulfonyl]imide([emim][Tf2N]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate([emim][TfO]) on the graphite surface.Our results show that the cations are parallelly dis-tributed to the surface in the l/2 monolayer(ML) crystalline film.The [Tf2N] anions are parallel to the surface with the oxygen atoms at the bottom,whereas the [TfO] anions are perpendicularly distributed to the surface also with the oxygen atoms at the bottom in the 1/2 ML crystalline film.It has been found that the IL-vapor interface strongly influences the arrangement of ions at the interface.The anions in the top layer with the oxygen atoms outmost turn over to make themselves with the F atoms outmost so as to form C-H...O hydrogen bonds with the cations.The calculated orientational ordering shows that in the outmost layer at the IL-vapor interface,the cation rings present either parallel or perpendicular to the surface at 350 K.

  8. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Burkert, U., Allinger, N. L., Molecular Mechanics, York: Maple Press Company, 1982.[2]Daw, M. S. , Baskes, M. I., Embedded-atom method: derivation and application to impurities, surface and other defects in metals, Phys. Rev. B, 1984, 29: 6443-6453.[3]Frenke, D., Smit, B., Understanding Molecular Simulation, San Diego: Academic Press, 1996, 60-67, 125-140.[4]Granick, S., Motions and relaxation of confined liquids, Science, 1991, 253: 1374-1379.[5]Koplik, J., Banavar, J., Willemsen, J., Molecular dynamics of Poisewulle flow and moving contact line, Phys. Rev.Lett., 1988, 60: 1282-1285.[6]Hu, Y. Z., Wang, H., Guo, Y. et al., Simulation of lubricant rheology in thin film lubrication, Part I: simulation of Poiseuille flow, Wear, 1996, 196: 243-259.[7]Zou, K., Li, Z. J, Leng, Y. S. et al. , Surface force apparatus and its application in the study of solid contacts, Chinese Science Bulletin, 1999, 44: 268-271.[8]Stevens, M. , Mondello, M., Grest, G. et al. , Comparison of shear flow of hexadecane in a confined geometry and in bulk,J. Chem. Phys., 1997, 106: 7303-7314.[9]Huang, P., Luo, J. B., Wen, S. Z., Theoretical study on the lubrication failure for tthe lubricants with a limiting shear stress, Tribology International, 1999, 32: 421-426.[10]Ryckaert, J. P. , Bellemans. , A molecular dynamics of alkanes, Faraday Soc. , 1978, 66: 95-106.[11]Wang, H. , Hu, Y. Z., A molecular dynamics study on slip phenomenon at solid-liquid interface, in Proceedings of tthe First AICT, Beijing: Tsinghua University Press, 1998, 295-299.[12]Landman, U., Luedtke, W., Burnham, N. et al., Mechanisms and dynamics of adhesion, nanoindentation, and fracture, Science, 1990, 248: 454-461.[13]Leng, Y. S., Hu, Y. Z., Zheng, L. Q., Adhesive contact of flat-ended wedges: theory and computer experiments, Journal of Tribology, 1999, 121: 128-132.

  9. Molecular dynamic results on transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alder, B.J.; Alley, W.E.

    1978-06-01

    Following a broad discussion of generalized hydrodynamics, three examples are given to illustrate how useful this approach is in extending hydrodynamics to nearly the scale of molecular dimensions and the time between collisions, principally by including viscoelastic effects. The three examples concern the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function, the decay of fluctuations in a resonating system, and the calculation of the dynamic structure factor obtained from neutron scattering. In the latter case the molecular dynamics results are also compared to the predictions of generalized kinetic theory. Finally it is shown how to implement generalized hydrodynamics both on a microscopic and macroscopic level. Hydrodynamics is unable to account for the long time tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions and the divergent Burnett coefficients observed for the Lorentz gas. Instead, the long time behavior of the Burnett coefficient and the distribution of displacements (the self part of the dynamic structure factor) can be accounted for by a random walk with a waiting time distribution which is chosen to give the correct velocity autocorrelation function. This random walk predicts, in agreement with the observations, that this displacement distribution is Gaussian at long times for the Lorentz gas, while for hard disks it has been found not to be so.

  10. Molecular dynamic results on transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a broad discussion of generalized hydrodynamics, three examples are given to illustrate how useful this approach is in extending hydrodynamics to nearly the scale of molecular dimensions and the time between collisions, principally by including viscoelastic effects. The three examples concern the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function, the decay of fluctuations in a resonating system, and the calculation of the dynamic structure factor obtained from neutron scattering. In the latter case the molecular dynamics results are also compared to the predictions of generalized kinetic theory. Finally it is shown how to implement generalized hydrodynamics both on a microscopic and macroscopic level. Hydrodynamics is unable to account for the long time tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions and the divergent Burnett coefficients observed for the Lorentz gas. Instead, the long time behavior of the Burnett coefficient and the distribution of displacements (the self part of the dynamic structure factor) can be accounted for by a random walk with a waiting time distribution which is chosen to give the correct velocity autocorrelation function. This random walk predicts, in agreement with the observations, that this displacement distribution is Gaussian at long times for the Lorentz gas, while for hard disks it has been found not to be so

  11. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  12. Molecular dynamics studies of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project mainly involves a molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo study of the effect of molecular shape on thermophysical properties of bulk fluids with an emphasis on the aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard we have studied the modeling, simulation methodologies, and predictive and correlating methods for thermodynamic properties of fluids of nonspherical molecules. In connection with modeling we have studied the use of anisotropic site-site potentials, through a modification of the Gay-Berne Gaussian overlap potential, to successfully model the aromatic rings after adding the necessary electrostatic moments. We have also shown these interaction sites should be located at the geometric centers of the chemical groups. In connection with predictive methods, we have shown two perturbation type theories to work well for fluids modeled using one-center anisotropic potentials and the possibility exists for extending these to anisotropic site-site models. In connection with correlation methods, we have studied, through simulations, the effect of molecular shape on the attraction term in the generalized van der Waals equation of state for fluids of nonspherical molecules and proposed a possible form which is to be studied further. We have successfully studied the vector and parallel processing aspects of molecular simulations for fluids of nonspherical molecules

  13. A stochastic phase-field model determined from molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    von Schwerin, Erik

    2010-03-17

    The dynamics of dendritic growth of a crystal in an undercooled melt is determined by macroscopic diffusion-convection of heat and by capillary forces acting on the nanometer scale of the solid-liquid interface width. Its modelling is useful for instance in processing techniques based on casting. The phase-field method is widely used to study evolution of such microstructural phase transformations on a continuum level; it couples the energy equation to a phenomenological Allen-Cahn/Ginzburg-Landau equation modelling the dynamics of an order parameter determining the solid and liquid phases, including also stochastic fluctuations to obtain the qualitatively correct result of dendritic side branching. This work presents a method to determine stochastic phase-field models from atomistic formulations by coarse-graining molecular dynamics. It has three steps: (1) a precise quantitative atomistic definition of the phase-field variable, based on the local potential energy; (2) derivation of its coarse-grained dynamics model, from microscopic Smoluchowski molecular dynamics (that is Brownian or over damped Langevin dynamics); and (3) numerical computation of the coarse-grained model functions. The coarse-grained model approximates Gibbs ensemble averages of the atomistic phase-field, by choosing coarse-grained drift and diffusion functions that minimize the approximation error of observables in this ensemble average. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2010.

  14. Continuous Finite Element Methods of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Qiong Tang; Luohua Liu; Yujun Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are necessary to perform very long integration times. In this paper, we discuss continuous finite element methods for molecular dynamics simulation problems. Our numerical results about AB diatomic molecular system and A2B triatomic molecules show that linear finite element and quadratic finite element methods can better preserve the motion characteristics of molecular dynamics, that is, properties of energy conservation and long-term stability. So finite elemen...

  15. Parallelization of quantum molecular dynamics simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum molecular dynamics simulation code has been developed for the analysis of the thermalization of photon energies in the molecule or materials in Kansai Research Establishment. The simulation code is parallelized for both Scalar massively parallel computer (Intel Paragon XP/S75) and Vector parallel computer (Fujitsu VPP300/12). Scalable speed-up has been obtained with a distribution to processor units by division of particle group in both parallel computers. As a result of distribution to processor units not only by particle group but also by the particles calculation that is constructed with fine calculations, highly parallelization performance is achieved in Intel Paragon XP/S75. (author)

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrostatic Energy Calculations for Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Love, M J; Comment, Henri J.F. Jansen; Love, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of Coulomb forces is a difficult task. The summations that are involved converge only conditionally and care has to be taken in selecting the appropriate procedure to define the limits. The Ewald method is a standard method for obtaining Coulomb forces, but this method is rather slow, since it depends on the square of the number of atoms in a unit cell. In this paper we have adapted the plane-wise summation method for the evaluation of Coulomb forces. The use of this method allows for larger computational cells in molecular dynamics calculations.

  18. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  19. Molecular dynamics at constant temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxvaerd, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for molecular dynamics (MD) at constant temperature and pressure are investigated. The ability to remain in a regular orbit in an intermittent chaotic regime is used as a criterion for long-time stability. A simple time-centered algorithm (leap frog) is found to be the most stable of the commonly used algorithms in MD. A model of N one-dimensional dimers with a double-well intermolecular potential, for which the distribution functions at constant temperature T and pressure P can be calculated, is used to investigate MD-NPT dynamics. A time-centered NPT algorithm is found to sample correctly and to be very robust with respect to volume scaling.

  20. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics and short range correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmeier, H; Roth, R S; Schnack, J

    1998-01-01

    Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) models a system of fermions by means of many-body states which are composed of antisymmetrized products of single-particle states. These consist of one or several Gaussians localized in coordinate and momentum space. The parameters specifying them are the dynamical variables of the model. As the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon interaction induces short range correlations which cannot be accommodated by a Slater determinant, a novel approach, the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM), is applied. The unitary correlator moves two particles away from each other whenever their relative distance is within the repulsive core. The time-dependent variational principle yields the equations of motion for the variables. Energies of the stationary ground states are calculated and compared to exact many-body results for nuclei up to Ca 48. Time-dependent solutions are shown for collisions between nuclei.

  1. Synthetic molecular machines and polymer/monomer size switches that operate through dynamic and non-dynamic covalent changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Adrian-Mihail; Ramírez, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The present chapter is focused on how synthetic molecular machines (e.g. shuttles, switches and molecular motors) and size switches (conversions between polymers and their units, i.e., conversions between relatively large and small molecules) can function through covalent changes. Amongst the interesting examples of devices herein presented are molecular motors and size switches based on dynamic covalent chemistry which is an area of constitutional dynamic chemistry. PMID:22169959

  2. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  3. Molecular dynamics analysis on impact behavior of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present an analytical solution of impact based on two degree of freedom model. • The accuracy is verified by Molecular dynamics simulations. • The effects of the small-size effects on the dynamic deflections are investigated. • The relative motion is also accounted that is due to local indentation. - Abstract: Dynamic analysis of impact of a nanoparticle on carbon nanotubes is investigated based on two degree of freedom model. The accuracy and stability of the present methods are verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of different types of boundary condition on the maximum dynamic deflections is studied for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs with various aspect ratios (length/diameter). Besides, the influences of velocity of impactor on the dynamic deflections are studied. It is shown that the dynamic behavior on the armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost similar. Finally, by making use of the above MD simulation and theoretical results some insight has been obtained about the dynamic characteristics of the impact problems of nanobeam structures. Nonlocal Timoshenko beam models TBT2 should be employed for an accurate prediction of the dynamic deflection rather than nonlocal Euler–Bernoulli beam models EBT2 which ignores the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia that is especially significant for short beams. The results from nonlocal EBT2 and TBT2 models demonstrated good agreement with MD simulation. The EBT2 and TBT2 models also account for the relative motion between the nanoparticle and the nanobeam that is due to local indentation as can be seen in MD simulation

  4. Molecular dynamics analysis on impact behavior of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifoori, Sajjad, E-mail: sajjad.seifoori@vru.ac.ir

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present an analytical solution of impact based on two degree of freedom model. • The accuracy is verified by Molecular dynamics simulations. • The effects of the small-size effects on the dynamic deflections are investigated. • The relative motion is also accounted that is due to local indentation. - Abstract: Dynamic analysis of impact of a nanoparticle on carbon nanotubes is investigated based on two degree of freedom model. The accuracy and stability of the present methods are verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of different types of boundary condition on the maximum dynamic deflections is studied for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs with various aspect ratios (length/diameter). Besides, the influences of velocity of impactor on the dynamic deflections are studied. It is shown that the dynamic behavior on the armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost similar. Finally, by making use of the above MD simulation and theoretical results some insight has been obtained about the dynamic characteristics of the impact problems of nanobeam structures. Nonlocal Timoshenko beam models TBT2 should be employed for an accurate prediction of the dynamic deflection rather than nonlocal Euler–Bernoulli beam models EBT2 which ignores the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia that is especially significant for short beams. The results from nonlocal EBT2 and TBT2 models demonstrated good agreement with MD simulation. The EBT2 and TBT2 models also account for the relative motion between the nanoparticle and the nanobeam that is due to local indentation as can be seen in MD simulation.

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of laser melting of silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite temperature density functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystal silicon. We have found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bond. As a result, the system undergoes a melting transition to a metallic state. In contrast to ordinary liquid silicon, the new liquid is characterized by a high coordination number and a strong reduction of covalent bonding effects.

  6. Viscosity in molecular dynamics with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Viscardy, S.; Gaspard, P.

    2003-01-01

    We report a study of viscosity by the method of Helfand moment in systems with periodic boundary conditions. We propose a new definition of Helfand moment which takes into account the minimum image convention used in molecular dynamics with periodic boundary conditions. Our Helfand-moment method is equivalent to the method based on the Green-Kubo formula and is not affected by ambiguities due to the periodic boundary conditions. Moreover, in hard-ball systems, our method is equivalent to the ...

  7. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  8. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    CERN Document Server

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-01-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  9. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  10. Thermal conductivity of ZnTe investigated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal conductivity of ZnTe with zinc-blende structure has been computed by equilibrium molecular dynamics method based on Green-Kubo formalism. A Tersoff's potential is adopted in the simulation to model the atomic interactions. The calculations are performed as a function of temperature up to 800 K. The calculated thermal conductivities are in agreement with the experimental values between 150 K and 300 K, while the results above the room temperature are comparable with the Slack's equation.

  11. Incorporation of quantum statistical features in molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We formulate a method for incorporating quantum fluctuations into molecular-dynamics simulations of many-body systems, such as those employed for energetic nuclear collision processes. Based on Fermi's Golden Rule, we allow spontaneous transitions to occur between the wave packets which are not energy eigenstates. The ensuing diffusive evolution in the space of the wave packet parameters exhibits appealing physical properties, including relaxation towards quantum-statistical equilibrium. (author)

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Handgraaf, J W; Meijer, E J; Handgraaf, Jan-Willem; Erp, Titus S. van; Meijer, Evert Jan

    2003-01-01

    We present a density-functional theory based molecular-dynamics study of the structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid methanol under ambient conditions. The calculated radial distribution functions involving the oxygen and hydroxyl hydrogen show a pronounced hydrogen bonding and compare well with recent neutron diffraction data, except for an underestimate of the oxygen-oxygen correlation. We observe that, in line with infrared spectroscopic data, the hydroxyl stretching mode is significantly red-shifted in the liquid. A substantial enhancement of the dipole moment is accompanied by significant fluctuations due to thermal motion. Our results provide valuable data for improvement of empirical potentials.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Janus Particle Dynamics in Uniform Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Archereau, Aurelien Y M; Willmott, Geoff R

    2016-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamics of Janus particles, micro- or nanoparticles which are not spherically symmetric, in the uniform flow of a simple liquid. In particular we consider spheres with an asymmetry in the solid-liquid interaction over their surfaces and calculate the forces and torques experienced by the particles as a function of their orientation with respect to the flow. We also examine particles that are deformed slightly from a spherical shape. We compare the simulation results to the predictions of a previously introduced theoretical approach, which computes the forces and torques on particles with variable slip lengths or aspherical deformations that are much smaller than the particle radius. We find that there is good agreement between the forces and torques computed from our simulations and the theoretical predictions, when the slip condition is applied to the first layer of liquid molecules adjacent to the surface.

  14. Study of the Thermal Decomposition of PFPEs Lubricants on a Thin DLC Film Using Finitely Extensible Nonlinear Elastic Potential Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Deb Nath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs are widely used as hard disk lubricants for protecting carbon overcoat reducing friction between the hard disk interface and the head during the movement of head during reading and writing data in the hard disk. Due to temperature rise of PFPE Zdol lubricant molecules on a DLC surface, how polar end groups are detached from lubricant molecules during coating is described considering the effect of temperatures on the bond/break density of PFPE Zdol using the coarse-grained bead spring model based on finitely extensible nonlinear elastic potential. As PFPE Z contains no polar end groups, effects of temperature on the bond/break density (number of broken bonds/total number of bonds are not so significant like PFPE Zdol. Effects of temperature on the bond/break density of PFPE Z on DLC surface are also discussed with the help of graphical results. How bond/break phenomenonaffects the end bead density of PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol on DLC surface is discussed elaborately. How the overall bond length of PFPE Zdol increases with the increase of temperature which is responsible for its decomposition is discussed with the help of graphical results. At HAMR condition, as PFPE Z and PFPE Zdol are not suitable lubricant on a hard disk surface, it needs more investigations to obtain suitable lubricant. We study the effect of breaking of bonds of nonfunctional lubricant PFPE Z, functional lubricants such as PFPE Zdol and PFPE Ztetrao, and multidented functional lubricants such as ARJ-DS, ARJ-DD, and OHJ-DS on a DLC substrate with the increase of temperature when heating of all of the lubricants on a DLC substrate is carried out isothermally using the coarse-grained bead spring model by molecular dynamics simulations and suitable lubricant is selected which is suitable on a DLC substrate at high temperature.

  15. A scheme to combine molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many engineering challenges occur on multiple interacting length scales, e.g. during fracture atoms separate on the atomic scale while plasticity develops on the micrometer scale. To investigate the details of these events, a concurrent multiscale model is required which studies the problem at appropriate length- and time-scales: the atomistic scale and the dislocation dynamics scale. The AtoDis multiscale model is introduced, which combines atomistics and dislocation dynamicsinto a fully dynamic model that is able to simulate deformation mechanisms at finite temperature. The model uses point forces to ensure mechanical equilibrium and kinematic continuity at the interface. By resolving each interface atom analytically, and not numerically, the framework uses a coarse FEM mesh and intrinsically filters out atomistic vibrations. This multiscale model allows bi-directional dislocation transition at the interface of both models with no remnant atomic disorder. Thereby, the model is able to simulate a larger plastic zone than conventional molecular dynamics while reducing the need for constitutive dislocation dynamics equations. This contribution studies dislocation nucleation at finite temperature and investigates the absorption of dislocations into the crack wake. (paper)

  16. An Evaluation of Explicit Receptor Flexibility in Molecular Docking Using Molecular Dynamics and Torsion Angle Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Armen, Roger S.; Chen, Jianhan; Brooks, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Incorporating receptor flexibility into molecular docking should improve results for flexible proteins. However, the incorporation of explicit all-atom flexibility with molecular dynamics for the entire protein chain may also introduce significant error and “noise” that could decrease docking accuracy and deteriorate the ability of a scoring function to rank native-like poses. We address this apparent paradox by comparing the success of several flexible receptor models in cross-docking and mu...

  17. Orbital free molecular dynamics; Approche sans orbitale des plasmas denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, F

    2007-08-15

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  18. Coherent Amplification of Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics in an Optical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igal; Pe'er, Avi

    2016-02-01

    Optical oscillators present a powerful optimization mechanism. The inherent competition for the gain resources between possible modes of oscillation entails the prevalence of the most efficient single mode. We harness this "ultrafast" coherent feedback to optimize an optical field in time, and show that, when an optical oscillator based on a molecular gain medium is synchronously pumped by ultrashort pulses, a temporally coherent multimode field can develop that optimally dumps a general, dynamically evolving vibrational wave packet, into a single vibrational target state. Measuring the emitted field opens a new window to visualization and control of fast molecular dynamics. The realization of such a coherent oscillator with hot alkali dimers appears within experimental reach.

  19. An implicit divalent counterion force field for RNA molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Paul S.; Mak, Chi H.

    2016-03-01

    How to properly account for polyvalent counterions in a molecular dynamics simulation of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids remains an open question. Not only do counterions such as Mg2+ screen electrostatic interactions, they also produce attractive intrachain interactions that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. Here, we show how a simple force field derived from a recently reported implicit counterion model can be integrated into a molecular dynamics simulation for RNAs to realistically reproduce key structural details of both single-stranded and base-paired RNA constructs. This divalent counterion model is computationally efficient. It works with existing atomistic force fields, or coarse-grained models may be tuned to work with it. We provide optimized parameters for a coarse-grained RNA model that takes advantage of this new counterion force field. Using the new model, we illustrate how the structural flexibility of RNA two-way junctions is modified under different salt conditions.

  20. Performance Analysis on Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Using GROMACS

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, A. D.; Mutiara, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer technology in chemistry, bring many application of chemistry. Not only the application to visualize the structure of molecule but also to molecular dynamics simulation. One of them is Gromacs. Gromacs is an example of molecular dynamics application developed by Groningen University. This application is a non-commercial and able to work in the operating system Linux. The main ability of Gromacs is to perform molecular dynamics simulation and minimization energy. In this...

  1. DMS: A Package for Multiscale Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Somogyi, Endre; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Advances in multiscale theory and computation provide a novel paradigm for simulating many-classical particle systems. The Deductive Multiscale Simulator (DMS) is a multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) program built on two of these advances, i.e., multiscale Langevin (ML) and multiscale factorization (MF). Both capture the coevolution of the the coarse-grained (CG) state and the microstate. This provides these methods with great efficiency over conventional MD. Neither involve the introduction of phenomenological governing equations for the CG state with attendant uncertainty in both their form of the governing equations and the data needed to calibrate them. The design and implementation of DMS as an open source computational platform is presented here. DMS is written in Python, uses Gromacs to achieve the microphase, and then advances the microstate via a CG-guided evolution. DMS uses MDAnalysis, a Python library for analyzing MD trajectories, to perform computations required to construct CG-related variables...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present molecular dynamic simulations of the shock compression of graphite with the LCBOPII potential. The range of shock intensities covers the full range of available experimental data, including near-tera-pascal pressures. The results are in excellent agreement with the available DFT data and point to a graphite-diamond transition for shock pressures above 65 GPa, a value larger than the experimental data (20 to 50 GPa). The transition mechanism leads preferentially to hexagonal diamond through a diffusion-less process but is submitted to irreversible re-graphitization upon release: this result is in good agreement with the lack of highly ordered diamond observed in post-mortem experimental samples. Melting is found for shock pressures ranging from 200 to 300 GPa, close to the approximate LCBOPII diamond melting line. A good overall agreement is found between the calculated and experimental Hugoniot data up to 46% compression rate. (authors)

  3. Nano-tribology through molecular dynamics simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧; 胡元中; 邹鲲; 冷永胜

    2001-01-01

    The solidification and interfacial slip in nanometer-scale lubricating films as well as the contact and adhesion of metal crystals have been studied via molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the critical pressure for the solid-liquid transition declines as the film thickness decreases, in-dicating that the lubricant in the thin films may exist in a solid-like state. It is also found that the interfa-cial slip may occur in thin films at relatively low shear rate, and there is a good correlation between the slip phenomenon and the lubricant solidification. The simulations reveal that a micro-scale adhesion may take place due to the atomic jump during the process of approaching or separating of two smooth crystal surfaces, which provides important information for understanding the origin of interfacial friction.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  5. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quack, M. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie)

    1981-05-11

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored.

  6. Statistical mechanics and dynamics of molecular fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the use of statistical-mechanical equations of motion, in particular the Pauli equation, for the description of intramolecular processes and molecular fragmentation are discussed briefly. Quantum-mechanical trajectories for model systems illustrate how the statistical behaviour may emerge from the dynamical equations of motion. Product state distributions resulting from the fragmentation of strongly coupled, metastable intermediates in chemical-activation experiments can be calculated by using restricted equipartition, which applies as the long-time limit of the Pauli equation. A simple Pauli-equation model is proposed to calculate lifetimes of metastable intermediates. The consequences of the finite rate of intramolecular relaxation processes for the specific rate constants for fragmentation and possible deviations from microcanonical equilibrium are explored. (author)

  7. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  8. Superdeformed $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Isaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Masaaki; Hiyama, Emiko; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The response to the addition of a $\\Lambda$ hyperon is investigated for the deformed states such as superdeformation in $^{41}_\\Lambda$Ca, $^{46}_\\Lambda $Sc and $^{48}_\\Lambda$Sc. In the present study, we use the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) model. It is pointed out that many kinds of deformed bands appear in $^{45}$Sc and $^{47}$Sc. Especially, it is found that there exists superdeformed states in $^{45}$Sc. By the addition of a $\\Lambda$ particle to $^{40}$Ca, $^{45}$Sc and $^{47}$Sc, it is predicted, for the first time, that the superdeformed states exist in the hypernuclei $^{41}_\\Lambda$Ca and $^{46}_\\Lambda$Sc. The manifestation of the dependence of the $\\Lambda$-separation energy on nuclear deformation such as spherical, normal deformation and superdeformation is shown in the energy spectra of $^{41}_\\Lambda$Ca, $^{46}_\\Lambda $Sc and $^{48}_\\Lambda$Sc hypernuclei.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  10. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments

  11. Dynamics of dewetting at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, E; Blake, T D; Ledauphin, V; Ogonowski, G; Coninck, J De; Fornasiero, D; Ralston, J

    2007-03-27

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to model the dewetting of solid surfaces by partially wetting thin liquid films. Two levels of solid-liquid interaction are considered that give rise to large equilibrium contact angles. The initial length and thickness of the films are varied over a wide range at the nanoscale. Spontaneous dewetting is initiated by removing a band of molecules either from each end of the film or from its center. As observed experimentally and in previous simulations, the films recede at an initially constant speed, creating a growing rim of liquid with a constant receding dynamic contact angle. Consistent with the current understanding of wetting dynamics, film recession is faster on the more poorly wetted surface to an extent that cannot be explained solely by the increase in the surface tension driving force. In addition, the rates of recession of the thinnest films are found to increase with decreasing film thickness. These new results imply not only that the mobility of the liquid molecules adjacent to the solid increases with decreasing solid-liquid interactions, but also that the mobility adjacent to the free surface of the film is higher than in the bulk, so that the effective viscosity of the film decreases with thickness. PMID:17328565

  12. Continuous Finite Element Methods of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are necessary to perform very long integration times. In this paper, we discuss continuous finite element methods for molecular dynamics simulation problems. Our numerical results about AB diatomic molecular system and A2B triatomic molecules show that linear finite element and quadratic finite element methods can better preserve the motion characteristics of molecular dynamics, that is, properties of energy conservation and long-term stability. So finite element method is also a reliable method to simulate long-time classical trajectory of molecular systems.

  13. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  14. EXCITON DYNAMICS IN ORGANIC MOLECULAR CRYSTALS

    OpenAIRE

    A. Matsui; Mizuno, K.; Kobayashi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamical behavior of Frenkel excitons in aromatic hydrocarbon crystals, pyrene, α-perylene, β-perylene, and tetracene are overviewed based on the published references and in terms of the self-trap depth. Then pressure-induced instability in exciton states (the change in the self-trap depth) in α-perylene and anthracene is demonstrated and discussed. Finally a quasi-free exciton state is suggested to be the origin of the luminescence in anthracene at room temperature.

  15. Lipid Dynamics Studied by Calculation of 31P Solid-State NMR Spectra Using Ensembles from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sara Krogh; Vestergaard, Mikkel; Thøgersen, Lea; Schiøtt, Birgit; Nielsen, Niels Christian; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to calculate 31P solid-state NMR spectra based on the dynamic input from extended molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The dynamic information confered by MD simulations is much more comprehensive than the information provided by traditional NMR dynamics models based on, for...... example, order parameters. Therefore, valuable insight into the dynamics of biomolecules may be achieved by the present method. We have applied this method to study the dynamics of lipid bilayers containing the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin, and we show that the calculated 31P spectra obtained with...

  16. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  17. Molecular Dynamics in the Multicanonical Ensemble: Equivalence of Wang-Landau Sampling, Statistical Temperature Molecular Dynamics, and Metadynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Junghans, Christoph; Perez, Danny; Vogel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We show direct formal relationship between the Wang-Landau iteration [PRL 86, 2050 (2001)], metadynamics [PNAS 99, 12562 (2002)] and statistical temperature molecular dynamics [PRL 97, 050601 (2006)], the major Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics work-horses for sampling from a generalized, multicanonical ensemble. We demonstrate that statistical temperature molecular dynamics (which is formally derived from the Wang-Landau method), augmented by the introduction of kernel updates of the statis...

  18. Simulation of a flowing snow avalanche using molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Güçer, Denizhan; ÖZGÜÇ, Halil Bülent

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the modeling and simulation of a flowing snow avalanche, which is formed of dry and liquefied snow that slides down a slope, using molecular dynamics and the discrete element method. A particle system is utilized as a base method for the simulation and marching cubes with real-time shaders are employed for rendering. A uniform grid-based neighbor search algorithm is used for collision detection for interparticle and particle-terrain interactions. A mass-spr...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of Si etching in Cl- and Br-based plasmas: Cl+ and Br+ ion incidence in the presence of Cl and Br neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed for Cl+ and Br+ ions incident on Si(100) surfaces with Cl and Br neutrals, respectively, to gain a better understanding of the ion-enhanced surface reaction kinetics during Si etching in Cl- and Br-based plasmas. The ions were incident normally on surfaces with translational energies in the range Ei = 20–500 eV, and low-energy neutrals of En = 0.01 eV were also incident normally thereon with the neutral-to-ion flux ratio in the range Γn0/Γi0 = 0–100, where an improved Stillinger--Weber potential form was employed for the interatomic potential concerned. The etch yields and thresholds presently simulated were in agreement with the experimental results previously reported for Si etching in Cl2 and Br2 plasmas as well as in Cl+, Cl2+, and Br+ beams, and the product stoichiometry simulated was consistent with that observed during Ar+ beam incidence on Si in Cl2. Moreover, the surface coverage of halogen atoms, halogenated layer thickness, surface stoichiometry, and depth profile of surface products simulated for Γn0/Γi0 = 100 were in excellent agreement with the observations depending on Ei reported for Si etching in Cl2 plasmas. The MD also indicated that the yield, coverage, and surface layer thickness are smaller in Si/Br than in Si/Cl system, while the percentage of higher halogenated species in product and surface stoichiometries is larger in Si/Br. The MD further indicated that in both systems, the translational energy distributions of products and halogen adsorbates desorbed from surfaces are approximated by two Maxwellians of temperature T1 ≈ 2500 K and T2 ≈ 7000–40 000 K. These energy distributions are discussed in terms of the desorption or evaporation from hot spots formed through chemically enhanced physical sputtering and physically enhanced chemical sputtering, which have so far been speculated to both occur in the ion-enhanced surface reaction

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of Si etching in Cl- and Br-based plasmas: Cl+ and Br+ ion incidence in the presence of Cl and Br neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazaki, Nobuya; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2015-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed for Cl+ and Br+ ions incident on Si(100) surfaces with Cl and Br neutrals, respectively, to gain a better understanding of the ion-enhanced surface reaction kinetics during Si etching in Cl- and Br-based plasmas. The ions were incident normally on surfaces with translational energies in the range Ei = 20-500 eV, and low-energy neutrals of En = 0.01 eV were also incident normally thereon with the neutral-to-ion flux ratio in the range Γn0/Γi0 = 0-100, where an improved Stillinger--Weber potential form was employed for the interatomic potential concerned. The etch yields and thresholds presently simulated were in agreement with the experimental results previously reported for Si etching in Cl2 and Br2 plasmas as well as in Cl+, Cl2+, and Br+ beams, and the product stoichiometry simulated was consistent with that observed during Ar+ beam incidence on Si in Cl2. Moreover, the surface coverage of halogen atoms, halogenated layer thickness, surface stoichiometry, and depth profile of surface products simulated for Γn0/Γi0 = 100 were in excellent agreement with the observations depending on Ei reported for Si etching in Cl2 plasmas. The MD also indicated that the yield, coverage, and surface layer thickness are smaller in Si/Br than in Si/Cl system, while the percentage of higher halogenated species in product and surface stoichiometries is larger in Si/Br. The MD further indicated that in both systems, the translational energy distributions of products and halogen adsorbates desorbed from surfaces are approximated by two Maxwellians of temperature T1 ≈ 2500 K and T2 ≈ 7000-40 000 K. These energy distributions are discussed in terms of the desorption or evaporation from hot spots formed through chemically enhanced physical sputtering and physically enhanced chemical sputtering, which have so far been speculated to both occur in the ion-enhanced surface reaction kinetics of plasma etching.

  1. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Vibrational Dynamics of Polyatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high- temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wave packet calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics

  2. Two methods for molecular dynamics on curved surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Paquay, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Lateral diffusion along membranes is an important transport mechanism in biology. Dynamical simulations of this transport can greatly aid in understanding biological processes where this diffusion plays a role. Brownian dynamics simulations in local coordinates are one possibility, but we show here that it is also possible to combine constraint algorithms with a velocity Verlet scheme to perform molecular dynamics simulations of particles confined on arbitrary time-independent curved surfaces. The main advantage is that this method is based on Cartesian coordinates instead of local coordinates, allowing the reuse of many other standard tools, including parallelisation through domain decomposition, without adapting those to local coordinates. Of the two constraint algorithms we considered, RATTLE is more computationally efficient and easier to implement, while the symmetric projection method has slightly better energy conservation. By applying the schemes to the Langevin equation, Brownian motion on various cu...

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of binary charged lipid membranes: Phase separation and morphological dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Biomembranes, which are mainly composed of neutral and charged lipids, exhibit a large variety of functional structures and dynamics. Here, we report a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phase separation and morphological dynamics in charged lipid bilayer vesicles. The screened long-range electrostatic repulsion among charged head groups delays or inhibits the lateral phase separation in charged vesicles compared with neutral vesicles, suggesting the transition of the phase-separation mechanism from spinodal decomposition to nucleation or homogeneous dispersion. Moreover, the electrostatic repulsion causes morphological changes, such as pore formation, and further transformations into disk, string, and bicelle structures, which are spatiotemporally coupled to the lateral segregation of charged lipids. Based on our coarse-grained MD simulation, we propose a plausible mechanism of pore formation at the molecular level. The pore formation in a charged-lipid-rich domain is initiated by the p...

  4. Molecular Dynamics Investigated by Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review of the present state of the problem of applicability of the Krieger-Nelkin theory as well as of the Griffing theory to gases is made. Then, on the basis of experiments with liquid methane, the applicability of the mass-tensor concept to molecules in condensed states is criticized. Strong arguments against the application of the Krieger-Nelkin theory to condensed states are: a shift of neutron energy distribution after scattering towards higher energies and the lack of dependence of the Inelastic part on the scattering angle. Further sections deal with the rotational dynamics of ammonium groups in ammonium compounds. Most of the experimental material is discussed in connection with ammonium halides on the basis of experiments by different authors. For some substances a freedom of rotation of NH4 groups was obtained from neutron measurements, whereas for some others the rotation goes over into torsional vibration. In this case, frequencies of torsional vibrations obtained by various authors from neutron experiments were compared with those obtained from infrared spectroscopy and specific heat measurements. The barrier-to-rotation evaluation from total neutron cross-section measurements is also discussed. Further a comparison is made of the rotational dynamics of NH4 groups in NH4CIO4 and H3O groups in H3OCIO4 on the basis of neutron inelastic scattering experiments. A free rotation of the NH4 group in ammonium perchlorate was obtained even at temperatures as low as liquid nitrogen temperature. For H3OCIO4 a torsional vibration of the H3O group with a frequency of 497 cm-1 was obtained. So in spite of the identity of the crystal lattices of NH4CIO4 and H3OCIO4 the dynamics of the NH4 and H3O groups are different. The results are compared with those known from Raman spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. Finally, a number of other substances is discussed from the point of view of molecular dynamics. (author)

  5. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  6. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  7. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  8. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  9. Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanville, Edward J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bock, Nicolas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, William M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cawkwell, Marc J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Niklasson, Anders M N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sewell, Thomas D [UNIV OF MISSOURI

    2010-01-01

    A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

  10. Enhanced reactivity of nanoenergetic materials: A first-principles molecular dynamics study based on divide-and-conquer density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya

    2009-07-01

    Integration of nanowires and nanoparticles of energetic materials into semiconducting structures is giving birth to "nanoenergetics-on-a-chip" technology. Understanding and controlling the reactions of nanoenergetic materials pose a theoretical challenge for combining quantum-mechanical accuracy with large scales to capture nanostructural effects. Recent developments in linear-scaling density functional theory have set a stage for first-principles molecular dynamics simulation of thermite reaction at an Al /Fe2O3 interface. Here, we report the finding of a concerted metal-oxygen flip mechanism that enhances mass diffusion and reaction rate at the interface. This mechanism leads to two-stage reactions, which may explain recent experimental observation in thermite nanowire arrays.

  11. Chemoinformatics in the New Era: From Molecular Dynamics to Systems Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanyu Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemoinformatics, due to its power in gathering information at the molecular level, has a wide array of important applications to biology, including fundamental biochemical studies and drug discovery and optimization. As modern “omics” based profiling and network based modeling and simulation techniques grow in sophistication, chemoinformatics now faces a great opportunity to include systems-level control mechanisms as one of its pillar components to extend and refine its various applications. This viewpoint article, through the example of computer aided targeting of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, outlines major steps of integrating systems dynamics simulations into molecular dynamics simulations to facilitate a higher level of chemoinformatics that would revolutionize drug lead optimization, personalized therapy, and possibly other applications.

  12. Molecular dynamics and binary collision modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the...

  13. Introduction to the quantum trajectory method and to Fermi molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lagattuta, K J

    2003-01-01

    The quantum trajectory method (QTM) will be introduced, and an approximation to the QTM known as Fermi molecular dynamics (FMD) will be described. Results of simulations based on FMD will be mentioned for specific nonequilibrium systems dominated by Coulomb interactions.

  14. Imaging the Breakdown of Molecular Frame Dynamics through Rotational Uncoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zipp, Lucas J; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2016-01-01

    We have observed directly in the time domain the uncoupling of electron motion from the molecular frame due to rotational-electronic coupling in a molecular Rydberg system. In contrast to Born- Oppenheimer dynamics, in which the electron is firmly fixed to the molecular frame, there exists a regime of molecular dynamics known as $l$-uncoupling where the motion of a non-penetrating Rydberg electron decouples from the instantaneous alignment of the molecular frame. We have imaged this unusual regime in time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions of a coherently prepared electron wave packet in the 4$f$ manifold of $N_2$.

  15. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  17. Cluster fragmentation and cluster beam steering studied by dynamic reaction coordinate and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study either cluster fragmentation, using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock formulation, or cluster deposition, based on classical molecular dynamics, have been studied. An exhaustive analysis has been performed on the many parameters acting on the two processes. Fragmentation calculations show a primary dependence on the input energy whereas the interatomic forces play a primary role in deposition. However the central result of this study is the essential agreement between the classical and quantum mechanical calculation

  18. Enhanced stability of a naringenin/2,6-dimethyl β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: molecular dynamics and free energy calculations based on MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2014-05-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior and binding affinity of the inclusion complexes between naringenin and the two cyclodextrins (CDs), β-CD and its 2,6-dimethyl derivative (DM-β-CD), were theoretically studied by multiple molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Naringenin most likely prefers to bind with CDs through the phenyl ring. Although a lower hydrogen bond formation of naringenin with the 3-hydroxyl group of DM-β-CD (relative to β-CD) was observed, the higher cavity could encapsulate almost the whole naringenin molecule. In contrast for the naringenin/β-CD complex, the phenyl ring feasibly passed through the primary rim resulting in the chromone ring binding inside instead. MM-PBSA/GBSA and QM-PBSA/GBSA binding free energies strongly suggested a greater stability of the naringenin/DM-β-CD inclusion complex. Van der Waals force played an important role as the key guest-host interaction for the complexation between naringenin and each cyclodextrin. PMID:24681901

  19. Generalized extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory is generalized in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization prior to the force evaluations. The equations of motion are derived directly from the extended Lagrangian under the condition of an adiabatic separation between the nuclear and the electronic degrees of freedom. We show how this separation is automatically fulfilled and system independent. The generalized equations of motion require only one diagonalization per time step and are applicable to a broader range of materials with improved accuracy and stability compared to previous formulations

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system with...

  1. Simulations of boundary migration during recrystallization using molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Rasmus Brauner; Trautt, Z.T.; Upmanyu, M.;

    2007-01-01

    We have applied an atomistic simulation methodology based on molecular dynamics to study grain boundary migration in crystalline materials, driven by the excess energy of dislocation arrangements. This method is used to simulate recrystallization in metals. The simulations reveal that the migration...... process is not uniform as assumed in many recrystallization models, but that the grain boundaries migrate in an irregular fashion and exhibit a strong dependence on the local presence of dislocations, which can distort the local migration process significantly. (c) 2007 Acta Materialia Inc. Published...

  2. Molecular nonlinear dynamics and protein thermal uncertainty quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Kelin [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wei, Guo-Wei, E-mail: wei@math.msu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    This work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND) as a new approach for describing protein folding and aggregation. By using a mode system, we show that the MND of disordered proteins is chaotic while that of folded proteins exhibits intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs). The stability of ILDMs is found to strongly correlate with protein energies. We propose a novel method for protein thermal uncertainty quantification based on persistently invariant ILDMs. Extensive comparison with experimental data and the state-of-the-art methods in the field validate the proposed new method for protein B-factor prediction.

  3. Molecular dynamic study of pressure fluctuations spectrum in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystryi, R. G.

    2015-11-01

    Pressure of plasma is calculated by using classical molecular dynamics method. The formula based on virial theorem was used. Spectrum pressure's fluctuations of singly ionized non-ideal plasma are studied. 1/f-like spectrum behavior is observed. In other words, flicker noise is observed in fluctuations of pressure equilibrium non-ideal plasma. Relations between the obtained result and pressure fluctuations within the Gibbs and Einstein approaches are discussed. Special attention is paid to features of calculating the pressure in strongly coupled systems.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of hollow thick-walled cylinder collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation and evolution of plastic deformation in a hollow single-crystal cylinder under high-rate axisymmetric loading were studied. An advantage of the proposed loading scheme is that all loading modes are applied simultaneously within the chosen crystallographic plane of the cylinder base and different strain degrees are achieved along the specimen cross section. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to show that the achievement of a certain strain causes the formation of structural defects on the inner surface of the specimen. The obtained results can be used to explain the main plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline solids

  5. A molecular understanding of the dynamic mechanism of aquaporin osmosis

    CERN Document Server

    Shua, Liangsuo; Qian, Xin; Wanga, Xiyun; Lin, Yixin; Tan, Kai; Shu, Chaohui; Jin, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    AQPs (aquaporins), the rapid water channels of cells, play a key role in maintaining osmotic equilibrium of cells. In this paper, we reported the dynamic mechanism of AQP osmosis at the molecular level. A theoretical model based on molecular dynamics was carried out and verified by the published experimental data. The reflection coefficients ({\\sigma}) of neutral molecules are mainly decided by their relative size with AQPs, and increase with a third power up to a constant value 1. This model also indicated that the reflection coefficient of a complete impermeable solute can be smaller than 1. The H+ concentration of solution can influence the driving force of the AQPs by changing the equivalent diameters of vestibules surrounded by loops with abundant polar amino acids. In this way, pH of solution can regulate water permeability of AQPs. Therefore, an AQP may not only work as a switch to open or close, but as a rapid response molecular valve to control its water flow. The vestibules can prevent the channel b...

  6. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M; Cuniberti, G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer) in presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations arising either fr...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of Pd-Ni transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed to study bulk properties of fcc metals and metal alloys by using the quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potentials within the context of the tight-binding approach. The Molecular Dynamics algorithms we used in the simulations of Pd-Ni alloys are based on an extended Hamiltonian formalism arising from the works of Andersen (1980), Parinello and Rahman (1980), Nose (1984), Hoover (1985) and Cagin (1988). In these simulations, the effect of temperature and concentration on the solid and liquid properties are studied. Elastic constants and phonon dispersion relation are the solid properties we simulated in this work. Dynamic and static properties of liquid Pd-Ni are also computed by examining the behavior of density, enthalpy, pair distribution function and structure factor. The melting temperatures of Pd-Ni alloys are investigated. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the mean square displacement using Einstein relation and from velocity auto-correlation function using Green-Kubo relations. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments

  8. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In most cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems

  9. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics by accelerated semiclassical Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-adiabatic dynamics, where systems non-radiatively transition between electronic states, plays a crucial role in many photo-physical processes, such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, and photoisomerization. Methods for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics are typically either numerically impractical, highly complex, or based on approximations which can result in failure for even simple systems. Recently, the Semiclassical Monte Carlo (SCMC) approach was developed in an attempt to combine the accuracy of rigorous semiclassical methods with the efficiency and simplicity of widely used surface hopping methods. However, while SCMC was found to be more efficient than other semiclassical methods, it is not yet as efficient as is needed to be used for large molecular systems. Here, we have developed two new methods: the accelerated-SCMC and the accelerated-SCMC with re-Gaussianization, which reduce the cost of the SCMC algorithm up to two orders of magnitude for certain systems. In many cases shown here, the new procedures are nearly as efficient as the commonly used surface hopping schemes, with little to no loss of accuracy. This implies that these modified SCMC algorithms will be of practical numerical solutions for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics in realistic molecular systems

  10. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danel, J.-F.; Blottiau, P.; Kazandjian, L.; Piron, R.; Torrent, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-10-15

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures.

  11. Equation of state of dense plasmas: Orbital-free molecular dynamics as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics for high-Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of quantum molecular dynamics to the calculation of the equation of state of a dense plasma is limited at high temperature by computational cost. Orbital-free molecular dynamics, based on a semiclassical approximation and possibly on a gradient correction, is a simulation method available at high temperature. For a high-Z element such as lutetium, we examine how orbital-free molecular dynamics applied to the equation of state of a dense plasma can be regarded as the limit of quantum molecular dynamics at high temperature. For the normal mass density and twice the normal mass density, we show that the pressures calculated with the quantum approach converge monotonically towards those calculated with the orbital-free approach; we observe a faster convergence when the orbital-free approach includes the gradient correction. We propose a method to obtain an equation of state reproducing quantum molecular dynamics results up to high temperatures where this approach cannot be directly implemented. With the results already obtained for low-Z plasmas, the present study opens the way for reproducing the quantum molecular dynamics pressure for all elements up to high temperatures

  12. Modeling shockwave deformation via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics (MD), where the equations of motion of up to thousands of interacting atoms are solved on the computer, has proven to be a powerful tool for investigating a wide variety of nonequilibrium processes from the atomistic viewpoint. Simulations of shock waves in three-dimensional (3D) solids and fluids have shown conclusively that shear-stress relaxation is achieved through atomic rearrangement. In the case of fluids, the transverse motion is viscous, and the constitutive model of Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics has been shown to be accurate - even on the time and distance scales of MD experiments. For strong shocks in solids, the plastic flow that leads to shear-stress relaxation in MD is highly localized near the shock front, involving a slippage along close-packed planes. For shocks of intermediate strength, MD calculations exhibit an elastic precursor running out in front of the steady plastic wave, where slippage similar in character to that in the very strong shocks leads to shear-stress relaxation. An interesting correlation between the maximum shear stress and the Hugoniot pressure jump is observed for both 3D and fluid shockwave calculations, which may have some utility in modeling applications. At low shock strengths, the MD simulations show only elastic compression, with no permanent transverse atomic strains. The result for perfect 3D crystals is also seen in calculations for 1D chains. It is speculated that, if it were practical, a very large MD system containing dislocations could be expected to exhibit more realistic plastic flow for weak shock waves, too

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster fission and fusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia;

    2004-01-01

    groups of atoms from the parent cluster is largely independent of the isomer form of the parent cluster. The importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster before actual......Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions Na_10^2+ --> Na_7^+ +Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+ --> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...... separation of the daughter fragments begins and/or forming a "neck" between the separating fragments. A novel algorithm for modeling the cluster growth process is described. This approach is based on dynamic search for the most stable cluster isomers and allows one to find the optimized cluster geometries...

  14. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Nanostructured Ceramic Materials on Parallel Computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to gain insight into: (1) sintering, structure, and mechanical behavior of nanophase SiC and SiO2; (2) effects of dynamic charge transfers on the sintering of nanophase TiO2; (3) high-pressure structural transformation in bulk SiC and GaAs nanocrystals; (4) nanoindentation in Si3N4; and (5) lattice mismatched InAs/GaAs nanomesas. In addition, we have designed a multiscale simulation approach that seamlessly embeds MD and quantum-mechanical (QM) simulations in a continuum simulation. The above research activities have involved strong interactions with researchers at various universities, government laboratories, and industries. 33 papers have been published and 22 talks have been given based on the work described in this report

  15. Analysis of the Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Shao, Sihong

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD) scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamic simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  16. Analysis of Time Reversible Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the time reversible Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (TRBOMD scheme, which preserves the time reversibility of the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics even with non-convergent self-consistent field iteration. In the linear response regime, we derive the stability condition, as well as the accuracy of TRBOMD for computing physical properties, such as the phonon frequency obtained from the molecular dynamics simulation. We connect and compare TRBOMD with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics in terms of accuracy and stability. We further discuss the accuracy of TRBOMD beyond the linear response regime for non-equilibrium dynamics of nuclei. Our results are demonstrated through numerical experiments using a simplified one-dimensional model for Kohn-Sham density functional theory.

  17. Generalized master equations for exciton dynamics in molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Michael; May, V.

    1995-02-01

    The paper demonstrates the applicability of a special type of density matrix theory for the derivation of generalized Master equations. The density matrix theory has been formulated for the description of the dissipative electron transfer dynamics in molecular complexes. The theoretical approach is based on a representation of the density matrix in appropriately taken diabatic electron-vibrational states. Dissipative effects are taken into account by a coupling of these states to further vibrational modes of the molecular complex as well as to environmental degrees of freedom. The approach is applied to a two-center system as well as to a molecular chain. Memory kernels are derived in second order with respect to the inter-center coupling. The kernels are discussed under the assumption of a quick intra-center relaxation for a part of the vibrational modes as well as for all vibrational modes. Standard expressions for the transition rates between different sites are extended to include finite life times of the vibrational levels. Results which have been obtained in the study of the so-called spin boson model can be simply reproduced. The application of the derived generalized Master equations to the investigation of the motion of Frenkel excitons in molecular chains is also presented.

  18. Visualization and orchestration of the dynamic molecular society in cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebiao Yao; Guowei Fang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Visualization of specific molecules and their interactions in real space and time is essential to delineate how cellular plasticity and dynamics are achieved and orchestrated as perturbation of cellular plasticity and dynamics is detrimental to health. Elucidation of cellular dynamics requires molecular imaging at nanometer scale at millisecond resolution. The 1st International Conference on Cellular Dynamics and Chemical Biology held in Hefei, China (from 12 September to 15 September,2008) launched the quest by bringing synergism among photonics, chemistry and biology.

  19. A Self-Adaptive Steered Molecular Dynamics Method Based on Minimization of Stretching Force Reveals the Binding Affinity of Protein–Ligand Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Gu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Binding affinity prediction of protein–ligand complexes has attracted widespread interest. In this study, a self-adaptive steered molecular dynamics (SMD method is proposed to reveal the binding affinity of protein–ligand complexes. The SMD method is executed through adjusting pulling direction to find an optimum trajectory of ligand dissociation, which is realized by minimizing the stretching force automatically. The SMD method is then used to simulate the dissociations of 19 common protein–ligand complexes which are derived from two homology families, and the binding free energy values are gained through experimental techniques. Results show that the proposed SMD method follows a different dissociation pathway with lower a rupture force and energy barrier when compared with the conventional SMD method, and further analysis indicates the rupture forces of the complexes in the same protein family correlate well with their binding free energy, which reveals the possibility of using the proposed SMD method to identify the active ligand.

  20. Molecular dynamics analysis of multiphase interfaces based on in situ extraction of the pressure distribution of a liquid droplet on a solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, S; Surblys, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Kuroda, K; Kagawa, M; Nakajima, T; Fujimura, H

    2014-02-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a nanoscale liquid droplet on a solid surface are carried out in order to examine the pressure tensor field around the multiphase interfaces, and to explore the validity of Young's equation. By applying the virial theorem to a hemicylindrical droplet consisting of argon molecules on a solid surface, two-dimensional distribution of the pressure tensor is obtained. Tensile principal pressure tangential to the interface is observed around the liquid-vapor transition layer, while both tensile and compressive principal pressure tangential to the interface exists around the solid-liquid transition layer due to the inhomogeneous density distribution. The two features intermix inside the overlap region between the transition layers at the contact line. The contact angle is evaluated by using a contour line of the maximum principal pressure difference. The interfacial tensions are calculated by using Bakker's equation and Young-Laplace equation to the pressure tensor distribution. The relation between measured contact angle and calculated interfacial tensions turns out to be consistent with Young's equation, which is known as the description of the force balance at the three-phase interface. PMID:24559360

  1. Elastic properties of surfactant monolayers at liquid-liquid interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    Using a simple molecular model based on the Lennard-Jones potential, we systematically study the elastic properties of liquid-liquid interfaces containing surfactant molecules by means of extensive and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The main elastic constants of the interface, corres...

  2. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  3. An Orbital-free Molecular Dynamics Study of Static and Dynamic Properties of Liquid Sn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González D.J.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The static and dynamic properties of liquid Sn at two different thermodynamic states have been studied from the Orbital Free Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics (OFAIMD simulation method. This method is based on the density functional theory (DFT of Hohenberg and Kohn. The exchange and correlation interaction is described here with the local density approximation (LDA. We, in this study, have developed a pseudopotential model to describe the external non-Coulombic interaction acting on an electron; this is an essential ingredient of the theory. We have studied several static and dynamic properties of the system. The calculated results are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental data. They are also found to be of similar accuracy as those of other ab-initio studies.

  4. Modelling of Spectroscopic and Structural Properties using Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Muniz Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The following dissertation is about the study that I performed at the Chemistry Department of the University of Florence and at the European Laboratory for Non- Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) to recover and elucidate structural, dynamical, and spectroscopic molecular features adopting computer simulations. In particular, here ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and time-frequency analysis are the most employed “tools”, in order to have a better understanding of the origins ...

  5. Multi CPU clusters and calculations by molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical characteristics of multi CPU (Central Processor Unit) clusters in Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies AS RUz and Institute of Mathematics and Information Technologies AS RUz are described. There is detail information about cluster s architecture, installed programs and their productivity for decision of molecular dynamics tasks. Molecular dynamics program packages GROMACS, OPENMX and AutoDock-4.2.3 are described. The results of calculations using these program packages are presented. (author)

  6. Applications of Molecular Dynamics in Atmospheric and Solution Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the applications of molecular dynamics simulation techniques in the fields of solution chemistry and atmospheric chemistry. The work behind the thesis takes account of the fast development of computer hardware, which has made computationally intensive simulations become more and more popular in disciplines like pharmacy, biology and materials science. In molecular dynamics simulations using classical force fields, the atoms are represented by mass points with partial ch...

  7. Combining Optimal Control Theory and Molecular Dynamics for Protein Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Yaman Arkun; Mert Gur

    2012-01-01

    Combining Optimal Control Theory and Molecular Dynamics for Protein Folding Yaman Arkun1*, Mert Gur2¤ 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamic...

  8. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  9. Role of wave packet width in quantum molecular dynamics in fusion reactions near barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamical fusion process of 48Ca + 144Sm with different impact parameters near barrier is studied by an extended quantum molecular dynamics (EQMD) model, where width of wavepacket is dynamically treated based on variational principle. The time evolution of different energy components such as potential energy, kinetic energy, Coulomb energy and Pauli potential are analyzed when dynamical or fixed width is assumed in calculation. It is found that the dynamical wavepacket width can enhance the dissipation of incident energy and the fluctuations, which are important to form compound nuclei. Moreover, we compare the fusion barrier dependence on the incident energy when it is determined by both dynamical and fixed wavepacket width.

  10. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of RAFM steels with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of main expected nano-sized defects in irradiated pure Fe and Fe-He alloys, as model materials for RAFM steels, and simulations of their corresponding TEM images and SANS signals. In particular, the SANS signal of various types of defects was simulated for the first time. The methodology used in this work was the following: (i) SANS experiments were performed by applying a strong saturating magnetic field to unirradiated and irradiated specimens of three types of RAFM steels, namely the European EUROFER 97, the Japanese F82H and the Swiss OPTIMAX A steels. The available irradiated specimens included specimens which had been irradiated with 590 MeV protons in the Proton IRradiation EXperiment (PIREX) facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at temperatures in the range of 50-350 °C to doses in the range of 0.3-2.0 dpa. SANS spectra as well as values of the so-called A ratio, which represents the ratio of the total scattered intensity to the nuclear scattered intensity, were obtained for the various irradiation doses and temperatures investigated. (ii) MD simulations of atomic displacement cascades in pure Fe and in Fe-He alloys were performed using Embedded Atom Method (EAM) many-body interatomic potentials. The main nano-sized defects that should be produced in RAFM steels under irradiation were created by means of MD in pure Fe. These included dislocation loops of various types, voids, helium bubbles with various He concentration and Cr precipitates. (iii) TEM images of cascade damage and all the defects created by MD were simulated in the dark field/weak beam imaging modes by using the Electron Microscopy Software (EMS) developed by P.A. Stadelmann (EPFL) and analyzed in terms of variations of contrast intensities versus depth inside the specimen. (iv) The SANS signal provided by cascade damage and all the defects created by MD was simulated by using a slightly modified version of EMS, accounting for

  11. Evaluating Molecular Interactions in Polycaprolactone-Biomineralized Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites using Steered Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Payne, Scott; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.

    2015-04-01

    An experimental and modeling study of a complex nanoclay-based polymeric scaffold system is presented here. A representative molecular model of polymeric nanocomposite scaffold system for bone tissue engineering applications was developed. Polymeric scaffolds were synthesized using organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) with biomineralized hydroxyapatite and polycaprolactone (OMMT-HAP-PCL). The OMMT-HAP-PCL representative model was constructed and validated using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and material density results. We observed strong molecular interactions between OMMT, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and polycaprolactone (PCL) in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system. Attractive and repulsive interactions between PCL and different constituents of OMMT and HAP indicate influence of OMMT-HAP on PCL. Polymeric scaffolds were found to have improved nanomechanical properties as compared to pristine PCL due to the introduction of OMMT-HAP. Stress-strain response for the representative OMMT-HAP-PCL model was evaluated using constant force steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations. Two distinct stress-strain responses observed in the system indicate a two-phase nanomechanical behavior of OMMT-HAP-PCL obtained at low and high applied stresses. The results obtained from the MD and SMD simulations provide quantitative understanding of molecular interactions between different constituents of OMMT, HAP and PCL and mechanical response in the OMMT-HAP-PCL system.

  12. Current-driven dynamics in molecular-scale devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review recent theoretical work on current-triggered processes in molecular-scale devices - a field at the interface between solid state physics and chemical dynamics with potential applications in diverse areas, including artificial molecular machines, unimolecular transport, surface nanochemistry and nanolithography. The qualitative physics underlying current-triggered dynamics is first discussed and placed in context with several well-studied phenomena with which it shares aspects. A theory for modelling these dynamics is next formulated within a time-dependent scattering approach. Our end result provides useful insight into the system properties that determine the reaction outcome as well as a computationally convenient framework for numerical realization. The theory is applied to study single-molecule surface reactions induced by a scanning tunnelling microscope and current-triggered dynamics in single-molecule transistors. We close with a discussion of several potential applications of current-induced dynamics in molecular devices and several opportunities for future research. (topical review)

  13. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2013-01-01

    We present an efficient general approach to first principles molecular dynamics simulations based on extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The reduction of the optimization requirement reduces the computational cost to a minimum, but without causing any significant loss of accuracy or longterm energy drift. The optimization-free first principles molecular dynamics requires only one single diagonalization per time ...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of a single stranded (ss) DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Thakur, Siddarth; Burin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop an understanding of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to assist the development of new DNA-based biosensors. A ssDNA model containing twelve bases was constructed from the 130-145 codon sequence of the p53 gene. Various thermodynamic macroscopic observables such as temperature, energy distributions, as well as root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the nucleic acid backbone of the ssDNA were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The AMBER program was used for building the structural model of the ssDNA, and atomistic MD simulations in three different ensembles were carried out using the NAMD program. The microcanonical (NVE), conical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles were employed to compare the equilibrium characteristics of ssDNA in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the conformational stability of the ssDNA is dependent on the thermodynamic conditions.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bao-Ling; Wang Jun; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the pressure state of the helium bubble in titanium is simulated by a molecular dynamics (MD) method. First, the possible helium/vacancy ratio is determined according to therelation between the bubble pressure and helium/vacancy ratio; then the dependences of the helium bubble pressure on the bubble radius at different temperatures are studied. It is shown that the product of the bubble pressure and the radius is approximately a constant, a result justifying the pressure-radius relation predicted by thermodynamics-based theory for gas bubble. Furthermore, a state equation of the helium bubble is established based on the MD calculations. Comparison between the results obtained by the state equation and corresponding experimental data shows that the state equation can describe reasonably the state of helium bubble and thus could be used for Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of helium bubble in metals.

  16. Unified rotational dynamics of molecular crystals with orientational phase transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, K.H.; Raedt, H. De

    1976-01-01

    A unified theory for the rotational dynamics of molecular crystals with orientational phase transitions is given. As basic secular variables one takes symmetry adapted functions, which describe the molecular orientations, and the angular momenta of the molecules. Using Mori’s projection operator tec

  17. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  18. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  19. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets' spin dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Babak Abdollahipour; Jahanfar Abouie; Navid Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junct...

  20. Generalized Langevin models of molecular dynamics simulations with applications to ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dan; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2009-10-01

    We present a new methodology, which combines molecular dynamics and stochastic dynamics, for modeling the permeation of ions across biological ion channels. Using molecular dynamics, a free energy profile is determined for the ion(s) in the channel, and the distribution of random and frictional forces is measured over discrete segments of the ion channel. The parameters thus determined are used in stochastic dynamics simulations based on the nonlinear generalized Langevin equation. We first provide the theoretical basis of this procedure, which we refer to as "distributional molecular dynamics," and detail the methods for estimating the parameters from molecular dynamics to be used in stochastic dynamics. We test the technique by applying it to study the dynamics of ion permeation across the gramicidin pore. Given the known difficulty in modeling the conduction of ions in gramicidin using classical molecular dynamics, there is a degree of uncertainty regarding the validity of the MD-derived potential of mean force (PMF) for gramicidin. Using our techniques and systematically changing the PMF, we are able to reverse engineer a modified PMF which gives a current-voltage curve closely matching experimental results.

  1. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Dynamics and their relevance to drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Salsbury, Freddie R.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have become increasingly useful in studying biological systems of biomedical interest, and not just in the study of model or toy systems. In this article, the methods and principles of all-atom molecular dynamics will be elucidated with several examples provided of their utility to investigators interested on drug discovery.

  3. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete “Verlet” algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence...

  4. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  5. Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of the shock-induced chemistry of phenylacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial chemical events that occur during the shock compression of liquid phenylacetylene have been investigated using self-consistent tight binding molecular dynamics simulations. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism enabled us to compute microcanonical trajectories with precise conservation of the total energy. Our simulations revealed that the first density-increasing step under shock compression arises from the polymerization of phenylacetylene molecules at the acetylene moiety. The application of electronic structure-based molecular dynamics with long-term conservation of the total energy enabled us to identify electronic signatures of reactivity via monitoring changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap, and to capture directly adiabatic shock heating, transient non-equilibrium states, and changes in temperature arising from exothermic chemistry in classical molecular dynamics trajectories

  6. ls1 mardyn: The massively parallel molecular dynamics code for large systems

    CERN Document Server

    Niethammer, Christoph; Bernreuther, Martin; Buchholz, Martin; Eckhardt, Wolfgang; Heinecke, Alexander; Werth, Stephan; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim; Glass, Colin W; Hasse, Hans; Vrabec, Jadran; Horsch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation code ls1 mardyn is presented. It is a highly scalable code, optimized for massively parallel execution on supercomputing architectures, and currently holds the world record for the largest molecular simulation with over four trillion particles. It enables the application of pair potentials to length and time scales which were previously out of scope for molecular dynamics simulation. With an efficient dynamic load balancing scheme, it delivers high scalability even for challenging heterogeneous configurations. Presently, multi-center rigid potential models based on Lennard-Jones sites, point charges and higher-order polarities are supported. Due to its modular design, ls1 mardyn can be extended to new physical models, methods, and algorithms, allowing future users to tailor it to suit their respective needs. Possible applications include scenarios with complex geometries, e.g. for fluids at interfaces, as well as non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of heat and mass ...

  7. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  8. Order parameter prediction from molecular dynamics simulations in proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Perilla, Juan R

    2011-01-01

    A molecular understanding of how protein function is related to protein structure will require an ability to understand large conformational changes between multiple states. Unfortunately these states are often separated by high free energy barriers and within a complex energy landscape. This makes it very difficult to reliably connect, for example by all-atom molecular dynamics calculations, the states, their energies and the pathways between them. A major issue needed to improve sampling on the intermediate states is an order parameter -- a reduced descriptor for the major subset of degrees of freedom -- that can be used to aid sampling for the large conformational change. We present a novel way to combine information from molecular dynamics using non-linear time series and dimensionality reduction, in order to quantitatively determine an order parameter connecting two large-scale conformationally distinct protein states. This new method suggests an implementation for molecular dynamics calculations that ma...

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  10. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  11. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman Arkun

    Full Text Available A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD. In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  12. Metascalable molecular dynamics simulation of nano-mechano-chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, F.; Kalia, R. K.; Nakano, A.; Nomura, K.; Vashishta, P.

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallel application-development framework for first-principles based simulations of nano-mechano-chemical processes on emerging petaflops architectures based on spatiotemporal data locality principles. The framework consists of (1) an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework based on spatial locality to design linear-scaling algorithms, (2) a space-time-ensemble parallel (STEP) approach based on temporal locality to predict long-time dynamics, and (3) a tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition (HCD) parallelization framework to map these scalable algorithms onto hardware. The EDC-STEP-HCD framework exposes and expresses maximal concurrency and data locality, thereby achieving parallel efficiency as high as 0.99 for 1.59-billion-atom reactive force field molecular dynamics (MD) and 17.7-million-atom (1.56 trillion electronic degrees of freedom) quantum mechanical (QM) MD in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) on adaptive multigrids, in addition to 201-billion-atom nonreactive MD, on 196 608 IBM BlueGene/L processors. We have also used the framework for automated execution of adaptive hybrid DFT/MD simulation on a grid of six supercomputers in the US and Japan, in which the number of processors changed dynamically on demand and tasks were migrated according to unexpected faults. The paper presents the application of the framework to the study of nanoenergetic materials: (1) combustion of an Al/Fe2O3 thermite and (2) shock initiation and reactive nanojets at a void in an energetic crystal.

  13. Molecular dynamics with deterministic and stochastic numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Leimkuhler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical underpinnings of algorithms used for molecular dynamics simulation, including both deterministic and stochastic numerical methods. Molecular dynamics is one of the most versatile and powerful methods of modern computational science and engineering and is used widely in chemistry, physics, materials science and biology. Understanding the foundations of numerical methods means knowing how to select the best one for a given problem (from the wide range of techniques on offer) and how to create new, efficient methods to address particular challenges as they arise in complex applications.  Aimed at a broad audience, this book presents the basic theory of Hamiltonian mechanics and stochastic differential equations, as well as topics including symplectic numerical methods, the handling of constraints and rigid bodies, the efficient treatment of Langevin dynamics, thermostats to control the molecular ensemble, multiple time-stepping, and the dissipative particle dynamics method...

  14. Dynamics Studies on Molecular Diffusion in Zeolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秋霞; 樊建芬; 肖鹤鸣

    2003-01-01

    A review about the applications of molecular dynamics(MD)simulation in zeolites is presented. MD simulation has been proved to be a useful tool due to its applications in this field for the recent two decades. The fundamental theory of MD is introduced and the hydrocarbon diffusion in zeolites is mainly focused on in this paper.

  15. Phase diagram of kaolinite from Molecular Dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and thermal behaviors of uncharged 1:1 phyllosilicates kaolinite were investigated from molecular dynamics simulations based on the CLAYFF force field. The focus is on the variation of structural properties including bulk modulus with pressure from 0 to 20 GPa under various range of temperature. The largest bulk modulus between the pressures of 200 and 800 MPa varies from 80 GPa at 298 K to 50 GPa at 1473 K. The obtained value of Cp varies between 7.8 and 13.6 Kcal mol-1 K-1 in the pressure range of 0.1 MPa-20 GPa. Besides, a huge difference was noticed regarding the computed properties at the superheating point. Finally, we show the relationship between superheating point temperature and pressure leading to a phase diagram of kaolinite.

  16. Applications of Discrete Molecular Dynamics in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Elizabeth A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2016-04-01

    Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD) is a physics-based simulation method using discrete energetic potentials rather than traditional continuous potentials, allowing microsecond time scale simulations of biomolecular systems to be performed on personal computers rather than supercomputers or specialized hardware. With the ongoing explosion in processing power even in personal computers, applications of DMD have similarly multiplied. In the past two years, researchers have used DMD to model structures of disease-implicated protein folding intermediates, study assembly of protein complexes, predict protein-protein binding conformations, engineer rescue mutations in disease-causative protein mutants, design a protein conformational switch to control cell signaling, and describe the behavior of polymeric dispersants for environmental cleanup of oil spills, among other innovative applications. PMID:26638022

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Helium Behaviour in Titanium Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Tie-Ying; LONG Xing-Gui; WANG Jun; HOU Qing; WU Zhong-Cheng; PENG Shu-Ming; LUO Shun-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the behaviour of helium atoms in titanium at a temperature of 300 K.The nucleation and growth of helium bubble has been simulated up to 50 helium atoms.The approach to simulate the bubble growth is to add helium atoms one by one to the bubble and let the system evolve.The titanium cohesion is based on the tight binding scheme derived from the embedded atom method,and the helium-titanium interaction is characterized by fitted potential in the form of a Lennard-Jones function.The pressure in small helium bubbles is approximately calculated.The simulation results show that the pressure will decrease with the increasing bubble size,while increase with the increasing helium atoms.An analytic function about the quantitative relationship of the pressure with the bubble size and number of helium atoms is also fitted.

  18. Packaging stiff polymers in small containers: A molecular dynamics study

    CERN Document Server

    Rapaport, D C

    2016-01-01

    The question of how stiff polymers are able to pack into small containers is particularly relevant to the study of DNA packaging in viruses. A reduced version of the problem based on coarse-grained representations of the main components of the system -- the DNA polymer and the spherical viral capsid -- has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The results, involving longer polymers than in earlier work, show that as polymers become more rigid there is an increasing tendency to self-organize as spools that wrap from the inside out, rather than the inverse direction seen previously. In the final state, a substantial part of the polymer is packed into one or more coaxial spools, concentrically layered with different orientations, a form of packaging achievable without twisting the polymer.

  19. Anisotropic mechanical properties of graphene: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming; Zeng, Anna; Zeng, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    The anisotropic mechanical properties of monolayer graphene with different shapes have been studied using an efficient quantum mechanics molecular dynamics scheme based on a semi-empirical Hamiltonian (refereed as SCED-LCAO) [PRB 74, 15540; PHYSE 42, 1]. We have found the anisotropic nature of the membrane stress. The stresses along the armchair direction are slightly stronger than that along the zigzag direction, showing strong direction selectivity. The graphene with the rectangular shape could sustain strong load (i . e ., 20%) in both armchair and zigzag directions. The graphene with the rhombus shape show large difference in the strain direction: it will quickly crack after 18 % of strain in armchair the direction, but slowly destroyed after 20% in the zigzag direction. The obtained 2D Young's modulus at infinitesimal strain and the third-order (effective nonlinear) elastic modulus are in good consistent with the experimental observation.

  20. First-principles molecular dynamics study of the thermal stability of the BN, AlN, SiC and SiN interfacial layers in TiN-based heterostructures: Comparison with experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted first-principles molecular dynamics calculations of the stability and possible transformations of heterostructures consisting of face-centered-cubic (NaCl)-TiN(001) slabs with one monolayer thick pseudomorphically stabilized interfacial layer of B1-type BN, AlN, SiC and SiN, respectively. The calculations have been done with subsequent static relaxation of the heterostructures at temperatures between 0 and 1400 K. It is shown that: i) the BN interfacial layer forms a disordered h-BN-like structure consisting of BN3 units within the whole temperature range considered; ii) the B1-AlN interfacial layer is stable within the whole temperature range; iii) the B1-SiC interfacial layer transforms into a distorted 3C–SiC(111)-like phase above 600 K; and iv) the SiN interfacial layer consists of SiN4 and SiN6 units aligned along the [110] direction at room and high temperatures. Phonon calculations show that the observed modifications of the interfaces are due to the dynamical instability of the B1-type (001) and (111) interfacial layers of BN, SiC and SiN driven by soft modes within the given planes. The results, which can be understood also without the knowledge of the theoretical methods, were used to interpret the available experimental results on TiN-based heterostructures and nanocomposite coatings in order to provide guidance to the experimentalists for the preparation of better coatings. - Highlights: • First-principles quantum molecular dynamics studies were conducted. • TiN-based heterostructures with SiN, BN, AlN and SiC interfacial monolayers • Stability and structural transformation between 0 and 1400 K have been calculated. • The results of the calculations have been compared with experiments. • It is concluded which of the systems may form stable superhard nanocomposites

  1. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum–classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S., E-mail: okazaki@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum–classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute–solvent interactions.

  3. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-01-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction k...

  4. Conformational flexibility of β-secretase:molecular dynamics simulation and essential dynamics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing XIONG; Xiao-qin HUANG; Ling-ling SHEN; Jian-hua SHEN; Xiao-min LUO; Xu SHEN; Hua-liang JIANG; Kai-xian CHEN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Based on the structural analysis to reveal the mechanism of ligand binding to β-secretase and the specificity of each binding sub-site. METHODS: Molecular dynamics was used to simulate on the ligand free β-secretase and ligand bound β-secretase. The trajectories were analyzed using the essential dynamics, and the significant conformational change was illustrated employing the DynDom program. RESULTS: The essential dynamics and DynDom analyses clearly showed that the β-secretase experienced a large conformational change upon the substrate or inhibitor binding. The flap structure adopted a swing motion, gradually covering the active site to facilitate the ligand binding process. Residues Ser86 and Ile87 served as the hinge point. Inhibitor-enzyme interaction analysis revealed that residues at P2, Pl, and P1' positions of the inhibitor were very important for the binding, and residues at P2' and P3' positions may be modified to improve the binding specificity. S3 subsite of the enzyme still had space to modify the inhibitors in increasing the binding affinity. CONCLUSION: The information presented here is valuable and could be used to identify small molecular inhibitors of β-secretase.

  5. Cell Molecular Dynamics for Cascades (CMDC): A new tool for cascade simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new Molecular Dynamics (MD) scheme for the simulation of cascades: Cell Molecular Dynamics for Cascades (CMDC). It is based on the decomposition of the material in nanometric cells which are added and removed on the fly from the MD simulation and the dynamics of which are treated with a local time step. An acceleration of several orders of magnitude is observed compared to standard calculation. The capacity of the method is demonstrated on the test cases of 60 keV He implantation and self-cascades in iron up to 1.8 MeV

  6. Tunneling Dynamics Between Atomic and Molecular Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong

    2004-01-01

    Tunneling dynamics of multi-atomic molecules between atomic and multi-atomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with Feshbach resonance is investigated.It is indicated that the tunneling in the two Bose-Einstein condensates depends on not only the inter-atomic-molecular nonlinear interactions and the initial number of atoms in these condensates,but also the tunneling coupling between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate.It is discovered that besides oscillating tunneling current between the atomic condensate and the multi-atomic molecular condensate,the nonlinear multi-atomic molecular tunneling dynamics sustains a self-locked population imbalance:a macroscopic quantum self-trapping effect.The influence of de-coherence caused by non-condensate atoms on the tunneling dynamics is studied.It is shown that de-coherence suppresses the multi-atomic molecular tunneling.Moreover,the conception of the molecular Bose-Einstein condensate,which is different from the conventional single-atomic Bose-Einstein condensate,is specially emphasized in this paper.

  7. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Polyethylene/Graphene Nanocomposites through Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassia N. Rissanou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed atomistic (united atoms molecular dynamics simulations of several graphene based polymer (polyethylene, PE nanocomposite systems have been performed. Systems with graphene sheets of different sizes have been simulated at the same graphene concentration (~3%. In addition, a periodic graphene layer (“infinite sheet” has been studied. Results concerning structural and dynamical properties of PE chains are presented for the various systems and compared to data from a corresponding bulk system. The final properties of the material are the result of a complex effect of the graphene’s sheet size, mobility and fluctuations. A detailed investigation of density, structure and dynamics of the hybrid systems has been conducted. Particular emphasis has been given in spatial heterogeneities due to the PE/graphene interfaces, which were studied through a detailed analysis based on radial distances form the graphene’s center-of-mass. Chain segmental dynamics is found to be slower, compared to the bulk one, at the PE/graphene interface by a factor of 5 to 10. Furthermore, an analysis on the graphene sheets characteristics is presented in terms of conformational properties (i.e., wrinkling and mobility.

  8. A dynamic knowledge base based search engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-jin; HU Hua; LI Qing

    2005-01-01

    Search engines have greatly helped us to find thedesired information from the Intemet. Most search engines use keywords matching technique. This paper discusses a Dynamic Knowledge Base based Search Engine (DKBSE), which can expand the user's query using the keywords' concept or meaning. To do this, the DKBSE needs to construct and maintain the knowledge base dynamically via the system's searching results and the user's feedback information. The DKBSE expands the user's initial query using the knowledge base, and returns the searched information after the expanded query.

  9. Structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of laser-heated silicon: An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D

    1997-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystalline silicon. We found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bonding. As a result the system undergoes a melting transition to a metallic state. We studied several structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of this phase of silicon. In contrast to ordinary liquid silicon, this liquid is characte...

  10. Hydrogen bond dynamics in liquid water: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheolhee; Kim, Eunae [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Min Sun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of intermolecular interaction on the distribution of the harmonic vibrational frequencies of water molecules was investigated through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Born-Oppenheimer approach. For single water, the effect of the dynamics of the oxygen atom in single water and the simulation time step on the frequency distribution were examined. The distributions of the OH stretching and HOH bending vibrational frequencies of liquid water were compared to those of single water. The probability distributions of the change in OH bond length and the lifetime of the dangling OH bond were also obtained. The distribution of the frequencies was strongly affected by the long lifetime of the dangling OH bond, resulting in the formation of hydrogen bonds between water molecules.

  11. Dissociation dynamics of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, K.; Shibuta, Y.; Ohmura, S.; Arifin, R.; Shimojo, F.

    2016-04-01

    The atomistic mechanism of dissociative adsorption of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. The activation free energy to dehydrogenate an ethylene molecule on the Ni cluster and the corresponding reaction rate is estimated. A remarkable finding is that the adsorption energy of ethylene molecules on the Ni cluster is considerably larger than the activation free energy, which explains why the actual reaction rate is faster than the value estimated based on only the activation free energy. It is also found from the dynamic simulations that hydrogen molecules and an ethane molecule are formed from the dissociated hydrogen atoms, whereas some exist as single atoms on the surface or in the interior of the Ni cluster. On the other hand, the dissociation of the C-C bonds of ethylene molecules is not observed. On the basis of these simulation results, the nature of the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth is discussed.

  12. Dissociation dynamics of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomistic mechanism of dissociative adsorption of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. The activation free energy to dehydrogenate an ethylene molecule on the Ni cluster and the corresponding reaction rate is estimated. A remarkable finding is that the adsorption energy of ethylene molecules on the Ni cluster is considerably larger than the activation free energy, which explains why the actual reaction rate is faster than the value estimated based on only the activation free energy. It is also found from the dynamic simulations that hydrogen molecules and an ethane molecule are formed from the dissociated hydrogen atoms, whereas some exist as single atoms on the surface or in the interior of the Ni cluster. On the other hand, the dissociation of the C-C bonds of ethylene molecules is not observed. On the basis of these simulation results, the nature of the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth is discussed. (paper)

  13. Passage from quantum to classical molecular dynamics in the presence of Coulomb interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrosio, Luigi; Friesecke, Gero; Giannoulis, Jannis

    2009-01-01

    We present a rigorous derivation of classical molecular dynamics (MD) from quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) that applies to the standard Hamiltonians of molecular physics with Coulomb interactions. The derivation is valid away from possible electronic eigenvalue crossings.

  14. Optical control of molecular dynamics: Molecular cannons, reflectrons, and wave-packet focusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jeffrey L.; Whitnell, Robert M.; Wilson, Kent R.; Yan, YiJing; Mukamel, Shaul

    1993-11-01

    We consider the control of molecular dynamics using tailored light fields, based on a phase space theory of control [Y. J. Yan et al., J. Phys. Chem. 97, 2320 (1993)]. This theory enables us to calculate, in the weak field (one-photon) limit, the globally optimal light field that produces the best overlap for a given phase space target. We present as an illustrative example the use of quantum control to overcome the natural tendency of quantum wave packets to delocalize on excited state potential energy curves. Three cases are studied: (i) a ``molecular cannon'' in which we focus an outgoing continuum wave packet of I2 in both position and momentum, (ii) a ``reflectron'' in which we focus an incoming bound wave packet of I2, and (iii) the focusing of a bound wave packet of Na2 at a turning point on the excited state potential using multiple light pulses to create a localized wave packet with zero momentum. For each case, we compute the globally optimal light field and also how well the wave packet produced by this light field achieves the desired target. These globally optimal fields are quite simple and robust. While our theory provides the globally optimal light field in the linear, weak field regime, experiment can in reality only provide a restricted universe of possible light fields. We therefore also consider the control of molecular quantum dynamics using light fields restricted to a parametrized functional form which spans a set of fields that can be experimentally realized. We fit the globally optimal electric field with a functional form consisting of a superposition of subpulses with variable parameters of amplitude, center time, center frequency, temporal width, relative phase, and linear and quadratic chirp. The best fit light fields produce excellent quantum control and are within the range of experimental possibility. We discuss relevant experiments such as ultrafast spectroscopy and ultrafast electron and x-ray diffraction which can in principle

  15. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  16. Real time quantum dynamics preaveraged over imaginary time path integral: A formal basis for both Centroid Molecular Dynamics and Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Seogjoo

    2013-01-01

    An exact real time quantum dynamics preaveraged over imaginary time path integral is formulated for general condensed phase equilibrium ensemble. This formulation results in the well-known centroid dynamics approach upon filtering of centroid constraint, and provides a rigorous framework to understand and analyze a related quantum dynamics approximation method called ring polymer molecular dynamics. The formulation also serves as the basis for developing new kinds of quantum dynamics that uti...

  17. Nonlocalized cluster dynamics and nuclear molecular structure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Xu, Chang; Yamada, Taiichi

    2013-01-01

    A container picture is proposed for understanding cluster dynamics where the clusters make nonlocalized motion occupying the lowest orbit of the cluster mean-field potential characterized by the size parameter $``B"$ in the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"{o}pke) wave function. The nonlocalized cluster aspects of the inversion-doublet bands in $^{20}$Ne which have been considered as a typical manifestation of localized clustering are discussed. So far unexplained puzzling features of the THS...

  18. On the stochastic dynamics of molecular conformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An important functioning mechanism of biological macromolecules is the transition between different conformed states due to thermal fluctuation. In the present paper, a biological macromolecule is modeled as two strands with side chains facing each other, and its stochastic dynamics including the statistics of stationary motion and the statistics of conformational transition is studied by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi Hamiltonian systems. The theoretical results are confirmed with the results from Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed. (paper)

  20. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. PMID:26489820

  1. Structural, dynamical, electronic, and bonding properties of laser-heated silicon: An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1997-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to simulate laser heating of crystalline silicon. We found that a high concentration of excited electrons dramatically weakens the covalent bonding. As a result the system undergoes a melting t

  2. Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Enzyme Mechanism and Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, C L; Martí, M A; Roitberg, A E

    2016-01-01

    One of the main goals of chemistry is to understand the underlying principles of chemical reactions, in terms of both its reaction mechanism and the thermodynamics that govern it. Using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM)-based methods in combination with a biased sampling scheme, it is possible to simulate chemical reactions occurring inside complex environments such as an enzyme, or aqueous solution, and determining the corresponding free energy profile, which provides direct comparison with experimental determined kinetic and equilibrium parameters. Among the most promising biasing schemes is the multiple steered molecular dynamics method, which in combination with Jarzynski's Relationship (JR) allows obtaining the equilibrium free energy profile, from a finite set of nonequilibrium reactive trajectories by exponentially averaging the individual work profiles. However, obtaining statistically converged and accurate profiles is far from easy and may result in increased computational cost if the selected steering speed and number of trajectories are inappropriately chosen. In this small review, using the extensively studied chorismate to prephenate conversion reaction, we first present a systematic study of how key parameters such as pulling speed, number of trajectories, and reaction progress are related to the resulting work distributions and in turn the accuracy of the free energy obtained with JR. Second, and in the context of QM/MM strategies, we introduce the Hybrid Differential Relaxation Algorithm, and show how it allows obtaining more accurate free energy profiles using faster pulling speeds and smaller number of trajectories and thus smaller computational cost. PMID:27497165

  3. A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study of Doped Polypyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonner, John M; Schmidt, Christine E; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-10-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a biocompatible, electrically conductive polymer that has great potential for battery, sensor, and neural implant applications. Its amorphous structure and insolubility, however, limit the experimental techniques available to study its structure and properties at the atomic level. Previous theoretical studies of PPy in bulk are also scarce. Using ab initio calculations, we have constructed a molecular mechanics force field of chloride-doped PPy (PPyCl) and undoped PPy. This model has been designed to integrate into the OPLS force field, and parameters are available for the Gromacs and TINKER software packages. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of bulk PPy and PPyCl have been performed using this force field, and the effects of chain packing and electrostatic scaling on the bulk polymer density have been investigated. The density of flotation of PPyCl films has been measured experimentally. Amorphous X-ray diffraction of PPyCl was obtained and correlated with atomic structures sampled from MD simulations. The force field reported here is foundational for bridging the gap between experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for PPy based materials. PMID:21052521

  4. Hybrid particle-field molecular dynamics simulation for polyelectrolyte systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Milano, Giuseppe; Shi, An-Chang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-04-14

    To achieve simulations on large spatial and temporal scales with high molecular chemical specificity, a hybrid particle-field method was proposed recently. This method is developed by combining molecular dynamics and self-consistent field theory (MD-SCF). The MD-SCF method has been validated by successfully predicting the experimentally observable properties of several systems. Here we propose an efficient scheme for the inclusion of electrostatic interactions in the MD-SCF framework. In this scheme, charged molecules are interacting with the external fields that are self-consistently determined from the charge densities. This method is validated by comparing the structural properties of polyelectrolytes in solution obtained from the MD-SCF and particle-based simulations. Moreover, taking PMMA-b-PEO and LiCF3SO3 as examples, the enhancement of immiscibility between the ion-dissolving block and the inert block by doping lithium salts into the copolymer is examined by using the MD-SCF method. By employing GPU-acceleration, the high performance of the MD-SCF method with explicit treatment of electrostatics facilitates the simulation study of many problems involving polyelectrolytes. PMID:27001709

  5. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulation of Zn(II) in water using the AMOEBA force field

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Johnny C.; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Chaudret, Robin; Reinhardt, Peter; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-01-01

    The hydration free energy, structure, and dynamics of the zinc divalent cation are studied using a polarizable force field in molecular dynamics simulations. Parameters for the Zn2+ are derived from gas-phase ab initio calculation of Zn2+-water dimer. The Thole-based dipole polarization is adjusted based on the Constrained Space Orbital Variations (CSOV) calculation while the Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) approach is also discussed. The vdW parameters of Zn2+ have been obtained ...

  6. Dynamic phase diagrams and compensation behaviors in molecular-based ferrimagnet A F eΙΙ F eΙΙΙ(C2O4)3 under an oscillating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoling; Wang, Li; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Xingguang

    2016-07-01

    Within the effective-field theory (EFT), the compensation behaviors in molecular-based ferrimagnet A F eΙΙ F e Ι Ι Ι(C2O4)3 which is described by a mixed spin-2 (FeΙΙ) and spin-5/2 (FeΙΙΙ) ferrimagnetic Ising model on a honeycomb lattice are studied. The Glauber-type stochastic dynamic is used to describe the time evolution of the system under an oscillating magnetic field. A magnetic field dependence of the compensation temperature and a temperature dependence of compensating magnetic field are calculated and both curves agree qualitatively with experimental data. In particular, a two-compensation-points phenomenon which has been reported in the experimental work is also observed in this compound. Dynamic phase boundaries containing the compensation points are calculated. The dynamic tricritical point and critical end point exist on the phase transition lines. Comparing with previous theoretical results obtained by the mean-field theory (MFT), the effective-field theory results show a reasonable improvement over the MFT results.

  7. Structural dynamics of human telomeric G-quadruplex loops studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhu

    Full Text Available Loops which are linkers connecting G-strands and supporting the G-tetrad core in G-quadruplex are important for biological roles of G-quadruplexes. TTA loop is a common sequence which mainly resides in human telomeric DNA (hTel G-quadruplex. A series of molecular dynamics (MD simulations were carried out to investigate the structural dynamics of TTA loops. We found that (1 the TA base pair formed in TTA loops are very stable, the occupied of all hydrogen bonds are more than 0.95. (2 The TA base pair makes the adjacent G-quartet more stable than others. (3 For the edgewise loop and the diagonal loop, most loop bases are stacking with others, only few bases have considerable freedom. (4 The stabilities of these stacking structures are distinct. Part of the loops, especially TA base pairs, and bases stacking with the G-quartet, maintain certain stable conformations in the simulation, but other parts, like TT and TA stacking structures, are not stable enough. For the first time, spontaneous conformational switches of TTA edgewise loops were observed in our long time MD simulations. (5 For double chain reversal loop, it is really hard to maintain a stable conformation in the long time simulation under present force fields (parm99 and parmbsc0, as it has multiple conformations with similar free energies.

  8. Molecular phenomena in dynamic wetting: superspreading and precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Isele-Holder, Rolf Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Wetting is a multiscale process that can be controlled simultaneously by complex flow patterns on the macroscale and contact line phenomena at the Ångstrom scale. While resolving the latter scale is often circumvented by usage of boundary conditions, there are molecular wetting phenomena in which this approach is infeasible. The focus of this study is to use molecular dynamics simulations to examine two of these phenomena: superspreading, the ultra-rapid wetting of aqueous solutions facilitat...

  9. Polarizable Molecular Dynamics in a Polarizable Continuum Solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Lipparini, Filippo; Lagardère, Louis; Raynaud, Christophe; Stamm, Benjamin; Cancès, Eric; Mennucci, Benedetta; Schnieders, Michael; Ren, Pengyu; Maday, Yvon; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time scalable polarizable molecular dynamics (MD) simulations within a polarizable continuum solvent with molecular shape cavities and exact solution of the mutual polarization. The key ingredients are a very efficient algorithm for solving the equations associated with the polarizable continuum, in particular, the domain decomposition Conductor-like Screening Model (ddCOSMO), a rigorous coupling of the continuum with the polarizable force field achieved through a rob...

  10. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Ruggerone; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Francesca Collu; Nadine Fischer; Christian Kandt

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformation...

  11. Analysis of the epidemiological dynamics during the 1982-1983 epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in Denmark based on molecular high-resolution strain identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Normann, Preben; Thykier-Nielsen, Søren; Sorensen, J.H.; de Stricker, K.; Rosenorn, S.

    2005-01-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) causing a total of 23 cases in 1982-1983, primarily on the island of Funen, Denmark, was subjected to molecular epidemiological investigations. In an attempt to exploit the quasi-species nature of foot-and-mouth disease virus strains for molecular high...... epidemic was caused by at least three introductions across Danish borders and one case of airborne transmission between two islands in Denmark over a distance of 70 km. The assortment of nucleotide markers among the three strains is indicative of common recombination events in their evolutionary history...

  12. Analysis of the epidemiological dynamics during the 1982-1983 epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease in Denmark based on molecular high-resolution strain identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Normann, Preben; Thykier-Nielsen, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) causing a total of 23 cases in 1982-1983, primarily on the island of Funen, Denmark, was subjected to molecular epidemiological investigations. In an attempt to exploit the quasi-species nature of foot-and-mouth disease virus strains for molecular high......, and the prerequisite of co- or superinfection of animals with variant strains in turn implies that they have a common source or epidemiologically related sources originating from an area with endemic FMD....

  13. Driving ordering processes in molecular-dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Harro; Kusalik, Peter G

    2014-05-16

    Self-organized criticality describes the emergence of complexity in dynamical nonequilibrium systems. In this paper we introduce a unique approach whereby a driven energy conversion is utilized as a sampling bias for ordered arrangements in molecular dynamics simulations of atomic and molecular fluids. This approach gives rise to dramatically accelerated nucleation rates, by as much as 30 orders of magnitude, without the need of predefined order parameters, which commonly employed rare-event sampling methods rely on. The measured heat fluxes suggest how the approach can be generalized. PMID:24877946

  14. Finite Temperature Infrared Spectra from Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrouni, David; Sharma, Ashwani; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Ohanessian, Gilles; Clavaguéra, Carine

    2014-08-12

    Infrared spectra of biomolecules are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature using the AMOEBA force field. Diverse examples are presented such as N-methylacetamide and its derivatives and a helical peptide. The computed spectra from polarizable molecular dynamics are compared in each case to experimental ones at various temperatures. The role of high-level electrostatic treatment and explicit polarization, including parameters improvements, is highlighted for obtaining spectral sensitivity to the environment including hydrogen bonds and water molecules and a better understanding of the observed experimental bands. PMID:26588289

  15. The application of molecular dynamics in the uracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the (N, V, T) system, the position, speed, strength and direction of under stress and the changes of bond distance and bond angle of the evolution of each atom in uracil molecule are calculated by using the semiempirical molecular dynamics. The calculations come to the conclusions which are difficult or failed to be obtained on the microcosmic information of particles during the experiment be- cause of the limit of today's technology. It is to provide the theoretical basis that will go a step further to know molecular inner dynamics. (authors)

  16. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  17. Femtochemistry and femtobiology ultrafast dynamics in molecular science

    CERN Document Server

    Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2002-01-01

    This book contains important contributions from top international scientists on the-state-of-the-art of femtochemistry and femtobiology at the beginning of the new millennium. It consists of reviews and papers on ultrafast dynamics in molecular science.The coverage of topics highlights several important features of molecular science from the viewpoint of structure (space domain) and dynamics (time domain). First of all, the book presents the latest developments, such as experimental techniques for understanding ultrafast processes in gas, condensed and complex systems, including biological mol

  18. A computational toy model for shallow landslides: Molecular Dynamics approach

    CERN Document Server

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Massaro, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a 2D computational algorithm for modeling of the trigger and the propagation of shallow landslides caused by rainfall. We used a Molecular Dynamics (MD) inspired model, similar to discrete element method (DEM), that is suitable to model granular material and to observe the trajectory of single particle, so to identify its dynamical properties. We consider that the triggering of shallow landslides is caused by the decrease of the static friction along the sliding surface due to water infiltration by rainfall. Thence the triggering is caused by two following conditions: (a) a threshold speed of the particles and (b) a condition on the static friction, between particles and slope surface, based on the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The latter static condition is used in the geotechnical model to estimate the possibility of landslide triggering. Finally the interaction force between particles is defined trough a potential that, in the absence of experimental data, we have mode...

  19. Switching dynamics in reaction networks induced by molecular discreteness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the fluctuations and dynamics in chemical reaction processes, stochastic differential equations based on the rate equation involving chemical concentrations are often adopted. When the number of molecules is very small, however, the discreteness in the number of molecules cannot be neglected since the number of molecules must be an integer. This discreteness can be important in biochemical reactions, where the total number of molecules is not significantly larger than the number of chemical species. To elucidate the effects of such discreteness, we study autocatalytic reaction systems comprising several chemical species through stochastic particle simulations. The generation of novel states is observed; it is caused by the extinction of some molecular species due to the discreteness in their number. We demonstrate that the reaction dynamics are switched by a single molecule, which leads to the reconstruction of the acting network structure. We also show the strong dependence of the chemical concentrations on the system size, which is caused by transitions to discreteness-induced novel states

  20. [Molecular bases of cancer immunology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Madrid-Marina, V

    1995-01-01

    The immune system is a tight network of different types of cells and molecules. The coordinated action of these elements mounts a precise immune response against tumor cells. However, these cells present several escape mechanisms, leading to tumor progression. This paper shows several cellular and molecular events involved in the regulation of the immune response against tumor cells. The interaction of several molecules such as MHC, TcR, adhesins, tumor antigens and cytokines are discussed, as well as the most recent knowledge about escape mechanisms and immunotherapy. PMID:7502157

  1. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets' spin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar; Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet's spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  2. A Coupling Tool for Parallel Molecular Dynamics-Continuum Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-06-01

    We present a tool for coupling Molecular Dynamics and continuum solvers. It is written in C++ and is meant to support the developers of hybrid molecular - continuum simulations in terms of both realisation of the respective coupling algorithm as well as parallel execution of the hybrid simulation. We describe the implementational concept of the tool and its parallel extensions. We particularly focus on the parallel execution of particle insertions into dense molecular systems and propose a respective parallel algorithm. Our implementations are validated for serial and parallel setups in two and three dimensions. © 2012 IEEE.

  3. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtíková, J.; Kalvoda, L.; Sedlák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 637-639. ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : molecular dynamics * poly(dimethylsiloxane) * dissipative particle dynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2014 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/PDF/128/a128z4p40.pdf

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Pabis, Anna; Geronimo, Inacrist; York, Darrin M.; Paneth, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron–sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specif...

  6. Molecular Dynamics Study of Iron-Nickel Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, R.; Entel, P.

    1995-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of disordered iron-nickel alloys. In particular we discuss the α-γ transition and associated anharmonic properties by making use of semiempirical potentials. Our results show that the structural transformation in these alloys is driven by local disorder. From data of specific heat and thermal expansion we conclude that the lattice dynamics at elevated temperatures (above the Curie temperature) can be described correctly without considering ...

  7. ProtoMD: A Prototyping Toolkit for Multiscale Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Somogyi, Endre; Mansour, Andrew Abi; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    ProtoMD is a toolkit that facilitates the development of algorithms for multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It is designed for multiscale methods which capture the dynamic transfer of information across multiple spatial scales, such as the atomic to the mesoscopic scale, via coevolving microscopic and coarse-grained (CG) variables. ProtoMD can be also be used to calibrate parameters needed in traditional CG-MD methods. The toolkit integrates `GROMACS wrapper' to initiate MD simula...

  8. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H; Suleimanov, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett–Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any ...

  9. Micellar Crystals in Solution from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J A; Lorenz, C. D.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers with both soluble and insoluble blocks typically self-assemble into micelles, aggregates of a finite number of polymers where the soluble blocks shield the insoluble ones from contact with the solvent. Upon increasing concentration, these micelles often form gels that exhibit crystalline order in many systems. In this paper, we present a study of both the dynamics and the equilibrium properties of micellar crystals of triblock polymers using molecular dynamics simulations. Our result...

  10. Dynamics of excess electrons in atomic and molecular clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Ryan Michael

    2011-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging (TRPEI) is applied to the study of excess electrons in clusters as well as to microsolvated anion species. This technique can be used to perform explicit time-resolved as well as one-color (single- or multiphoton) studies on gas phase species. The first part of this dissertation details time-resolved studies done on atomic clusters with an excess electron, the excited-state dynamics of solvated molecular anions, and charge-transfer dynamics to...

  11. Deposition of Small Clusters on Surface: a Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Xiang-Mei; GONG Xin-Gao

    2000-01-01

    By using the molecular dynamics simulation, we have studied the dynamic behaviors of small energetic clusters deposited on the surface. We find that, at incident energy as low as 1.0eV/atom, the structure of the cluster is destroyed and cluster atoms form an epitaxial layer above the surface. At high energy incidence, the site exchange between cluster atom and surface atom is observed. The effects of the cluster size and orientation are discussed.

  12. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. III. Molecules with partial charges at bulk phases, confined geometries and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Paper I [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 139(23), 234104 (2013)], we showed that how a third-order Weeks–Chandler–Anderson (WCA) Thermodynamic Perturbation Theory and molecular simulation can be integrated to characterize the repulsive and dispersive contributions to the Helmholtz free energy for realistic molecular conformations. To this end, we focused on n-alkanes to develop a theory for fused and soft chains. In Paper II [A. F. Ghobadi and J. R. Elliott, J. Chem. Phys. 141(2), 024708 (2014)], we adapted the classical Density Functional Theory and studied the microstructure of the realistic molecular fluids in confined geometries and vapor-liquid interfaces. We demonstrated that a detailed consistency between molecular simulation and theory can be achieved for both bulk and inhomogeneous phases. In this paper, we extend the methodology to molecules with partial charges such as carbon dioxide, water, 1-alkanols, nitriles, and ethers. We show that the electrostatic interactions can be captured via an effective association potential in the framework of Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT). Implementation of the resulting association contribution in assessing the properties of these molecules at confined geometries and interfaces presents satisfactory agreement with molecular simulation and experimental data. For example, the predicted surface tension deviates less than 4% comparing to full potential simulations. Also, the theory, referred to as SAFT-γ WCA, is able to reproduce the specific orientation of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail of 1-alkanols at the vapor-liquid interface of water

  13. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  14. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of therapeutics targeting EGF

  15. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  16. The origin of chiral discrimination: supersonic molecular beam experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of collisional mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Grossi, Gaia; Lombardi, Andrea; Maciel, Glauciete S; Palazzetti, Federico [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, Via Elce di Sotto 8, 06123 Perugia (Italy)], E-mail: abulafia@dyn.unipg.it

    2008-10-15

    The target of the present paper is the study of chirality effects in molecular dynamics from both a theoretical and an experimental point of view under the hypothesis of a molecular dynamics mechanism as the origin of chiral discrimination. This is a fundamental problem per se, and of possible relevance for the problem of the intriguing homochirality in Nature, so far lacking satisfactory explanations. We outline the steps that have been taken so far toward this direction, motivated by various experimental studies of supersonic molecular beams carried out in this laboratory, such as the detection of aligned oxygen in gaseous streams and further evidence on nitrogen, benzene and various hydrocarbons, showing the insurgence of molecular orientation in the dynamics of molecules in flows and in molecular collisions. Chiral effects are theoretically demonstrated to show up in the differential scattering of oriented molecules, also when impinging on surfaces. Focus on possible mechanisms for chiral bio-stereochemistry of oriented reactants may be of pre-biotical interest, for example when flowing in atmospheres of rotating bodies, specifically the planet Earth, as well as in vortex motions of celestial objects. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental verifications of the hypothesis are reviewed and objectives of future research activity proposed.

  17. Simplistic Coulomb Forces in Molecular Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    salt model the SF approximation overall reproduces the structural and dynamical properties as accurately as does the Wolf method. It is shown that the optimal Wolf damping parameter depends on the property in focus and that neither the potential energy nor the radial distribution function are useful...... measures for the convergence of the Wolf method to the Ewald summation method. The SF approximation is also tested for the SPC/Fw model of liquid water at room temperature, showing good agreement with both the Wolf and the particle mesh Ewald methods; this confirms previous findings [Fennell, C. J......In this paper we compare the Wolf method to the shifted forces (SF) method for efficient computer simulation of bulk systems with Coulomb forces, taking results from the Ewald summation and particle mesh Ewald methods as representing the true behavior. We find that for the Hansen–McDonald molten...

  18. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  19. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2015-05-15

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 Å cutoff, correct atom masses, reproducible trajectory, CPU with 3.6 GHz, no turbo boost, 8 AVX registers). The new features include a mixed multiple time-step algorithm (reaching 5 fs), a tuned version of LINCS to constrain bond angles, the fusion of pair list creation and force calculation, pressure coupling with a "densostat," and exploitation of new CPU instruction sets like AVX2. The impact of Intel's new transactional memory, atomic instructions, and sloppy pair lists is also analyzed. The algorithms map well to GPUs and can automatically handle most Protein Data Bank (PDB) files including ligands. An implementation is available as part of the YASARA molecular modeling and simulation program from www.YASARA.org. PMID:25824339

  20. Molecular circuits for dynamic noise filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Christoph; Seelig, Georg; Rullan, Marc; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-04-26

    The invention of the Kalman filter is a crowning achievement of filtering theory-one that has revolutionized technology in countless ways. By dealing effectively with noise, the Kalman filter has enabled various applications in positioning, navigation, control, and telecommunications. In the emerging field of synthetic biology, noise and context dependency are among the key challenges facing the successful implementation of reliable, complex, and scalable synthetic circuits. Although substantial further advancement in the field may very well rely on effectively addressing these issues, a principled protocol to deal with noise-as provided by the Kalman filter-remains completely missing. Here we develop an optimal filtering theory that is suitable for noisy biochemical networks. We show how the resulting filters can be implemented at the molecular level and provide various simulations related to estimation, system identification, and noise cancellation problems. We demonstrate our approach in vitro using DNA strand displacement cascades as well as in vivo using flow cytometry measurements of a light-inducible circuit in Escherichia coli. PMID:27078094

  1. Thermostatted molecular dynamics: How to avoid the Toda demon hidden in Nose-Hoover dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nose-Hoover thermostat, which is often used in the hope of modifying molecular dynamics trajectories in order to achieve canonical-ensemble averages, has hidden in it a Toda ''demon,'' which can give rise to unwanted, noncanonical undulations in the instantaneous kinetic temperature. We show how these long-lived oscillations arise from insufficient coupling of the thermostat to the atoms, and give straightforward, practical procedures for avoiding this weak-coupling pathology in isothermal molecular dynamics simulations

  2. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The method is also used to investigate higher-order central difference algorithms, which are symplectic and also have shadow Hamiltonians, and for which one can also determine the exact criteria for the limit of stability of a single harmonic mode. A fourth-order central difference algorithm gives...

  3. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B.

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H2 and D2 molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H2 and D2 with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules.

  4. C60 molecular dynamics studied by muon spin relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In muonium-substituted organic radicals, the muon spin can serve as a probe of molecular dynamics. The motional perturbation induces transitions between the coupled spin states of muon and unpaired electron. Studies of the resultant muon spin relaxation in C60Mu, the species formed by muon implantation in solid C60, yield the correlation time characteristic of the reorientational motion

  5. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    2004-01-01

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the po

  6. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  7. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  8. Molecular Dynamics ofa Coulomb System with Deformable Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Totsuji, Hiroo; Shirokoshi, Hideki; Nara, Shigetoshi

    1991-01-01

    Variable shape molecular dynamics is formulated for the one-component plasma and the structural transition from the fcc lattice to the bcc lattice has been observed. It is emphasized that the condition of constant volume should be imposed when deformations of periodic boundary conditions are taken into account.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Study on Chiral Room -Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lísal, Martin; Chvál, Z.; Storch, Jan; Izák, Pavel; Aim, Karel

    Frankfurt : DECHEMA, 2012, P2-35. ISBN N. [European Symposium on Applied Thermodynamics - ESAT 2012 /26./. Potsdam (DE), 07.10.2012-10.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : ionic liquids * molecular dynamics simulations * thermodynamics properties Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://events.dechema.de/events/en/esat2012.html

  10. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.sternberg@partner.kit.edu; Witter, Raiker [Tallinn University of Technology, Technomedicum (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  13. Molecular dynamics of flows in the Knudsen regime

    OpenAIRE

    Cieplak, Marek; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2000-01-01

    Novel technological applications often involve fluid flows in the Knudsen regime in which the mean free path is comparable to the system size. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the transition between the dilute gas and the dense fluid regimes as the fluid density is increased.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the Ni(001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirita, V.; Pailthorpe, B.A. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia))

    1992-02-10

    A Lennard-Jones two-body interatomic potential is used in a molecular dynamics simulation of bulk nickel and of the Ni(001) surface stabilized using a Dion-Barker-Merrill substrate interaction. It is found that the bulk and surface Debye temperatures and surface atomic displacements compare well with previous theoretical and experimental studies. (orig.).

  15. Enhanced molecular dynamics performance with a programmable graphics processor

    CERN Document Server

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-01-01

    Design considerations for molecular dynamics algorithms capable of taking advantage of the computational power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) are described. Accommodating the constraints of multistream processor hardware necessitates a reformulation of the underlying algorithm. Performance measurements demonstrate the considerable benefit and cost-effectiveness of such an approach.

  16. A Molecular Dynamics Approach to Grain Boundary Structure and Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, R. M. J.; Leffers, Torben; Lilholt, Hans

    1974-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that grain boundary formation from the melt can be simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The space between two mutually-misoriented crystal slabs was filled with atoms in a random manner and this liquid was then cooled until crystallization occurred. The general...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of a charged biological membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López Cascales, J.J.; García de la Torre, J.; Marrink, S.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of a membrane with net charge in its liquid-crystalline state was carried out. It was modeled by dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine lipids with net charge, sodium ions as counterions and water molecules. The behavior of this membrane differs from that was shown by other me

  18. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable `gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the `gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF PHARMACOLOGICAL TARGETS COMBINING DOCKING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilizaliturri-Flores Ian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies that include both experimental data and computational simulations (in silico have increased in number because the techniques are complementary. In silico methodologies are currently an essential component of drug design; moreover, identification and optimization of the best ligand based on the structures of biomolecules are common scientific challenges. Geometric structural properties of biomolecules explain their behavior and interactions and when this information is used by a combination of algorithms, a dynamic model based on atomic details can be produced. Docking studies enable researchers to determine the best position for a ligand to bind on a macromolecule, whereas Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations describe the relevant interactions that maintain this binding. MD simulations have the advantage of illustrating the macromolecule movements in more detail. In the case of a protein, the side chain, backbone and domain movements can explain how ligands are trapped during different conformational states. Additionally, MD simulations can depict several binding sites of ligands that can be explored by docking studies, sampling many protein conformations. Following the previously mentioned strategy, it is possible to identify each binding site that might be able to accommodate different ligands through atomic motion. Another important advantage of MD is to explore the movement of side chains of key catalytic residues, which could provide information about the formation of transition states of a protein. All this information can be used to propose ligands and their most probable site of interaction, which are daily tasks of drug design. In this review, the most frequent criteria that are considered when determining pharmacological targets are gathered, particularly when docking and MD are combined.

  20. Salient Frame Detection for Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Youngmin; Patro, Robert; Yiu Ip, Cheuk; O’Leary, Dianne P.; Anishkin, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in sophisticated computational techniques have facilitated simulation of incrediblydetailed time-varying trajectories and in the process have generated vast quantities of simulation data. The current tools to analyze and comprehend large-scale time-varying data, however, lag far behind our ability to produce such simulation data. Saliency-based analysis can be applied to time-varying 3D datasets for the purpose of summarization, abstraction, and motion analysis. As the sizes o...

  1. An allosteric mechanism inferred from molecular dynamics simulations on phospholamban pentamer in lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lian

    Full Text Available Phospholamban functions as a regulator of Ca(2+ concentration of cardiac muscle cells by triggering the bioactivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase. In order to understand its dynamic mechanism in the environment of bilayer surroundings, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamic simulations based on the high-resolution NMR structure of phospholamban pentamer. It was observed from the molecular dynamics trajectory analyses that the conformational transitions between the "bellflower" and "pinwheel" modes were detected for phospholamban. Particularly, the two modes became quite similar to each other after phospholamban was phosphorylated at Ser16. Based on these findings, an allosteric mechanism was proposed to elucidate the dynamic process of phospholamban interacting with Ca(2+-ATPase.

  2. Influence of conformational molecular dynamics on matter wave interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gring, Michael; Eibenberger, Sandra; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Berrada, Tarik; Arndt, Markus; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Hornberger, Klaus; Müri, Marcel; Mayor, Marcel; Böckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the influence of thermally activated internal molecular dynamics on the phase shifts of matter waves inside a molecule interferometer. While de Broglie physics generally describes only the center-of-mass motion of a quantum object, our experiment demonstrates that the translational quantum phase is sensitive to dynamic conformational state changes inside the diffracted molecules. The structural flexibility of tailor-made hot organic particles is sufficient to admit a mixture of strongly fluctuating dipole moments. These modify the electric susceptibility and through this the quantum interference pattern in the presence of an external electric field. Detailed molecular dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory allow us to quantify the time-dependent structural reconfigurations and to predict the ensemble-averaged square of the dipole moment which is found to be in good agreement with the interferometric result. The experiment thus opens a new perspective on matter wave interfe...

  3. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  4. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  5. Using Markov models to simulate electron spin resonance spectra from molecular dynamics trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Sezer, Deniz; Freed, Jack H.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Simulating electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra directly from molecular dynamics simulations of a spin labeled protein necessitates a large number (hundreds or thousands) of relatively long (hundreds of ns) trajectories. To meet this challenge, we explore the possibility of constructing accurate stochastic models of the spin label dynamics from atomistic trajectories. A systematic, two-step procedure, based on the probabilistic framework of hidden Markov models, is developed to build a discr...

  6. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with linear scaling: application to liquid ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and dynamical properties of liquid ethanol (C2H5OH) at ambient conditions have been studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using a large supercell containing 125 molecules (1125 atoms). The results obtained from a trajectory of 10 ps are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. Without sacrificing accuracy, the computational cost of simulations is reduced by more than a factor of four by the linear scaling algorithm based on the augmented orbital minimization method

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  8. Semiconductor nanostructure properties. Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for research is based on the fact that development of non-planar semiconductor nanosystems and nanomaterials with controlled properties is an important scientific and industrial problem. So, final scientific and technological problem is the creation of adequate modern methods and software for growth and properties simulation and optimization of various III-V (GaAs, InAs, InP, InGaAs etc.) nanostructures (e.g. nanowires) with controlled surface morphology, crystal structure, optical, transport properties etc. Accordingly, now we are developing a specialized computer code for atomistic simulation of structural (distribution of atoms and impurities, elastic and force constants, strain distribution etc.) and thermodynamic (mixing energy, interaction energy, surface energy etc.) properties of the nanostructures. Some simulation results are shown too

  9. DNA-based applications in molecular electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Linko, Veikko

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is mainly focused on DNA molecules and especially on self-assembled DNA constructs and their potential applications in nanotechnology and molecular electronics. In the field of molecular electronics the conductivity of DNA is a crucial - yet open - question, and it is of great concern, since DNA is a very promising molecule in a context of bottom-up based nanodevices due to its superior selfassembly characteristics. A key tool in all the experiments presented in ...

  10. Qt-based Molecular Graphics Application (QMGA)

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel, A. T.; Meyer, T.; Germano, G.

    2007-01-01

    Coarse-grained modeling of molecular fluids is often based on non-spherical convex rigid bodies like ellipsoids or spherocylinders representing rodlike or platelike molecules or groups of atoms, with site-site interaction potentials depending both on the distance among the particles and the relative orientation. In this category of potentials, the Gay-Berne family has been studied most extensively. However, conventional molecular graphics programs are not designed to visualize such objects. U...

  11. A mezoscopic model of nucleic acids. Part 1. Lagrangian and quaternion molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, W R; Bakalarski, G; Lesyng, B

    2000-06-01

    This study presents a model for mezoscopic molecular dynamics simulations with objects of different scale and properties e.e. atoms, pseudoatoms, rigid and pseudo-elastic bodies, described by the external coordinates and internal degrees of freedom. The Lagrangian approach is used to derive equations of motion and a quaternion representation is used for the description of the dynamics of rigid and pseudo-elastic molecular elements. Stability of the LQMD algorithm was tested for a 10-base pair deoxynucleotide. The total energy, momentum and angular momentum are conserved for time-steps up to 20 fs. PMID:10949175

  12. Quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the molecular dynamics of discotic molecules in the bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In- and quasielastic neutron scattering is employed to investigate both the vibrational density of states and the molecular dynamics of two homologous discotic liquid crystals (DLC) with different length of the alkyl side chain based on a triphenylene derivate. For both compounds characteristic low frequency excess contributions to the vibrational density of states are found. Therefore it is concluded that these liquid crystals show a glass-like behaviour. Elastic scans further show that a rich molecular dynamics takes place in these materials. (authors)

  13. Disturbance of DNA conformation by the binding of testosterone-based platinum drugs via groove-face and intercalative interactions: a molecular dynamics simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Shanshan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Guangju

    2013-01-01

    Background To explore novel platinum-based anticancer agents that are distinct from the structure and interaction mode of the traditional cisplatin by forming the bifunctional intrastrand 1,2 GpG adduct, the monofunctional platinum + DNA adducts with extensive non-covalent interactions had been studied. It was reported that the monofunctional testosterone-based platinum(II) agents present the high anticancer activity. Moreover, it was also found that the testosterone-based platinum agents cou...

  14. Mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions for carbon alloy catalysts via first principles molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon alloy catalysts (CACs) are one of promising candidates for platinum-substitute cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We have investigated possible mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) for CACs via first-principles-based molecular dynamics simulations. In this contribution, we review possible ORRs at likely catalytic sites of CACs suggested from our simulations. (author)

  15. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi-c...

  16. Conductance of Alkanedithiol Single-Molecule Junctions: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Krag, Casper; Frederiksen, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    We study formation and conductance of alkanedithiol junctions using density functional based molecular dynamics. The formation involves straightening of the molecule, migration of thiol end-groups, and pulling out Au atoms. Plateaus are found in the low-bias conductance traces which decrease by 1...

  17. The structure of molecular liquids. Neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , showing that the agreement at the rdf level does not provide a critical evaluation of appropriateness of a chosen potential model to reproduce the observed liquid structure. Both the simulations reproduce equally well the X-X partial comprising of six correlations. The ability of the 3-site model simulations to satisfactorily reproduce this function dominated by contributions from the methyl group, demonstrates that the methyl group does not participate in any bonding in the liquid. However, the main peaks of the simulated Ho-Ho pdf are found to be slightly higher and shifted to larger distances as compared to the ND results. A comparison of the simulated and ND X-Ho inter-molecular functions dominated by H-Ho correlations shows that although the 3-site model reproduces at least qualitatively the experimental features, the six-site model fails badly. The structure of liquid benzene at 298 K is investigated by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in NVE ensemble using three different force field models differing both in their functional form and in the way they were devised. Surprisingly however, they lead to similar results for the pdfs. The structural results from MD simulations are compared with the neutron diffraction (ND) results where the newly C-C, C-H and H-H inter-molecular pdfs are obtained in this study by the H/D substitution on hydrogen atoms of benzene. A good agreement is found between the simulated and experimental total inter-molecular rdfs for C6D6 and C6(H/D)6 experimental, but not for C6H6. Most of the structural properties of benzene discussed in the past have been based on the models, which showed a reasonable agreement between the simulated and neutron inter-molecular rdf or X-ray C-C pdf The C-C pdf extracted from the present ND studies however differs from the one obtained earlier from the X-ray measurements. Apart from that, the simulated C-C pdf reproduces the corresponding ND function better than that obtained from the X

  18. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  19. Imaging molecular structure and dynamics using laser driven recollisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. Laser driven electron recollision provides a unique tool for measuring the structure and dynamics of matter. We illustrate this with experiments that use HHG to measure molecular structure with sub-Angstrom spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. Our recent work has looked in particular at the signal from high order harmonic generation which contains rich information about the structure and intra-molecular dynamics of small molecules. This we will illustrate by two types of experiment; (a) measurements of HHG from aligned molecular samples to observe two-centre recombination interference and electronic structure dependence of the angle dependent yield, (b) reconstruction of intra-molecular proton dynamics from the spectral dependence of the HHG using the intrinsic chirp of recolliding electrons. We experimentally investigate the process of intramolecular quantum interference in high-order harmonic generation in impulsively aligned CO2 molecules. The recombination interference effect is clearly seen through the order dependence of the harmonic yield in an aligned sample. This confirms that the effective de Broglie wavelength of the returning electron wave is not significantly altered by acceleration in the Coulomb field of the molecular ion. For the first time, to our knowledge, we demonstrate that such interference effects can be effectively controlled by changing the ellipticity of the driving laser field. Here we also report the results of angular dependence measurements of high order harmonics (17tth - 27th) from impulsively aligned organic molecules: Acetylene, Ethylene, and Allene. Since these molecules have a relatively low Ip an appropriately short pulse is required to produce as many harmonic orders as possible. This was provided by the ∼ 10 fs beam line of the ASTRA laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory whilst a somewhat longer pulse, properly forwarded with respect to the driving pulse, induced the

  20. Rarefied Gas Flow in Rough Microchannels by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹炳阳; 陈民; 过增元

    2004-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation method is applied to investigate the rarefied gas flow in a submicron channel with surface roughness which is modelled by an array of triangle modules. The boundary conditions are found to be determined not only by the Knudsen number but also the roughness, which implies that the breakdown of the Maxwell slip model under the conditions that the surface roughness is comparable to the molecular mean free path. The effects of the rarefaction and the surface roughness on the boundary conditions and the flow characteristics are strongly coupled. The flow friction increases with increasing roughness and with decreasing Knudsen number.

  1. Spectra modelling combining molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Vít; Bouř, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA15-09072S Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman scattering * molecular dynamics * autocorrelation function Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  3. Molecular-Level Organization of the Tear Film Lipid Layer: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wizert, A.; Iskander, D. R.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    Elsevier. Roč. 106, č. 2 (2014), 710A. ISSN 0006-3495. [Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society /58./. 15.02.2014-19.02.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : tear film * lipid layer * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  5. Clusters, halos, and s-factors in fermionic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Fermionic Molecular Dynamics antisymmetrized products of Gaussian wave packets are projected on angular momentum, linear momentum, and parity. An appropriately chosen set of these states span the many-body Hilbert space in which the Hamiltonian is diagonalized. The wave packet parameters - position, momentum, width and spin - are obtained by variation under constraints. The great flexibility of this basis allows to describe not only shell-model like states but also exotic states like halos, e.g. the two-proton halo in 17Ne, or cluster states as they appear for example in 12C close to the α breakup threshold where the Hoyle state is located. Even a fully microscopic calculation of the 3He(α,γ) 7Be capture reaction is possible and yields an astrophysical S-factor that compares very well with newer data. As representatives of numerous results these cases will be discussed in this contribution, some of them not published so far. The Hamiltonian is based on the realistic Argonne V18 nucleon-nucleon interaction. (authors)

  6. Force field development for molecular dynamics simulations of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals and their interfaces with aqueous solutions play an important role in many subsurface processes, including the retention and transport of aqueous species. Molecular simulations provide atomistic details of structural and dynamic properties of these fine-grained minerals that are difficult to obtain experimentally. Our research focus has been classical simulations of bulk clay minerals and their basal surfaces and interfaces using the fully flexible Clayff energy force field. Clayff is compatible with other force fields based on electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, permitting the study of a wide range of inorganic and organic solute at clay interfaces. Trends in clay swelling and ion adsorption onto the basal surfaces of clays are accurately described using this force field approach. Adsorption at pH-dependent edge sites is beyond the original scope of Clayff but is critical to a complete understanding of radionuclide transport near radioactive waste repositories. The application of Clayff to such edge sites requires three-body angle bend terms, and our recent work has involved parameterizing the hydroxylated edge site species (Mg-O-H, Al-O-H, and Si-O-H) found in end member models. (authors)

  7. Molecular dynamics study of helium bubble pressure in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the stress field in a tungsten matrix containing a nano-scale helium bubble. A helium bubble in tungsten is found to consist of a core and an interface of finite thickness of approximately 0.6 nm. The core contains only helium atoms that are uniformly distributed. The interface is composed of both helium and tungsten atoms. In the periphery region of the helium bubble, the stress filed is found to follow the stress formula based on the elasticity theory of solid. The pressure difference between both sides of the interface can be well described by the Young–Laplace equation for the core size of a helium bubble as small as 0.48 nm. A comparison was performed between the pressure in the helium bubble core and the pressure in pure helium. For a core size larger than 0.3 nm, the pressure in the core of a helium bubble is in good agreement with the pressure in pure helium of the same helium density. These results provide guidance to larger scale simulation methods, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory

  8. Simulation and dynamics of entropy-driven, molecular self-assembly processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular self-assembly is frequently found to generate higher-order functional structures in biochemical systems. One such example is the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous solution forming membranes, micelles, and vesicles; another is the dynamic formation and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. These processes are often driven by local, short-range forces and therefore the dynamics is solely based on local interactions. In this paper, we introduce a cellular automata based simulation, the lattice molecular automaton, in which data structures, representing different molecular entities such as water and hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers, share locally propagated force information on a hexagonal, two-dimensional lattice. The purpose of this level of description is the simulation of entropic and enthalpic flows in a microcanonical, molecular ensemble to gain insight about entropy-driven processes in molecular many-particle systems. Three applications are shown, i.e., modeling structural features of a polar solvent, cluster formation of hydrophobic monomers in a polar environment, and the self-assembly of polymers. Processes leading to phase separation on a molecular level are discussed. A thorough discussion of the computational details, advantages, and limitations of the lattice molecular automaton approach is given elsewhere [B. Mayer and S. Rasmussen (unpublished)]. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Balancing an accurate representation of the molecular surface in generalized Born formalisms with integrator stability in molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chocholoušová, Jana; Feig, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2006), s. 719-729. ISSN 0192-8651 Keywords : molecular surface * generalized Born formalisms * molecular dynamic simulations Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2006

  10. Collective excitations in liquid CD4: Neutron scattering and molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, E.; Bafile, U.; Barocchi, F.; Demmel, F.; Formisano, F.; Sampoli, M.; Venturi, G.

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamic structure factor S(Q,ω) of liquid CD4 at T = 97.7 K in the wave vector range 2 <= Q/nm-1 <= 15 by means of neutron scattering and molecular-dynamics simulation, in order to study the centre-of-mass collective dynamics. The agreement between the experimental spectra and those simulated using a recent ab initio based intermolecular potential is good, particularly at low Q. Underdamped collective excitations, detected in the whole experimental Q-range, characterize the dynamics of liquid CD4 as markedly different from that of other molecular liquids. Also, the energy and damping of collective excitations in methane are shown to differ considerably, even at the lowest measured Q-values, from those of linearized hydrodynamic modes. An empirical relation, able to reconcile the different wave vector ranges of mode propagation observed in disparate liquids, is investigated.

  11. Eventful Evolution of Giant Molecular Clouds in Dynamically Evolving Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Junichi; Saitoh, Takayuki R

    2016-01-01

    The formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in spiral galaxies have been investigated in the traditional framework of the combined quasi-stationary density wave and galactic shock model. However, our understanding of the dynamics of spiral arms is changing from the traditional spiral model to a dynamically evolving spiral model. In this study, we investigate the structure and evolution of GMCs in a dynamically evolving spiral arm using a three-dimensional N-body/hydrodynamic simulation of a barred spiral galaxy at parsec-scale resolution. This simulation incorporated self-gravity, molecular hydrogen formation, radiative cooling, heating due to interstellar far-ultraviolet radiation, and stellar feedback by both HII regions and Type-II supernovae. In contrast to a simple expectation based on the traditional spiral model, the GMCs exhibited no systematic evolutionary sequence across the spiral arm. Our simulation showed that the GMCs behaved as highly dynamic objects with eventful lives involvi...

  12. Microscopic study of nuclear 'pasta' by quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure of cold dense matter at subnuclear densities is investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. We succeeded in showing that the phases with slab-like and rod-like nuclei etc. and be formed dynamically from hot uniform nuclear matter without any assumptions on nuclear shape. We also observe intermediate phases, which has complicated nuclear shapes. Geometrical structures of matter are analyzed with Minkowski functionals, and it is found out that intermediate phases can be characterized as ones with negative Euler characteristic. Our result suggests the existence of these kinds of phases in addition to the simple 'pasta' phases in neutron star crusts. (author)

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  14. Finite Temperature Quasicontinuum: Molecular Dynamics without all the Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, L; Tadmor, E B; Miller, R E; Phillips, R

    2005-02-02

    Using a combination of statistical mechanics and finite-element interpolation, the authors develop a coarse-grained (CG) alternative to molecular dynamics (MD) for crystalline solids at constant temperature. The new approach is significantly more efficient than MD and generalizes earlier work on the quasi-continuum method. The method is validated by recovering equilibrium properties of single crystal Ni as a function of temperature. CG dynamical simulations of nanoindentation reveal a strong dependence on temperature of the critical stress to nucleate dislocations under the indenter.

  15. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  16. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures

  17. The chaos and order in nuclear molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the presented report is role of chaos in scattering processes in the frame of molecular dynamics. In this model, it is assumed that scattering particles (nuclei) consist of not-interacted components as alpha particles or 12C, 16O and 20Ne clusters. The results show such effects as dynamical in stabilities and fractal structure as well as compound nuclei decay and heavy-ion fusion. The goal of the report is to make the reader more familiar with the chaos model and its application to nuclear phenomena. 157 refs, 40 figs

  18. Ranking of Molecular Biomarker Interaction with Targeted DNA Nucleobases via Full Atomistic Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Cranford, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based sensors can detect disease biomarkers, including acetone and ethanol for diabetes and H2S for cardiovascular diseases. Before experimenting on thousands of potential DNA segments, we conduct full atomistic steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to screen the interactions between different DNA sequences with targeted molecules to rank the nucleobase sensing performance. We study and rank the strength of interaction between four single DNA nucleotides (Adenine (A), Guanine (G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T)) on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with acetone, ethanol, H2S and HCl. By sampling forward and reverse interaction paths, we compute the free-energy profiles of eight systems for the four targeted molecules. We find that dsDNA react differently than ssDNA to the targeted molecules, requiring more energy to move the molecule close to DNA as indicated by the potential of mean force (PMF). Comparing the PMF values of different systems, we obtain a relative ranking of DNA base for the detection of each molecule. Via the same procedure, we could generate a library of DNA sequences for the detection of a wide range of chemicals. A DNA sensor array built with selected sequences differentiating many disease biomarkers can be used in disease diagnosis and monitoring.

  19. Molecular magnetic materials based on porphyrin macrocyles

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNAL, Emel

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of Molecule-Based Magnets is based on the assembling carriers of magnetic moment. These may be the metal ions only with diamagnetic linkers or the metal ions connected through open-shell organic molecule. The building of novel Molecule-Based Magnets architectures following the metal-radical approach relies on the design of innovative open-shell organic molecular blocks. In this regard, we focus our strategy on the synthesis of porphyrins incorporating free radicals. Indeed, po...

  20. Cryptosystems based on chaotic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNees, R.A.; Protopopescu, V.; Santoro, R.T.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    An encryption scheme based on chaotic dynamics is presented. This scheme makes use of the efficient and reproducible generation of cryptographically secure pseudo random numbers from chaotic maps. The result is a system which encrypts quickly and possesses a large keyspace, even in small precision implementations. This system offers an excellent solution to several problems including the dissemination of key material, over the air rekeying, and other situations requiring the secure management of information.

  1. Excitation Dynamics and Relaxation in a Molecular Heterodimer

    CERN Document Server

    Balevicius, V; Abramavicius, D; Mancal, T; Valkunas, L

    2011-01-01

    The exciton dynamics in a molecular heterodimer is studied as a function of differences in excitation and reorganization energies, asymmetry in transition dipole moments and excited state lifetimes. The heterodimer is composed of two molecules modeled as two-level systems coupled by the resonance interaction. The system-bath coupling is taken into account as a modulating factor of the energy gap of the molecular excitation, while the relaxation to the ground state is treated phenomenologically. Comparison of the description of the excitation dynamics modeled using either the Redfield equations (secular and full forms) or the Hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) is demonstrated and discussed. Possible role of the dimer as an excitation quenching center in photosynthesis self-regulation is discussed. It is concluded that the system-bath interaction rather than the excitonic effect determines the excitation quenching ability of such a dimer.

  2. Fermionic molecular dynamics for ground states and collisions of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antisymmetric many-body trial state which describes a system of interacting fermions is parametrized in terms of localized wave packets. The equations of motion are derived from the time-dependent quantum variational principle. The resulting Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) equations include a wide range of semi-quantal to classical physics extending from deformed Hartree-Fock theory to Newtonian molecular dynamics. Conservation laws are discussed in connection with the choice of the trial state. The model is applied to heavy-ion collisions with which its basic features are illustrated. The results show a great variety of phenomena including deeply inelastic collisions, fusion, incomplete fusion, fragmentation, neck emission, promptly emitted nucleons and evaporation. (orig.)

  3. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  4. Serine Proteases an Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    De Santis, L

    1999-01-01

    In serine proteases (SP's), the H-bond between His-57 and Asp-102, and that between Gly-193 and the transition state intermediate play a crucial role for enzymatic function. To shed light on the nature of these interactions, we have carried out ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on complexes representing adducts between the reaction intermediate and elastase (one protein belonging to the SP family). Our calculations indicate the presence of a low--barrier H-bond between His-57 and Asp-102, in complete agreement with NMR experiments on enzyme--transition state analog complexes. Comparison with an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on a model of the substrate--enzyme adduct indicates that the Gly-193--induced strong stabilization of the intermediate is accomplished by charge/dipole interactions and not by H-bonding as previously suggested. Inclusion of the protein electric field in the calculations does not affect significantly the charge distribution.

  5. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Myo, Takayuki; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting system. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model (TOSM). We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  6. Optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhizhin, GN

    1995-01-01

    The current volume is a single topic volume on the optical spectra and lattice dynamics of molecular crystals. The book is divided into two parts. Part I covers both the theoretical and experimental investigations of organic crystals. Part II deals with the investigation of the structure, phase transitions and reorientational motion of molecules in organic crystals. In addition appendices are given which provide the parameters for the calculation of the lattice dynamics of molecular crystals, procedures for the calculation of frequency eigenvectors of utilizing computers, and the frequencies and eigenvectors of lattice modes for several organic crystals. Quite a large amount of Russian literature is cited, some of which has previously not been available to scientists in the West.

  7. Surface hopping methodology in laser-driven molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fiedlschuster, T; Gross, E K U; Schmidt, R

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical justification of the empirical surface hopping method for the laser-driven molecular dynamics is given utilizing the formalism of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction [Abedi et al., PRL $\\textbf{105}$, 123002 (2010)] in its quantum-classical limit. Employing an exactly solvable $\\textrm H_2^{\\;+}$-like model system, it is shown that the deterministic classical nuclear motion on a single time-dependent surface in this approach describes the same physics as stochastic (hopping-induced) motion on several surfaces, provided Floquet surfaces are applied. Both quantum-classical methods do describe reasonably well the exact nuclear wavepacket dynamics for extremely different dissociation scenarios. Hopping schemes using Born-Oppenheimer surfaces or instantaneous Born-Oppenheimer surfaces fail completely.

  8. Reaction dynamics of molecular hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratu, P.; Brenig, W.; Gross, A.; Hartmann, M.; Höfer, U.; Kratzer, Peter; Russ, R.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the dynamics of dissociative adsorption and recombinative desorption of hydrogen on silicon are presented. Using optical second-harmonic generation, extremely small sticking probabilities in the range 10(-9)-10(-5) could be measured for H-2 and D-2 on Si(111...... between the two surfaces. These results indicate that tunneling, molecular vibrations, and the structural details of the surface play only a minor role for the adsorption dynamics. Instead, they appear to be governed by the localized H-Si bonding and Si-Si lattice vibrations. Theoretically, an effective...... five-dimensional model is presented taking lattice distortion, corrugation, and molecular vibrations into account within the framework of coupled-channel calculations. While the temperature dependence of the sticking is dominated by lattice distortion, the main effect of corrugation is a reduction of...

  9. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neogi, Anupam, E-mail: anupamneogi@atdc.iitkgp.ernet.in [Advanced Technology Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Mitra, Nilanjan, E-mail: nilanjan@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  10. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns

  11. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2015-07-01

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays an important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting systems. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model. We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics on the electronic Boltzmann equilibrium distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J L; Echenique, P [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Castro, A; Polo, V [Institute for Biocomputation and Physics of Complex Systems (BIFI), University of Zaragoza, Mariano Esquillor s/n, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubio, A [Nano-Bio Spectroscopy group and ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, Centro de Fisica de Materiales, CSIC-UPV/EHU-MPC and DIPC, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Zueco, D, E-mail: dzueco@unizar.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    We prove that for a combined system of classical and quantum particles, it is possible to describe a dynamics for the classical particles that incorporates in a natural way the Boltzmann equilibrium population for the quantum subsystem. In addition, these molecular dynamics (MD) do not need to assume that the electrons immediately follow the nuclear motion (in contrast to any adiabatic approach) and do not present problems in the presence of crossing points between different potential energy surfaces (conical intersections or spin-crossings). A practical application of this MD to the study of the effect of temperature on molecular systems presenting (nearly) degenerate states-such as the avoided crossing in the ring-closure process of ozone-is presented.

  13. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Moritsugu

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  14. Dynamic features of carboxy cytoglobin distal mutants investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    Cytoglobin (Cgb) is a member of hemoprotein family with roles in NO metabolism, fibrosis, and tumourigenesis. Similar to other hemoproteins, Cgb structure and functions are markedly influenced by distal key residues. The sixth ligand His(81) (E7) is crucial to exogenous ligand binding, heme pocket conformation, and physiological roles of this protein. However, the effects of other key residues on heme pocket and protein biological functions are not well known. In this work, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of two single mutants in CO-ligated Cgb (L46FCgbCO and L46VCgbCO) and two double mutants (L46FH81QCgbCO and L46VH81QCgbCO) was conducted to explore the effects of the key distal residues Leu(46)(B10) and His(81)(E7) on Cgb structure and functions. Results indicated that the distal mutation of B10 and E7 affected CgbCO dynamic properties on loop region fluctuation, internal cavity rearrangement, and heme motion. The distal conformation change was reflected by the distal key residues Gln(62) (CD3) and Arg(84)(E10). The hydrogen bond between heme propionates with CD3 or E10 residues were evidently influenced by B10/E7 mutation. Furthermore, heme pocket rearrangement was also observed based on the distal pocket volume and occurrence rate of inner cavities. The mutual effects of B10 and E7 residues on protein conformational rearrangement and other dynamic features were expressed in current MD studies of CgbCO and its distal mutants, suggesting their crucial role in heme pocket stabilization, ligand binding, and Cgb biological functions. The mutation of distal B10 and E7 residues affects the dynamic features of carboxy cytoglobin. PMID:26841790

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Elucidate Conformational Dynamics Responsible for the Cyclization Reaction in TEAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Chen, Nanhao; Wu, Ruibo

    2016-05-23

    The Mg-dependent 5-epi-aristolochene synthase from Nicotiana tabacum (called TEAS) could catalyze the linear farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) substrate to form bicyclic hydrocarbon 5-epi-aristolochene. The cyclization reaction mechanism of TEAS was proposed based on static crystal structures and quantum chemistry calculations in a few previous studies, but substrate FPP binding kinetics and protein conformational dynamics responsible for the enzymatic catalysis are still unclear. Herein, by elaborative and extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the loop conformation change and several crucial residues promoting the cyclization reaction in TEAS are elucidated. It is found that the unusual noncatalytic NH2-terminal domain is essential to stabilize Helix-K and the adjoining J-K loop of the catalytic COOH-terminal domain. It is also illuminated that the induce-fit J-K/A-C loop dynamics is triggered by Y527 and the optimum substrate binding mode in a "U-shape" conformation. The U-shaped ligand binding pose is maintained well with the cooperative interaction of the three Mg(2+)-containing coordination shell and conserved residue W273. Furthermore, the conserved Arg residue pair R264/R266 and aromatic residue pair Y527/W273, whose spatial orientations are also crucial to promote the closure of the active site to a hydrophobic pocket, as well as to form π-stacking interactions with the ligand, would facilitate the carbocation migration and electrophilic attack involving the catalytic reaction. Our investigation more convincingly proves the greater roles of the protein local conformational dynamics than do hints from the static crystal structure observations. Thus, these findings can act as a guide to new protein engineering strategies on diversifying the sesquiterpene products for drug discovery. PMID:27082764

  16. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Thermocapillary Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Holger Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A natural convection occurs at lateral spatially variable solid-fluid or liquid-fluid interfaces [probstein1994]. It can play an important role in the transport of heat or mass across such interfaces, e.g. in evaporation or solvent extraction as they are often employed in chemical engineering [sherwood1975]. Model systems of such interfacial systems have been studied by different methods [colinet2001]. A very fundamental method is the usage of so-called molecular dynamics (MD) simulation...

  17. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Primary Ferrofluid Aggregate Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Tanygin, B. M.; Kovalenko, V. F.; Petrychuk, M.V.; Dzyan, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the phase transitions and self-organization in the magnetic aggregates are of the fundamental and applied interest. The long-range ordering structures described in the Tom\\'anek's systematization (M. Yoon, and D. Tom\\'anek, 2010 [1]) are not yet obtained in the direct molecular dynamics simulations. The resulted structures usually are the linear chains or circles, or, else, amorphous (liquid) formations. In the present work, it was shown, that the thermodynamically equilibri...

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of melittin in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernèche, S; Nina, M; Roux, B

    1998-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories of melittin in an explicit dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer are generated to study the details of lipid-protein interactions at the microscopic level. Melittin, a small amphipathic peptide found in bee venom, is known to have a pronounced effect on the lysis of membranes. The peptide is initially set parallel to the membrane-solution interfacial region in an alpha-helical conformation with unprotonated N-terminus. Solid-state nuclear magnetic reso...

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of zigzag molecular chains (in Russian)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, A. V.; Manevitsch, L. I.; Christiansen, Peter Leth;

    1999-01-01

    Nonlinear, collective, soliton type excitations in zigzag molecular chains are analyzed. It is shown that the nonlinear dynamics of a chain dramatically changes in passing from the one-dimensional linear chain to the more realistic planar zigzag model-due, in particular, to the geometry...... types (such as extension and compression varieties) develop simultaneously in the chain. Accordingly, the inclusion of chain geometry is necessary if physical phenomena are to be described in terms of solitary waves...

  20. Understanding disordered and membrane protein recognition by molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley, Nathaniel H., 1983-

    2015-01-01

    This thesis has been about the use of a simulation technique, known as molecular dynamics simulations, to study biophysics in proteins that have historically been difficult to study with other methods. We have studied numerous systems, namely binding to the membrane proteins Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1R), and folding in the disordered protein kinase inducible domain (KID). In each case we have been able to analyze processes and uncover be...