WorldWideScience

Sample records for based learning curriculum

  1. Learning-Based Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Claus; Hojlt, Thomas; Hermansen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    This article is written to inspire curriculum developers to centre their efforts on the learning processes of students. It presents a learning-based paradigm for higher education and demonstrates the close relationship between curriculum development and students' learning processes. The article has three sections: Section "The role of higher…

  2. Learning-Based Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Claus; Hojlt, Thomas; Hermansen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    This article is written to inspire curriculum developers to centre their efforts on the learning processes of students. It presents a learning-based paradigm for higher education and demonstrates the close relationship between curriculum development and students' learning processes. The article has three sections: Section "The role of higher…

  3. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    the challenges in applying problem based learning strategies in a context where several universities, with different cultures of teaching, collaboratively develop and deliver online courses. We present a pedagogical framework embracing both problem based and curriculum based strategies and show how we used....../or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...... this as a basis for trying out various online learning strategies....

  4. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally there has been a clear distinction between curriculum based and problem based approaches to accomplish learning. Preferred approaches depend of course on conviction, culture, traditions and also on the specific learning situation. We will argue that it is not a question of either....../or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...... the challenges in applying problem based learning strategies in a context where several universities, with different cultures of teaching, collaboratively develop and deliver online courses. We present a pedagogical framework embracing both problem based and curriculum based strategies and show how we used...

  5. Curriculum-Based Learning Communities Centered within a Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrull, Mark C.; Rocheleau, Courtney A.; Smith, M. Corinne; Bergman, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on curriculum-based learning communities (LCs). In these LCs, manipulation of the curriculum is intentional and often innovative, with the overarching goals of developing meaningful connections among students, between students and faculty, and between students and their coursework. The variety of curriculum-based models…

  6. Creating Problem-Based Leadership Learning across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E.; Couto, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores problem-based learning (PBL) as effective pedagogy to enhance leadership learning. Through institutional examples, research, and personal experiences, the authors provide a rationale for faculty and staff to utilize PBL across the curriculum.

  7. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  8. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  9. Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2013-01-01

    encloses three methodological approaches to investigate three interrelated research questions. Phase one, a literature review; aims develop a theoretical and analytical framework. The second phase aims to investigate examples of practices that combine PBL and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD......This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design...

  10. Problem based learning (PBL) vs. Case based curriculum in clinical clerkship, Internal Medicine innovated Curriculum, Student prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarallah, Badr; Hassan, Mohammad Saleh

    2015-04-01

    The vast majority of PBL experience is in basic science courses. Application of classic Problem based learning in clerkship phase is challenging. Although the clinical case is considered a problem, yet solving this problem following the burrow's law has faced hurdles. The difficulties are facing the learner, the teacher and curricula. We implement innovative curriculum for the clerkship year in internal medicine course. We surveyed the student just before coming to an internal medicine course to ask them about continuing PBL or other types of learning in clinical years. A committee was created to study the possible ways to integrate PBL in the course. After multiple brainstorming meeting, an innovated curriculum was implemented. Student surveyed again after they completed their course. The survey is asking them about what is the effect of the implemented curriculum in their skills, attitude, and knowledge. 70% of Students, who finished their basic science in PBL, preferred not to have classical PBL, but more a clinical oriented case based curriculum in the clinical years. After this innovated curriculum, 50-60 % of students who completed it showed a positive response in all aspects of effects including skill, attitude, and knowledge. The Innovated curriculum includes daily morning report, 3 bedside teaching, investigation session, and clinical reasoning weekly, and Lectures up to twice a week. We suggest implementing a curriculum with PBL and case-based criteria in clinical phase are feasible, we are providing a framework with this innovated curriculum.

  11. Changing the Curriculum to Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Problem based and project based learning (PBL) models are implemented all over the world in various versions at curriculum or course level. Due to this development, the conceptual understanding of PBL has become more diverse and sometimes confusing. This chapter summarizes the conceptual work done...... by the UNESCO Chair in PBL in engineering education in order to define PBL as a set of core learning principles that can be applied in practice. The PBL learning principles are formulated within three aspects: learning, social, and content of study. Furthermore, the chapter contains a PBL curriculum model......, which can be used for analysis and development of the curriculum or single courses. Seven elements are identified as important for the planning and implementation of PBL learning principles, and for each of the elements there are several choices to be made. Finally, the chapter presents concrete advice...

  12. Changing the Curriculum to Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Problem based and project based learning (PBL) models are implemented all over the world in various versions at curriculum or course level. Due to this development, the conceptual understanding of PBL has become more diverse and sometimes confusing. This chapter summarizes the conceptual work done...... by the UNESCO Chair in PBL in engineering education in order to define PBL as a set of core learning principles that can be applied in practice. The PBL learning principles are formulated within three aspects: learning, social, and content of study. Furthermore, the chapter contains a PBL curriculum model......, which can be used for analysis and development of the curriculum or single courses. Seven elements are identified as important for the planning and implementation of PBL learning principles, and for each of the elements there are several choices to be made. Finally, the chapter presents concrete advice...

  13. Campus Clinical: simulation-based curriculum designed to meet clinical course learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Michelle; Rivers, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Campus Clinical is a simulation-based curriculum designed to meet the challenge of decreasing clinical spaces in maternal-child units. The curriculum framework is situated in a constructivist, experiential learning context, integrating Chickering and Gamson's principles for good practice in education. This innovative approach to meeting clinical course learning outcomes is transferable to a variety of settings.

  14. Testing a causal model for learning in a problem-based curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, M.M. van den; Dolmans, D.H.J.M.; Wolfhagen, H.A.P.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between elements that are important for the tutorial group process and the individual learning process in a problem-based curriculum. The variables under investigation were student-generated learning issues, individual learning process, reportin

  15. A problem-based learning curriculum and undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    learning.[3] Central to the approach is the use of problems, which are posed to .... collected through surveys or interviews soliciting information from .... McParland M, Noble ML, Livingston G. The effectiveness of problem based learning.

  16. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatemia, Lukas D; Susilo, Astrid P; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-12-03

    To identify the student's readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students' life styles, students' perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students' self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher's experiences, student's background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student's in conducting self-directed learning.

  17. Support of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum by Basic Science Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, William L.; Glew, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    Although published reports describe benefits to students of learning in a problem-based, student-centered environment, questions have persisted about the excessive faculty time commitments associated with the implementation of PBL pedagogy. The argument has been put forward that the excessive faculty costs of such a curriculum cannot be justified based upon the potential benefits to students. However, the magnitude of the faculty time commitment to a PBL curriculum to support the aforemention...

  18. Competence-Based Blended Learning in Building Automation: Towards a EU Curriculum in "Domotica"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommaruga, L.; De Angelis, E.

    2007-01-01

    A competence-based approach was applied to a blended learning on line distance training in the Euroinno EU project aimed at vocational training in building automation. The current paper describes the experience gathered during the learning process and the definition of the curriculum. A number of issues emerged during the sessions concerning…

  19. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  20. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  1. Appreciation of learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills in a problem-based learning medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala-Maung; Abdullah, Azman; Abas, Zoraini W

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the appreciation of the learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills among students attending the Medical Curriculum at the International Medical University, Malaysia which provides traditional and e-learning resources with an emphasis on problem based learning (PBL) and self-directed learning. Of the 708 participants, the majority preferred traditional to e-resources. Students who highly appreciated PBL demonstrated a higher appreciation of e-resources. Appreciation of PBL is positively and significantly correlated with higher-order learning skills, reflecting the inculcation of self-directed learning traits. Implementers must be sensitive to the progress of learners adapting to the higher education environment and innovations, and to address limitations as relevant.

  2. Evaluation of a Problem Based Learning Curriculum Using Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihatiningsih, Titi Savitri; Qomariyah, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Faculty of Medicine UGM has implemented Problem Based Learning (PBL) since 1985. Seven jump tutorial discussions are applied. A scenario is used as a trigger to stimulate students to identify learning objectives (LOs) in step five which are used as the basis for self study in step six. For each scenario, the Block Team formulates the LOs which are…

  3. Renewed roles for librarians in problem-based learning in the medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching-learning process or method of instruction that is widely used in medical education curricula. Librarians play important roles as facilitators for PBL as well as guides for information resources. Involvement in PBL activities presents unique opportunities to incorporate library resources and instruction into the medical curriculum. This article reviews the problem-based learning method within the conceptual framework of the learning theory of constructivism. It describes how a medical librarian at a U.S. medical school used emerging technologies to facilitate PBL small group case discussions, guide students to quality information resources, and enhance the learning environment for the PBL process.

  4. Instituting systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement: a curriculum of inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilper, Andrew P; Smith, Curtis Scott; Weppner, William

    2013-09-16

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that training programs integrate system-based practice (SBP) and practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) into internal medicine residency curricula. CONTEXT AND SETTING: We instituted a seminar series and year-long-mentored curriculum designed to engage internal medicine residents in these competencies. Residents participate in a seminar series that includes assigned reading and structured discussion with faculty who assist in the development of quality improvement or research projects. Residents pursue projects over the remainder of the year. Monthly works in progress meetings, protected time for inquiry, and continued faculty mentorship guide the residents in their project development. Trainees present their work at hospital-wide grand rounds at the end of the academic year. We performed a survey of residents to assess their self-reported knowledge, attitudes and skills in SBP and PBLI. In addition, blinded faculty scored projects for appropriateness, impact, and feasibility. We measured resident self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and skills at the end of the academic year. We found evidence that participants improved their understanding of the context in which they were practicing, and that their ability to engage in quality improvement projects increased. Blinded faculty reviewers favorably ranked the projects' feasibility, impact, and appropriateness. The 'Curriculum of Inquiry' generated 11 quality improvement and research projects during the study period. Barriers to the ongoing work include a limited supply of mentors and delays due to Institutional Review Board approval. Hospital leadership recognizes the importance of the curriculum, and our accreditation manager now cites our ongoing work. A structured residency-based curriculum facilitates resident demonstration of SBP and practice-based learning and improvement. Residents gain knowledge and skills though this enterprise

  5. Instituting systems-based practice and practice-based learning and improvement: a curriculum of inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Wilper

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background : The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires that training programs integrate system-based practice (SBP and practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI into internal medicine residency curricula. Context and setting : We instituted a seminar series and year-long-mentored curriculum designed to engage internal medicine residents in these competencies. Methods : Residents participate in a seminar series that includes assigned reading and structured discussion with faculty who assist in the development of quality improvement or research projects. Residents pursue projects over the remainder of the year. Monthly works in progress meetings, protected time for inquiry, and continued faculty mentorship guide the residents in their project development. Trainees present their work at hospital-wide grand rounds at the end of the academic year. We performed a survey of residents to assess their self-reported knowledge, attitudes and skills in SBP and PBLI. In addition, blinded faculty scored projects for appropriateness, impact, and feasibility. Outcomes : We measured resident self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and skills at the end of the academic year. We found evidence that participants improved their understanding of the context in which they were practicing, and that their ability to engage in quality improvement projects increased. Blinded faculty reviewers favorably ranked the projects’ feasibility, impact, and appropriateness. The ‘Curriculum of Inquiry’ generated 11 quality improvement and research projects during the study period. Barriers to the ongoing work include a limited supply of mentors and delays due to Institutional Review Board approval. Hospital leadership recognizes the importance of the curriculum, and our accreditation manager now cites our ongoing work. Conclusions : A structured residency-based curriculum facilitates resident demonstration of SBP and practice-based learning and

  6. A Method of Developing and Introducing Case-Based Learning to a Preclinical Veterinary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) has been introduced as part of a major review of the veterinary curriculum at the University of Bristol. The initial aim was to improve integration between all first year subjects, i.e., basic science disciplines (anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry), animal management, and professional studies, while highlighting the…

  7. Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as a Means for School-Based Science Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Christi L.

    The challenge of school-based science curriculum change and educational reform is often presented to science teachers and departments who are not necessarily prepared for the complexity of considerations that change movements require. The development of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) focused on a science department's curriculum change efforts, may provide the necessary tools to foster sustainable school-based curriculum science changes. This research presents a case study of an evolving science department PLC consisting of 10 middle school science teachers from the same middle school and their efforts of school-based science curriculum change. A transformative mixed model case study with qualitative data and deepened by quantitative analysis, was chosen to guide the investigation. Collected data worked to document the essential developmental steps, the occurrence and frequency of the five essential dimensions of successful PLCs, and the influences the science department PLC had on the middle school science department's progression through school-based science curriculum change, and the barriers, struggles and inhibiting actions of the science department PLC. Findings indicated that a science department PLC was unique in that it allowed for a focal science departmental lens of science curriculum change to be applied to the structure and function of the PLC and therefore the process, proceedings, and results were directly aligned to and driven by the science department. The science PLC, while logically difficult to set-up and maintain, became a professional science forum where the middle school science teachers were exposed to new science teaching and learning knowledge, explored new science standards, discussed effects on student science learning, designed and critically analyzed science curriculum change application. Conclusions resulted in the science department PLC as an identified tool providing the ability for science departmental actions to lead to

  8. Creating a virtual pharmacology curriculum in a problem-based learning environment: one medical school's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Vrana, Kent E

    2013-02-01

    Integrating pharmacology education into a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum has proven challenging for many medical schools, including the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine (Penn State COM). In response to pharmacology content gaps in its PBL-intensive curriculum, Penn State COM in 2003 hired a director of medical pharmacology instruction to oversee efforts to improve the structure of pharmacology education in the absence of a stand-alone course. In this article, the authors describe the ongoing development of the virtual pharmacology curriculum, which weaves pharmacology instruction through the entire medical school curriculum with particular emphasis on the organ-based second year. Pharmacology is taught in a spiraling manner designed to add to and build upon students' knowledge and competency. Key aspects of the virtual curriculum (as of 2011) include clearly stated and behaviorally oriented pharmacology learning objectives, pharmacology study guides that correspond to each PBL case, pharmacology review sessions that feature discussions of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)-type questions, and pharmacology questions for each PBL case on course examinations to increase student accountability. The authors report a trend toward improved USMLE Step 1 scores since these initiatives were introduced. Furthermore, graduates' ratings of their pharmacology education have improved on the Medical School Graduation Questionnaire. The authors suggest that the initiatives they describe for enhancing pharmacology medical education are relevant to other medical schools that are also seeking ways to better integrate pharmacology into PBL-based curricula.

  9. Integrated problem-based learning in the neuroscience curriculum – the SUNY Downstate experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trappler Brian

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports the author's initial experience as Block Director in converting a Conventional Curriculum into a problem-based learning model (PBL for teaching Psychopathology. As part of a wide initiative in curriculum reform, Psychopathology, which was a six-week course in the second-year medical school curriculum, became integrated into a combined Neuroscience block. The study compares curriculum conversion at State University of New York (SUNY, Downstate, with the experiences at other medical centres that have instituted similar curricula reform. Methods Student satisfaction with the Conventional and PBL components of the Neuroscience curriculum was compared using questionnaires and formal discussions between faculty and a body of elected students. The PBL experience in Psychopathology was also compared with that of the rest of the Neuroscience Block, which used large student groups and expert facilitators, while the Psychopathology track was limited to small groups using mentors differing widely in levels of expertise. Results Students appeared to indicate a preference toward conventional lectures and large PBL groups using expert facilitators in contrast to small group mentors who were not experts. Small PBL groups with expert mentors in the Psychopathology track were also rated favorably. Conclusion The study reviews the advantages and pitfalls of the PBL system when applied to a Neuroscience curriculum on early career development. At SUNY, conversion from a Conventional model to a PBL model diverged from that proposed by Howard S. Barrows where student groups define the learning objectives and problem-solving strategies. In our model, the learning objectives were faculty-driven. The critical issue for the students appeared to be the level of faculty expertise rather than group size. Expert mentors were rated more favorably by students in fulfilling the philosophical objectives of PBL. The author, by citing the

  10. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Gonzaga, Mubuuke A., E-mail: gmubuuke@gmail.co [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  11. Curriculum design for problem-based learning on a volunteer basis: a Yonsei approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Moo Sang; Ahn, Duck Sun

    2002-04-01

    Innovative new medical programs such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are being developed worldwide. An increasing number of medical schools are starting to introduce these programs into or even to replace the existing curriculum. At Yonsei University College of Medicine (YUCM), we developed our own PBL curriculum and evaluation method. In order to develop a program suitable for our school, we suggest that for trial purposes, a small number of student and teacher volunteers should be selected and that the tutors involved in the program be given adequate training.

  12. Proposing Community-Based Learning in the Marketing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwallader, Susan; Atwong, Catherine; Lebard, Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Community service and service learning (CS&SL) exposes students to the business practice of giving back to society while reinforcing classroom learning in an applied real-world setting. However, does the CS&SL format provide a better means of instilling the benefits of community service among marketing students than community-based…

  13. Learning and Motivational Processes When Students Design Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2015-01-01

    -design process with teachers and students. The learning approach was founded in problem-based learning (PBL) and constructionist pedagogical methodology, building on the thesis that there is a strong connection between designing and learning. The belief is that activities that involve making, building......This design-based research (DBR) project has developed an overall gamified learning design (big Game) to facilitate the learning process for adult students by inviting them to be their own learning designers through designing digital learning games (small games) in cross-disciplinary subject......, or programming provide a rich context for learning, since the construction of artefacts, in this case learning games, enables reflection and new ways of thinking. The students learned from reflection and interaction with the tools alone as well as in collaboration with peers. After analysing the students...

  14. Job requirements compared to dental school education: impact of a case-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeve, Philip L; Gerhards, Ute; Arnold, Wolfgang A; Zimmer, Stefan; Zöllner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) is suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve dental education. The purpose of this study was to assess graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL)-based curriculum as regards to key competencies required at their professional activity. 407 graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL) dental curriculum who graduated between 1990 and 2006 were eligible for this study. 404 graduates were contacted between 2007 and 2008 to self-assess nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in dental school on a 6-point Likert scale. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables. To determine whether dental education sufficiently covers the job requirements of physicians, we calculated the mean difference ∆ between the ratings of competencies as required in day-to-day work and as taught in medical school by subtracting those from each other (negative mean difference ∆ indicates deficit; positive mean difference ∆ indicates surplus). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was calculated to reveal statistical significance (statistical significance pInterdisciplinary thinking" (∆+0.47), "Dental medical knowledge" (∆+0.43), "Practical dental skills" (∆+0.21), "Team work" (∆+0.16) and "Independent learning/working" (∆+0.08), whereas "Problem-solving skills" (∆-0.07), "Psycho-social competence" (∆-0.66) and "Business competence" (∆-2.86) needed improvement in the CBL-based curriculum. CBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of dentists. Psycho-social and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular development.

  15. Developing the Learning Physical Science Curriculum: Adapting a Small Enrollment, Laboratory and Discussion Based Physical Science Course for Large Enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Fred; Price, Edward; Robinson, Stephen; Boyd-Harlow, Danielle; McKean, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, "Physical Science and Everyday Thinking" (PSET), for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new "Learning Physical Science" (LEPS) curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the…

  16. Developing a Simulation-Based Mastery Learning Curriculum: Lessons From 11 Years of Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Wayne, Diane B; Siddall, Viva J; McGaghie, William C

    2016-02-01

    Curriculum development in medical education should follow a planned, systematic approach fitted to the needs and conditions of a local institutional environment and its learners. This article describes the development and maintenance of a simulation-based medical education curriculum on advanced cardiac life support skills and its transformation to a mastery learning program. Curriculum development used the Kern 6-step model involving problem identification and general needs assessment, targeted needs assessment, goals and objectives, educational strategies, implementation, and evaluation and feedback. Curriculum maintenance and enhancement and dissemination are also addressed. Transformation of the simulation-based medical education curriculum to a mastery learning program was accomplished after a 2-year phase-in trial. A series of studies spanning 11 years was performed to adjust the curriculum, improve checklist outcome measures, and evaluate curriculum effects as learning outcomes among internal medicine residents and improved patient care practices. We anticipate wide adoption of the mastery learning model for skill and knowledge acquisition and maintenance in medical education settings.

  17. Investigating the impact of a LEGO(TM)-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulcu, Ismail

    This mixed method study examined the impact of a LEGO-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. This study takes a social constructivist theoretical stance that science learning involves learning scientific concepts and their relations to each other. From this perspective, students are active participants, and they construct their conceptual understanding through the guidance of their teacher. With the goal of better understanding the use of engineering education materials in classrooms the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council in the book "Engineering in K-12 Education" conducted an in-depth review of the potential benefits of including engineering in K--12 schools as (a) improved learning and achievement in science and mathematics, (b) increased awareness of engineering and the work of engineers, (c) understanding of and the ability to engage in engineering design, (d) interest in pursuing engineering as a career, and (e) increased technological literacy (Katehi, Pearson, & Feder, 2009). However, they also noted a lack of reliable data and rigorous research to support these assertions. Data sources included identical written tests and interviews, classroom observations and videos, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To investigate the impact of the design-based simple machines curriculum compared to the scientific inquiry-based simple machines curriculum on student learning outcomes, I compared the control and the experimental groups' scores on the tests and interviews by using ANCOVA. To analyze and characterize the classroom observation videotapes, I used Jordan and Henderson's (1995) method and divide them into episodes. My analyses revealed that the design-based Design a People Mover: Simple Machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and Pulleys unit in terms of students' content learning. I also

  18. Context Impact of Clinical Scenario on Knowledge Transfer and Reasoning Capacity in a Medical Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, A.; Brédart, S.; Bourguignon, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the faculty of Medicine at the University of Liège has integrated problem-based learning (PBL) seminars from year two to seven in its seven-year curriculum. The PBL approach has been developed to facilitate students' acquisition of reasoning capacity. This contextualized learning raises the question of the de- and re-contextualization…

  19. Support of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum by Basic Science Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Anderson

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Although published reports describe benefits to students of learning in a problem-based, student-centered environment, questions have persisted about the excessive faculty time commitments associated with the implementation of PBL pedagogy. The argument has been put forward that the excessive faculty costs of such a curriculum cannot be justified based upon the potential benefits to students. However, the magnitude of the faculty time commitment to a PBL curriculum to support the aforementioned argument is not clear to us and we suspect that it is also equally unclear to individuals charged with making resource decisions supporting the educational efforts of the institution. Therefore, to evaluate this cost - benefit question, we analyzed the actual basic science faculty time commitment in a hybrid PBL curriculum during the first phase 18 months of undergraduate medical education. The results of this analysis do demonstrate an increase in faculty time commitments but do not support the argument that PBL pedagogy is excessively costly in terms of faculty time. For the year analyzed in this report, basic science faculty members contributed on average of 27.4 hours to the instruction of medical students. The results of the analysis did show significant contributions (57% of instructional time by the clinical faculty during the initial 18 months of medical school. In addition, the data revealed a four-fold difference between time commitments of the four basic science departments. We conclude that a PBL curriculum does not place unreasonable demands on the time of basic science faculty. The demands on clinical faculty, in the context of their other commitments, could not be evaluated. Moreover, this type of analysis provides a tool that can be used to make faculty resource allocation decisions fairly.

  20. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However......, limitations of the programme show that only five days of training did not fit the requirements of learning skills in PBL. So the supervisors are suggested to offer more creativity techniques and process engagement to move projects forward....

  1. Impact of an engineering design-based curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marulcu, Ismail; Barnett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elementary Science Education is struggling with multiple challenges. National and State test results confirm the need for deeper understanding in elementary science education. Moreover, national policy statements and researchers call for increased exposure to engineering and technology in elementary science education. The basic motivation of this study is to suggest a solution to both improving elementary science education and increasing exposure to engineering and technology in it. Purpose/Hypothesis: This mixed-method study examined the impact of an engineering design-based curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. We hypothesize that the LEGO-engineering design unit is as successful as the inquiry-based unit in terms of students' science content learning of simple machines. Design/Method: We used a mixed-methods approach to investigate our research questions; we compared the control and the experimental groups' scores from the tests and interviews by using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) and compared each group's pre- and post-scores by using paired t-tests. Results: Our findings from the paired t-tests show that both the experimental and comparison groups significantly improved their scores from the pre-test to post-test on the multiple-choice, open-ended, and interview items. Moreover, ANCOVA results show that students in the experimental group, who learned simple machines with the design-based unit, performed significantly better on the interview questions. Conclusions: Our analyses revealed that the design-based Design a people mover: Simple machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and pulleys unit in terms of students' science content learning.

  2. Teaching pharmacology to medical students in an integrated problem-based learning curriculum:an Australian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Owen L WOODMAN; Agnes E DODDS; Albert G FRAUMAN; Mosepele MOSEPELE

    2004-01-01

    The world-wide move away from the didactic teaching of single disciples to integrated Problem-based Learning (PBL) curricula in medical education has posed challenges for the basic sciences. In this paper we identify two major challenges. The first challenge is the need to describe a core disciplinary curriculum that can be articulated and mapped onto the new structure. We illustrate how the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) Guidelines are used to evaluate the curriculum coverage in the medical course at The University of Melbourne. The second challenge is to ensure that foundational concepts are given adequate emphasis within the new structure, and in particular, that students have the opportunity to pursue these concepts in their self-directed learning. We illustrate one approach to teaching important pharmacological concepts in an integrated curriculum with a case study from the first year curriculum at The University of Melbourne. Finally, we propose the features of an integrated curriculum that facilitates the learning of basic pharmacology in a situation where PBL and integration sets the curriculum framework.

  3. Students' engagement with their group in a problem-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, J; Kay, E J; Coombes, L R

    2012-02-01

    In a new enquiry-based learning dental curriculum, problem-based learning (PBL) was chosen as a central methodology because it promotes a collaborative and constructive approach to learning. However, inevitably, some groups function worse than others. This study explores the relationship between group functionality and individuals' results on knowledge-based assessment. It also sought to establish whether using the Belbin team role theory could improve group functionality. Students completed the Belbin team role inventory that assigns individuals to a team role type and were allocated to either an ideal Belbin group or a control group. To evaluate the functionality of the groups, Macgowan's group engagement measure was completed after 18 and 31 weeks for each student by their group facilitator. The scores were summed and averaged giving a group engagement score for each group. Relationships between group engagement, individual performance in assessment in weeks 18 and 31 and Belbin and non-Belbin teams were investigated. Individual group engagement scores and performance in the knowledge tests had a statistically significant positive relationship despite the small number of students involved (62). However, no correlation was shown between Belbin groups and group engagement scores. Those students who engaged most with the PBL process performed markedly better in assessments of knowledge. Using Belbin's team role theory to place students in PBL groups in an effort to increase group functionality had no effect when compared with non-Belbin control groups. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Medical Students’ Perceptions of Peer Assessment in a Problem-based Learning Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin I. Tayem

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Peer assessment (PA is believed to support learning and help students develop both professionally and personally. The aim of this study was to examine medical students’ perceptions of intragroup PA in a problem-based learning (PBL setting. Methods: This study was carried out between September and November 2014 and involved six random groups of fourth-year undergraduate medical students (n = 60 enrolled at the Arabian Gulf University in Manama, Bahrain. While working on set tasks within a curriculum unit, each student evaluated a randomly selected peer using an English language adapted assessment tool to measure responsibility and respect, information processing, critical analysis, interaction and collaborative skills. At the end of the unit, students’ perceptions of PA were identified using a specifically-designed voluntary and anonymous selfadministered questionnaire in English. Results: A total of 55 students participated in the study (response rate: 92%. The majority of students reported that their learning (60%, attendance (67%, respect towards group members (70% and participation in group discussions (71% improved as a result of PA. Regarding problem analysis skills, most participants believed that PA improved their ability to analyse problems (65%, identify learning needs (64%, fulfil tasks related to the analysis of learning needs (72% and share knowledge within their group (74%. Lastly, a large proportion of students reported that this form of assessment helped them develop their communication (71% and self-assessment skills (73%, as well as collaborative abilities (75%. Conclusion: PA was well accepted by the students in this cohort and led to self-reported improvements in learning, skills, attitudes, engagement and other indicators of personal and professional development. PA was also perceived to have a positive impact on intragroup attitudes.

  5. Medical Students' Perceptions of Peer Assessment in a Problem-based Learning Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayem, Yasin I; James, Henry; Al-Khaja, Khalid A J; Razzak, Rima L A; Potu, Bhagath K; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2015-08-01

    Peer assessment (PA) is believed to support learning and help students develop both professionally and personally. The aim of this study was to examine medical students' perceptions of intragroup PA in a problem-based learning (PBL) setting. This study was carried out between September and November 2014 and involved six random groups of fourth-year undergraduate medical students (n = 60) enrolled at the Arabian Gulf University in Manama, Bahrain. While working on set tasks within a curriculum unit, each student evaluated a randomly selected peer using an English language adapted assessment tool to measure responsibility and respect, information processing, critical analysis, interaction and collaborative skills. At the end of the unit, students' perceptions of PA were identified using a specifically-designed voluntary and anonymous self-administered questionnaire in English. A total of 55 students participated in the study (response rate: 92%). The majority of students reported that their learning (60%), attendance (67%), respect towards group members (70%) and participation in group discussions (71%) improved as a result of PA. Regarding problem analysis skills, most participants believed that PA improved their ability to analyse problems (65%), identify learning needs (64%), fulfil tasks related to the analysis of learning needs (72%) and share knowledge within their group (74%). Lastly, a large proportion of students reported that this form of assessment helped them develop their communication (71%) and self-assessment skills (73%), as well as collaborative abilities (75%). PA was well accepted by the students in this cohort and led to self-reported improvements in learning, skills, attitudes, engagement and other indicators of personal and professional development. PA was also perceived to have a positive impact on intragroup attitudes.

  6. Opinions of Turkish Language and Literature Teachers on the Curriculum of Turkish Literature Course Based on the Constructivist Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epcacan, Cahit

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to collect the opinions of Turkish Language and Literature teachers at secondary schools about the Curriculum of the Turkish Literature Course based on the constructivist learning theory. To this end, the descriptive method was employed to collect teacher opinions. Structured interview was used as a data…

  7. Comparison of Knowledge Scores of Medical Students in Problem-Based Learning and Traditional Curriculum on Public Health Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpinar, Erol; Musal, Berna; Aksakoglu, Gazanfer; Ucku, Reyhan

    2005-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the study was to compare the knowledge scores of medical students in Problem-based Learning and traditional curriculum on public health topics. Methods: We planned a cross-sectional study including the fifth and sixth year medical students of Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. The fifth year students (PBL group, n = 56)…

  8. A method of developing and introducing case-based learning to a preclinical veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) has been introduced as part of a major review of the veterinary curriculum at the University of Bristol. The initial aim was to improve integration between all first year subjects, i.e., basic science disciplines (anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry), animal management, and professional studies, while highlighting the relevance by providing clinical context. The CBL was delivered as whole class sessions in a lecture theatre, as small group teaching facilities were not readily available, co-facilitated by two to four basic scientists and clinicians. Active learning tasks were included by using an audience response system and encouraging discussion. A case template was developed in PowerPoint and then populated by basic science and clinical staff in an iterative design process. Comments from a student focus group informed the design of the case sessions. Feedback collected from students via a survey after the first three cases suggested that CBL was well received and assisted students in integrating material taught in the first year units and was used to further improve the ongoing case design. The project team developed eight cases for Year 1 and is implementing CBL in various formats throughout the curriculum. There was a considerable time commitment in developing each case; however, the use of readily available software and the large group format overcame limitations, including resourcing small group sessions. This article reports a model that could be successfully adapted by other institutions wishing to use CBL to provide clinical context and promote integration of the basic sciences. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Personal skills and abilities in curriculum development planning for Project Oriented and Problem-Based Learning (POPBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon

    2005-01-01

    professional competences as well as personal competences in a new POPBL based curriculum. The article continues by giving an example of a possible method to be used in the developing of a curriculum where the personal skills and abilities are an active and equally valued as the development of the students......In this article, the author is giving examples on an approach to include the personal competences in the initial phase of the planning process for a change towards project organized and problem-based learning ? POPBL. A model is presented on how to have trainees recognize the necessity to include...

  10. Personal skills and abilities in curriculum development planning for Project Oriented and Problem-Based Learning (POPBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author is giving examples on an approach to include the personal competences in the initial phase of the planning process for a change towards project organized and problem-based learning ? POPBL. A model is presented on how to have trainees recognize the necessity to include...... professional competences as well as personal competences in a new POPBL based curriculum. The article continues by giving an example of a possible method to be used in the developing of a curriculum where the personal skills and abilities are an active and equally valued as the development of the students...

  11. Student Reactions to Learning Theory Based Curriculum Materials in Linear Algebra--A Survey Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laurel; Vidakovic, Draga; Martin, William O.; Dexter, Scott; Suzuki, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In this report we examine students' perceptions of the implementation of carefully designed curriculum materials (called modules) in linear algebra courses at three different universities. The curricular materials were produced collaboratively by STEM and mathematics education faculty as members of a professional learning community (PLC) over…

  12. Use of Portfolio-based Learning and Assessment in Community-based Field Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Swaroop Kumar; Soudarssanane, Mb; Roy, Gautam; Premrajan, Kc; Sarkar, Sonali

    2008-04-01

    Portfolio-based learning is recognized in medical education. It helps students to assess themselves as per the key learning objectives and outcomes expected out of them. The faculty could also get feedback regarding individual student's progress toward learning outcomes and facilitate the students achieve the same. This article addresses the process of portfolio development and assesses from students feedbacks, if portfolio-based learning is an improvement over record-based study in community-based field studies. The results of this study shows that involving students in framing objectives, developing a mechanism for self-introspection and self-assessment by the students and a mechanism by which faculty can monitor each student's progress toward the defined objectives can significantly enhance the learnability of the students.

  13. Use of portfolio-based learning and assessment in community-based field curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Swaroop

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio-based learning is recognized in medical education. It helps students to assess themselves as per the key learning objectives and outcomes expected out of them. The faculty could also get feedback regarding individual student′s progress toward learning outcomes and facilitate the students achieve the same. This article addresses the process of portfolio development and assesses from students feedbacks, if portfolio-based learning is an improvement over record-based study in community-based field studies. The results of this study shows that involving students in framing objectives, developing a mechanism for self-introspection and self-assessment by the students and a mechanism by which faculty can monitor each student′s progress toward the defined objectives can significantly enhance the learnability of the students.

  14. Curriculum sequencing for an e-learning system based on learning styles

    OpenAIRE

    Peña de Carrillo, Clara Inés; Marzo i Lázaro, Josep Lluís; Rosa, Josep Lluís de la

    2004-01-01

    This work shows the use of adaptation techniques involved in an e-learning system that considers students' learning styles and students' knowledge states. The mentioned e-learning system is built on a multiagent framework designed to examine opportunities to improve the teaching and to motivate the students to learn what they want in a user-friendly and assisted environment

  15. Theory in Practice instead of Theory versus Practice – Curricular design for Task-based Learning within a competency oriented Curriculum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Windolf, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    ...: Based on the findings of educational research, a new curriculum for clinical training was developed at Duesseldorf University, focussing on workplace-based teaching, learning and assessment.Results...

  16. Using apps for learning across the curriculum a literacy-based framework and guide

    CERN Document Server

    Beach, Richard

    2014-01-01

    How can apps be used to foster learning with literacy across the curriculum? This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students' disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculumpresents a wide range of different apps and also assesses their value features methods for and apps related to planning instruction and assessing student learning identifies favorite apps whose affordances are most likely to foster certain disciplinary literacies includes reso

  17. Development of Community Based Learning and Education system within Undergraduate Medical Curriculum of Patan Academy of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, K P; Upadhyay, S K; Bhandary, S; Gongal, R N; Karki, A

    2016-01-01

    In response to continuing health disparities between rural and urban population, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) was established in 2008. It aimed to produce physicians who would be able and willing to serve in the rural areas. In order to empower them with understanding and tools to address health issues of rural population, an innovative curriculum was developed. This paper aims to describe the community based learning and education (CBLE) system within the overall framework of PAHS undergraduate medical curriculum. A Medical School Steering Committee (MSSC) comprising of a group of committed medical educators led the curriculum development process. The committee reviewed different medical curricula, relevant literatures, and held a series of consultative meetings with the stakeholders and experts within and outside Nepal. This process resulted in defining the desirable attributes, terminal competencies of the graduates, and then the actual development of the entire curriculum including CBLE. Given the critical importance of population health, 25% of the curricular weightage was allocated to the Community Health Sciences (CHS). CBLE system was developed as the primary means of delivering CHS curriculum. The details of CBLE system was finalized for implementation with the first cohort of medical students commencing their studies from June 2010. The CBLE, a key educational strategy of PAHS curriculum, is envisaged to improve retention and performance of PAHS graduates and, thereby, health status of rural population. However, whether or not that goal will be achieved needs to be verified after the graduates join the health system.

  18. Integrating neuroscience in the training of psychiatrists: a patient-centered didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; Rohrbaugh, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The authors describe the development and implementation of a new adult psychiatry residency didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles and an integrative, patient-centered approach that includes a progressive 4-year neuroscience curriculum. The authors describe the process of conducting a needs assessment, engaging stakeholders and developing guiding principles for the new curriculum. The curriculum was evaluated using qualitative measures, a resident survey, course evaluations, and a pilot version of a specialized assessment tool. Feedback from the resident survey and from course evaluations was positive, and residents indicated interest in receiving additional training in neuroscience. Residents self-reported not incorporating neuroscience into formulation and treatment planning as often as other perspectives. They also reported that neuroscience was reinforced less by clinical faculty than other perspectives. Performance on the curriculum assessment corroborated that clinical application of neuroscience may benefit from additional reinforcement. Residents responded well to the design and content of the new didactic curriculum. The neuroscience component appears to have achieved its primary objective of enhancing attitudes to the field. Continued work including enhancing the culture of neuroscience at the clinical sites may be required to achieve broader behavioral goals.

  19. LAND-MAN: a new curriculum based on open distance learning for Asian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, F. M.; Dhital, M. R.; Petley, D.

    2003-04-01

    Land-Man is a one-year Asian-European partnership project (Asia-Link EU programme), aiming to implement both a new curriculum and a new distance learning model in the field of landslides management which deals with situations that occur prior to, during, and after the landslide. The emphasis in Land-Man is placed on establishing methodologies, guidelines, and tools to develop Open and Distance Learning (ODL) for the future improvement and harmonisation of education in Landslides Management. Decision-makers, postgraduate students in environmental, earth and engineering disciplines, as well as professionals may benefit from the project. During the implementation of activities, the clear intention is to use internet-based tools in order to strengthen the co-operation between partners and thus lay a stable, cross-cultural, internet-oriented foundation for the future ODL-based educational model. At the end of the project, an ODL-based model for Asian-European Landslides Management Education will be designed and based on specially assembled, multimedia products. In particular, the project aims to provide tutors/professors with training by supplying them with appropriate materials and support to enable them to change to the new teaching model and by focusing on assessment of training, self-esteem, comfort level, commitment, and enthusiasm for tutors. The project also aims to nurture positive attitudes towards distance learning by changing the techniques whereby students learn landslides management, using the latest educational strategies and technology. Although the management of territory is the responsibility of national and local authorities, personnel in these departments can have limited training and experience in natural hazard and, particularly, in landslides management plans. This project will not only hypothesise, through a new curriculum, how management planning can be undertaken, but will also consider how to bring together practitioners and decision makers

  20. Primary exploration of the application of case based learning method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-zhen XU; Ye-fei WANG; Yan WANG; Shu CHENG; Yi-qun HU; Lei DING

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the application and the effect of the case based learning(CBL)method in clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.Methods The CBL method was applied to the experimental group,and the traditional approach for the control group.After the lecture,a questionnaire survey was conducted to evaluate the teaching effect in the two groups.Results The CBL method efficiently increased the students’interest in learning and autonomous learning ability,enhanced their ability to solve clinical problems with basic theoretic knowledge and cultivated their clinical thinking ability.Conclusion The CBL method can improve the quality of clinical probation teaching of the integrated curriculum of hematology among eight-year-program medical students.

  1. Adding problem-based learning tutorials to a traditional lecture-based curriculum: a pilot study in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial in our advanced program for second year students within an existing curriculum. The program was opened on the last 5 days of the summer vacation and students could volunteer to be part of the group. Students separated themselves into small groups by random sampling. The PBL tutorials were done during the first 3 days for medical problems according to our original scenarios (based on medical cases), and during the last 2 days, students made presentations of their learning outcomes, using information technology (IT) by themselves. Throughout this program, students were expected to engage in self-learning, except for a 1(1/2)-h group session with a tutor. Assessment was done by attendance at a group session and by portfolio analysis. Following the portfolio analysis, students identified the number of learning issues (group A, 26 +/- 7 issues; group B, 20 +/- 3 issues; group C, 21 +/- 7 issues). Research, by questionnaire, revealed that 84% of the students were strongly interested in each scenario and 95% of the students felt familiar with each scenario. The levels of satisfaction with the tutor were different in the three groups. All of the students were comfortable in the discussion room and IT center. These results suggested that PBL tutorials are supported by the scenario, the tutor, and the location of the group session, as well as by self-learning. Moreover, one of the most important factors for a PBL tutorial that the student is ready for the free discussions and has enough time for individual self-learning.

  2. Inquiry Learning of High School Students through a Problem-Based Environmental Health Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Smith, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which high school students improved their inquiry capabilities in relation to scientific literacy through their experience of a problem-based environmental health science curriculum. The two inquiry capabilities studied were scientific questioning and approaches to inquiry into their own…

  3. School-Based Curriculum Development towards a Culture of Learning: Nonlinearity in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Thanq; Wang, Li-Yi; Neo, Wei-Leng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to unpack the context, processes and outcomes as the three key components of school-based curriculum development (SBCD) in six different schools in Singapore. A total of 31 focus group discussions were conducted with teachers, key personnel and school leaders in these schools. From the data, we derived a framework of SBCD which…

  4. School-Based Curriculum Development towards a Culture of Learning: Nonlinearity in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Thanq; Wang, Li-Yi; Neo, Wei-Leng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to unpack the context, processes and outcomes as the three key components of school-based curriculum development (SBCD) in six different schools in Singapore. A total of 31 focus group discussions were conducted with teachers, key personnel and school leaders in these schools. From the data, we derived a framework of SBCD which…

  5. Adult Learning Center Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Univ. of New York, Bronx. Herbert H. Lehman Coll. Inst. for Literacy Studies.

    These curriculum materials were collected from teachers in the Lehman College Adult Learning Center (New York). They include various activities and resources, such as a series of questions about the aims of teaching adults, a list of sources for adult basic education (ABE) materials, poems, and autobiographical materials. Teaching suggestions and…

  6. First graduates' perceptions on a problem-based and task-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, S; Karademir, S; Gursel, Y; Taskiran, H C; Musal, B

    2005-07-01

    Determination of graduates' perceptions and suggestions is essential in the evaluation of educational programmes. Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine (DEUSM), the country's first medical school implementing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) and Task-Based Learning (TBL) programme, graduated the first students of its new educational programme starting from the 2002-2003 academic year. The aim of the present study is to determine first graduates' perceptions on their self-efficacy and school's educational programme's efficacy. In June 2003, 51 graduating students were asked to use five-point scales to evaluate: the content of the educational programme, the educational methods, communication with educators, assessment methods and instruments, the efficacy of each year of their undergraduate programme and the overall program, their satisfaction levels about educational programme regarding the acquisition of knowledge and skills, their self-efficacy and contentment level of being a physician. In the content of educational programme, the highest score was attributed to "acquisition of behavioural objectives" and the lowest score to "acquisition of basic science knowledge". Regarding the efficacy of educational programme, the highest score was attributed to "communication with educators". The highest scores regarding the satisfaction levels on the acquisition of knowledge and skills provided by the School were attributed to "implementing basic professional procedures" and "history taking" and the lowest score to "selecting appropriate treatment". The graduating students' mainly positive evaluations regarding the efficacy of DEUSM's new educational programme were considered as supportive reflections on the new educational programme. Further studies to monitor our graduates' future professional performances are being envisaged.

  7. Learning and Design Processes in a Gamified Learning Design in which Students Create Curriculum-Based Digital Learning Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2017-01-01

    ’ cognitively complex learning processes, and how four parallel types of processes for designing and learning supported this gamified learning design. The experiment took place in a hybrid synchronous learning environment. The project found that the students experienced deep and motivating learning...

  8. A longitudinal analysis of the self-directed learning readiness level of nursing students enrolled in a problem-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Gülseren; Dicle, Aklime; Ugur, Aysen

    2009-05-01

    Self-directed learning is an important outcome of nursing education. Although problem-based learning is believed to facilitate self-directed learning, previous studies have reported conflicting results. This longitudinal survey explored the perceived changes in self-directed learning for 4 years in a baccalaureate nursing education program with an integrated problem-based learning curriculum. Fifty of 59 students (response rate, 85%) completed the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale at five different time points: at the beginning of each academic year and at program completion. Scores were significantly lower during the first academic year compared with other years, and fourth-year scores were significantly higher than in previous years. Scores on the three subscales (i.e., self-management, desire for learning, and self-control) increased significantly during the 4 years of the program. These findings support self-directed learning as a maturational process. Implications for nursing faculty and curriculum development are discussed.

  9. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Bregje de; Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ colla

  10. Contextual considerations in implementing problem-based learning approaches in a Brazilian medical curriculum: the UNAERP experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite being a well-established pedagogical approach in medical education, the implementation of problem-based learning (PBL approaches hinges not only on educational aspects of the medical curriculum but also on the characteristics and necessities of the health system and the medical labor market within which it is situated. Aim: To report our experiences implementing a PBL-based approach in a region of Brazil where: 1 all pre-university education and the vast majority of medical courses are based on traditional, lecture-based instructions; and 2 students’ career interests in primary care, arguably the prototypical PBL trainee, are heavily disfavored because of economics. Results: Brazilian guidelines require that clinical training take place during the last 2 years of the medical program and include intensive, supervised, inpatient and outpatient rotations in pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery. Throughout the pre-clinical curriculum, then, students learn to deal with progressively more difficult and complex cases – typically through the use of PBL tutors in a primary care context. However, because of curricular time constraints in the clerkships, and students’ general preoccupation with specialty practice, the continuation of PBL-based approaches in the pre-clinical years – and the expansion of PBL into the clerkships – has become exceedingly difficult. Discussion and conclusion: Our experience illustrates the importance of context (both cultural and structural in implementing certain pedagogies within one Brazilian training program. We plan to address these barriers by: 1 integrating units, whenever possible, within a spiral curriculum; 2 introducing real patients earlier in students’ pre-clinical coursework (primarily in a primary care setting; and 3 using subject experts as PBL tutors to better motivate students.

  11. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  12. Conversations about Curriculum Change: Mathematical Thinking and Team-Based Learning in a Discrete Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Judy; Sneddon, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the learning conversations between a mathematician and a mathematics educator as they worked together to change the delivery model of a third year discrete mathematics course from a traditional lecture mode to team-based learning (TBL). This change prompted the mathematician to create team tasks which increasingly focused…

  13. The "Comparing Approaches" Workshop as an Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning, Curriculum Design, and the Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Comparing Approaches to Hands-On Science workshop was developed by the Institute for Inquiry at the Exploratorium and incorporated as a half-day activity into the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (PDP) and other teaching venues supported by PDP participants and staff. The Comparing Approaches activity builds upon the common assumption that "hands-on" learning experiences develop deeper and longer-lasting understanding of material. It challenges teacher-participants to reflect on why that is and to consider how hands-on learning is most effectively incorporated into a science curriculum to meet the defined content, scientific process, and attitudinal objectives. I have participated in the Comparing Approaches workshop at several venues and with a variety of roles, and in this paper I describe how the workshop is effective as preparation for exploring the concept of inquiry and inquiry-based learning and as an introduction to "backward" curriculum design and to the PDP as a whole. I discuss challenges I faced as a participant, as a facilitator (instructor) for the activity, and as a discussion leader and provide advice for future implementations of the workshop.

  14. Conceptualizations on Innovation Competency in a Problem- and Project-Based Learning Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fenzhi; Kolmos, Anette; de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    identified by analyzing the narratives of interviewees and coding the transcriptions into pre-prepared categories, based on the theoretical framework inspired by activity theory. The analysis of empirical data indicates a collaborative nature of innovation competency in the PBL curriculum; emphasizes...... the empowerment of individuals during teamwork; displays the interaction between individuals, teams and the social system. Furthermore, it describes innovation competency as a wide range of human abilities and processes, such as personal ability (in finding real-life problems and formulating research questions......), interpersonal ability (by being open and responsive to diverse perspectives and intentionally constructing collaborative relationships), and implementing ability (by effectively implementing their ideas in useful projects)....

  15. Using the PubMatrix literature-mining resource to accelerate student-centered learning in a veterinary problem-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John; Irizarry, Kristopher J L

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) creates an atmosphere in which veterinary students must take responsibility for their own education. Unlike a traditional curriculum where students receive discipline-specific information by attending formal lectures, PBL is designed to elicit self-directed, student-centered learning such that each student determines (1) what he/she does not know (learning issues), (2) what he/she needs to learn, (3) how he/she will learn it, and (4) what resources he/she will use. One of the biggest challenges facing students in a PBL curriculum is efficient time management while pursuing learning issues. Bioinformatics resources, such as the PubMatrix literature-mining tool, allow access to tremendous amounts of information almost instantaneously. To accelerate student-centered learning it is necessary to include resources that enhance the rate at which students can process biomedical information. Unlike using the PubMed interface directly, the PubMatrix tool enables users to automate queries, allowing up to 1,000 distinct PubMed queries to be executed per single PubMatrix submission. Users may submit multiple PubMatrix queries per session, resulting in the ability to execute tens of thousands of PubMed queries in a single day. The intuitively organized results, which remain accessible from PubMatrix user accounts, enable students to rapidly assimilate and process hundreds of thousands of individual publication records as they relate to the student's specific learning issues and query terms. Subsequently, students can explore substantially more of the biomedical publication landscape per learning issue and spend a greater fraction of their time actively engaged in resolving their learning issues.

  16. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  17. Curriculum Design and Children's Learning at Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Larry D.; Paroschi, Eliane E.; Habenicht, Donna J.; Hollingsead, Candice C.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between curriculum design and children's learning in church. Participants in this study included 12 six-year-old children attending two different Sabbath school classes in the same Midwestern Seventh-day Adventist church. A traditional curriculum guided instruction in Class 1. "GraceLink," a new curriculum,…

  18. Teacher Learning in Collaborative Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.; de Vries, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers' collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to…

  19. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.B.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Vries, de B.

    2011-01-01

    Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to identify the l

  20. Bringing Curriculum to Life. Enacting Project-Based Learning in Music Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Evan S.; Campbell, Mark Robin; Greco, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    At its core, project-based learning is based on the idea that real-life problems capture student interest, provoke critical thinking, and develop skills as they engage in and complete complex undertakings that typically result in a realistic product, event, or presentation to an audience. This article offers a starting point for music teachers who…

  1. Curriculum-Based Measurement in Science Learning: Vocabulary-Matching as an Indicator of Performance and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espin, Christine A.; Busch, Todd W.; Lembke, Erica S.; Hampton, David D.; Seo, Kyounghee; Zukowski, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    The technical adequacy of curriculum-based measures in the form of short and simple vocabulary-matching probes to predict students' performance and progress in science at the secondary level was investigated. Participants were 198 seventh-grade students from 10 science classrooms. Curriculum-based measurements (CBM) were 5-min vocabulary-matching…

  2. Games-Based Learning as an Interdisciplinary Approach to Literacy across Curriculum for Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh O'Donnell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy remains an area of concern in early secondary education in Scotland (ages 12-14, with recent research suggesting a continued decline in attainment levels. As literacy underpins learning, interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to teaching literacy are now being emphasized through the new Curriculum for Excellence that aims to address this issue. It is not clear, however, what types of learning activity are most appropriate for implementing this new, more cooperative approach. One candidate is the use of educational games and reflective writing. So, to what extent do learners demonstrate transferable literacy skills through engaging with educational games? This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the multi-user simulation game, Mars Colony Challenger (MCC, which portrays a scientifically accurate Mars colonisation mission in a way that aims to facilitate both scientific and literary development. A class of secondary school pupils (n=28 used the game within the context of a science class on ‘The Three States of Matter’. They then produced written narratives that captured the experiential learning undertaken. Comparing these narratives with the remaining pupils in the cohort, who had not used MCC in their science class, revealed a statistically significant difference in literacy ability. Further qualitative analysis of the narratives themselves highlighted a high level of engagement and inspiration evoked through the experience. Consequently, these results highlight the efficacy of MCC as a means of literacy development, and they suggest a means to elicit greater frequency of opportunity for pupil engagement with, and subsequent assessment of, literacy competencies. Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5

  3. The Robotic Decathlon: Project-Based Learning Labs and Curriculum Design for an Introductory Robotics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, D. J.; Vitoroulis, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a series of novel project-based learning labs for an introductory robotics course that are developed into a semester-long Robotic Decathlon. The last three events of the Robotic Decathlon are used as three final one-week-long project tasks; these replace a previous course project that was a semester-long robotics competition.…

  4. The Robotic Decathlon: Project-Based Learning Labs and Curriculum Design for an Introductory Robotics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, D. J.; Vitoroulis, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a series of novel project-based learning labs for an introductory robotics course that are developed into a semester-long Robotic Decathlon. The last three events of the Robotic Decathlon are used as three final one-week-long project tasks; these replace a previous course project that was a semester-long robotics competition.…

  5. Incorporating Health Information Technology and Pharmacy Informatics in a Pharmacy Professional Didactic Curriculum -with a Team-based Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapie, Ana L; Cutler, Timothy W; Fingado, Amanda R

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To incorporate a pharmacy informatics program in the didactic curriculum of a team-based learning institution and to assess students' knowledge of and confidence with health informatics during the course. Design. A previously developed online pharmacy informatics course was adapted and implemented into a team-based learning (TBL) 3-credit-hour drug information course for doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in their second didactic year. During a period of five weeks (15 contact hours), students used the online pharmacy informatics modules as part of their readiness assurance process. Additional material was developed to comply with the TBL principles. Online pre/postsurveys were administered to evaluate knowledge gained and students' perceptions of the informatics program. Assessment. Eighty-three second-year students (84% response rate) completed the surveys. Participants' knowledge of electronic health records, computerized physician order entry, pharmacy information systems, and clinical decision support was significantly improved. Additionally, their confidence significantly improved in terms of describing health informatics terminology, describing the benefits and barriers of using health information technology, and understanding reasons for systematically processing health information. Conclusion. Students responded favorably to the incorporation of pharmacy informatics content into a drug information course using a TBL approach. Students met the learning objectives of seven thematic areas and had positive attitudes toward the course after its completion.

  6. Developing the learning physical science curriculum: Adapting a small enrollment, laboratory and discussion based physical science course for large enrollments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Fred; Price, Edward; Robinson, Stephen; Boyd-Harlow, Danielle; McKean, Michael

    2012-06-01

    We report on the adaptation of the small enrollment, lab and discussion based physical science course, Physical Science and Everyday Thinking (PSET), for a large-enrollment, lecture-style setting. Like PSET, the new Learning Physical Science (LEPS) curriculum was designed around specific principles based on research on learning to meet the needs of nonscience students, especially prospective and practicing elementary and middle school teachers. We describe the structure of the two curricula and the adaptation process, including a detailed comparison of similar activities from the two curricula and a case study of a LEPS classroom implementation. In LEPS, short instructor-guided lessons replace lengthier small group activities, and movies, rather than hands-on investigations, provide the evidence used to support and test ideas. LEPS promotes student peer interaction as an important part of sense making via “clicker” questions, rather than small group and whole class discussions typical of PSET. Examples of student dialog indicate that this format is capable of generating substantive student discussion and successfully enacting the design principles. Field-test data show similar student content learning gains with the two curricula. Nevertheless, because of classroom constraints, some important practices of science that were an integral part of PSET were not included in LEPS.

  7. Effects of Teacher Professional Characteristics on Student Achievement: An Investigation in Blended Learning Environment with Standards-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Hasan; Bichelmeyer, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Use of different teaching materials and curriculum for the same subjects is always a confounding factor in studies investigating teacher characteristics and student achievement. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of different teacher qualities on student achievement in high schools with a standards-based curriculum delivered…

  8. Concept map analysis in the assessment of speech-language pathology students' learning in a problem-based learning curriculum: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Cecilia K F; Whitehill, Tara L; Dodd, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to track students' critical thinking performance longitudinally through concept map analysis in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. Concept map analysis has been employed in the assessment of students' critical thinking in medical education. Little is known concerning concept mapping (CM) in speech-language pathology (SLP) education. In this quantitative study, students in a 4-year SLP education program (N = 38) were followed until the completion of a fully-integrated PBL curriculum from Years 1 to 3. Students' concept maps were analyzed using a tool developed for this study, the Concept Map Assessment Profile (CMAP). There was an increase in concept map scores across the 3 years at the beginning of the academic year. The CM performance over the 3 years predicted 21.0% to 33.6% of variance in three measures of learning outcomes. The CMAP is a reliable measure, with strong inter-rater and intra-rater reliability (r = 0.85 and r = 0.96, respectively). In addition to its use as an assessment tool, the CMAP might be used to facilitate students' learning as feedback concerning strengths and weaknesses in the development of critical thinking can be provided.

  9. The Development of an E-Learning-Based Learning Service for MKDP Curriculum and Learning at the Indonesia University of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusman

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is a general term used to refer to computer-enhanced learning based that facilitates whoever, wherever, and whenever the person is to be able to learn more fun, easier and cheaper by using Internet. In other words, E-learning is the use of network technologies to create, foster, deliver, and facilitate learning, anytime and anywhere. It…

  10. An e-project-based approach to ESP learning in an ICT curriculum in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Mamakou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the integration of language learning with knowledge/content construction isgrowing around the world leading to Content-Based Instruction (CBI which emphasizes theconnection between the skills and information provided in the English for Specific Purposes(ESP course and the technical material taught in their discipline. Interactive teamwork,critical reading and writing, communication skills, negotiation, presentations are some of thevital soft skills for today’s academic and future work environment. Traditionally, ESP involvesa lecture mode where academic literacies and skills such as reading comprehension, writing,and vocabulary are practised. This paper discusses and analyses qualitative and quantitativeresults from the introduction of an e-methodology in two university departments forteaching/learning ESP in the framework of discipline-related, CBI and project work whichenhances and modernizes teaching and learning ESP and develops new study habits forlearners by promoting self-directed, autonomous, active learning, out-of-classroom learningand by encouraging students’ engagement and academic socialisation.

  11. Comparing Problem-Based Learning Students to Students in a Lecture-Based Curriculum: Learning Strategies and the Relation with Self-Study Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Marit; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Smeets, Guus; Kroeze, Maarten; van der Molen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    In educational theory, deep processing (i.e., connecting different study topics together) and self-regulation (i.e., taking control over one's own learning process) are considered effective learning strategies. These learning strategies can be influenced by the learning environment. Problem-based learning (PBL), a student-centered educational…

  12. Embedding Research-Based Learning Early in the Undergraduate Geography Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkington, Helen; Griffin, Amy L.; Keys-Mathews, Lisa; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Wendy E.; Baker, Richard; France, Derek

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the rationale for embedding research and enquiry skills early in the undergraduate geography curriculum and for making these skills explicit to students. A survey of 52 international geography faculty identified critical thinking, framing research questions, reflectivity and creativity as the most challenging research skills…

  13. Embedding Research-Based Learning Early in the Undergraduate Geography Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkington, Helen; Griffin, Amy L.; Keys-Mathews, Lisa; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Wendy E.; Baker, Richard; France, Derek

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the rationale for embedding research and enquiry skills early in the undergraduate geography curriculum and for making these skills explicit to students. A survey of 52 international geography faculty identified critical thinking, framing research questions, reflectivity and creativity as the most challenging research skills…

  14. Facilitated learning model to teach habits of evidence-based reasoning across an integrated master of science in occupational therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ellen S; Coster, Wendy J; Kramer, Jessica M

    2014-01-01

    We describe an integrated master of science in occupational therapy curriculum and a coordinated sequence of evidence-based practice (EBP) courses that incorporate systematic, pragmatic teaching strategies to develop students' EBP skills and habits of reasoning. The EBP courses focus sequentially on the occupational lives of clients and methods for gaining information about occupational performance and needs; appraising the internal, external, and statistical validity of intervention evidence; and generating evidence from one's own practice to answer questions about individual or group client outcomes. All EBP courses use facilitated learning processes that encourage graduate students to take responsibility for their own learning, guided by a carefully structured series of assignments. The integrated curriculum scaffolds the translation and application of previously learned knowledge and skills, including EBP knowledge, into different contexts. Student survey data suggest that graduating students view EBP as an integral part of the clinical process and begin to internalize the habits necessary to be evidence-based practitioners.

  15. The Impact of High School Science Teachers' Beliefs, Curricular Enactments and Experience on Student Learning During an Inquiry-based Urban Ecology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Silva Pimentel, Diane; Strauss, Eric G.

    2013-10-01

    Inquiry-based curricula are an essential tool for reforming science education yet the role of the teacher is often overlooked in terms of the impact of the curriculum on student achievement. Our research focuses on 22 teachers' use of a year-long high school urban ecology curriculum and how teachers' self-efficacy, instructional practices, curricular enactments and previous experience impacted student learning. Data sources included teacher belief surveys, teacher enactment surveys, a student multiple-choice assessment focused on defining and identifying science concepts and a student open-ended assessment focused on scientific inquiry. Results from the two hierarchical linear models indicate that there was significant variation between teachers in terms of student achievement. For the multiple-choice assessment, teachers who spent a larger percentage of time on group work and a smaller percentage of time lecturing had greater student learning. For the open-ended assessment, teachers who reported a higher frequency of students engaging in argument and sharing ideas had greater student learning while teachers who adapted the curriculum more had lower student learning. These results suggest the importance of supporting the active role of students in instruction, emphasising argumentation, and considering the types of adaptations teachers make to curriculum.

  16. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Westbroek, Hanna; Handelzalts, Adam; Walraven, Amber; McKenney, Susan; Pieters, Jules; De Vries, Bregje

    2011-01-01

    Voogt, J., Westbroek, H., Handelzalts, A., Walraven, A., McKenney, S., Pieters, J., & De Vries, B. (2011). Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1235-1244.

  17. Analysis of physics textbooks for 10th and 11th grades in accordance with the 2013 secondary school physics curriculum from the perspective of project-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Erdem, Aytekin

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the 10th and 11th grade Physics textbooks in accordance with the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum from the perspective of project-based learning method and to share the results with the physics education public. The research was carried out in the 2015-2016 academic year as part of an undergraduate course taught in physics teaching program at a faculty of education; and 10 senior students of physics teachercandidates participated in the study. The research method is the survey model based on qualitative research approach. Data collection tools consist of the reports written by the participants who examined the curriculum and textbooks for project-based learning problems. According to research findings, most of the educational gains in the 10th and 11th grade physics textbooks were supported with experimental activities; however, project-based assignments are needed.

  18. Integrating Curriculum through the Learning Cycle: Content-Based Reading and Vocabulary Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brenda H.; Guillaume, Andrea M.

    2006-01-01

    The content areas provide rich contexts for developing vocabulary. This article presents some principles and a lesson model--the learning cycle--that can be used to develop vocabulary while building understanding in science. Because science instruction and the learning cycle model promote learning in real-world contexts, they provide students with…

  19. Effective use of real-life events as tools for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology in a problem-based learning curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This paper describes how in a problem-based learning (PBL medical curriculum, having identified the learning outcomes, problems can be developed from real-life events for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology topics for which PBL cases might be inadequate. Such problems can be very interesting and educational. Methodology: Using the story of the development and withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx ® , we developed a problem for undergraduate medical students to address important issues related to clinical pharmacology and therapeutics such as new drug development, preclinical testing, clinical trials, adverse drug reactions, professionalism, and critical appraisal of literature. These topics would otherwise be difficult to address in patient-based problems. Results: The evaluation of the problem based on pooled feedback from 57 tutorial groups, each comprising 8-10 students, collected over 5 years, supported the effectiveness of the problem. Conclusion: A systematic approach described in this paper can be used for the development and validation of educational material for introducing focal topics of pharmacology/clinical pharmacology integrated with other disciplines in innovative medical (and other health profession curricula.

  20. Using concept maps and goal-setting to support the development of self-regulated learning in a problem-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa; Bennett, Sue; Lockyer, Lori

    2016-09-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education focuses on preparing independent learners for continuing, self-directed, professional development beyond the classroom. Skills in self-regulated learning (SRL) are important for success in PBL and ongoing professional practice. However, the development of SRL skills is often left to chance. This study presents the investigated outcomes for students when support for the development of SRL was embedded in a PBL medical curriculum. This investigation involved design, delivery and testing of SRL support, embedded into the first phase of a four-year, graduate-entry MBBS degree. The intervention included concept mapping and goal-setting activities through iterative processes of planning, monitoring and reflecting on learning. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data from seven students to develop case studies of engagement with, and outcomes from, the SRL support. The findings indicate that students who actively engaged with support for SRL demonstrated increases in cognitive and metacognitive functioning. Students also reported a greater sense of confidence in and control over their approaches to learning in PBL. This study advances understanding about how the development of SRL can be integrated into PBL.

  1. Increasing student success in STEM through geosciences based GIS curriculum, interdisciplinary project based learning, and specialized STEM student services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, W.

    2012-12-01

    Under the auspices of the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education Grant and the Department of Education's Title V/HSI Grant, Palomar College students from a variety of disciplines have not only been exposed to the high growth field of geospatial technologies, but have also been exposed to the geosciences and regional environmental issues in their GIS courses. By integrating introductory Physical Geography topics such as liquefaction, subsidence, ozone depletion, plate tectonics, and coastal processes in the introductory GIS curriculum, GIS students from fields ranging from Archaeology to Zoology were exposed to basic geosciences theories in a series of hands-on interactive exercises, while gaining competency in geospatial technologies. Additionally, as students undertake interdisciplinary service learning projects under the supervision of experts in the private, governmental, and nonprofit sectors, students were introduced to the STEM workplace, forged invaluable professional connections, applied their classroom knowledge to advance research (e.g. analyzing migration patterns of cephalopod), and analyzed regional environmental issues (e.g. distribution of invasive plants in state natural preserves). In order to further the retention and completion of students in GIS, Earth Science, and other STEM courses, a STEM Student Learning Center was constructed, whereby students can receive services such as supplemental instruction, walk-in tutoring, STEM counseling and transfer advising, as well as faculty and peer mentoring.

  2. An evidence-based laparoscopic simulation curriculum shortens the clinical learning curve and reduces surgical adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Win G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gunter De Win,1,2 Siska Van Bruwaene,3,4 Jyotsna Kulkarni,5 Ben Van Calster,6 Rajesh Aggarwal,7,8 Christopher Allen,9 Ann Lissens,4 Dirk De Ridder,3 Marc Miserez4,10 1Department of Urology, Antwerp University Hospital, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 3Department of Urology, University Hospitals of KU Leuven, 4Centre for Surgical Technologies, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 5Kulkarni Endo Surgery Institute, Pune, India; 6Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 7Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, 8Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 9School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 10Department of Abdominal Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Background: Surgical simulation is becoming increasingly important in surgical education. However, the method of simulation to be incorporated into a surgical curriculum is unclear. We compared the effectiveness of a proficiency-based preclinical simulation training in laparoscopy with conventional surgical training and conventional surgical training interspersed with standard simulation sessions.Materials and methods: In this prospective single-blinded trial, 30 final-year medical students were randomized into three groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training. The control group received only clinical training during residency, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The Center for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Program (CST PTP group received a proficiency-based preclinical simulation course during the final year of medical school but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residency. After 6 months of surgical residency, the influence on the learning curve while performing

  3. A Power Electronic and Drives Curriculum with Project-oriented and Problem-based Learning: A Dynamic Teaching Approach for the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede

    2002-01-01

    extra study time. This paper present a teaching approach which makes it possible very fast for the student to get in-depth skills in this important area which is the problem-oriented and project-based learning. The trend and application of power electronics are illustrated. The necessary skills...... for power electronic engineers are outlined followed up by a discussion on how problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics related projects at different study levels are carried out.......Power electronics is an emerging technology. New applications are added every year as well as the power handling capabilities are steadily increasing. The demands to the education of engineers in this field are also increasing. Basically the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without...

  4. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmi, Keramat; Marzoughi, Rahmatallah; Torkzadeh, Jafar

    2015-10-01

    One of the most significant elements of entrepreneurship curriculum design is teaching-learning methods, which plays a key role in studies and researches related to such a curriculum. It is the teaching method, and systematic, organized and logical ways of providing lessons that should be consistent with entrepreneurship goals and contents, and should also be developed according to the learners' needs. Therefore, the current study aimed to introduce appropriate, modern, and effective methods of teaching entrepreneurship and their validation. This is a mixed method research of a sequential exploratory kind conducted through two stages: a) developing teaching methods of entrepreneurship curriculum, and b) validating developed framework. Data were collected through "triangulation" (study of documents, investigating theoretical basics and the literature, and semi-structured interviews with key experts). Since the literature on this topic is very rich, and views of the key experts are vast, directed and summative content analysis was used. In the second stage, qualitative credibility of research findings was obtained using qualitative validation criteria (credibility, confirmability, and transferability), and applying various techniques. Moreover, in order to make sure that the qualitative part is reliable, reliability test was used. Moreover, quantitative validation of the developed framework was conducted utilizing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis methods and Cronbach's alpha. The data were gathered through distributing a three-aspect questionnaire (direct presentation teaching methods, interactive, and practical-operational aspects) with 29 items among 90 curriculum scholars. Target population was selected by means of purposive sampling and representative sample. Results obtained from exploratory factor analysis showed that a three factor structure is an appropriate method for describing elements of teaching-learning methods of entrepreneurship curriculum

  5. Teaching learning methods of an entrepreneurship curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KERAMAT ESMI

    2015-10-01

    teaching-learning methods of entrepreneurship curriculum. Moreover, the value for Kaiser Meyer Olkin measure of sampling adequacy equaled 0.72 and the value for Bartlett’s test of variances homogeneity was significant at the 0.0001 level. Except for internship element, the rest had a factor load of higher than 0.3. Also, the results of confirmatory factor analysis showed the model appropriateness, and the criteria for qualitative accreditation were acceptable. Conclusion: Developed model can help instructors in selecting an appropriate method of entrepreneurship teaching, and it can also make sure that the teaching is on the right path. Moreover, the model is comprehensive and includes all the effective teaching methods in entrepreneurship education. It is also based on qualities, conditions, and requirements of Higher Education Institutions in Iranian cultural environment.

  6. A Power Electronic and Drives Curriculum with Project-oriented and Problem-based Learning: A Dynamic Teaching Approach for the Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede

    2002-01-01

    extra study time. This paper present a teaching approach which makes it possible very fast for the student to get in-depth skills in this important area which is the problem-oriented and project-based learning. The trend and application of power electronics are illustrated. The necessary skills...... for power electronic engineers are outlined followed up by a discussion on how problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics related projects at different study levels are carried out....

  7. Sources of Stress and Coping Strategies among Undergraduate Medical Students Enrolled in a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira S. Bamuhair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Medical education is rated as one of the most difficult trainings to endure. Throughout their undergraduate years, medical students face numerous stressors. Coping with these stressors requires access to a variety of resources, varying from personal strengths to social support. We aimed to explore the perceived stress, stressors, and coping strategies employed by medical students studying in a problem-based learning curriculum. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional study of randomly selected medical students that explored demographics, perceived stress scale, sources of stress, and coping strategies. Results. Of the 378 medical students that participated in the study, males were 59.3% and females 40.7%. Nearly 53% of the students often felt stressed, and a third felt that they could not cope with stress. Over 82% found studying stressful and 64.3% were not sleeping well. Half of the students reported low self-esteem. Perceived stress scores were statistically significantly high for specific stressors of studying in general, worrying about future, interpersonal conflict, and having low self-esteem. Coping strategies that were statistically significantly applied more often were blaming oneself and being self-critical, seeking advice and help from others, and finding comfort in religion. Female students were more stressed than males but they employ more coping strategies as well. Conclusions. Stress is very common among medical students. Most of the stressors are from coursework and interpersonal relationships. Low self-esteem coupled with self-blame and self-criticism is quite common.

  8. A curriculum based on social learning theory emphasizing fruit exposure and positive parent child-feeding strategies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Laura Siem; Falciglia, Grace; Davis, Angela M; Couch, Sarah C

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a nutrition intervention program to enhance children's knowledge, preference, and intake of whole fruit and to decrease parents' use of controlling child-feeding behaviors. Subjects were fifth- and sixth-grade students (children aged 10-12 years) from Cincinnati, Ohio. Nine parent-child pairs completed the study. Seventeen parent-child pairs who expressed interest but were unable to attend more than one session served as controls. Based on the Social Learning Theory, the curriculum combined child-focused interactive lessons and skill-building activities with parent-focused lessons on child-feeding strategies to increase the fruit intake of children. Change in children's knowledge, preference, and intake of fruit and parents' use of controlling child-feeding strategies were measured in a pretest/posttest manner using validated questionnaires. There was a significant increase in knowledge scores and fruit intake by children in the experimental vs the control group. Fruit preference scores were similar between groups. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in use of controlling child-feeding strategies by parents in the intervention vs the control group.

  9. Community-Based Learning, Internationalization of the Curriculum, and University Engagement with Latino Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield-Mendez, Vialla

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes efforts at Emory University to understand international presences, focusing especially on Spanish-speaking communities and neighborhoods in Atlanta and Georgia, and to integrate these into the life of the university through engaged learning courses. Using a fresh look at the concepts of global citizenship and cosmopolitanism…

  10. Service Learning in a Social Studies Methods Course: Experience and Place-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Reese H.; Brinkman, Stephanie Gray

    2008-01-01

    When an instructor reframed the social studies methods course to include a service-learning project, both education certification students and a museum's outreach program benefited. University students gained practical teaching experience leading a children's summer class about local prairie dogs, and the museum gained quality teachers.…

  11. Place-Based Curriculum Making: Devising a Synthesis between Primary Geography and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor learning provides children with an opportunity to experience the interdisciplinary nature of the real world through interactions with each other and the planet. Geographical enquiry involves exploring the outdoors in an investigative capacity. Space, place and sustainability are three core concepts in primary geography, although…

  12. Transdisciplinarity and Art Integration: Toward a New Understanding of Art-Based Learning across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Art integration is a rich and complex approach to teaching and learning that not only aligns with new initiatives in education that prioritize conceptual and procedural skills but could also contribute to education's transformation. Framing art integration as a transdisciplinary field with a distinct conceptual framework, epistemology, and…

  13. Place-Based Curriculum Making: Devising a Synthesis between Primary Geography and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor learning provides children with an opportunity to experience the interdisciplinary nature of the real world through interactions with each other and the planet. Geographical enquiry involves exploring the outdoors in an investigative capacity. Space, place and sustainability are three core concepts in primary geography, although…

  14. Theory in Practice instead of Theory versus Practice – Curricular design for Task-based Learning within a competency oriented Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotthoff, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Already during their studies, medical students should intensively train their clinical thinking and practice skills, enhancing their clinical expertise in theoretical and practical terms.Methods: Based on the findings of educational research, a new curriculum for clinical training was developed at Duesseldorf University, focussing on workplace-based teaching, learning and assessment.Results: For students in their 3, 4 and 5 year of study, our curriculum is based on learning with patient complaint items in regard to multidisciplinary areas of outpatient and inpatient care. For this educational format, 123 complaint items were defined and their compatibility with diseases from various disciplines was tested. Based on the complaint of a specific case, students locate the underlying disease pattern, the differential diagnostic and therapeutical procedures and thereby deepen the required knowledge in the basic subjects. Study books have been created by the clinical departments to support this process. Learning is integrated in competence-oriented and workplace-based learning and assessment, offering a close-knit contact between students and doctors.Conclusion: The concept allows the integration of theory into practice and the integration of knowledge from the basic, clinical-theoretical and clinical subjects into clinical thinking and action.

  15. Theory in Practice instead of Theory versus Practice – Curricular design for Task-based Learning within a competency oriented Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Windolf, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Already during their studies, medical students should intensively train their clinical thinking and practice skills, enhancing their clinical expertise in theoretical and practical terms. Methods: Based on the findings of educational research, a new curriculum for clinical training was developed at Duesseldorf University, focussing on workplace-based teaching, learning and assessment. Results: For students in their 3rd, 4th and 5th year of study, our curriculum is based on learning with patient complaint items in regard to multidisciplinary areas of outpatient and inpatient care. For this educational format, 123 complaint items were defined and their compatibility with diseases from various disciplines was tested. Based on the complaint of a specific case, students locate the underlying disease pattern, the differential diagnostic and therapeutical procedures and thereby deepen the required knowledge in the basic subjects. Study books have been created by the clinical departments to support this process. Learning is integrated in competence-oriented and workplace-based learning and assessment, offering a close-knit contact between students and doctors. Conclusion: The concept allows the integration of theory into practice and the integration of knowledge from the basic, clinical-theoretical and clinical subjects into clinical thinking and action. PMID:25699107

  16. Theory in practice instead of theory versus practice--curricular design for task-based learning within a competency oriented curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthoff, Thomas; Schneider, Matthias; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie; Windolf, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Already during their studies, medical students should intensively train their clinical thinking and practice skills, enhancing their clinical expertise in theoretical and practical terms. Based on the findings of educational research, a new curriculum for clinical training was developed at Duesseldorf University, focussing on workplace-based teaching, learning and assessment. For students in their 3rd, 4th and 5th year of study, our curriculum is based on learning with patient complaint items in regard to multidisciplinary areas of outpatient and inpatient care. For this educational format, 123 complaint items were defined and their compatibility with diseases from various disciplines was tested. Based on the complaint of a specific case, students locate the underlying disease pattern, the differential diagnostic and therapeutical procedures and thereby deepen the required knowledge in the basic subjects. Study books have been created by the clinical departments to support this process. Learning is integrated in competence-oriented and workplace-based learning and assessment, offering a close-knit contact between students and doctors. The concept allows the integration of theory into practice and the integration of knowledge from the basic, clinical-theoretical and clinical subjects into clinical thinking and action.

  17. What can we learn from facilitator and student perceptions of facilitation skills and roles in the first year of a problem-based learning curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Michelle

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The small group tutorial is a cornerstone of problem-based learning. By implication, the role of the facilitator is of pivotal importance. The present investigation canvassed perceptions of facilitators with differing levels of experience regarding their roles and duties in the tutorial. Methods In January 2002, one year after problem-based learning implementation at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, facilitators with the following experience were canvassed: trained and about to facilitate, facilitated once only and facilitated more than one six-week theme. Student comments regarding facilitator skills were obtained from a 2001 course survey. Results While facilitators generally agreed that the three-day training workshop provided sufficient insight into the facilitation process, they become more comfortable with increasing experience. Many facilitators experienced difficulty not providing content expertise. Again, this improved with increasing experience. Most facilitators saw students as colleagues. They agreed that they should be role models, but were less enthusiastic about being mentors. Students were critical of facilitators who were not up to date with curriculum implementation or who appeared disinterested. While facilitator responses suggest that there was considerable intrinsic motivation, this might in fact not be the case. Conclusions Even if they had facilitated on all six themes, facilitators could still be considered as novices. Faculty support is therefore critical for the first few years of problem-based learning, particularly for those who had facilitated once only. Since student and facilitator expectations in the small group tutorial may differ, roles and duties of facilitators must be explicit for both parties from the outset.

  18. STEM the Boredom: Engage Students in the Australian Curriculum Using ICT with Problem-Based Learning and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-01

    The well-being of modern economies and societies is increasingly requiring citizens to possess capabilities in integrating knowledge and skills in science, technology, engineering and science to solve problems. However, by the end of schooling, the majority of Australian students show little interest in these discipline areas and have no plans to continue study or work in them; many refer to these disciplines as boring. Further, they typically have little experience in integrating knowledge and skills from these disciplines and/or in applying this to solve relevant problems. Therefore, there is a need to engage students with such learning experiences to develop their interest and capabilities, particularly during the early years of secondary schooling. This is not easy for teachers to respond to, but with the support of modern digital technologies and the new Australian curriculum, the potential is expanded and the challenge is more readily achievable. However, appropriate pedagogies need to be supported that include more authentic approaches to assessment. Learning activities need to support students to integrate knowledge and skills across discipline areas in tackling real problems, and this also needs to be reflected in how students are assessed. In this paper, I will draw on personal experience as a teacher, a review of recent literature, components of the Australian Curriculum, and findings from research projects associated with my University research centre, to argue for, and illustrate how, teachers can orchestrate powerful learning activities to promote an interdisciplinary approach to STEM.

  19. STEM the Boredom: Engage Students in the Australian Curriculum Using ICT with Problem-Based Learning and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Christopher Paul

    2016-09-01

    The well-being of modern economies and societies is increasingly requiring citizens to possess capabilities in integrating knowledge and skills in science, technology, engineering and science to solve problems. However, by the end of schooling, the majority of Australian students show little interest in these discipline areas and have no plans to continue study or work in them; many refer to these disciplines as boring. Further, they typically have little experience in integrating knowledge and skills from these disciplines and/or in applying this to solve relevant problems. Therefore, there is a need to engage students with such learning experiences to develop their interest and capabilities, particularly during the early years of secondary schooling. This is not easy for teachers to respond to, but with the support of modern digital technologies and the new Australian curriculum, the potential is expanded and the challenge is more readily achievable. However, appropriate pedagogies need to be supported that include more authentic approaches to assessment. Learning activities need to support students to integrate knowledge and skills across discipline areas in tackling real problems, and this also needs to be reflected in how students are assessed. In this paper, I will draw on personal experience as a teacher, a review of recent literature, components of the Australian Curriculum, and findings from research projects associated with my University research centre, to argue for, and illustrate how, teachers can orchestrate powerful learning activities to promote an interdisciplinary approach to STEM.

  20. Development of a responsive and constructivist portfolio-based assessment of a writing-to-learn curriculum in introductory astronomy: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Mary

    As the primary evaluator of a National Science Foundation grant-supported project to develop an introductory, writing-to-learn-based astronomy curriculum, my goal was to help design and test materials that would meet the learning needs of non-science majors, especially women and minorities, and promote their science literacy. My immediate problem was to create a context-sensitive assessment that engages teachers' goals and objectives while reconciling these with the diverse needs, interests, and abilities of students. To that end, I developed a responsive or stakeholder-focused constructivist assessment based upon Guba and Lincoln's fourth generation evaluation. Both responsive and constructivist, my-approach reflects recent developments in sociocognitive theories of writing and learning, especially those by Linda Flower. Flower focuses on the literate act or learning task, such as writing a summary, as the basic unit of analysis. Not the act itself but the "site" at which it occurs is of main interest. This is where the tension between the private "self" and the public "other" provides an opportunity for meaning to evolve as students explore alternate writing and learning strategies through inner acts of negotiation. Because the new astronomy curriculum centered around students keeping a learning log or process portfolio, portfolios afforded the ideal documentary evidence of the site at which students negotiate meanings and strategies. The portfolio-based assessment, therefore, centers upon having evaluators or teacher-researchers identify and interpret how students represent learning tasks to themselves and develop strategies to complete these tasks. Researchers next compare and judge their own interpretations of these behaviors according to the pre-ordinate objectives of the curriculum. Then the key stakeholders (i.e., evaluators, students, and teachers), through hermeneutic and dialectic interchanges, reconstruct or recondition these pre-ordmate evaluation

  1. The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative: Lessons Learned in Designing a GIS-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Peter W.; Silberman, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative is a Web- and GIS-based set of lesson units for teaching geographic concepts and research methods within the context of the state's high school geography standards. Each unit follows a research-based, inquiry-centered model addressing questions of health because of Delaware's high incidence of cancer,…

  2. The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative: Lessons Learned in Designing a GIS-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Peter W.; Silberman, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative is a Web- and GIS-based set of lesson units for teaching geographic concepts and research methods within the context of the state's high school geography standards. Each unit follows a research-based, inquiry-centered model addressing questions of health because of Delaware's high incidence of cancer,…

  3. PATHS in Croatia: A school-based randomised-controlled trial of a social and emotional learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Miranda; Mihić, Josipa; Bašić, Josipa; Nix, Robert L

    2017-04-01

    This study represents the first rigorous evaluation of a social-emotional learning curriculum, PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies; Kusché & Greenberg, 1994), in elementary schools in Croatia. This study randomly assigned 29 schools to receive the universal preventive intervention or continue with usual practices. Within those schools, this study included 57 classrooms and 568 children. Teachers rated nine child behaviours in the middle of first grade (pre-intervention) and near the end of second grade (post-intervention). Hierarchical linear models, nesting children within classrooms, revealed few changes in behaviour across the sample as a whole or among higher risk children. However, there were changes on eight of the nine behaviours for lower risk children. The findings are considered in the context of the classroom culture and teachers' preparation and readiness to implement a social-emotional learning curriculum in Croatia. This study highlights the need to supplement universal preventive interventions with selective preventive interventions that can provide more intensive and targeted skill practice for higher risk children. This study also highlights the nuanced effects of a universal preventive intervention in helping different children in different ways. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  4. Intergenerational Learning and Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Presents rationale for education of grandparents and format of innovative program. Discusses these elements of grandparent curriculum: sharing feelings and ideas with peers, listening to perspective of young people, studying life-span personal development, improving family communication skills, and focusing self-evaluation on relevant behavior.…

  5. What Makes the Learning of Physiology in a PBL Medical Curriculum Challenging? Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Mark A.; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Physiology is an integral component of any medical curriculum. Traditionally, the learning of physiology has relied heavily on systems-based didactic lectures. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (NRMSM; Durban, South Africa) embarked on a problem-based curriculum in which the learning of physiology was integrated with relevant…

  6. Towards a Conceptual Framework of GBL Design for Engagement and Learning of Curriculum-Based Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Azita Iliya Abdul; Felicia, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to show best practices of GBL design for engagement. It intends to show how teachers can implement GBL in a collaborative, comprehensive and systematic way, in the classrooms, and probably outside the classrooms, based on empirical evidence and theoretical framework designed accordingly. This paper presents the components needed to…

  7. Learning (PBL) Curriculum at the University of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aspects of the PBL teaching/learning process. It is an ... organization"2 and is therefore a valu- able tool to identify ... included the resistance of some staff to change ... changes. Because the curriculum encourages a strong sense of autonomy, flexibility, ... various ways of undertaking the ... has been a drastic reduction of stu-.

  8. Tractor Mechanic--Student Material. Competency Based Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Edward W.

    Developed to assist vocational agricultural mechanics students in learning to be tractor mechanics, this curriculum guide contains all the student competency sheets which comprise this competency-based curriculum. These competency sheets are categorized under sixteen instructional units. The first two units cover employment opportunities and…

  9. The development of self-regulated learning during the pre-clinical stage of medical school: a comparison between a lecture-based and a problem-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucieer, Susanna M; van der Geest, Jos N; Elói-Santos, Silvana M; de Faria, Rosa M Delbone; Jonker, Laura; Visscher, Chris; Rikers, Remy M J P; Themmen, Axel P N

    2016-03-01

    Society expects physicians to always improve their competencies and to be up to date with developments in their field. Therefore, an important aim of medical schools is to educate future medical doctors to become self-regulated, lifelong learners. However, it is unclear if medical students become better self-regulated learners during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and whether students develop self-regulated learning skills differently, dependent on the educational approach of their medical school. In a cross-sectional design, we investigated the development of 384 medical students' self-regulated learning skills with the use of the Self-Regulation of Learning Self-Report Scale. Next, we compared this development in students who enrolled in two distinct medical curricula: a problem-based curriculum and a lectured-based curriculum. Analysis showed that more skills decreased than increased during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and that the difference between the curricula was mainly caused by a decrease in the skill evaluation in the lecture-based curriculum. These findings seem to suggest that, irrespective of the curriculum, self-regulated learning skills do not develop during medical school.

  10. Integration of evidence based medicine into a medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, A H

    2009-09-20

    The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum.

  11. Integration of Evidence Based Medicine into a Medical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, AH

    2009-01-01

    The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum. PMID:20165529

  12. The Curriculum for Children with Severe and Profound Learning Difficulties at Stephen Hawking School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The increasing number of children with profound and multiple learning difficulties means that many schools for children with severe learning difficulties are having to review the curriculum that they offer. In addition, these schools are continuing to question whether a subject-based approach, in line with the National Curriculum, is the most…

  13. Technology and Curriculum Standards: How Well Do Internet-Based Learning Games Support Common Core Standards for Mathematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Teri; Ray, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to keep up with the new generation of digital learners, educators are integrating multiple forms of technology into their teaching, including online learning game applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which internet-based learning game applications selected by preservice teachers were aligned with the…

  14. Towards an inpatient diabetes curriculum: medical student-generated aims, objectives and methods for ward-based learning of non-critical, non-perioperative inpatient diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C G; Atherley, A; Murphy, M M

    2016-06-01

    To create a summative document containing aims, objectives and methods that can be used for the training of healthcare professionals in inpatient diabetes care. A four-stage approach was introduced for the ward-based teaching of inpatient diabetes care at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill over the 2014-2015 academic year. Within this approach, 55 students (100%) submitted aims, objectives and methods to support two 2-h, ward-based sessions. This was guided by brief instructions and access to a copy of the Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline on the management of non-critical, non-perioperative inpatient diabetes. Conceptual content analysis was used to convert submissions into a unifying document. Six themes emerged from students' submissions: diagnosis; assessment and investigation of diabetes and its complications; planning individualized care and pharmacological management; hypoglycaemia management, including severe hypoglycaemia; patient education; discharge planning; and multidisciplinary teamwork. Students were primarily interested in patient management and treatment using higher-level objectives and active learning methods. This study produced comprehensive, student-generated, and hence student-centred, aims, objectives and methods for inpatient diabetes care with objectives appropriately set for higher cognitive levels of learning. This material can be used to guide teaching or for further development into a curriculum. This is the first known publication of content that could be used in a ward-based inpatient diabetes curriculum. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  15. Investigating engagement, thinking, and learning among culturally diverse, urban sixth graders experiencing an inquiry-based science curriculum, contextualized in the local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Sybil Schantz

    This mixed-methods study combined pragmatism, sociocultural perspectives, and systems thinking concepts to investigate students' engagement, thinking, and learning in science in an urban, K-8 arts, science, and technology magnet school. A grant-funded school-university partnership supported the implementation of an inquiry-based science curriculum, contextualized in the local environment through field experiences. The researcher worked as co-teacher of 3 sixth-grade science classes and was deeply involved in the daily routines of the school. The purposes of the study were to build a deeper understanding of the complex interactions that take place in an urban science classroom, including challenges related to implementing culturally-relevant instruction; and to offer insight into the role educational systems play in supporting teaching and learning. The central hypothesis was that connecting learning to meaningful experiences in the local environment can provide culturally accessible points of engagement from which to build science learning. Descriptive measures provided an assessment of students' engagement in science activities, as well as their levels of thinking and learning throughout the school year. Combined with analyses of students' work files and focus group responses, these findings provided strong evidence of engagement attributable to the inquiry-based curriculum. In some instances, degree of engagement was found to be affected by student "reluctance" and "resistance," terms defined but needing further examination. A confounding result showed marked increases in thinking levels coupled with stasis or decrease in learning. Congruent with past studies, data indicated the presence of tension between the diverse cultures of students and the mainstream cultures of school and science. Findings were synthesized with existing literature to generate the study's principal product, a grounded theory model representing the complex, interacting factors involved in

  16. Problem-Based Learning across the Curriculum: Exploring the Efficacy of a Cross-Curricular Application of Preparation for Future Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Karen; Vahey, Philip; van 't Hooft, Mark; Kratcoski, Annette; Rafanan, Ken; Stanford, Tina; Yarnall, Louise; Cook, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The research reported in this paper explores the applicability and efficacy of a variant of problem-based learning, the Preparation for Future Learning (PFL) approach, to teaching and learning within the context of a cross-curricular, middle school data literacy unit called "Thinking with Data" (TWD). A quasi-experimental design was used…

  17. Promoting Assessment for Learning through Curriculum-Based Performance Standards: Teacher Responses in the Northern Territory of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Lisl

    2017-01-01

    Governments in Australia claim that standards-based reforms to schooling will result in greater use of assessment for and as learning. This study analyses the assessment practices that evolved within the planned curricula for senior secondary schooling in the Northern Territory of Australia during standards-based reforms. Case-study methodology…

  18. Aesthetic Learning about, in, with and through the Arts: A Curriculum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic learning is a major issue in arts education. The "method of art" is often expected to facilitate in-depth learning not only in the arts but across the curriculum. This article defines aesthetic learning in terms of a conceptual framework based on two dimensions, one representing the goal and the other the means of aesthetic learning. The…

  19. Enhancing learning through optimal sequencing of web-based and manikin simulators to teach shock physiology in the medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendan, Juan C; Johnson, Teresa R

    2011-12-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges has encouraged educators to investigate proper linkage of simulation experiences with medical curricula. The authors aimed to determine if student knowledge and satisfaction differ between participation in web-based and manikin simulations for learning shock physiology and treatment and to determine if a specific training sequencing had a differential effect on learning. All 40 second-year medical students participated in a randomized, counterbalanced study with two interventions: group 1 (n = 20) participated in a web-based simulation followed by a manikin simulation and group 2 (n = 20) participated in reverse order. Knowledge and attitudes were documented. Mixed-model ANOVA indicated a significant main effect of time (F(1,38) = 18.6, P learning when web-based simulation precedes manikin use. This finding warrants further study.

  20. Development of Science Web-Based Curriculum for Elementary School: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuntalee Boriraksontikul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research were to develop and evaluate science web-based curriculum for elementary school: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok. Research for Development method was applied in this study which consisted of 4 stages: preparation of science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum evaluation and teachers development for science web-based unit plans design. The population was science teachers who have taught in 2014 academic year. The instrument used in this study were 1 the evaluation form for web-based curriculum and web-based unit plans. 2 the interview form for interview teachers’ opinion on web-based curriculum. lastly 3 the questionnaire of elementary students’ opinion on web-based curriculum. The results of this study were 1 Pratchatorn School had science web-based curriculum for elementary students with interesting units’ names. The units’ names reflect the focus and goals of learning. The learning activities were well organized according to the units design in a sequential manner for the website resource and science web-based curriculum for elementary school was evaluated as being a good quality. 2 Science web-based unit plans were also evaluated as being a good quality. 3 Teachers understood the science web-based curriculum development process and thaught about science web-based curriculum enhancing students’ learning. And 4 students’ opinion on web-based curriculum were as being a excellence quality.

  1. From Curriculum Guides to Classroom Enactment: Examining Early Career Elementary Teachers' Orientations toward Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujarati, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This article examines three early career elementary teachers' orientations toward standards-based mathematics curriculum implementation in New York City public schools. It is important to have a greater understanding of teachers who are responsible for enacting standards-based curriculum in authentic teaching situations in order to learn more…

  2. Studentische Rezeption zum problemorientierten Lernen im Vergleich mit konventionellen Lernmethoden im zahnmedizinischen kieferorthopädischen Curriculum – Eine Pilotstudie [Student evaluation of problem-based learning in a dental orthodontic curriculum – A Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedrange, T.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The present questionnaire survey investigated student reception of problem-based learning (PBL in the orthodontic curriculum with regard to acceptance, sense of purpose and motivation, knowledge and understanding, as well as tutorial support.Methods: Over a period of two terms, we compared two different didactic methods (PBL and short presentations by randomizing the participants of a course on orthodontic diagnostics into two different groups, who inversed methods after the first term. Results: The two student groups did not show any significant differences with regard to assessments or examination performance. Therefore, acceptance of the PBL concept seems to be mainly associated with the motivation of individuals to use this method. The higher the motivation, the more positive is the attitude towards the PBL concept. Students seem to work more constructively and efficiently with PBL if they can judge the concept meaningful for themselves.Conclusion: In consideration of the relevant literature and the present results, PBL can be principally integrated into the dental curriculum as a method of learning. However, student motivation is vital to learning success.[german] Ziel: In der vorliegenden Fragebogenstudie wurde die studentische Rezeption des problemorientierten Lernens (POL im Curriculum der Kieferorthopädie hinsichtlich Akzeptanz, Sinn/Motivation, Wissen/Verstehen und tutorieller Unterstützung untersucht. Methode: Es erfolgte eine Gegenüberstellung zweier verschiedener didaktischer Methoden (POL, Kurzreferate bei der Durchführung des kieferorthopädischen Diagnostikkurses in einem randomisierten Zwei-Gruppen-Plan über zwei Semester, in dem die Reihenfolge der Methoden variiert wurde. Ergebnisse: Es konnten keine Unterschiede zwischen den Gruppen bezüglich ihrer Einschätzungen und Prüfungsleistungen gefunden werden. Es zeigt sich, dass die Akzeptanz des POL hauptsächlich mit der individuellen Motivation zum

  3. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppus, Sjors F P J; Emparanza, Jose I; Hadley, Julie; Kulier, Regina; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karin; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2007-11-27

    Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone') and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.

  4. A clinically integrated curriculum in Evidence-based Medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Andrea R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone' and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. Methods A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. Results We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. Conclusion The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.

  5. Evaluation of problem-based learning curriculum implementation in a clerkship rotation of a newly established African medical training institution: lessons from the University of Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshitenge, Stephane Tshitenge; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen; Ogundipe, Radiance

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Problem-based Learning (PBL) curricula, like all curricula, require systematic evaluation as there is a risk of implementing a dysfunctional PBL curriculum. The study intended to evaluate the PBL curriculum delivery from the perspective of the clerkship students at the University of Botswana-Faculty of Medicine. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among clerkship students in Family Medicine, Paediatrics, Internal Medicine and Surgery. During a 4-week period, each respondent completed weekly a questionnaire based survey tool. The three part questionnaire consisted of demographic data, 'seven-jumps' adapted from a 'typical' PBL tool to evaluate PBL process and 11 items 'adopted 'from the Short-Questionnaire-to-Evaluate-the-Effectiveness-of-Tutors in the PBL tool to evaluate the PBL facilitation with open ended questions at the end. Results Of the 81 eligible participants, 89% (n=72) responded. We collected back 141 (49%) forms out of the 288 expected (72 X 4 weeks). PBL first sessions took place all the time only in Family Medicine and in about 75% of the time in Pediatrics but none were conducted in the other disciplines. Overall, they evaluated the PBL process as 'good' (median= 8 /10) and the PBL facilitation as 'very good' (median=9 /10). Students appeared to have differing opinions on the preferred approach to the nature of patient problems that the PBL sessions should be structured around. Conclusion Despite students rating PBL process as 'good' and facilitation as 'very good', PBL first sessions were not consistently undertaken. PMID:28748015

  6. How do medical educators design a curriculum that facilitates student learning about professionalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langendyk, Vicki; Mason, Glenn; Wang, Shaoyu

    2016-02-04

    This study analyses the ways in which curriculum reform facilitated student learning about professionalism. Design-based research provided the structure for an iterative approach to curriculum change which we undertook over a 3 year period. The learning environment of the Personal and Professional Development Theme (PPD) was analysed through the sociocultural lens of Activity Theory. Lave and Wenger's and Mezirow's learning theories informed curriculum reform to support student development of a patient-centred and critically reflective professional identity. The renewed pedagogical outcomes were aligned with curriculum content, learning and teaching processes and assessment, and intense staff education was undertaken. We analysed qualitative data from tutor interviews and free-response student surveys to evaluate the impact of curriculum reform. Students' and tutors' reflections on learning in PPD converged on two principle themes--'Developing a philosophy of medicine' and 'Becoming an ethical doctor'--which corresponded to the overarching PPD theme aims of communicative learning. Students and tutors emphasised the importance of the unique learning environment of PPD tutorials for nurturing personal development and the positive impact of the renewed assessment programme on learning. A theory-led approach to curriculum reform resulted in student engagement in the PPD curriculum and facilitated a change in student perspective about the epistemological foundation of medicine.

  7. The Impact of High School Science Teachers' Beliefs, Curricular Enactments and Experience on Student Learning during an Inquiry-Based Urban Ecology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Katherine L.; Pimentel, Diane Silva; Strauss, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based curricula are an essential tool for reforming science education yet the role of the teacher is often overlooked in terms of the impact of the curriculum on student achievement. Our research focuses on 22 teachers' use of a year-long high school urban ecology curriculum and how teachers' self-efficacy, instructional practices,…

  8. A Research of Objectives and Contents of Information and Technology Curriculum Based on Psychology of Learning%基于学习心理学的信息技术课程目标和内容的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春声

    2012-01-01

    以学习心理学理论为指导来探索学校教育中不同学科学习与教学的规律成为当代心理学与教育相结合的一大趋势。学习心理学拓展了学习心理学在中小学课程中运用的学科领域,促进教师将信息技术课程的学习与教学相结合,为创建心理学取向的信息技术教学论奠定基础。%It is a trend to investigate the learning and teaching rules in different disciplines under the guidance of psychology of learning in the integration of psychology and education. This article first analyzes the psychological base of "three-dimensional goals" of information technology curriculum, and then analyzes the content of information technology curriculum with the theory of learning classification. Finally, it proposes that the application of psychology of learning to information technology curriculum promotes the integration of psychology of learning and specific disciplines and lays the foundation for the construction of psychology-based information technology curriculum.

  9. Identifying values and beliefs in an outcomes-based curriculum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    In an analysis of Curriculum 2005 and the National Curriculum Statement, value and belief .... discussed in detail: the different learning areas; a value screen and .... Printer. 2001. National Curriculum Statement 2005. Department of Education.

  10. Supporting curriculum development by visualizing a continuous learning pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, Judith; Oud, Wil

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Schoonenboom, J., & Oud, W. (2006). Supporting curriculum development by visualizing a continuous learning pathway. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulg

  11. Mechatronic Control Engineering: A Problem Oriented And Project Based Learning Curriculum In Mechatronic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    Mechatronics is a field of multidisciplinary engineering that not only requires knowledge about different technical areas, but also insight into how to combine technologies optimally, to design efficient products and systems.This paper addresses the group project based and problem-oriented learning...... approach in relation to a mechatronic education, which makes it possible for the student to get in-depth skills in the area of mechatronics very fast. The trends and applications of mechatronic engineering and research are illustrated. Control engineering plays a central role in this context, where...... the well established methods from control engineering form very powerful techniques in both analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems. The necessary skills for mechatronic engineers are outlined followed up by a discussion on how problem oriented project based learning is implemented. A complete...

  12. Mechatronic Control Engineering: A Problem Oriented And Project Based Learning Curriculum In Mechatronic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    Mechatronics is a field of multidisciplinary engineering that not only requires knowledge about different technical areas, but also insight into how to combine technologies optimally, to design efficient products and systems.This paper addresses the group project based and problem-oriented learning...... approach in relation to a mechatronic education, which makes it possible for the student to get in-depth skills in the area of mechatronics very fast. The trends and applications of mechatronic engineering and research are illustrated. Control engineering plays a central role in this context, where...... the well established methods from control engineering form very powerful techniques in both analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems. The necessary skills for mechatronic engineers are outlined followed up by a discussion on how problem oriented project based learning is implemented. A complete...

  13. Evolution of curriculum systems to improve learning outcomes and reduce disparities in school achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.K. Altinyelken

    2015-01-01

    Based on an extensive review of scholarly literature, this paper seeks to overview curriculum reforms aimed at improving learning outcomes and reduce disparities in school achievement in low and middle income countries in the past 15 years. The paper focuses on four major curriculum areas, including

  14. Structuring a Clinical Learning Environment for a Hybrid-PBL Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, M. A. J.; Walton, Joanne N.; Clark, D. Christopher; Tobias, David L.; Harrison, Rosamund L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the evolution and implementation of a joint medical-dental problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum at the University of British Columbia's medical and dental schools, featuring development of an integrated care clinic. Issues in structuring the new curriculum are discussed, including management of the clinic's group practices, affective…

  15. Concept-Based Curriculum: Changing Attitudes and Overcoming Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan M; Wangerin, Virginia

    Many nursing educators have considered the implementation of a concept-based curriculum, with active, conceptual teaching and learning strategies, which offers a way to respond to the overwhelming content saturation in many nursing curricula. However, barriers abound, including faculty concerns about loss of control, changing faculty role and identity, and fear of failure. This article clarifies these legitimate barriers and offers practical strategies for success in curriculum change.

  16. 工作场所学习课程开发的理论解读--基于比利特的思想%Theoretical Interpretation of the Workplace Learning Curriculum Development---Based on the Idea of Billett

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘嘉俊; 胡巧真

    2015-01-01

    Workplace curriculum as a natural curriculum is a situational curriculum .T he theory of Billett’s workplace learning curriculum development describes the theoretical framework of the course based on the access activities and guide .This article attempts to interpret the ideas of Billett’s workplace learning curriculm from the philosophical foundation of workplace learning curriculum development , guiding principle ,development process interpretation and the course of the legitimacy .%工作场所学习课程作为一种自然而然产生的课程,是一种情境课程。比利特工作场所学习课程开发理论描述了基于活动访问和指导双重原则下工作场所学习课程的理论框架。本文试图从工作场所学习课程开发的哲学基础、指导原则、开发流程及课程的合法性等方面,对比利特的工作场所学习课程思想进行解读。

  17. School-Based Curriculum Development in Scotland: Curriculum Policy and Enactment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark; Minty, Sarah; Eager, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent worldwide trends in curriculum policy have re-emphasised the role of teachers in school-based curriculum development. Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence is typical of these trends, stressing that teachers are agents of change. This paper draws upon empirical data to explore school-based curriculum development in response to Curriculum for…

  18. School-Based Curriculum Development in Scotland: Curriculum Policy and Enactment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark; Minty, Sarah; Eager, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent worldwide trends in curriculum policy have re-emphasised the role of teachers in school-based curriculum development. Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence is typical of these trends, stressing that teachers are agents of change. This paper draws upon empirical data to explore school-based curriculum development in response to Curriculum for…

  19. PLA-Based Curriculum: Humanistic Model of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova-Gonci, Viktoria; Tobol, Amy Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The authors believe that there is no inherent academic validity or lack of thereof in the notion of prior learning assessment (PLA)-based curriculum. If mishandled, it can become the tool for carrying out diploma mill practices. Conversely, if implemented and facilitated appropriately, PLA-based curricula can offer humanistic educational values…

  20. Use of a Virtual Learning Platform for Distance-Based Simulation in an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Margaret; Xu, Shu; Rushton, Sharron; Smallheer, Benjamin A; Williams, Denise; Amarasekara, Sathya; Oermann, Marilyn H

    Acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) programs that use high-fidelity simulation as a teaching tool need to consider innovative strategies to provide distance-based students with learning experiences that are comparable to those in a simulation laboratory. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of virtual simulations in a distance-based ACNP program and student performance in the simulations. Virtual simulations using iSimulate were integrated into the ACNP course to promote the translation of content into a clinical context and enable students to develop their knowledge and decision-making skills. With these simulations, students worked as a team, even though they were at different sites from each other and from the faculty, to manage care of an acutely ill patient. The students were assigned to simulation groups of 4 students each. One week before the simulation, they reviewed past medical records. The virtual simulation sessions were recorded and then evaluated. The evaluation tools assessed 8 areas of performance and included key behaviors in each of these areas to be performed by students in the simulation. More than 80% of the student groups performed the key behaviors. Virtual simulations provide a learning platform that allows live interaction between students and faculty, at a distance, and application of content to clinical situations. With simulation, learners have an opportunity to practice assessment and decision-making in emergency and high-risk situations. Simulations not only are valuable for student learning but also provide a nonthreatening environment for staff to practice, receive feedback on their skills, and improve their confidence.

  1. The role of project-based learning in the "Political and social sciences of the environment" curriculum at Nijmegen University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leroy, P.; Bosch, van den H.; Ligthart, S.S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Since the end of 1996, teachers at the Faculty of Policy Sciences at Nijmegen University, The Netherlands, have been working on a new educational programme called "Political and Social Sciences of the Environment" (PSSE). In fact, the PSSE curriculum builds on the Environmental Policy Sciences

  2. The Innovative Immersion of Mobile Learning into a Science Curriculum in Singapore: an Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wu, Longkai; Xie, Wenting

    2016-08-01

    With advancements made in mobile technology, increasing emphasis has been paid to how to leverage the affordances of mobile technology to improve science learning and instruction. This paper reports on a science curriculum supported by an inquiry-based framework and mobile technologies. It was developed by teachers and researchers in a multiyear program of school-based research. The foci of this paper is on the design principles of the curriculum and its enactment, and the establishment of a teacher learning community. Through elucidating the design features of the innovative curriculum and evaluating teacher and student involvement in science instruction and learning, we introduce the science curriculum, called Mobilized 5E Science Curriculum (M5ESC), and present a representative case study of how one experienced teacher and her class adopted the curriculum. The findings indicate the intervention promoted this teacher's questioning competency, enabled her to interact with students frequently and flexibly in class, and supported her technology use for promoting different levels of cognition. Student learning was also improved in terms of test achievement and activity performance in and out of the classroom. We propose that the study can be used to guide the learning design of mobile technology-supported curricula, as well as teacher professional development for curriculum enactment.

  3. Improving Curriculum through Blended Learning Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojat DAROJAT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a study of blended learning pedagogy in open and distance learning (ODL, involving two universities in Southeast Asia, STOU Thailand and UT Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to understand the issues related to the implementation of blended-learning pedagogy. Existing theories in Distance education (DE specifically interaction and communication theory proposed by Holmberg (1995, autonomy and independence theory based on the work Wedemeyer (1981 and Moore (1994 and community of inquiry (CoI model contributed by Garrison, Anderson, and Archer (2000 are detected to provide a general picture on how practices in teaching-learning provisions and DE theories may inform each other. Qualitative case study was employed to optimize my understanding of the blended learning phenomena gathered through semi-structured interview and documentary analysis. Whilst they operated in different educational settings, these two universities shared similarities. They have developed blended learning pedagogy to promote students’ learning classified into three dimensions: printed learning materials, F2F sessions, and online learning. Printed materials, however, may be identified as a major one and online learning have been regarded as strategic policies for further development. They have been equipped with their VLE; the use of VLE helped these universities to provide two-way traffic communications. They have been involved in developing internet-based instruction to widening access and to meet challenges for better future.

  4. Nurse Educator Pathway Project: a competency-based intersectoral curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; Frost, Linda J; Bigl, Julie; Clauson, Marion; McRae, Cora; Scarborough, Kathy S; Murphy, Sue; Jillings, Carol; Gillespie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we begin by providing an overview of the Educator Pathway Project (EPP), an education infrastructure that was developed in response to emerging critical nursing workplace issues, and the related demand for enhanced workplace education. We then describe the EPP competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nurses as preceptors, mentors, and educators to lead learning with diverse learner groups. This competency-based curriculum was developed through a collaboration of nurse leaders across practice, academic, and union sectors and drew from a widely embraced curriculum development model (Iwasiw, Goldenberg, & Andrusyzyn, 2005). The goal of the curriculum was to prepare nurses through a four-level career pathway model that contextualized practice and education theory to various education-related roles and levels of experience within the practice setting. Over 1,100 nurses participated in this innovative intersectoral nursing initiative.

  5. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Adaptation of Science Curriculum Materials for Inquiry-Based Elementary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cory T.

    2011-01-01

    Curriculum materials are important resources with which teachers make pedagogical decisions about the design of science learning environments. To become well-started beginning elementary teachers capable of engaging their students in inquiry-based science, preservice elementary teachers need to learn to use science curriculum materials…

  6. Casecube : An internet-based, intercultural, interprofessional master's curriculum Biomedical Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W M; Verkerke, G J

    2011-01-01

    An internet-based, intercultural and interprofessional 2 years Master's curriculum Biomedical Engineering was developed by a joint effort of 3 Asian and 3 European Universities. The curriculum consists of a mixture of face-to-face and e-learning courses ('blended learning') and was developed and tau

  7. Designing a Learning Curriculum and Technology's Role in It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sue; Scott, Logan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the design and implementation of a master's level research course. Factors that defined the curriculum design problem included the subject matter, a view of learning as a change in identity, and the role of technology in curriculum design. Both the design process and results of research on the implementation of…

  8. A Sexual Learning Curriculum for Parents of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kathryn F.; And Others

    The aims of this sexual learning curriculum are to increase parents' emotional and intellectual understanding of human sexuality and to improve their ability to talk about sexuality with their children. Specifically, the curriculum attempts to increase parents' awareness that (1) sexuality includes lifestyle choices, body image, gender role,…

  9. Transformative Learning through Internationalization of the Curriculum in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Valerie; Montgomery, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, universities have, almost universally, adopted the mantra of internationalization. However, the implications of internationalization for transformative learning through curriculum receive little consideration. This article draws on data from a fully online course entitled "Internationalizing the Curriculum for All…

  10. An Ebonics-Based Curriculum: The Educational Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Arnetha F.; Williams, Jilo; Cooks, Jamal

    1997-01-01

    Examines issues in introduction of an ebonics-based curriculum in public schools in response to the crisis in academic achievement of African American students. Outlines the cultural role of African American Vernacular English, concerns about learning levels of students not proficient in Standard English, and implications for supporting diversity…

  11. Competency Based Curriculum for Clothing Services and Production Sewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Charlotte

    Designed to meet individual needs and learning levels of high school and postsecondary students enrolled in vocational training for occupations in clothing services and production sewing, this competency-based curriculum teaches skills in alterations, dressmaking, and power sewing machine operations. Skills are organized into 13 units: Awareness…

  12. Curriculum Design Requirements and Challenges of the Learning Society Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sedighe; Nasr, Ahmad-Reza; Sharif, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Entering the twenty-first century with the development of communities, they are faced with the necessity of moving towards a learning society. University must extend the learning opportunities and improve the quality of them with curriculum design by learning society approach to respond to the necessity. Researchers believe that some conditions…

  13. Impact of Project-Based Curriculum Materials on Student Learning in Science: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher J.; Penuel, William R.; D'Angelo, Cynthia M.; DeBarger, Angela Haydel; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Kennedy, Cathleen A.; Cheng, Britte Haugen; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    The "Framework for K-12 Science Education" (National Research Council, 2012) sets an ambitious vision for science learning by emphasizing that for students to achieve proficiency in science they will need to participate in the authentic practices of scientists. To realize this vision, all students will need opportunities to learn from…

  14. Teachers' Concerns about Adopting Constructivist Online Game-Based Learning in Formal Curriculum Teaching: The VISOLE Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Morris S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Our work is set against the backdrop of the pervasive discussion of harnessing online games to provide students with new constructivist learning opportunities. Upon the theoretical foundation, we have developed Virtual Interactive Student-Oriented Learning Environment (VISOLE), a teaching framework for implementing constructivist online game-based…

  15. Does Curriculum 2005 promote successful learning of elementary algebra?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelis Vermeulen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews literature, previous to the development of Curriculum 2005, describing possible causes and solutions for learners’ poor performance in algebra. It then analyses the Revised National Curriculum Statement for Mathematics in an attempt to determine whether it addresses these causes and suggested solutions. This analysis finds that the curriculum to a large extent does address them, but that some are either not addressed, or addressed only implicitly. Consequently, Curriculum 2005 may only partly promote successful learning of elementary algebra.

  16. Veterinary public health in a problem-based learning curriculum at the Western University of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peggy L; Trevejo, Rosalie T; Tkalcic, Suzana

    2008-01-01

    As detailed in the Association of Schools of Public Health / Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges 2007 Joint Symposium on Veterinary Public Health, veterinary public health (VPH) can no longer be viewed as a unique sub-specialty of veterinary medicine. Rather, its practice pervades nearly every aspect of the veterinary profession, regardless of whether the practitioner is engaged in small-animal, large-animal, research, corporate, or military practice. In congruence with the practice of VPH, the teaching of VPH should also pervade nearly every aspect of veterinary education. Accordingly, at Western University of Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine (WU-CVM), public health is not simply taught as an individual course but, rather, is interwoven into almost every aspect of the curriculum, continually emphasizing the relevance of this discipline to the practice of veterinary medicine. This article outlines the teaching philosophy of WU-CVM, provides an overview of the curriculum, and describes the integral nature of public health throughout all four years of the educational program.

  17. An Exploration of Teacher Learning from an Educative Reform-Oriented Science Curriculum: Case Studies of Teacher Curriculum Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Bujosa, Lisa M.; McNeill, Katherine L.; González-Howard, María; Loper, Suzanna

    2017-01-01

    Educative curriculum materials provide teachers with authentic opportunities to learn new skills and practices. Yet, research shows teachers use curriculum in different ways for different reasons, and these modifications could undermine the learning goals of the curriculum. Little research, however, has examined the variation in teacher use of…

  18. An Exploration of Teacher Learning from an Educative Reform-Oriented Science Curriculum: Case Studies of Teacher Curriculum Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Bujosa, Lisa M.; McNeill, Katherine L.; González-Howard, María; Loper, Suzanna

    2017-01-01

    Educative curriculum materials provide teachers with authentic opportunities to learn new skills and practices. Yet, research shows teachers use curriculum in different ways for different reasons, and these modifications could undermine the learning goals of the curriculum. Little research, however, has examined the variation in teacher use of…

  19. Merging curriculum design with chemical epistemology: A case of teaching and learning chemistry through modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel

    The central problem underlying this dissertation is the design of learning environments that enable the teaching and learning of chemistry through modeling. Significant role of models in chemistry knowledge is highlighted with a shift in emphasis from conceptual to epistemological accounts of models. Research context is the design and implementation of student centered Acids & Bases Curriculum, developed as part of Project SEPIA. Qualitative study focused on 3 curriculum activities conducted in one 7th grade class of 19 students in an urban, public middle school in eastern United States. Questions guiding the study were: (a) How can learning environments be designed to promote growth of chemistry knowledge through modeling? (b) What epistemological criteria facilitate learning of growth of chemistry knowledge through modeling? Curriculum materials, and verbal data from whole class conversations and student group interviews were analyzed. Group interviews consisted of same 4 students, selected randomly before curriculum implementation, and were conducted following each activity to investigate students' developing understandings of models. Theoretical categories concerning definition, properties and kinds of models as well as educational and chemical models informed curriculum design, and were redefined as codes in the analysis of verbal data. Results indicate more diversity of codes in student than teacher talk across all activities. Teacher concentrated on educational and chemical models. A significant finding is that model properties such as 'compositionality' and 'projectability' were not present in teacher talk as expected by curriculum design. Students did make reference to model properties. Another finding is that students demonstrate an understanding of models characterized by the seventeenth century Lemery model of acids and bases. Two students' developing understandings of models across curriculum implementation suggest that curriculum bears some change in

  20. A curriculum-based approach for feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavala, Deepthi; Bhagvati, Chakravarthy

    2017-06-01

    Curriculum learning is a learning technique in which a classifier learns from easy samples first and then from increasingly difficult samples. On similar lines, a curriculum based feature selection framework is proposed for identifying most useful features in a dataset. Given a dataset, first, easy and difficult samples are identified. In general, the number of easy samples is assumed larger than difficult samples. Then, feature selection is done in two stages. In the first stage a fast feature selection method which gives feature scores is used. Feature scores are then updated incrementally with the set of difficult samples. The existing feature selection methods are not incremental in nature; entire data needs to be used in feature selection. The use of curriculum learning is expected to decrease the time needed for feature selection with classification accuracy comparable to the existing methods. Curriculum learning also allows incremental refinements in feature selection as new training samples become available. Our experiments on a number of standard datasets demonstrate that feature selection is indeed faster without sacrificing classification accuracy.

  1. A curriculum framework based on archetypal phenomena and technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrowski, Bernie

    2002-07-01

    The current crop of published curriculum materials for elementary and middle school makes various claims about their relevancy to the student and their alignment with national standards. Although it may appear that they show improvement in their pedagogical practices and use of recent research, it is argued that they still are founded on questionable assumptions about student learning. The general approach of these curriculum programs is examined in relationship to issues such as the context of learning, the relationship between domain general and domain specific knowledge, and the essential role that aesthetics and personal frameworks play in conceptual change. An alternative paradigm of curriculum development is presented based on the theory of situated cognition. This approach starts with context rather than concept, gives greater weight to students' interpretative frameworks, and provides for a more holistic development. A grade 1-8 framework is presented having archetypal phenomena and technologies as the focus of investigations.

  2. 'Discovery learning': an account of rapid curriculum change in response to accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J; Paslawski, T; Kearney, R

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of leaders responsible for making rapid changes to a medical school curriculum in response to an adverse accreditation report. The new curriculum was based on the principles of problem-based learning ('Discovery Learning'), with changes to the way that students were assessed. We conducted semi-structured interviews with leaders responsible for education at the school two and a half years after the adoption of the new curriculum. We coded the resulting transcripts to identify major and minor themes expressed by participants. Thirty-five senior leaders, administrators and course directors were invited for the interview; 14 (40%) were interviewed. Five main themes were noted in the data: (1) organization and control of the curriculum; (2) changes in the practices of teaching and learning; (3) effects on faculty members; (4) sources of resistance and (5) attitudes to curriculum change in general. This study demonstrates that major curriculum change can be achieved successfully in a short period of time. This study also illustrates some of the problems associated with making rapid changes to the medical school curriculum, and highlights the importance of attitudes to change amongst the leadership of a medical school.

  3. Formative Evaluation of EFNEP Curriculum: Ensuring the Eating Smart • Being Active Curriculum Is Theory Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natker, Elana; Baker, Susan S.; Auld, Garry; McGirr, Kathryn; Sutherland, Barbara; Cason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here served to assess a curriculum for EFNEP to ensure theory compliance and content validity. Adherence to Adult Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory tenets was determined. A curriculum assessment tool was developed and used by five reviewers to assess initial and revised versions of the curriculum. T-tests for…

  4. Formative Evaluation of EFNEP Curriculum: Ensuring the Eating Smart • Being Active Curriculum Is Theory Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natker, Elana; Baker, Susan S.; Auld, Garry; McGirr, Kathryn; Sutherland, Barbara; Cason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here served to assess a curriculum for EFNEP to ensure theory compliance and content validity. Adherence to Adult Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory tenets was determined. A curriculum assessment tool was developed and used by five reviewers to assess initial and revised versions of the curriculum. T-tests for…

  5. From Theme-Based to Emergent Curriculum: Four Teachers Change and Learn about Themselves, the Children, and Authentic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashin, Diane

    2011-01-01

    For those who are tired of old images and practices, Malaguzzi suggests that there is time for mistakes to be corrected. New paths of practice can be forged by being willing to consider another way of teaching and learning with young children. And as with any change in professional practice, teachers face cognitive dissonance when they try to…

  6. Learning material in compliance with the Revised National Curriculum Statement: A dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertus van Etten

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the challenges confronting a developer of mathematics learning material according to the Revised National Curriculum Statement of South Africa. The material development is based on the approach to learning embodied in Realistic Mathematics Education in the Netherlands. It is a real challenge to realise the learning outcomes and assessment standards in the South African curriculum and simultaneously to explore learners’ informal strategies to come up with their ‘own’ solutions to practical problems and thus to experience mathematics as real, relevant and enjoyable.

  7. 基于E—leaning的体育课程网络化教学改革%Sports Network Curriculum Teaching Reform Based on E- learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘怀金

    2012-01-01

    E -learning can optimize the educational resource, improve learning efficiency and reduce the cost of learning. For the physical education curriculum teaching, the flexible teaching method can solve the contradiction of learning and training, and facilitate students autonomous learning. Learning process record is convenient, teaching management and curriculum resources are effectively and timely updated. It is not only convenient for teaching management, but also creates the conditions for distance education. E - learning network across the cam- pus space constraints, and provide learners with a new learning environment, shorten the distance between schools and learners, and make school education to the wider region of radiation. With the help of E - leaning sports cour- ses and network curriculum integration, the developing distance education contributes to the existing sports courses and network course in sustainable development, and is favor of physical education resources sharing. It is the important way of future school physical education and lifelong physical education.%E—leaning可以优化教育资源、提高学习效率、降低学习成本,对于体育课程教学而言,其灵活便捷的教学方式能够解决“学训矛盾”,方便学生自主学习。学习过程记录方便、教学管理和课程资源及时有效的更新,既方便了教学管理,也为体育远程教育创造了条件。E—leaning借助网络跨越了校园空间的限制,给学习者提供了一个全新的学习环境,促使了学校与学习者之间距离的缩短,让学校教育向更广泛的地区辐射。借助E—leaning进行体育精品课程和网络课程整合,开展体育远程教育有助于现有体育精品课程和网络课程的可持续发展,有利于体育教育资源共享,是未来学校体育教育和终身体育教育的重要途径。

  8. Innovative Conference Curriculum: Maximizing Learning and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nancy; Kranzow, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the potential of an innovative curriculum to move 73 graduate students toward professional development. The curriculum was grounded in the professional conference and utilized the motivation and expertise of conference presenters. This innovation required students to be more independent, act as a critical…

  9. Therapeutic Recreation Education: Guidelines for a Competency-Based Entry-Level Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jerry D.; And Others

    The book contains guidelines for a competency-based entry-level curriculum in therapeutic recreation. An introductory session discusses the rationale for and process of developing a competency-based curriculum. Suggested learning activities and performance criteria are listed for each objective in the following 10 modules: philosophical and…

  10. Retention of Statistical Concepts in a Preliminary Randomization-Based Introductory Statistics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintle, Nathan; Topliff, Kylie; VanderStoep, Jill; Holmes, Vicki-Lynn; Swanson, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggests that a randomization-based introductory statistics course may improve student learning compared to the consensus curriculum. However, it is unclear whether these gains are retained by students post-course. We compared the conceptual understanding of a cohort of students who took a randomization-based curriculum (n = 76)…

  11. Improving Information Technology Curriculum Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick L Anderson

    2017-06-01

    The case study research methodology has been selected to conduct the inquiry into this phenomenon. This empirical inquiry facilitates exploration of a contemporary phenomenon in depth within its real-life context using a variety of data sources. The subject of analysis will be two Information Technology classes composed of a combination of second year and third year students; both classes have six students, the same six students. Contribution It is the purpose of this research to show that the use of improved approaches to learning will produce more desirable learning outcomes. Findings The results of this inquiry clearly show that the use of the traditional behaviorist based pedagogic model to achieve college and university IT program learning outcomes is not as effective as a more constructivist based andragogic model. Recommendations Instruction based purely on either of these does a disservice to the typical college and university level learner. The correct approach lies somewhere in between them; the most successful outcome attainment would be the product of incorporating the best of both. Impact on Society Instructional strategies produce learning outcomes; learning outcomes demonstrate what knowledge has been acquired. Acquired knowledge is used by students as they pursue professional careers and other ventures in life. Future Research Learning and teaching approaches are not “one-size-fits-all” propositions; different strategies are appropriate for different circumstances and situations. Additional research should seek to introduce vehicles that will move learners away from one the traditional methodology that has been used throughout much of their educational careers to an approach that is better suited to equip them with the skills necessary to meet the challenges awaiting them in the professional world.

  12. Curriculum reformation of e-commerce based on MOOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with emerging problems in the teaching process of e-commerce course, such as unitary teaching method, obsolete teaching content, weak practicality, unitary test measurement, and so on, this paper proposes the curriculum reformation of e-commerce based on MOOC to deal with the current e-commerce teaching difficulties that exist. By MOOC mode applications, as well as pilots in the usual teaching classroom, this paper gives the reform program of e-commerce courses and designs many other aspects, such as the refine-ment of curriculum teaching design, enhanced multi-interactive, process-oriented evaluation mode. Through the pilot, some certain results have achieved. The curriculum reformation of e-commerce based on MOOC has pro-moted students to learn effectively, and improve the teaching quality of e-commerce knowledge of the course, to a certain extent.

  13. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin Linda; Singh Mamta; Bateman Betzi L; Glover Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and...

  14. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) at four medical faculties. Part I: Conducive resources and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria; Giesler, Marianne; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Narciss, Elisabeth; Wosnik, Annette; Zipfel, Stephan; Griewatz, Jan; Fritze, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Objective: After passing of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, [NKLM, retrieved on 22.03.2016]), the German medical faculties must take inventory and develop their curricula. NKLM contents are expected to be present, but not linked well or sensibly enough in locally grown curricula. Learning and examination formats must be reviewed for appropriateness and coverage of the competences. The necessary curricular transparency is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping, combined with effective change management. Mapping a complex existing curriculum and convincing a faculty that this will have benefits is not easy. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen take inventory by mapping their curricula in comparison to the NKLM, using the dedicated web-based MERLIN-database. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping could be successful in spite of resistance at the faculties. The target is conveying the widest possible overview of beneficial framework conditions, strategies and results. Part I of the article shows the beneficial resources and structures required for implementation of curriculum mapping at the faculties. Part II describes key factors relevant for motivating faculties and teachers during the mapping process. Method: The network project was systematically planned in advance according to steps of project and change management, regularly reflected on and adjusted together in workshops and semi-annual project meetings. From the beginning of the project, a grounded-theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on structures, measures and developments at the faculties using various sources and methods, to continually analyse them and to draw a final conclusion (sources: surveys among the project participants with questionnaires, semi-structured group interviews and

  15. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM at four medical faculties. Part I: Conducive resources and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: After passing of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, [, retrieved on 22.03.2016], the German medical faculties must take inventory and develop their curricula. NKLM contents are expected to be present, but not linked well or sensibly enough in locally grown curricula. Learning and examination formats must be reviewed for appropriateness and coverage of the competences. The necessary curricular transparency is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping, combined with effective change management. Mapping a complex existing curriculum and convincing a faculty that this will have benefits is not easy. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen take inventory by mapping their curricula in comparison to the NKLM, using the dedicated web-based MER-database. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping could be successful in spite of resistance at the faculties. The target is conveying the widest possible overview of beneficial framework conditions, strategies and results. Part I of the article shows the beneficial resources and structures required for implementation of curriculum mapping at the faculties. Part II describes key factors relevant for motivating faculties and teachers during the mapping process.Method: The network project was systematically planned in advance according to steps of project and change management, regularly reflected on and adjusted together in workshops and semi-annual project meetings. From the beginning of the project, a grounded-theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on structures, measures and developments at the faculties using various sources and methods, to continually analyse them and to draw a final conclusion (sources: surveys among the project participants with questionnaires, semi-structured group interviews

  16. Implementing a modified team-based learning strategy in the first phase of an outcome-based curriculum--challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuwa, Ibrahim M; Al-Rawahy, Maimouna; Roychoudhry, Sadhana; Taranikanti, Varna

    2012-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an innovative form of collaborative learning. The aim of TBL is to create a motivational context in which students become accountable for their learning. Student attendance at didactic lecture sessions in our school is usually poor. A modified TBL approach in lieu of lectures was undertaken for the first time in a large class (150 students). This communication reports on the challenges of its implementation in our setting and preliminary data on its effects on student performance. Using computer-based evaluation followed by an in-class activity, a modified TBL approach was implemented over two semesters during an introductory basic science course. Data on student performance, student motivation and faculty reflection were collected and analysed. This strategy had significantly enhanced students' class attendance. They performed better on the built-in TBL assessment (IRAT) compared to standard in-course tests. Besides content mastery, TBL approach could also instill useful attitudinal outcomes such as self-directed learning. The TBL strategy is a viable and refreshing alternative to the usual didactic faculty engagement with the teaching process. Students appear to do better in tests built-in within TBL as compared to stand-alone in-course tests.

  17. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  18. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Linda Orkin; Singh, Mamta; Bateman, Betzi L; Glover, Pamela Bligh

    2009-06-10

    Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at (http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum). Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  19. Intelligent Web-Based Learning System with Personalized Learning Path Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Personalized curriculum sequencing is an important research issue for web-based learning systems because no fixed learning paths will be appropriate for all learners. Therefore, many researchers focused on developing e-learning systems with personalized learning mechanisms to assist on-line web-based learning and adaptively provide learning paths…

  20. Dissemination of an innovative mastery learning curriculum grounded in implementation science principles: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Kristopaitis, Theresa; Wayne, Diane B

    2015-11-01

    Dissemination of a medical education innovation, such as mastery learning, from a setting where it has been used successfully to a new and different medical education environment is not easy. This article describes the uneven yet successful dissemination of a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum on central venous catheter (CVC) insertion for internal medicine and emergency medicine residents across medical education settings. The dissemination program was grounded in implementation science principles. The article begins by describing implementation science which addresses the mechanisms of medical education and health care delivery. The authors then present a mastery learning case study in two phases: (1) the development, implementation, and evaluation of the SBML CVC curriculum at a tertiary care academic medical center; and (2) the dissemination of the SBML CVC curriculum to an academic community hospital setting. Contextual information about the drivers and barriers that affected the SBML CVC curriculum dissemination is presented. This work demonstrates that dissemination of mastery learning curricula, like all other medical education innovations, will fail without active educational leadership, personal contacts, dedication, hard work, rigorous measurement, and attention to implementation science principles. The article concludes by presenting a set of lessons learned about disseminating an SBML CVC curriculum across different medical education settings.

  1. An Efficacy Trial of Research-Based Curriculum Materials with Curriculum-Based Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph A.; Getty, Stephen R.; Kowalski, Susan M.; Wilson, Christopher D.; Carlson, Janet; Van Scotter, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a curriculum-based intervention for high school science students. Specifically, the intervention was two years of research-based, multidisciplinary curriculum materials for science supported by comprehensive professional development for teachers that focused on those materials. A modest positive effect was…

  2. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Chan, Te-Fu; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Chin, Chi-Chun; Chou, Fan-Hao; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2013-09-01

    Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group). Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA) test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about "interprofessional communication and collaboration" (p = 0.0184). The scores in the mixed group (37.58 ± 3.26) were higher

  3. The ABC's of Adventure-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhr, Paul T.; Sutherland, Sue; Ressler, Jim; Ortiz-Stuhr, Esther M.

    2016-01-01

    Adventure-based learning (ABL) consists of highly structured physical activity with periods of reflection (i.e., debrief) that help promote personal and social development. It can be used as a valid curriculum in physical education to promote intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships. This type of curriculum can also help physical educators…

  4. The Development of Foreign Language Substance Group Curriculum Based on Marzano's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakyam, Jirapan; Kwangsawad, Thoopthong; Sriampai, Pissamai

    2013-01-01

    This study was firstly aimed to develop the Foreign Language Substance Group Curriculum for enhancing students' four English skills required to promote learning in the different areas of subject. It used Marzano's Taxonomy as a framework for curriculum design. To articulate this framework, the study used content-based instruction (CBI)…

  5. Managing School-Based Curriculum Innovations: A Hong Kong Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Edmond H. F.; Wan, Sally W. Y.; Galton, Maurice; Lee, John C. K.

    2010-01-01

    This study was originally designed to explore the impact of a distributed approach to developing curriculum leadership among schoolteachers. Previous papers have focused on reporting evidence of teacher learning in the process of engaging teachers in various types of curriculum decision-making in an innovation project based on interview data. This…

  6. A Strategy for Incorporating Learning Analytics into the Design and Evaluation of a K-12 Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Carlos; Rangel, Virginia Snodgrass; Whitaker, Reid

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a scalable approach for integrating learning analytics into an online K-12 science curriculum. A description of the curriculum and the underlying pedagogical framework is followed by a discussion of the challenges to be tackled as part of this integration. We include examples of data visualization based on teacher usage…

  7. Change in medical students' readiness for self-directed learning after a partially problem-based learning first year curriculum at the KIST medical college in Lalitpur, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, R; Bajracharya, O; Jha, N; Gurung, S B; Ansari, S R; Thapa, H S

    2011-08-01

    Modern medical education and the requirement for lifelong learning place increasing emphasis on self-directed learning. Studies have not been done on readiness for self-directed learning (SDL) among medical students in Nepal. The present study was carried out to (1) measure and compare readiness for SDL among medical students, and (2) note differences in readiness for SDL according to students' personal characteristics at the beginning and end of the first year of the MBBS course for medical students at the KIST Medical College in Nepal. The study was done using the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale. Respondents' agreement with each of forty statements pertinent to self-directed learning readiness using a modified Likert-type scale was noted. The mean total and scores on the subcategories 'self-management', 'desire for learning' and 'self-control' were calculated and compared across subgroups of respondents and in January and August 2010 using appropriate parametric and non-parametric tests (plearning scores from 46.9 to 47.7 and in the self-control scores from 58 to 59 from January to August, but not in other scores. Self-directed learning scores were lower among these Nepalese students than reported elsewhere in the literature. Total scores and self-management scores improved at the end of the first year, but not scores on desire for learning and self-control.

  8. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study.

  9. A Research on the Generative Learning Model Supported by Context-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Fatma Merve; Onen, Aysem Seda

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on the generative learning model which involves context-based learning. Using the generative learning model, we taught the topic of Halogens. This topic is covered in the grade 10 chemistry curriculum using activities which are designed in accordance with the generative learning model supported by context-based learning. The…

  10. Business Game Learning Environment : Design and development of a competency-based distance education business curriculum at the Open University of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    The current approach to learning is based upon an educational system and paradigm that is supplydriven and course-based. In this paradigm, learning is offered in courses whose content, time, place and pace of delivery, method of delivery, and breadth and sequence of instruction are defined and state

  11. Impact of Problem-Based Learning to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirca, Necati

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of National Education of Turkey has decided to give up traditional methods to be used in the classes and to develop a new secondary school curriculum based on Context-Based Learning (CBL) in 2007. This paper discusses integrating Problem-Based Learning (PBL) tasks into the new physics curriculum in Turkey. A brief overview of a…

  12. Analysis of dermatology resident self-reported successful learning styles and implications for core competency curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Erik J; Vogel, Curt A; Reck, Samuel J; Mukesh, Bickol N

    2008-01-01

    There are different teaching styles for delivering competency-based curricula. The education literature suggests that learning is maximized when teaching is delivered in a style preferred by learners. To determine if dermatology residents report learning style preferences aligned with adult learning. Dermatology residents attending an introductory cutaneous biology course completed a learning styles inventory assessing self-reported success in 35 active and passive learning activities. The 35 learning activities were ranked in order of preference by learners. Mean overall ratings for active learning activities were significantly higher than for passive learning activities (P = 0.002). Trends in dermatology resident learning style preferences should be considered during program curriculum development. Programs should integrate a variety of curriculum delivery methods to accommodate various learning styles, with an emphasis on the active learning styles preferred by residents.

  13. Community based curriculum in psychiatric nursing science

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Cur. The purpose of this study is to describe guidelines for a Community Based Curriculum in Psychiatric Nursing Science for a nursing college in KwaZulu Natal. The study consists of 4 phases. To reach the purpose of the study, a situational analysis was done in 3 phases to identify the principles for a Community Based Curriculum in Psychiatric Nursing Science. In Phase I - a document analysis of relevant government policies and legislation was conducted to obtain the principles of menta...

  14. The Innovative Immersion of Mobile Learning into a Science Curriculum in Singapore: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daner; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wu, Longkai; Xie, Wenting

    2016-01-01

    With advancements made in mobile technology, increasing emphasis has been paid to how to leverage the affordances of mobile technology to improve science learning and instruction. This paper reports on a science curriculum supported by an inquiry-based framework and mobile technologies. It was developed by teachers and researchers in a multiyear…

  15. Cooperative Learning and Adaptive Instruction in a Mathematics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwel, Jan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that current research suggests that heterogeneous grouping is preferable. Reports on a study of a new mathematics curriculum using 600 students in 6 Dutch schools. Finds that students in heterogeneous classes taught with cooperative-learning techniques achieved more than students in traditional ability-grouped classrooms. (CFR)

  16. Student Learning and Engagement in the Context of Curriculum Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinegar, Kathleen; Bishop, Penny A.

    2011-01-01

    Although curriculum integration has a long history of myriad models, rarely have those stakeholders most connected to the practice--the students--been consulted about the efficacy of the approach. This study applied a longitudinal, intrinsic case study approach (Stake, 2000) to examine middle school students' perceptions of learning and engagement…

  17. Curriculum Design of a Flipped Classroom to Enhance Haematology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Pauline A.; Jackson, Denise E.; McLaughlin, Patricia M.; O'Malley, Cindy J.

    2016-01-01

    A common trend in higher education is the "flipped" classroom, which facilitates active learning during class. The flipped approach to teaching was instituted in a haematology "major" class and the students' attitudes and preferences for the teaching materials were surveyed. The curriculum design was explicit and involved four…

  18. The Impact of MALL on Task-based Curriculum Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文辉

    2015-01-01

    The following is a research proposal for finding out“what is the impact of MALL on task-based curriculum development”.Ever since late 1960, the emergence of online learning has brought a wave of new MALL.The study aims to provides model of better assess for students to acquire knowledge through MALL.A cross-sectional survey combining both qualitative and quantitative method would be employed to apply a prospective research on the corresponding impact.Expected results of the transformation of student learning performance after the utilization of MALL would lead to the influence of activity theory.

  19. Curriculum Development for Transfer Learning in Dynamic Multiagent Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    16 3.5 Curriculum Construction by non-Expert Humans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.5.1 Language Learning with...select training examples with increasing difficulty tailored to the current ability of the learner , ne- glecting how non-expert humans may design...While learning the target task, the agent estimated the value of known options by maintaining a belief about the target task’s identity with respect to

  20. Active learning: a resident's reflection on the impact of a student-centred curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Jennie J; Kaplan, William E; Macneily, Andrew E

    2009-10-01

    Classic medical education pedagogy typically involves the model of an active teacher and a passive student. There has been a shift in education theory to a more student-centred approach, and this is being reflected in resident education. Concepts, such as "competencies," "curricula" and "objectives," are becoming part of the fabric of the residency training equation. The University of British Columbia Department of Urologic Sciences had previously created a urology residency curriculum for its 15 residents in 2000. This curriculum was based on competencies and objectives outlined by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. In an attempt to address a required change in the formal curriculum, an "accidental" student-centred curriculum emerged. This paper outlines this active learning approach, its benefits and challenges in implementation.

  1. A Service-Learning Curriculum for Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringle, Robert G.; Hatcher, Julie A.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that higher education institutions should provide faculty development opportunities for service-learning that develop a common understanding on campus concerning the nature of service-learning, establish and maintain academic integrity of service-learning; increase faculty confidence in implementing a new pedagogy, and increase the…

  2. Improving Curriculum through Blended Learning Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darojat, Ojat

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a study of blended learning pedagogy in open and distance learning (ODL), involving two universities in Southeast Asia, STOU Thailand and UT Indonesia. The purpose of this study is to understand the issues related to the implementation of blended-learning pedagogy. Qualitative case study was employed to optimize my understanding of…

  3. Integrating Social Emotional Learning into Secondary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    When students are able to cope with, manage and maneuver the social and emotional landscapes of their lives, their ability to learn on all levels improves. Teaching Social / Emotional Learning (SEL), as a component of secondary education, not only increases academic performance, but prepares students to meet the challenges of lifelong learning in…

  4. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group. Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about “interprofessional communication and collaboration” (p = 0.0184. The scores in the mixed group (37

  5. Multi-criteria curriculum-based coursetimetabling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, Martin Josef

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a solution approach for a curriculum-based timetabling problem, a complex planning problem found in many universities. With regard to the true nature of the problem, we treat it as multi-objective optimization problem, trying to balance several aspects that simultaneous have ...

  6. What drives students' self-directed learning in a hybrid PBL curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Mee; Mann, Karen V; Frank, Blye W

    2010-08-01

    Evidence supporting Problem-based learning (PBL) fostering students' self-directed learning (SDL) in hybrid PBL curricula is inconsistent. To explore the influence of PBL in a hybrid curriculum on students' SDL, the authors investigated the following: (1) students' self-assessed SDL ability, (2) students' perceptions of the influence of curricular components on SDL, and (3) the relationships between curricular elements and SDL. The research questions were explored both quantitatively and qualitatively. All year 1 (n = 93) and year 2 (n = 93) students in 2004 were invited to participate. Participants completed a 53-item questionnaire addressing (a) self-assessment of their SDL ability, and (b) perceived influence of individual curriculum elements on individual study and SDL. Student and faculty focus group interviews (FGIs) were conducted. Students rated their SDL skills highly, particularly identifying knowledge deficits, learning skills and strategies, and managing study time. Students thought lectures helped in selecting study topics and learning for the tutorial case. Other components including tutors, unit/case objectives, tests, and tutorial discussions, were seen as influencing what to study and the learning process. No significant difference was observed in the responses between year 1 and 2 students. Among the six curriculum components, tutorial discussion and objectives were weakly correlated with with SDL ability. Findings from students and faculty focus group supported the perceived positive influence of the curriculum on SDL. This study found that students' perceived SDL ability was positively influenced by several components of the hybrid PBL curriculum. However, further investigations are needed for a clearer understanding of the specific effects of the hybrid PBL curriculum on students' SDL.

  7. Implications of accreditation criteria when transforming a traditional nursing curriculum to a competency-based curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Botma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurse educators in a resource-poor country have identified the need to change from content-driven curriculum to a competency-based curriculum. A rapid assessment was done to determine the standing of nursing education in the country. Structured interviews were conducted with educational and administrative staff as well as students at all six nursing schools in Lesotho. Programme design, human resources, teaching and learning, physical resources, and programme accreditation were addressed during the rapid assessment. The results were uniform due to the country being small and four nursing schools forming a consortium. A traditional content-driven three-year diploma programme that renders a single-qualified nurse is being offered. A five-year degree programme in nursing is being offered by the only university in the country. Nursing schools are resource-poor with limited or no external funding sources. Changing to and sustaining a competency-based curriculum will require extensive empowerment of nurse educators. Professional governing bodies should produce supporting rules and regulations.

  8. Complexity Theory and CALL Curriculum in Foreign Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexity theory literally indicates the complexity of a system, behavior, or a process. Its connotative meaning, while, implies dynamism, openness, sensitivity to initial conditions and feedback, and adaptation properties of a system. Regarding English as a Foreign/ Second Language (EFL/ESL this theory emphasizes on the complexity of the process of teaching and learning, including all the properties of a complex system. The purpose of the current study is to discuss the role of CALL as a modern technology in simplifying the process of teaching and learning a new language while integrating into the complexity theory. Nonetheless, the findings obtained from reviewing previously conducted studies in this field confirmed the usefulness of CALL curriculum in EFL/ESL contexts. These findings can also provide pedagogical implications for employing computer as an effective teaching and learning tool. Keywords: Second/foreign language curriculum, CALL, Complexity theory

  9. 基于课程资源的移动虚拟学习社区模型构建研究%Based on the Curriculum Resources of Mobile Virtual Learning Community Model Building Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何显文

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the teaching effect,cultivate students′autonomous learning ability,discusses how to construct a mo-bile virtual learning community curriculum resources based on to the traditional teaching mode,analyzes the framework and function module of mobile virtual learning community,and students to construct learning,autonomous learning and teacher student interaction factors such as design the concept of mobile virtual learning community,the module introduces the construction method of the communi-ty,has an important guiding significance for the realization of the community platform.%为了进一步提高课程的教学效果,培养学生的自主学习能力,探讨如何通过构建基于课程资源的移动虚拟学习社区来辅助传统教学模式,重点分析移动虚拟学习社区的模型框架和功能模块,并将学生建构学习、自主学习和师生交流互动等因素作为移动虚拟学习社区的设计理念,模块化地介绍社区构建方法,对社区平台的实现具有重要的指导意义。

  10. Kahua A'o: A Learning Foundation: Using Hawaiian Language Newspaper Articles for Place and Culture-based Geoscience Teacher Education and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, I.; Stone, K.; Spencer, L.

    2012-12-01

    Kahua A'o is a collaborative project funded by the National Science Foundation aimed at developing science curriculum grounded in Hawaiian culture and place-based education. The project team is composed of members who contribute expertise in meteorology, geology, curriculum development, and Hawaiian language. To date, six lessons have been produced, four with a focus in meteorology and two with a focus in geology. The lessons are geared towards the middle school level, but can easily be adapted for other levels. Each lesson combines a scientific topic with relevant Hawaiian language resources. Serving as the main source for resources is the Hawaiian language newspaper archive, which is an online database of 75,000 pages from newspapers that were published between 1834 and 1948. By incorporating Hawaiian language newspaper articles into science lessons, we aim to teach science through culture and show a history of scientific inquiry intrinsic to Hawaiian culture in order to generate more interest in science among Hawai'i students, especially native Hawaiian students, who are underrepresented in scientific fields. Since most of the articles are specific to the Hawaiian Islands, all students will find more relevance with the lesson through place-based education. Kahua A'o lessons are currently being piloted with groups of public school teachers. Bishop Museum is also incorporating elements of the meteorology lessons into their science education curriculum. The goal of Kahua A'o is to become the first of many such interdisciplinary collaborations, especially those that utilize the rich repository of untapped knowledge in the Hawaiian language newspaper archive.

  11. Reflections on Curriculum Reform in Higher Vocational Colleges Based on Experiential Learning Theory%基于“体验学习”视角的高职课程改革反思

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏振乾; 丁钟复

    2011-01-01

    Suppose the current curriculum reform in higher vocational colleges is a new thing to be learned,the teachers who participate in the reform are learners.Based on the theory of "experiential learning",the paper analyzes the present situations of curriculum reform in higher vocational colleges from the perspectives of curriculum development,implementation and evaluation.It points out the crux of all the problems,and puts forward the countermeasures.%把当前进行的高职课程改革作为一项新事物,将参与课程改革的教师放在学习者的位置,借助"体验学习"理论,对当前高职课程改革在课程开发、课程实施和课程评价三方面现状进行分析,指出了课程改革过程中众多问题的症结所在,并提出了解决问题的思路。

  12. Interdisciplinary research: evaluating writing to learn in the nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, G P

    1995-01-01

    A 3-year collaborative study was conducted by the department head of baccalaureate nursing and the director of writing at a southern university in Louisiana. The research was designed to test the effectiveness of an intense writing-to-learn curriculum intervention incorporated into a required introductory nursing course. Writing-to-learn strategies used in this study were designed to foster personal involvement in the subject matter, improve data comprehension, and encourage critical thinking (Dobie & Poirrier, 1995). The findings reported in this study represent Part III of a 3-year investigation into the effectiveness of using writing-to-learn strategies in freshman nursing classes.

  13. Surgical Practical Skills Learning Curriculum: Implementation and Interns' Confidence Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Danilo; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Garces-Descovich, Alejandro; Watkins, Ammara A; Gupta, Alok; Critchlow, Jonathan F; Kent, Tara S

    2017-08-18

    To provide an overview of the practical skills learning curriculum and assess its effects over time on the surgical interns' perceptions of their technical skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge. An 84-hour practical skills curriculum composed of didactic, simulation, and practical sessions was implemented during the 2015 to 2016 academic year for general surgery interns. Totally, 40% of the sessions were held during orientation, whereas the remainder sessions were held throughout the academic year. Interns' perceptions of their technical skills, administrative tasks, patient management, and knowledge were assessed by the practical skills curriculum residents' perception survey at various time points during their intern year (baseline, midpoint, and final). Interns were also asked to fill out an evaluation survey at the completion of each session to obtain feedback on the curriculum. General Surgery Residency program at a tertiary care academic institution. 20 General Surgery categorical and preliminary interns. Significant differences were found over time in interns' perceptions on their technical skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge (p skills, patient management, administrative tasks, and knowledge (p > 0.05 for all). Implementation of a Practical Skills Curriculum in surgical internships can improve interns' confidence perception on their technical skills, patient management skills, administrative tasks, and knowledge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Curriculum for Evidence Based Medicine for MBBS II phase Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine is the training of health care professionals to access, assess and apply the best scientific evidence to clinical practice. EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence along with clinical expertise and patient values in making decisions about the case of individual patients. The current undergraduate curriculum of health profession is based on past knowledge accumulated for years. The scientific relevance of the mostly outdated information has never been questioned. The students passively absorb this available knowledge and apply it in their future professional life. There is no active learning on their part, by way of positive enquiry and critical analysis of the curriculum imposed on them. This has an undesirable impact on their competency as health professionals and the quality of the health care imparted by them. Hence there is need for emphasis on the teaching of EBM skills in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education programs. Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. The EBM course is planned to introduce in the curriculum of medical undergraduates at the beginning of second phase when they enter clinical posting. Total number of student would be 100 per batch and the course duration will be of 1 year. Educational methods program incorporates multiple teaching methods like lectures, discussion sessions, demonstration, case based learning, timely feedback, real life exposure, role modeling and peer evaluation.

  15. 基于工作过程的《机械设计》学习领域课程开发%Learning Field Curriculum Development of "Mechanical Design" Based on Working Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高英敏; 刘庆华; 路建彩

    2009-01-01

    以"学工一体、校企融合"思想为指导,以培养学生完成整体化工作任务的综合职业能力为着眼点,开发基于工作过程的学习领域课程标准,在开发过程中选择合适的任务载体作为学习性工作任务,依据工作任务设计学习情境,依据不同的学习情境设计教学活动.%Taking the thought of "learning-working integration and school-enterprise integration" as a guide and fostering students" overall professional abilities of completing integrated tasks as standing points, the learning field curriculum standards of "mechanical design" based on working process was developed. In the development process, teachers selected suitable task carrier as learning task, designed learning environment according to working tasks and designed teaching activities according to different learning environment.

  16. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) at four medical faculties. Part II: Key factors for motivating the faculty during the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria; Giesler, Marianne; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Narciss, Elisabeth; Wosnik, Annette; Zipfel, Stephan; Griewatz, Jan; Fritze, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Objective: After adoption of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine [Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, NKLM], the German medical faculties are asked to test the learning obejctives recorded in it and evaluate them critically. The faculties require curricular transparency for competence-oriented transition of present curricula, which is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping in comparison to the NKLM. Based on this inventory, curricula can be further developed target-oriented. Considerable resistance has to be expected when a complex existing curriculum is to be mapped for the first time and a faculty must be convinced of its usefulness. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen rose to this task. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping was successful at the locations despite resistance. Part I presented the resources and structures that supported implementation. Part II focuses on factors that motivate individuals and groups of persons to cooperate in the faculties. Method: Both parts used the same method. In short, the joint project was systematically planned following the steps of project and change management and adjusted in the course of the process. From the beginning of the project, a Grounded-Theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on measures and developments at the faculties, to continually analyse them and to draw final conclusions. Results: At all sites, faculties, teachers, students and administrative staff were not per se willing to deal with the NKLM and its contents, and even less to map their present curricula. Analysis of the development reflected a number of factors that had either a negative effect on the willingness to cooperate when missing, or a positive one when present. These were: clear top-down and bottom-up management; continuous information of the faculty; user

  17. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) at four medical faculties. Part II: Key factors for motivating the faculty during the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria; Giesler, Marianne; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Narciss, Elisabeth; Wosnik, Annette; Zipfel, Stephan; Griewatz, Jan; Fritze, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Objective: After adoption of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine [Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, NKLM], the German medical faculties are asked to test the learning obejctives recorded in it and evaluate them critically. The faculties require curricular transparency for competence-oriented transition of present curricula, which is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping in comparison to the NKLM. Based on this inventory, curricula can be further developed target-oriented. Considerable resistance has to be expected when a complex existing curriculum is to be mapped for the first time and a faculty must be convinced of its usefulness. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen rose to this task. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping was successful at the locations despite resistance. Part I presented the resources and structures that supported implementation. Part II focuses on factors that motivate individuals and groups of persons to cooperate in the faculties. Method: Both parts used the same method. In short, the joint project was systematically planned following the steps of project and change management and adjusted in the course of the process. From the beginning of the project, a Grounded-Theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on measures and developments at the faculties, to continually analyse them and to draw final conclusions. Results: At all sites, faculties, teachers, students and administrative staff were not per se willing to deal with the NKLM and its contents, and even less to map their present curricula. Analysis of the development reflected a number of factors that had either a negative effect on the willingness to cooperate when missing, or a positive one when present. These were: clear top-down and bottom-up management; continuous information of the faculty; user

  18. A New Project-Based Curriculum of Design Thinking with Systems Engineering Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haruyama, S.; Kim, S.K.; Beiter, K.A.; Dijkema, G.P.J.; De Weck, O.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new education curriculum called "ALPS" (Active Learning Project Sequence) at Keio University that emphasizes team project-based learning and design thinking with systems engineering techniques. ALPS is a 6 month course, in which students work as a team and design and propose innovativ

  19. Blended Learning and Curriculum Renewal across Three Medical Schools: The Rheumatology Module at the University of Otago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, Simon; Bagheri, Nasser; Perrie, Kellie; Blyth, Phil; McDonald, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    In response to the challenges created by the implementation of a new medical school curriculum at the University of Otago in 2008, we aimed to develop a blended learning course for teaching rheumatology within the existing musculoskeletal course. We developed a multimedia online learning resource structured to support class based problem-based…

  20. Releasing the power: research led learning in a professional practice undergraduate curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Daws, Michael; Johansen, Eric; Osborne, Allan

    2009-01-01

    There is a challenge for vocational programmes in Higher Education in addressing the needs of a practice based discipline while developing enquiry based abilities in students. Ongoing research is being carried out into the use and suitability of student research-led learning within Built Environment curriculum at Northumbria University. This is aimed at undergraduate professional practice education and its perceived value by staff and students as compared to the use of the more traditional pe...

  1. Global Learning and the School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourn, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The global society of today is one that children and young people are aware of but this has not been fully recognised by education policy-makers despite the efforts and activities of many civil society organisations and the enthusiasm of teachers. Since 2010 in England, a government-sponsored programme, the Global Learning Programme, has been a…

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Music Learning and Mathematics Learning in an Interdisciplinary Pre-K Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonel, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine children's musical and mathematical behaviors as they participated in an interdisciplinary pre-K curriculum. Research questions were: 1. What connections--if any--do young children make between music learning and mathematics learning? 2. Is there a relationship between young children's emergent rhythm…

  3. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  4. A Replicable, Zero-Based Model for Marketing Curriculum Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Norm; Metcalf, Lynn E.; Tietje, Brian C.

    2007-01-01

    As university curriculums inevitably change, their evolution typically occurs through a series of minor incremental adjustments to individual courses that cause the curriculum to lose strategic consistency and focus. This article demonstrates a zero-based approach to marketing curriculum innovation. The authors describe forces of change that led…

  5. Tractor Mechanic--Teacher's Guide. Competency Based Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Edward W.

    This teacher's guide is designed to accompany the Tractor Mechanic Competency Based Education (CBE) Curriculum (CE 022 480). The following information is included: a discussion of the uses of the Tractor Mechanic CBE curriculum; definitions of related terms; the table of contents for the Tractor Mechanic CBE curriculum; a list of competencies by…

  6. The development of a problem-based curriculum in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B G; Quant, V M; Cooke, P

    1998-12-01

    Making use of best available evidence has clearly become an important part of midwifery practice. As educational programmes are preparing the practitioners of the future, it is believed that midwifery education should also be informed by evidence. At Thames Valley University, a BSc Midwifery curriculum, using the principles of problem-based learning, has been implemented following a review of both appropriate research and evaluation. This article explains the process undertaken in preparation for the course as well as the proposed means of ongoing evaluation.

  7. From Essential Learnings to Tasmania's Curriculum: Will this Change Improve Curriculum Reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate initiatives the state government announced in 2006 to review the curriculum and assessments, and enhance capacity building and accountability. The methodology for reviewing states' systemic reform policies devised by Achieve, an organisation based in Washington, DC, was applied to identify issues and…

  8. Managerial Competences in the Field of University Curriculum for Virtual Learning Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Marian BUNĂIAŞU; Ștefan VLĂDUŢESCU; Alexandru Constantin STRUNGĂ

    2014-01-01

    Virtual communities are learning environments that facilitate effective learning, in attractive and flexible ways, facilitated by information and communication technologies. If in traditional instruction, teacher training is focused on developing scientific and didactic skills, in the digital curriculum the emphasis is on managerial skills of facilitating learning and networking within virtual communities. Analysis of managerial skills in the field of digital curriculum involves multidimensio...

  9. Mastery-Based Virtual Reality Robotic Simulation Curriculum: The First Step Toward Operative Robotic Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Melissa E; Tam, Vernissia; Zenati, Mazen; Novak, Stephanie; Miller, Jennifer; Zureikat, Amer H; Zeh, Herbert J

    Hepatobiliary surgery is a highly complex, low-volume specialty with long learning curves necessary to achieve optimal outcomes. This creates significant challenges in both training and measuring surgical proficiency. We hypothesize that a virtual reality curriculum with mastery-based simulation is a valid tool to train fellows toward operative proficiency. This study evaluates the content and predictive validity of robotic simulation curriculum as a first step toward developing a comprehensive, proficiency-based pathway. A mastery-based simulation curriculum was performed in a virtual reality environment. A pretest/posttest experimental design used both virtual reality and inanimate environments to evaluate improvement. Participants self-reported previous robotic experience and assessed the curriculum by rating modules based on difficulty and utility. This study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (Pittsburgh, PA), a tertiary care academic teaching hospital. A total of 17 surgical oncology fellows enrolled in the curriculum, 16 (94%) completed. Of 16 fellows who completed the curriculum, 4 fellows (25%) achieved mastery on all 24 modules; on average, fellows mastered 86% of the modules. Following curriculum completion, individual test scores improved (p < 0.0001). An average of 2.4 attempts was necessary to master each module (range: 1-17). Median time spent completing the curriculum was 4.2 hours (range: 1.1-6.6). Total 8 (50%) fellows continued practicing modules beyond mastery. Survey results show that "needle driving" and "endowrist 2" modules were perceived as most difficult although "needle driving" modules were most useful. Overall, 15 (94%) fellows perceived improvement in robotic skills after completing the curriculum. In a cohort of board-certified general surgeons who are novices in robotic surgery, a mastery-based simulation curriculum demonstrated internal validity with overall score improvement. Time to complete the

  10. A Framework for Curriculum Reform: Re-designing a Curriculum for Self-directed Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Thornton

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to this new SiSAL column, which will examine a long-term project conducted at one institution in depth over several issues. The focus of this column will be the curriculum design project currently being undertaken at the Self-Access Learning Centre (SALC at Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS in Chiba, Japan. In my role as Academic Coordinator of the SALC from 2011-2013, I was in charge of leading this project in its initial stages, before I moved institution. As editor, it is from this perspective, as someone familiar but no longer directly involved in the project, that I hope to collate and introduce a number of columns from the learning advisors and teachers who are conducting the research and designing the new self-directed learning curriculum. In this first installment, a revision of an earlier article which first appeared in the IATEFL Learner Autonomy SIG newsletter, Independence, (Thornton, 2012 I present the background to the project, the framework used to guide it and the results of the first stage, the environment analysis.

  11. 加拿大医学教育中以问题为基础学习体系概览%The overview of problem-based learning curriculum system in Canadian medical education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪青

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the integrated problem-based learning medical curriculum system adopted in McMaster University and the University of British Columbia in Canada were defined and analyzed hoping to offer helpful information or suitable models for medical schools in China.%本文对加拿大东西部2所知名院校医学教育的较为成熟的以问题为基础学习课程体系进行了详细介绍与分析,希望能够为国内正在开展或准备开展以问题为基础学习教学的医学院校提供一些有益的信息或可以借鉴参考的样板.

  12. Development of a global health curriculum for family medicine based on ACGME competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Therese; Solberg, Erik

    2014-01-01

    With the popularity of global health among medical students and residents, family medicine (FM) residencies are developing pathways in global health. Curriculum based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies adds rigor to the efforts. We describe the adaptation of a comprehensive pediatric global health curriculum based on ACGME competencies for family medicine. The curriculum maps out goals, objectives, curricular elements, and evaluation modalities for each of the six competencies (medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, professionalism, communication, and systems-based practice). A literature review, followed by an iterative process, guided the expansion of the pediatric curriculum and the prioritization of domains for FM. Input was sought from FM global health faculty at our 8 residencies, affiliated community faculty, and international health experts from across the United States who attended our workshop at a national FM global health meeting. The final product includes comprehensive competency-based curriculum, open-source resources, and evaluation modalities. The goals and objectives pertinent to all FM residents, and those specific to global health pathway residents and fellows, are outlined. The limiting and enabling factors of the curriculum implementation are presented. This global family medicine curriculum has added structure and rigor to our international electives in the department at the University of Minnesota. The competency-based curriculum is in the early stages of implementation and evaluation. It has already strengthened components of the residency learning experience for all residents. A robust evaluation is needed and requires monitoring pathway graduates and their career choices into the future. The curriculum is available for adoption by other FM residencies.

  13. Lessons learned from curriculum changes and setting curriculum objectives at the University of Pennsylvania's Earth and Environmental Science Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Recent restructuring of the University of Pennsylvania’s curriculum, including a revised multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major and a proposed Environmental Science major has led to several changes, including a mandatory junior research seminar. Feedback from students indicates that a more structured curriculum has helped guide them through the multi-disciplinary Environmental Studies major. The addition of mandatory courses in Statistics, Geographical and Environmental Modeling, as well as Economics and Policy has ensured that students have important skills needed to succeed after graduation. We have compiled a curriculum objective matrix to clarify both the broad and focused objectives of our curriculum and how each course helps to fulfill these objectives. An important aspect of both majors is the Senior Thesis. The junior research seminar was recently revised to help students prepare for their thesis research. Topic selection, library research, data presentation, basic research methods, advisor identification, and funding options are discussed. Throughout the course, faculty from within the department lecture about their research and highlight opportunities for undergraduates. In one assignment, students are given a few types of datasets and asked to present the data and error analysis in various formats using different software (SPSS and Excel). The final paper was a research proposal outlining the student’s Senior Thesis. Based on both the university and instructor written course evaluations, students felt they benefited most from writing their senior thesis proposal; doing assignments on data analysis, library research and critical analysis; and the faculty research lectures. The lessons learned in restructuring this flexible major and providing a research seminar in the junior year may benefit other departments considering such changes.

  14. The integration of blended learning into an occupational therapy curriculum: a qualitative reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Ashton, Paula; Rothberg, Alan; McInerney, Patricia

    2017-08-17

    This paper presents a critical reflection of the integration of Blended Learning (BL) into an undergraduate occupational therapy curriculum which was delivered through Problem Based Learning (PBL). This is a qualitative reflection of a Participatory Action Research (PAR) study using Brookfield's model for critical reflection of an educator's practice. The model uses four 'lenses' through which to focus enquiry: Lens 1) our autobiography as a learner of practice; Lens 2) our learners' eyes; Lens 3) our colleagues' experiences; and Lens 4) the theoretical literature. Grounded theory analysis was applied to the data. The factors that contributed to successful integration of technology and e-Learning into an existing curriculum, the hurdles that were navigated along the way, and how these influenced decisions and innovation are explored. The core categories identified in the data were "drivers of change" and "outcomes of BL integration". Key situations and pivotal events are highlighted for their role in the process that led to the project maturing. Each lens reflects the successes and hurdles experienced during the study. Brookfield's model provides an objective method of reflection which showed that despite the hurdles, e-Learning was successfully integrated into the curriculum.

  15. 基于移动学习的微课程资源建设研究%Research on the construction of micro curriculum resources based on Mobile Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宫展鹏

    2016-01-01

    移动学习这种新的学习方式已经越来越得到人们重视,人们参加移动学习的热情也越来越高,这就为移动学习资源的建设提出了更高的要求,同时也促进了移动学习资源建设的研究工作。本文从微课程的设计原则、微课程的开发与制作、微课程的设计与评价等几个方面,论述了微课程的一般设计方法。%Mobile learning this new way of learning is getting more and more people's attention,people in mobile learning enthusiasm is also getting higher and higher,which is mobile learning resources construction put forward higher requirements,but also to promote the mobile learning resources construction work.This article discusses the general design method of micro curriculum from several aspects,such as the design principle of the micro curriculum, the development and production of the micro curriculum,the design and evaluation of the micro curriculum.

  16. Learning effectiveness and satisfaction of international medical students: Introducing a Hybrid-PBL curriculum in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Lina; Zhang, Wenli

    2017-07-08

    A biochemistry course is a fundamental but important subject in medical education in China. In recent years, the number of international medical students has increased. Curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching is needed because of the knowledge limitations of students, a close linkage of biochemical content with clinics, the shortcomings of lecture-centered teaching, and the requirements for early clinical practice training and competence. In this study, we analyzed a novel curriculum reform, "Hybrid-PBL," which combined problem-based learning (PBL) with biochemistry lectures and was implemented for biochemical teaching at Dalian Medical University (DMU) in China. The change in curriculum affected 189 international medical students. This study selected two PBL cases concerning the basic biochemical issues of carbohydrate metabolism and liver biochemistry for the analysis, and ten examples of learning issues for each case were reported by the international students. A questionnaire was utilized to evaluate students' perceptions of the Hybrid-PBL, and examination scores were analyzed to assess the curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching. A statistical analysis revealed that the Hybrid-PBL curriculum was well accepted by the international students as an effective supplement to lecture-centered teaching programs. The students obtained more abilities, higher examination scores, and an improved understanding of biomedical information from the Hybrid-PBL program than from conventional teaching methods. Our study was an innovative trial that applied a PBL curriculum to the specific discipline of biochemistry and may provide a potential and promising new teaching method that can be widely utilized. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):336-342, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Assessing Vertical Development in Experiential Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Kirsty K.; McDonald, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    For 30 years, management educators have supported competency-based management education (CBME). When applying CBME, educators stimulate students' "lateral development", known as the acquisition of subject-specific knowledge and competencies that deepen their current perceptions and task performance. We contend CBME is necessary but not…

  18. Assessing Vertical Development in Experiential Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Kirsty K.; McDonald, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    For 30 years, management educators have supported competency-based management education (CBME). When applying CBME, educators stimulate students' "lateral development", known as the acquisition of subject-specific knowledge and competencies that deepen their current perceptions and task performance. We contend CBME is necessary but not…

  19. Identifying the elements of physics courses that impact student learning: Curriculum, instructor, peers, and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Emily Lincoln Ashbaugh

    Prior research across hundreds for introductory physics courses has demonstrated that traditional physics instruction does not generally lead to students learning physics concepts in a meaningful way, but that interactive-engagement physics courses do sometimes promote a great deal more student learning. In this work I analyze a reform effort in a large-enrollment, introductory, physics course. I find that evaluating a curriculum in isolation from other influences, such as the instructor implementation and the student population, is problematical. Instead, I propose a model of classroom culture identifying the curriculum, instructor, and student peer group as key components to creating a learning environment. Assessment, a key influence of classroom culture, is considered a product of the instructor/curriculum interaction. All three aspects of the classroom culture have the potential to influence student learning outcomes. I analyze the implementation of two different reformed physics series in terms of classroom culture. In a calculus-based course, I evaluate a new reform-based curriculum for the first and third quarters of instruction. In the first quarter, mechanics, I find that having an instructor teach in alignment with the philosophy of the reformed curriculum is essential, with students of only certain section instructors having improved outcomes over traditional instruction on measures of conceptual understanding. In the electromagnetism quarter of instruction, student outcomes for all reformed sections are higher than those from traditional sections in spite of variations in instructor implementation. The vast range of instructor-student interactions within such a reformed course are analyzed in an observational study, finding that some types of interactions are characteristic of particular instructors, regardless of the content studied that day. An analysis of assessment proposes an alternative grading method that is superior to the traditional grading

  20. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  1. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  2. A Trivium Curriculum for Mathematics Based on Literacy, Matheracy, and Technoracy: An Ethnomathematics Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Milton; Orey, Daniel Clark

    2015-01-01

    In an ethnomathematics-based program there exists the need for teachers to identify pedagogical actions in the form of teaching-learning practices. In this theoretical paper we outline a curriculum proposal based on D'Ambrosio's "Trivium," composed of "literacy," "matheracy," and "technoracy." The Trivium…

  3. toward a curriculum for justice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    profound justice; i.e. justice that is based on reasonableness and, more ... way to conduct a curriculum enquiry, since it acknowledges the crisis of ..... The principle of having a caring curriculum necessitates that we create learning-teaching.

  4. Model Wind Turbine Design in a Project-Based Middle School Engineering Curriculum Built on State Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogger, Steven D.; Miley, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes that project-based active learning is a key part of engineering education at the middle school level. One project from a comprehensive middle school engineering curriculum developed by the authors is described to show how active learning and state frameworks can coexist. The theoretical basis for learning and assessment in a…

  5. A Learning Curriculum: Toward Student-Driven Pedagogy in the Context of Adult English for Academic Purposes, English for Specific Purposes, and Workplace English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of a learning curriculum that places adult English as a second language (ESL) students' needs in the center and encourages the engagement of ESL learners in curriculum design. The study is based on contemporary research in the field of adult ESL program planning. It summarizes key components of a learning…

  6. Graduates from a reformed undergraduate medical curriculum based on Tomorrow's Doctors evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum 6 years after graduation through interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor David CM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1996 Liverpool reformed its medical curriculum from a traditional lecture based course to a curriculum based on the recommendations in Tomorrow's Doctors. A project has been underway since 2000 to evaluate this change. This paper focuses on the views of graduates from that reformed curriculum 6 years after they had graduated. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 45 interviews took place with doctors from the first two cohorts to graduate from the reformed curriculum. Results The interviewees felt like they had been clinically well prepared to work as doctors and in particular had graduated with good clinical and communication skills and had a good knowledge of what the role of doctor entailed. They also felt they had good self directed learning and research skills. They did feel their basic science knowledge level was weaker than traditional graduates and perceived they had to work harder to pass postgraduate exams. Whilst many had enjoyed the curriculum and in particular the clinical skills resource centre and the clinical exposure of the final year including the "shadowing" and A & E attachment they would have liked more "structure" alongside the PBL when learning the basic sciences. Conclusion According to the graduates themselves many of the aims of curriculum reform have been met by the reformed curriculum and they were well prepared clinically to work as doctors. However, further reforms may be needed to give confidence to science knowledge acquisition.

  7. Is a PBL curriculum a better nutrient medium for student-generated learning issues than a PBL island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlhar, K; Wüller, A; Lieverscheidt, H; Fischer, M R; Schäfer, T

    2010-12-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is often introduced in curricula in form of short segments. In the literature the value of these PBL-islands is doubted. In order to gain more insight in this curricular approach, we compared student generated learning issues, from a 7-week PBL-island introduced in a traditional curriculum (PBL-I), with the gold standard of a PBL-based model-curriculum (PBL-B) existing in parallel at the same University (Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany). Both tracks use five identical PBL-cases. Thousand seven hundred and three student-generated learning issues of 252 tutorial groups (193 PBL-I and 59 PBL-B groups with six to seven students per group) were analysed in seven different categories. Results showed that overall there were no substantial differences between both curricula. PBL-B students generated more problem-related and less basic science clinical learning issues than PBL-I students, but in both groups learning issues were related to the same number of different subjects. Furthermore, students in the PBL-curriculum tend to generate little less but slightly better phrased issues. Taken together, we found no substantial evidence with respect to student-generated learning issues that could prove that students cannot work with the PBL-method, even if it is introduced later in the curriculum and last only for a short period of time.

  8. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  9. Why are medical students 'checking out' of active learning in a new curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Casey; Bradley, Elizabeth; Martindale, James; Roy, Paula; Patel, Kunal; Yoon, Michelle; Worden, Mary Kate

    2014-03-01

    The University of Virginia School of Medicine recently transformed its pre-clerkship medical education programme to emphasise student engagement and active learning in the classroom. As in other medical schools, many students are opting out of attending class and others are inattentive while in class. We sought to understand why, especially with a new student-centred curriculum, so many students were still opting to learn on their own outside of class or to disengage from educational activities while in class. Focus groups were conducted with students from two classes who had participated in the new curriculum, which is designed to foster small-group and collaborative learning. The sessions were audio-recorded and then transcribed. The authors read through all of the transcripts and then reviewed them for themes. Quotes were analysed and organised by theme. Interview transcripts revealed candid responses to questions about learning and the learning environment. The semi-structured nature of the interviews enabled the interviewers to probe unanticipated issues (e.g. reasons for choosing to sit with friends although that diminishes learning and attention). A content analysis of these transcripts ultimately identified three major themes embracing multiple sub-themes: (i) learning studio physical space; (ii) interaction patterns among learners, and (iii) the quality of and engagement in learning in the space. Students' reluctance to engage in class activities is not surprising if classroom exercises are passive and not consistently well designed or executed as active learning exercises that students perceive as enhancing their learning through collaboration. Students' comments also suggest that their reluctance to participate regularly in class may be because they have not yet achieved the developmental level compatible with adult and active learning, on which the curriculum is based. Challenges include helping students better understand the nature of deep learning and

  10. Food Marketing: Cashier-Checker. Student Material. Competency Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froelich, Larry; And Others

    This curriculum for food marketing (cashier-checking) is designed to provide entry-level employment skills. It is organized into 13 units which contain one to ten competencies. A student competency sheet provided for each competency is organized into this format: unit and competency number and name, learning steps, learning activities, and…

  11. The role of project-based learning in the “Political and Social Sciences of the Environment” curriculum at Nijmegen University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leroy, P.; Ligthart, S.S.H.; Bosch, H. van den

    2001-01-01

    Since the end of 1996, teachers at the Faculty of Policy Sciences at Nijmegen University, The Netherlands, have been working on a new educational programme called “Political and Social Sciences of the Environment” (PSSE). In fact, the PSSE curriculum builds on the Environmental Policy Sciences

  12. Enhancing Curriculum Acceptance among Students with E-learning 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I; Gandhi, Ankita

    2010-01-01

    E-learning; enhanced by communicating and interacting is becoming increasingly accepted and this puts Web 2.0 at the center of the new educational technologies. E-Learning 2.0 emerges as an innovative method of online learning for its incorporation of Web 2.0 tools. For any academic study, the curriculum provides overview of intact learning area. The Curriculum provides overview to content of the Subject. Many institutions place student interaction as a priority of their online curriculum design. It is proved that interaction has a great effect on the students' involvement in learning and acceptance of Curriculum. Students are accepting curriculum that is designed by teacher; whereas E-learning 2.0 enabled Curriculum management system allows student to involve in learning activities. It works as a stimulus and increases their dedication to the Curriculum. While Institute adapts E-Learning 2.0 as Learning Management System, it also provides Social Networking services and provides direct and transparent interac...

  13. Measuring the short-term effects of incorporating academic service learning throughout a dental hygiene curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer-Beck, M; Gadbury-Amyot, C; Williams, K B; Keselyak, N T; Branson, B; Mitchell, T V

    2013-11-01

    Academic service learning (ASL) provides the venue for dental hygiene education to take oral healthcare services directly into communities while at the same time promoting professional responsibility within the student bodies. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine the change in pre-existing attitudes and behaviours of dental hygiene students following the incorporation of ASL activities throughout a five-semester dental hygiene curriculum. Seventy-seven first-year dental hygiene students who participated in ASL from the graduating classes of 2008-2010 participated in the study. A survey instrument developed by Shiarella, based on Schwartz's Helping Behaviors Model, was used to assess students' attitudes towards community service. Additionally, questions were developed using Shinnamon's Methods and Strategies for Assessing Service-Learning in the Health Professions. Internal estimates of reliability for scales (Cronbach's α) were all >0.8. The results revealed statistically significant improvements over time in enhanced learning (P = 0.0001), self-awareness (P = 0.0001), sense of volunteerism (P = 0.013), impact on career choices (P = 0.001) and decrease in personal costs (P = 0.0001). There were no significant changes in other subscales over time. Further investigating these domains revealed minimal to no changes in attributes of service learning. Service learning integrated into the dental hygiene curriculum can enhance learning and improve students' self-awareness, sense of volunteerism, career choices and perception of personal costs. In concert with the literature on ASL, these experiences throughout the curriculum have potential for increasing students' awareness of community need and their roles as oral health professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. The Reliability of Randomly Generated Math Curriculum-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Gerald G.; Smith, Bradley H.; Pender, Carolyn; Malone, Patrick S.; Roberts, Jarod; Hall, John D.

    2015-01-01

    "Curriculum-Based Measurement" (CBM) is a direct method of academic assessment used to screen and evaluate students' skills and monitor their responses to academic instruction and intervention. Interventioncentral.org offers a math worksheet generator at no cost that creates randomly generated "math curriculum-based measures"…

  15. Making Online Learning Personal: Evolution, Evidentiary Reasoning, and Self-Regulation in an Online Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Robert B.

    An online curriculum about biological evolution was designed according to the Promoting Evidentiary Reasoning and Self-regulation Online (PERSON) theoretical framework. PERSON is an attempt to develop online science instruction focused on supporting evidentiary reasoning and self-regulation. An efficacy study was conducted with 80 suburban high school biology students using a design-based research approach to develop a curriculum to promote biological evolution understandings, evidentiary reasoning, and self-regulation. Data sources and instruments included (1) the Biological Evolution Assessment Measurement (BEAM); (2) the modified Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ); (3) discussion forum posts; (4) formative assessments of evidence based reasoning; (5) Prediction, Monitoring, and Reflection forms (PMR); (6) the Online Instruction Questionnaire; and (7) field notes. Findings revealed that BEAM posttest scores were significantly greater than pretest scores for items designed to measure biological evolution content knowledge and evidentiary reasoning. Students tracked in a lower level biology course showed improvement in biological evolution understandings and evidentiary reasoning. It was found that performance on daily evidentiary reasoning tasks strongly predicted BEAM posttest scores. However, findings revealed that students did not meet local standards for performance on items designed to measure evidentiary reasoning. Students expressed a variety of opinions about their learning experiences with the online curriculum. Some students expressed a definite preference for traditional learning environments, while others expressed a definite preference for online learning. Self-regulatory ability did not significantly predict BEAM gain scores. Further, self-regulatory ability was not demonstrably improved as a result of this intervention. Implications for designing science instruction in asynchronous online learning environments to support

  16. Conceptions of how a learning or teaching curriculum, workplace culture and agency of individuals shape medical student learning and supervisory practices in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Pia; Edgren, Gudrun; Borna, Petter; Lindgren, Stefan; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-05-01

    The role of workplace supervisors in the clinical education of medical students is currently under debate. However, few studies have addressed how supervisors conceptualize workplace learning and how conceptions relate to current sociocultural workplace learning theory. We explored physician conceptions of: (a) medical student learning in the clinical workplace and (b) how they contribute to student learning. The methodology included a combination of a qualitative, inductive (conventional) and deductive (directed) content analysis approach. The study triangulated two types of interview data from 4 focus group interviews and 34 individual interviews. A total of 55 physicians participated. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: learning as membership, learning as partnership and learning as ownership. The themes described how physician conceptions of learning and supervision were guided by the notions of learning-as-participation and learning-as-acquisition. The clinical workplace was either conceptualized as a context in which student learning is based on a learning curriculum, continuity of participation and partnerships with supervisors, or as a temporary source of knowledge within a teaching curriculum. The process of learning was shaped through the reciprocity between different factors in the workplace context and the agency of students and supervising physicians. A systems-thinking approach merged with the "co-participation" conceptual framework advocated by Billet proved to be useful for analyzing variations in conceptions. The findings suggest that mapping workplace supervisor conceptions of learning can be a valuable starting point for medical schools and educational developers working with changes in clinical educational and faculty development practices.

  17. Aligning physical learning spaces with the curriculum: AMEE Guide No. 107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, Jonas; Sundberg, Kristina; Laing, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    This Guide explores emerging issues on the alignment of learning spaces with the changing curriculum in medical education. As technology and new teaching methods have altered the nature of learning in medical education, it is necessary to re-think how physical learning spaces are aligned with the curriculum. The better alignment of learning spaces with the curriculum depends on more directly engaged leadership from faculty and the community of medical education for briefing the requirements for the design of all kinds of learning spaces. However, there is a lack of precedent and well-established processes as to how new kinds of learning spaces should be programmed. Such programmes are essential aspects of optimizing the intended experience of the curriculum. Faculty and the learning community need better tools and instruments to support their leadership role in briefing and programming. A Guide to critical concepts for exploring the alignment of curriculum and learning spaces is provided. The idea of a networked learning landscape is introduced as a way of assessing and evaluating the alignment of physical spaces to the emerging curriculum. The concept is used to explore how technology has widened the range of spaces and places in which learning happens as well as enabling new styles of learning. The networked learning landscaped is explored through four different scales within which learning is accommodated: the classroom, the building, the campus, and the city. High-level guidance on the process of briefing for the networked learning landscape is provided, to take into account the wider scale of learning spaces and the impact of technology. Key to a successful measurement process is argued to be the involvement of relevant academic stakeholders who can identify the strategic direction and purpose for the design of the learning environments in relation to the emerging demands of the curriculum.

  18. The new formal competency-based curriculum and informal curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine: overview and five-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelman, Debra K; Cottingham, Ann H

    2007-04-01

    There is growing recognition in the medical community that being a good doctor requires more than strong scientific knowledge and excellent clinical skills. Many key qualities are essential to providing comprehensive care, including the abilities to communicate effectively with patients and colleagues, act in a professional manner, cultivate an awareness of one's own values and prejudices, and provide care with an understanding of the cultural and spiritual dimensions of patients' lives. To ensure that Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) graduates demonstrate this range of abilities, IUSM has undertaken a substantial transformation of both its formal curriculum and learning environment (informal curriculum). The authors provide an overview of IUSM's two-part initiative to develop and implement a competency-based formal curriculum that requires students to demonstrate proficiency in nine core competencies and to create simultaneously an informal curriculum that models and supports the moral, professional, and humane values expressed in the formal curriculum. The authors describe the institutional and curricular transformations that have enabled and furthered the new IUSM curricular goals: changes in education administration; education implementation, assessment, and curricular design; admissions procedures; performance tracking; and the development of an electronic infrastructure to facilitate the expanded curriculum. The authors address the cost of reform and the results of two progress reviews. Specific case examples illustrate the interweaving of the formal competency curriculum through the students' four years of training, as well as techniques that are being used to positively influence the IUSM informal curriculum.

  19. Curriculum Design of a Flipped Classroom to Enhance Haematology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Pauline A.; Jackson, Denise E.; McLaughlin, Patricia M.; O'Malley, Cindy J.

    2016-06-01

    A common trend in higher education is the "flipped" classroom, which facilitates active learning during class. The flipped approach to teaching was instituted in a haematology `major' class and the students' attitudes and preferences for the teaching materials were surveyed. The curriculum design was explicit and involved four major components (1) the preparation of the students; (2) the weekly pre-class work; (3) the in-class active learning strategies and (4) closing the learning loop using formative quizzes. Each of these components is discussed in detail and was informed by sound pedagogical strategies. Several different sources of information and several freely available software tools to engage the students are discussed. Two iterations are reported here, with improved pass rate for the final examination from 47 to 48 % in the traditional class to 56-65 % in the flipped classroom approach. The majority of students (93 and 89 %) came to the class prepared, after viewing the screencasts and engaged fully with the activities within the face-to-face time. The students perceived that solving case studies (93 %) was the most beneficial activity for their learning and this was closely followed by the production of essay plans (71 %). The majority of students recommended that this approach be repeated the following year (69 and 75 %).

  20. Curriculum as a support to investigative approach in learning chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for low achievement of our students in international tests is the lack of functional, applicable knowledge. Formation of such knowledge demands changing the usual way of implementation of instruction (transfer of ready-made knowledge to learning through performing simple research and practical work. Considering the fact that instruction, as an organised process, takes place in frameworks determined in advance, which are arranged and regulated on the national level by curricula, it is assumed that this kind of approach must originate precisely from curricula, which is not the case in our educational practice. The goal of this paper was to determine the way in which this kind of approach in instruction and learning of chemistry can be supported by the curriculum, in order for it to become a part of regular teaching practice on the national level. The paper presents how different structural components of curricula from eight different educational systems (four European countries, one Asian country, two American federal states and one Canadian province are used to promote and support the importance of research work in instruction and learning of chemistry. The curricula from Slovenia, England, Denmark, Malta, Singapore, North Carolina, Utah and Ontario were analyzed in order to determine the kind of information they offer within structural components and accordingly, the way in which each component promotes research approach to learning chemistry, how it guides the teacher in planning such activities in the classroom, organization and performing instruction, monitoring and evaluating students' achievements.

  1. Job requirements compared to dental school education: impact of a case-based learning curriculum [Integratives fallbezogenes Lernen aus Sicht zahnmedizinischer Absolventen in Bezug auf spätere Berufsanforderungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeve, Philip L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Case-based learning (CBL is suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve dental education. The purpose of this study was to assess graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL-based curriculum as regards to key competencies required at their professional activity.Methods: 407 graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL dental curriculum who graduated between 1990 and 2006 were eligible for this study. 404 graduates were contacted between 2007 and 2008 to self-assess nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in dental school on a 6-point Likert scale. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD for continuous variables. To determine whether dental education sufficiently covers the job requirements of physicians, we calculated the mean difference ∆ between the ratings of competencies as required in day-to-day work and as taught in medical school by subtracting those from each other (negative mean difference ∆ indicates deficit; positive mean difference ∆ indicates surplus. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was calculated to reveal statistical significance (statistical significance p[german] Einführung: Das fallbezogene und patientenorientierte Studium nimmt eine Schlüsselstellung in der Ausbildung von Human- und Zahnmedizinern ein. Ziel dieser Studie war es zu prüfen, ob Studierende durch ein integratives fallbezogenes Curriculum in bestimmten Schlüsselkompetenzen den späteren Berufsanforderungen entsprechend vorbereitet werden.Methodik: Von 407 Absolventen eines integrativen Zahnmedizinstudiums mit fallbezogenen Lerninhalten, die ihre Ausbildung erfolgreich zwischen 1990 und 2006 abschlossen, wurden 404 Absolventen zwischen 2007 und 2008 anhand eines standardisierten Fragebogens zu neun Schlüsselkompetenzen befragt. Die Schlüsselkompetenzen wurden auf einer 6

  2. Using Computation Curriculum-Based Measurement Probes for Error Pattern Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Minyi Shih; Calhoon, Mary Beth; Olson, Christopher L.; Williams, Cara

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how "curriculum-based measurement--computation" (CBM-C) mathematics probes can be used in combination with "error pattern analysis" (EPA) to pinpoint difficulties in basic computation skills for students who struggle with learning mathematics. Both assessment procedures provide ongoing assessment data…

  3. Capitalizing on Curriculum-Based Measurement for Reading: Collaboration within a Response to Instruction Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stacy L.; Friesen, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Response to Instruction (RTI) frameworks provide a structure for assessing student progress and evaluating the effectiveness of reading interventions. Schools frequently use RTI to support students who are struggling with learning to read while utilizing curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to monitor performance and guide instructional decisions…

  4. A case study of the impact of a reformed science curriculum on student attitudes and learning in a secondary physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotsky, Gregg Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    This case study examined the impact of the application of an inquiry-based concept related physics curriculum on student attitudes and learning in a secondary physics classroom in southern New Jersey. Students who had previously used a traditional physics curriculum were presented with a 10 week inquiry-based concept related physics curriculum on electricity and magnetism. The study utilized observations, a pre/post attitudinal survey, interviews of students and teachers about their perceptions of the inquiry-based curriculum, and artifact analysis of student work. The results showed a positive change in students' attitude in four of the eight categories designated in the CLASS survey. The observations, interviews and artifact analysis revealed that students were more engaged in learning physics through their discoveries in relating physics concepts to real world applications, a growing personal interest in the value and relevance of science learning and a disconnect between the students' and teacher's perceptions about what is important in learning physics. The study recommends that the rigidity of a traditional physics curriculum with its emphasis on covering many topics and the mathematical language of physics should give way to more inquiry-based concept related curriculum that incorporates exploration, hands-on inquiry activities, and real world connections. The research supports that better efforts be made to familiarize current and future secondary physics educators with the body of research that establishes the benefits of inquiry-based concept related curriculum on physics students.

  5. [Design and implementation of a competency-based curriculum for medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco de Domínguez, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Competency-based education is a form of designing, developing, delivering and documenting instruction based on a set of objectives and results that have been recommended for medical education. This article describes the steps in the process of designing and implementing a competency-based curriculum at a new medical school in a Peruvian university. We present the process followed including context analysis, mission design, the professional profile, the content and organization of the curriculum as well as the evaluation and resources for the training. Finally, issues and challenges faced, as well as lessons learned are summarized.

  6. Comparing the Impact of Course-Based and Apprentice-Based Research Experiences in a Life Science Laboratory Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Shapiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This four-year study describes the assessment of a bifurcated laboratory curriculum designed to provide upper-division undergraduate majors in two life science departments meaningful exposure to authentic research. The timing is critical as it provides a pathway for both directly admitted and transfer students to enter research. To fulfill their degree requirements, all majors complete one of two paths in the laboratory program. One path immerses students in scientific discovery experienced through team research projects (course-based undergraduate research experiences, or CUREs and the other path through a mentored, independent research project (apprentice-based research experiences, or AREs. The bifurcated laboratory curriculum was structured using backwards design to help all students, irrespective of path, achieve specific learning outcomes. Over 1,000 undergraduates enrolled in the curriculum. Self-report survey results indicate that there were no significant differences in affective gains by path. Students conveyed which aspects of the curriculum were critical to their learning and development of research-oriented skills. Students’ interests in biology increased upon completion of the curriculum, inspiring a subset of CURE participants to subsequently pursue further research. A rubric-guided performance evaluation, employed to directly measure learning, revealed differences in learning gains for CURE versus ARE participants, with evidence suggesting a CURE can reduce the achievement gap between high-performing students and their peers.

  7. [Teaching and learning in surgery--The Gottingen curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S; Markus, P M; Becker, H

    2001-05-01

    The study of medicine in Germany is in need of reform. Oversubscribed courses, the lack of practical reference, scarce patient contact and cancelled lessons define the educational landscape for many students. Since at present we cannot carry out global reforms, the quality of medical education is highly dependent on the commitment of those responsible in the individual institution. The aim of the revised surgical curriculum in Göttingen is to demonstrate how medical education with a high didactic level including multimedia teaching can be realised despite large student numbers. Duties both in patient care and education are coordinated through integrated organisation. Educational content and structure are made transparent by online guidebooks. In the surgical examination course and the practical course in surgery, patient-oriented tuition takes place consistently in small groups. The Teaching Studio provides additional aids such as interactive CD-ROMs, online research, textbooks, ultrasound equipment, examination and suturing dummies. Curriculum-relevant information, including the weekly case examples and instruction guides for clinical practical experience, is presented on an Internet website. Constant evaluation of the curriculum not only documents student motivation, but also serves to improve the educational concepts on a continuous basis. On completion of the practical course in surgery, 65% of participants maintain that they have reached the defined learning objectives "well" or "very well" (prior to reform only 17%). In the summer semester 2000, 46% of students gave top marks in the practical course in surgery with respect to tuition in patient contact. The results of the evaluations verify the positive feedback from the student body.

  8. Innovative Curriculum Revision (Competency-Based).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Betty

    A four year competency based education course for prospective physical education teachers is outlined. This course is divided into blocks and modules. The blocks consist of an arrangement of integrated learning experiences (combined from subjects conventionally separated) and directed toward specific student outcomes. The modules are units of a…

  9. Learning Outcomes in Vocational Education: A Business Plan Development by Production-Based Learning Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, Indrati; Hidayat, Hendra; Ganefri; Anori, Sartika; Dewy, Mega Silfia

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the development of a business plan by using production-based learning approach. In addition, this development also aims to maximize learning outcomes in vocational education. Preliminary analysis of curriculum and learning and the needs of the market and society become the basic for business plan development. To produce a…

  10. Health Is Life in Balance: Students and Communities Explore Healthy Lifestyles in a Culturally Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Lynn; Ackerman, Joni; Bointy, Shelley; Cuch, Marilyn; Hindelang, Mary; Pinnow, Stephanie; Turnbull, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    From exploring knowledge from wise members of the community to investigating the science of homeostasis, students learn healthy ways of living through a new hands-on curriculum, Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools: Health Is Life in Balance. The curriculum integrates science and Native American traditions to educate students about science, diabetes and its risk factors, and the importance of nutrition and physical activity in maintaining health and balance in life. Applying an inquiry-based approach to learning, the curriculum builds skills in observation, measurement, prediction, experimentation, and communication, and provides healthy lifestyle messages and innovative science activities for all students. The curriculum is now available to teachers and health educators at no cost through a federal grant.Health Is life in Balance incorporates interdisciplinary standards as well as storytelling to help children understand important messages. Implementation evaluation of the curriculum indicated improved knowledge and attitudes about science and health, positive teacher and student comments, and culturally relevant content. The lessons highlighted in this article give a glimpse into this hands-on curriculum which integrates science and Native American traditions, looking to our past and listening to the wisdom of our Elders, to gain powerful information for healthy, holistic living. The circle of balance is a theme in many indigenous belief systems and is woven into the lessons, providing enduring understandings of health behaviours that can prevent type 2 diabetes in the context of Native American cultural themes.

  11. Electrical Installation and Maintenance: A Competency-Based Curriculum Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Peggy, Ed.; And Others

    Described is a competency-based community college curriculum for programs in electrical installation and maintenance. The initial curriculum development project involved identifying career opportunities, determining the skills (tasks) required for each job, and analyzing each task for necessary competencies and performance criteria. Project…

  12. PBL融入師資培育教學實習課程之個案研究 Case Study on Applying Problem-Based Learning to the Student Teaching Curriculum

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    徐靜嫻 Ching-Hsien Hsu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 能力導向的教育模式已逐漸成為世界各國培育專業人才的重要方式。在此理念下所強調的「問題導向學習」(problem-based learning, PBL),在醫學、護理、科學等領域上的應用,都顯示對於實務人員面對錯綜複雜實務問題的解決能力培養上,有相當不錯的成效。借鏡於這些領域的經驗,本研究目的在探討問題導向學習融入教學實習課程對學生產生之具體學習成效,以及PBL 融入教學實習課程之適切性。本研究以三種量化問卷,蒐集學生對案例問題、PBL 教練行為的適切性,及其在教學知識與技能、學習能力與興趣和專業互動能力等三面向提升的感受。此外,亦藉由上課實錄、學生學習文件、訪談與研究日誌等質性方式,瞭解PBL運作之情形。研究顯示,師資生在教學專業知識與技能、學習能力與興趣,以及專業互動等能力上均有極正向之學習成效;同時,PBL 融入教學實習能提升學生未來面對教學問題的解決能力。 Ability-orientation has become a critical educational model for educating professionals working in many fields across the world. Featuring an ability-orientation approach, the problem-based learning (PBL approach been successfully applied in medical, nursing, and scientific areas. Studies in these areas also show that PBL can effectively provide people with the problem-solving abilities that they require in their professions. In light of these results, this study explores whether PBL can be effectively applied to early-stage teacher programs. The purpose of this research is to apply PBL to the student teaching curriculum to explore its effects. We discovered how PBL can be effectively applied to a curriculum design and what teaching outcomes can be achieved. This study shows that positive effects were observed in the disciplinary knowledge and skills, learning abilities, interests, and

  13. Designing a Deeply Digital Science Curriculum: Supporting Teacher Learning and Implementation with Organizing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Heather; Severance, Samuel; Penuel, William R.; Quigley, David; Sumner, Tamara; Devaul, Holly

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the impacts of technology (e.g., Chromebooks, Google Drive) on teacher learning and student activity in the development and implementation of a deeply digital high school biology unit. Using design-based implementation research, teachers co-designed with researchers and curriculum specialists a student-centered unit aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) that utilizes classroom technology. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to understand the barriers that inhibit the implementation of a digital curriculum as well as the extent that teachers engage in the design process and begin to make shifts in their practice. We found that through the co-design process teachers began to shift their knowledge of NGSS, technology implementation, and adapted to tensions and barriers inherent in the process.

  14. Curriculum-based library instruction from cultivating faculty relationships to assessment

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    Blevins, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Curriculum-Based Library Instruction: From Cultivating Faculty Relationships to Assessment highlights the movement beyond one-shot instruction sessions, specifically focusing on situations where academic librarians have developed curriculum based sessions and/or become involved in curriculum committees.

  15. Designing a National Longitudinal Faculty Development Curriculum Focused on Educational Scholarship: Process, Outcomes, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Latha; Gusic, Maryellen E; Lane, J Lindsey; Baldwin, Constance D

    2017-01-01

    Clinical educators at U.S. academic health centers are frequently disadvantaged in the academic promotion system, lacking needed faculty development, mentoring, and networking support. In 2006, we implemented the national Educational Scholars Program to offer faculty development in educational scholarship for early career educators in pediatrics. We aimed to provide them with skills, experience, and initial success in educational scholarship and dissemination. The 3-year curriculum is delivered in interactive sessions at the annual pediatric academic meetings and online intersession modules. Curriculum content progresses from educational scholarship and implementing scholarly projects to dissemination and professional networking. Intersession modules address project planning, building an educator portfolio, reviewing the literature, using technology, authorship, and peer review. Concurrently, all scholars must complete a mentored educational project and demonstrate national dissemination of a peer-reviewed product to obtain a Certificate of Excellence in Educational Scholarship. The setting of this study was a national, longitudinal, cohort-based faculty development program built within the Academic Pediatric Association, a 2,000-member professional organization. In 10 years, the Educational Scholars Program has enrolled 172 scholars in 8 cohorts; 94 have graduated so far. We describe how formative evaluation guided curriculum refinement and process improvement. Summative evaluations show that faculty and scholars were satisfied with the program. Participant outcomes from Cohort 1, assessed at Kirkpatrick's four levels of evaluation, demonstrate increases in scholarly productivity, leadership activities, and academic promotions. Curriculum building is a dynamic process of ongoing evaluation and modification. Our program benefited from designing an integrated and focused curriculum, developing educational principles to guide program improvements, creating

  16. Introducing integrated laboratory classes in a PBL curriculum: impact on student’s learning and satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background With the introduction of integrated problem-based learning (PBL) program in the medical curriculum, there is a need to create laboratory classes that suit students’ learning needs and the changes introduced to the curriculum. This paper outlines the development and implementation of four integrated laboratory classes (ILCs) at King Saud University College of Medicine. It also examines whether core concepts addressed in these classes were learned and retained and how the students perceived the ILCs. Methods ILCs are based on enhancing enquiry-based learning, and encouraging students to work on tasks in small groups (apply and integrate knowledge from biochemistry, pathology and microbiology) and conduct a laboratory procedure (practical part). In two of these ILCs, a pretest comprising 15 multiple-choice questions were administrated at the start of the class and an identical posttest was administrated at the end of these classes. Performance of the students in the Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE) at the end of the blocks was also evaluated. Students’ perceptions were evaluated using a questionnaire completed at the end of each class. Results A total of 247, 252, 238, and 244 students participated in practical classes covering cerebrospinal fluid infection, small intestine, liver function tests and adrenal gland function, respectively. Students got higher scores in posttests compared to pre-test scores in two classes (12.68 ± 2.03 vs 6.58 ± 3.39 and 13.02 ± 2.03 vs 7.43 ± 2.68, respectively). Paired t-test showed that the difference was significant (P learning. Conclusions Given the increase in the posttest scores (short-term retention) and the satisfactory performance of students at the end of block examinations (long-term retention) together with the students’ satisfaction, the study suggests that the core concepts addressed in these classes were learned and retained. PMID:23706014

  17. Introducing integrated laboratory classes in a PBL curriculum: impact on student's learning and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A; Hasanato, Rana; Al-Nassar, Sami; Somily, Ali; AlSaadi, Muslim M

    2013-05-24

    With the introduction of integrated problem-based learning (PBL) program in the medical curriculum, there is a need to create laboratory classes that suit students' learning needs and the changes introduced to the curriculum. This paper outlines the development and implementation of four integrated laboratory classes (ILCs) at King Saud University College of Medicine. It also examines whether core concepts addressed in these classes were learned and retained and how the students perceived the ILCs. ILCs are based on enhancing enquiry-based learning, and encouraging students to work on tasks in small groups (apply and integrate knowledge from biochemistry, pathology and microbiology) and conduct a laboratory procedure (practical part). In two of these ILCs, a pretest comprising 15 multiple-choice questions were administrated at the start of the class and an identical posttest was administrated at the end of these classes. Performance of the students in the Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE) at the end of the blocks was also evaluated. Students' perceptions were evaluated using a questionnaire completed at the end of each class. A total of 247, 252, 238, and 244 students participated in practical classes covering cerebrospinal fluid infection, small intestine, liver function tests and adrenal gland function, respectively. Students got higher scores in posttests compared to pre-test scores in two classes (12.68 ± 2.03 vs 6.58 ± 3.39 and 13.02 ± 2.03 vs 7.43 ± 2.68, respectively). Paired t-test showed that the difference was significant (P learning. Given the increase in the posttest scores (short-term retention) and the satisfactory performance of students at the end of block examinations (long-term retention) together with the students' satisfaction, the study suggests that the core concepts addressed in these classes were learned and retained.

  18. Introducing the ICF: the development of an online resource to support learning, teaching and curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lester E

    2011-03-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was adopted as one of the key models to support early health professional learning across a suite of new preregistration health science courses. It was decided that an online resource should be developed to enable students, course designers and teaching staff, across all disciplines, to have access to the same definitions, government policies and other supporting information on disability. As part of the comprehensive curriculum review, enquiry-based learning was adopted as the educational approach. Enquiry-based learning promotes deeper learning by encouraging students to engage in authentic challenges. As such, it was important that the online resource was not merely a site for accessing content, but enabled students to make decisions about where else to explore for credible information about the ICF. The selection of a host location that all students and staff could access meant that the resource could not be located in the existing online learning management system. Construction using software being trialled by the library at La Trobe University allowed for the required access, as well as alignment with an enquiry-based learning approach. Consultation for the content of the online resource included formal and informal working groups on curriculum review. The published version included resources from the World Health Organization, examples of research completed within different disciplines, a test of knowledge and a preformatted search page. The format of the online resource allows for updating of information, and feedback on the utilisation of the software has been used to enhance the student experience. The key issues for the development of this online resource were accessibility for students and staff, alignment with the adopted educational approach, consultation with all disciplines, and ease of modification of information and format once published. Copyright © 2010 Chartered

  19. 校本課程領導與課程評價School-based Curriculum Leadership and Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    李子建Chi-Kin Lee

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available 校本課程發展可說是課程改革的一個核心議題。本文嘗試把課程領導和課程評鑑在校本課程發展的脈絡中作一綜合討論。文章分為四部分:第一部分探討課程領導及課程評價的意涵;第二部分討論課程領導、課程評鑑及校本課程發展三者的關聯;第三及第四部分分別探討校長課程領導,以及技術與非技術取向的校本課程領導與課程評鑑。 School-based curriculum development is seen as one of the core issues in curriculum reform. This article attempts to discuss, in an integrated manner, curriculum leadership and curriculum evaluation under the context of school-based curriculum development. The article is divided into four parts. The first part explores the meaning of curriculum leadership and curriculum evaluation. The second part discusses the association among curriculum leadership, curriculum evaluation and school-based curriculum development. The third and fourth part explores principal’s curriculum leadership as well as technical and non-technical approaches to curriculum leadership and curriculum evaluation respectively.

  20. Development of Visualization of Learning Outcomes Using Curriculum Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Takashi; Gotoh, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Niigata University has started to develop the Niigata University Bachelor Assessment System (NBAS). The objective is to have groups of teachers belonging to educational programs discuss whether visualized learning outcomes are comprehensible. Discussions based on teachers' subjective judgments showed in general that visualized learning outcomes…

  1. More confident trauma resuscitation team leaders: a novel simulation-based training curriculum utilizing video feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Falcone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There are deficiencies in trauma leader performance. Simulation training and video-based feedback can lead to durable changes in behavior. A trauma resuscitation team leader training curriculum was developed. The curriculum consisted of eight simulated trauma scenarios with a mix of acuities and injury patterns using patient simulators. Other team members included a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a chief resident, a trauma nurse, a medical student, and presenting emergency medicine staff. Each scenario was followed by video-based feedback. Attitudes regarding this curriculum were evaluated before and after the intervention with Likert-based surveys. Eight residents completed the curriculum. On a seven-point Likert scale, the median overall curriculum rating, the video discussion quality, the plan to apply leadership skills, and the plan to apply learned knowledge and behaviors was 7/7. A Wilcoxon Sign-Rank test showed improved confidence for leading Level 1 trauma resuscitations, improved beliefs in adequate training, and improved attitudes regarding team leader training (P<0.05. There was reduced nervousness of being the team leader (P=0.048. Qualitative analyses showed that the learners valued the feedback process and scenario realism. This pilot curriculum was well-received by trauma residents and offers insight into meta-cognition of trauma team leaders.

  2. Data-based Decision-making: Teachers' Comprehension of Curriculum-based Measurement Progress-monitoring Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Roxette M.; Espin, Christine A.; Chung, Siuman; Saab, Nadira

    2017-01-01

    Teachers have difficulty using data from Curriculum-based Measurement (CBM) progress graphs of students with learning difficulties for instructional decision-making. As a first step in unraveling those difficulties, we studied teachers' comprehension of CBM graphs. Using think-aloud methodology, we examined 23 teachers' ability to…

  3. The Impact of Technology-Enhanced Curriculum on Learning Advanced Algebra in US High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Stephen J.; Dalton, Sara; Tapper, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on two large studies conducted in advanced algebra classrooms in the US, which evaluated the effect of replacing traditional algebra 2 curriculum with an integrated suite of dynamic interactive software, wireless networks and technology-enhanced curriculum on student learning. The first study was a cluster randomized trial and the second…

  4. The Impact of Technology-Enhanced Curriculum on Learning Advanced Algebra in US High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Stephen J.; Dalton, Sara; Tapper, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on two large studies conducted in advanced algebra classrooms in the US, which evaluated the effect of replacing traditional algebra 2 curriculum with an integrated suite of dynamic interactive software, wireless networks and technology-enhanced curriculum on student learning. The first study was a cluster randomized trial and the second…

  5. Experiential Learning Laboratories in Business Schools: The WD-40® for Curriculum Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroff, Karen E.; Riley, Elven

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case analysis of how a business school brought about curriculum innovation. The school used something borrowed, specifically experiential learning laboratories, and something new to attain measureable curriculum change, with only modest investments. The authors urge that the nimbleness of a medium-size school committed to…

  6. Principles for Learning and Competences in the 21st-Century Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, Clementina; Hughes, Conrad

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the core competences, attitudes and knowledge that the authors believe will promote transformative learning in the 21st century and should, therefore, feature in curriculum design. It first defines the purpose of curriculum, stressing the need for a coherent worldwide understanding of what is meant and intended by…

  7. Investigating Purposeful Science Curriculum Adaptation as a Strategy to Improve Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarger, Angela Haydel; Penuel, William R.; Moorthy, Savitha; Beauvineau, Yves; Kennedy, Cathleen A.; Boscardin, Christy Kim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the potential and conditions for using curriculum adaptation to support reform of science teaching and learning. With each wave of reform in science education, curriculum has played a central role and the contemporary wave focused on implementation of the principles and vision of the "Framework for K-12 Science…

  8. THE TASK OF SYNTHESIS OF INDIVIDUAL CURRICULUMS IN THE SPACE OF VIRTUAL LEARNING GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Denks

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The approach of educational planning and organization of educational process is offered to provide students the ability to select and adjust trajectories of learning. The mathematical description of curriculum and algorithm of synthesis individual curriculums are presented. The results of applying the algorithm are showed using an automated system.

  9. The Challenge of Learning Physics before Mathematics: A Case Study of Curriculum Change in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify challenges in implementing a physics-before- 10 mathematics curriculum. Obviously, students need to learn necessary mathematics skills in order to develop advanced physics knowledge. In the 2010 high school curriculum in Taiwan, however, grade 11 science students study two-dimensional motion in physics without…

  10. Embedding Responsible Conduct in Learning and Research into an Australian Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lynette B.

    2017-01-01

    Responsible conduct in learning and research (RCLR) was progressively introduced into the pharmacology curriculum for undergraduate science students at The University of Western Australia. In the second year of this undergraduate curriculum, a lecture introduces students to issues such as the use of animals in teaching and responsible conduct of…

  11. Embedding Responsible Conduct in Learning and Research into an Australian Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lynette B.

    2017-01-01

    Responsible conduct in learning and research (RCLR) was progressively introduced into the pharmacology curriculum for undergraduate science students at The University of Western Australia. In the second year of this undergraduate curriculum, a lecture introduces students to issues such as the use of animals in teaching and responsible conduct of…

  12. Principles for Learning and Competences in the 21st-Century Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, Clementina; Hughes, Conrad

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the core competences, attitudes and knowledge that the authors believe will promote transformative learning in the 21st century and should, therefore, feature in curriculum design. It first defines the purpose of curriculum, stressing the need for a coherent worldwide understanding of what is meant and intended by…

  13. Investigating Purposeful Science Curriculum Adaptation as a Strategy to Improve Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarger, Angela Haydel; Penuel, William R.; Moorthy, Savitha; Beauvineau, Yves; Kennedy, Cathleen A.; Boscardin, Christy Kim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the potential and conditions for using curriculum adaptation to support reform of science teaching and learning. With each wave of reform in science education, curriculum has played a central role and the contemporary wave focused on implementation of the principles and vision of the "Framework for K-12 Science…

  14. Care as Curriculum: Investigating Teachers' Views on the Learning in Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, Katherine; Hill, Diti

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the approach of care as curriculum and teachers' perceptions of this notion. It is a descriptive account of the interviews of four Aotearoa New Zealand-based infant and toddler teachers' perceptions of care as curriculum. Care as curriculum is a pedagogical approach that was brought to the research process. This was an…

  15. Challenges of Teaching Physiology in an Integrated System-Based Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Zuheir; Sequeira, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of a traditional discipline-based medical curriculum into a system-based integrated curriculum often poses dilemmas to faculty involved in teaching basic medical sciences. This paper examines the challenges of teaching physiology to medical students in a system-based curriculum. Some of these challenges include: defining the core curriculum, curriculum links, sequencing curriculum content, interdisciplinary integration, and student assessment. A number of relevant issues in...

  16. Does Curriculum 2005 promote successful learning of elementary algebra?

    OpenAIRE

    Nelis Vermeulen

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews literature, previous to the development of Curriculum 2005, describing possible causes and solutions for learners’ poor performance in algebra. It then analyses the Revised National Curriculum Statement for Mathematics in an attempt to determine whether it addresses these causes and suggested solutions. This analysis finds that the curriculum to a large extent does address them, but that some are either not addressed, or addressed only implicitly. Consequently, Curriculum...

  17. Team-Based Curriculum Design as an Agent of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Andrew R.; Cavanagh, Michael; Young, Sherman; Carter, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum design in higher education environments, namely the consideration of aims, learning outcomes, syllabus, pedagogy and assessment, can often be ad hoc and driven by informal cultural habits. Academics with disciplinary expertise may be resistant to (or ignorant of) pedagogical approaches beyond existing practice. In an environment where…

  18. The AdditionalCurriculum of Career and Technology Learning Strand onCloth Products of Local Invention for Matthayomsueksa 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifon Lasudta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were: 1 to develop additional curriculum in the Career and Technology Learning Strand for Mathayomsueksa 2 ; 2 to comprehend the efficiency and effectiveness of the additional curriculum developed. The samples of the study consisted of 20 parents or guardians of Mathayomsueksa 2, 5 teachers of the Career and Technology Learning Strand, and 40 Mathayomsueksa 2 of Rachaprachanukroh 16 School obtained by using the purposive sampling technique. Research instruments were as follows: 1 interview protocol consisting of 13 issues used to explore problems and needs ; 2 questionnaire with 10 items ; 3 8 lesson plans as implementing the developed additional curriculum ; 4 40-items of achievement test with discriminating power (rxy ranging from 0.49 to 0.75 and the reliability (α of 0.91. The statistics used to analyze data were percentage, mean, standard deviation and t-test (Dependent samples. Findings were as follows: 1. Fundamental data revealed that the involved persons realized that the additionalcurriculum was important and required to develop. Their opinions were at 90 percent of consensus.The components of the additional curriculum developedwere found, as evaluatedby the experts, to be appropriate and consistent with thelocal contexts. The curriculum met this criterion at 4.80 of means. The opropriateness of lesson plans was at 4.67 of means. 2. From conducting try-out activities, it revealed that: 2.1 The efficiency of the additional curriculum developed was 82.69 / 84.69.This was higher than the established criterion. 2.2 The effectiveness index of the lesson plans was 0.7100. 2.3 For learning achievement, the students’ post-test score was significantly higher than pre-test score at the .01 level of significance. 2.4 The students had process skills at the level of 4.63 Ofmeans. 2.5 The students’ satisfaction toward learning based on Thecurriculum developed was at the highest level of 4.67 of means. In summary, the

  19. Effects of conventional and problem-based learning on clinical and general competencies and career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Geertsma, Jelle; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test hypotheses regarding the longitudinal effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and conventional learning relating to students' appreciation of the curriculum, self-assessment of general competencies, summative assessment of clinical competence and indicators of career development.

  20. Management of Character-Based Curriculum in the Educational Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Agustinus Hermino Superma Putra

    2015-01-01

    Manajemen Kurikulum Berbasis Karakter pada Satuan Pendidikan Abstract: The purpose of this study to determine the character-based curriculum in the educational unit. The approach used is a multi-case study design using the constant comparative method. Data were collected through interviews, observation, and study documentation. Analysis using comparative analysis. The results showed that curriculum planning based on the needs of the school, the ability of the foundation, educational exper...

  1. Kindling fires: examining the potential for cumulative learning in a Journalism curriculum

    KAUST Repository

    Kilpert, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated context-dependency of learning as an indicator for students\\' potential to continue learning after graduation. We used Maton\\'s theoretical concepts of \\'cumulative\\' and \\'segmented\\' learning, and \\'semantic gravity\\', to look for context-independent learning in students\\' assessments in a Journalism curriculum. We postulated whether the curriculum constrained or enabled cumulative learning. Students\\' responses to assessments were coded by their degree of context-dependency, or semantic gravity. We found that, firstly, students are overly successful in producing context-dependent answers but struggle to deliver context-independent responses. Secondly, students were not effective when they used higher level knowledge principles without the foundation of lower level ones. Lastly, the marking criteria were encouraging markers to reward context-dependent answers over context-independent ones. This study has implications for educators interested in curriculum design that enables cumulative learning in discipline specific contexts. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  2. An international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program: an option in the dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Stelzner, Sarah M; Lorant, Diane E; Riner, Mary E; Yoder, Karen M

    2011-04-01

    Many health professions students who treat Spanish-speaking patients in the United States have little concept of their culture and health related traditions. The lack of understanding of these concepts may constitute major barriers to healthcare for these patients. International service-learning experiences allow students to work directly in communities from which patients immigrate and, as a result, students gain a better understanding of these barriers. This article describes the implementation of an international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program in a dental school in the United States. The Indiana University International Service-Learning program in Hidalgo, Mexico began in 1999 as an alternative spring break travel and clinical experience for medical students, focusing on the treatment of acute health problems. Travel-related preparatory sessions were offered, and no learning or service objectives had been developed. The program has evolved to include a multidisciplinary team of dental, medical, nursing, public health and social work students and faculty. The experience is now integrated into a curriculum based on the service-learning model that allows students to use their clinical skills in real-life situations and provides structured time for reflection. The program aims to enhance teaching and foster civic responsibility in explicit partnership with the community. Preparatory sessions have evolved into a multidisciplinary graduate level course with defined learning and service objectives. PROGRAM EVALUATION METHODS: In order to assess the program's operation as perceived by students and faculty and to evaluate student's perceptions of learning outcomes, evaluation tools were developed. These tools included student and faculty evaluation questionnaires, experiential learning journals, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis. Evaluation data show that after program participation, students perceived an increase in their

  3. Examining the Learning Outcomes Included in the Turkish Science Curriculum in Terms of Science Process Skills: A Document Analysis with Standards-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duruk, Umit; Akgün, Abuzer; Dogan, Ceylan; Gülsuyu, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    Science process skills have provided a valuable chance for everyone to construct their own knowledge by means of scientific inquiry. If students are to understand what science is and how it actually works, then they should necessarily make use of their science process skills as well as scientific content knowledge compulsory to be learned in any…

  4. Modelling Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Usefulness of an ICT-Based Student-Centred Learning (SCL) Curriculum: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Lee, Chwee Beng; Chai, Ching Sing; Choy, Doris

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that influence pre-service teachers' perceived usefulness of an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) course that was conducted using the student-centred learning (SCL) approach. In this study, perceived usefulness was used as the dependent variable and perceived competence, course…

  5. Information literacy of medical students studying in the problem-based and traditional curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskola Eeva-Liisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on part of a research project on the relationships between learning methods and students' information behaviour in Finland. In this qualitative study information behaviour is studied in the contexts of a problem-based learning curriculum and a traditional curriculum. In 1998, 16 theme interviews were conducted at the Tampere University medical school, which applied the problem-based learning curriculum and 15 interviews at the Turku University Medical School, in which the traditional curriculum with an early patient contact programme was implemented. The focus of this paper is on the concept of information literacy as a part of the students' information behaviour. The findings indicate that students' information literacy is developed on the other hand through active use of information and sources in connection with real information needs, on the other hand through an educational context which offers opportunities to get different viewpoints on issues. Superiority of small group instruction compared to lecturing as a teaching method on courses in information searching and the importance of the correct timing of the instruction are confirmed.

  6. A Media-Rich Curriculum for Improving Early Literacy Outcomes of Low-Income Children: Evaluation Results for the "Ready to Learn" Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Pasnik, Shelley; Llorente, Carlin

    2010-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a digital media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy", that is, when children have opportunities to learn skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media (Neuman, 1995). The study is part of the "Ready to…

  7. REFORMATION OF THE PRESENT CURRICULUM OF THE PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION ACCORDING TO THE COMPETENCE – BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuljeta Cinga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Up to the present the efforts to raise the quality of the Albanian educational system have been focused mostly in the direction of the content of the school curriculum, delivery of knowledge through the standards, as well as in the direction of instructional plans and programs. These achievements have been insufficient for raising the quality of the contemporary education, a fact that was also noticed by the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA. 60% of students in Albania did not complete the second level of PISA. The curriculum compilers 2014 using the best international research and practice data in educational field raised the problem of the preceding curriculum, which they characterized as a curriculum traditional in essence. The aim of this work is to argue the proposals of the curriculum compilers for “a curriculum which creates conditions and supports the competence development” through competence mastering, focusing on the students,  needs and demands for education, learning in situations and knowledge building from the students, against a curriculum centered in instructional objectives and focused on the subject content acquirement.Considering the fast rhythm of knowledge explosion in the society of technology and knowledge, the new developments in the work market, changes in conceptions in the learning process, the necessity of reformation of a curriculum “after the competence-based approach” will be argued.

  8. Community of learners: charting learning in first year graduate entry medical students during problem-based learning (PBL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Paul; Zvauya, R

    2015-05-01

    This study considers social learning practices within and outside the overt curriculum. A thematic approach was used to analyse data from six focus group interviews with 11 graduate entry medical students from a UK university over a year of study. The results indicate that: (1) during their first year of study students form a community of learning practice, (2) this community of practice influences learning inside and outside the overt curriculum, (3) there is a changing community profile over the year of practice, (4) the students' engagement in problem-based learning (PBL) as part of their overt curriculum strongly influences the development of a community of practice and hence learning both inside and outside the overt curriculum. Findings are discussed in terms of Wenger's community of practice framework, the role of distributed cognition and social learning. It is concluded that PBL is an effective approach for academics to enrich students' social learning practices.

  9. 課堂學習研究:香港的一種校本課程發展及教師專業發展模式 Learning Study: A Mode of School-based Curriculum Development and Teacher Professional Development in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    吳本韓Pun-Hon NG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available 教師是實施校本課程發展的關鍵人物,在實施過程中,教師需要不斷重新審視課程及評估學與教的關係。課堂學習研究是參考日本的授業研究(lesson study),並以變易學習理論(the theory of variation)為基礎的一種校本課程發展及教師專業發展模式。教師和大學的研究員對課程中某些重要課題和學生的學習難點進行深入的探討,然後共同設計一堂研究課,最後進行有系統地觀課、評量和反思。本文會先介紹課堂學習研究的理論架構,之後以一個小學常識科研究課案例來說明課堂學習研究的各個步驟,最後討論課堂學習研究與校本課程發展及教師專業發展的關係。 Teachers are the key figures in the implementation of school-based curriculum development. During the process, teachers need to continuously re-examine the curriculum and evaluate the relationship between learning and teaching. Learning study is a kind of school-based curriculum development and teacher professional development model inspired by the lesson study in Japan and grounded on the theory of variation. In each learning study, teachers work collaboratively with researchers from tertiary institutes to plan a research lesson aiming at developing some capabilities or values which are central to the curriculum and in which their students have difficulties to learn. Then they will go through a systematic process to observe lessons, to evaluate and to reflect. This paper first introduces the theoretical framework of lesson study. Then a case of a research lesson of Primary School General Studies is used to elaborate the steps in conducting learning study. Finally, the role of learning study in school-based curriculum development is discussed.

  10. Longitudinal Study of the Impacts of a Climate Change Curriculum on Undergraduate Student Learning: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin C. Burkholder

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the efficacy of a semester-long undergraduate sustainability curriculum designed from a systems approach. The three-course curriculum, which incorporated environmental science and ethics courses along with an integrative course using a community-based learning pedagogy, was intended to provide students with experience using knowledge and skills from distinct disciplines in a holistic way in order to address the complex problems of the human acceptance of and response to anthropogenic climate change. In the fall of 2013, 23 of the 24 sophomore general education students enrolled in the three courses were surveyed at the beginning and end of the semester; 17 of those same students completed the survey again in the spring of 2016, their senior year. Results, which focus on the 17 students who continued to participate through their senior year, were analyzed with quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The pre/post data from the surveys demonstrated significant improvement in climate literacy, certainty, concern and urgency over the course of the semester; the senior data indicated that those improvements were largely retained. The study also suggests that the nine-credit curriculum improved transferable skills such as interdisciplinary thinking, self-confidence and public speaking. A qualitative analysis of three student cases, informed by a focus group (n = 7 of seniors along with other sources of information, suggested retention of such transferable skills, and, in some cases, deeper involvement in climate and sustainability action.

  11. Developing a quality and safety curriculum for fellows: lessons learned from a neonatology fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Munish; Ringer, Steve; Tess, Anjala; Hansen, Anne; Zupancic, John

    2014-01-01

    Formal training in health care quality and safety has become an important component of medical education at all levels, and quality and safety are core concepts within the practice-based learning and system-based practice medical education competencies. Residency and fellowship programs are rapidly attempting to incorporate quality and safety curriculum into their training programs but have encountered numerous challenges and barriers. Many program directors have questioned the feasibility and utility of quality and safety education during this stage of training. In 2010, we adopted a quality and safety educational module in our neonatal fellowship program that sought to provide a robust and practical introduction to quality improvement and patient safety through a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Our module has been successfully integrated into the fellowship program's curriculum and has been beneficial to trainees, faculty, and our clinical services, and our experience suggests that fellowship may be particularly well suited to incorporation of quality and safety training. We describe our module and share tools and lessons learned during our experience; we believe these resources will be useful to other fellowship programs seeking to improve the quality and safety education of their trainees.

  12. Beyond active learning: a case study of teaching practices in an occupation-centered curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Although occupation-centered curricula are highly promoted, the teaching processes that convey such designs remain unclear. This case study elucidated occupation-centered teaching practices. Interview and observational data were collected over 8 weeks, and analysis involved coding transcriptions, data matrices, concept maps, journaling, and writing. Participants augmented active learning strategies with strategies that linked course topics to the subject of occupation. The use of linking strategies suggested that: (a) course content was treated as two-tiered; (b) neither content nor instructional processes were inherently occupation-centered; and (c) subject-centered education strengthens social learning theories. Although curricula may appear occupation-centered based on a curriculum description and course content, ultimately "linking opportunities" in the classroom constitute an essential feature that demarcates a program as occupation-centered.

  13. Curriculum Renewal in Second-Language Learning: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, John L.

    1985-01-01

    Directions in second-language curriculum development in Australia are discussed in the context of three contemporary educational value systems or ideologies: classical humanism, reconstructionism, and progressivism. (MSE)

  14. Genetically Modified Food in Perspective: An Inquiry-Based Curriculum to Help Middle School Students Make Sense of Tradeoffs. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial…

  15. Genetically Modified Food in Perspective: An Inquiry-Based Curriculum to Help Middle School Students Make Sense of Tradeoffs. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial…

  16. Curriculum Materials and Its Uses in Teaching and Learning Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yeping; Fuson, Karen

    As an outline of school educational activities, curriculum has been the focus of educational reforms in the past several decades (e.g., National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1980, 2000). In contrast, there are very limited research efforts given to examine the nature of mathematics curriculum and its roles in teaching and learning…

  17. Teachers' sense-making of curriculum structures and its impact on the implementation of an innovative reform-based science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckford-Smart, Meredith

    This study discusses the social interactions involved in teachers' enactment and use of new science curricula. The teachers studied participated in the LiFE program, a university-school partnership, which is an inquiry based science and nutrition education program. In this program fifth and sixth grade students learned science through the study of food. The program used the study of food and food systems to teach life sciences and nutrition through inquiry based studies. Through the partnership teachers received professional development which aimed to deepen their conceptual understandings of life science and develop skills in implementing inquiry-base teaching. Using qualitative research methods of ethnography and narrative inquiry to study teachers' sense-making of messages from curriculum structures, the intention was to explore how teachers' sense-making of these structures guided their classroom practices. Two research questions were addressed: (a) How do teachers make sense of curriculum given their perceptions, their school context and their curricular context; (b) What influence do their identities as science teachers/learners have on their enactment of an innovative science curriculum. I used comparative analysis to examine teacher's beliefs and identities as teachers/learners. In the process of studying these teachers an understanding of how teachers' stories and identities shape their use and enactment of science curriculum came to light. The initial analysis revealed four distinct teacher identities: (a) social responsibility teacher/learner; (b) experiential teacher/learner; (c) supportive institution teacher/learner; and (d) turning point teacher. Besides these distinct teacher identities three cross cutting themes emerged: (a) creating environments conducive to their teaching visions; (b) empowering student through science teaching; and (c) dealing with the uncertainty of teaching. The information gathered from this study will illuminate how these

  18. Supporting the Implementation of Externally Generated Learning Outcomes and Learning-Centered Curriculum Development: An Integrated Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubball, Harry; Gold, Neil; Mighty, Joy; Britnell, Judy

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of one Canadian provincially initiated curriculum reform effort in which several generic learning outcomes were established. It also presents a flexible, practical, and integrated framework for the development, implementation, and evaluation of program-level learning outcomes in undergraduate curricula contexts.…

  19. Impact of a College Freshman Social and Emotional Learning Curriculum on Student Learning Outcomes: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Wilhite, Stephen C.; Wyatt, Jeannette; Young, Thomas; Bloemker, Geraldine; Wilhite, Emily

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of implementing a social and emotional learning curriculum for college freshmen on student learning outcomes, including social and emotional competence and academic performance. Through the use of a quasi-experimental design, the growth in social and emotional competence of students who participated in the social…

  20. A Research-Based Curriculum for Teaching the Photoelectric Effect

    CERN Document Server

    McKagan, S B; Perkins, K K; Wieman, C E

    2007-01-01

    Physics faculty consider the photoelectric effect important, but many erroneously believe it is easy for students to understand. We have developed curriculum on this topic including an interactive computer simulation, interactive lectures with peer instruction, and conceptual and mathematical homework problems. Our curriculum addresses established student difficulties and is designed to achieve two learning goals, for students to be able to (1) correctly predict the results of photoelectric effect experiments, and (2) describe how these results lead to the photon model of light. We designed two exam questions to test these learning goals. Our instruction leads to better student mastery of the first goal than either traditional instruction or previous reformed instruction, with approximately 85% of students correctly predicting the results of changes to the experimental conditions. On the question designed to test the second goal, most students are able to correctly state both the observations made in the phot...

  1. An Exploration of the Potential Impact of the Integrated Experiential Learning Curriculum in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Campbell, Todd

    2012-05-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of the Integrated Experiential Learning Curriculum (IELC) in China. This curriculum was developed to engage Chinese elementary students in science to cultivate a scientifically literate society by focusing science instruction on practical applications of scientific knowledge. Cornerstones of the approach adopted are scientific inquiry and Science-Technology-Society instruction. An experimental IELC (n = 7 teachers; n = 201 students) group and control non-IELC (n = 6 teachers; n = 184 students) group of elementary teachers and students were studied to determine whether significant differences could be found over a one-year intervention period. Pre- and post-measures were used to track teachers' attitude about teaching science and student attitude about science as well as student citizenship beliefs. Additionally, post-measures of student attitude toward the learning environment and teacher quality classroom observations were made of both teacher groups. Sequential (or hierarchical) ordinary least-squares regression analyzes were conducted to investigate which factors influenced teacher attitudes about the initial three outcome measures investigated (i.e. teacher attitude about teaching science, student attitude about science, and student citizenship beliefs), an independent t-test was conducted to investigate differences in student attitude toward the learning environment, and descriptive statistics were used to investigate teacher quality across the two groups. Based on the findings, the IELC has shown promise for improving teachers' attitudes about teaching science and their teaching quality. When considering student measures, the IELC (1) improved students' attitude toward science, (2) their citizen beliefs, and (3) their attitudes about the learning environment.

  2. An Evaluation of Open Source Learning Management Systems According to Administration Tools and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamli, Fezile

    2007-01-01

    Distance education is becoming more important in the universities and schools. The aim of this research is to evaluate the current existing Open Source Learning Management Systems according to Administration tool and Curriculum Design. For this, seventy two Open Source Learning Management Systems have been subjected to a general evaluation. After…

  3. Open Learning and Formal Credentialing in Higher Education: Curriculum Models and Institutional Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reushle, Shirley, Ed.; Antonio, Amy, Ed.; Keppell, Mike, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of education is a multi-faceted system that must constantly integrate new strategies and procedures to ensure successful learning experiences. Enhancements in education provide learners with greater opportunities for growth and advancement. "Open Learning and Formal Credentialing in Higher Education: Curriculum Models and…

  4. How to Implement an E-Learning Curriculum to Streamline Teaching Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    In the field of teaching, one of the interesting subjects is the research of the fact which didactic methods are good for learning the current curriculum for the students who show a wide range of age, interest, chosen courses, previous studies and motivation. This article introduces the facilities that support the learning process: the…

  5. The Relevance of Workplace Learning in Guiding Student and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduna, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the relevance of workplace learning (previously known as "cooperative education") in guiding student and curriculum development, this article presents findings from a research project on the current practice of workplace learning, drawn from an analysis of evaluation reports in a university of technology.…

  6. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  7. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  8. Threshold Concepts, Student Learning and Curriculum: Making Connections between Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradell, Sarah; Kennedy-Jones, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Threshold concepts, student learning and curriculum are constructs within a learning and teaching discourse foregrounded by Meyer and Land. In this paper, we introduce a conceptual model that integrates these three constructs and identifies desired outcomes at the intersects: namely the processes of (1) ways of thinking and practising, (2)…

  9. The Relevance of Workplace Learning in Guiding Student and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduna, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the relevance of workplace learning (previously known as "cooperative education") in guiding student and curriculum development, this article presents findings from a research project on the current practice of workplace learning, drawn from an analysis of evaluation reports in a university of technology.…

  10. Curriculum Issues: Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries--Zimbabwe Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambudzo, Ignatius Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate curriculum issues, teaching and learning for sustainable development in secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Education for sustainable development (ESD) aims at changing the approach to education by integrating principles, values, practices and needs in all forms of learning. Literature has documented the importance of…

  11. The Challenge of Learning Physics Before Mathematics: A Case Study of Curriculum Change in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify challenges in implementing a physics-before- 10 mathematics curriculum. Obviously, students need to learn necessary mathematics skills in order to develop advanced physics knowledge. In the 2010 high school curriculum in Taiwan, however, grade 11 science students study two-dimensional motion in physics without prior learning experiences of trigonometry in mathematics. The perspectives of three curriculum developers, 22 mathematics and physics teachers, two principals, and 45 science students were obtained by interview. The results of qualitative data analysis revealed six challenges and suggested likely solutions. The national level includes political and social challenges, resolved by respecting teachers as professionals; the teacher level includes knowledge and teaching challenges, resolved by increasing teacher trans-literal capacities; and the student level includes learning and justice challenges, resolved by focusing on students' diverse developments in cross-domain learning.

  12. The Challenge of Learning Physics Before Mathematics: A Case Study of Curriculum Change in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify challenges in implementing a physics-before- 10 mathematics curriculum. Obviously, students need to learn necessary mathematics skills in order to develop advanced physics knowledge. In the 2010 high school curriculum in Taiwan, however, grade 11 science students study two-dimensional motion in physics without prior learning experiences of trigonometry in mathematics. The perspectives of three curriculum developers, 22 mathematics and physics teachers, two principals, and 45 science students were obtained by interview. The results of qualitative data analysis revealed six challenges and suggested likely solutions. The national level includes political and social challenges, resolved by respecting teachers as professionals; the teacher level includes knowledge and teaching challenges, resolved by increasing teacher trans-literal capacities; and the student level includes learning and justice challenges, resolved by focusing on students' diverse developments in cross-domain learning.

  13. Integration of evidence based medicine into the clinical years of a medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Ferwana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM helps medical students to develop their decision making skills based on current best evidence, especially when it is taught in a clinical context. Few medical schools integrate Evidence Based Medicine into undergraduate curriculum, and those who do so, do it at the academic years only as a standalone (classroom teaching but not at the clinical years. The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences was established in January 2004. The college adopted a four-year Problem Based Learning web-based curriculum. The objective of this paper is to present our experience in the integration of the EBM in the clinical phase of the medical curriculum. We teach EBM in 3 steps: first step is teaching EBM concepts and principles, second is teaching the appraisal and search skills, and the last step is teaching it in clinical rotations. Teaching EBM at clinical years consists of 4 student-centered tutorials. In conclusion, EBM may be taught in a systematic, patient centered approach at clinical rounds. This paper could serve as a model of Evidence Based Medicine integration into the clinical phase of a medical curriculum.

  14. 基于移动学习教学模式的“静态网页设计”课程改革%Static Web Design Curriculum Reform based on Mobile Learning Teaching Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    南楠

    2014-01-01

    开放性、自由化的移动学习教学模式为学生提供了更有效的学习环境。本文就“静态网页设计”这门课中如何引入移动学习,提高学生的自主性学习进行探究,以促进“静态网页设计”课程新的教学模式的生成。%Traditional way of teaching computer science courses have become students of the resistance, the emergence of mobile learning teaching model for undergraduate education work has injected new vitality, curriculum reform is to promote an active exploration. mobile learning model of openness, liberalization provides students with a more effective learning environment. In this paper, static web design this course how to introduce mobile learning to enhance students' independent learning be explored to facilitate static web design course to generate new teaching mode.

  15. Problem based learning in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, D I; Kayastha, S R; Makaju, R; Dongol, M

    2012-01-01

    Problem based learning, originally introduced in the Medical School at Mc-Master University in Canada in the late 1960s, and is now being used as a learning method in many medical schools in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Problem based learning have been adapted in many medical colleges of Nepal be used either as the mainstay of an entire curriculum or for the delivery of individual courses. Institution of Medicine, Tribhuvan University in 1980, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences at Dharan in 1999, KUSMS with the great support of faculties from Harvard University in 2001, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS), and lately all the affiliated medical colleges of Kathmandu University have adapted Problem based learning.

  16. Bases para el Curriculum de las Escuelas de Nivel Elemental (Bases for the Elementary School Curriculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio de Cultura y Educacion, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Centro National de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa.

    This document proposes a detailed foundation for curriculum planning in grades 1, 2, and 3 in the Argentine elementary schools. The book covers such topics as curriculum objectives, contents and activities, personalization and individualization, socialization and regionalization, quality, organization, and suggestions for subject matter and…

  17. 普通高中研究性学习课程实施的深度反思--以 E中学为例%A Deep Reflection on Curriculum Implementation of Project-based Learning in High Schools---Taking E School as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志刚

    2014-01-01

    通过E中学研究性学习课程十年实践的深度反思,提出改进研究性学习课程实施和管理的具体措施:理顺学校管理关系,明晰责权;落实课时和任课教师;实行档案袋管理;成立市级研究性学习教科研组织;加强教育行政部门的督导管理。%Based on a deep reflection on the ten years'project-based learning curriculum in E school , this paper puts forward the following measures to improve the curriculum implementation and management of project-based learning :rationalizing the relationship management in schools ,explicitly defining the duties and responsibilities , guaranteeing class hours and teachers ,establishing portfolio management ,setting up teaching and researching institutes of project-based learning at municipal level , and strengthening the supervision and management of the education administrative departments .

  18. Learning approaches of undergraduate medical students to physiology in a non-PBL- and partially PBL-oriented curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, R R; Vinod, P; Kamath, M G; Asha, K; Ramnarayan, K

    2008-03-01

    Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Campus; Manipal, Karnataka, India) conducts the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program, for which the admission intakes are during the months of March and September. The present study was undertaken to study the differences in learning approaches to physiology of undergraduate medical students in a partially problem-based learning (PBL)- and non-PBL-oriented curriculum. PBL was introduced as a curricular reform for the September 2006 batch of students (partially PBL group), whereas it was not incorporated for the March 2006 batch of students (non-PBL group). Learning approaches to physiology of both groups of students were compared using the short inventory of approaches to learning. Mean scores for deep and strategic approaches were found to be significantly higher for the partially PBL group compared with the non-PBL group. The results of the present study support the earlier observation that PBL promotes a deep approach to learning.

  19. Deliberation and School-Based Curriculum Development--A Hong Kong Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tak Shing John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deliberative mode of curriculum development has been hailed as one effective way of developing school-based curriculum. Its participatory, egalitarian and discursive characteristics have helped to generate the much-needed synergy and ownership feeling among the curriculum team members that lead to curriculum success. Nevertheless there…

  20. Prenatal Care: A Content-Based ESL Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Elissa Anne

    A content-based curriculum in English as a Second Language (ESL) focusing on prenatal self-care is presented. The course was designed as a solution to the problem of inadequate prenatal care for limited-English-proficient Mexican immigrant women. The first three sections offer background information on and discussion of (1) content-based ESL…

  1. A blended learning framework for curriculum design and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The need for flexibility in learning and the affordances of technology provided the impetus for the rise of blended learning (BL globally across higher education institutions. However, the adoption of BL practices continues at a low pace due to academics’ low digital fluency, various views and BL definitions, and limited standards-based tools to guide academic practice. To address these issues, this paper introduces a BL framework, based on one definition and with criteria and standards of practice to support the evaluation and advancement of BL in higher education. The framework is theoretically underpinned by the extant literature and supported by focus group discussions. The evidence supporting the criteria and standards are discussed with suggestions for how they can be used to guide course design, academic practice, and professional development.

  2. Intensification of the Learning Process: Prototype Curriculum Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucks County Public Schools, Doylestown, PA.

    A general rationale and a specific blueprint for developing curriculum are presented. (See TM 001 363 for description of total project; for other related documents, see TM 001 160, TM 001 364-373.) (MS)

  3. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  4. Optimizing biomedical science learning in a veterinary curriculum: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Amy L; Donnon, Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    As veterinary medical curricula evolve, the time dedicated to biomedical science teaching, as well as the role of biomedical science knowledge in veterinary education, has been scrutinized. Aside from being mandated by accrediting bodies, biomedical science knowledge plays an important role in developing clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic reasoning skills in the application of clinical skills, in supporting evidence-based veterinary practice and life-long learning, and in advancing biomedical knowledge and comparative medicine. With an increasing volume and fast pace of change in biomedical knowledge, as well as increased demands on curricular time, there has been pressure to make biomedical science education efficient and relevant for veterinary medicine. This has lead to a shift in biomedical education from fact-based, teacher-centered and discipline-based teaching to applicable, student-centered, integrated teaching. This movement is supported by adult learning theories and is thought to enhance students' transference of biomedical science into their clinical practice. The importance of biomedical science in veterinary education and the theories of biomedical science learning will be discussed in this article. In addition, we will explore current advances in biomedical teaching methodologies that are aimed to maximize knowledge retention and application for clinical veterinary training and practice.

  5. CURRICULUM DESIGN BASED ON HOME STUDENTS’ INTERPRETATIONS OF INTERNATIONALISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIZABETH JACKSON

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle University has acknowledged the importance of educating culturally aware and diverse students by developing the strategic objective: “to deliver international excellence in our learning, teaching and scholarship activities, whilst providing an excellent all-round student experience”. One way of achieving Newcastle University‟s objective of developing itself as a truly international learning environment is to improve home students‟ exposure to such international learning. This research focuses on the internationalisation of home students, in particular stage-1 undergraduate students within the University‟s School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (AFRD. Since this group of students is generally characterised as not being culturally diverse, the attempt was to understand their attitudes and perceptions of internationalisation with the ultimate goal of developing new modules that are truly internationally focused.A two-phased, mixed-method approach was used to determine students‟ perspectives on their needs for internationalising the curriculum. The first phase of the research involved conducting focus groups which revealed that whilst stage-1 students from the School of AFRD are apparently unaware of internationalisation or its benefits to their education,they are enthusiastically receptive to having such concepts incorporated into their degree programmes. For the second phase of the research, quantitative data was collected using TurningPoint technology in a class of stage-1 students to determine effective ways of introducing internationalisation issues into the curriculum. Results of phase two indicate that students believe that internationalisation is the responsibility of the entire university, not just lecturers developing curricula. They also considered that working with international students provided a valuable learning experience thereby suggesting that lecturers can play a role in internationalising the

  6. Postgraduate pharmacology curriculum in medical institutions in India: time for need-based appraisal and modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Desai, Chetna; Tripathi, Santanu K; Dhaneria, S P; Chandy, Sujith J; Bezbaruah, B K

    2014-01-01

    The need to revise the curriculum for the postgraduate course (M.D.) in Pharmacology has been perceived by the academicians in India since quite some time. The changing professional requirements of the graduating students, the current scenario vis a vis animal experimentation and the emphasis of the Medical Council of India on a competency based curriculum has triggered this felt need. In spite of the fact that most medical institutions and universities in India offer postgraduate courses in pharmacology, the curriculum lacks uniformity with extreme variations observed at some places. This article attempts to analyze the existing curricula in pharmacology in India and suggest modifications that could be recommended to the suitable regulatory bodies for implementation. A revision of objectives in the three domains of learning, development of skills that help develop suitable competencies, adoption of teaching learning methods in addition to the conventional methods, and a rethink on the assessment methods have been recommended. Development and validation of alternatives skill-based modules in lieu of animal experiments are recommended. Additional skills like medical writing and communication skills, professionalism and ethics, multi and inter-disciplinary integration and collaboration and a wider exposure of students to the pharmaceutical, academic, regulatory and research institutions for onsite learning were also recommended to fulfill their future career requirements.

  7. On Task-based English Learning Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱蕾

    2010-01-01

    @@ Task-Based learning(TBL)is becoming a catchword in English circles.The new national English Curricular Syllabus also recommends the use of the TBL approach in classroom teaching.The purpose of learning a foreign language is the most direct communicative in the target language,and speaking is the most direct communicative method.In recent years,with the publication of the New Curriculum Standard by the State Education Department,the teaching reform in middle and primary schools has been being implemented step by step.

  8. Influential factors on learning through the hidden curriculum in the perspective of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOHREH KARIMI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing curriculum is not always overt; it can also exist covertly in the form of a hidden curriculum. This study aims to explain the factors influencing learning through the hidden curriculum in the perspective of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. Method: This qualitative study was conducted through purposeful sampling strategy on 24 undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students studying in the first to the fourth years of their education. The data were collected using semistructured interviews and this process continued until data saturation and categories’ emergence. Inductive content analysis was used for data analysis. Results: Professional promotion as a learning factor, impact of personal characteristics on learning, educator’s behavior as a learning stimulus, and feedback as a learning stimulus are the main categories emerged in this study; some of them included sub-categories as well. Conclusion: Professional promotion, personal characteristics, educator’s behavior and feedback were the main influencing factors on learning through the hidden curriculum in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. The findings of this study can be used for developing strategies to promote nursing education and as a result patient care. Further studies are recommended to identify other factors.

  9. The Role of Work-Integrated Learning in Student Preferences of Instructional Methods in an Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Indra

    2015-01-01

    The role of work-integrated learning in student preferences of instructional methods is largely unexplored across the accounting curriculum. This study conducted six experiments to explore student preferences of instructional methods for learning, in six courses of the accounting curriculum that differed in algorithmic rigor, in the context of a…

  10. Curriculum Development 101: Lessons Learned from a Curriculum-Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albilehi, Reema; Han, Ju Young; Desmidt, Heather

    2013-01-01

    To better prepare themselves for authentic teaching situations, pre- and in-service teachers should become familiarized with the application of curriculum-development theory in their training programs. The authors will detail how they have become more prepared to face the challenges of course development by outlining their own experience designing…

  11. Implementation and Web-Based Learning: The Unimplemented Program Yields Few Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James

    2005-01-01

    This paper turns away from Web-based learning content and addresses a universal concern of technology-based learning, namely, program implementation. Without the necessary attention to curriculum alignment, implementation planning and support, Web-based learning initiatives can fall victim to competing priorities. Here, we present the ATLAS model…

  12. Development of Science Web-Based Curriculum for Elementary School: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok

    OpenAIRE

    Khuntalee Boriraksontikul; Sitthikorn Sumalee; Wiparat Sangchan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research were to develop and evaluate science web-based curriculum for elementary school: Pratchatorn School, Bangkok. Research for Development method was applied in this study which consisted of 4 stages: preparation of science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum development ; science web-based curriculum evaluation and teachers development for science web-based unit plans design. The population was science teachers who have taug...

  13. Health and disease in context: a community-based social medicine curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jessica; Solotaroff, Rachel; Amann, Ted; Michael, Yvonne; Bowen, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention paid to the role of social forces in determining health, most physicians finish their training ill-prepared to address these issues. The authors describe their efforts to fill that training gap for internal medicine residents at Oregon Health and Science University through a community-based social medicine curriculum, designed in 2006 in conjunction with community partners at Central City Concern (CCC), an organization addressing homelessness, poverty, and addiction in downtown Portland, Oregon. The challenge was to develop a curriculum that would (1) fit within the scheduling constraints of an established categorical internal medicine residency program, (2) give all internal medicine residents a chance to better understand how social forces affect health, and (3) help show how they, as health professionals, might intervene to improve health and health care. The authors maintain that by developing this curriculum with community partners--who took the lead in deciding what residents should learn about their community and how they should learn it--the residency program is providing a relatively brief but extremely rich opportunity for residents to engage the personal, social, and health-related issues experienced by clients served by CCC. The authors first provide a brief overview of the curriculum and describe how the principles and practices of community-based participatory research were used in its development. They then discuss the challenges involved in teaching medical residents about social determinants of health, how their academic-community partnership approaches those challenges, and the recently established methods of evaluating the curriculum.

  14. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    , the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However....... Exemplary practice. The University of Aalborg in Denmark started with PBL right from the start when the school was founded merging several educational institutes in Northern Denmark in 1974. The Aalborg PBL model is recognized around the world as an example or a source of inspiration, in particular...

  15. Teaching and Learning in Chemical Product Engineering - an Evolving par of the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigild, Martin Etchells; Kiil, Søren; Wesselingh, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    and preparing a text book on the subject. [1] Chemical Product Engineering is solidly based on chemical technical and engineering knowledge. Furthermore, the subject naturally calls for a holistic approach to teaching and learning and introduces elements which target transferable and professional engineering......Over the last decade Chemical Product Engineering has evolved as part of the Chemical Engineering Curriculum at several universities in Europe and America. At the DTU Chemical Product Engineering was introduced in 2000. This presentation will report on the experiences gained from teaching classes...... skills. Such skills are important in Chemical Product Engineering when dealing with open-ended problems, creative problem solutions, operating in a team working environment and exercising project management. In our course we emphasise team activites, formative feed back to the students as well as helping...

  16. Problem-based and project-oriented learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Chen, Zhe

    2005-01-01

    . Generally, the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without extra study time. This paper presents a teaching approach, which makes it possible very fast for the students to obtain in-depth skills into new research areas, and this method is the problem-oriented and project-based learning....... In this paper the necessary skills for power electronic engineers are outlined that is followed up by a description on how the problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum in power electronics and drives at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics...... related projects at different study levels also are presented....

  17. Comparing student role perceptions: traditional to community-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Carolyn; Resick, Lenore K

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored role perceptions of senior baccalaureate nursing students in a traditional curriculum (TC) and a community-based curriculum (CBC) following one U.S. school's curriculum revision. Researchers inquired into that moment when students intervened like a nurse. Results were analyzed by groups and then compared. The assumptions and style of the Dutch school of phenomenology guided the collection and analysis of data. Among identified themes were traditional nursing role functions. Students from the CBC perceived a comparatively broader scope for nursing practice, broader definition of client, and a more nuanced description of the nurse's role. Seniors from the TC described a developmental trajectory which culminated in being able to intervene like a nurse. Responses from both participant groups confirm the importance of nurse-client and nurse-nurse proximities for the development of professional nursing in both structured and unstructured settings.

  18. AIAA Educator Academy - Mars Rover Curriculum: A 6 week multidisciplinary space science based curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, E.; Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.; Nieser, K.; Carlson, C.; Kapral, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity mission has captured the imagination of children, as NASA missions have done for decades. The AIAA and the University of Houston have developed a flexible curriculum program that offers children in-depth science and language arts learning culminating in the design and construction of their own model rover. The program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration. It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students learn to research Mars in order to pick a science question about Mars that is of interest to them. They learn principles of spacecraft design in order to build a model of a Mars rover to carry out their mission on the surface of Mars. The model is a mock-up, constructed at a minimal cost from art supplies. This project may be used either informally as an after school club or youth group activity or formally as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system astronomy or robotics, or as a multi-disciplinary unit for a gifted and talented program. The project's unique strength lies in engaging students in the process of spacecraft design and interesting them in aerospace engineering careers. The project is aimed at elementary and secondary education. Not only will these students learn about scientific fields relevant to the mission (space science, physics, geology, robotics, and more), they will gain an appreciation for how this knowledge is used to tackle complex problems. The low cost of the event makes it an ideal enrichment vehicle for low income schools. It provides activities that provide professional development to educators, curricular support resources using NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) content, and provides family opportunities for involvement in K-12 student learning. This paper will describe the structure and organization of the 6 week curriculum. A set of 30 new 5E lesson plans have been written to support this project as a classroom activity. The challenge of developing interactive

  19. Do Undergraduate Paramedic Students Embrace Case Based Learning Using a Blended Teaching Approach? A 3-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a descriptive longitudinal study which aimed to identify student paramedic perceptions of case based learning used in the clinical curriculum of the Bachelor of Emergency Health (BEH) degree at Monash University, Victoria, Australia. Case based learning and its integration within clinical curriculum is an…

  20. The Development of an Inquiry-based Curriculum Specifically for the Introductory Algebra-based Physics Course

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, B; Eligon, A M; Diaz, Abel; Eligon, Ann Marie; Thacker, Beth

    2007-01-01

    We discuss an inquiry-based curriculum that has been developed specifically for the introductory algebra-based physics course, taking into account the needs, backgrounds, learning styles and career goals of the students in that class. The course is designed to be taught in a laboratory-based environment, however parts of the materials can be used in other settings. As instructors we found ourselves drawing on materials developed for the calculus-based course and for other populations (materials developed for pre-service teachers, for example), parts of which were appropriate, but not a complete curriculum as we would like to teach it, developed specifically for students in the introductory algebra-based physics course. So we have modified and adapted parts of existing materials and integrated them with our own new units and our own format, creating a course aimed specifically at these students.

  1. Extending Curriculum-Based Assessment to Early Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David C.; Burns, Matthew K.; McMaster, Kristen L.; Shapiro, Edward S.

    2012-01-01

    Early writing interventions can help students develop the writing skills they need to experience positive educational and postsecondary outcomes, but effective intervention requires instructionally relevant assessment data. Shapiro's curriculum-based assessment (CBA) model integrates related yet distinct CBA approaches into a model that informs…

  2. Curriculum Guide Based on Pedagogy of Place Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Angelica, Ed.; Guajardo, Juan, Ed.; Guajardo, Francisco, Ed.; Saldivar, Jose, Ed.

    The Llano Grande Research Project in south Texas directs research methods and special projects classes that assist students in developing effective academic, research, and social skills. Students in these classes pursue a curriculum based on pedagogy of place principles and gain an understanding of their community's environment and culture. This…

  3. An overview of curriculum-based course timetabling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bettinelli, Andrea; Cacchiani, Valentina; Roberti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Second International Timetabling Competition (ITC-2007) has been organized and a formal definition of the Curriculum-Based Course Timetabling (CB-CTT) problem has been given, by taking into account several real-world constraints and objectives while keeping the problem general. CB...

  4. Student Material for Competency-Based Education Curriculum for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Associated Educational Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This student welding competency-based education curriculum consists of six units dealing with general areas related to trade occupations and nine units covering specific aspects of working with welding equipment and performing welding operations. Topics covered in the first six units are welding opportunities, human relations, safety, basic…

  5. Establishing and Applying Performance Standards for Curriculum-Based Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, John; Tognolini, Jim; Pickering, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how a state education system in Australia introduced standards-referenced assessments into its large-scale, high-stakes, curriculum-based examinations in a way that enables comparison of performance across time even though the examinations are different each year. It describes the multi-stage modified Angoff standard-setting…

  6. A Curriculum Framework Based on Archetypal Phenomena and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrowski, Bernie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an alternative paradigm of curriculum development based on the theory of situated cognition. This approach starts with context rather than concept, gives greater weight to students' interpretative frameworks, and provides for a more holistic development. Presents a grade 1-8 framework that uses archetypal phenomena and technologies as the…

  7. Evaluating Curriculum-Based Measurement from a Behavioral Assessment Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Scott P.; Roof, Claire M.; Klubnick, Cynthia; Carfolite, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement Reading (CBM-R) is an assessment procedure used to evaluate students' relative performance compared to peers and to evaluate their growth in reading. Within the response to intervention (RtI) model, CBM-R data are plotted in time series fashion as a means modeling individual students' response to varying levels of…

  8. Advanced (Measurement) Applications of Curriculum-Based Measurement in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petscher, Yaacov; Cummings, Kelli Dawn; Biancarosa, Gina; Fien, Hank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a commentary on the current state of several measurement issues pertaining to curriculum-based measures of reading (R-CBM). We begin by providing an overview of the utility of R-CBM, followed by a presentation of five specific measurements considerations: (a) the reliability of R-CBM oral reading fluency…

  9. Using Curriculum-Based Measurement to Monitor Kindergarteners' Mathematics Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethaler, Pamela M.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine technical and instructional features of a kindergarten curriculum-based measurement (CBM) tool designed to track students' mathematics progress in terms of computational concepts, procedures, and counting strategies. Students in 10 kindergarten classrooms in three elementary schools completed alternate…

  10. Development of a Synergistic Case-Based Micro anatomy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Prayson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of an interactive approach to teaching and assessing a micro anatomy curriculum in an innovative medical school program. As an alternative to lectures and labs, students are engaged in interactive seminars focused on discussion of clinical and research-based cases matched with normal histology and pathology…

  11. Emergency Medical Technician. Competency Based Education Curriculum. Student Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotts, Sue Ann

    Beginning with an introductory handbook, this competency-based curriculum contains 13 modules for an 81-hour secondary- or postsecondary-level course for Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Introductory materials include module component descriptions and information for administering an EMT training program, such as an instructor's schedule, list…

  12. Putting the Cart before the Horse: The Role of a Socio-Moral Atmosphere in an Inquiry-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiken, Rosemary; Van Meeteren, Beth Dykstra; Kato, Tsuguhiko

    2009-01-01

    Research lends support to inquiry-based curriculum demonstrating how social interaction, such as discussion and presentation, positively affects children's learning. As a result, teachers spend an inordinate amount of time and effort in planning investigations to develop skills in inquiry. However, many of them overlook the necessary foundation…

  13. Los Arboles Hablan: A Spanish Language Curriculum Unit Based on the Study of Latin American Rain Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuman, John P.

    "Los Arboles Hablan," a video-based curriculum that promotes the learning of Spanish as a second language through study of the Latin American rain forests is described. The 12-session unit was designed for use at the middle school level and integrates science, social science, and environmental education with content focusing on the…

  14. The ABCs of CBM: A Practical Guide to Curriculum-Based Measurement. Practical Intervention in the Schools Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosp, Michelle K.; Hosp, John L.; Howell, Kenneth W.

    2007-01-01

    This pragmatic, accessible book presents an empirically supported conceptual framework and hands-on instructions for conducting curriculum-based measurement (CBM) in grades K-8. The authors provide everything needed to evaluate student learning in reading, spelling, writing, and math; graph the resulting data; and use this information to make…

  15. Educational Change towards Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun

    at the university, depending on which strategy the mangers have employed. Further, the organizational members’ understandings of PBL are more concerned with teaching and curriculum design rather than learning, which should be highlighted within PBL context. Besides, staff members have to struggle between different......As a promising educational approach, PBL (Problem Based Learning) has been adopted by an increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide to replace the traditional lectured based educational approach. However, the organizational change towards PBL is not easy for higher education...... institutions, especially for those with a long history of Lecture Based Learning. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the challenges and obstacles for higher education institutions which are implementing PBL. In order to address the research concern, this book involves in an intensive exploration of two...

  16. Mapping or Tracing? Rethinking Curriculum Mapping in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum mapping has been emphasized in recent curriculum innovations in higher education in the drive for global competitiveness. This paper begins by providing an outline of current discourses of curriculum mapping in higher education. Curriculum mapping is frequently associated with outcome-based learning and work readiness, and guiding the…

  17. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, B.; Reuter, S.; Taverna, M.; Fischer, M. R.; Schelling, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options. Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM). Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic. Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives. Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in regular teaching

  18. Vaccination: Developing and implementing a competency-based-curriculum at the Medical Faculty of LMU Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogel, B.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Germany medical students should gain proficiency and specific skills in the vaccination field. Especially important is the efficient communication of scientific results about vaccinations to the community, in order to give professional counseling with a complete overview about therapeutic options.Aim of the project: The aim of this project is to set up a vaccination-related curriculum in the Medical Faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The structure of the curriculum is based on the National catalogue for competency-based learning objectives in the field of vaccination (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielekatalog Medizin NKLM. Through this curriculum, the students will not only acquire the classical educational skills concerning vaccination in theory and practice, but they will also learn how to become independent in the decision-making process and counseling. Moreover, the students will become aware of consequences of action related to this specific topic.Methods: According to defined guidelines, an analysis was performed on courses, which are currently offered by the university. A separate analysis of the NKLM was carried out. Both analyses identified the active courses related to the topic of vaccination as well as the NKLM learning objectives. The match between the topics taught in current courses and the NKLM learning objectives identified gaps concerning the teaching of specific content. Courses were modified in order to implement the missing NKLM learning objectives.Results: These analyses identified 24 vaccination-related courses, which are currently taught at the University. Meanwhile, 35 learning objectives on vaccination were identified in the NKLM catalogue. Four of which were identified as not yet part of the teaching program. In summary, this interdisciplinary work enabled the development of a new vaccination-related curriculum, including 35 learning objectives, which are now implemented in

  19. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  20. Can medical students from two cultures learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Phillip; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Begg, Michael; Lam, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to establish whether medical students from 2 different cultures can learn effectively from a shared web-based learning environment. Students from the College of Medicine, Edinburgh, UK and the Medical School, Gifu, Japan shared 2 weeks of teaching and learning in clinical genetics, using problem-based learning in a web-based application (WBA). Questions about language, time zone, agreement about the curriculum (learning outcomes, tutor activity and assessment) and specific pedagogical issues about the educational effectiveness of students' learning were considered. The evidence indicates that a shared WBA is practical where the learning outcomes and problem scenarios are common and students are fluent in the same language. Problem-based learning transfers itself best to online discussion boards when the numbers in the group are 16 or more. Students do not use the WBA as a primary source of resource material, and they augment the discussion boards with face-to-face meetings with peers and tutors.

  1. Information Processing and the Management of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, D. S. G.

    Well-constructed Information Management Systems (IMSs) are designed specifically to allow for the unobtrusive and automatic acquisition of data describing the key operations associated with the interlocking cycle of relationships between curriculum, instruction, and assessment. This paper argues that IMS software is an essential element to be…

  2. Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cappola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this current work, I am proposing a general close examination of Problem Based Learning as a student centered educational method in which a problem constitutes  the starting point of the learning process. Such a method provides students with the suitable knowledge for problem solving and presents numerous and significant differences compared to traditional education.In particular, I analyze the theoretic aspects of problem learning by tracing a history and presenting its structure, clarifying the role of the tutor in the various phases of the learning process. The method has found a wide diffusion since the beginning of the 70s and numerous studies have confirmed the advantages. The effectiveness of PBL is construable and is based on principles of constructivism and cognitivism.

  3. Rethinking Effective Teaching and Learning for the Design of Efficient Curriculum for Technical Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiia Rüütmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Technical teachers need to possess skills in at least two distinct areas: engineering discipline and the art of teaching, balancing these two areas, knowing in-action how to do it in real-life situations and for real professional purposes. Understanding student individualities and their different learning styles is one of the midpoints of teacher training. The newly designed curriculum for technical teachers makes scientifically-founded and practice-oriented teacher training possible. The aim of the study programme described is to abolish mismatches between common learning styles and traditional teaching styles. The implementation of the designed curriculum concentrates on interactive lectures and inductive teaching model. Contemporary teaching models and strategies motivate students to learn more effectively, providing future technical teachers with teaching techniques which address all learning styles.

  4. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  5. 研究性学习——国家课程校本化的实践和思考%Project-based learning:the Practice of and Reflection on Transforming State Curriculum into School-based Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志刚

    2011-01-01

    杜威实用主义哲学及其"新教育"思想是研究性学习综合实践活动课程的哲学基础,加德纳多元智力理论是其心理学依据,陶行知"知行合一"与苏霍姆林斯基"研究性学习法"是其历史传统和教学论背景。研究性学习作为课程形态进入高中课程体系,属于活动课程、综合课程、必修课程、国家课程、校本课程。研究性学习国家课程校本化的实施需从制度建设、常态管理、师资培训、校本特色几个方面着力。%Dewey's Pragmatism and its "New Education" ideal is the philosophical foundation,Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligence is the psychological foundation,Tao-xingzhi's "Knowledge and Action should go Hand in Hand" and Cyxomjnhcknn's "Inquiry Learning" are its historical tradition and pedagogical background.Project-based learning has the nature of activity curriculum,the integrated curriculum,the required course,the state curriculum and the school-based curriculum.The project-based learning curriculum should be transformed from state curriculum into school-based curriculum by making great efforts in the following aspects:establishing the rules and institutions,normalizing the administration,training teachers,and strengthening local school's characteristic.

  6. Curriculum Development for Learning To Live Together: The Caribbean Sub-Region. The Final Report of the Sub-Regional Seminar (Havana, Cuba, May 15-18, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Isabel, Ed.; Rozemeijer, Saskia, Ed.

    A sub-regional seminar based on the theme, "Curriculum Development for Learning to Live Together" (Havana, Cuba, May 15-18, 2001), brought together 20 member states of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization's Caribbean Network of Educational Innovation for Development: Antigua and Barbuda, Anguilla, Aruba,…

  7. The Delphi Technique in Identifying Learning Objectives for the Development of Science, Technology and Society Modules for Palestinian Ninth Grade Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualrob, Marwan M. A.; Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines how learning objectives based upon science, technology and society (STS) elements for Palestinian ninth grade science textbooks were identified, which was part of a bigger study to establish an STS foundation in the ninth grade science curriculum in Palestine. First, an initial list of STS elements was determined. Second,…

  8. The Effects of Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy and Utilizing the Virginia Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework to Develop Mathematics Lessons for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Kristel W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if teachers who developed lessons based on Bloom's Taxonomy and the "Virginia Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework" saw increased scores on the mathematics benchmark assessment for fourth grade. Two classes taught by different mathematics teachers participated. The mean of the posttest scores for…

  9. The Effects of Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy and Utilizing the Virginia Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework to Develop Mathematics Lessons for Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Kristel W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if teachers who developed lessons based on Bloom's Taxonomy and the "Virginia Standards of Learning Curriculum Framework" saw increased scores on the mathematics benchmark assessment for fourth grade. Two classes taught by different mathematics teachers participated. The mean of the posttest…

  10. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  11. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  12. Integration of Practice Experiences into the Allied Health Curriculum: Curriculum and Pedagogic Considerations Before, during and after Work-Integrated Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) is an essential component of all allied health university courses. In allied health, learning that occurs during WIL experiences and the relationship between academic and WIL experiences are not well understood. Good integration of WIL experiences into the allied health curriculum is key to realizing the full…

  13. Entwicklung eines E-Learning Curriculums für die medizinische Ausbildung [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz, Wilfried

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] An e-learning curriculum will be developed in which content and learning systems suitable to study phases can be utilised. The development of the e-learning curriculum takes place via the connection of established e-learning offers with needs, and subsequent curricular integration. For the evaluation of e-learning offers, a quality criteria catalogue was developed which describes how learning units are embedded into the system, and of what quality they are. Standards were defined against which national and international e-learning offers could be measured. The result is a selection of offers suitable for e-learning which together form a reference directory. Through the illustration of conformity between the contents of the reference directory and requirements, on the basis of location-specific curricula and the medical subject catalogue, location-specific directories are created which represent the relevance of e-learning offers for both courses and examinations. With the location-specific e-learning directories, teachers and learners are provided with an instrument to complement courses with e-learning components. The curricular integration takes place under the influence of the results of the analysis of the target group, as well as the location-specific resources. The efficiency of the practical implementation and the location-specific requirements determine the character of each e-learning curriculum. [german] Es wird ein E-Learning Curriculum erarbeitet, in dem definiert wird, in welchen Studienabschnitten geeignete Inhalte und Lernsysteme eingesetzt werden können. Die Entwicklung des E-Learning Curriculums geschieht über die Verknüpfung von bewerteten E-Learning Angeboten mit dem Bedarf und anschließender curricularer Integration. Zur Bewertung von E-Learning Angeboten wurde ein Qualitätskriterienkatalog entwickelt, der beschreibt wie Lerneinheiten im System eingebettet und von welcher Qualität sie sind. Es wurden Standards

  14. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  15. Sabemos y Podemos: Learning for Social Action. Adult Education Curriculum. English Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel

    This adult education curriculum, part of the Aprender Es Poder (To Learn Is Power) program, explores the themes of school success for Latino children, expands the work options and improves the working conditions of Latino adults, and identifies community issues. It is meant to be a resource for English as a Second Language Literacy and adult basic…

  16. Developing a Curriculum for Initial Teacher Education Using a Situated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that the implications of the concept of situated learning are important when developing a curriculum for initial teacher education (ITE). It describes and analyses the use of a model of ITE designed to stimulate discussions promoting the development of professional craft knowledge situated mainly in schools and to connect these…

  17. Development of a Program to Enhance Curriculum and Learning Management Competency of Private Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichpongsapak, Ratthasart; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were: (1) to study the factors and indicators to enhance curriculum and learning management competency of private primary school teachers; (2) to study current situations and desirable situations and techniques; (3) to develop a program; and (4) to study the effects of a program. The study comprised 4 phases: Phase…

  18. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  19. Curriculum Disruption: A Vision for New Practices in Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bradley; Moroye, Christy M.; Uhrmacher, P. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    With increased attention to measurable, common student achievement outcomes, the experience of both students and teachers has been overlooked. While measurable outcomes may possess value, they have served to shift the focus of schools, administrators, and teachers to writing curriculum that centers on assessable content learning rather than…

  20. Exploring and Embracing Complexity in a Distance-Learning Curriculum for Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Splaine, Mark E.; Foster, Tina; Regan-Smith, Martha; Batalden, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Describes the VA National Quality Scholars Fellowship's decision to use interactive video (IV) as its primary medium for delivering the curriculum to its six sites around the nation. Describes how this disruption to the education system helped to fashion an adaptable learning environment. (EV)

  1. Code to Learn: Where Does It Belong in the K-12 Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-León, Jesús; Robles, Gregorio; Román-González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of computer programming in K-12 has become mainstream in the last years, as countries around the world are making coding part of their curriculum. Nevertheless, there is a lack of empirical studies that investigate how learning to program at an early age affects other school subjects. In this regard, this paper compares three…

  2. An Encounter with "Sayings" of Curriculum: Levinas and the Formalisation of Infants' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Sandra; Press, Frances; Sumsion, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Increased global attention to early childhood education and care in the past two decades has intensified attention on the education of infants and assessment of their learning in education policy. This interest is particularly evident in the focus upon infants in the early childhood curriculum frameworks developed in recent years in many…

  3. Applying the Kirkpatrick Model: Evaluating an "Interaction for Learning Framework" Curriculum Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Whitsed, Craig; Girardi, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Global perspectives and interpersonal and intercultural communication competencies are viewed as a priority within higher education. For management educators, globalisation, student mobility and widening pathways present numerous challenges, but afford opportunities for curriculum innovation. The "Interaction for Learning Framework"…

  4. Implementation of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Learning Approaches in Social Work and Sociology Gerontology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the goals and methods of the international Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement in higher education, and WAC-enriched learning approaches that the author used in teaching a social work gerontology practice course and a sociological theories of aging course. The author's in-class, low-stakes, nongraded writing…

  5. Facility Planning and Curriculum Design--The Impact of Environment on Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niece, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Facility planning and curriculum design, key ingredients of effective schooling, should complement one another. The open-classroom concept failed because of poor coordination between facility design and instructional practice. Aesthetic qualities of learning environments express certain values and affect teacher energy and student creativity.…

  6. The Reflections of Layered Curriculum to Learning-Teaching Process in Social Studies Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun, Emine Seda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to set the effect of Layered Curriculum on learning-teaching processes. The research was conducted on 2011-2012 educational year. The implementation process, which lasted for 4 weeks, was carried out with the theme named "The World of All of Us" in Social Studies lesson at 5th grade. Observation and interview…

  7. An Investigation of Curriculum Elements for the Enhancement of the Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Any curriculum consists of several components: goals, disposition, duration, needs analysis, learners and teachers, exercises and activities, resources, ways of learning, skills to be acquired, lexis, language structure, and ability assessment. Before setting up a program or course of study, these components should be determined and described in…

  8. Co-operative learning and adaptive instruction in a mathematics curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, J.; Herfs, P.G.P.; Mertens, E.H.M.; Perrenet, J.Chr.

    1994-01-01

    The AGO 12 to 16 Project (the acronym AGO stands for the Dutch equivalent of 'Adaptive Instruction and Co-operative Learning') seeks to develop and evaluate a mathematics curriculum which is suitable for mixed-ability groups in secondary education. The research questions we will address here are, fi

  9. A comparison of learning strategies, orientations and conceptions of learning of first-year medical students in a traditional and an innovative curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marambe, Kosala N; Athuraliya, T Nimmi C; Vermunt, Jan D; Boshuizen, Henny Pa

    2007-09-01

    Students adapt their learning strategies, orientations and conceptions to differences in the learning environment. The new curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, which commenced in 2005, puts greater emphasis on student-centred learning. The aim of this study was to compare the learning strategies, orientations and conceptions measured by means of a validated Sri Lankan version of the Inventory of Learning Styles (ILS) at the end of the first academic year for a traditional curriculum student group and a new curriculum student group. The Adyayana Rata Prakasha Malawa (ARPM) 130-item Sinhala version of the ILS was administered to students of the traditional curriculum and the new curriculum at the end of their first academic year respectively. Mean scale scores of the 2 groups were compared using independent sample t-test. Students of the new curriculum reported the use of critical processing, concrete processing and memorising and rehearsing strategies significantly more than those in the traditional curriculum group. With respect to learning orientations, personal interest scores were significantly higher for the new curriculum students while reporting of ambiguity was significantly lower among them. The results favour the assumption that changes made to the organisation of subject content and instructional and assessment methods have a positive impact on students' use of learning strategies and motivation.

  10. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    of virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning......, locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study...

  11. Cognitive development in introductory physics: A research-based approach to curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Raluca Elena

    This project describes the research on a classification of physics problems in the context of introductory physics courses. This classification, called the Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems (TIPP), relates physics problems to the cognitive processes required to solve them. TIPP was created for designing and clarifying educational objectives, for developing assessments that can evaluate individual component processes of the problem-solving process, and for guiding curriculum design in introductory physics courses, specifically within the context of a "thinking-skills" curriculum. TIPP relies on the following resources: (1) cognitive research findings adopted by physics education research, (2) expert-novice research discoveries acknowledged by physics education research, (3) an educational psychology taxonomy for educational objectives, and (4) various collections of physics problems created by physics education researchers or developed by textbook authors. TIPP was used in the years 2006--2008 to reform the first semester of the introductory algebra-based physics course (called Phys 11) at The George Washington University. The reform sought to transform our curriculum into a "thinking-skills" curriculum that trades "breadth for depth" by focusing on fewer topics while targeting the students' cognitive development. We employed existing research on the physics problem-solving expert-novice behavior, cognitive science and behavioral science findings, and educational psychology recommendations. Our pedagogy relies on didactic constructs such as the GW-ACCESS problem-solving protocol, learning progressions and concept maps that we have developed and implemented in our introductory physics course. These tools were designed based on TIPP. Their purpose is: (1) to help students build local and global coherent knowledge structures, (2) to develop more context-independent problem-solving abilities, (3) to gain confidence in problem solving, and (4) to establish

  12. CURRICULUM ENRICHMENT FOR LEARNING OUTCOMES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. P. M. Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In higher education learning outcomes are the specifications of what a student should learn and demonstrate on successful completion of the course or the programme.  It could be seen as desired outcome of learning process more importantly in terms of acquisition of skills and knowledge.  The ultimate learning outcome may be reflected in the vision and mission of the institution like for example, developing younger generation into responsible citizens of the country with social sensitivity and...

  13. Challenges of Teaching Physiology in an Integrated System-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zuheir; Sequeira, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of a traditional discipline-based medical curriculum into a system-based integrated curriculum often poses dilemmas to faculty involved in teaching basic medical sciences. This paper examines the challenges of teaching physiology to medical students in a system-based curriculum. Some of these challenges include: defining the core curriculum, curriculum links, sequencing curriculum content, interdisciplinary integration, and student assessment. A number of relevant issues including defining the core physiology content, faculty expertise, and coping and adapting to curriculum transitions are discussed from a personal perspective. For successful implementation of a system-based curriculum and to overcome the challenges, educational issues should be debated in regional and international forums.

  14. Designing Web-Based Educative Curriculum Materials for the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Cory; Saye, John; Brush, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a design experiment of web-based curriculum materials explicitly created to help social studies teachers develop their professional teaching knowledge. Web-based social studies curriculum reform efforts, human-centered interface design, and investigations into educative curriculum materials are reviewed, as well as…

  15. Designing Web-Based Educative Curriculum Materials for the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Cory; Saye, John; Brush, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a design experiment of web-based curriculum materials explicitly created to help social studies teachers develop their professional teaching knowledge. Web-based social studies curriculum reform efforts, human-centered interface design, and investigations into educative curriculum materials are reviewed, as well as…

  16. School-Based Communities of Practice as Mechanisms for Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Thomas E.; Jong, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    The authors drew upon Remillard and Bryans' categorization of curriculum use in observating two middle-grade teachers' integration of Standards-based curriculum materials produced by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Each teacher participated in a two-year professional development program focused on increasing content knowledge and…

  17. How we developed a comprehensive resuscitation-based simulation curriculum in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; McGraw, Robert; Howes, Daniel; Messenger, David; Bruder, Eric; Hall, Andrew; Chaplin, Timothy; Szulewski, Adam; Kaul, Tom; O'Brien, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, simulation-based education has emerged as a new and exciting adjunct to traditional bedside teaching and learning. Simulation-based education seems particularly relevant to emergency medicine training where residents have to master a very broad skill set, and may not have sufficient real clinical opportunities to achieve competence in each and every skill. In 2006, the Emergency Medicine program at Queen's University set out to enhance our core curriculum by developing and implementing a series of simulation-based teaching sessions with a focus on resuscitative care. The sessions were developed in such as way as to satisfy the four conditions associated with optimum learning and improvement of performance; appropriate difficulty of skill, repetitive practice, motivation, and immediate feedback. The content of the sessions was determined with consideration of the national training requirements set out by the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. Sessions were introduced in a stepwise fashion, starting with a cardiac resuscitation series based on the AHA ACLS guidelines, and leading up to a more advanced resuscitation series as staff became more adept at teaching with simulation, and as residents became more comfortable with this style of learning. The result is a longitudinal resuscitation curriculum that begins with fundamental skills of resuscitation and crisis resource management (CRM) in the first 2 years of residency and progresses through increasingly complex resuscitation cases where senior residents are expected to play a leadership role. This paper documents how we developed, implemented, and evaluated this resuscitation-based simulation curriculum for Emergency Medicine postgraduate trainees, with discussion of some of the challenges encountered.

  18. Practical classes: a platform for deep learning? Overall context in the first-year veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Marion T; Baird, Alan W; Mulholland, Clive W; Irwin, Jane A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the many practical formats that support the first-year veterinary curriculum. These practical classes are diverse in content and style. They include laboratory-based formats, classes involving live animals and cadavers, classes conducted using computer-aided learning tools, study groups, and information technology training. This preliminary study examines ratings for these practical classes, but also relates these ratings to students' approaches to study with the aim of understanding how a deep learning approach manifests itself in the practical setting. The diverse behaviors and attitudes to practical classes are also evaluated in the light of the approaches to study. A questionnaire that evaluated (1) a total of 24 practical classes, (2) the 52-item Approaches to Study Inventory, and (3) 13 behaviors within and attitudes to practical classes was distributed to 69 first-year veterinary students in their final term. Practical classes that involved live animals and cadavers were rated most positively by this group of students. These ratings, however, did not correlate significantly with the deep or surface learning score. The majority of practical classes where the ratings were found to be associated with deep and surface learning were laboratory-based, although overall these practical classes tended to be rated lower than those involving animals. Ratings did not correlate significantly with the strategic approach. A number of behaviors and attitudes to practical classes were also found to be positively and significantly (p=0.0001) associated with the deep learning approach. This preliminary study indicates that this cohort of veterinary students has an overall positive perception of practical classes that permit contact with live animals or cadavers. Although the perception of laboratory-type practical classes was lower overall, the ratings for these practical classes appeared to be influenced by their deep and surface learning

  19. [Development of a portfolio for competency-based assessment in a clinical clerkship curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, HyeRin; Lee, Jong-Tae; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe our experience in planning and developing a portfolio for a clinical clerkship curriculum. We have developed a portfolio for assessing student competency since 2007. During an annual workshop on clinical clerkship curricula, clerkship directors from five Paik hospitals of Inje University met to improve the assessment of the portfolio. We generated templates for students to record their activities and reflection and receive feedback. We uploaded these templates to our school's website for students to download freely. Annually, we have held a faculty development seminar and a workshop for portfolio assessment and feedback. Also, we established an orientation program on how to construct a learning portfolio for students. Future actions include creating a ubiquitous portfolio system, extending the portfolio to the entire curriculum, setting up an advisor system, and managing the quality of the portfolio. This study could be helpful for medical schools that plan to improve their portfolio assessment with an outcome-based approach.

  20. A rural community-based interdisciplinary curriculum: a social work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon-Dearing, Robin; Florence, Joe; Garrett, Linda; Click, Ivy A; Abercrombie, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Although social workers are frequently part of interdisciplinary teams in health care and community settings, interdisciplinary training is often lacking in social work education (Berg-Weger & Schneider, 1998). This article describes a study of the effects of an interdisciplinary community-based experiential course preparing new health care professionals for work as part of interdisciplinary teams. The interdisciplinary curriculum was established for a summer course taught in 2006 by faculty from five disciplines: social work, nutrition, medicine, nursing, and public health. The course, Quality Improvement in Rural Healthcare, which focused on health literacy in people with a diagnosis of diabetes that live in northeast Tennessee, provided a model environment for learning interdisciplinary teamwork. Evaluation of this course found that social work students displayed a statistically significant increase in positive attitude toward interdisciplinary teamwork. Course strengths, weaknesses, obstacles, and opportunities for curriculum improvement are elaborated.

  1. The development and implementation of a curriculum to improve clinicians' self-directed learning skills: a pilot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravata, Dawn MT; Huot, Stephen J; Abernathy, Hadley S; Skeff, Kelley M; Bravata, Dena MC

    2003-01-01

    Background Clinicians need self-directed learning skills to maintain competency. The objective of this study was to develop and implement a curriculum to teach physicians self-directed learning skills during inpatient ward rotations. Methods Residents and attendings from an internal medicine residency were assigned to intervention or control groups; intervention physicians completed self-directed learning curricular exercises. Results Among the 43 intervention physicians, 21 (49%) completed pre- and post-curriculum tests; and 10 (23%) completed the one-year test. Immediately after exposure to the curriculum, the proportion of physicians defining short- and long-term learning goals increased [short-term: 1/21 (5%) to 11/21 (52%), p = 0.001; long-term: 2/21 (10%) to 15/21 (71%), p = 0.001]. There were no significant changes post-curriculum in the quantity or quality of clinical question asking. The physicians' mean self-efficacy (on a 100-point scale) improved for their abilities to develop a plan to keep up with the medical literature (59 vs. 72, p = 0.04). The effects of the curriculum on self-reported learning behaviors was maintained from the immediate post-curriculum test to the one-year post curriculum test: [short-term learning goals: 1/21 (5%) pre-, 11/21 (52%) immediately post-, and 5/10 (50%) one-year after the curriculum (p = 0.0075 for the pre- vs one-year comparison); long-term learning goals: 2/21 (10%) pre-, 15/21 (71%) immediately post-, and 7/10 (70%) one-year (p = 0.0013 for the pre- vs one-year comparison). At one-year, half of the participants reported changed learning behaviors. Conclusions A four-week curriculum may improve self-directed learning skills. PMID:14572314

  2. State-Based Curriculum-Making: Approaches to Local Curriculum Work in Norway and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølstad, Christina Elde

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how state authorities in Norway and Finland design national curriculum to provide different policy conditions for local curriculum work in municipalities and schools. The topic is explored by comparing how national authorities in Norway and Finland create a scope for local curriculum. The data consist of interviews with…

  3. State-Based Curriculum-Making: Approaches to Local Curriculum Work in Norway and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølstad, Christina Elde

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how state authorities in Norway and Finland design national curriculum to provide different policy conditions for local curriculum work in municipalities and schools. The topic is explored by comparing how national authorities in Norway and Finland create a scope for local curriculum. The data consist of interviews with…

  4. Developing a competency-based curriculum in HIV for nursing schools in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knebel Elisa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing health workers to confront the HIV/AIDS epidemic is an urgent challenge in Haiti, where the HIV prevalence rate is 2.2% and approximately 10 100 people are taking antiretroviral treatment. There is a critical shortage of doctors in Haiti, leaving nurses as the primary care providers for much of the population. Haiti's approximately 1000 nurses play a leading role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment. However, nurses do not receive sufficient training at the pre-service level to carry out this important work. Methods To address this issue, the Ministry of Health and Population collaborated with the International Training and Education Center on HIV over a period of 12 months to create a competency-based HIV/AIDS curriculum to be integrated into the 4-year baccalaureate programme of the four national schools of nursing. Results Using a review of the international health and education literature on HIV/AIDS competencies and various models of curriculum development, a Haiti-based curriculum committee developed expected HIV/AIDS competencies for graduating nurses and then drafted related learning objectives. The committee then mapped these learning objectives to current courses in the nursing curriculum and created an 'HIV/AIDS Teaching Guide' for faculty on how to integrate and achieve these objectives within their current courses. The curriculum committee also created an 'HIV/AIDS Reference Manual' that detailed the relevant HIV/AIDS content that should be taught for each course. Conclusion All nursing students will now need to demonstrate competency in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, skills and attitudes during periodic assessment with direct observation of the student performing authentic tasks. Faculty will have the responsibility of developing exercises to address the required objectives and creating assessment tools to demonstrate that their graduates have met the objectives. This activity brought different

  5. Educational Reform, Enquiry-Based Learning and the Re-Professionalisation of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben; Morgan, John

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the implications for teacher education and continuous professional development (CPD) of enquiry-based learning, by drawing specifically on data collected during a four-year curriculum development and research project, Enquiring Minds (2005-9). Within the partnership approach to curriculum design endorsed by the project,…

  6. Competency-Based Curriculum and Curriculum Autonomy in the Republic of Korea. IBE Working Papers on Curriculum Issues No. 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keunho

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of the national curriculum in the Republic of Korea is ensured through curriculum revisions and the instructions issued by the Ministry of Education. The latter are acts of the Minister of Education that must be enforced in individual schools as stipulated in the regulations of Article 23 of the Elementary and Secondary…

  7. Sparking Passion: Engaging Student Voice through Project-Based Learning in Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christy L.

    2016-01-01

    How do we confront entrenched educational practices in higher education that lead to student demotivation, poor retention, and low persistence? This article argues that project-based learning that situates student voice and capacity at the center of culturally-responsive curriculum has the potential to spark student passion for problem-solving…

  8. Task-based learning: the answer to integration and problem-based learning in the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R; Crosby, J; Davis, M H; Howie, P W; Struthers, A D

    2000-05-01

    Integrated teaching and problem-based learning (PBL) are powerful educational strategies. Difficulties arise, however, in their application in the later years of the undergraduate medical curriculum, particularly in clinical attachments. Two solutions have been proposed - the use of integrated clinical teaching teams and time allocated during the week for PBL separate from the clinical work. Both approaches have significant disadvantages. Task-based learning (TBL) is a preferred strategy. In TBL, a range of tasks undertaken by a doctor are identified, e.g. management of a patient with abdominal pain, and these are used as the focus for learning. Students have responsibility for integrating their learning round the tasks as they move through a range of clinical attachments in different disciplines. They are assisted in this process by study guides. The implementation of TBL is described in one medical school. One hundred and thirteen tasks, arranged in 16 groups, serve to integrate the student learning as they rotate through 10 clinical attachments. This trans-disciplinary approach to integration, which incorporates the principles of PBL offers advantages to both teachers and students. It recognizes that clinical attachments in individual disciplines can offer rich learning opportunities and that such attachments can play a role in an integrated, as well as in a traditional, curriculum. In TBL, the contributions of the clinical attachments to the curriculum learning outcomes must be clearly defined and tasks selected which will serve as a focus for the integration of the students' learning over the range of attachments.

  9. Proof of Concept for a Novel Curriculum: Learning a Second Language during Anesthesiology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Kate Mitchell; Macias, Alvaro Andres; Lekowski, Robert; Concepcion, Mercedes; Zeballos, Jose

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a novel curriculum for anesthesiology residents matriculating through Brigham and Women's Department of Anesthesiology. It is offered electively and provides physician residents with time to acquire language skills through a medically-focused immersion program abroad. It is designed for them to learn or improve a second language and then to speak it while practicing perioperative medicine. Ultimately, the elective curriculum will equip future anesthesiologists with the communication tools to deliver professional and compassionate patient care both within the United States and internationally.

  10. Six scenarios of exploiting an ontology based, mobilized learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kismihók, G.; Szabó, I.; Vas, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, six different exploitation possibilities of an educational ontology based, mobilized learning management system are presented. The focal point of this system is the educational ontology model. The first version of this educational ontology model serves as a foundation for curriculum

  11. Examining the Gaps between Teaching and Learning in the Technology Curriculum within Taiwan's 9-Year Articulated Curriculum Reform from the Perspective of Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Chang, Liang-Te; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Kao, Chia-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers' and students' perceptions of content, learning…

  12. Examining the Gaps between Teaching and Learning in the Technology Curriculum within Taiwan's 9-Year Articulated Curriculum Reform from the Perspective of Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Chang, Liang-Te; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Kao, Chia-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers' and students' perceptions of content, learning…

  13. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  14. Learning To Serve, Serving To Learn: A View from Higher Education. Integrating Service-Learning into Curriculum: Lessons Learned. Teacher Education Consortium in Service-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    This collection of papers includes lessons learned from a 3-year collaboration among faculty who had pursued a scholarly inquiry of service-learning, integrated service-learning into their curricula, altered their teaching, forged partnerships with community based organizations, and developed measures and methodologies for assessing results. The…

  15. Curriculum Inquiry and Design for School-­ and Community-­Based Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudert, Lynn; McClure, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a range of possibilities and starting points for--and conversations about--meaningful journeys related to the exploration of visual arts content and the engagement of learning. The authors highlight and blend theoretical, practical, and flexible approaches to integrating curriculum inquiry and curriculum design. "Curriculum…

  16. Competency Based Curriculum Guide for Practical Nursing Education in Virginia. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA. Dept. of Industrial Arts Education.

    This final report contains a three-page narrative and extensive appendixes, including correspondence, surveys, field test evaluation and guide, and the Competency-Based Curriculum Guide for Practical Nursing Education in Virginia developed by the project. The over 200-page curriculum guide presents a suggested master curriculum for a twelve or…

  17. The Design of Curriculum Development Based on Entrepreneurship through Balanced Scorecard Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Muhammad; Musa, Chalid Imran; Haerani, Siti; Sudirman, Indrianti

    2015-01-01

    This research is intended to develop curriculum based on entrepreneurship through balanced scorecard approach at the School of Business or "Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Ekonomi" (STIE) Nobel Indonesia. In order to develop the curriculum, a need analysis in terms of curriculum development that involves all stakeholders at STIE Nobel in Indonesia…

  18. Learning Futures: Rebuilding Curriculum and Pedagogy around Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the Learning Futures programme, a partnership set up between the Paul Hamlyn Foundation and the Innovation Unit. The two organisations had previously worked together on the Musical Futures project that had involved radical new approaches to teaching and learning in secondary school music. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  19. A Problem Solving Curriculum for Active Learning at the Northwest Center for Medical Education, Indiana University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatridis, Panayotis G.

    An innovative curriculum called the "Regional Center Alternative Pathway," recently adopted by the Northwest Center for Medical Education (part of Indiana University's School of Medicine), is presented. The curriculum combines the traditional structure's didactic approach with a new problem-based tutorial curriculum. In this curriculum…

  20. Context-Based Science Curriculum Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, several science courses have been developed which could be labelled “context-based.” In some areas of the world, these courses are named Science-Technology-Society (STS). The aims of such courses are usually to make science more relevant to students by linking science to

  1. A case for problem-based collaborative learning in the nursing classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Trudeau, Kimberlee J

    2003-01-01

    To facilitate student learning of the content in a clinical nursing course, the authors used ideas from Problem-based Learning (PBL) and collaborative learning to develop student writing assignments and group workshops. They describe the PBL-enhanced activities and student work, concluding with student feedback and future directions for this curriculum.

  2. Mathematics Teachers’ Opinions about New Sub Learning Domains in Elementary Mathematics (6-8 Curriculum

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    Kürşat YENİLMEZ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There are mathematical behaviors in all levels from the preschool education to higher education programs. These behaviors are in mathematics curriculum as objectives. Elementary Mathematics (6-8th grades curriculum was developed in 2005 at last and applied gradually from the 6th grade in 2006-2007 academic year. Thematic approach was considered in regulating context in new mathematics curriculum and determined learning domains and sub learning domains. Some subjects were taken out and some new subjects were added in developing program studies. Patterns and relations in integers, translation, tessellations, structural drawings, transformation geometry, fractals, geometric movements, histogram, kinds of probability, standard deviation, combination, perspective drawings, intersections of objects, polyhedral objects, symmetries of geometric objects are some new subjects in mathematics (6-8th grades curriculum. Patterns and relations in integers and special number patterns are in Patterns and Relations in Algebra learning domain, translation, reflection, rotation, geometric movements and symmetries of geometric objects, tessellations and fractal, structural drawings, intersections of objects and polyhedral objects are in Geometry learning domain, histogram, kinds of probability, standard deviation, combination are in Probability and Statistics learning domain. The purpose of this study was to determine mathematics teachers’ opinions and qualifications about new sub learning domains in elementary mathematics (6-8th grades curriculum. The descriptive survey method was used in the study. The work group of the study consists of 27 mathematics teachers from primary schools in Tekirdağ. Data were collected by a questionnaire which has been developed by the researchers. The questionnaire has 9 open-ended and 17 close-ended questions. Open-ended questions were used to determine mathematics teachers’ views about new sub learning domains were

  3. [The construction of collective portfolios in traditional curriculums: an innovative approach in teaching-learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, Rosângela Minardi Mitre; Silva, Luciana Saraiva da; Lopes, Lílian Lelis; Gomes, Karine de Oliveira; Cotta, Fernanda Mitre; Lugarinho, Regina; Mitre, Sandra Minardi

    2012-03-01

    Education to promote health has traditionally been based on knowledge transmission methodologies. However, the current scenario calls for the training of professionals with a critical-reflective profile, who are able to work in teams. We present the report of an innovative experience using the construction of collective portfolios as instruments of learning, changing attitudes and training of undergraduates, in a traditional subject-based curriculum structure context. It is a descriptive exploratory study, with a qualitative-quantitative approach, based on analysis of collective portfolios (n=9), built by Health Policy students, together with an open questionnaire to students who attended the course (n=58) and also the staging of focus groups (n=3). The use of collective portfolios mobilized students in critical and reflective thinking on Brazilian health policy - the Unified Health System - broadening the concept on the health-disease process and practices related to health services, prioritizing teamwork and the active search for knowledge building, stressing the exercise of otherness, resilience and empowerment.

  4. Student perceptions of syndicate learning: tutor-less group work within an undergraduate dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKerlie, R A; Cameron, D A; Sherriff, A; Bovill, C

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the implementation of syndicate learning (tutor-less group working) to teach the basic principles and skills of removable partial denture design within an undergraduate dental curriculum at the University of Glasgow. Student perceptions of syndicate group learning were collected through using questionnaires with Likert scales and through focus group interviews. The majority of students expressed positive views of syndicate learning that focused on the following themes: the added value of the group in terms of learning and in terms of social cohesion; the sense of responsibility to peers that led them to work harder; the autonomy of tutor-less groups that led them to improve their ability to justify their work; and the effectiveness of the syndicate groups in comparison with other learning methods. On the basis of these findings along with reports from students that learning about group roles enhanced their preparation for future work, we argue that syndicate learning can offer some valuable benefits to the undergraduate dental curriculum.

  5. Problem-based learning packages: considerations for neophyte package writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengstberger-Sims, C; McMillan, M A

    1993-02-01

    Adopting problem-based learning (PBL) as the major educational approach in the implementation of a nursing curriculum requires the development of numerous learning stimulus packages. When reviewing the experience of the Division of Nursing within the Faculty of Health at the University of Western Sydney, Macarthur in Australia, several considerations for package writers were identified and are discussed. These include needs assessment, integration of the curricula content strands, multi-media learning stimuli, context, role and the incorporation of ongoing client management. The need for nurturance of writers and peer review of the developed packages is also addressed, as is a review of the impact of different learning stimuli.

  6. Effectiveness of an e-learning curriculum on occupational health for music performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Huei; Lin, Yaw-Jen; Tang, Hsin-Yi Jean; Su, Mei-Ju; Chen, Heng-Shuen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of the e-learning curriculum and (2) to explore the type of questions raised by students through the "Health Promotion for Music Performers" (HPMP) e-learning curriculum. This study was primarily a pedagogical research composed of a pre- and postintervention design coupled with a 1-month longitudinal knowledge retention measurement. The intervention, the HPMP e-learning curriculum, was implemented over 14 weeks, once a week, for a total of 14 classes. Each class consisted of a 60-min prerecorded lecture followed by a 40-min real-time interactive discussion. The interdisciplinary faculty panel consisted of experts from the field of music and medicine. The Self-Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ) was used to evaluate knowledge changes concerning (1) Practice and Performance issues and (2) Health and Life Style issues. Fifteen graduate-level music students participated in the study. The SAQ scores on the 1-month follow-up test for Practice and Performance issues were significantly higher than the pretest (t=2.731, ppsychology (11%). The findings suggest that the HPMP e-learning course enhanced student awareness of Practice and Performance issues but did not have as significant an impact on student awareness of Health and Lifestyle issues.

  7. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  8. Simulation-based medical teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important steps in curriculum development is the introduction of simulation- based medical teaching and learning. Simulation is a generic term that refers to an artificial representation of a real world process to achieve educational goals through experiential learning. Simulation based medical education is defined as any educational activity that utilizes simulation aides to replicate clinical scenarios. Although medical simulation is relatively new, simulation has been used for a long time in other high risk professions such as aviation. Medical simulation allows the acquisition of clinical skills through deliberate practice rather than an apprentice style of learning. Simulation tools serve as an alternative to real patients. A trainee can make mistakes and learn from them without the fear of harming the patient. There are different types and classification of simulators and their cost vary according to the degree of their resemblance to the reality, or ′fidelity′. Simulation- based learning is expensive. However, it is cost-effective if utilized properly. Medical simulation has been found to enhance clinical competence at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It has also been found to have many advantages that can improve patient safety and reduce health care costs through the improvement of the medical provider′s competencies. The objective of this narrative review article is to highlight the importance of simulation as a new teaching method in undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  9. Practical Curriculum Design Based on Food Motoring System of PLC

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    Jie Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study designed a kind of stepping food motoring control system based on PLC and touch screen, complete the secondary design and renovation based on PLC technology. According to the trend that the PLC new technology is widely and deeply applied into modern food industrial production, combining students electrician, maintenance electrician basic skill training needs to make a reformation of the food motoring system of student training curriculum. This system has simple structure, stable performance, economic value, outstanding using effect, remarkable specific design example and expected effect.

  10. Curriculum scholars: Embedding learning and teaching scholarship in first year academic identities. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This practice report details an institutional innovation designed to enhance academic capacities for curriculum development, with a particular focus on the first year experience (FYE. The authors discuss the appointment of “Curriculum Scholars” in each of the faculties at James Cook University. This innovation can be seen as an example of third generation responses to the challenges of the first year in higher education (FYHE (Kift, Nelson & Clarke, 2010. The report  discusses the question of academic identity and the tension between a discipline-specific identity and identification with the scholarship of teaching and learning. The authors argue that this tension may have significant implications for the success of third generation approaches to the FYE. This tension is the focus of a multi-method research project being developed by the authors. The autoethnographical dimension of this project is described, inviting participants to reflect on their own journeys as academics engaged in learning and teaching.

  11. 基于项目课程理论的高校篮球课程改革%College basketball curriculum reform based on project curriculum theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董伦红; 饶英

    2013-01-01

    Based on epistemology and learning psychology, the authors analyzed the current situation of college bas-ketball teaching in China. The reasons for the poor practical effect of basketball teaching in China are as follows:cur-riculum contents were organized under the disciplinary system mode;failure to understand the relationship between skill and ability;failure to profoundly grasp the profound connotations and spiritual essence of the curriculum. Based on project curriculum theory, the authors put forward the following measures for college basketball curriculum teaching reform:routinize basketball curriculum contents into such 4 projects as ground offense, shifting from offense to de-fense, ground defense, and shifting from defense to offense;establish semester curriculum contents according to the 4 projects respectively;develop semester basketball curriculum contents in the order of project-task-knowledge;im-plement teaching according to the classroom teaching and extracurricular activity integrated curriculum teaching mode.%以知识论和学习心理学为基础,分析我国高校篮球教学现状。我国篮球教学实践效果不佳的原因是篮球教学以学科体系模式组织课程内容,没有理解技能与能力的关系,没有深刻领会课程的深刻内涵和精神实质。基于项目课程理论提出高校篮球课程教学改革的措施:把篮球课程内容序化为阵地进攻、从攻转守、阵地防守和从守转攻等4个项目;按4个项目分别构建学期课程内容;按项目-任务-知识的顺序进行学期篮球课程内容开发;按课堂教学与课外活动一体化课程教学模式实施教学。

  12. Percepción de los estudiantes de medicina del ambiente educativo en una facultad con currículo tradicional (UCH-Chile y otra con currículo basado en problemas (UNC-Argentina Medical students' perception of the educational environment in a faculty developing a traditional curriculum (UCH-Chile and another with a problem based learning curriculum (UNC-Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Díaz-Véliz

    2011-03-01

    (UNC, which develop a traditional curriculum and a problem based curriculum, respectively. Subjects and methods: A transversal study was performed in 465 students: 232 from the UCH and 233 from the UNC. The distribution was 84/70 for the first course, 77/97 for the third one and 71/66 for the fifth one, respectively. The DREEM questionnaire, which consists of 50 items, was applied. It covers 5 dimensions of the educational environment: perception about learning, perception about teachers, academic self-perception, perception about educational climate and social self-perception. Results: Total DREEM scores were significantly higher in the UNC. Scores were similar in all courses from both universities, with the exception of fifth course UCH. Regarding their perception about teachers, students of the fifth course UCH showed the lowest score, whereas students of the first course UNC had the best perception. Similar results were obtained for the academic auto-perception; while the perception of the learning environment obtained higher scores in the three courses from the UNC. Social auto-perception was similar in all courses tested in this study. Conclusions: Differences observed between both universities could be attributed to their different curricula. Problem based curriculum seems to be better appreciated than the traditional one. Our study corroborates the efficacy of the DREEM questionnaire to identify strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum and for the assessment of teaching quality in medical schools.

  13. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  14. A Taxonomic Analysis of the Intended Learning Outcomes of the Primary School Social Studies Curriculum for 7th Graders

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    Ahmet Ali Gazel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes held as a result of scientific and technological developments affect our lives from all perspectives. Educational activities are also affected by this process. The previous primary school curriculum in Turkey has been gradually given up since 2005. “Constructivist” curricula have been developed. The Social Studies curriculum has been renewed in accordance with this conception as well. Therefore, all elements of the curriculum have been changed. Being defined as “objectives or goals” in the previous curriculum, the intended learning outcomes (ILOs of the Social Studies curriculum for 7th graders have been taxonomically analyzed. Findings indicated the ILOs of the Social Studies curriculum for 7th graders intensively take place in cognitive taxonomy and the number of the ILOs related to other taxonomies is lacking. It was seen that ILOs are compatible with content and activities in general. Through the findings and the literature, some recommendations were made.

  15. The scientific learning approach using multimedia-based maze game to improve learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Wawan; Hafitriani, Sarah; Prabawa, Harsa Wara

    2016-02-01

    The objective of curriculum 2013 is to improve the quality of education in Indonesia, which leads to improving the quality of learning. The scientific approach and supported empowerment media is one approach as massaged of curriculum 2013. This research aims to design a labyrinth game based multimedia and apply in the scientific learning approach. This study was conducted in one of the Vocational School in Subjects of Computer Network on 2 (two) classes of experimental and control. The method used Mix Method Research (MMR) which combines qualitative in multimedia design, and quantitative in the study of learning impact. The results of a survey showed that the general of vocational students like of network topology material (68%), like multimedia (74%), and in particular, like interactive multimedia games and flash (84%). Multimediabased maze game developed good eligibility based on media and material aspects of each value 840% and 82%. Student learning outcomes as a result of using a scientific approach to learning with a multimediabased labyrinth game increase with an average of gain index about (58%) and higher than conventional multimedia with index average gain of 0.41 (41%). Based on these results the scientific approach to learning by using multimediabased labyrinth game can improve the quality of learning and increase understanding of students. Multimedia of learning based labyrinth game, which developed, got a positive response from the students with a good qualification level (75%).

  16. Preschool Teachers Can Use a Media-Rich Curriculum to Prepare Low-Income Children for School Success: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Summative Evaluation of the "Ready to Learn Initiative"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Pasnik, Shelley; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Llorente, Carlin; Hupert, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy," that is, when children have opportunities to learn a focused set of skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media. Participants in this study were low-income children ages…

  17. Genetically modified food in perspective: an inquiry-based curriculum to help middle school students make sense of tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

    To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial ideas and those presented in the curriculum. Pre-test and post-test scores from 190 students show that students made significant (p genetically modified food controversy. Analyses of students' final papers, in which they took and defended a position on what type of agricultural practice should be used in their geographical region, showed that students were able to provide evidence both for and against their positions, but were less explicit about how they weighed these tradeoffs. These results provide important insights into students' thinking and have implications for curricular design.

  18. eABLE: Embedding Social Media in Academic Curriculum as a Learning and Assessment Strategy to Enhance Students Learning and E-Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megele, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the redesign of an MSc module to enhance students' engagement and learning through embedding social media technologies into the academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy, and in a complementary manner that facilitated and enhanced the achievement of the module's learning outcomes. This paper describes the…

  19. eABLE: Embedding Social Media in Academic Curriculum as a Learning and Assessment Strategy to Enhance Students Learning and E-Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megele, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the redesign of an MSc module to enhance students' engagement and learning through embedding social media technologies into the academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy, and in a complementary manner that facilitated and enhanced the achievement of the module's learning outcomes. This paper describes the…

  20. Next generation of procedural skills curriculum development: Proficiency-based progression

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    Richard M. Satava

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The FRS use a new process (full life-cycle curriculum development with proficiency-based progression which can be used in order to develop any quantitative procedural curriculum, through generic templates that have been developed. Such an approach will dramatically decrease the cost, time and effort to develop a new specific curriculum, while producing uniformity in approach, inter-operability among different curricula and consistency in objective assessment. This process is currently online, open source and freely available, to encourage the adoption of a scholarly and rigorous approach to curriculum development which is flexible enough to be adopted and adapted to most technical skills curriculum needs.

  1. Curriculum-Dependent and Curriculum-Independent Factors in Preservice Elementary Teachers' Adaptation of Science Curriculum Materials for Inquiry-Based Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cory T.

    2013-02-01

    In this nested mixed methods study I investigate factors influencing preservice elementary teachers' adaptation of science curriculum materials to better support students' engagement in science as inquiry. Analyses focus on two `reflective teaching assignments' completed by 46 preservice elementary teachers in an undergraduate elementary science methods course in which they were asked to adapt existing science curriculum materials to plan and enact inquiry-based science lessons in elementary classrooms. Data analysis involved regression modeling of artifacts associated with these lessons, as well as in-depth, semester-long case studies of six of these preservice teachers. Results suggest that features of the existing science curriculum materials, including measures of how inquiry-based they were, have a relatively small influence on the preservice teachers' curricular adaptations, while teacher-specific variables account for a much greater percentage of the variance. Evidence from the case studies illustrates the critical impact of the preservice teachers' field placement contexts as an explanatory, teacher-specific factor in their curricular adaptations. These findings have important implications for science teacher educators and science curriculum developers, in terms of not only better understanding how preservice teachers engage with curriculum materials, but also how programmatic features of teacher education programs influence their ability to do so.

  2. University Teaching with a Disability: Student Learnings beyond the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Lynnaire; Kotevski, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the learning experience of university students who were tutored by a teacher with quadriplegia mixed type cerebral palsy. It was inspired by Pritchard's [2010. "Disabled People as Culturally Relevant Teachers." "Journal of Social Inclusion" 1 (1): 43-51] argument that the presence of people with a…

  3. Infusing Social Emotional Learning into the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waajid, Badiyyah; Garner, Pamela W.; Owen, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    Research supports the importance of policies and interventions to infuse social emotional curricula in schools. The role of teachers in supporting young children's social and emotional readiness for classroom learning has been recognized, but instruction in children's well-being and social emotional competence is a low priority in teacher…

  4. Current Developments in Language Curriculum Design: An Australian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Jill

    1998-01-01

    A review of literature on second-language curriculum design in Australia outlines some general trends in communicative language teaching theory and needs-based language curriculum planning, task-based learning, and recent cultural, social, and literacy perspectives on curriculum, and then examines specific initiatives to reform curricula, to…

  5. Spiraling evidence-based practice and outcomes management concepts in an undergraduate curriculum: a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy Miner; Noone, Joanne; Luce, Linda L; Sideras, Stephanie A

    2009-06-01

    Preparing undergraduate nursing students to practice nursing in the 21st century requires a focus on the development of evidence-based practice and outcomes management knowledge and skills throughout the nursing curriculum. To this end, seven learning activities were created that spiral and increase in complexity while building on previously acquired skills. Working in teams and practicing team-building techniques, students learned how to develop a clinical question, search the literature, synthesize the current knowledge, identify the significance of the issue in an ecological model, decipher existing quality data and compare that data to national benchmarks, investigate a health care quality issue using quality improvement methods, and draft a proposal for implementation of a continuous quality improvement initiative. Work was presented in both written and oral presentation formats, with emphasis on engaging various audiences in a compelling health care issue.

  6. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

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    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  7. An overview of case-based and problem-based learning methodologies for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Lyon, Cindy; Blaseio, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Dental education has undergone significant curriculum reform in response to the 1995 Institute of Medicine report Dental Education at the Crossroads and the series of white papers from the American Dental Education Association Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) first published in the Journal of Dental Education and subsequently collected in a volume titled Beyond the Crossroads: Change and Innovation in Dental Education. An important element of this reform has been the introduction into academic dentistry of active learning strategies such as problem-based and case-based learning. As an aide to broadening understanding of these approaches in order to support their expansion in dental education, this article reviews the major characteristics of each approach, situates each in adult learning theory, and discusses the advantages of case-based learning in the development of a multidisciplinary, integrated predoctoral dental curriculum.

  8. A Field-Based Learning Experience for Introductory Level GIS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pedagogic foundation for introducing a field-based geographic information systems (GIS) experience to the GIS curriculum at the university level and uses a dual evaluation methodology to monitor student learning and satisfaction. Students learned the basics of field-based global position systems (GPS) and GIS data…

  9. Activity Based Learning in a Freshman Global Business Course: Analyses of Preferences and Demographic Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark F.; Guy, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates pre-business students' reaction to Activity Based Learning in a lower division core required course entitled Introduction to Global Business in the business curriculum at California State University Chico. The study investigates students' preference for Activity Based Learning in comparison to a more traditional…

  10. Problem-Based Learning: An Exercise on Vermont's Legalization of Civil Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Susan M.; Hurlbert, Janet McNeil

    2004-01-01

    The majority of literature regarding problem-based learning demonstrates its usefulness as a teaching technique in the natural sciences curriculum. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the broad purpose is to illustrate the application of problem-based learning for instructing students about controversial issues in sociology. Within the…

  11. How To Spice Up The Curriculum?

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    Muhammad Imran Omar,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical education has witnessed tremendous development in the last three decades. The traditional lecture based didactic teaching is gradually replaced with small group teaching; problem- based learning; learning with standardized patients and community-oriented medical education.Traditional methods of teaching and learning are no longer considered the most appropriate approach and new methods of teaching and learning are based on strong foundation of educational theories. Students are the focus point while designing medical curriculum and teaching and learning should be student centered. The traditional approach of sorting curriculum; based upon subject areas; is no longer considered appropriate and curriculum requires integration of various disciplines. Community needs are of utmost importance while designing curriculum. Students should be offered various electives so that the teaching and learning is individualized and fulfilling the community needs as well.

  12. Teaching and learning in an integrated curriculum setting: A case study of classroom practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMath, Sheryl Lynn

    Curriculum integration, while a commonly used educational term, remains a challenging concept to define and examine both in research and in classroom practice. Numerous types and definitions of curriculum integration exist in educational research, while, in comparison, teachers tend to focus on curriculum integration simply as a mixing of subject areas. To better understand curriculum integration in practice, this thesis details a case study that examines both teacher and student perspectives regarding a grade nine integrated unit on energy. Set in a public secondary school in Ontario, Canada, I comprehensively describe and analyze teacher understandings of, and challenges with, the implementation of an integrated unit, while also examining student perspectives and academic learning. My participants consisted of two high school teachers, a geography teacher and a science teacher, and their twenty-three students. Using data gathered from interviews before, during, and after the implementation of a 16-lesson unit, as well as observations throughout, I completed a case description and thematic analysis. My results illustrate the importance of examining why teachers choose to implement an integrated unit and the planning and scheduling challenges that exist. In addition, while the students in this study were academically successful, clarification is needed regarding whether student success can be linked to the integration of these two subjects or the types of activities these two teachers utilized.

  13. Improving Prevention Curricula: Lessons Learned Through Formative Research on the Youth Message Development Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kathryn; Catona, Danielle; Elek, Elvira; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Banerjee, Smita C; Hecht, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    This article describes formative research (a pilot study, interviews, and focus groups) conducted as part of a feasibility test of 2 versions (Analysis vs. Planning) of a brief media literacy intervention titled Youth Message Development (YMD). The intervention targets high school student alcohol use with activities to understand persuasion strategies, increase counter-arguing, and then apply these new skills to ad analysis or a more engaging ad poster planning activity. Based on the theory of active involvement (Greene, 2013), the Planning curriculum is proposed to be more effective than the Analysis curriculum. Overall, results of the formative research indicated that students (N = 182) and mentors/teachers (N = 53) perceived the YMD Planning curriculum as more interesting, involving, and novel, and these ratings were associated with increased critical thinking about the impact of advertising, lower alcohol use intentions, and fewer positive expectations about the effects of alcohol use. Qualitative feedback indicated a need to supplement alcohol-focused ad stimuli with ads targeting other advertising images, use incentives and competition-based activities to further enhance student motivation, and provide flexibility to enhance the appropriateness of the curriculum to various settings. These concerns led to the development of a revised curriculum and plans for further study.

  14. Improving Prevention Curricula: Lessons Learned Through Formative Research on the Youth Message Development Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    GREENE, KATHRYN; CATONA, DANIELLE; ELEK, ELVIRA; MAGSAMEN-CONRAD, KATE; BANERJEE, SMITA C.; HECHT, MICHAEL L.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes formative research (a pilot study, interviews, and focus groups) conducted as part of a feasibility test of 2 versions (Analysis vs. Planning) of a brief media literacy intervention titled Youth Message Development (YMD). The intervention targets high school student alcohol use with activities to understand persuasion strategies, increase counter-arguing, and then apply these new skills to ad analysis or a more engaging ad poster planning activity. Based on the theory of active involvement (Greene, 2013), the Planning curriculum is proposed to be more effective than the Analysis curriculum. Overall, results of the formative research indicated that students (N = 182) and mentors/teachers (N = 53) perceived the YMD Planning curriculum as more interesting, involving, and novel, and these ratings were associated with increased critical thinking about the impact of advertising, lower alcohol use intentions, and fewer positive expectations about the effects of alcohol use. Qualitative feedback indicated a need to supplement alcohol-focused ad stimuli with ads targeting other advertising images, use incentives and competition-based activities to further enhance student motivation, and provide flexibility to enhance the appropriateness of the curriculum to various settings. These concerns led to the development of a revised curriculum and plans for further study. PMID:27684111

  15. 校本課程領導與課程評價School-based Curriculum Leadership and Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    李子建Chi-Kin Lee

    2005-01-01

    校本課程發展可說是課程改革的一個核心議題。本文嘗試把課程領導和課程評鑑在校本課程發展的脈絡中作一綜合討論。文章分為四部分:第一部分探討課程領導及課程評價的意涵;第二部分討論課程領導、課程評鑑及校本課程發展三者的關聯;第三及第四部分分別探討校長課程領導,以及技術與非技術取向的校本課程領導與課程評鑑。 School-based curriculum development is seen as one of the core issues in curriculum reform. This article attempts to discuss, in an integrated manner, curriculum leadership and curriculum evaluation under the context of school-based curriculum development. The article is divided into four parts. The first part explores the meaning of curricul...

  16. Empowering chemistry teachers for context-based education. Towards a framework for design and evaluation of a teacher professional development programme in curriculum innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many countries experience a wave of context-based curriculum innovation aimed at meaningful student learning. During such innovations, teachers are encouraged to participate in the design of innovative context-based teaching materials. This thesis describes studies on the empowerment of Dutch

  17. Empowering chemistry teachers for context-based education. Towards a framework for design and evaluation of a teacher professional development programme in curriculum innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many countries experience a wave of context-based curriculum innovation aimed at meaningful student learning. During such innovations, teachers are encouraged to participate in the design of innovative context-based teaching materials. This thesis describes studies on the empowerment of Dutch chemis

  18. Interprofessional education as part of becoming a doctor or physiotherapist in a competency-based curriculum

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    Sander, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interprofessional learning is a critical pre-requisite for future interprofessional work. Structural adaptations in education offer possibilities to introduce new concepts. Rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMD are both prevented and treated by physicians and physiotherapists but the development of interprofessional roles is seldom part of curricula.Project description: A complex, longitudinal interprofessional educational approach for future doctors and physiotherapists was designed and implanted at various stages (anatomy, physical examination, pathology, therapy. Most segments of the RMD curriculum are now based on interprofessional classes. Student satisfaction with learning is continually and comparatively evaluated. Learning success is assessed with practical and written exams.Results: Interprofessional teaching was first introduced in 2013 for 420 first-year and 360 fourth-year medical students, along with 40 first- and third-year physiotherapy majors. The satisfaction with teaching and learning is high and distinctly above average for all teaching areas (satisfaction RMD rated as 2.4; average for all is 3.3. The percentage of those who pass the final exam is 94%. 100% of the students surveyed support the continuation of this interprofessional unit.Conclusion: Interprofessional teaching of RMD can be successfully implemented for future physicians and physiotherapists at different learning levels.

  19. The New Trends in School-based Curriculum Decision-making in the West%西方校本课程决策的新动向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁念金

    2012-01-01

    Currendy,there are many new trends in the school-based curriculum decision-making in the western countries. In the ideology,they insist that the school- based curriculum decision-making should centered on learning,should emphasize personalized learning,emphasize the integration of the knowledge learning and the whole life experience,and pay close attention to the culture aspect of the school-based curriculum decision-making. In the mechanism,there are changes both in the whole frame of curriculum decision-making mechanism and the inner mechanism of the school-based curriculum decision-making. In the way,they lay stress on the decision- making of curriculum unified planning,the decision-making of curriculum supplementation and the decision-making of the guidance on students" personalized learning.%当前,西方国家校本课程决策出现了许多新的动向:在理念上,以学习为中心。强调个性化学习,强调知识学习与整体生活经验融通,关注校本课程决策的文化视角;在机制上,课程决策机制的整体框架和校本课程决策的内在机制都有变化;在方式上,注重课程统筹性的决策,注重课程补充上的决策。注重对学生进行个性化学习指导上的决策。

  20. Dramatizing the Content with Curriculum-Based Readers Theatre, Grades 6-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Rosalind M.

    2007-01-01

    Unlike traditional Readers Theatre, which is typically limited to literature-based scripts, Curriculum-Based Readers Theatre (CBRT) allows teachers and students to create scripts based on any topic, any work of literature, any textbook, or almost any collection of facts. It can be easily incorporated into the existing curriculum, and because this…