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Sample records for based glass ceramics

  1. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  2. Neodymium incorporation in zirconolite-based glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigations on enhanced reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel, and notably on separating the long-lived minor actinides, such as Am and Cm, from the other fission products have led to the development of highly durable specific matrices such as glass-ceramics for their immobilization. This study deals with the characterization of zirconolite (CaZrT2O7) based glass-ceramics synthesized by devitrification of an aluminosilicate parent glass. Trivalent actinide ions were simulated by neodymium, which is a paramagnetic local probe. Glass-ceramics with Nd2O3 contents ranging from 0 to 10 weight % were prepared by heat treatment of a parent glass at two different growth temperatures: 1050 deg and 1200 deg C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements clearly indicate that Nd3+ ions are partly incorporated in zirconolite crystals formed in the bulk of the glass-ceramic samples. The amount of neodymium in the crystalline phase was estimated using ESR results and was found to decrease with increasing either heat treatment temperature or total Nd2O-3 content. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  3. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    OpenAIRE

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne Dybdahl; Ulsund, Amanda Hembre; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based res...

  4. Crystallisation Kinetics of a β-Spodumene-Based Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available LZSA (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O3 glass ceramic system has shown high potential to obtain LTCC laminate tapes at low sintering temperature (<1000°C for several applications, such as screen-printed electronic components. Furthermore, LZSA glass ceramics offer interesting mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties, which make LZSA also a potential candidate for fabricating multilayered structures processed by Laminated Objects Manufacturing (LOM technology. The crystallization kinetics of an LZSA glass ceramic with a composition of 16.9Li2O⋅5.0ZrO2⋅65.1SiO2⋅8.6Al2O3 was investigated using nonisothermal methods by differential thermal analysis and scanning electronic microscopy. Apparent activation energy for crystallization was found to be in the 274–292 kJ⋅mol−1 range, and an Avrami parameter n of 1 was obtained that is compared very favorably with SEM observations.

  5. Barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics for scintillation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europium (Eu)-activated barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics represent a promising class of Xray scintillators. The scintillation in these glass ceramics is mainly caused by the emission of divalent Eu incorporated in hexagonal BaCl2 nanocrystals which are formed in the glass matrix upon appropriate annealing. Experiments with cerium (Ce)-activated fluorozironate glass ceramics showed that Ce is an interesting alternative. In order to get a better understanding of the scintillation mechanism in Eu- or Ce-activated barium halide nanocrystals, an investigation of the processes in the corresponding bulk material is essential. The objective of this thesis is the investigation of undoped, Eu-, and Ce-doped barium halides by X-ray excited luminescence (XL), pulse height, and scintillation decay spectra. That will help to figure out which of these crystals has the most promising scintillation properties and would be the best nanoparticles for the glass ceramics. Furthermore, alternative dopants like samarium (Sm) and manganese (Mn) were also investigated. Besides the above-mentioned optical investigation electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Moessbauer measurements were carried out in order to complete the picture of Eu-doped barium halides. The EPR data of Eu-doped BaI2 is anticipated to yield more information about the crystal field and crystal structure that will help to understand the charge carrier process during the scintillation process. The main focus of the Moessbauer investigations was set on the Eu-doped fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics. The results of this investigation should help to improve the glass ceramics. The Eu2+/Eu3+ ratio in the glass ceramics should be determined and optimize favor of the Eu2+. We also want to distinguish between Eu2+ in the glass matrix and Eu2+ in the nanocrystals. For a better understanding of Moessbauer spectroscopy on Eu also measurements on Eu in a CaF2 host lattice were carried out. (orig.)

  6. Diopside-fluorapatite-wollastonite based bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Kansal, Ishu

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics are a class of biomaterials which elicit special response on their surface when in contact with biological fluids, leading to strong bonding to living tissue. This particular trait along with good sintering ability and high mechanical strength make them ideal materials for scaffold fabrication. The work presented in this thesis is directed towards understanding the composition-structure-property relationships in potentially bioactive glasses...

  7. Review of glass ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramics are being considered for the immobilization of nuclear wastes to obtain a waste form with improved properties relative to glasses. Improved impact resistance, decreased thermal expansion, and increased leach resistance are possible. In addition to improved properties, the spontaneous devitrification exhibited in some waste-containing glasses can be avoided by the controlled crystallization after melting in the glass-ceramic process. The majority of the glass-ceramic development for nuclear wastes has been conducted at the Hahn-Meitner Institute (HMI) in Germany. Two of their products, a celsian-based (BaAl3Si2O8) and a fresnoite-based (Ba2TiSi2O8) glass ceramic, have been studied at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A basalt-based glass ceramic primarily containing diopsidic augite (CaMgSi2O6) has been developed at PNL. This glass ceramic is of interest since it would be in near equilibrium with a basalt repository. Studies at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan have favored a glass-ceramic product based upon diopside (CaMgSi2O6). Compositions, processing conditions, and product characterization of typical commercial and nuclear waste glass ceramics are discussed. In general, glass-ceramic waste forms can offer improved strength and decreased thermal expansion. Due to typcially large residual glass phases of up to 50%, there may be little improvement in leach resistance

  8. NMR studies of strontium zinc silicate based glass/glass-ceramic sealants for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass having composition 40SrO-10ZnO-40SiO2-2 B2O3-2Al2O3-2TiO2-2Cr2O3-2Y2O3, mol %) was prepared by melt-quench technique and converted into glass-ceramics by controlled crystallization. MAS-NMR spectroscopy shows the presence of mainly Q1 and Q2 silicate structural units and BO3 structural units of boron in the glass network. It is inferred from 29SiNMR and XRD that glass-ceramics have high crystallinity and during crystallization initially Sr2ZnSi2O7 crystalline phase is formed and later SrSiO3 crystalline phase crystallized. 11B and 27Al MAS-NMR of glass-ceramics depict an increase in the BO4 and AlO4 structural units with the crystallization. In accordance with XRD, NMR results also suggest the formation of solid solution of Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase with substitution of Zn/Si tetrahedral sites with B/Al. (author)

  9. Corrosion Behavior of SnO2-based Electrode Ceramics in Soda-lime Glass Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense SnO2-based electrode ceramics have extensive application prospect in glass electric-melting industry due to the excellent electrically-conductive and chemical property in high temperatures and oxidation environment. In this paper, dense SnO2-based electrode ceramics doped with MnO2 and Sb2O3 were prepared by pressureless sintering method and the corrosion rate in soda-lime glass liquid as well as the microstructure evolution was mainly investigated. The results suggested that SnO2-based ceramics had good corrosion resistance, and the minimum value was only 2.54x10-4 mm/h when MnO2 content is 1.0% and Sb2O3 content is 0.1%. Composition Elements of Glass liquid were detected in the grain boundary and some intergranular pores. It was found that SnO2 grains remained unchanged, whereas MnO2 was easily dissolved into molten glass liquid. SnO2-based electrode ceramics with dense structure and few amounts of additives had excellent corrosion resistance to the molten glass.

  10. Experimental Study on LTCC Glass-Ceramic Based Dual Segment Cylindrical Dielectric Resonator Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar Gangwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The measured characteristics in C/X bands, including material properties of a dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (CDRA fabricated from glass-ceramic material based on B2O3–La2O3–MgO glass and La(Mg0.5Ti0.5O3 ceramic, are reported. The sintering characteristic of the ceramic in presence of glass is determined from contact angle measurement and DTA. The return loss and input impedance versus frequency characteristics and radiation patterns of CDRA at its resonant frequency of 6.31 GHz are studied. The measured results for resonant frequency and return loss bandwidth of the CDRA are also compared with corresponding theoretical ones.

  11. Immobilization of gadolinium in iron borophosphate glasses and iron borophosphate based glass-ceramics: Implications for the immobilization of plutonium(Ⅲ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Liao, Qilong; Dai, Yunya; Zhu, Hanzhen

    2016-08-01

    Immobilization of gadolinium (Gd), a nonradioactive surrogate for Pu3+, in iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) has been investigated. The IBP glass containing 4 mol% Gd2O3 is homogeneously amorphous. At higher Gd2O3 concentrations, additional Gd is retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase detected with X-ray diffraction. Moreover, Gd2O3 addition increases the Tg of the IBP glasses in glass formation range, which is consistent with the structural modification of the glasses. The structure of the Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is mainly based on pyrophosphate units. The chemical durability of Gd2O3-loaded IBP glasses/glass-ceramics is comparable to widely used borosilicate glass waste forms and the existence of monazite GdPO4 crystalline phase does not degrade the aqueous chemical durability of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics. The Gd-loading results imply that the solubility should not be a limiting factor in processing nuclide Pu3+ if the formed crystalline phase(s) have high chemical durability.

  12. Nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics by microwave heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-wei Li; Hong-xia Li; Xue-feng Zhang; Xiao-lin Jia; Zhi-chao Sun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics was investigated using a 2.45 GHz multimode microwave cavity. Tailing-based glass samples were prepared from Shandong gold tailings and Guyang iron tailings utilizing a conventional glass melting technique. For comparison, the tailing-based glass samples were crystallized using two different heat-treatment meth-ods:conventional heating and hybrid microwave heating. The nucleation and crystallization temperatures were determined by performing a dif-ferential thermal analysis of the quenched tailing-based glass. The prepared glass-ceramic samples were further characterized by Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, thermal expansion coefficient measurements, and scanning electron micros-copy. The results demonstrated that hybrid microwave heating could be successfully used to crystallize the tailing-based glass, reduce the proc-essing time, and decrease the crystallization temperature. Furthermore, the results indicated that the nucleation and crystallization mechanism of the hybrid microwave heating process slightly differs from that of the conventional heating process.

  13. Nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics by microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-wei; Li, Hong-xia; Zhang, Xue-feng; Jia, Xiao-lin; Sun, Zhi-chao

    2015-12-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics was investigated using a 2.45 GHz multimode microwave cavity. Tailing-based glass samples were prepared from Shandong gold tailings and Guyang iron tailings utilizing a conventional glass melting technique. For comparison, the tailing-based glass samples were crystallized using two different heat-treatment methods: conventional heating and hybrid microwave heating. The nucleation and crystallization temperatures were determined by performing a differential thermal analysis of the quenched tailing-based glass. The prepared glass-ceramic samples were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, thermal expansion coefficient measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The results demonstrated that hybrid microwave heating could be successfully used to crystallize the tailing-based glass, reduce the processing time, and decrease the crystallization temperature. Furthermore, the results indicated that the nucleation and crystallization mechanism of the hybrid microwave heating process slightly differs from that of the conventional heating process.

  14. Barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics for scintillation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selling, J.

    2007-07-01

    Europium (Eu)-activated barium halide nanocrystals in fluorozirconate based glass ceramics represent a promising class of Xray scintillators. The scintillation in these glass ceramics is mainly caused by the emission of divalent Eu incorporated in hexagonal BaCl{sub 2} nanocrystals which are formed in the glass matrix upon appropriate annealing. Experiments with cerium (Ce)-activated fluorozironate glass ceramics showed that Ce is an interesting alternative. In order to get a better understanding of the scintillation mechanism in Eu- or Ce-activated barium halide nanocrystals, an investigation of the processes in the corresponding bulk material is essential. The objective of this thesis is the investigation of undoped, Eu-, and Ce-doped barium halides by X-ray excited luminescence (XL), pulse height, and scintillation decay spectra. That will help to figure out which of these crystals has the most promising scintillation properties and would be the best nanoparticles for the glass ceramics. Furthermore, alternative dopants like samarium (Sm) and manganese (Mn) were also investigated. Besides the above-mentioned optical investigation electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Moessbauer measurements were carried out in order to complete the picture of Eu-doped barium halides. The EPR data of Eu-doped BaI{sub 2} is anticipated to yield more information about the crystal field and crystal structure that will help to understand the charge carrier process during the scintillation process. The main focus of the Moessbauer investigations was set on the Eu-doped fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics. The results of this investigation should help to improve the glass ceramics. The Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} ratio in the glass ceramics should be determined and optimize favor of the Eu{sup 2+}. We also want to distinguish between Eu{sup 2+} in the glass matrix and Eu{sup 2+} in the nanocrystals. For a better understanding of Moessbauer spectroscopy on Eu also measurements on Eu in a

  15. Microstructural studies on some silicate and phosphate based glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments have made it possible to make a new class of ceramic materials called glass-ceramics with tailored expansion coefficients and improved thermo-mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. Since these are formed by controlled crystallization in which crystallites are embedded in the glassy matrix, it is possible to make nano glass-ceramics having pronounced effect of particle size on various properties such as transparency, bioactivity, etc. In this talk, some of the recent results on micro-structural properties of a few glass-ceramic-to-metal sealants and bio-glass-ceramics are discussed

  16. Sintering of SnO2-based ceramics and corrosion behaviour in molten glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With regards to their good mechanical properties and their interesting oxidation behaviour at high temperatures, SnO2-based ceramics can be used, for example, for electrodes heating in the glass industry or, more specially, in nuclear waste melting furnaces. In the working conditions where these materials can be in direct contact with metallic pieces at temperature higher than 700 deg. C, the using of additives such as ZrO2 seems to be necessary in order to reduce the tin activity in SnO2 by dilution of tin by Zr. Consequently, in the first part, the role of zirconium additions on the natural sintering process of SnO2-based ceramics has been identified between 1100 and 1200 deg. C. The densification and grain growth mechanisms have been elucidated for Sn1-xZrxO2 materials for small additions of zirconia and cobalt monoxide which is well known to favour the densification process of tin dioxide. In a second part, some corrosion tests of SnO2-based ceramics in a molten glass for long times at temperatures higher than 1200 deg. C were performed. These results indicated a low ceramic dissolution and glass intergranular penetration for the most severe conditions. In comparison with the metallic materials, the corrosion rate recorded for SnO2-based materials in the most severe conditions seems to be low. (authors)

  17. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100 A scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth

  18. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  19. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcoyne, S.H.; Bentley, P.M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N.L.; Al-Shammary, H.A.O.; Wood, D.J

    2004-07-15

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q{sup -4} dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100 A scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  20. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  1. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  2. Strontium chloroapatite based glass-ceramics composites for nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apatites are naturally occurring minerals with a general formula of M10(PO4)6X2, (M= Ca, Sr, Ba, X= OH, Cl, F) with a hexagonal crystal structure (S.G :P63/m) and can accommodate alkaline earth and various other aliovalent cations and anions into its crystal structure. Apatites are also known to have high resistance to leaching of the constituent elements under geological conditions. It may not often be possible to immobilize the whole spectrum of the radioactive waste in a single phase M10(PO4)6Cl2, then a combination of M-chloroapatite encapsulated in borosilicate glass (BSG) can immobilize most of the radwaste elements in the composite glass-ceramic matrix (glass bonded chloroapatite), thus utilizing the immobilizing efficiency of both the ceramic phase and glass. In the present study, the synthesis, characterization and thermo-physical property measurements of the Sr-chloroapatite (SrApCI) and some glass-bonded composites based on it have been investigated. The Sr-chloroapatite glass-ceramics were prepared by solid state reactions among stoichiometric concentrations of apatite forming reagents, 20 wt. % borosilicate glass (BSG), and known concentrations (10, 13 and 16 wt. %) of a simulated waste in chloride form. The products were characterized by XRD to confirm the formation of Sr10(PO4)6Cl2 and glass bonded-chloroapatite composites. The surface morphology and qualitative chemical composition of the powders were examined by SEM and EDX. Thermal expansion and glass transition temperature of the matrices were measured by dilatometry. Glass transition temperature of the glass-bonded composites was also examined by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis. The 10-16 wt.% waste loaded matrices showed similar thermal expansion as that of SrApCI, indicating the thermal stability of the matrix to chloride waste immobilization. The glass transition temperature of the waste loaded matrices decreases on increasing the waste loading. The

  3. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  4. Zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron-particle-based magnetorheological fluid for polishing optical glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on magnetorheological finishing (MRF) spotting experiments performed on glasses and ceramics using a zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI)-particle-based magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The zirconia-coated magnetic CI particles were prepared via sol-gel synthesis in kilogram quantities. The coating layer was ∼50-100 nm thick, faceted in surface structure, and well adhered. Coated particles showed long-term stability against aqueous corrosion. ''Free'' nanocrystalline zirconia polishing abrasives were cogenerated in the coating process, resulting in an abrasive-charged powder for MRF. A viable MR fluid was prepared simply by adding water. Spot polishing tests were performed on a variety of optical glasses and ceramics over a period of nearly three weeks with no signs of MR fluid degradation or corrosion. Stable material removal rates and smooth surfaces inside spots were obtained.

  5. Zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron-particle-based magnetorheological fluid for polishing optical glasses and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafrir, Shai N.; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Skarlinski, Michael; Wang, Mimi; Miao, Chunlin; Salzman, Sivan; Chartier, Taylor; Mici, Joni; Lambropoulos, John C.; Shen Rui; Yang Hong; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2009-12-10

    We report on magnetorheological finishing (MRF) spotting experiments performed on glasses and ceramics using a zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI)-particle-based magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The zirconia-coated magnetic CI particles were prepared via sol-gel synthesis in kilogram quantities. The coating layer was {approx}50-100 nm thick, faceted in surface structure, and well adhered. Coated particles showed long-term stability against aqueous corrosion. ''Free'' nanocrystalline zirconia polishing abrasives were cogenerated in the coating process, resulting in an abrasive-charged powder for MRF. A viable MR fluid was prepared simply by adding water. Spot polishing tests were performed on a variety of optical glasses and ceramics over a period of nearly three weeks with no signs of MR fluid degradation or corrosion. Stable material removal rates and smooth surfaces inside spots were obtained.

  6. Tungstate-based glass-ceramics for the immobilization of radio cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drabarek, Elizabeth; McLeod, Terry I.; Hanna, John V.; Griffith, Christopher S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Institute of Materials Engineering, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Luca, Vittorio [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Institute of Materials Engineering, New Illawarra Road, PMB 1, Menai, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: vlu@ansto.gov.au

    2009-02-15

    The preparation of tungstate-containing glass-ceramic composites (GCC) for the potential immobilization of radio cesium has been considered. The GCC materials were prepared by blending two oxide precursor compositions in various proportions. These included a preformed Cs-containing hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase (Cs{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.2}W{sub 0.8}O{sub 3}, P6{sub 3}/mcm) and a blend of silica and other oxides. The use of the HTB phase was motivated on the assumption that a HTB-based adsorbent could be used to remove cesium directly from aqueous high level liquid waste feeds. In the absence of the HTB, glass-ceramics were relatively easily prepared from the Cs-containing glass-forming oxide blend. On melting the mixture a relative complex GCC phase assemblage formed. The principal components of this phase assemblage were determined using X-ray powder diffraction, {sup 133}Cs MAS-NMR, and cross-sectional SEM and included glass, various zeolites, scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) and a range of other oxide phases and Cs-containing aluminosilicate. Importantly, under no circumstance was cesium partitioned into the glass phase irrespective of whether or not the composition included the preformed Cs-containing HTB compound. For compositions containing the HTB, cesium was partitioned into one of four major phases including zeolite; Cs-silica-tungstate bronze, pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), and an aluminosilicate with an Al/Si ratio close to one. The leach resistance of all materials was evaluated and related to the cesium distribution within the GCC phase assemblages. In general, the GCCs prepared from the HTB had superior durability compared with materials not containing tungsten. Indeed the compositions in many cases had leach resistances comparable to the best ceramics or glass materials.

  7. Tungstate-based glass-ceramics for the immobilization of radio cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of tungstate-containing glass-ceramic composites (GCC) for the potential immobilization of radio cesium has been considered. The GCC materials were prepared by blending two oxide precursor compositions in various proportions. These included a preformed Cs-containing hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase (Cs0.3Ti0.2W0.8O3, P63/mcm) and a blend of silica and other oxides. The use of the HTB phase was motivated on the assumption that a HTB-based adsorbent could be used to remove cesium directly from aqueous high level liquid waste feeds. In the absence of the HTB, glass-ceramics were relatively easily prepared from the Cs-containing glass-forming oxide blend. On melting the mixture a relative complex GCC phase assemblage formed. The principal components of this phase assemblage were determined using X-ray powder diffraction, 133Cs MAS-NMR, and cross-sectional SEM and included glass, various zeolites, scheelite (CaWO4) and a range of other oxide phases and Cs-containing aluminosilicate. Importantly, under no circumstance was cesium partitioned into the glass phase irrespective of whether or not the composition included the preformed Cs-containing HTB compound. For compositions containing the HTB, cesium was partitioned into one of four major phases including zeolite; Cs-silica-tungstate bronze, pollucite (CsAlSi2O6), and an aluminosilicate with an Al/Si ratio close to one. The leach resistance of all materials was evaluated and related to the cesium distribution within the GCC phase assemblages. In general, the GCCs prepared from the HTB had superior durability compared with materials not containing tungsten. Indeed the compositions in many cases had leach resistances comparable to the best ceramics or glass materials

  8. Glass and ceramics. [lunar resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of glasses and ceramics can be produced from bulk lunar materials or from separated components. Glassy products include sintered regolith, quenched molten basalt, and transparent glass formed from fused plagioclase. No research has been carried out on lunar material or close simulants, so properties are not known in detail; however, common glass technologies such as molding and spinning seem feasible. Possible methods for producing glass and ceramic materials are discussed along with some potential uses of the resulting products.

  9. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  10. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  11. Structure, solubility and bioactivity in TiO2-doped phosphate-based bioglasses and glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate-based bioactive glasses in addition to TiO2 (x = 0-2.5 mol%) were prepared by melt quenching technique. Glass-ceramics were prepared by controlled two-step thermal treatment of the as-prepared phosphate bioglasses at their nucleation and crystallisation temperatures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to explore the amorphous and crystalline nature of materials. The presence of calcium phosphate crystals like NaPO3, α, β-Ca2P2O7, α,β-Ca3(PO4)2 and Na5Ti(PO4)3 plays a dominant role in glass-ceramics. The structural changes were analyzed by density and Tg measurements. The degradation process in deionised water (DIW) was observed by pH and weight loss measurements. It was interesting to note that the highest solubility phosphate glasses become stiffer to degradation with increasing TiO2 content. Addition of TiO2 leads to densify the glass structure and interconnect the cross-linkages in the network. Chemical durability of glass-ceramics in DIW purely depends on the formed crystalline as well as the residual glassy phases. The formation of a biologically active layer on the surface of glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated by in vitro studies through XRD analysis.

  12. A neutron scintillator based on transparent nanocrystalline CaF2:Eu glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struebing, Christian; Chong, JooYun; Lee, Gyuhyon; Zavala, Martin; Erickson, Anna; Ding, Yong; Wang, Cai-Lin; Diawara, Yacouba; Engels, Ralf; Wagner, Brent; Kang, Zhitao

    2016-04-01

    There are no efficient Eu2+ doped glass neutron scintillators reported due to low doping concentrations of Eu2+ and the amorphous nature of the glass matrix. In this work, an efficient CaF2:Eu glass ceramic neutron scintillator was prepared by forming CaF2:Eu nanocrystals in a 6Li-containing glass matrix. Through appropriate thermal treatments, the scintillation light yield of the transparent glass ceramic was increased by a factor of at least 46 compared to the as-cast amorphous glass. This improvement was attributed to more efficient energy transfer from the CaF2 crystals to the Eu2+ emitting centers. Further light yield improvement is expected if the refractive index of the glass matrix can be matched to the CaF2 crystal.

  13. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  14. Optical thermometry based on luminescence behavior of Dy3+-doped transparent LaF3 glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dy3+-doped transparent LaF3 glass ceramics were fabricated, and its structures of resulting glass ceramics are studied by the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Optical temperature sensing of the resulting glass ceramics in the temperature range from 298 to 523 K is studied based on the down-conversion luminescence of Dy3+ ion. By using fluorescence intensity ratio method, the 4I15/2 and 4F9/2 of Dy3+ ions are verified as thermally coupled levels. A minimum SR = 1.16 x 10-4 K-1 is obtained at T = 294 K. By doping Eu3+ ion, the overall emission color of Eu3+-Dy3+ co-doped transparent glass ceramics can be tuned from white to yellow with the temperature increase through energy transfer between Eu3+ and Dy3+. Additionally, the thermal stability of the Dy3+ single-doped transparent glass ceramics becomes higher after doping Eu3+ ion. (orig.)

  15. Optical thermometry based on luminescence behavior of Dy{sup 3+}-doped transparent LaF{sub 3} glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Y.Y. [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, College of Science, Nanjing (China); Cheng, S.J.; Wang, X.F. [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China); Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yan, X.H. [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China); Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, College of Science, Nanjing (China)

    2015-11-15

    Dy{sup 3+}-doped transparent LaF{sub 3} glass ceramics were fabricated, and its structures of resulting glass ceramics are studied by the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Optical temperature sensing of the resulting glass ceramics in the temperature range from 298 to 523 K is studied based on the down-conversion luminescence of Dy{sup 3+} ion. By using fluorescence intensity ratio method, the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} of Dy{sup 3+} ions are verified as thermally coupled levels. A minimum S{sub R} = 1.16 x 10{sup -4} K{sup -1} is obtained at T = 294 K. By doping Eu{sup 3+} ion, the overall emission color of Eu{sup 3+}-Dy{sup 3+} co-doped transparent glass ceramics can be tuned from white to yellow with the temperature increase through energy transfer between Eu{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+}. Additionally, the thermal stability of the Dy{sup 3+} single-doped transparent glass ceramics becomes higher after doping Eu{sup 3+} ion. (orig.)

  16. Sintered gahnite–cordierite glass-ceramic based on raw materials with different fluorine sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Esmat M A Hamzawy; Mohammed A Bin Hussain

    2015-12-01

    Glass-ceramic based on Zn-containing cordierite was prepared from kaolin, silica'sand and commercial ZnO. The addition of AlF3, MgF2 and CaF2 was performed as nucleation catalysts. Dark brown glasses were obtained from the glass batches. The transformation and crystallization temperatures were in the range of 739–773 and 972–1007°C, respectively. Gahnite, cordierite and very little enstatite were the development crystalline phases through the heating and sintering process between 1000 and 1340°C. The microstructure of crystallized samples at 1340°C showed the appearance of dominant euhedral octahedral crystals of gahnite and hexagonal cordierite, in the low micro-scale, disseminated in the glassy matrix. The microanalysis of the crystallized samples indicated that Zn and Mg may replace each other in gahnite and cordierite structure. Densities of the crystallized samples were between 2.2517 and 2.5278 g cm−3. The thermal expansion of the crystallized samples was ranging from 19.22 to 59.30 × 10−7°C−1. However, the higher crystallization of both cordierite and gahnite accompany with the higher values of densities and the lower values of coefficient of thermal expansion.

  17. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  18. Bending strength of glass-ceramics based on 3CaO.P2O5-SiO2-MgO glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the Modulus of Rupture of bioactive glass-ceramic based on 3CaO.P2O5-SiO2-MgO system was investigated, aiming its use in bone-restorations. The mechanical property was correlated with microstructural and crystallographic features of this material. High-purity starting-powders, CaCO3, SiO2, MgO, Ca (H2PO4).H2O, were used in this study. The powders were mixed in a stoichiometric ratio, using planetary ball-mill. The suspensions were dried, sieved and melted at 1600 deg C, for 4h. The casting ones were cooled quickly until annealing temperature 700 deg C, in which remained for 2h, with controlled cooling-rate until ambient temperature. Bulks of glass were heat-treated with temperatures varying between 700 deg C and 1100 deg C, for 4h, being after that, cooled at 3 deg C/min. Bioactive glass and glass-ceramic were characterized by HRXRD (high resolution X-ray diffraction), where whitlockite was main phase. The microstructure was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy. Modulus of Rupture was determined by four-point bending testing using specimens of 1.5 x 2 x 25 mm and glasses presented strength near to 70MPa, while glass ceramics treated at 975 deg C-4h, presented bending strength of 120MPa. (author)

  19. Crystallization and structural investigation of Eu-doped fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of Eu-doped fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics has been developed for medical and photovoltaic applications. In the first case, the materials can be used as X-ray scintillators or X-ray storage phosphors, in the latter case as down-converting top layers for highly efficient solar cells. The glasses are based on a modified ZBLAN composition, i.e. a mixture of Zr, Ba, La, Al, and Na fluorides. They are additionally doped with chlorine ions to initiate the growth of BaCl2 nanocrystals upon thermal processing. Eu2+ ions are incorporated into the nanocrystals during the annealing procedure enabling a strong fluorescence upon ultraviolet or x-ray excitation. The nanocrystal size and structural phase depend significantly on the heating conditions and Eu doping level. X-ray diffraction patterns show a structural phase change of the BaCl2 nanocrystals from hexagonal to orthorhombic as annealing temperatures are increased. DSC experiments were performed to obtain activation energies, thermal stability parameters and information on the crystal growth mechanisms.

  20. A new bio-active glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1960 fine ceramics such as alumina have been used side by side with metallic materials for bone and joint replacement. They have high mechanical strength and are free from corrosion problem faced by metals. However they don't bond to the natural living bone and hence are called bio-inactive. This was followed by the development of bio-active glasses and glass-ceramics which bond to the natural bone but have low mechanical strength. In the present work a new bio-active glass-ceramic, based on CaO-SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 3/-MgO composition, has been developed which has mechanical strength compared to that of a bio-inactive glass ceramic and also bonds strongly to the natural bone. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals wollastanite and apatite phases in the glass ceramic. A new bio-active cement has also been developed which can be used to join broken pieces of bone or by itself at a filler. (author)

  1. Correlation between nanostructural and electrical properties of barium titanate-based glass-ceramic nano-composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Glasses have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at crystallization temperature. → Glass-ceramic nano-composites are important because of their new physical. → Grain sizes are the most significant structural parameter in electronic nanocrystalline phases. → These phases are very high electrical conductivity. → Hence, glass-ceramic nanocrystals are expected to be used, as gas sensors. - Abstract: Glasses in the system BaTiO3-V2O5-Bi2O3 have been transformed into glass-ceramic nano-composites by annealing at crystallization temperature Tcr determined from DSC thermograms. After annealing they consist of small crystallites embedded in glassy matrix. The crystallization temperature Tcr increases with increasing BaTiO3 content. XRD and TEM of the glass-ceramic nano-composites show that nanocrystals were embedded in the glassy matrix with an average grain size of 25 nm. The resulting materials exhibit much higher electrical conductivity than the initial glasses. It was postulated that the major role in the conductivity enhancement of these nanomaterials is played by the developed interfacial regions between crystalline and amorphous phases, in which the concentration of V4+-V5+ pairs responsible for electron hopping, has higher than values that inside the glassy matrix. The experimental results were discussed in terms of a model proposed in this work and based on a 'core-shell' concept. From the best fits, reasonable values of various small polaron hopping (SPH) parameters were obtained. The conduction was attributed to non-adiabatic hopping of small polaron.

  2. Heat treatment of pre-hydrolyzed silane increases adhesion of phosphate monomer-based resin cement to glass ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Furtado; Caroline COTES; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Leite, Fabíola Pessoa Pereira; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different forms of heat treatment on a pre-hydrolyzed silane to improve the adhesion of phosphate monomer-based (MDP) resin cement to glass ceramic. Resin and feldspathic ceramic blocks (n=48, n=6 for bond test, n=2 for microscopy) were randomly divided into 6 groups and subject to surface treatments: G1: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + MDP resin cement (Panavia F); G2: HF 9.6% for 20 s + Silane + Heat Treatment (oven) + Panavia F; G3: Sil...

  3. Investigation on Structural and Optical Properties of Willemite Doped Mn2+ Based Glass-Ceramics Prepared by Conventional Solid-State Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Farhana Samsudin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mn-doped willemite (Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ glass-ceramics derived from ZnO-SLS glass system were prepared by a conventional melt-quenching technique followed by a controlled crystallization step employing the heat treatment process. Soda lime silica (SLS glass waste, ZnO, and MnO were used as sources of silicon, zinc, and manganese, respectively. The obtained glass-ceramic samples were characterized using the X-ray diffraction (XRD, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, UV-Visible (UV-Vis, and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. The results of XRD revealed that ZnO crystal and willemite (β-Zn2SiO4 were presented as major embedded crystalline phases. This observation was consistent with the result of FESEM which showed the presence of irregularity in shape and size of willemite crystallites. FTIR spectroscopy exhibits the structural evolution of willemite based glass-ceramics. The optical band gap shows a decreasing trend as the Mn-doping content increased. Photoluminescent technique was applied to characterize the role of Mn2+ ions when entering the willemite glass-ceramic structure. By measuring the excitation and emission spectra, the main emission peak of the glass-ceramic samples located at a wavelength of 585 nm after subjecting to 260 nm excitations. The following results indicate that the obtained glass-ceramics can be applied as phosphor materials.

  4. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  5. Light scattering in glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Glass-ceramic materials with microstructures comprised of dispersed nanocrystallites in a residual glass matrix show promise for many new technological applications. In particular, transparent glass-ceramics offer low thermal expansion and stability, in addition to the prospect of novel non-linear optical properties that can arise from the nanocrystallites. Good transparency requires low optical scattering and low atomic absorption. Light scattering in the glass-ceramic arises primarily from the glass-crystallite interface. The attenuation due to scattering (turbidity) will depend upon the difference in refractive index of the two phases and the size and distribution of nanocrystallites in the glass. Here we consider models of glass-ceramic structure formation and look at scattering in these model structures to increase our understanding of the transparency of glass-ceramics

  6. Pressurized heat treatment of glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.

    1984-04-19

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  7. Optimization of La 2O 3-containing diopside based glass-ceramic sealants for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ashutosh; Tulyaganov, Dilshat U.; Kharton, Vladislav V.; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A.; Eriksson, Sten; Ferreira, José M. F.

    We report on the optimization of La 2O 3-containing diopside based glass-ceramics (GCs) for sealant applications in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Seven glass compositions were prepared by modifying the parent glass composition, Ca 0.8Ba 0.1MgAl 0.1La 0.1Si 1.9O 6. First five glasses were prepared by the addition of different amounts of B 2O 3 in a systematic manner (i.e. 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 wt.%) to the parent glass composition while the remaining two glasses were derived by substituting SrO for BaO in the glasses containing 2 wt.% and 5 wt.% B 2O 3. Structural and thermal behavior of the glasses was investigated by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), density measurements, dilatometry and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Liquid-liquid amorphous phase separation was observed in B 2O 3-containing glasses. Sintering and crystallization behavior, microstructure, and properties of the GCs were investigated under different heat treatment conditions (800 and 850 °C; 1-300 h). The GCs with ≥5 wt.% B 2O 3 showed an abnormal thermal expansion behavior above 600 °C. The chemical interaction behavior of the glasses with SOFC electrolyte and metallic interconnects, has been investigated in air atmosphere at SOFC operating temperature. Thermal shock resistance and gas-tightness of GC sealants in contact with 8YSZ was evaluated in air and water. The total electrical resistance of a model cell comprising Crofer 22 APU and 8YSZ plates joined by a GC sealant has been examined by the impedance spectroscopy. Good matching of thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) and strong, but not reactive, adhesion to electrolyte and interconnect, in conjunction with a low level of electrical conductivity, indicate that the investigated GCs are suitable candidates for further experimentation as SOFC sealants.

  8. Glass ceramics for high - Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass formation in the BiO1.5-Ca0.5-Sr0.5O-CuO quasiternary oxide system was examined by the twin-roller and metal-plate quenching techniques. The crystallization process and kinetics were systematically studied by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy as well as electrical measurements. The route and kinetic properties of crystallization were shown to have a strong compositional dependence. It was found that the growth of crystals in the glasses can be accelerated in the presence of an electrical field. A temperature gradient-related orientation of crystallization was revealed in the Bi-based glasses. This has been ascribed to the large crystallographic anisotropy of the superconducting crystals. The effects of compositions, annealing conditions, and oxygen deficiency on the superconductivity in the Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-0 glass ceramics are also discussed. 27 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs

  9. Oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given on the published works to study oxygen diffusion in glasses and ceramic materials in the last years. In the first part methods are described for the measurement of oxygen diffusion coefficients and in the second part the published reports on oxygen diffusion in glasses, ceramic and other oxides are discussed. The most important results are summarized in different tables. (author)

  10. Characterisation of Nd-doped calcium aluminosilicate parent glasses designed for the preparation of zirconolite-based glass-ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconolite-based (nominally CaZrTi2O7) glass-ceramics belonging to the SiO2Al2O3-CaO- ZrO3-TiO2 system are good waste forms for the specific immobilisation of actinides. The understanding of their crystallisation processes implies to investigate the structure of the glass. Thus, the environment around Ti, Zr (nucleating agents) and Nd (trivalent actinides surrogate) was characterised in parent glasses. Electron spin resonance (ESR) study of the small amount of Ti3+ occurring in the glass enabled to identify two types of sites for titanium: the main one is of C4v or D4h symmetry. EXAFS showed that Zr occupied a quite well defined 6-7-fold coordinated site with second neighbours which could correspond to Ca/Ti and Zr. Nd environment was probed by optical spectroscopies (absorption, fluorescence), ESR and EXAFS. All these techniques demonstrated that the environment around Nd was very constrained by the glassy network. Notably, Nd occupies a highly distorted 8-9-fold coordinated site in the parent glass. (authors)

  11. Bioactive type glass-ceramics within incorporated aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioactive glass-ceramics are used as biomaterials for the reparation of bone tissue. They are prepared, generally, by bioglass of specific composition for each particular use. The aluminium addition in the formulation at very small quantities influences on the structural properties. Two glass-ceramics obtained by P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 formulation within aluminium (0.5 % in Al2O3 base) added through a reactive alumina and purified feldspar were analyzed. The results showed structural differences between both glass-ceramics. (author)

  12. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-02-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  13. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  14. Wear of MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-F-Based Glass Ceramics Compared to Selected Dental Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozturk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Wear of a glass-ceramic produced through controlled crystallization of a glass in the MgO-CaO-SiO2-P2O5-F system has been evaluated and compared to various commercial dental ceramics including IPS Empress 2, Cergo Pressable Ceramic, Cerco Ceram, and Super porcelain EX-3. Wear tests were performed in accord with the ASTM G99 for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus. The friction coefficient and specific wear rate of the materials investigated were determined at a load of 10 N and at ambient laboratory conditions. Microhardness of the materials was also measured to elucidate the appropriateness of these materials for dental applications.

  15. Effect of Different Al/Si Ratios on the Structure and Energy Storage Properties of Strontium Barium Niobate-Based Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Shaomei; Xiao, Shi; Xue, Shuangxi; Shen, Bo; Zhai, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    Strontium barium niobate-based glass-ceramics (BSN-AS) with various Al/Si ratios have been prepared through melt casting followed by controlled crystallization. The effect of the various Al/Si ratios on the phase evolution, microstructure, dielectric properties, and energy storage density, and the relationship between the breakdown strength properties and the activation energy E a of BSN-AS glass-ceramics, were investigated. The results reveal that the microstructure of BSN-AS glass-ceramics gradually becomes dense and uniform, and the phenomenon of reunited grains is effectively improved in a certain range of Al/Si ratios. With the Al/Si ratios increasing, the breakdown strength increases to a maximum value and then decreases drastically. For the relationship between breakdown strength properties and activation energy E a, it was found that the various trends between breakdown properties and activation energy E a of the BSN-AS glass-ceramics are opposite. In this study, the energy storage densities reach 4.8 J/cm3 by adjusting the Al/Si ratios in the BSN-AS glass-ceramics.

  16. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  17. Bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bioactivity of mica/apatite glass ceramic composites, including the in vitro behavior in simulated body fluid and the histological appearance of the interface between the mica/apatite glass ceramics and the rabbit mandible defect in vivo under a dynamic condition. The results show that biological apatite layer forms on the surface of the mica/apatite glass ceramics after 1 d of immersion in the simulated body fluid, and becomes dense after 14 d. In vivo tests indicate that bone formation occurs after implantation for 14 d, and strong bonding of bone to the implant occurs after 42 d. No aseptic loosening occurs during 42 d of implantation. The finding shows that mica/apatite glass ceramics have good bioactivity and osteoconductivity for constructing bone graft, and can be promising for biomedical application.

  18. Structure and nonlinear optical properties of novel transparent glass-ceramics based on Co2+:ZnO nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiko, P. A.; Dymshits, O. S.; Vitkin, V. V.; Skoptsov, N. A.; Zhilin, A. A.; Shemchuk, D. V.; Tsenter, M. Ya; Bogdanov, K. V.; Malyarevich, A. M.; Glazunov, I. V.; Mateos, X.; Yumashev, K. V.

    2016-05-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics (GCs) based on Co2+:ZnO nanocrystals (mean diameter, 11 nm) are synthesized on the basis of cobalt-doped glasses of the K2O–ZnO–Al2O3–SiO2 system. For these GCs, the absorption band related to the 4A2(4F)  →  4T1(4F) transition of Co2+ ions in tetrahedral sites spans until ~1.73 μm. Saturation of the absorption is demonstrated at 1.54 μm, with a saturation fluence F s  =  0.8  ±  0.1 Jcm‑2 (σ GSA  =  1.7  ±  0.2  ×  10‑19 cm2) and a recovery time of 890  ±  10 ns. Passive Q-switching of an Er,Yb:glass laser is realized with the synthesized GCs. This laser generated 0.37 mJ/100 ns pulses at 1.54 μm. The developed GCs are promising as saturable absorbers for 1.6–1.7 μm crystalline erbium lasers.

  19. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  20. Preliminary study in development of glass-ceramic based on SiO2-LiO2 system, starting of different SiO2 starting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, lithium disilicate glass-ceramics were developed starting of the rice ash- SiO2 and Li2CO3 powders. The results were compared with glass ceramics based on the lithium disilicate obtained by commercial SiO2 powders. Glass were melted at 1580 deg C, and annealed at 850 deg C. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for characterization of the materials, and hardness and fracture toughness were evaluated using Vickers indentation method. Glasses with amorphous structure were obtained in both materials. After annealing, 'rice-ash' samples presented Li2SiO3 and residual SiO2 as crystalline phases. On the other side, commercial SiO2- Samples presented only Li2Si2O5 as crystalline phases and the better results of hardness and fracture toughness. (author)

  1. Surface or internal nucleation and crystallization of glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, W.; Rheinberger, V. M.; Ritzberger, C.; Apel, E.

    2013-07-01

    Fluoroapatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was precipitated in glass-ceramics via internal crystallization of base glasses. The crystals grew with a needle-like morphology in the direction of the crystallographic c-axis. Two different reaction mechanisms were analyzed: precipitation via a disordered primary apatite crystals and a solid state parallel reaction to rhenanite (NaCaPO4) precipitation. In contrast to the internal nucleation used in the formation of fluoroapatite, surface crystallization was induced to precipitate a phosphate-free oxyapatite of NaY9(SiO4)6O2-type. Internal nucleation and crystallization have been shown to be a very useful tool for developing high-strength lithium disilicate (Li2Si2O5) glass-ceramics. A very controlled process was conducted to transform the lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic precursor material into the final product of the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic without the major phase of the precursor material. The combination of all these methods allowed the driving forces of the internal nucleation and crystallization mechanisms to be explained. An amorphous phosphate primary phase was discovered in the process. Nucleation started at the interface between the amorphous phosphate phase and the glass matrix. The final products of all these glass-ceramics are biomaterials for dental restoration showing special optical properties, e.g. translucence and color close to dental teeth.

  2. He-irradiation effects on glass-ceramics for joining of SiC-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzelino, L.; Casalegno, V.; Ghigo, G.; Moskalewicz, T.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.; Ferraris, M.

    2016-04-01

    CaO-Al2O3 (CA) and SiO2-Al2O3-Y2O3 (SAY) glass-ceramics are promising candidates for SiC/SiC indirect joints. In view of their use in locations where high radiation level is expected (i.e. fusion plants) it is important to investigate how radiation-induced damage can modify the material microstructure. To this aim, pellets of both types were irradiated with 5.5 MeV 4He+ ions at an average temperature of 75 °C up to a fluence of almost 2.3·1018 cm-2. This produces a displacement defect density that increases with depth and reaches a value of about 40 displacements per atom in the ion implantation region, where the He-gas reaches a concentration of several thousands of atomic parts per million. X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy showed no change in the microstructure and in the morphology of the pellet surface. Moreover, a transmission electron microscopy investigation on cross-section lamellas revealed the occurrence of structural defects and agglomerates of He-bubbles in the implantation region for the CA sample and a more homogeneous He-bubble distribution in the SAY pellet, even outside the implantation layer. In addition, no amorphization was found in both samples, even in correspondence to the He implantation zone. The radiation damage induced only occasional micro-cracks, mainly located at grain boundaries (CA) or within the grains (SAY).

  3. Effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments on the color, microstructure, flexural strength and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Wang, Fu; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xiang; Deng, Zai-Xi; Wang, Hui; Jin, Lei; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments (praseodymium zircon yellow, ferrum zircon red, and vanadium zircon blue) on the color, thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, flexural strength, and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. The pigments were added to the glass frit, milled, pressed, and sintered. Ninety monochrome samples were prepared and the colors were analyzed. The effect of the pigments on thermal property, crystalline phase composition, and microstructure were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Addition of the pigments resulted in the acquisition of subtractive primary colors as well as tooth-like colors, and did not demonstrate significant effects on the thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, and flexural strength of the experimental glass-ceramic. Although significant differences (p zircon-based pigment colored ceramics, the translucencies of the latter were sufficient to fabricate dental restorations. These results indicate that the zircon-based tricolor pigments can be used with dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic to produce abundant and predictable tooth-like colors without significant adverse effects, if mixed in the right proportions. PMID:23853033

  4. Comparison of Leaching Rates of Glass-Ceramic and Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>With the increase of the burn-up of the nuclear fuel, the amounts of the long-lived radionuclides increase. The solubility of actinides such as plutonium in glass is very limited. Glass-ceramic as the new

  5. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ritzberger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate high translucency, preferable optical/mechanical properties and an application as dental inlays, onlays and crowns. Based on an improvement of the mechanical parameters, specially the strength and toughness, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramics are used as crowns; applying a procedure to machine an intermediate product and producing the final glass-ceramic by an additional heat treatment. Small dental bridges of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic were fabricated using a molding technology. ZrO2 ceramics show high toughness and strength and were veneered with fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. Machining is possible with a porous intermediate product.

  6. Effect of the glass melting condition on the processing of phosphate-based glass-ceramics with persistent luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J.; Gaussiran, M.; Głuchowski, P.; Lastusaari, M.; Petit, L.; Hölsä, J.; Hupa, L.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of the temperature and the duration of the melting on the persistent luminescence properties of phosphate glasses within the P2O5-Na2O-CaO and P2O5-Na2O-SrO systems prepared using a standard melting process in normal atmosphere by adding Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+,Dy3+ microparticles in the glass batch before melting. Glasses with persistent luminescence properties can be successfully prepared if the melting conditions are carefully controlled.

  7. Development and characterization of basalt-glass ceramics for the immobilization of transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basalt-based waste forms were developed for the immobilization of transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes. The specific waste studied is a 3:1 blend of process sludge and incinerator ash. Various amounts of TRU blended waste were melted with Pomona basalt powder. The vitreous products were subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to form glass ceramics. The total crystallinity of the glass ceramic, ranging from 20 to 45 wt %, was moderately dependent on composition and heat treatment conditions. Three parent glasses and four glass ceramics with varied composition and heat treatment were produced for detailed phase characterization and leaching. Both parent glasses and glass ceramics were mainly composed of a continuous, glassy matrix phase. This glass matrix entered into solution during leaching in both types of materials. The Fe-Ti rich dispersed glass phase was not significantly degraded by leaching. The glass ceramics, however, exhibited four to ten times less elemental releases during leaching than the parent glasses. The glass ceramic matrix probably contains higher Fe and Na and lower Ca and Mg relative to the parent glass matrix. The crystallization of augite in the glass ceramics is believed to contribute to the improved leach rates. Leach rates of the basalt glass ceramic are compared to those of other TRU nuclear waste forms containing 239Pu

  8. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  9. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  10. Spectral investigations on Dy3+-doped transparent oxyfluoride glasses and nanocrystalline glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dysprosium-doped oxyfluoride glasses and nanocrystalline glass ceramics have been synthesized and studied by x-ray diffraction, absorption, and visible and near-infrared emission spectra. The samples emit intense white light when populating the 4F9/2 level with a 451 nm laser light and, from the visible emission spectra, yellow to blue intensity ratios and chromaticity color coordinates have been calculated and their relative variation have been discussed based on the concentration of Dy3+ ions and the heat treatment conditions used to prepare the glass ceramics. Infrared emission has also been observed in glasses and glass ceramics after laser excitation at 800 nm, showing bands at 1.33 and 1.67 μm, useful for optical amplification in fiber amplifiers

  11. Cathodoluminescence of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tb, Ce, Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics with the composition SiO2 · Al2O3 · Li2O · LaF3 have been studied by cathodoluminescence (CL). We compared CL intensities and decay times of the Tb, Ce, Eu activated glass-ceramic samples and observed that the Tb activated sample has the most intense luminescence, but the Ce activated sample has the shortest decay times. Induced optical absorption and thermostimulated luminescence have been observed after X-ray irradiation of samples. -- Highlights: ►We have studied Tb, Ce and Eu activated oxyfluoride glass-ceramics. ► Ce activated sample has the fastest cathodoluminescence decay times. ► X-ray excited luminescence shows, that Tb activated sample is the most intense. ► Intensity of Tb activated sample is 10 times smaller than intensity of CsI(Tl)

  12. Element Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Glass-ceramics were designed for immobilization of actinides. In order to immobilizing more wastes in the matrix and to develop the optimum formulation for the glass-ceramic, it is necessary to study the

  13. Hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Estrup, Maja; Kristjansson, Maria; Lönnroth, Nadja Teresia; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of the hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their degree of crystallisation has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses were achieved by...... varying the temperature of heat treatment. The predominant crystalline phase in the glass was identified as augite. It was found that the hardness of the glass phase decreased slightly with an increase in the degree of crystallisation, while that of the augite phase drastically decreased....

  14. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokken, R. O.

    1981-11-01

    Glass ceramic waste forms were investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt percent simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 90 C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 grams per square meter when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant.

  15. Study of glass-glass and ceramic metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the junction between glass and glass, ceramic and metal are studied. The materials are transparent for light and dielectric, It is found that combination of TiO2 - Al2O3 - SiO2 - MnO2 is the most suitable for this process. The temperature used for melting materials was 800-850deg C and suitable time, 30-40 seconds

  16. Radioluminescence properties of Sm-doped fluorochlorozirconate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Go; Edgar, Andy; Kasap, Safa; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated X-ray induced radioluminescence (XL) properties of Sm-doped fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses and glass-ceramics. The FCZ glass is a modified ZBLAN glass which shows a very high optical transmission over a wide spectral range. The glass matrix includes Sm3+-doped nanocrystals of BaCl2 after heat-treatment at temperatures above 250 °C. The glass-ceramic emits red light under UV and X-ray exposure. Since conventional Si-based photodetectors, e.g., CCDs, have the highest quantum efficiency to red light in general, the Sm-doped FCZ glass-ceramic plate can be a good candidate as a scintillator material for indirect radiation detection. Moreover, a very broad emission is present in the glass-ceramic around 300-500 nm, which is attributed to a self-trapped exciton (STE) emissions. The temperature dependence of X-ray induced luminescence and photoluminescence are very similar. The XL light yield is linearly proportional to the X-ray exposure rate for rates higher than 20 mR/s. For low exposure rates, emissions by Sm2+ are more sensitive than others, leading to a nonlinear response.

  17. Study of Using Certain Composition of Bismuth Silicate Glass and Glass Ceramic for Gamma Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bismuth silicate glass with composition 20, 80 wt. % respectively was prepared. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements show that this glass has a very good stability when exposed to γ irradiation, which encourage the assumption of using it as a shielding material. Many properties should be investigated to fulfill this application. Study of density and molar volume to understand the structural properties, also the mechanical properties are verified by measuring microhardness, while the chemical resistance was identified by testing its durability in a base solution. The EPR results were supported by measuring electrical conductivity of the glass samples at different temperatures ranging from 295 - 553 K, which proved that this glass has very low conductivity even at high temperatures. The corresponding glass ceramic was prepared by means of heat treatment, and the formed phases were demonstrated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Also the probability of using this glass ceramic as a shielding material was investigated

  18. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appr...

  19. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  20. Lead-barium fluoroborate glass ceramics doped with Nd3+ or Er3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, O. B.; Sevostjanova, T. S.; Anurova, M. O.; Khomyakov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Lead-barium fluoroborate glasses in the PbF2-BaF2-B2O3, PbF2-BaO-B2O3, and PbO- BaF2-B2O3 systems doped with rare-earth ions (Nd3+ or Er3+) are synthesized and studied. It is shown that, based on these glasses, it is possible to produce transparent glass ceramics with fluoride crystalline phases, including ceramics with one crystalline phase of the fluorite structure. The spectral and luminescent properties of the doped glasses, glass ceramics, and polycrystalline complex fluorides containing Pb, Ba, and rare ions are studied.

  1. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  2. Glass-Derived Superconductive Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Farrell, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Critical superconducting-transition temperature of 107.2 K observed in specimen made by annealing glass of composition Bi1.5Pb0.5Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox for 243 h at 840 degrees C. PbO found to lower melting temperature and viscosity of glass, possibly by acting as fluxing agent. Suggested partial substitution of lead into bismuth oxide planes of crystalline phase having Tc of 110 K stabilizes this phase and facilitates formation of it.

  3. The Effect of Sm2O3 on the Chemical Stability of Borosilicate Glass and Glass Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yongqiang; WANG Mitang; LI Mei; WANG Ming; LIU Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Sm2O3 containing zinc-borosilicate glass and glass ceramics were prepared by melt quenching method, and the effect of Sm2O3 and micro-crystallization on the chemical stability of borosilicate glass was explored. DTA analysis showed that the endothermic peak and exothermic peak of basic glass changed from 635℃and 834℃to 630℃and 828℃respectively as a result of the doping of Sm2O3. XRD analysis showed the promoting effect of Sm2O3 on crystallization ability of this glass. The cumulative mass loss of base glass, Sm2O3 containing glass, glass ceramic and Sm2O3 containing glass ceramic was 0.289, 0.253, 0.329, 0.269 mg/mm2 respectively after 26 days corrosion in alkali solution, and 1.293, 1.290, 0.999, 1.040 mg/mm2 respectively in acidic erosion medium. Micro-crystallization decreased and improved the alkali and acid resistance of borosilicate glass respectively, the addition of Sm2O3 increased the alkali resistance of base glass and glass ceramics, and the slight effect of Sm2O3 on the acid resistance of borosilicate glass was also observed.

  4. Crystallization of pyroxene phases and physico-chemical properties of glass-ceramics based on Li2O–Cr2O3–SiO2 eutectic glass system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization characteristics, crystalline phase assemblages and solid solution phases developed due to thermally crystallized glasses based on the Li2SiO3–Li2Si2O5–LiCrSi2O6 (1028 ± 3 °C) eutectic glass system by replacing some trivalent oxides instead of Cr2O3 were investigated. The microhardness and chemical durability of the glass-ceramics were also determined. Lithium meta and disilicate (Li2SiO3 and Li2Si2O5), lithium gallium silicate (LiGaSiO4), and varieties of pyroxene phases, including Cr-pyroxene phase, i.e. lithium-kosmochlor (LiCrSi2O6), lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi2O6), lithium indium silicate (LiInSi2O6) and pyroxene solid solution of Li-aegerine type [Li (Fe0.5, Cr0.5) Si2O6] were the main crystalline phases formed in the crystallized glasses. There is no evidence for the formation of solid solution or liquid immiscibility gaps between LiAlSi2O6 or LiInSi2O6 phases and LiCrSi2O6 phase. However, LiCrSi2O6 and LiFeSi2O6 components were accommodated in the pyroxene structure under favorable conditions of crystallization to form monomineralic pyroxene solid solution phase of the probably formula [Li (Fe0.5, Cr0.5) Si2O6]. The type and compatibility of the crystallized phases are discussed in relation to the compositional variation of the glasses and heat-treatment applied. The microhardness values of the crystalline materials ranged between 5282 and 6419 MPa while, the results showed that the chemical stability of the glass-ceramics was better in alkaline than in acidic media. - Highlights: • Glass ceramics based on Li2O–Cr2O3–SiO2 eutectic (1028 ± 3 °C) glass were prepared. • LiCrSi2O6 and LiFeSi2O6 phases form monomineralic pyroxene solid solution phase. • Solid solution between LiAlSi2O6 or LiInSi2O6 phases and LiCrSi2O6 phase doesn't form. • Microhardness values of the crystalline materials ranged between 5282 and 6419 MPa. • Chemical stables of the glass-ceramics were better in alkaline than in acidic

  5. Development of a low-permeability glass--ceramic to seal to molybdenum. [For long-life vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagan, R. J.

    1975-03-01

    This report describes the development of low-permeability glass-ceramics which can be sealed directly to molybdenum for the purpose of producing long-life vacuum tubes. Low permeability to helium and thermal expansion match to molybdenum are the bases upon which particular glass-ceramic compositions were selected and developed. The fabrication of tube envelopes using glass-ceramics is simplified when compared to conventional ceramic/metal tubes and these melting and sealing techniques are presented.

  6. Development of mica glass-ceramic glazes

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Acosta, Anselmo

    2004-01-01

    The effect of iron content on crystallization of a mica glaze as coating for fast firing stoneware substrates has been investi¬gated. Measurements by differential thermal analysis (DTA) combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have shown the development of preferential crystal orientation in the mica glass-ceramic glaze. By com¬parison with amorphous and partly crystalline glazes, an enhancement of the mechanical properties of coatings with aligned and inte...

  7. Laser Micromachining of Glass, Silicon, and Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    L. Rihakova; Chmelickova, H.

    2015-01-01

    A brief review is focused on laser micromachining of materials. Micromachining of materials is highly widespread method used in many industries, including semiconductors, electronic, medical, and automotive industries, communication, and aerospace. This method is a promising tool for material processing with micron and submicron resolution. In this paper micromachining of glass, silicon, and ceramics is considered. Interaction of these materials with laser radiation and recent research held o...

  8. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  9. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotovs, A; Rogulis, U; Sarakovskis, A; Dimitrocenko, L, E-mail: andris-f@navigator.l [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga st. 8, LV-1063, Riga (Latvia)

    2010-11-01

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF{sub 3} crystalline phase.

  10. EPR of radiation defects in lithium-oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied oxyfluoride composites based on lithium silicate glasses with yttrium fluorides and rare-earth dopants. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been used to obtain information about radiation induced defects in these materials. Spectra have been measured before and after X-ray irradiation at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature. Fluoride crystallites within samples were created by means of thermal treatment at specific temperatures. EPR spectra of radiation induced defects in oxyfluoride glass ceramics, in which crystallites have not been yet created, show no explicit hfs interaction of fluorine nuclei. However, in glass ceramics, which already contains fluoride crystallites, the hfs characteristic to fluorine nuclei appears in the EPR spectra. EPR hyperfine structure could be explained within a model of an F-type centre in YF3 crystalline phase.

  11. Functional Glasses and Glass-ceramics Derived from Industrial Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Rama Krishna Satish, Chinnam

    2014-01-01

    Wastes from industrial processes and energy generation facilities pose environment and health issues. Diversion of wastes from landfill to favour reuse or recycling options and towards the fabrication of marketable products is of high economic and ecologic interest. Moreover safe recycling of industrial wastes is necessary and even vital to our society because of the increasing volume being generated. Glasses and glass–ceramics (GCs) attract particular interest in waste recycli...

  12. Enhanced mid-IR emission in Yb3+-Tm3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions had been enriched in the nanocrystals of the glass ceramics. → Mid-IR luminescence intensity of the glass ceramics was enhanced. → Judd-Ofelt theory was used to calculate optical parameters. - Abstract: Tm3+-Yb3+ co-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics were prepared through thermal treatment of the as-prepared glasses. The precipitation of nanocrystals and the incorporation of Tm3+ and Yb3+ into the nanocrystals were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and absorption spectra. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the J-O parameters Ωλ (λ = 2, 4, 6), spontaneous radiative transition rates, radiative lifetimes and fluorescence branching ratios of Tm3+ in both as-prepared glasses and glass ceramics were calculated. Intense mid-IR emission and upconversion luminescence in the Tm3+ and Yb3+ co-doped glass ceramics were observed under 980 nm excitation. Especially, compared with that of the as-prepared glasses, mid-IR luminescence intensity of Tm3+ in the glass ceramics was greatly enhanced. Desirable spectroscopic characteristics suggest that these oxyfluoride glass ceramics may be promising mid-IR laser active medium.

  13. Sintering behavior of LZSA glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Rubem Klegues Montedo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The LZSA glass-ceramic system (Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O 3 shows interesting properties, such as good chemical resistance, low thermal expansion, high abrasion resistance, and a low dielectric constant. However, in order to obtain a high performance material for specific applications, the sintering behavior must be better understood so that the porosity may be reduced and other properties improved. In this context, a sintering investigation for a specific LZSA glass-ceramic system composition was carried out. A 18.8Li2O-8.3ZrO2-64.2SiO2-8.7Al 2O3 glass was prepared by melting the solids, quenching the melt in water, and grinding the resulting solid in order to obtain a powder (3.68 μm average particle diameter. Subsequently, the glass powder was characterized (chemical analysis and determination of thermal properties and the sintering behavior was investigated using optical non-contact dilatometry measurements. The results showed that the crystallization process strongly reduced the sintering in the temperature interval from 785 to 940 °C, and a maximum thermal shrinkage of 15.4% was obtained with operating conditions of 1020 °C and 180 minutes.

  14. Glass ceramic ZERODUR enabling nanometer precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Nieder, Johannes; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The IC Lithography roadmap foresees manufacturing of devices with critical dimension of positioning accuracy requiring sub nanometer position measurement accuracy. The glass ceramic ZERODUR® is a well-established material in critical components of microlithography wafer stepper and offered with an extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), the tightest tolerance available on market. SCHOTT is continuously improving manufacturing processes and it's method to measure and characterize the CTE behavior of ZERODUR® to full fill the ever tighter CTE specification for wafer stepper components. In this paper we present the ZERODUR® Lithography Roadmap on the CTE metrology and tolerance. Additionally, simulation calculations based on a physical model are presented predicting the long term CTE behavior of ZERODUR® components to optimize dimensional stability of precision positioning devices. CTE data of several low thermal expansion materials are compared regarding their temperature dependence between - 50°C and + 100°C. ZERODUR® TAILORED 22°C is full filling the tight CTE tolerance of +/- 10 ppb / K within the broadest temperature interval compared to all other materials of this investigation. The data presented in this paper explicitly demonstrates the capability of ZERODUR® to enable the nanometer precision required for future generation of lithography equipment and processes.

  15. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF GLASS-CERAMICS BY DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. NOZAD

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization behavior of fluorphlogopite, a glass-ceramic in the MgO–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–F system, was studied by substitution of Li2O for K2O in the glass composition. DTA, XRD and SEM were used for the study of crystallization behavior, formed phases and microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. Crystallization kinetics of the glass was investigated under non-isothermal conditions, using the formal theory of transformations for heterogeneous nucleation. The crystallization results were analyzed, and both the activation energy of crystallization process as well as the crystallization mechanism were characterized. Calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the appropriate crystallization mechanism was bulk crystallization for base glass and the sample with addition of Li2O. Non-isothermal DTA experiments showed that the crystallization activation energies of base glasses was in the range of 234-246 KJ/mol and in the samples with addition of Li2O was changed to the range of 317-322 KJ/mol.

  16. Fatigue analysis of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing resin-based composite vs. lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankyu, Shuhei; Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Hong, Guang; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Resin-based composite molar crowns made by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have been proposed as an inexpensive alternative to metal-ceramic or all-ceramic crowns. However, there is a lack of scientific information regarding fatigue resistance. This study aimed to analyze the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin-based composite compared with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. One-hundred and sixty bar-shaped specimens were fabricated using resin-based composite blocks [Lava Ultimate (LU); 3M/ESPE] and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max press (EMP); Ivoclar/Vivadent]. The specimens were divided into four groups: no treatment (NT); thermal cycling (TC); mechanical cycling (MC); and thermal cycling followed by mechanical cycling (TCMC). Thermal cycling was performed by alternate immersion in water baths of 5°C and 55°C for 5 × 10(4) cycles. Mechanical cycling was performed in a three-point bending test, with a maximum load of 40 N, for 1.2 × 10(6) cycles. In addition, LU and EMP molar crowns were fabricated and subjected to fatigue treatments followed by load-to-failure testing. The flexural strength of LU was not severely reduced by the fatigue treatments. The fatigue treatments did not significantly affect the fracture resistance of LU molar crowns. The results demonstrate the potential of clinical application of CAD/CAM-generated resin-based composite molar crowns in terms of fatigue resistance. PMID:27203408

  17. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Keith D.; Michalske, Terry A.

    1986-01-01

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat-treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nucleating agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200.degree. to 1700.degree. C. and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800.degree. to 1200.degree. C. in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO.sub.2. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat-treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  18. Crystallization of cerium containing iron borophosphate glasses/glass-ceramics and their spectral properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Liao, Qilong; Zhu, Hanzhen; Dai, Yunya; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The crystallization behaviors of CeO2 containing 36Fe2O3-10B2O3-54P2O5 glasses/glass-ceramics (IBP glasses/glass-ceramics) and the effect of CeO2 addition on the structure of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics annealed at 850 °C for 10 h were investigated by XRD, SEM and FTIR. The results show that Fe4(PO4)2O and Fe2(PO4)O phases are detected in the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics annealed at 650 °C for 10 h, and traces of FePO4 crystal is also detected when the CePO4 crystallite pre-exists in the unannealed IBP glass-ceramics. When the glasses/glass-ceramics are heat-treated at 850 °C for 10 h, Fe4(PO4)2O, Fe2(PO4)O and a small amount of FePO4 phase are detected. Meanwhile, CePO4 phase also appears in the crystallized IBP glasses/glass-ceramics containing more than 6 mol% (including 6 mol%) CeO2. Moreover, the main structural units of the crystallized glasses/glass-ceramics are [PO4] and [BO4] tetrahedron. [CeO4] tetrahedron also exists in the structure of the crystallized IBP glasses/glass-ceramics containing CeO2. CeO2 addition and the pre-existing CePO4 crystallite improve the resistance of the IBP glasses/glass-ceramics to crystallization, which makes the infrared bands associated with the vibration of [PO4] group increase in intensity and shift to high wave number.

  19. Effects of neutron irradiation on glass ceramics as pressure-less joining materials for SiC based components for nuclear applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferraris, M.; Casalegno, V.; Rizzo, S.; Salvo, M.; Van Staveren, T.O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 429, 1-3 (2012), s. 166-172. ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : glass-ceramic * joining * SiC composites * fusion materials Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311512002668

  20. Microtensile bond strength of a resin cement to glass infiltrated zirconia-reinforced ceramic : The effect of surface conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, R; Ozcan, M; Bottino, MA; Valandro, LF

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to a glass-infiltrated zirconia-reinforced alumina-based core ceramic. Methods. Thirty blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (In-Ceram Zirconia-INC-ZR, VI

  1. Processing FeB03 glass-ceramics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of preparing FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space is explored. A transparent glass-ceramic of FeBO3, due to its unique properties could be an excellent material for magneto-optic applications which currently utilize high price materials such as single crystals of Ga-YIG. The unique magneto-optic properties of FeBO3 were found to come from glass-ceramic but not from the glass form. It was anticipated and later confirmed that the FeBO3 glass-ceramics could not be prepared on earth. Phase separation and iron valence reduction, were identified as the two terrestrial manufacturing obstacles. Since the phase separation problem could be overcome by space processing, the preparation of FeBO3 glass-ceramic in space appears attractive.

  2. Optical properties of Dy3+ doped bismuth zinc borate glass and glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavelu, B.; Kanth Kumar, V. V. Ravi

    2012-06-01

    Dy3+ doped bismuth zinc borate transparent glasses were prepared by melt quenching technique and these glasses were used precursor to obtain transparent glass ceramics by heat treatment method. XRD pattern of the glass ceramic shows the formation of the β-BiB3O6 and Bi2ZnOB2O6 phases. The visible emission intensity of the glass ceramics is stronger than the glass. This can be due to the formation of nano nonlinear optical crystallites in glass matrix.

  3. Calculation of thermal stresses in glass-ceramic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Opto-electronics make intensive use of composite materials based on amorphous materials, which can be considered as smart materials since they are capable of high performances in their final state. Particularly, glass-ceramic composites involved in welding operations for microelectronics applications are subjected to important thermal stresses during their production, which can deteriorate their properties at room temperature, until the failure stage is reached. It is then essential to be abl...

  4. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications; Sintese e processamento de compositos a base de alumina e zirconia com infiltracao de fase vitrea para aplicacoes odontologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-07-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning

  5. Creep mechanisms in glass-containing ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    D. Wilkinson; Chadwick, M.

    1991-01-01

    The creep of glass-containing ceramics is outlined, with particular reference to data for sintered silicon nitride. We conclude that there are 2 important mechanisms. These are viscous flow, and dissolution-precipitation creep. The models for these processes are reviewed, and are compared with experimental data for Si3N4. At low strains and moderate temperatures (≤ 1250 °C), viscous flow controls the creep behaviour. However, we find evidence for dissolution-precipitation creep at 1325 °C.

  6. Irradiation study of PNNL synthesized glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossoy-simakov, Anna-eden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Usov, Igor O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18

    Two types of glass-ceramic were investigated: (1) for immobilization of Ln, alkali, and alkaline earths (GC4); and (2) same as above + high (7%) molybdenum content (Mo7) multiphase specimens. The purpose was to study the radiation stability of PNNL synthesized glass-ceramics and changes in microstructure/phase composition.

  7. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...

  8. Changes in properties of glass ceramics under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in properties of glass ceramics are considered as in initial state so after additional heat treatment up to 3000 K during neutron irradiation in the temperature range of 400-430 to 700-800 K and with fluence up to 2.5x1020 n/cm2. It is shown that additional heat treatment diminishes radiation effects in glass ceramics

  9. Leaching behavior of glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramic waste forms have been investigated as alternatives to borosilicate glasses for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Three glass ceramic systems were investigated, including basalt, celsian, and fresnoite, each containing 20 wt % simulated high-level waste calcine. Static leach tests were performed on seven glass ceramic materials and one parent glass (before recrystallization). Samples were leached at 900C for 3 to 28 days in deionized water and silicate water. The results, expressed in normalized elemental mass loss, (g/m2), show comparable releases from celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics. Basalt glass ceramics demonstrated the lowest normalized elemental losses with a nominal release less than 2 g/m2 when leached in polypropylene containers. The releases from basalt glass ceramics when leached in silicate water were nearly identical with those in deionized water. The overall leachability of celsian and fresnoite glass ceramics was improved when silicate water was used as the leachant

  10. Luminescent properties of Tb3+-doped transparent glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dense transparent glass ceramics containing BaGdF5 and BaLu2F8 nanocrystals were prepared from the Tb3+-activated SiO2–B2O3–BaF2–Lu2O3–Gd2O3 oxyfluoride scintillating glasses by thermal treatment technology. Glass structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM); the optical properties including transmission, luminescent properties excited under both ultraviolet light and X-ray excitation, and the decay times of the glass and glass ceramics were also investigated. The coexistence of BaGdF5 and BaLu2F8 nanocrystals in the transparent glass ceramics was confirmed by the XRD results, which plays a key role in the improvement of scintillation performance. The density of glass ceramics is higher compared with the precursor glass, and it increases with the increasing temperature of heat treatment. Moreover, a blue-shift in the excitation spectra and the decreasing decay times of Tb3+ ions are obviously observed in the glass and glass ceramics with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Compared with the precursor glass, the enhanced emission intensity of Tb3+ ions in the glass ceramics is associated with the increasing energy transfer efficiency from Gd3+ to Tb3+ ions, which is due to the precipitation of BaGdF5 and BaLu2F8 nanocrystals in glass ceramics. In addition, the energy transfer efficiency from Gd3+ to Tb3+ ions was also discussed by the stretched exponential function. - Highlights: • The BaGdF5 and BaLu2F8 nanocrystals coexist in glass ceramics. • Density of glass ceramics gets higher with the increasing heat treatment temperature. • Compared with glass, the enhanced emission intensity of Tb3+ ions in glass ceramics. • Discussed the energy transfer efficiency from Gd3+ to Tb3+ ions in glass ceramics

  11. Bone bonding ability of some borate bio-glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma H. Margha; Amr M. Abdelghany

    2012-01-01

    Ternary borate glasses from the system Na2O·CaO·B2O3 together with soda-lime-borate samples containing 5 wt.% of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2 or P2O5 were prepared. The obtained glasses were converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives by controlled heat treatment. X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the separated crystalline phases in glass-ceramics after heat treatment of the glassy samples. The glasses and corresponding glass-ceramics after immersion in water or diluted phosphate solution f...

  12. Optimization of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing diopside based glass-ceramic sealants for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Ashutosh [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Tulyaganov, Dilshat U. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); State Committee of Geology and Mineral Resources, Centre of remote sensing and GIS technologies, 11-A, Shevchenko str., 100060 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Kharton, Vladislav V.; Yaremchenko, Aleksey A.; Ferreira, Jose M.F. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Eriksson, Sten [Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2009-04-15

    We report on the optimization of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing diopside based glass-ceramics (GCs) for sealant applications in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Seven glass compositions were prepared by modifying the parent glass composition, Ca{sub 0.8}Ba{sub 0.1}MgAl{sub 0.1}La{sub 0.1}Si{sub 1.9}O{sub 6}. First five glasses were prepared by the addition of different amounts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a systematic manner (i.e. 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 wt.%) to the parent glass composition while the remaining two glasses were derived by substituting SrO for BaO in the glasses containing 2 wt.% and 5 wt.% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Structural and thermal behavior of the glasses was investigated by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), density measurements, dilatometry and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Liquid-liquid amorphous phase separation was observed in B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing glasses. Sintering and crystallization behavior, microstructure, and properties of the GCs were investigated under different heat treatment conditions (800 and 850 C; 1-300 h). The GCs with {>=}5 wt.% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed an abnormal thermal expansion behavior above 600 C. The chemical interaction behavior of the glasses with SOFC electrolyte and metallic interconnects, has been investigated in air atmosphere at SOFC operating temperature. Thermal shock resistance and gas-tightness of GC sealants in contact with 8YSZ was evaluated in air and water. The total electrical resistance of a model cell comprising Crofer 22 APU and 8YSZ plates joined by a GC sealant has been examined by the impedance spectroscopy. Good matching of thermal expansion coefficients (CTE) and strong, but not reactive, adhesion to electrolyte and interconnect, in conjunction with a low level of electrical conductivity, indicate that the investigated GCs are suitable candidates for further experimentation as SOFC sealants. (author)

  13. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  14. Bioactive type glass-ceramics within incorporated aluminium; Vitroceramicos del tipo bioactivo con aluminio incorporado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volzone, C.; Stabile, F.M.; Ortiga, J., E-mail: volzcris@netverk.com.ar [Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica (CETMIC), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramics are used as biomaterials for the reparation of bone tissue. They are prepared, generally, by bioglass of specific composition for each particular use. The aluminium addition in the formulation at very small quantities influences on the structural properties. Two glass-ceramics obtained by P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO-SiO{sub 2} formulation within aluminium (0.5 % in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} base) added through a reactive alumina and purified feldspar were analyzed. The results showed structural differences between both glass-ceramics. (author)

  15. Properties and Clinical Application of Three Types of Dental Glass-Ceramics and Ceramics for CAD-CAM Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Ritzberger; Elke Apel; Wolfram Höland; Arnd Peschke; Volker M. Rheinberger

    2010-01-01

    The main properties (mechanical, thermal and chemical) and clinical application for dental restoration are demonstrated for three types of glass-ceramics and sintered polycrystalline ceramic produced by Ivoclar Vivadent AG. Two types of glass-ceramics are derived from the leucite-type and the lithium disilicate-type. The third type of dental materials represents a ZrO2 ceramic. CAD/CAM technology is a procedure to manufacture dental ceramic restoration. Leucite-type glass-ceramics demonstrate...

  16. Effects of growing integrated layer [GIL] formation on bonding behavior between hydroxyapatite ceramics and Ti-based bulk metallic glasses via hydrothermal hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors successfully formed a bond between bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics and titanium (Ti)-based bulk metallic glasses (Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14: BMG) through a growing integrated layer (GIL) to develop a new type of biomaterial. The GILs were formed on the BMG surfaces by hydrothermal-electrochemical (HE) techniques. The BMG substrates were treated in a 5 mol/L NaOH solution at 90 deg. C for 10-120 min while a constant electric current of 0.5 mA/cm2 was maintained between the electrodes. Then the BMG disks with the GIL and a powder mixture of CaHPO4.2H2O and Ca(OH)2 were simultaneously treated with an autoclave for hydrothermal hot-pressing (HHP) (150 oC, 40 MPa, 2 h). Direct bonding between the HA ceramics and the BMG disks could be achieved through the above processing method. Consequently, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the usefulness of a series of hydrothermal techniques (HE and HHP) for direct bonding of bulk ceramics and bulk metallic materials.

  17. Development of glass ceramics for the incorporation of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous devitrification of fission-product-containing borosilicate glasses can be avoided by controlled crystallization after melting. Glass ceramics have been developed from a vitrified simulated waste and further improvement of product properties was achieved. In particular perovskite, h-celsian, diopside and eucryptite glass ceramics were prepared. These contained leach resistant host phases which exhibited considerable enrichment of long-lived fission products. All products showed increased impact resistance, but the thermal expansion was only slightly improved

  18. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  19. Crystallization of pyroxene phases and physico-chemical properties of glass-ceramics based on Li{sub 2}O–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} eutectic glass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salman, S.M.; Salama, S.N.; Abo-Mosallam, H.A., E-mail: abomosallam@yahoo.com.au

    2015-01-15

    The crystallization characteristics, crystalline phase assemblages and solid solution phases developed due to thermally crystallized glasses based on the Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}–Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}–LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} (1028 ± 3 °C) eutectic glass system by replacing some trivalent oxides instead of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated. The microhardness and chemical durability of the glass-ceramics were also determined. Lithium meta and disilicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), lithium gallium silicate (LiGaSiO{sub 4}), and varieties of pyroxene phases, including Cr-pyroxene phase, i.e. lithium-kosmochlor (LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), lithium aluminum silicate (LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), lithium indium silicate (LiInSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and pyroxene solid solution of Li-aegerine type [Li (Fe{sub 0.5}, Cr{sub 0.5}) Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}] were the main crystalline phases formed in the crystallized glasses. There is no evidence for the formation of solid solution or liquid immiscibility gaps between LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} or LiInSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phases and LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. However, LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and LiFeSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} components were accommodated in the pyroxene structure under favorable conditions of crystallization to form monomineralic pyroxene solid solution phase of the probably formula [Li (Fe{sub 0.5}, Cr{sub 0.5}) Si{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. The type and compatibility of the crystallized phases are discussed in relation to the compositional variation of the glasses and heat-treatment applied. The microhardness values of the crystalline materials ranged between 5282 and 6419 MPa while, the results showed that the chemical stability of the glass-ceramics was better in alkaline than in acidic media. - Highlights: • Glass ceramics based on Li{sub 2}O–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} eutectic (1028 ± 3 °C) glass were prepared. • LiCrSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and LiFeSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} phases form monomineralic pyroxene solid

  20. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  1. Manganese-alumina-ceramic glass eliminates rigid controls necessary in bonding metals to ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollar, E. L.

    1968-01-01

    Matrix of manganese-alumino-silicate glass simplifies the processes of metallizing alumina ceramics. Because the manganese in the glass is preoxidized to the 2 plus state by firing in nitrogen, the ceramic can be metallized in dry hydrogen. Lengthening the firing time permits a lower metallizing temperature.

  2. Photocatalytic activity of glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals were prepared. ► The glass ceramics showed photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation. ► Higher activity was observed in the MgTi4(PO4)6- and CaTi4(PO4)6-containing glass ceramics. -- Abstract: Glass ceramics were prepared by heat-treating MO–TiO2–P2O5 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) and R2O–TiO2–P2O5–SiO2 (R = Li, Na and K) glasses, and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The crystalline phases precipitated in the glasses were only Nasicon-type crystals, MTi4(PO4)6 or RTi2(PO4)3. Decomposition experiments of both methylene blue (MB) and acetaldehyde showed that the glass ceramics exhibited effective photocatalytic activity. The activity did not depend on the radius of the M2+ or R+ ion, and higher activity was observed in the MgTi4(PO4)6 and CaTi4(PO4)6 precipitated glass ceramics.

  3. Resorbable glass-ceramic phosphate-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: synthesis, properties, and in vitro effects on human marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Leonardi, Elisa; Baldini, Nicola; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Baino, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Highly porous bioresorbable glass-ceramic scaffolds were prepared via sponge replication method by using an open-cell polyurethane foam as a template and phosphate-based glass powders. The glass, belonging to the P2O5-SiO2-CaO-MgO-Na2O-K2O system, was synthesized by a melting-quenching route, ground, and sieved to obtain powders with a grain size of less than 30 μm. A slurry containing glass powders, polyvinyl alcohol, and water was prepared to coat the polymeric template. The removal of the polymer and the sintering of the glass powders were performed by a thermal treatment, in order to obtain an inorganic replica of the template structure. The structure and properties of the scaffold were investigated from structural, morphological, and mechanical viewpoints by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, density measurements, image analysis, and compressive tests. The scaffolds exhibited a trabecular architecture that closely mimics the structure of a natural spongy bone. The solubility of the porous structures was assessed by soaking the samples in acellular simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-HCl for different time frames and then by assessing the scaffold weight loss. As far as the test in SBF is concerned, the nucleation of hydroxyapatite on the scaffold trabeculae demonstrates the bioactivity of the material. Biological tests were carried out using human bone marrow stromal cells to test the osteoconductivity of the material. The cells adhered to the scaffold struts and were metabolically active; it was found that cell differentiation over proliferation occurred. Therefore, the produced scaffolds, being biocompatible, bioactive, resorbable, and structurally similar to a spongy bone, can be proposed as interesting candidates for bone grafting. PMID:20566654

  4. The use of glass ceramics for immobilising high level wastes from nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review paper summarises the origin and composition of fuel recycling wastes and discusses some of the methods which have been proposed for their solidification and disposal. After a more detailed description of the celsian, fresnoite, basalt, and sphene based glass ceramics which have been developed in Germany, the USA, and Canada, the underlying factors involved in the production of glass ceramics and their performance are briefly reviewed. (author)

  5. Use of glass ceramics for immobilising high level wastes from nuclear fuel recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This review paper summarises the origin and composition of fuel recycling wastes and discusses some of the methods which have been proposed for their solidification and disposal. After a more detailed description of the celsian, fresnoite, basalt, and sphene based glass ceramics which have been developed in Germany, the USA, and Canada, the underlying factors involved in the production of glass ceramics and their performance are briefly reviewed.

  6. A Novel Technique for the Connection of Ceramic and Titanium Implant Components Using Glass Solder Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Mick; Joachim Tinschert; Aurica Mitrovic; Rainer Bader

    2015-01-01

    Both titanium and ceramic materials provide specific advantages in dental implant technology. However, some problems, like hypersensitivity reactions, corrosion and mechanical failure, have been reported. Therefore, the combining of both materials to take advantage of their pros, while eliminating their respective cons, would be desirable. Hence, we introduced a new technique to bond titanium and ceramic materials by means of a silica-based glass ceramic solder. Cylindrical compound samples (...

  7. Glass-ceramics: A class of nanostructured materials for photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramics (GCs) are constituted by nanometer–to–micron-sized crystals embedded in a glass matrix; usually, their structural or functional elements (clusters, crystallites or molecules) have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. As the name says, GCs must be considered an intermediate material between inorganic glasses and ceramics; in most cases the crystallinity is between 30 and 50%. GCs share many properties with both glasses and ceramics, offering low defects, extra hardness, high thermal shock resistance (typical of ceramics) together with the ease of fabrication and moulding (typical of glasses). The embedded crystalline phase, however, can enhance the existing properties of the matrix glass or lead to entirely new properties. GCs are produced by controlled crystallization of certain glasses, generally induced by nucleating additives; they may result opaque or transparent. Transparent GCs are now gaining a competitive advantage with respect to amorphous glasses and, sometimes, to crystals too. The aim of the present paper is to introduce the basic characteristics of transparent glass-ceramics, with particular attention to the relationship between structure and transparency and to the mechanism of crystallization, which may also be induced by selective laser treatments. Their applications to the development of guided-wave structures are also briefly described.

  8. Glass-ceramics: A class of nanostructured materials for photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablos-Martin, A.; Ferrari, M.; Pascual, M. J.; Righini, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    Glass-ceramics (GCs) are constituted by nanometer-to-micron-sized crystals embedded in a glass matrix; usually, their structural or functional elements (clusters, crystallites or molecules) have dimensions in the 1 to 100nm range. As the name says, GCs must be considered an intermediate material between inorganic glasses and ceramics; in most cases the crystallinity is between 30 and 50%. GCs share many properties with both glasses and ceramics, offering low defects, extra hardness, high thermal shock resistance (typical of ceramics) together with the ease of fabrication and moulding (typical of glasses). The embedded crystalline phase, however, can enhance the existing properties of the matrix glass or lead to entirely new properties. GCs are produced by controlled crystallization of certain glasses, generally induced by nucleating additives; they may result opaque or transparent. Transparent GCs are now gaining a competitive advantage with respect to amorphous glasses and, sometimes, to crystals too. The aim of the present paper is to introduce the basic characteristics of transparent glass-ceramics, with particular attention to the relationship between structure and transparency and to the mechanism of crystallization, which may also be induced by selective laser treatments. Their applications to the development of guided-wave structures are also briefly described.

  9. Upconversion studies of Er3+/Yb3+ doped SrO.TiO2 borosilicate glass ceramic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upconversion behaviour has been studied in various matrices and fine powders of SrTiO3 by previous workers. In present work, Er3+/Yb3+ were doped in appropriate ratio in SrO.TiO2 borosilicate glass ceramic system to study the upconversion phenomenon. Dielectric properties of this class of glass ceramic system have been extensively investigated by Thakur et al. It has been observed that both upconversion efficiency and dielectric constant increases with transformation of glass into glass ceramic. Therefore, present investigation is based upon the study of optical as well as the electrical properties of same glass ceramic system. In order to prepare different crystalline matrices, two different Er3+/Yb3+:SrO.TiO2 borosilicate glasses with same amount of Er2O3 and Yb2O3 were prepared by melt quench method. Glasses were transparent with light-wine colour. Glass ceramics were prepared from the glasses by heat treatment based on DTA (Differential thermal analysis) results. Glass ceramics were fully opaque with brownish-cream colour. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed that two different crystalline matrices, Sr3Ti2O7, Ti10O19 and SrTiO3, TiO2 were present in two glass ceramic samples respectively. Luminescence properties of glass and glass ceramic samples with 976nm laser irradiation showed that the intensities of the green and red emission increased multiple times in glass ceramic than that of the glass. Possible mechanisms responsible for upconversion eg. Energy Transfer (ET) and Excited State Absorption (ESA), were studied through laser pumping power log dependence

  10. Preparation and characterization of novel foamed porous glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent have been synthesized in a novel glass system of SrO-CaO-Al2O3-TiO2-B2O3-SiO2-P2O5-MxOy (where M = Ba, Mg, La, Ce and Ni) by a simple process of powder sintering. The glass and glass-ceramics are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), heating stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), optical microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the glasses formed are amorphous and the glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of these glasses are found to be in the range 673–678 °C and 706–728 °C respectively. The glasses are highly stable as indicated by the DSC evaluated glass stability parameters of the range 195–240 °C. Quantitative sintering study of glass powder compacts revealed swelling in the samples with NiO and CeO2 corresponding to a geometry change of 75 and 108% around 900 °C respectively. With reference to this finding the glass powder compacts are heated to 900 °C and the foamed glass-ceramics are obtained. Characteristic crystalline silicate phases have been identified in the XRD studies and their microstructures are recorded by FESEM. Optical microscope study of the foamed samples revealed formation of bigger foamed cavity with residual pores in samples with NiO and CeO2 in comparison to samples with BaO, MgO and La2O3. The mean pore diameters of the samples with NiO and CeO2 are determined to be 43 and 32 μm, and their respective porosities are 2.34 and 1.82 cm3/g respectively. Thus NiO and CeO2 are found to be very effective to obtain foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent by the viscous flow sintering of fine glass powder compacts along with the reduction of the respective polyvalent ions. - Highlights: • Synthesis of foamed porous glass-ceramics without foaming agent by sintering method • Only powder compact yielded foamed porous glass-ceramics

  11. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes

  12. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  13. Microstructure and luminescence of Yb3+-doped fluorosilicate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fine nano-SrF2 lattices were observed in the fluorosilicate glass ceramics. ► EDXS analysis showed Yb3+ was enriched into the SrF2 nanocrystals. ► That deduced intense cooperative luminescence of the glass ceramics. ► NIR emissions appeared large bandwidths and long lifetimes simultaneously. ► Yb3+ can be an efficient upconversion sensitizer or NIR activator in this host. -- Abstract: Yb3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing cubic SrF2 nanocrystals were prepared by heat treating the precursor fluorosilicate glass. The precipitated crystals increase in size and the crystallinity decreases with increasing Yb3+ doping level. With high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, the nano-sized nature of SrF2 was clearly observed. Owing to a significant change in the crystal-field effects with Yb3+ enriching in the SrF2 phase, the glass ceramics present near infrared emission with large bandwidths and long lifetimes, simultaneously. This indicates the glass ceramics have potential application in the efficient IR lasers pumping by InGaAs diodes. The glass ceramics can also emit blue upconversion luminescence, deriving from Yb3+ pairs’ cooperative luminescence. It suggested that Yb3+ can be an efficient upconversion sensitizer for other rare earth ions.

  14. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass

  15. Solidification of high level liquid waste by glass-ceramic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glass-ceramic composition for the solidification of high level liquid wastes was studied. Glass-ceramic is a product obtained by the heat treatment of glass which is converted to thermodynamically stable state. The systems of glass-ceramics studied were diopside, celsian, perovskite, and eucryptite systems. The simulated oxides coming from the high level liquid wastes in PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.) plant were incorporated by 20 wt. % into the base glass. The evaluation of the properties was performed to seek the compositions with excellent crystallization behavior among the respective systems. The evaluation of water durability, thermal expansion coefficient, bending strength, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal shock strength and thermal stability, and the observation of crystalline texture with an electron microscope and described and summarized. As a result, the glass-ceramic of diopside system was proved to be superior to others in the water durability, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and bending strength. It also showed good thermal stability and high thermal resistance. Therefore, it was concluded that the glass-ceramic of diopside system is the most suitable for the solidification of high level liquid wastes. The homogeneous glass obtained was crystallized by heating at the rate of 300 deg C/hr from room temperature to 500 deg C, and subsequently heating at the rate of 33 deg C/hr from 500 deg C to the maximum crystallization temperature, and keeping for 1 - 3 hours at these temperatures. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Rechargeable lithium batteries, using sulfur-based cathode materials and Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All-solid-state cells, using sulfur-based cathode materials and Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolytes exhibited excellent cycling performance at room temperature. The cathode materials consisting of sulfur and CuS were synthesized by mechanical milling, using a mixture of sulfur and copper crystals with several different molar ratios. The cell performance was influenced by the composition of S/Cu for the cathode materials and the cell with the cathode material of S/Cu = 3 prepared by milling for 15 min retained large discharge capacities over 650 mA h g-1 for 20 cycles. Sulfur as well as CuS in the cathode materials proved to be utilized as active materials on charge-discharge processes in the all-solid-state batteries

  17. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF GLASS-CERAMICS BY DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    A. NOZAD; Z. HAMNABARD; S. BAGHSHAHI; M. Ghasemzadeh; A. NEMATI

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of fluorphlogopite, a glass-ceramic in the MgO–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–F system, was studied by substitution of Li2O for K2O in the glass composition. DTA, XRD and SEM were used for the study of crystallization behavior, formed phases and microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. Crystallization kinetics of the glass was investigated under non-isothermal conditions, using the formal theory of transformations for heterogeneous nucleation. The crystallization resu...

  18. Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Proof test diagrams for Zerodur glass-ceramics are calculated from available fracture mechanics data. It is shown that the environment has a large effect on minimum time-to-failure as predicted by proof test diagrams.

  19. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  20. Cracking phenomena in lithium-di-silicate glass ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajat Banerjee

    2001-04-01

    Lithium-di-silicate glass ceramic (Li2O, SiO2) with uniformly oriented crystals was placed on a Vickers indentation with extrusion axis horizontally parallel to the base axis. The material was rotated through 0°– 90° and at each angle a 20 N load was applied to ascertain the crack path. It was observed that the crack length decreases and the crack deviates from its original path with increasing angle. The deviation of the crack was correlated with the component of the crack driving force and the theoretical strength of the aligned crystals at different angles.

  1. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  2. Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-Tellurite Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bragatto, Caio B.;

    2013-01-01

    spectroscopy. We find similar activation energies for both glass and crystal, implying that they have similar conduction mechanisms, i.e., thermally activated hopping. The electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass is about one order of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding crystal, and a......In this paper, we investigate the electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics with crystallinity ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%, i.e., from entirely amorphous to completely crystalline. The glass is prepared by the melt quenching technique, and the crystal is prepared by subsequent heat...... treatment thereof. Glass-ceramics are prepared by mixing glass and crystal powder, followed by a sintering procedure. Activation energies for electronic conduction in the glass and in the crystal are determined by fitting the Mott-Austin equation to the electronic conductivity data obtained by impedance...

  3. Long-term behavior of glass-ceramic zirconolite; Etude du comportement a long terme des vitrocristallins a base de zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ch

    2003-07-01

    This work is a part of the investigation of new containment matrices considered for specific conditioning of radionuclides after separation. The aim was to demonstrate the long-term aqueous corrosion resistance of the glass-ceramic zirconolite considered for the conditioning of plutonium and the minor actinides. This material is composed of crystals of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}) dispersed in a residual vitreous phase. It appears that glass-ceramic zirconolite presents a better kinetic behavior than the nuclear glass R 7T7. This is mainly due to a more important rate decrease that occurs more rapidly, that induces a quantity of glass altered at least 10 times as small as for R 7T7 glass. This high slowdown of the alteration rate is attributed to the formation of an alteration film that has been the subject of a specific study. We have demonstrated that the rate decrease was controlled as for the R7T7 glass by the amorphous phase of the alteration film forming a diffusion barrier for reactive species. It seems that the porosity is not the single parameter that explains the protective effect of the gel. The main differences compared with R7T7 glass are that silicon does not control the alteration of the material and that the gel is composed of two distinct phases. We have in particular identified a dense phase enriched in titanium and neodymium that probably influences deeply the kinetics. (author)

  4. Enhanced mid-IR emission in Yb{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+} co-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Junhua [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang Qiang [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhuang Yixi [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu Xiaofeng [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guan Miaojia; Zhu Bin; Yang Rong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Qiu Jianrong, E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-02-10

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions had been enriched in the nanocrystals of the glass ceramics. > Mid-IR luminescence intensity of the glass ceramics was enhanced. > Judd-Ofelt theory was used to calculate optical parameters. - Abstract: Tm{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} co-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics were prepared through thermal treatment of the as-prepared glasses. The precipitation of nanocrystals and the incorporation of Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} into the nanocrystals were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and absorption spectra. Based on the Judd-Ofelt theory, the J-O parameters {Omega}{sub {lambda}} ({lambda} = 2, 4, 6), spontaneous radiative transition rates, radiative lifetimes and fluorescence branching ratios of Tm{sup 3+} in both as-prepared glasses and glass ceramics were calculated. Intense mid-IR emission and upconversion luminescence in the Tm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glass ceramics were observed under 980 nm excitation. Especially, compared with that of the as-prepared glasses, mid-IR luminescence intensity of Tm{sup 3+} in the glass ceramics was greatly enhanced. Desirable spectroscopic characteristics suggest that these oxyfluoride glass ceramics may be promising mid-IR laser active medium.

  5. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  6. Bone bonding ability of some borate bio-glasses and their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma H. Margha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary borate glasses from the system Na2O·CaO·B2O3 together with soda-lime-borate samples containing 5 wt.% of MgO, Al2O3, SiO2 or P2O5 were prepared. The obtained glasses were converted to their glass-ceramic derivatives by controlled heat treatment. X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the separated crystalline phases in glass-ceramics after heat treatment of the glassy samples. The glasses and corresponding glass-ceramics after immersion in water or diluted phosphate solution for extended times were characterized by the grain method (adopted by several authors and recommended by ASTM and Fourier-transform infrared spectra to justify the formation of hydroxyapatite as an indication of the bone bonding ability. The influence of glass composition on bioactivity potential was discussed too.

  7. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangutova Bianka V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa. The polyurethane foam was used as a pore creator which gave the material porosity of 70(5% (fly ash-glass composite and a porosity of 65( 5% (slag-glass composite. E-modulus values of the designed porous systems were 3.5(1.2 GPa and 8.1(3 GPa, while the bending strength values were 6.0(2 MPa and 13.2(3.5 MPa, respectively. These materials could be used for the production of tiles, wall bricks, as well as for the construction of air diffusers for waste water aeration.

  8. Inward Cationic Diffusion and Percolation Transition in Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsklaer, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng; Mørup, Steen

    2010-01-01

    We show the quantitative correlation between the degree of crystallization and the cationic diffusion extent in iron-containing diopside glass–ceramics at the glass transition temperature. We find a critical degree of crystallization, above which the diffusion extent sharply drops with the degree...... disconnected glass phase....

  9. Ytterbium-doped glass-ceramics for optical refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Elton Soares de Lima; Krishnaiah, Kummara Venkata; Ledemi, Yannick; Yu, Ye-Jin; Messaddeq, Younes; Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-02-23

    We report for the first time the characterization of glass-ceramics for optical refrigeration. Ytterbium-doped nanocrystallites were grown in an oxyfluoride glass matrix of composition 2YbF(3):30SiO(2)-15Al(2)O(3)-25CdF(2)-22PbF(2)-4YF(3), forming bulk glass-ceramics at three different crystalisation levels. The samples are compared with a corresponding uncrystalised (glass) sample, as well as a Yb:YAG sample which has presented optical cooling. The measured X-ray diffraction spectra, and thermal capacities of the samples are reported. We also report for the first time the use of Yb:YAG as a reference for absolute photometric quantum efficiency measurement, and use the same setup to characterize the glass and glass-ceramic samples. The cooling figure-of-merit was measured by optical calorimetry using a fiber Bragg grating and found to depend on the level of crystallization of the sample, and that samples with nanocrystallites result in higher quantum efficiency and lower background absorption than the pure-glass sample. In addition to laser-induced cooling, the glass-ceramics have the potential to serve as a reference for quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:25836500

  10. Thermal properties and crystallization of lithium–mica glass and glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two groups of Li–mica glass-ceramics, have been compared. • By controlling the glass composition, crystalline lepidolite was obtained. • The Tp of Li–mica was through the previous virgilite and eucryptite phase. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was the synthesis of two groups of Li–mica glass-ceramics denoted by lepidolite (Al2.5F2KLi1.5O10Si3) and Li-phlogopite (LiMg3AlSi3O10F2). The studied system was SiO2–Al2O3–MgO–K2O–Li2O. A total of 3 compositions were prepared. Bulk casted glasses and sintered glass-ceramics of Li-phlogopite and lepidolite systems, were prepared. Eucryptite and virgilite were two prior phases of lepidolite and Li-phlogopite crystallization. It was shown that the obtained glass-ceramics have lower TEC than corresponding glasses. Sinterability of lepidolite glass-ceramic was shown that improved by increasing the Al2O3 content in glass composition. TEC and microhardness values were α = 6.08 × 10−6/°C, 755 ± 11.1, α = 7.86 × 10−6/°C, 739 ± 7.4 and α = 5.05 × 10−6/°C, 658 ± 6.2 HV for Li-lep, Klep1 and Klep2 glasses, respectively

  11. Bioactivity of thermal plasma synthesized bovine hydroxyapatite/glass ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone injuries and failures often require the inception of implant biomaterials. Research in this area is receiving increasing attention worldwide. A variety of artificial bone materials, such as metals, polymeric materials, composites and ceramics, are being explored to replace diseased bones. Calcium phosphate ceramics are currently used as biomaterials for many applications in both dentistry and orthopedics. Bioactive silicate-based glasses show a higher bioactive behaviour than calcium phosphate materials. It is very interesting to study the mixtures of HA and silicate-based glasses. In the present study; natural bovine hydroxyapatite / SiO2-CaO-MgO glass composites were produced using the Transferred arc plasma (TAP) melting method. TAP melting route is a brisk process of preparation of glass-ceramics in which the raw materials are melted in the plasma and crystallization of the melt occurs while cooling down at a much faster rate in relatively short processing times compared to the conventional methods of manufacture of glass ceramics/composites. It is well known that; one essential step to the understanding of the biological events occurring at the bone tissue/material interface is the biological investigation by in vitro tests. Cell lines are commonly used for biocompatibility tests, and are very efficient because of their reproducibility and culture facility. In this study, we report the results of a study on the response of primary cultures of human fibroblast cells to TAP melted bioactive glass ceramics.

  12. LSA glass-ceramic tiles made by powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low cost alternative for the production of glass-ceramic materials is the pressing of the matrix glass powders and its consolidation simultaneously with crystallization in a single stage of sintering. The main objective of this work was to obtain LSA glass ceramics with low thermal expansion, processed by pressing and sintering a ceramic frit powder. The raw materials were homogenized and melted (1480 deg C, 80min), and the melt was poured in water. The glass was chemically (XRF and AAS) and thermally (DTA, 10 deg C/min, air) characterized, and then ground (60min and 120min). The ground powders were characterized (laser diffraction) and compressed (35MPa and 45MPa), thus forming four systems. The compacts were dried (150 deg C, 24h) and sintered (1175 deg C and 1185 deg C, 10 deg C/min). Finally, the glass-ceramics were characterized by microstructural analysis (SEM and XRD), mechanical behavior (σbending) and thermal analysis (α). The best results for thermal expansion were those for the glass-ceramics processed with smaller particle size and greater compaction pressure. (author)

  13. Crystalline phase responsible for the permanent second-harmonic generation in chalcogenide glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, Marie; Nazabal, Virginie; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Smektala, Frédéric; Moréac, Alain; Pechev, Stanislas; Zeghlache, Hassina; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Martinelli, Gilbert; Quiquempois, Yves

    2007-10-01

    Permanent second-harmonic generation (SHG) has been demonstrated in chalcogenide based glass-ceramics containing non-linear micro-crystals with a size of a few micrometers. A glass composition from the Ge-Sb-S system was chosen as the reference glass for its stability against crystallization and atmospheric corrosion. Metallic cadmium was introduced in this matrix to promote crystallite formation resulting in infrared transparent glass-ceramics. A volume crystallization of β-GeS2 phase was obtained within the glass media by heating the glass samples at 370 °C for different durations. The glass-ceramics were then investigated by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and NanoSIMS. The second-order non-linear signals were recorded by using Maker fringes experiment and were studied as a function of the crystallized volume fraction. The results indicated a non-linearity in chalcogenide glass-ceramics about one hundred times lower than α-quartz for a 1 mm thick sample heat treated 144 h.

  14. Dynamic fatigue testing of Zerodur glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent brittleness of glass invariably leads to a large variability in strength data and a time dependence in strength. Leading rate plays a large role in strength values. Glass is found to be weaker when supporting loads over long periods of time as compared to glass which undergoes rapid leading. These properties complicate the structural design allowables for the utilization of glass components in an application such as Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The test methodology to obtain parameters which can be used to predict the reliability and life time of Zerodur glass-ceramic which is to be used for the mirrors in the AXAF is described.

  15. Glasses and ceramics for immobilisation of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.K. Research Programme on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high level liquid reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behaviour under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilising activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms is described. The U.K. philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented. (author)

  16. Thermal insulation of pipelines by foamed glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apkaryan, A. S.; Kudyakov, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    Based on broken glass, clay and organic additives granular insulating glass crystalline material and technology of its receipt are developed. The regularities of the effect of composition and firing temperature on the properties of the granules are specified. The resulting granular thermally insulating material is produced with a bulk density of 260-280 kg/m3 pellet strength - 1.74 MPa, thermal conductivity - 0.075 W/m °C, water absorption - 2.6 % by weight. The effect of the basic physical characteristics of the components of the charge on the process of pore formation is studied. According to the research results, basic parameters affecting the sustainability of the swelling glass are specified. Rational charge composition, thermal and gas synthesis mode are chosen so that the partial pressure of gases is below the surface tension of the melt. This enables the formation of granules with small closed pores and vitrified surface. The article is the result of studies on the application of materials for pipe insulation of heating mains with foamed glass ceramics.

  17. A fruitful demonstration in sensors based on upconversion luminescence of Yb3+/Er3+codoped Sb2O3-WO3-Li2O (SWL) glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Sukul, Prasenjit; Kumar, Kaushal

    2016-07-01

    In this article, erbium and ytterbium doped lithium tungsten antimonate (Yb3+/Er3+:Sb2O3-WO3-Li2O) glass-ceramics (GC) is synthesized and its novel applications in temperature sensing and detection of latent fingerprints is studied. It is also estimated that this material could be useful as a solar cell concentrator. The upconversion emission studies on Yb3+/Er3+:SWL glass-ceramics have shown intense green emission at 525 nm (2H11/2 → 4I15/2) & 545 nm (4s3/2 → 4I15/2). The variation of UC intensities with external temperature have shown a well-fashioned pattern, which suggests that the 2H11/2 and 4S3/2 levels of Er3+ ion are thermally coupled and can act as a temperature sensor in the 300–500 K temperature range. Dry powder of Yb3+/Er3+:SWL glass-ceramic is used to develop latent fingerprint with high contrast in green color on glass slide.

  18. Barium zirconate base ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical corrosion at high temperatures is a serious problem in the refractory materials field, leading to degradation and bath contamination by elements of the refractory. The main objective of this work was to search for ceramics that could present higher resistance to chemical attack by aggressive molten oxides. The general behaviour of a ceramic material based on barium zirconate (Ba Zr O3) with the addition of different amounts of liquid phase former was investigated. The densification behaviour occurred during different heat treatments, as well as the microstructure development, as a function of the additives and their reactions with the main phase, were observed and are discussed. (author)

  19. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  20. Study of the effect of Ca/Mg alkali-oxides ratio on the structure of a glass-ceramic based on an aluminosilicated glass containing 2wt.% of zirconolite crystalline phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souag R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New nuclear glass-ceramics are extensively studied for the radioactive waste confinement, due to the double confinement conferred by the glass-ceramics. In this study, a glass-ceramic constituted by an aluminosilicate glass in the system: SiO2-Al2O3-CaO-MgOZrO2-TiO2, containing 2wt.% of Ca0.83Ce0.17ZrTi1.66Al0.34O7 zirconolite, has been synthesized by the discontinuous method. Cerium, an actinide surrogate is introduced both in the glass and ceramic phases. The synthesis is performed by a double melting at 1350°C, followed by a nucleation at 564°C, during 2 h, and a crystal growth at 1010°C during 3 h. Then effect of Ca/Mg ratio on the distribution of the crystalline network in the material was studied for Ca / Mg ratios ranging from 0.4 to 5.5. For the whole of the materials, Archimedes density is about 2.80 g/cm3. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis shows that the increase of Ca/Mg ratio leads to the increase of aluminosilicated crystalline phases with high Ca contents; the materials molar volumes remaining constant. The zirconolite phase is not affected by these additive aluminosilicated phases. The scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis confirmed these results; and shows the uniformity of distribution of the ceramics in the bulk of the materials.

  1. Porous bioactive glass and glass-ceramics made by reaction sintering under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W; Abdelouas, A; Lutze, W

    2001-03-01

    A glass and a rhenanite-wollastonite glass-ceramic were synthesized with the qualitative composition Na2O-CaO-SiO2-P2O5. Both materials were prepared by reaction sintering under isostatic pressure (RSIP) using powder mixtures. Solid state reactions were complete within a few hours at 950 degrees C under modest pressure. Formation of the glass and crystalline phases was driven by an intermediate, reactive, low viscosity Na2O-SiO2 phase. A reaction mechanism is suggested. Porous materials were obtained with two ranges of pore sizes: 100-200 microm and ceramic were corroded in simulated body fluid at 37 degrees C. The evolution of surface features was studied. Gel layers formed on both materials. Corrosion was fastest inside the pores. Microcrystals of apatite were identified by crystal structure analysis and by chemical analysis. During corrosion of the glass-ceramic, rhenanite most likely was converted into apatite. Comparison of these results with published information suggests that the glass and glass-ceramic are bioactive. We suggest that RSIP can be used (a) to control the surface porosity and pore size of bioactive implants, thereby increasing the stability of tissue/implant interfaces; (b) to make glasses and glass-ceramics with new properties; and (c) to make near net-shape materials. PMID:11189036

  2. Inorganic glasses and glass-ceramics studied by isothermal mechanical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes isothermal mechanical spectroscopy measurements carried out in silicate glasses and LAS (Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2)-type glass-ceramics. Single alkali silicate glass Na2O.3SiO2 exhibits two relaxation peaks. The first one located at a low temperature is generally assigned to the stress-induced diffusion of alkali ions. The second relaxation peak is attributed to the 'non-bridging oxygen'. Mixed alkali silicate glasses (1 - x)Na2O.xLi2O.3SiO2 with x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 exhibit the mixed alkali peak. And also the 'non-bridging oxygen' peak. Two LAS-type glass-ceramics having the same chemical composition but different microstructures: 'β-quartz' and 'β-spodumene' type, respectively, and their parent glass have been studied. For the glass which does not contain 'non-bridging oxygen', a single mechanical relaxation peak linked with the stress-induced movement of lithium ions is observed. On the contrary, two peaks occur in the 'β-quartz' and 'β-spodumene' glass-ceramics. The 'low-temperature' peak (∼340 K for 1 Hz) is linked with ion mobility in the respective main crystalline phase. The origin of the 'high-temperature' peak is totally different for the two glass-ceramics; in the 'β-quartz' glass-ceramic, it is due to Mg2+ and Zn2+ ion relaxation in the crystalline phase, whereas in the 'β-spodumene' glass-ceramic, it is linked with a complex entity within the residual vitreous phase

  3. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved

  4. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  5. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  6. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 10000C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm3, depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF2, CaZrTi207, CaTiO3, monoclinic ZrO2, and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO2, CaO, and SiO2) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U238. The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO2. Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF2, Al203, and ZrSi04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  7. Evaluation of the reuse of glass and ceramic blocks in the development of a ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ceramic industry has enormous potential to absorb wastes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing leftovers ceramic blocks, from construction and, with shards of glass in the development of a ceramic product. The ceramic pieces were prepared with different compositions of glass by the method of pressing conformation and heating at 1000 and 1100 deg C. The conformed pieces were tested for linear shrinkage, water absorption, porosity, and tensile strength. The techniques for characterization were X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, the results show that the ceramic material produced has a high flexural strength and low values of water absorption. (author)

  8. Sealing ceramic material in low melting point glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritoki, M.; Fujikawa, T.; Miyanaga, J.

    1984-01-01

    A structured device placed in an aerated crucible to pack ceramics molding substance that is to be processed was designed. The structure is wrapped by sealing material made of pyrex glass and graphite foil or sheet with a weight attached on top of it. The crucible is made of carbon; the ceramics material to be treated through heat intervenient press process is molding substance consisting mainly of silicon nitride.

  9. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Yttrium Aluminum Borate Glasses and Glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J.; Brooks, M.; Crenshaw, T.; Morris, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Morgan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Raman spectra of glasses and glass-ceramics in the Y2O3-Al2O3-B2O3 system are reported. Glasses with B2O3 contents ranging from 40 to 60 mole percent were prepared by melting 20 g of the appropriate oxide or carbonate powders in alumina crucibles at 1400 C for 45 minutes. Subsequent heat treatments of the glasses at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C were performed in order to induce nucleation and crystallization. It was found that Na2CO3 added to the melt served as a nucleating agent and resulted in uniform bulk crystallization. The Raman spectra of the glasses are interpreted primarily in terms of vibrations of boron - oxygen structural groups. Comparison of the Raman spectra of the glass-ceramic samples with spectra of aluminate and borate crystalline materials reveal that these glasses crystallize primarily as yttrium aluminum borate, YAl3(BO3)4.

  10. Tailored spectroscopic and optical properties in rare earth-activated glass-ceramics planar waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Davor; Van Tran, Thi Thanh; Dieudonné, Belto; Cristina, Armellini; Berneschi, Simone; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Varas, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Feron, Patrice; Duverger Arfuso, Claire; Cibiel, Gilles; Turrell, Sylvia; Tran Ngoc, Khiem; Boulard, Brigitte; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Glass-ceramic waveguides overcome some of the efficiency problems experienced with conventional waveguides. These two-phase materials are composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The respective volume fractions of the crystalline and amorphous phases determine the properties of the glass ceramic. They also represent a valid alternative to widely used glass hosts such as silica as an effective optical medium for light propagation and luminescence enhancement. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters for solar energy exploitation.

  11. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hua; Ye Xiaojian; Li Jiashun, E-mail: ljsspine@163.co [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  12. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ye, Xiao-Jian; Li, Jia-Shun

    2009-08-01

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:19605959

  13. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  14. Glass-ceramic frits for porcelain stoneware bodies: effects on sintering, phase composition and technological properties

    OpenAIRE

    Zanelli, Chiara; Baldi, Giovanni; Dondi, Michele; Ercolani, Giampaolo; Guarini, Guia; Raimondo, Maria Rosa

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, the effects of glass-ceramic frits (10wt%) added to a porcelain stoneware body in replacement of non-plastic raw materials, were evaluated simulating the tile-making process. Each glass-ceramic frit plays its own peculiar effect on the compositional properties and only some precursors behave as real glass ceramic materials. The positive influence of glass-ceramic precursors in promoting the sintering stands out when temperature onset densification and sintering rate are c...

  15. Preparation and characterization of novel foamed porous glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasmal, Nibedita; Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in

    2015-05-15

    Foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent have been synthesized in a novel glass system of SrO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-M{sub x}O{sub y} (where M = Ba, Mg, La, Ce and Ni) by a simple process of powder sintering. The glass and glass-ceramics are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), heating stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), optical microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the glasses formed are amorphous and the glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of these glasses are found to be in the range 673–678 °C and 706–728 °C respectively. The glasses are highly stable as indicated by the DSC evaluated glass stability parameters of the range 195–240 °C. Quantitative sintering study of glass powder compacts revealed swelling in the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} corresponding to a geometry change of 75 and 108% around 900 °C respectively. With reference to this finding the glass powder compacts are heated to 900 °C and the foamed glass-ceramics are obtained. Characteristic crystalline silicate phases have been identified in the XRD studies and their microstructures are recorded by FESEM. Optical microscope study of the foamed samples revealed formation of bigger foamed cavity with residual pores in samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} in comparison to samples with BaO, MgO and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The mean pore diameters of the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} are determined to be 43 and 32 μm, and their respective porosities are 2.34 and 1.82 cm{sup 3}/g respectively. Thus NiO and CeO{sub 2} are found to be very effective to obtain foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent by the viscous flow sintering of fine glass powder compacts along with the reduction of the respective polyvalent ions. - Highlights: • Synthesis of foamed porous glass-ceramics

  16. Method for solidification of aqueous, radioactive wastes in a glass, glass ceramic or glass ceramic-like matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with an improvement of the known method to solidify aqueous, highly radioactive waste in a glass matrix or in a glass ceramic matrix in which the previously denitrated waste water is spray-dried and calined. The calined product occuring can then be mixed with glass-forming substances or with ground glass grit and then be melted in a crucible or oven to a homogeneous mass. By applying such a method however, the spray nozzle in the spray calcinator gets blocked up after a time. In order to avoid this the invention suggests to add kieselguhr-like material in solid form to the aqueous waste solution prior to spray drying. The kieselguhr has a composition of about 90 wt.% SiO2; 4 wt.% Al2O3; 3.3 wt.% Na2O+K2O; 1.3 wt.% Fe2O3, as well as MgO, CO, TiO2 and P2O5 with grain sizes of more than 70 wt.% grain size distribution between 10 and 40 mum. The kieselguhr is added to the aqueous waste solution in a quantity of 50 to 60 g/l. (orig./PW)

  17. The effect of flourine content on crystallization and properites of fluorisilicic mica glass-ceramic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xiao-gang; TIAN Jie-mo; QIN Yan-jun

    2001-01-01

    @@ Fluormica glass-ceramics are widely used in dental field because of their high esthetics, excellent biocompatibility, and good mechanical properties and machinability. The main crystalline phase in fluormica glass-ceramics is either fluorophlogopite or fluorosilicic mica. Dicor(r) is the most notable commercialized fluorsilicic mica glass-ceramics.

  18. Glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilizing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported on several new glass and glass-ceramic waste formulations for plutonium disposition. The approach proposed involves employing existing calcined high level waste (HLW) present at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and an additive to: (1) aid in the formation of a durable waste form and (2) decrease the attractiveness level of the plutonium from a proliferation viewpoint. The plutonium, PuO2, loadings employed were 15 wt% (glass) and 17 wt% (glass-ceramic). Results in the form of x-ray diffraction patterns, microstructure and durability tests are presented on cerium surrogate and plutonium loaded waste forms using simulated calcined HLW and demonstrate that durable phases, zirconia and zirconolite, contain essentially all the plutonium

  19. Glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilizing plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Holleran, T.P.; Johnson, S.G.; Frank, S.M.; Meyer, M.K.; Noy, M.; Wood, E.L. [Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knecht, D.A.; Vinjamuri, K.; Staples, B.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Results are reported on several new glass and glass-ceramic waste formulations for plutonium disposition. The approach proposed involves employing existing calcined high level waste (HLW) present at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and an additive to: (1) aid in the formation of a durable waste form and (2) decrease the attractiveness level of the plutonium from a proliferation viewpoint. The plutonium, PuO{sub 2}, loadings employed were 15 wt% (glass) and 17 wt% (glass-ceramic). Results in the form of x-ray diffraction patterns, microstructure and durability tests are presented on cerium surrogate and plutonium loaded waste forms using simulated calcined HLW and demonstrate that durable phases, zirconia and zirconolite, contain essentially all the plutonium.

  20. Transmission Properties of a New Glass Ceramic and Doped with Co2+ as Saturable Absorber for 1.54 μm Er Glass Short Pulse Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chunlei; CHEN Li; FENG Suya; HE Dongbing; WANG Meng; HU Lili

    2012-01-01

    The preparation and characteristics of a new transparent glass ceramic were described.Crystal phase particles with nanometer size were successfully precipitated in glass matrix,which was confirmed to be one of indium aluminum zinc oxide compounds (InxAlyZnzO).The presence of aluminum (Al) and indium (In) impurities in the zinc oxides (ZnO) crystal lattice leads to some changes of the carrier concentration in the material and then promote the sharply changes of transmission spectra in IR range wavelength.And subsequently,the IR cut-off edge blue shifted from 5.5 μm in base glass to 3 μm in transparent glass ceramic sample.Furthermore,passive Q switched 1.54 μm Er glass laser pulses with pulse energy of 10 mJ and pulse width of 800 ns were successfully obtained by using the cobalt doped transparent glass ceramic as a saturable absorber.

  1. Fiber reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics for high performance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewo, K. M.; Brennan, J. J.; Layden, G. K.

    1986-01-01

    The development of fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites is described. The general concepts involved in composite fabrication and resultant composite properties are given for a broad range of fiber and matrix combinations. It is shown that composite materials can be tailored to achieve high levels of toughness, strength, and elastic stiffness, as well as wear resistance and dimensional stability.

  2. Bending strength of glass-ceramics based on 3CaO.P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}-MgO glass system; Resistencia a fratura de vitroceramicos do sistema 3CaO.P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}-MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daguano, J.K.M.F.; Suzuki, P.A.; Santos, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de Lorena. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Fernandes, M.H.V. [Universidade de Aveiro (UAveiro/CECICO), Aveiro (Portugal). Centro de Investigacao em Materiais Ceramicos e Compositos. Dept. de Engenharia Ceramica e do Vidro; Elias, C.N. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biomateriais

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the Modulus of Rupture of bioactive glass-ceramic based on 3CaO.P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}-MgO system was investigated, aiming its use in bone-restorations. The mechanical property was correlated with microstructural and crystallographic features of this material. High-purity starting-powders, CaCO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, MgO, Ca (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}).H{sub 2}O, were used in this study. The powders were mixed in a stoichiometric ratio, using planetary ball-mill. The suspensions were dried, sieved and melted at 1600 deg C, for 4h. The casting ones were cooled quickly until annealing temperature 700 deg C, in which remained for 2h, with controlled cooling-rate until ambient temperature. Bulks of glass were heat-treated with temperatures varying between 700 deg C and 1100 deg C, for 4h, being after that, cooled at 3 deg C/min. Bioactive glass and glass-ceramic were characterized by HRXRD (high resolution X-ray diffraction), where whitlockite was main phase. The microstructure was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy. Modulus of Rupture was determined by four-point bending testing using specimens of 1.5 x 2 x 25 mm and glasses presented strength near to 70MPa, while glass ceramics treated at 975 deg C-4h, presented bending strength of 120MPa. (author)

  3. Characterization and durability testing of a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded ceramic waste form for encapsulating the fission products and transuranics from the conditioning of metallic reactor fuel. This waste form is currently being scaled to the multi-kilogram size for encapsulation of actual high level waste. This paper will present characterization and durability testing of the ceramic waste form. An emphasis on results from application of glass durability tests such as the Product Consistency Test and characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The information presented is based on a suite of tests utilized for assessing product quality during scale-up and parametric testing

  4. Preparation and Characteristic of Glass-Ceramics with Super Low Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The preparation technics of glass-ceramics with super low coefficient of thermal expansion containing β-quartz solid solution as a main crystal phase based on the glass in the system Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 was introduced. The composition of base glass, technics of melting and heat treatment effecting on characteristic of glass-ceramics was described. Specimens were prepared by melting, anneal and controlled two steps heat treatment. Crystal phase, microstructure and elementary distributing were studied by using XRD, SEM and EDS respectively. Prepared specimens show excellent transparency and super low thermal expansion coefficient of 2×10-8 ·K-1, which reaches international advanced level.

  5. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F.; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A.; Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A.; Bih, L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P2O5-17.2Nb2O5-13.8WO3-34.5A2O-13.8B2O3, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σac and σdc, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz.

  6. Optical and spectroscopic properties of Eu-doped tellurite glasses and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellurite glasses doped with trivalent europium were prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique, in the chemical composition of (85−x) TeO2+5La2O3+10TiO2+xEu2O3 by varying the concentration of the rare-earth ion in the order 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mol%. Using Judd–Ofelt analysis, we calculated intensity parameters (Ω2 and Ω4), spontaneous emission probabilities, the radiative lifetime, luminescence branching factors, the quantum yield of luminescence, and the stimulated emission cross-sections for 5D0→7F2 transition. The change in optical properties with the variation of Eu3+ ion concentration have been discussed and compared with other glasses. The luminescence intensity ratio, quantum efficiency and emission cross-section values support that the TeEu1.5 tellurite glass is a suitable candidate for red laser source applications. Optical properties for Eu3+ doped tellurite glass, heated for different temperature, were investigated. Crystalline phases for α-TeO2, γ-TeO2 and TiTe3O8 system were determined by the XRD method. The effect of heat treatment on luminescence properties in the tellurite glass was discussed. By using Eu3+ as a probe, the local structure of rare-earth ion in tellurite glass, vitro-ceramic and ceramic glass has been investigated. The evaluated J–O intensity parameters have been used to calculate different radiative and laser characteristic parameters of the 5D0 excited level. The large magnitudes of stimulated emission cross-section (σe), branching ratio (β) and Gain bandwidth (σe×Δλeff) obtained for 5D0→7F2 (613 nm) transition for ceramic glass indicate that the present glass ceramic is promising host material for Eu3+doped fiber amplifiers. The measured lifetime of 5D0 excited state increases with increase of the heat treatment which further indicate that some Eu3+ ions were successfully embedded in the crystal phase and prove the low phonon energy environment of Eu3+ ions in the nanocrystals precipitated in the glass

  7. Cementation of Glass-Ceramic Posterior Restorations: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Breemer, Carline R. G.; Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Cune, Marco S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive review is to systematically organize the current knowledge regarding the cementation of glass-ceramic materials and restorations, with an additional focus on the benefits of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS). Materials and Methods. An extensive literature search concerning the cementation of single-unit glass-ceramic posterior restorations was conducted in the databases of MEDLINE (Pubmed), CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), and EMBASE. To be considered for inclusion, in vitro and in vivo studies should compare different cementation regimes involving a “glass-ceramic/cement/human tooth” complex. Results and Conclusions. 88 studies were included in total. The in vitro data were organized according to the following topics: (micro)shear and (micro)tensile bond strength, fracture strength, and marginal gap and integrity. For in vivo studies survival and quality of survival were considered. In vitro studies showed that adhesive systems (3-step, etch-and-rinse) result in the best (micro)shear bond strength values compared to self-adhesive and self-etch systems when luting glass-ceramic substrates to human dentin. The highest fracture strength is obtained with adhesive cements in particular. No marked clinical preference for one specific procedure could be demonstrated on the basis of the reviewed literature. The possible merits of IDS are most convincingly illustrated by the favorable microtensile bond strengths. No clinical studies regarding IDS were found. PMID:26557651

  8. Crystallization toughening of a model glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium disilicates are commercially important and among the most widely studied and well-characterized glass-ceramics, but their toughening mechanism – and those of most glass-ceramics – is still unknown. In this work, stoichiometric lithium disilicate glasses were used as a model system and crystallized using carefully designed and controlled two-stage heat treatments to give different crystallized volume fractions while maintaining a constant grain size of approximately 12 μm. This original procedure allowed us to separately control the effects of these two microstructural parameters on the mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic. The hardness, elastic modulus, four-point bending strength, indentation fracture toughness and double-torsion fracture toughness were measured for samples with different crystallized volume fractions, ranging from the parent glass to fully crystallized samples. We found that the bending strength increases rapidly with crystallization at crystal volume fractions below 10% and reaches a value 2.5 times greater than that of the original glass. For a fully crystallized sample, the fracture toughness increases almost fivefold, from 0.75 to 3.5 MPa.m1/2. Laser confocal microscopy was used to reveal the topography of the fracture surfaces. Three mechanisms that contribute to toughening – crack deflection, crack bowing and trapping, and crack bridging – were evaluated. A model incorporating the elastic modulus, crystal fracture toughness and crystallized volume fraction was proposed and successfully tested to explain the increased fracture toughness with crystallized volume fraction for the full range of crystallization in LS2 glass-ceramics

  9. Fast-ion conducting glass and glass-ceramics for the pH sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast-ion conducting glasses of the compositions Na1+xM2-x/3SixP3-xO12-2x/3 (0≤ x ≤3), where M = Zr, Ti, were studied to determine their structural arrangement, physical properties and ionic conductivity. Glass samples were prepared using the conventional melt-quench method in the melting temperature range, 1550 deg C to 1650 deg C. Glass products were characterised by XRD, DTA, dilatometry and density measurement. Solid state MAS NMR experiments of three accessible nuclei, 23Na, 29Si and 31P were used to determine short-range order arrangement in the glasses. XRD confirms the amorphicity of glasses for the compositions of x in range 0-3. Glass transition temperatures, Tg, TEC, and molar volume are controlled by glass composition. The MAS NMR results suggest that glass structure could be visualised as the silicate network modified by Na+ and Zr4+ or Ti4+ and [PO4] tetrahedra link up with the remaining of these modifiers with no Si-O-P observed. The glass structures were also controlled by the compositions. Using parameters determined by DTA, the corresponding glass-ceramics were produced by heat treatment for 4 hr. The composition containing ZrO2 provided the fast-ion conducting crystalline phase at a small concentration. The major crystalline phase is Na2ZrSi2O7. Glass-ceramics containing TiO2 produce very small concentration of the crystallised phase. Ionic conductivity measurement was used to determine the electrical properties of glass and glass-ceramics. Glasses having high Na2O content showed the higher ionic conductivity compared to the others. (author)

  10. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50 % of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminium borosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 degree centigrade). In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites) the mentioned by-products and illicit clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia) with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90 % was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA) and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15 - 35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45 - 65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 degree centigrade in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090 - 1100 degree centigrade with the most optimal properties - porosity 38 - 52 %, water absorption 39 - 47 % and bulk density 1.35 - 1.67 g/cm3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35 - 1.1 %, water absorption 0.7 - 2.6 % and bulk density 2.1 - 2.3 g/cm3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM). By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected. (Author) 16 refs.

  11. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–SiO2 glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio

  12. The influence of glass composition on crystalline phase stability in glass-ceramic wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddrell, Ewan, E-mail: ewan.r.maddrell@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Thornber, Stephanie; Hyatt, Neil C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Crystalline phase formation shown to depend on glass matrix composition. • Zirconolite forms as the sole crystalline phase only for most aluminous glasses. • Thermodynamics indicate that low silica activity glasses stabilise zirconolite. - Abstract: Zirconolite glass-ceramic wasteforms were prepared using a suite of Na{sub 2}O–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass matrices with variable Al:B ratios. Zirconolite was the dominant crystalline phase only for the most alumina rich glass compositions. As the Al:B ratio decreased zirconolite was replaced by sphene, zircon and rutile. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate a silica activity in the glass melt below which zirconolite is the favoured crystalline phase. The concept of the crystalline reference state of glass melts is then utilised to provide a physical basis for why silica activity varies with the Al:B ratio.

  13. Long-term behavior of glass-ceramic zirconolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a part of the investigation of new containment matrices considered for specific conditioning of radionuclides after separation. The aim was to demonstrate the long-term aqueous corrosion resistance of the glass-ceramic zirconolite considered for the conditioning of plutonium and the minor actinides. This material is composed of crystals of zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) dispersed in a residual vitreous phase. It appears that glass-ceramic zirconolite presents a better kinetic behavior than the nuclear glass R 7T7. This is mainly due to a more important rate decrease that occurs more rapidly, that induces a quantity of glass altered at least 10 times as small as for R 7T7 glass. This high slowdown of the alteration rate is attributed to the formation of an alteration film that has been the subject of a specific study. We have demonstrated that the rate decrease was controlled as for the R7T7 glass by the amorphous phase of the alteration film forming a diffusion barrier for reactive species. It seems that the porosity is not the single parameter that explains the protective effect of the gel. The main differences compared with R7T7 glass are that silicon does not control the alteration of the material and that the gel is composed of two distinct phases. We have in particular identified a dense phase enriched in titanium and neodymium that probably influences deeply the kinetics. (author)

  14. Elaboration of optical glass-ceramic for frequency doubling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High power laser development required the need of materials with nonlinear properties. Glass materials can be considered as ideal materials as they can be transparent and elaborated in very large dimension. Precipitation of non-centro symmetric crystalline particles in bulk glass leads to a material with bulk nonlinear properties. This glass-ceramic should be then easily integrated in such laser facilities. In this thesis, the results concerning the precipitation of the phase LiNbO3 in the glassy-matrix 35 Li2O - 25 Nb2O5 - 40 SiO2 are detailed. The crystallization mechanism of this phase is studied through thermal analysis, optical and electronic microscopy as well as in-situ analyses. These studies reveal glass-ceramics are obtained through a precipitation of the lithium niobate crystalline phase in spherulite shape. The nonlinear optical properties are investigated on this materials and an original, isotropic Second Harmonic Generation Signal (SHG) is registered in the bulk glass-ceramic. A complete study using a multi-scale approach allows the correlation between the spherulite structure and the nonlinear optical properties. A mechanism at the origin of the SHG signal is proposed. This leads to a new approach for transparent inorganic materials development for isotropic SHG conversion. (author)

  15. Transparent nano-glass-ceramics for efficient infrared emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarise the experimental data and provide a general theoretical basis for efficient infrared emission in the rare-earth doped transparent oxyfluoride nano-glass-ceramics. In these glass-ceramics, more than 90% fraction of the rare-earth dopant, such as Ho3+, Dy3+, Eu3+, Tm3+, Er3+, dissolve in the cubic β-PbF2 nano-crystals with a certain diameter of the order of 10 nm, whilst these nano-crystals are embedded in a robust aluminosilicate glass network. A remarkably low maximal phonon energy coupled to the rare-earth dopant in the β-PbF2 (at about 250 cm-1) permits the efficient infrared emission of the dopants from the levels, which are non-radiatively quenched in other glassy hosts. Further advantage of this nano-glass-ceramic material is in its robustness typical of the aluminosilicate glass, which offers fabrication of durable waveguide devices. The site of the rare-earth dopant is proposed to be nearly cubic with 8 fluorine ligands around the dopant resulting in prolonged lifetimes of the lasing levels and admixture of the vibronic coupling to the strength of some electric dipole transitions

  16. Compatibility tests of materials for a prototype ceramic melter for defense glass-waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion--erosion resistance of potential electrode and refractory materials was evaluated by static and dynamic tests in simulated glass waste. Based on corrosion--erosion behavior, thermal and electrical properties, and cost and availability, Monofrax K3 (Carborundum Co.) and Inconel 690 (International Nickel Co.) were selected as the contact refractory and electrode materials, respectively, for a prototype ceramic melter

  17. Selective laser densification of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Selective laser densification of glass-ceramic tapes has been investigated. ► A possible application to the layerwise-slurry deposition process was evaluated. ► The effect of a few percent organic in the slurry was also studied. ► A range of parameters was identified to densify layers without macroscopic defects. - Abstract: Tapes, cast by blade deposition of a lithium aluminosilicate glass slurry, were sintered using a YAG-fiber laser, with the aim of finding suitable parameters for an additive manufacturing process based on layer-wise slurry deposition and selective laser densification. The influence of the laser parameters (output power and scan velocity) on the sintering was evaluated, by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction, on the basis of the quality of the processed layer. Well densified samples could be obtained only in a small window of values for the output power and the scan velocity. The measurement of the width of a set of single scanned lines allowed also to estimate the minimum resolution of the system along the layer plane.

  18. Transport properties of lithium- lead-vanadium-telluride glass and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasses with the chemical composition 35Li2O-(45-x)V2O5−20PbO-xTeO2 (where x = 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15 mol %) have prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The electrical conductivity of Li+ ion conducting lead vanadium telluride glass samples has been carried out both as a function of temperature and frequency in the temperature range 503K-563K and over frequencies 40 Hz to 10 MHz. The electronic conduction has been observed in the present systems. When these samples annealed around 400°C for 2hour become the glass ceramic, which also shows increase tendency of conductivity. SEM confines glass and glass ceramic nature of the prepared samples

  19. Magnetic behavior of erbium-zinc-borate glasses and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasses of the system (Er2O3)x⋅(B2O3)(60−x)⋅(ZnO)40 (3 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%) were prepared by conventional melt quenching and subsequently converted to glass ceramics by heat treatment of glass samples at 860 °C for 2 h. The magnetic behaviour of the studied glasses and glass ceramics were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and a Faraday-type magnetic balance. Magnetic data show that erbium ions are involved in negative superexchange interactions in all the investigated samples, being antiferromagnetically coupled. For all studied samples the experimental values obtained for the effective magnetic moments are lower than the value corresponding to free Er3+ ions and decrease with the increasing of Er2O3 content. The decrease is more pronounced in heat treated samples than untreated ones

  20. Magnetic behavior of erbium-zinc-borate glasses and glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, G. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Pascuta, P.; Bosca, M.; Pop, V. [Technical University, 28 Memorandumului, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Stefan, R. [Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine University, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Tetean, R. [Babes-Bolyai University, 1 Mihail Kogalniceanu, Faculty of Physics, 400084 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Radulescu, D. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, 8 Victor Babes, 400012 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    Glasses of the system (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} (3 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%) were prepared by conventional melt quenching and subsequently converted to glass ceramics by heat treatment of glass samples at 860 °C for 2 h. The magnetic behaviour of the studied glasses and glass ceramics were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and a Faraday-type magnetic balance. Magnetic data show that erbium ions are involved in negative superexchange interactions in all the investigated samples, being antiferromagnetically coupled. For all studied samples the experimental values obtained for the effective magnetic moments are lower than the value corresponding to free Er{sup 3+} ions and decrease with the increasing of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. The decrease is more pronounced in heat treated samples than untreated ones.

  1. Magnetic behavior of erbium-zinc-borate glasses and glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Bosca, M.; Stefan, R.; Tetean, R.; Pop, V.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-01

    Glasses of the system (Er2O3)xṡ(B2O3)(60-x)ṡ(ZnO)40 (3 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%) were prepared by conventional melt quenching and subsequently converted to glass ceramics by heat treatment of glass samples at 860 °C for 2 h. The magnetic behaviour of the studied glasses and glass ceramics were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and a Faraday-type magnetic balance. Magnetic data show that erbium ions are involved in negative superexchange interactions in all the investigated samples, being antiferromagnetically coupled. For all studied samples the experimental values obtained for the effective magnetic moments are lower than the value corresponding to free Er3+ ions and decrease with the increasing of Er2O3 content. The decrease is more pronounced in heat treated samples than untreated ones.

  2. Up-conversion luminescence of oxyfluoride glasses and nano-glass-ceramics based on them, doped with Er3+ and Er3+/Yb3+ ions: spectral and structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to the study of spectral and structural characteristics of up-conversion luminescent (UCL) transparent oxyfluoride glass materials doped with rare earth elements Er3+ and Er3+/Yb3+. Excited with the 980 nm laser, green, red and near IR UCL bands were registered for all samples under study, both before and after their heat treatment. In the heat treated samples the intensity of the up-conversion increased significantly due to the formation of nano-crystalline phase of lead fluoride PbF2 in a glass matrix (nano-glass-ceramics). The structural analysis of the samples conducted with the method of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) showed the cluster organization of nanocrystals of PbF2 in heat treated samples.

  3. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ming, E-mail: mtang@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  4. Processing of glass-ceramics from lunar resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabes, B. D.; Poisl, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal is to fabricate useful ceramic materials from the by-products of lunar oxygen production processes. Specifically, the crystal nucleation and growth kinetics of ilmenite-extracted lunar regolith were studied in order to produce glass-ceramics with optimal mechanical, thermal, and abrasion resistant properties. In the initial year of the program, construction and calibration of a high temperature viscometer, used for determining the viscosity of simulated lunar glasses was finished. A series of lunar simulants were also prepared, and the viscosity of each was determined over a range of temperatures. It was found that an increase in the concentration of Fe2O3 decreases the viscosity of the glass. While this may be helpful in processing the glass, Fe2O3 concentrations greater than approximately 10 wt percent resulted in uncontrolled crystallization during viscosity measurements. Impurities (such as Na2O, MnO, and K2O) in the regolith appeared to decrease the viscosity of the parent glass. These effects, as well as those of TiO2 and SiO2 on the processability of the glass, however, remain to be quantified.

  5. 晶化温度对牙科用云母微晶玻璃微观结构的影响%Influence of crystallization temperature on microstructures of mica-based glass-ceramics for dental restorations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦燕军; 王忠义; 曹小刚; 田杰谟

    2001-01-01

    AIM To investigate the influence of crystallization temperature on microstructures of mica-based machinable glass-ceramics used for CAD/CAM dental restorations. METHODS According to the requirements of dental restorative materials, K2O-MgO-MgF2-SiO2 glass-ceramics system was chosen to make tetrasilicic fluormica glass-ceramics and three different temperatures were used to finish the crystallization procedure. Differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to observe the crystallization behavior, crystalline phases and microstructures of the glass-ceramics. Three point bending strength was also measured. RESULTS Grain shape changes from spherical to platelike as crystallization temperature went up. Improving crystallization temperature was increase the grain size, aspect ratio and flexural strength of the mica, while the crystalline phase is not affected by temperature changes. CONCLUSION Microstructures of the glass-ceramics are determined by crystallization temperature.%目的研究晶化温度对牙科CAD/CAM加工用四硅氟云母微晶玻璃微观结构的影响. 方法选用K2O-MgO-MgF2-SiO2系统来制备云母微晶玻璃,通过差热分析(DTA)、X射线衍射分析(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜观测(SEM)及三点弯曲强度的测试,比较了三种不同晶化温度对四硅氟云母微晶玻璃的晶化特性、微观结构及抗弯强度的影响. 结果随着晶化温度的逐步升高,四硅氟云母晶粒的形态由球形转变为片层状,晶粒尺寸和径厚比逐步增大,微晶玻璃的抗弯强度也逐步升高,但其晶相组成未发生明显变化. 结论晶化温度对四硅氟云母微晶玻璃的微观结构起决定作用.

  6. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF4 nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF4 nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  8. Alteration kinetics of the glass-ceramic zirconolite and role of the alteration film Comparison with the SON68 glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.; Ribet, I.; Frugier, P.; Gin, S.

    2007-06-01

    The glass-ceramic zirconolite is being considered for specific conditioning of plutonium or the minor actinides. The actinides are distributed throughout the zirconolite crystals and the residual glass phase. Since zirconolite alteration is extremely limited, actinide release from the glass-ceramic material is mainly attributable to alteration of the residual glass. Specimens corresponding to the residual glass phase alone were therefore altered under different conditions to compare their kinetics with the one of the SON68 glass (inactive R7T7 type glass). Glass-ceramic zirconolite presents a more important rate decrease occuring more rapidly and that induces a quantity of glass altered at least 10 times as small as for SON68 glass. This slowdown of the alteration rate is attributed to the formation of an alteration film that has been the subject of a specific study. We have in particular identified a dense phase enriched in titanium and neodymium that probably influences deeply the kinetics.

  9. Mechanical properties of molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic constants, thermal expansion, strength, and fracture toughness were determined for a molybdenum-sealing glass-ceramic containing approximately 31 volume percent Zn2SiO4 crystals in a glass matrix. The microstructure was studied for two different crystallization treatments and moderate changes in composition. Mechanical properties of the composite were compared with the properties of the constituent phases through application of mixture theory and by fractographic observations. The reinforcing effects of the crystal phase at room temperature are evident in comparison with the properties of the residual glass but not necessarily in comparison with the parent glass. Fracture toughness of the composite depends primarily upon additive properties of the separate phases instead of by interactive effects such as microcracks. (U.S.)

  10. Dimensional stability. [of glass and glass-ceramic materials in diffraction telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochen, R.; Justie, B.

    1976-01-01

    The temporal stability of glass and glass-ceramic materials is important to the success of a large diffraction-limited telescope. The results are presented of an experimental study of the dimensional stability of glasses and glass ceramics being considered for substrates of massive diffraction-limited mirrors designed for several years of service in earth orbit. The purpose of the study was to measure the relative change in length of the candidate substrate materials, to the order of 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power, as a function of several years time. The development of monolithic test etalons, the development and improvement of two types of ultra-high precision interferometers, and certain aspects of tests data presently achieved are discussed.

  11. A Novel Technique for the Connection of Ceramic and Titanium Implant Components Using Glass Solder Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Mick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Both titanium and ceramic materials provide specific advantages in dental implant technology. However, some problems, like hypersensitivity reactions, corrosion and mechanical failure, have been reported. Therefore, the combining of both materials to take advantage of their pros, while eliminating their respective cons, would be desirable. Hence, we introduced a new technique to bond titanium and ceramic materials by means of a silica-based glass ceramic solder. Cylindrical compound samples (Ø10 mm × 56 mm made of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ, as well as titanium grade 5, were bonded by glass solder on their end faces. As a control, a two-component adhesive glue was utilized. The samples were investigated without further treatment, after 30 and 90 days of storage in distilled water at room temperature, and after aging. All samples were subjected to quasi-static four-point-bending tests. We found that the glass solder bonding provided significantly higher bending strength than adhesive glue bonding. In contrast to the glued samples, the bending strength of the soldered samples remained unaltered by the storage and aging treatments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analyses confirmed the presence of a stable solder-ceramic interface. Therefore, the glass solder technique represents a promising method for optimizing dental and orthopedic implant bondings.

  12. Luminescent properties of Eu3+-Tb3+-doped SiO2-SnO2-based nano-glass-ceramics prepared by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent nano-glass-ceramics of composition 95SiO2-5SnO2 mol%, single doped with 0.4 mol% of Tb3+ and co-doped with 0.4 mol% of Eu3+ and Tb3+ have been obtained by thermal treatment of precursor sol-gel glasses. The segregated SnO2 nanocrystals, precipitated in the insulator SiO2 glass matrix during heat treatment, constitute a wide band gap quantum-dot system with mean radius of nanocrystals around 2.2-2.8 nm, comparable to the bulk exciton Bohr radius. A fraction of the rare earth ions is incorporated to the SnO2 nanocrystals and can be excited by energy transfer from the semiconductor host. The efficiency of this energy transfer process is strongly dependent on the nanocrystal radius in the case of the Tb3+ ions, whereas the dependence is not appreciable in the case of Eu3+ ions. These results can be explained taking into account the variations of the overlap of the SnO2 broad visible emission due to oxygen vacancies with the rare earth excitation spectra

  13. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  14. Dynamic and static fatigue of a machinable glass ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magida, M. B.; Forrest, K. A.; Heslin, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic and static fatigue behavior of a machinable glass ceramic was investigated to assess its susceptibility to stress corrosion-induced delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results so that lifetime predictions for components of this material could be made. The resistance to subcritical crack growth of this material was concluded to be only moderate and was found to be dependent on the size of its microstructure.

  15. Optimal glass-ceramic structures: Components of giant mirror telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenauer, Hans A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed investigations are carried out on optimal glass-ceramic mirror structures of terrestrial space technology (optical telescopes). In order to find an optimum design, a nonlinear multi-criteria optimization problem is formulated. 'Minimum deformation' at 'minimum weight' are selected as contradictory objectives, and a set of further constraints (quilting effect, optical faults etc.) is defined and included. A special result of the investigations is described.

  16. Crystalline phase characterization of glass-ceramic glazes

    OpenAIRE

    Rasteiro, M. G.; Gassman, Tiago; Santos, R; Antunes, E

    2007-01-01

    The firing process of five raw crystalline frits was investigated by means of DTA, XRD, heating microscopy and dilatometry. The chemical composition of the frits was determined by FAAS, to define the main glass-ceramic system of each frit. The final crystalline structure detected for the sintered frits conformed to the temperatures for which transformations were obtained during heating. The existence of a relationship between the crystallization process and sintering behaviour was confirmed. ...

  17. Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo R. Boccaccini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, bioactive glasses have been used to fill and restore bone defects. More recently, this category of biomaterials has become an emerging research field for bone tissue engineering applications. Here, we review and discuss current knowledge on porous bone tissue engineering scaffolds on the basis of melt-derived bioactive silicate glass compositions and relevant composite structures. Starting with an excerpt on the history of bioactive glasses, as well as on fundamental requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds, a detailed overview on recent developments of bioactive glass and glass-ceramic scaffolds will be given, including a summary of common fabrication methods and a discussion on the microstructural-mechanical properties of scaffolds in relation to human bone (structure-property and structure-function relationship. In addition, ion release effects of bioactive glasses concerning osteogenic and angiogenic responses are addressed. Finally, areas of future research are highlighted in this review.

  18. Preparation and Luminescence of Er3+ Doped Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics Containing LaF3 Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Er3+ doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing LaF3 nanocrystals were prepared and the up-con-version and near infrared luminescence behavior of Er3+ in glasses and glass ceramics were investigated. With increasing heat-treating time and temperature, the size (varied from 0 to 19 nm) and crystallinity (varied from 0 to 47%) of LaF3 nanocrystals in the glass ceramics are increased. The up-conversion luminescence intensity of Er3+ ions in the glass ceramics is much stronger than that in the glasses and increased significantly with increasing heat-treating time and temperature. The near infrared emission of Er3+ ions in the glass ceramics is found to be similar to that in the glasses.

  19. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO3 in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO3 as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B2O3, Al2O3, CaO and SiO2 by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  20. Glass reactive sintering as an alternative route for the synthesis of NZP glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NZP-type crystal structure allows a large number of ionic substitutions which leads to ceramics with adjustable thermal expansion properties or interesting ionic conductivity. However, NZP is difficult to fabricate into monoliths because it requires both high temperatures and long sintering times. An alternative low temperature route to obtain a tungsten (IV) and tin (IV) containing NZP crystalline phase uses a process of glass reactive sintering of a phosphate glass. Using a microwave oven, a glass with the appropriate composition in the NaPO3-Sn(II)O-W(VI)O3 ternary diagram is prepared by a conventional melting and casting technique. After crushing, the glass powder is pressed at room temperature. The green pellet is cured during various times at temperatures where glass reactive sintering takes place. From XRD and DTA experiments, we have shown that different parameters influence the achievement of NZP phase. Consequently, specific conditions, such as (i) initial glass composition, (ii) equimolar quantities of SnO and WO3, (iii) glass particle size lower than 100 μ m, and (iv) curing conducted under air, are required to obtain a glass-ceramic with a single crystalline phase with the NZP-type crystal structure. (authors)

  1. Experimental maxillary sinus augmentation using a highly bioactive glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Mecca, Carlos Eduardo; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Okamoto, Roberta; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Duarte, Marco Húngaro; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2016-02-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of a biomaterial directly influence its biological behavior and fate. However, anatomical and physiological particularities of the recipient site also seem to contribute with this process. The present study aimed to evaluate bone healing of maxillary sinus augmentation using a novel bioactive glass ceramic in comparison with a bovine hydroxyapatite. Bilateral sinus augmentation was performed in adult male rabbits, divided into 4 groups according to the biomaterial used: BO-particulate bovine HA Bio-Oss(®) (BO), BO+G-particulate bovine HA + particulate autogenous bone graft (G), BS-particulate glass ceramic (180-212 μm) Biosilicate(®) (BS), and BS+G-particulate glass ceramic + G. After 45 and 90 days, animals were euthanized and the specimens prepared to be analyzed under light and polarized microscopy, immunohistochemistry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and micro-computed tomography (μCT). Results revealed different degradation pattern between both biomaterials, despite the association with bone graft. BS caused a more intense chronic inflammation with foreign body reaction, which led to a difficulty in bone formation. Besides this evidence, SEM and μCT confirmed direct contact between newly formed bone and biomaterial, along with osteopontin and osteocalcin immunolabeling. Bone matrix mineralization was late in BS group but became similar to BO at day 90. These results clearly indicate that further studies about Biosilicate(®) are necessary to identify the factors that resulted in an unfavorable healing response when used in maxillary sinus augmentation. PMID:26712707

  2. Dielectric behaviour of (Ba,Sr)TiO3 perovskite borosilicate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various perovskite (Ba,Sr)TiO3 borosilicate glasses were prepared by rapid melt-quench technique in the glass system ((Ba1-xSrx).TiO3)-(2SiO2.B2O3)-(K2O)-(La2O3). On the basis of differential thermal analysis results, glasses were converted into glass ceramic samples by regulated heat treatment schedules. The dielectric behaviour of crystallized barium strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramic samples shows diffuse phase transition. The study depicts the dielectric behaviour of glass ceramic sample BST5K1L0.2S814. The double relaxation was observed in glass ceramic samples corresponding 80/20% Ba/Sr due to change in crystal structure from orthorhombic to tetragonal and tetragonal to cubic with variation of temperature. The highest value of dielectric constant was found to be 48289 for the glass ceramic sample BST5K1L0.2S814. The high value of dielectric constant attributed to space charge polarization between the glassy phase and perovskite phase. Due to very high value of dielectric constant, such glass ceramics are used for high energy storage devices. La2O3 acts as nucleating agent for crystallization of glass to glass ceramics and enhances the dielectric constant and retarded dielectric loss. Such glass ceramics can be used in high energy storage devices such as barrier layer capacitors, multilayer capacitors etc. (author)

  3. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (pMachining speeds dropped more rapidly with increased removal rates than other glass ceramics (pmachinability indices associated with the hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were derived based on the normal force-removal rate relations, which ranked LDGC the most difficult to machine among glass ceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments. PMID:26318569

  4. Zinc containing borate glasses and glass-ceramics: Search for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. Abdelghany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary soda lime borate glass and samples with ZnO replacing CaO up to 10 mol% were prepared and studied for their bone bonding ability. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR absorption spectra of the prepared glasses before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF, for one or two weeks, showed the appearance of calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite (HA which is an indication of bone bonding ability. X-ray diffraction patterns were measured for the glasses and indicated the presence of small peaks related to hydroxyapatite in the samples immersed in SBF. The glasses were heat treated with controlled two-step regime to convert them to their corresponding glass-ceramic derivatives. FTIR and X-ray diffraction measurements of the glass-ceramic samples (before and after immersion in SBF confirmed the appearance of HA which is influenced by ZnO content. The overall data are explained on the basis of current views about the corrosion behaviour of borate glasses including hydrolysis and direct dissolution mechanism.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda–lime–silica waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda–lime–silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. - Highlights: • A bioactive glass-ceramic was synthesized using soda–lime–silica waste glass. • Solid-state reaction method was used to synthesize bioactive glass-ceramic. • Ca2Na2Si3O9 and CaNaPO4 were formed with a one-step thermal treatment condition. • The amounts of crystalline and amorphous phases influenced the bioactivity. • The sample with a smaller amount of the crystalline phase had a higher bioactivity

  6. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda–lime–silica waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak, E-mail: hashemib@shirazu.ac.ir

    2014-04-01

    Soda–lime–silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. - Highlights: • A bioactive glass-ceramic was synthesized using soda–lime–silica waste glass. • Solid-state reaction method was used to synthesize bioactive glass-ceramic. • Ca{sub 2}Na{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CaNaPO{sub 4} were formed with a one-step thermal treatment condition. • The amounts of crystalline and amorphous phases influenced the bioactivity. • The sample with a smaller amount of the crystalline phase had a higher bioactivity.

  7. Development of glass-ceramics from combination of industrial wastes together with boron mining waste

    OpenAIRE

    Cicek, Bugra

    2013-01-01

    The utilization of borate mineral wastes with glass-ceramic technology was first time studied and primarily not investigated combinations of wastes were incorporated into the research. These wastes consist of; soda lime silica glass, meat bone and meal ash and fly ash. In order to investigate possible and relevant application areas in ceramics, kaolin clay, an essential raw material for ceramic industry was also employed in some studied compositions. As a result, three different glass-c...

  8. FTIR and optical assessment of zinc doped calcium phospho-borosilicate sol-gel glasses/glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Arora, N.; Pandey, O. P.; Kaur, G.

    2015-08-01

    CaO-P2O5-ZnO-SiO2-B2O3 glasses with varying compositions of calcium oxide and phosphorous oxide are synthesized using sol-gel technique. The glasses are heat-treated for a duration of 10 h at 500°C to obtain the glass-ceramics. The glass-ceramics and glasses are characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Extinction coefficients, attenuation coefficients and dielectric constant have been obtained for all the glasses as well as glass ceramics. The results are discussed in light of non-bridging oxygens (NBO) and heat-treatment of glasses. In addition to this, the effect of calcium and phosphorous on the infra-red spectra has been analysed thoroughly.

  9. Pressurized heat treatment of glass-ceramic to control thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Daniel P.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing a glass-ceramic having a specified thermal expansion value is disclosed. The method includes the step of pressurizing the parent glass material to a predetermined pressure during heat treatment so that the glass-ceramic produced has a specified thermal expansion value. Preferably, the glass-ceramic material is isostatically pressed. A method for forming a strong glass-ceramic to metal seal is also disclosed in which the glass-ceramic is fabricated to have a thermal expansion value equal to that of the metal. The determination of the thermal expansion value of a parent glass material placed in a high-temperature environment is also used to determine the pressure in the environment.

  10. Broadband and High Efficient 1530 nm Emission from Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics Codoped with Er3+ and Yb3+ Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bao-Rong; ZHAO Li-Juan; SUN Jian; YU Hua; SONG Jie; XU Jing-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The emission at 1530 nm and its applications in optical communications are discussed. The efficient width of the emission band △eff, which is up to 91 nm, is larger as compared with silica-based glass, bismuth glass and ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) glass doped by Er3+ ions. Under the excitation of 785 nm laser, the emission integral intensity of 1530 nm increases about five times in the glass ceramics higher than that in the glass. This is explained by the quantum cutting process by two-photon emission with phonon assistance. The results indicate that the glass ceramics are a promising candidate for developing broadband optical amplifiers in wavelength-division multiplexed systems.

  11. Series multilayer internal electrodes for high energy density glass-ceramic capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jun; DU Jun; TANG Qun; MAO ChangHui

    2009-01-01

    The glass-ceramic dielectrics and internal electrode structures are investigated for improving the general energy storage density of capacitors.Calculation indicates that glass-ceramics acquired from glass matrix annealing at 850℃ for 3 hours can be approximately up to 17 J/cm3 in energy storage density.They are appropriately chosen as the dielectrics for preparing high energy storage density capacitors (HESDCs).A series multilayer structure of internal electrode is developed for the HESDCs,in which each layer is a combination of gold film and silver paste.This electrode structure promises the capacitor immune from the residual porosity defects inevitably brought by electrode paste sintering process,and specifically improves the electrical breakdown strength of the capacitor.Based on this new electrode structure,the energy storage densities of capacitors are increased by more than one order of magnitude compared with those traditional ones with only single layer of internal electrode.Thus,HESDCs based on the optimized glass-ceramic dielectrics can potentially achieve 7.5 J/cm3 in energy storage density,even taking into consideration the enlargement of total capacitor volumes while encapsulating practicable capacitors from dielectrics media.

  12. Ancient ceramics and glass compositional studies using nuclear methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of archaeological objects requires simultaneously non-destructive, fast, versatile, sensitive and multielemental methods. Romania has a lot of interesting archaeological sites: Greek on the Black Sea coast, Roman in Transylvania and Dobroudja, Byzantine on the Danube border. Our purpose was to help Romanian archaeologists to identify objects provenance (workshops, technologies, mines) and to explain commercial, military and political aspects. Three methods were used: in air 3 MeV protons PIXE (Paricle Induced X-ray Emission), 241Am source based XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) and FNAA (Fast Neutron Activation Analysis). For in air PIXE, we used a 3-4 MeV proton beam obtained from the 6.5 MeV Cyclotron nominal regime protons extracted through a 20 mm aluminium foil into the air, striking the sample after 8-10 cm. X-rays were detected through reflection, using a horizontal Si(Li) detector. XRF measurements were done with a spectrometer consisting of a 30mCi 241Am annular gamma-source, a Si(Li) detector and a conventional electronic chain. Using both PIXE and XRF methods, we can determine all the elements from Potassium to Uranium. For FNAA, to produce fast neutrons, deuterons, accelerated up to 13 MeV bombarded a thick (166.5 mg/cm2) Be target placed at 20 degrees against the incident beam (up to 20 mA). The absolute intensity flux on free air, at 10 cm behind the Be target was 1.82 x 108 n/cm2 mC, with a neutron average energy of 5.24 MeV at 00. Using this fast neutrons beam, some light elements can be determined: Al, Mg, Na, Si, but also Ca, Ti, Fe, Zn, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Ba, Pb. The above mentioned methods are complementary and they work better together. As examples, we could mention ceramics and glassy materials. We routinely detect Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, Zr, Ba, La, Ce (interferences Mg-Al-Si and Y-Zr) using FNAA and Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Bi, Au, Ag, Sn, Sb, Ba using PIXE-XRF. The precision of our results is in the order of 15 to 25 percent

  13. Enhanced up-conversion in Er3+-doped transparent glass-ceramics containing NaYbF4 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly transparent Er3+ doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing cubic NaYbF4 nanocrystals were fabricated in an aluminosilicate matrix by melt-quenching technique. Their structural properties, optical properties and enhanced up-conversion behaviors were systemically investigated by XRD, TEM, HRTEM techniques and absorption, up-conversion spectra. Excited by 980 nm laser, samples present characteristic emissions of Er3+. Compared with precursor glasses, the intensity of red emission increases by 15 times for GC650 after crystallization. Our work indicates that transparent NaYbF4 glass-ceramics may be used as potential host for up-conversion. - Highlights: • NaYbF4:Er3+ nanocrystals (10 nm) based glass-ceramics with 90% transmittance were successfully fabricated. • Glass ceramics exhibit intense characteristic red up-conversion of Er3+ under 980 nm laser excitation. • Transparent NaYbF4 glass-ceramics may be used as potential host for up-conversion

  14. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases

  15. Quantum efficiencies of near-infrared emission from Ni2+-doped glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic method to evaluate potentials of Ni2+-doped transparent glass-ceramics as a new broadband optical gain media is presented. At first, near-infrared emission of various ceramics were investigated to explore the suitable crystalline phase to be grown in the glass-ceramics. The quantum efficiency of Ni2+ near-infrared emission estimated by the Struck-Fonger analysis was higher than 95% for spinel-type structure gallate crystals MgGa2O4 and LiGa5O8 at room temperature. Transparent glass-ceramics containing Ni2+:LiGa5O8 could be prepared and the quantum efficiency for the glass-ceramics was measured to be about 10%. This value shows a potential of Ni-doped transparent glass-ceramics as a broadband gain media

  16. Production of glass-ceramics from sewage sludge and waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study for recycling of sewage sludge and waste glass from JSC 'Valmieras stikla skiedra' treatment of them to the dense glass-ceramic composite material using powder technology is estimated. The physical-chemical properties of composite materials were identified – density 2.19 g/cm3, lowest water absorption of 2.5% and lowest porosity of 5% for the samples obtained in the temperature range of sintering 1120 – 1140 °C. Regarding mineralogical composition of glass-ceramics the following crystalline phases were identified by XRD analysis: quartz (SiO2), anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) and hematite (Fe2O3), which could ensure the high density of materials and improve the mechanical properties of material - compressive strength up to 60.31±5.09 – 52.67±19.18 MPa. The physical-chemical properties of novel materials corresponds to dense glass-ceramics composite which eventually could be used as a building material, e.g. for floor covering, road pavement, exterior tiles etc.

  17. Up-Conversion Properties of Er3+:PbF2-CONTAINING Nanophase Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoptsov, N. A.; Loiko, P. A.; Yumashev, K. V.; Rachkovskaya, G. E.; Zakharevich, G. B.

    2013-05-01

    Transparent Er3+:PbF2-containing nanophase glass-ceramics was synthesized by means of heat-treatment of as-cast erbium-doped oxyfluoride glass. Optical absorption of glass and glass-ceramics was investigated in details. Temporal characteristics of luminescence associated with 4I13/2→4I15/2 transition were studied under diode-pumping that results in the determination of decay times. Intense red and green up-conversion emission was obtained with glass-ceramic samples.

  18. Immobilization of radioactive wastes in glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of radioactive liquid wastes arises from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to recover uranium and plutonium. Immobilization of such wastes in solid form and disposal of the solidified wastes in safe places, to prevent contamination of the human environment, are topics of considerable interest for both the scientific community and the public in general. The great majority of materials candidate for the encapsulation of radioactive wastes are inorganic non-metalic, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, special cements, calcined ceramics and few more. Among these materials, certain glasses have received special attention, and are being studied for over twenty years. It is estimated that about US$2 billion have already been spent in these studies. The disposal (long term storage) of these solid wastes may be possible in deep geological formations, salt mines, the ocean bed, by evacuation to the outer space, etc. A brief review on the several options avaiable for encapsulation and disposal of high level radioactive liquid wastes is presented, along with the relative merits and disadvantages of the candidate materials for encapsulation. A few suggestions for the solution of the Brazilian problem are advanced. (Author)

  19. Processing of transparent glass-ceramics by nanocrystallisation of LaF3

    OpenAIRE

    Hémono, Nicolás; Pierre, G.; Muñoz, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Transparent glass-ceramics have been prepared by heat-treating oxyfluoride glasses in the Na2O–Al2O3–SiO2–LaF3 system. The nanocrystallisation of LaF3 was achieved by controlling time and temperature parameters. Glasses and glass-ceramics were characterised by dilatometry, DTA, XRD and TEM. The mean crystal size (

  20. Spectroscopic properties of Er3+ doped glass ceramics containing Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Er3+ doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals were prepared and their spectroscopic properties were discussed. The formation of Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals in the glass ceramics was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The split peaks of the upconversion and near infrared emission bands of the Er3+ doped glass ceramics can be observed. The upconversion luminescence intensity of Er3+ in the glass ceramics increased significantly with the increasing heat treated temperature. The luminescence decay curves and time-resolved spectra indicated that the lifetime of the 4S3/2 state of Er3+ in the glass ceramic was longer than that in the glass

  1. A low-temperature process for the denitration of Hanford single-shell tank, nitrate-based waste utilizing the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) or nitrate to ammonia and glass (NAG) process: Phase 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing benchtop studies using Hanford single-shell tank (SST) simulants and actual Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) low-level waste (LLW), employing a new denitration process for converting nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC), have conclusively shown that between 85 and 99% of the nitrate can be readily converted to gaseous ammonia. In this process, aluminum powders can be used to convert alkaline, nitrate-based supernate to ammonia and an aluminum oxide-sodium aluminate-based solid. The process may be able to use contaminated aluminum scrap metal from DOE sites to effect the conversion. The final, nitrate-free ceramic product can be pressed and sintered like other ceramics or silica and/or fluxing agents can be added to form a glassy ceramic or a flowable glass product. Based upon the starting volumes of 6.2 and 3.1 M sodium nitrate solution, volume reductions of 50 to 70% were obtained for the waste form produced. Sintered pellets produced from supernate from Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) have been leached in accordance with the 16.1 leach test for the radioelements 85Sr and 137Cs. Despite lengthy counting times, 85Sr could not be detected in the leachates. 137Cs was only slightly above background and corresponded to a leach index of 12.2 to 13.7 after 8 months of leaching. Leach testing of unsintered and sintered reactor product spiked with hazardous metals proved that both sintered and unsintered product passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Design of the equipment and flowsheet for a pilot demonstration-scale system to prove the nitrate destruction portion of the NAC process and product formation is under way

  2. Dynamic fatigue of a machinable glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, K. K.; Magida, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    To assess the stress-corrosion susceptibility of a machinable glass-ceramic, its dynamic fatigue behavior was investigated by measuring its strength as a function of stress rate. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for components of this material. This material was concluded to have only moderate resistance (N = 30) to stress corrosion in ambient conditions. The effects of specimen size on strength were assessed for the material used in this study; it was concluded that the Weibull edge-flaw scaling law adequately describes the observed strength-size relation.

  3. Sol-gel technology applied to glass and crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixation of high level and transuranium radioactive waste in glass or alternative ceramic forms requires remotely operable processes and equipment, and sol-gel technology developed for reactor fuel refabrication appears to be applicable. Advantages of the sol-gel process are absence of dust, easy pneumatic transfer and sampling of either liquids or free-flowing solid microspheres, excellent sinterability, and equipment amenable to remote operation because of mechanical simplicity. Synthetic rock microspheres and pellets containing up to 25% simulated defense waste have been prepared by the sol-gel process. 26 refs

  4. Recycling of glass fibers from fiberglass polyester waste composite for manufacture glass-ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    López Gómez, Félix Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; García Díaz, Irene; Rodríguez, O.; Alguacil, Francisco José; Romero, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the feasibility of reusing a glass fiber resulting from the thermolysis and gasification of waste composites to obtain glass-ceramic tiles. Polyester fiberglass (PFG) waste was treated at 550˚C for 3 h in a 9.6 dm3 thermolytic reactor. This process yielded an oil (≈24 wt%), a gas (≈8 wt%) and a solid residue (≈68 wt%). After the polymer has been removed, the solid residue is heated in air to oxidize residual char and remove surface contamination. The cleaning fibers were co...

  5. History and trends of bioactive glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerian, Maziar; Dutra Zanotto, Edgar

    2016-05-01

    The interest around bioactive glass-ceramics (GCs) has grown significantly over the last two decades due to their appropriate biochemical and mechanical properties. The intense research effort in this field has led to some new commercial products for biomedical applications. This review article begins with the basic concepts of GC processing and development via controlled heat treatments of monolithic pieces or sinter-crystallization of powdered glasses. We then go on to describe the processing, properties, and applications of some commercial bioactive GCs and discuss selected valuable reported researches on several promising types of bioactive GCs. The article finishes with a section on open relevant research directions for bioactive GC development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1231-1249, 2016. PMID:26707951

  6. Structural, thermal, and optical properties of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyhalide tellurite glasses, glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramics and ceramics containing nano-crystals of different phases doped with Er3+/Yb3+ ions have been successfully prepared by heat treatment of the precursor oxyhalide glasses synthesized by the melt-quench method. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images verify the precipitation of nano-crystals. Emission of Er3+ enhances several times when Yb3+ ion is added with the matrix. The Stark splitting and the intensity of different emission bands increase to a great extent when we approach to ceramics from glasses via glass-ceramics. The intensity of the blue and green emission bands increases much faster than the red and NIR emission bands. Intense upconversion emission observed by the naked eye has been quantified in terms of standard chromaticity diagram (CIE). Power dependence study shows that the upconversion of NIR radiation to visible radiation takes place mainly via photon avalanche (PA) process.

  7. Frequency stabilization based on high finesse glass-ceramic Fabry-Perot cavity for a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tingting; Yang, Kaiyong; Tan, Zhongqi; Luo, Zhifu; Wu, Suyong

    2014-12-01

    A frequency stabilization technique for a 632.8nm He-Ne laser with a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity is introduced in this paper. The resonant frequency of the cavity is taken as the frequency standard .In this system the Fabry-Perot cavity is composed of a glass-ceramic spacer, with thermal expansion coefficient smaller than 2×10-8/°C , which means an excellent thermal stabilization which greatly decreases the thermal impacts on the cavity length in the desired constant-temperature environment.The intra-cavity spherical mirror is specially designed, which makes the Fabry-cavity a sensor element in our subsequent experiments for a new practical optical accelerometer .Both cavity mirrors were custom made in our laboratory which have reflectivities greater than 99.995% at 632.8nm, so the Fabry-Perot cavity has a finesse of about 62830. The half-maximum transmission line width is about 55.48 KHz and the free spectral range is 3.5GHz .In the experimental setup, we adopt the frequency stabilization circuit with small dithering .With proper dithering voltage, the laser can be precisely locked to the Fabry-Perot cavity minimum reflection point. Theoretically the frequency stability can reach 10-10 order.

  8. Dielectric loss prediction in glass-ceramics for different correlation of mass shares of components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerimichoy I. N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An engineering method for predicting the dielectric loss in two-component non-porous glass ceramic has been proposed. The method allows to reduce the time and expense for conducting experiments and calculations during the design of such glass ceramic.

  9. Role of SrO on the bioactivity behavior of some ternary borate glasses and their glass ceramic derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Ouis, M. A.; Azooz, M. A.; ElBatal, H. A.; El-Bassyouni, G. T.

    2016-01-01

    Borate glasses containing SrO substituting both CaO and NaO were prepared and characterized for their bioactivity or bone bonding ability. Glass ceramic derivatives were prepared by thermal heat treatment process. FTIR, XRD and SEM measurements for the prepared glass and glass-ceramics before and after immersion in sodium phosphate solution for one and two weeks were carried out. The appearance of two IR peaks within the range 550-680 cm-1 after immersion in phosphate solution indicates the formation of hydroxyapatite or equivalent Sr phosphate layer. X-ray diffraction data agree with the FTIR spectral analysis. The solubility test was carried out for both glasses and glass ceramics derivatives in the same phosphate solution. The introduction of SrO increases the solubility for both glasses and glass ceramics and this is assumed to be due to the formation of Sr phosphate which is more soluble than calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite). SEM images reveal varying changes in the surfaces of glass ceramics after immersion according to the SrO content.

  10. Luminescence of Er3+ in Oxyfluoride Transparent Glass-Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Erbium doped silicate, germanate, and tellurium-germanate oxyfluoride glasses were prepared in a bulk form. Through appropriate heat treatment of the as-prepared glasses, transparent glass-ceramics (TGCs) were obtained with the formation of β-PbF2∶Er3+ nanocrystals in the glass matrix were confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Well-defined diffraction peaks were observed in the samples after heat-treatment. The average crystal diameter of these precipitated crystals from full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the diffraction peak was estimated to be between 8 and 13 nm. Optical absorption, photoluminescence, and upconversion luminescence were measured on as-prepared glass and glass-ceramics. Luminescence spectra in the TGC samples revealed well-resolved, sharp stark-splitting peaks, which indicates that a majority of Er3+ ions has been incorporated into the crystalline phase of the nanocrystals. The intensity of the visible and near infrared luminescence mostly increases in TSG compared to that in the as-prepared glass. In 1.53 μm absorption and emission bands, the maximum absorption peak is blue-shifted from 1531 to 1507 nm, whereas the maximum emission peak is red-shifted from 1535 to 1543 nm in TGC, as compared with that in glass. The bandwidth at half-maximum (BWHM) of the emission band is significantly broader in TGC than in glass, which is beneficial to the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). Upconversion luminescence was measured using 800 nm near-infrared light excitation. Drastically increased upconversion luminescence was observed from the TGC as compared to that from their corresponding as-prepared glasses. In addition to a strong green emission centered at 545 nm because of 4S3/2→4I15/2 transition and a weaker red emission centered at 662 nm because of 4F9/2→4I15/2 transition, generally seen from the Er3+ doped glasses, two violet emissions centered at 410 nm because of 2H9/2→4I15/2 transition and centered at 379 nm because of 4G11/2→4I15

  11. Fabrication of glass-ceramics containing spin-chain compound SrCuO2 and its high thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High thermal conductivity materials are in great demand for heat-flow control and heat dissipation in electronic devices. In this study, we have produced a glass-ceramics that contains spin-chain compound SrCuO2 and have found that the glass-ceramics yields high thermal conductivity of ∼5 W K−1 m−1 even at room temperature. The glass-ceramics is fabricated through crystallization of inhomogeneous melt-quenched oxides made from SrCO3, CuO, Li2CO3, Ga2O3, and Al2O3. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray and electron diffraction reveal that SrCuO2 crystallites with a size of 100–200 nm are precipitated in the glass-ceramics. The highness of the thermal conductivity is attributable to two sources: one is elongation of phonon mean free path due to the crystallization of the inhomogeneous structure or structural ordering. The other is emergence of the heat carriers, spinons, in the SrCuO2. This highly thermal conductive glass-ceramics is expected to be utilized as base materials for heat-flow control devices

  12. Luminescent properties of Tb{sup 3+}-doped transparent glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Weihuan; Ouyang, Shaoye [Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Material, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhang, Yuepin, E-mail: zhangyuepin@nbu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Material, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Material, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Sun, Xinyuan [Department of Physics, Jingganshan University, Ji’an 343009 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Dense transparent glass ceramics containing BaGdF{sub 5} and BaLu{sub 2}F{sub 8} nanocrystals were prepared from the Tb{sup 3+}-activated SiO{sub 2}–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–BaF{sub 2}–Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxyfluoride scintillating glasses by thermal treatment technology. Glass structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM); the optical properties including transmission, luminescent properties excited under both ultraviolet light and X-ray excitation, and the decay times of the glass and glass ceramics were also investigated. The coexistence of BaGdF{sub 5} and BaLu{sub 2}F{sub 8} nanocrystals in the transparent glass ceramics was confirmed by the XRD results, which plays a key role in the improvement of scintillation performance. The density of glass ceramics is higher compared with the precursor glass, and it increases with the increasing temperature of heat treatment. Moreover, a blue-shift in the excitation spectra and the decreasing decay times of Tb{sup 3+} ions are obviously observed in the glass and glass ceramics with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Compared with the precursor glass, the enhanced emission intensity of Tb{sup 3+} ions in the glass ceramics is associated with the increasing energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions, which is due to the precipitation of BaGdF{sub 5} and BaLu{sub 2}F{sub 8} nanocrystals in glass ceramics. In addition, the energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions was also discussed by the stretched exponential function. - Highlights: • The BaGdF{sub 5} and BaLu{sub 2}F{sub 8} nanocrystals coexist in glass ceramics. • Density of glass ceramics gets higher with the increasing heat treatment temperature. • Compared with glass, the enhanced emission intensity of Tb{sup 3+} ions in glass ceramics. • Discussed the energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions in glass ceramics.

  13. In Vitro Evaluation of Some Types of Ferrimagnetic Glass Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. M. Abdel-Hameed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at studying the acceleration of the bioactive layer on the surface of ferrimagnetic glass ceramic with a basic composition 40Fe2O3–15P2O5–20SiO2–5TiO2 through the addition of 20% of different types of metal oxides like MgO or CaO or MnO or CuO or ZnO or CeO2. SEM, EDAX, and ICP were applied to present the results of the study. SEM and EDAX measurements indicated the presence of apatite layer formed on the surface of the prepared glass ceramics after immersion in SBF within 7 to 30 days. The investigation of the results clarified that the addition of CaO or ZnO accelerated the formation of apatite on the surfaces of the samples in the simulated body fluid faster than other metal oxides. Inductive coupled plasma (ICP analysis shows the evolution of ion extraction by the simulated body fluid solution (SBF with time in relation to the elemental composition.

  14. Waste Not, Want Not: An Inexpensive Glass-Ceramic from Waste

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, J. P.; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 5 (2006), s. 29-32. ISSN 0002-7812 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glass ceramic s * fracture toughness * flexural strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.210, year: 2006 http://www. ceramic bulletin.org/2006-05.asp

  15. Thermophysical and structural studies on some glass-ceramics and role of nano size crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothiyal, G P; A, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh; Dixit, Anupam; Sharma, Kuldeep; Goswami, Madhumita, E-mail: gpkoth@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400-085 (India)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we present some studies on structure and thermophysical properties of glass and glass-ceramics with possible bio-medical and sealing applications. The glass-ceramics prepared for bio-medical applications include phosphate as well as silico-phosphate compositions. In vitro bio-compatibility/activity of these materials is discussed. The glass-ceramics used for the sealing application are lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) and lithium zinc silicate (LZS). The phase formation and some aspects of thermophysical properties and sealing are discussed.

  16. Thermophysical and structural studies on some glass-ceramics and role of nano size crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present some studies on structure and thermophysical properties of glass and glass-ceramics with possible bio-medical and sealing applications. The glass-ceramics prepared for bio-medical applications include phosphate as well as silico-phosphate compositions. In vitro bio-compatibility/activity of these materials is discussed. The glass-ceramics used for the sealing application are lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) and lithium zinc silicate (LZS). The phase formation and some aspects of thermophysical properties and sealing are discussed.

  17. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  18. Resorption of apatite-wollastonite containing glass-ceramic and beta-tricalcium phosphate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Hidefumi; Kawai, Akira; Sugihara, Shinsuke; Yoshida, Aki; Inoue, Hajime

    2005-10-01

    Apatite-wollastonite containing glass ceramic is considered to be difficult to resorb, but we experienced the disappearance of the porous type of Apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic particles . In this study, the resorption of porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic implanted in the femurs of rabbits was investigated, and the process was compared with beta-tricalcium phosphate, a resorbable ceramics. Porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic (70, 80, and 90% porosity) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (75% porosity) were implanted in the femurs of Japanese white rabbits. Samples were harvested and examined 0, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 36 weeks after implantation. Quantitative analysis of the radiographic and histologic findings was performed with NIH Image software. Radiographic examination demonstrated that the radiopacity and size of the porous apatite-wollastonite glassceramic cylinders decreased gradually after implantation. Histologic examination revealed that the surface area of the apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic cylinders decreased continuously, and approached 20% of the original area 36 weeks after implantation. However, the resorption rate of porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic was slower than that of beta-tricalcium phosphate. Toluidine blue staining showed abundant new bone formation on the surface of the apatite-wollastonite glassceramic matrix. Considering its mechanical strength, gradual resorption characteristics, and good osteochonductive activity, porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic appears to be a suitable artificial bone substitutes. PMID:16286959

  19. Resorption of apatite-wollastonite containing glass-ceramic and beta-tricalcium phosphate in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teramoto,Hidefumi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Apatite-wollastonite containing glass ceramic is considered to be difficult to resorb, but we experienced the disappearance of the porous type of Apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic particles . In this study, the resorption of porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic implanted in the femurs of rabbits was investigated, and the process was compared with beta-tricalcium phosphate, a resorbable ceramics. Porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic (70, 80, and 90% porosity and beta-tricalcium phosphate (75% porosity were implanted in the femurs of Japanese white rabbits. Samples were harvested and examined 0, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 36 weeks after implantation. Quantitative analysis of the radiographic and histologic findings was performed with NIH Image software. Radiographic examination demonstrated that the radiopacity and size of the porous apatite-wollastonite glassceramic cylinders decreased gradually after implantation. Histologic examination revealed that the surface area of the apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic cylinders decreased continuously, and approached 20% of the original area 36 weeks after implantation. However, the resorption rate of porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic was slower than that of beta-tricalcium phosphate. Toluidine blue staining showed abundant new bone formation on the surface of the apatite-wollastonite glassceramic matrix. Considering its mechanical strength, gradual resorption characteristics, and good osteochonductive activity, porous apatite-wollastonite glass-ceramic appears to be a suitable artificial bone substitutes.

  20. EFFECTS OF INCORPORATING NATURAL MINERALS ON PRODUCTION AND BIOACTIVITY OF BIOACTIVE GLASS CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Matias Stabile

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two glass-ceramics composition were produced from natural minerals. Quartzes and feldspars were pre-selected on the basis of their purities studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and chemical analysis. Prepared compositions of glasses precursors were two different theoretical leucite (KAlSi₂O₆ /Bioglass 45S5 (L/Bg ratios. Transformations of raw materials mixtures and glass precursors were studied by differential thermal analyses. On the basis of thermal analysis results, glass ceramics were produced and characterized by XRD. Glass-ceramics were composed of two major crystalline phases, leucite and sodium calcium silicate. Bioactivity tests were performed submerging the glass-ceramics into simulated body fluid (SBF for different periods (1, 5 and 10 days. Bioactive behavior was monitored by XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Studied samples were found to be bioactive, in which hydroxyapatite layer was developed within 5 days of contact with SBF.

  1. A new biocompatible and antibacterial phosphate free glass-ceramic for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Belén Cabal; Luís Alou; Fabio Cafini; Ramiro Couceiro; David Sevillano; Leticia Esteban-Tejeda; Francisco Guitián; Ramón Torrecillas; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on...

  2. TiO2 effect on crystallization mechanism and physical properties of nano glass-ceramics of MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sinae; Kang, Seunggu

    2013-05-01

    The effect of TiO2 on the degree of crystallization, thermal properties and microstructure for MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramics system containing 0-13 wt% TiO2 and 0-1.5 wt% B2O3 in which the cordierite is the main phase was studied. Using Kissinger and Augis-Bennett equations, the activation energy, 510 kJ/mol and Avrami constant, 1.8 were calculated showing the surface-oriented crystallization would be preferred. The alpha-cordierite phase was generated in the glass-ceramics of containing TiO2 of 0-5.6 wt%. However, for the glass-ceramics of TiO2 content above 7 wt%, an alpha-cordierite disappeared and micro-cordierite phase was formed. The glass-ceramics of no TiO2 added had spherical crystals of few tens nanometer size spread in the matrix. As TiO2 content increased up to 5.6 wt%, a lump of dendrite was formed. In the glass-ceramics containing TiO2 7-13 wt%, in which the main phase is micro-cordierite, the dendrite crystal disappeared and a few hundred nanometer sized crystal particles hold tightly each other were generated. The thermal conductivity of glass-ceramics of both a-cordierite and micro-cordierite base decreased with TiO2 contend added. The thermal conductivity of glass-ceramics of 1.5 wt% TiO2 added was 3.4 W/mK which is 36% higher than that of glass-ceramics of no TiO2 added. The sintering temperature for 1.5 wt% TiO2 glass-ceramics was 965 degrees C which could be concluded as to apply to LTCC process for LED packaging. PMID:23858898

  3. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing apatite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Sevim; M K Kulekci

    2006-06-01

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramic materials produced with two different processes is studied. Hot pressing process and conventional casting and controlled crystallization process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied material was calculated by fracture toughness equations using experimental hardness results of the bio-active glass ceramic material. Two fracture toughness equations in the literature were used to identify the wear behaviour of studied ceramics. Wear resistance results that identified with both of the equations were similar. The results showed that the abrasive wear resistance of the bio-active glass ceramics produced with hot pressing process was found to be higher than that of the ceramics produced by conventional casting and controlled crystallization process.

  4. Physicochemical, mechanical and vacuum properties of carbon glass ceramics and its surface erosion under hydrogen and helium ions bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigations and review of properties of new high-temperature high-strength chemically resistant carbon- containing material-carbon glass ceramics, having fine-grained quasiisotropic structure, are presented. It is established that gas permeability of carbon glass ceramics is 104-105 times less than that of graphite. Carbon glass ceramics, properly heat treated has elevated radiation resistance in fast neutron flux. Threshold automization energy of carbon glass ceramics with Hg+ ions 2-3 times surpasses the graphite automization threshold. Carbon glass ceramics degasses well in vacuum at 660-840 deg C

  5. Lead fluorosilicate glass ceramics doped with Nd3+, Er3+, and Yb3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, O. B.; Khomyakov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    Glasses in the PbF2-PbO-SiO2 system doped with 1 mol % of rare-earth elements (Nd3+, Er3+, or Yb3+) are synthesized and studied. The glasses were heat-treated in order to obtain glass ceramics with a fluoride crystalline phase. The changes in the structure and spectral optical properties of glass ceramics with respect to initial glasses were determined by using X-ray diffraction analysis and by studying the luminescent characteristics of dopant ions.

  6. Removal of glass adhered to sintered ceramics in hot isostatic pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    In the hot isostatic pressing of ceramic materials in molten glass using an inert gas as a pressing medium, glass adhered to the sintered ceramics is heated to convert it to a porous glass and removed. Thus, Si3N4 powder was compacted at 5000 kg/sq cm, coated with a 0.5 mm thick BN, embedded in Pyrex glass in a graphite crucible, put inside a hot isostatic press containing Argon, hot pressed at 1750 C and 100 kg/sq cm; cooled, taken out from the crucible, heated at 1100 C for 30 minutes, cooled, and then glass adhered to the sintered body was removed.

  7. Synthesis and structural studies of multi-component strontium zinc silicate glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass having composition 40SrO−10ZnO−40SiO2−2B2O3−2Al2O3−2TiO2−2Cr2O3−2Y2O3, (mol %) was prepared by melt-quench technique and converted into glass-ceramics by subjecting it to varying heat treatments. Thermal properties were measured by thermo-mechanical analyzer and differential thermal analyzer. The XRD revealed that initially Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase at lower temperature and later SrSiO3/Sr3Si3O9 phase crystallized. The structural elucidation by Raman spectroscopy shows the presence of mainly Q1 structural units along with Q2 and Q0 units in the base glass. Raman spectra revealed that during crystallization initially crystalline phase having Q1 structural units (corresponding to Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase) are formed and later crystalline phase having Q2 structural units with 3 member ring type structure crystallizes. Thus, Raman spectroscopy and XRD together confirm that in early stage of crystallization, Sr2ZnSi2O7 phase and later Sr3Si3O9 phase formed in the glass-ceramics.

  8. Preparation of Machinable Bioactive Glass-ceramics by Sol-gel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare machinable bioactive glass-ceramics by sol-gel method. A multi-component composite sol with great uniformity and stability was first prepared by a 2-step method.The composite sol was then transformed into gel by aging under different temperatures. The gel was dried finally by super critically drying method and sintered to obtain the machinable bioactive glass-ceramics. Effect of thermal treatment on crystallization of the glass-ceramics was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Microstructure of the glass-ceramics was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the mechanism of machinability was discussed. Phlogopite and hydroxylapatite were identified as main crystal phases by XRD analysis under thermal treatment at 750 ℃ and 950 ℃ for 1.5 h separately. The relative bulk density could achieve 99%under 1050 ℃ for 4 h. Microstructure of the glass-ceramics showed that the randomly distributed phlogopite and hydroxylapatite phases were favorable to the machinability of the glass-ceramics. A mean bending strength of about 160-180 MPa and a fracture toughness parameter KIC of about 2.1-2.3 were determined for the glass-ceramics.

  9. Enhanced emissions in Tb3+-doped oxyfluoride scintillating glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent Tb3+-doped glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals were prepared by melt-quenching method with subsequent heat treatment. The XRD and EDS results showed the precipitated crystalline phase in the glass matrix was BaF2. Under 376 nm light, Tb3+ doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals showed more intense green emission than the as-made glass, and the emission intensity increased with increasing heat treatment temperature and time. The lifetimes of 541 nm emission of Tb3+ doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics were longer than that of as-made glass, which are in the range from 3.00 ms to 3.55 ms. Under X-ray excitation, the green emission was enhanced in the glass ceramics compared to the as-made glass. The results indicate Tb3+ doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaF2 nanocrystals could be a material candidate for X-ray glass scintillator for slow event detection

  10. Er-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass ceramics for near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarski, Wojciech A; Goryczka, Tomasz; Pisarska, Joanna; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold

    2007-03-15

    Lead borate based glasses have been analyzed using Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The formation of different borate groups and the direction of BO3 BO4 conversion strongly depends on the PbO- and/or PbF2-to-B2O3 ratio in chemical composition. PbF2-PbO-B2O3 based glasses containing Er3+ ions have been studied after annealing. The orthorhombic PbF2 crystallites are formed during thermal treatment, which was evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Near-infrared luminescence at 1530 nm and green up-conversion at 545 nm have been registered for samples before and after annealing. The luminescence bands correspond to 4I13/2-4I15/2 and 4S3/2-4I15/2 transitions of Er3+ ions, respectively. In comparison to the precursor glasses, the luminescence intensities are higher in the studied transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics. Simultaneously, the half-width of the luminescence lines slightly decreases. It can be the evidence that a small amount of the Er3+ ions is incorporated into the orthorhombic PbF2 phase. PMID:17302452

  11. Structure of the nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of fluoro-silicate glasses obtained using high-purity SiO2, AlO1.5, CdF2, PbF2, ZnF2, and ErF3 has been investigated. Upon heat treatment, PbF2 nanocrystals form which host most of the Er3+ ions. The major peaks obtained by x-ray diffraction suggest that the nanocrystals are fluorite structured, but the low volume fraction of nanocrystals and line broadening due to their small size mean that unambiguous identification of the crystal structure is impossible. Therefore, atomistic simulation techniques have been performed to investigate the mechanism of incorporation of Er3+ in the PbF2 nanocrystals and polycrystalline (1-x)PbF2-xErF3 ceramics have been fabricated to study the expected phase assemblage

  12. Crack analysis, glass-ceramic insulator of vacuum tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high voltage glass-ceramic insulators from ten vacuum tubes that had failed a bubble leak test were analyzed to determine the cause. All insulators exhibited a similar crack pattern. It appeared that the primary crack initiated at a point near the top of the insulator and resulted in a fracture that radiated from the inner sleeve of the tube to the outer frame. These cracks were duplicated on subassemblies by applying heat to the inner sleeve near the top surface of the insulator. It was determined that the cracks resulted from heating problems associated with the source closure braze. It was determined that misalignment of the radio-frequency braze coil caused cracking of assemblies

  13. Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, A.

    1997-03-05

    The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste.

  14. The role of ceramics, cement and glass in the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account is given of the constitution and origin of nuclear waste. The immobilization of wastes is discussed: borosilicate glasses are considered as possible matrices; ceramic forms are dealt with in more detail. The principles of the use of ceramics are explained, with examples of different ceramic structures; cements are mentioned as being suitable for wet, medium- to low-active wastes. The effects of radiation on cement, ceramic and glass waste forms are indicated. The account concludes with 'summary and future progress'. (U.K.)

  15. A novel bioactive glass-ceramic for treating dentin hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Tirapelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dentin hypersensitivity (DH is a painful response to stimulus applied to the open dentinal tubules of a vital tooth. It's a common oral condition, however, without an ideal treatment available yet. This work evaluated in vitro the effect of micron-sized particles from a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate in occluding open dentinal tubules. A dentin disc model was employed to observe comparatively, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, dentinal tubule occlusion by different products and deposition of hydroxyl carbonate apatite (HCA on dentin surface by Biosilicate, after a single application: G1 - Dentifrice with potassium nitrate and fluoride; G2 - Two-step calcium phosphate precipitation treatment; G3 - Water-free gel containing Biosilicate particles (1%; G4 - Biosilicate particles mixed with distilled water in a 1:10 ratio; all of them after 1, 12 and 24 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was performed to detect HCA formation on dentin discs filled with Biosilicate after 2 minutes, 30 minutes and 12 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. SEM showed a layer of HCA formed on dentin surface after 24 hours by G4. G1, G2 and G3 promoted not total occlusion of open dentinal tubules after 24 hours. FTIR showed HCA precipitation on the dentin surface induced by Biosilicate after 30 minutes. The micron-sized particles from the bioactive glass-ceramic thus were able to induce HCA deposition in open dentinal tubules in vitro. This finding suggests that Biosilicate may provide a new option for treating DH.

  16. The precision of product consistency tests conducted with a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product consistency test (PCT) that is used for qualification of borosilicate high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses for disposal can be used for the same purpose in the qualification of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (CWF). The CWF was developed to immobilize radioactive salt wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuels. An interlaboratory study was conducted to measure the precision of PCTs conducted with the CWF for comparison with the precision of PCTs conducted with HLW glasses. The six independent sets of triplicate PCT results generated in the study were used to calculate the intralaboratory and interlaboratory consistency based on the concentrations of Al, B, Na, and Si in the test solutions. The results indicate that PCTs can be conducted as precisely with the CWF as with HLW glasses. For example, the values of the reproducibility standard deviation for Al, B, Na, and Si were 1.36, 0.347, 3.40, and 2.97 mg/l for PCT with CWF. These values are within the range of values measured for borosilicate glasses, including reference HLW glasses

  17. XRD and FTIR structural investigations of erbium-doped bismuth-lead-silver glasses and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasses with the xEr2O3(100 - x)[72Bi2O3.25PbO.3Ag2O] composition where x = 0-20 mol% were prepared and later thermally treated. The local environments characteristic of this system were investigated using X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the glass or glass ceramic network structure resembles to that of the host matrix, being composed of [BiO3], [BiO6], [PbO3] and [PbO4] structural units. The addition of Er2O3 stabilizes the host glass or glass ceramic structure. The erbium ions play the role of a network modifier in the studied glasses. It was shown that the heat treatment at 650 deg. C leads to the crystallization of the Bi2O3 and PbO1.44 phases.

  18. Synthesis and luminescence properties of transparent nanocrystalline GdF3:Tb glass-ceramic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent glass-ceramic containing rare-earth doped halide nanocrystals exhibits enhanced luminescence performance. In this study, a glass-ceramic with Tb doped gadolinium fluoride nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate glass matrix is investigated for X-ray imaging applications. The nanocrystalline glass-ceramic scintillator was prepared by a melt-quench method followed by an anneal. The GdF3:Tb nanocrystals precipitated within the oxide glass matrix during the processing and their luminescence and scintillation properties were investigated. In this nanocomposite scintillator system, the incorporation of high atomic number Gd compound into the glass matrix increases the X-ray stopping power of the glass scintillator, and effective energy transfer between Gd3+ and Tb3+ ions in the nanocrystals enhances the scintillation efficiency. -- Highlights: • Glass-ceramics containing Tb doped GdF3 nanocrystals were synthesized. • High transparency is due to negligible light scattering from nanocrystals. • Effective energy transfer between Gd3+ and Tb3+ ions in the nanocrystals enhances the scintillation efficiency. • GdF3:Tb glass-ceramic nanocomposite is promising for X-ray imaging applications

  19. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. PMID:24582266

  20. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2012-04-01

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  1. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  2. Surface morphology and fracture in handpiece adjusting of a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic with coarse diamond burs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Morphology and fracture on the removed leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. ► Morphology consisted of microfracture, chipping, ductile scratches, smear areas. ► Brittle fracture was the primary mechanism for the ceramic removal. ► Lateral and radial cracks due to the mechanical impact of diamond burs. ► Temperature-induced phase transformations were detected in leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, which might cause crack initiation. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to understand surface morphology and fracture occurring on leucite-reinforced glass ceramic surfaces adjusted with coarse diamond burs. The surface roughness was quantitatively assessed using stylus profilometry and was analyzed statistically. The surface morphology was viewed using scanning electron microscopy. Surface phase transformations were preliminarily studied using Raman spectrometry. The results show that the surface roughness did not significantly depend on either depth of cut (p > 0.05) or feed rate (p > 0.05). However, when decreasing the depth of cut and the feed rate, a tendency for brittle-to-ductile transition existed. The surface morphology consisted of microfracture, chipping, ductile removal scratches, smear areas and debris. Brittle fracture was the primary mechanism for material removal. Lateral and radial cracks due to the mechanical impact of diamond burs were the major cause of surface fracture in the leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The maximum adjusting temperatures on the adjusted surfaces were estimated based on heat transfer analysis. The Raman spectra of the adjusted and unadjusted surfaces show a strong temperature-dependence of Raman shifts near 525–529 cm−1. This indicates the occurrence of temperature-induced cubic-tetragonal phase transformations in the adjusted leucite glass ceramic surfaces. These phase transformations are considered to contribute crack initiation and propagation on the adjusted surfaces.

  3. Photocatalytic properties of TiO2–P2O5 glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Glass ceramics were prepared in the binary system P2O5–TiO2. ► Main crystalline phases were anatase-type TiO2 crystals or (TiO)2P2O7 crystals. ► The glass ceramics containing the anatase crystals showed photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: Binary TiO2–P2O5 glasses with 69 mol% and 76 mol% TiO2 were prepared and converted into glass ceramics by heat-treatments. XRD measurements show that the main crystalline phases precipitated in the glass ceramics are anatase-type TiO2 crystals or (TiO)2P2O7 crystals, depending on the concentration of titanium constituent. Photocatalytic activities of the glass ceramics were evaluated by the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) and measuring the water contact angle. It is found that the glass ceramics containing anatase crystals exhibit both photocatalytic oxidation activity and highly photo-induced hydrophilicity under UV irradiation with intensity of 1.0 mW/cm2.

  4. Magnetic properties of bioactive glass-ceramics containing nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramics with finely dispersed zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanocrystallites were obtained by heat treatment of x(ZnO,Fe2O3)(65-x)SiO220(CaO,P2O5)15Na2O (6≤x≤21 mole%) glasses. X-ray diffraction patterns of the glass-ceramic samples revealed the presence of calcium sodium phosphate [NaCaPO4] and zinc ferrite [ZnFe2O4] as major crystalline phases. Zinc ferrite present in nanocrystalline form contributes to the magnetic properties of the glass-ceramic samples. Magnetic hysteresis cycles of the glass-ceramic samples were obtained with applied magnetic field sweeps of ±20 kOe and ±500 Oe, in order to evaluate the potential of these glass-ceramics for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. The evolution of magnetic properties in these samples, viz., from a partially paramagnetic to fully ferrimagnetic nature has been explored using magnetometry and X-ray diffraction studies. - Research highlights: → The glass-ceramics contain bone mineral and magnetic phases. → Calcium sodium phosphate and zinc ferrite nanocrystallites have been identified in all the sample. → With an increase in ZnO and Fe2O3 content, magnetic property of samples evolved from partially paramagnetic to fully ferrimagnetic nature. → Large magnetic hysteresis loops have been obtained for samples with high ZnO+Fe2O3 content.

  5. A study on microstructure and luminescent properties of oxyfluoride silicate glass-ceramics with (Ho3+,Yb3+):NaYF4 crystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Oxyfluoride glass-ceramic with NaYF4 nanocrystals content the Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions. → Up-converted green emission in glass-ceramics was observed. → Up-converted red emission occurs in glass samples. → Appropriate up-conversion mechanism is proposed. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics containing NaYF4 nanocrystals were prepared by heat-treatment from oxyfluoride silicate-based glass doped with Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Absorption and emission spectra revealed that a fraction of Ho3+ and Yb3+ ions is incorporated into the NaYF4 ordered lattice influencing spectroscopic features of glass-ceramics in comparison with those of precursor glass. Green up-conversion emission (545 nm) originating in the 5S2 level in glass-ceramics and up-converted red emission (650 nm) originating in the 5F5 level in as-melted glass were observed under optical pumping into Yb3+ absorption band and analyzed. Although both emissions in both materials are achieved by two-photon excitations, the relation between green and red emission intensity in glass-ceramics and glass implies that processes relevant to up-conversion phenomena are different. Based on a careful analysis of relaxation dynamics of Ho3+ and Yb3+ excited states, the mechanisms involved in conversion of the infrared radiation into the visible emission in these materials are proposed and discussed.

  6. A study on microstructure and luminescent properties of oxyfluoride silicate glass-ceramics with (Ho{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}):NaYF{sub 4} crystallites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominiak-Dzik, G., E-mail: G.Dominiak-Dzik@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland); Lisiecki, R.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Krajczyk, L. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okolna 2, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Oxyfluoride glass-ceramic with NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals content the Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions. > Up-converted green emission in glass-ceramics was observed. > Up-converted red emission occurs in glass samples. > Appropriate up-conversion mechanism is proposed. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals were prepared by heat-treatment from oxyfluoride silicate-based glass doped with Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Absorption and emission spectra revealed that a fraction of Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions is incorporated into the NaYF{sub 4} ordered lattice influencing spectroscopic features of glass-ceramics in comparison with those of precursor glass. Green up-conversion emission (545 nm) originating in the {sup 5}S{sub 2} level in glass-ceramics and up-converted red emission (650 nm) originating in the {sup 5}F{sub 5} level in as-melted glass were observed under optical pumping into Yb{sup 3+} absorption band and analyzed. Although both emissions in both materials are achieved by two-photon excitations, the relation between green and red emission intensity in glass-ceramics and glass implies that processes relevant to up-conversion phenomena are different. Based on a careful analysis of relaxation dynamics of Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} excited states, the mechanisms involved in conversion of the infrared radiation into the visible emission in these materials are proposed and discussed.

  7. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander [School of Engineering and Science, Curtin University of Technology, Sarawak (Malaysia); Abou-El-Hossein, K A, E-mail: mohan.m@curtin.edu.my [Mechanical and Aeronautical Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elegebeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2011-02-15

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  8. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  9. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Sola; Jose I. Peña

    2013-01-01

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth...

  10. Preparation and properties of CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramics by sintered frits particle from mining wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of glass-ceramics containing gold tailings powder (GTP. Frits particle sintered technology was used to prepare glass ceramic products. SiO2, CaO, ZnO, BaO and B2O3 were selected to adjust the composition of the glass. Based on the results of differential thermal analysis (DTA, the nucleation and crystallization temperature of parent glass samples with different schedule were identified, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the produced glass-ceramics materials revealed that the main crystalline phase was β-wollastonite. With the increasing of CaO content, the intensity of crystal diffractive peaks also increases. The formation of β-wollastonite crystal could be accelerated by the increasing of CaO. The glass-ceramics with fine microstructure showed better physical, mechanical properties and chemical resistance. Overall results indicated that it was a feasible attempt to produce glass-ceramics for building and decorative materials from waste materials. The amount of GTP used in the glass batches was more than 65 wt% of the whole raw.

  11. Glass formation and crystallization in high-temperature glass-ceramics and Si3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-08-01

    The softening of glassy grain boundaries in ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 at high temperatures reduces mechanical strength and the upper-use temperature. By crystallizing this glass to a more refractory crystalline phase, a material which performs at higher temperatures may result. Three systems were examined: a cordierite composition with ZrO2 as a nucleating agent; celsian compositions; and yttrium silicate glasses both in bulk and intergranular in Si3N4. For the cordierite compositions, a series of metastable phases was obtained. The crystallization of these compositions was summarized in terms of metastable ternary isothermal sections. Zircon formed at the expense of ZrO2 and spinel. In SiC composites, the transformations were slower. In celsian, two polymorphs were crystallized. One phase, hexacelsian, which always crystallized, even when metastable, had an undesirable volume change. The other phase, celsian, was very difficult to crystallize. In yttrium silicate bulk glasses, similar in composition to the intergranular glass in Si3N4, a number of polymorphs of Y2Si2O7 were crystallized. The conditions under which these polymorphs formed are compared with crystallization in Si3N4.

  12. Glass formation and crystallization in high-temperature glass-ceramics and Si3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    The softening of glassy grain boundaries in ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 at high temperatures reduces mechanical strength and the upper-use temperature. By crystallizing this glass to a more refractory crystalline phase, a material which performs at higher temperatures may result. Three systems were examined: a cordierite composition with ZrO2 as a nucleating agent; celsian compositions; and yttrium silicate glasses both in bulk and intergranular in Si3N4. For the cordierite compositions, a series of metastable phases was obtained. The crystallization of these compositions was summarized in terms of metastable ternary isothermal sections. Zircon formed at the expense of ZrO2 and spinel. In SiC composites, the transformations were slower. In celsian, two polymorphs were crystallized. One phase, hexacelsian, which always crystallized, even when metastable, had an undesirable volume change. The other phase, celsian, was very difficult to crystallize. In yttrium silicate bulk glasses, similar in composition to the intergranular glass in Si3N4, a number of polymorphs of Y2Si2O7 were crystallized. The conditions under which these polymorphs formed are compared with crystallization in Si3N4.

  13. Fabrication of Rare Earth-Doped Transparent Glass Ceramic Optical Fibers by Modified Chemical Vapor Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, Wilfried; Nguyen, Luan; Bhaktha, S N B; Sebbah, Patrick; Pal, Bishnu P; Dussardier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped silica-based optical fibers with transparent glass ceramic (TGC) core was fabricated through the well-known modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process without going through the commonly used stage of post-ceramming. The main characteristics of the RE-doped oxyde nanoparticles namely, their density and mean diameter in the fibers are dictated by the concentration of alkaline earth element used as phase separating agent. Magnesium and erbium co-doped fibers were fabricated. Optical transmission in term of loss due to scattering as well as some spectroscopic characteristics of the erbium ions was studied. For low Mg content, nano-scale particles could be grown with and relatively low scattering losses were obtained, whereas large Mg-content causes the growth of larger particles resulting in much higher loss. However in the latter case, certain interesting alteration of the spectroscopic properties of the erbium ions were observed. These initial studies should be useful in incorporati...

  14. Effect of heat treatment time on microstructure and electrical conductivity in LATP glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-ceramic is prepared by heat treatment of melt quenched 14Li2O−9Al2O3−38TiO2−39P2O5 glass in the vicinity of crystallization temperature. Growth of ceramic phase is controlled by tuning heat treatment time at fixed temperature. Ceramic phase was identified to be LiTi2(PO4)3 from X Ray Diffraction analysis. Microstructural evolution of this phase with hold time was observed under high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope. DC conductivity is observed to increase by 4-5 orders of magnitude in this glass-ceramic compared to parent glass. However, formation of pores and cracks with very large heat treatment time seem to hinder further increase of conductivity

  15. STATIC AND DYNAMIC IN VITRO TEST OF BIOACTIVITY OF GLASS CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANA KOZÁNKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioactivity of glass ceramics from Li2O–SiO2–CaO–P2O5–CaF2 system, with different amount of fluorapatite expressed as P2O5 content, has been tested in vitro under static and dynamic regime. The paper reports the results of bioactivity test of glass ceramics in static and dynamic regime. XRD, SEM and EPMA analysis were used to characterise the sample as well as to detect the presence of new phase onto the surface of glass ceramics. The bioactivity, as demonstrated by the formation of new apatite layer, depends on P2O5 content and testing regime. In static regime, one can observe a fine microstructure of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface on glass ceramics samples. In dynamic regime, the formation rate of this layer seems to be retarded in comparison with that of static regime.

  16. Temperature effect on the magnetic properties of the coprecipitation derived ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic materials are promising candidates for destruction of cancerous cells by hysteresis loss, as a consequence of the increase of the local temperature when an alternating magnetic field is applied. The glass-ceramics prepared in this work contain magnetite and hematite crystals in a glassy matrix. They can be prepared by melting the coprecipitation-derived precursors at temperatures higher than 1400 deg. C. The influence of the melting temperature on the magnetic properties of these glass-ceramics has been analysed. Room temperature hysteresis cycles in quasi-static conditions were performed using two different magnetic field, one of 12 kOe, and the other one of 500 Oe. The heat generation was estimated from calorimetric measurements, using a magnetic induction furnace. The magnetic hysteresis parameters are strongly affected by the glass-ceramics microstructure, which is influenced by the melting temperature

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass and glass ceramic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium aluminium silicate glasses of compositions (wt%) (1)LAS1: 55SiO2-24Al2O3-1.0MgO- 3Li2O-1.0ZnO-2TiO2-2ZrO2-12P2O5 (wt%) and (2) LAS2: 59SiO2-19Al2O3-1MgO-3.5Li2O-1.5ZnO-2TiO2-2ZrO2-7P2O5-5.2B2O3 were prepared by melt-quench technique. The charges were melted in the temperature range 1600-1650 deg C followed by annealing at around 650 deg C. With addition of B2O3, decrease in glass transition temperature(Tg) and crystallization temperature (Tc) was observed. Samples were heat treated at different temperatures based on DTA data to convert the base glasses to glass ceramics. The microhardness and density values of crystallized samples were found to be higher than the base glasses. The major crystalline phases were identified as Quartz and Mullite in glass-ceramic samples after heat treatment at maximum 1010 deg C. (author)

  18. Intense red upconversion luminescence from Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped transparent glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2012-01-15

    Tm3+/Yb3+ codoped transparent glass ceramic containing β-PbF2 nanocrystals was successfully prepared. After thermal treatment, emissions from the state of Tm3+ excited by 980 nm laser were greatly quenched by cross relaxation and the 700 nm luminescence from Tm3+:3F2,3→3H6 transition was strongly enhanced. A nearly monochromatic red luminescence band was observed. Based on the luminescence decay curves and Judd-Ofelt analysis, the strengthened cross relaxation played an important role in such phenomenon. PMID:22854468

  19. The Fabrication and Characterization of PCL/Rice Husk Derived Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composite Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to fabricate a 3D scaffold using polycaprolactone (PCL) and silicate based bioactive glass-ceramic (R-SBgC). Different concentrations of R-SBgC prepared from rice husk ash (RHA) were combined with PCL to fabricate a composite scaffold using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method. The products were then characterized using SEM and EDX. The results demonstrated that R-SBgC in PCL matrix produced a bioactive material which has highly porous structure wit...

  20. Development of Glass Ceramics Made From Ferrous Tailings and Slag in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cheng-jun; SHI Pei-yang; ZHANG Da-yong; JIANG Mao-fa

    2007-01-01

    A great amount of ferrous tailings and slag cause severe damage to the ecological environment, which must be reclaimed and utilized. The composition, type, and characteristics of ferrous tailings and slag in China were introduced. The research status and the application outlook of glass ceramics made from ferrous tailings and slag were discussed. Glass ceramics made from ferrous tailings and slag can be applied to various fields, and it will be environmentally conscious materials in the 21st century.

  1. Thermally activated conversion of a silicate gel to an oxyfluoride glass ceramic: Optical study using Eu3+ probe ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol–gel route using metal alkoxides precursor and trifluoroacetic acid as in situ fluorination reagent has been used to prepare Eu3+-doped silicate xerogel, followed by thermal annealing to obtain oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing Eu3+-doped BaF2 nanocrystals. We have used Eu3+ as probe ion and we analyzed its characteristic features (photoluminescence, optical absorption and magnetic circular dichroism) to get information about the local environment around the ion during thermally activated evolution of the sol to xerogel and then glass ceramic. As the drying and annealing proceeds silica network is formed accompanied by precipitation of the nanofluoride crystalline phase; Eu3+ coordination changes gradually from a random and assymetric CF3COO- one (in the sol) to a symmetric one (in the BaF2 nanocrystals) given by the fluorine ions. Glass ceramization is based on a homogenous crystallization mechanism with BaF2 nucleation centres resulted from thermal decomposition of Ba-trifluoacetate at around 300 °C followed by subsequent growth into BaF2 nanocrystals above 600 °C; Eu3+-ions are incorporated during the nanocrystals growth. -- Highlights: • Glass ceramization is the result of a homogenous crystallization with BaF2 nucleation centres. • Eu3+-ions are incorporated during nanocrystals growth, above 600 °C. • Eu3+-ions are embedded dominantly in the BaF2 nanocrystals in high symmetry sites

  2. MASBAL: A computer program for predicting the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a user's manual for the MASBAL computer program. MASBAL's objectives are to predict the composition of nuclear waste glass produced by a slurry-fed ceramic melter based on a knowledge of process conditions; to generate simulated data that can be used to estimate the uncertainty in the predicted glass composition as a function of process uncertainties; and to generate simulated data that can be used to provide a measure of the inherent variability in the glass composition as a function of the inherent variability in the feed composition. These three capabilities are important to nuclear waste glass producers because there are constraints on the range of compositions that can be processed in a ceramic melter and on the range of compositions that will be acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. MASBAL was developed specifically to simulate the operation of the West Valley Component Test system, a commercial-scale ceramic melter system that will process high-level nuclear wastes currently stored in underground tanks at the site of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center (near West Valley, New York). The program is flexible enough, however, to simulate any slurry-fed ceramic melter system. 4 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Effect of Al2O3 on monazite glass-ceramic wasteform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of monazite glass-ceramic wasteform containing different Al2O3 contents on their structures and properties were investigated. The structure of the glass ceramic wasteform was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-radiation diffraction (XRD). The chemical stability of monazite glass-ceramic wasteform was measured by dissolution rate and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) method. The results show that the chemical stability of monazite glass ceramic wasteform with 4% (mole fraction) Al2O3 and made at 980 ℃ for 3 h is optimal. The 14 d leaching rate of monazite glass-ceramic wasteform is about 8.1 ng/(cm2 · min), which is the lowest in all the samples. The main crystalline phase of the as prepared glass-ceramic wasteform is monazite. There are a large number of [PO4]3 groups, a small number of [P2O7]4- groups, and no [PO3]- groups in the wasteform. (authors)

  4. Mechanical performance of a biocompatible biocide soda-lime glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Esteban, S; Bartolomé, J F; Dí Az, L A; Esteban-Tejeda, L; Prado, C; López-Piriz, R; Torrecillas, R; Moya, J S

    2014-06-01

    A biocompatible soda-lime glass-ceramic in the SiO2-Na2O-Al2O3-CaO-B2O3 system containing combeite and nepheline as crystalline phases, has been obtained at 750°C by two different routes: (i) pressureless sintering and (ii) Spark Plasma Sintering. The SPS glass-ceramic showed a bending strength, Weibull modulus, and toughness similar values to the cortical human bone. This material had a fatigue limit slightly superior to cortical bone and at least two times higher than commercial dental glass-ceramics and dentine. The in vitro studies indicate that soda-lime glass-ceramic is fully biocompatible. The in vivo studies in beagle jaws showed that implanted SPS rods presented no inflammatory changes in soft tissues surrounding implants in any of the 10 different cases after four months implantation. The radiological analysis indicates no signs of osseointegration lack around implants. Moreover, the biocide activity of SPS glass-ceramic versus Escherichia coli, was found to be >4log indicating that it prevents implant infections. Because of this, the SPS new glass-ceramic is particularly promising for dental applications (inlay, crowns, etc). PMID:24667693

  5. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  6. New Co-containing glass ceramics saturable absorbers for 1.5-μm solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarevich, Alexander M.; Denisov, Igor A.; Yumashev, Konstantin V.; Chuvaeva, Tamara I.; Dymshits, Olga S.; Onushchenko, Alexei A.; Zhilin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    New saturable absorber Q-switch for 1.54 %mum Er: glass laser is present. The saturable absorber is transparent glass ceramic containing magnesium-aluminum spinel nanocrystallites doped with tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions. Q-switched pulses of up to 5.5 mJ in energy and 80 ns in duration at 1.54 micrometers were achieved. Relaxation time of the 4A2 to 4T1(4F) transition bleaching was measured to be (450+/- 150)ns. Ground-state absorption cross-sections at 1.54 micrometers wavelength were estimated to be (3.2+/- 0.4)*10-19 cm2 and (5.0+/- 0.6)X10-20 cm2, respectively. Results of study absorption and luminescence spectra of different glass ceramics on the base of magnesium-aluminum, zinc-aluminum, lithium-aluminum spinel nanocrystallites doped with tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions are also analyzed.

  7. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verné, Enrica; Bruno, Matteo; Miola, Marta; Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta; Cochis, Andrea; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2-Na2O-CaO-P2O5-FeO-Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite - HAp - layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. PMID:26042695

  8. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  9. Study of the mechanical stability and bioactivity of Bioglass(®) based glass-ceramic scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Elena; Melli, Virginia; Catignoli, Gabriele; Altomare, Lina; Jahromi, Maryam Tavafoghi; Cerruti, Marta; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; De Nardo, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Large bone defects are challenging to heal, and often require an osteoconductive and stable support to help the repair of damaged tissue. Bioglass-based scaffolds are particularly promising for this purpose due to their ability to stimulate bone regeneration. However, processing technologies adopted so far do not allow for the synthesis of scaffolds with suitable mechanical properties. Also, conventional sintering processes result in glass de-vitrification, which generates concerns about bioactivity. In this work, we studied the bioactivity and the mechanical properties of Bioglass(®) based scaffolds, produced via a powder technology inspired process. The scaffolds showed compressive strengths in the range of 5-40 MPa, i.e. in the upper range of values reported so far for these materials, had tunable porosity, in the range between 55 and 77%, and pore sizes that are optimal for bone tissue regeneration (100-500 μm). We immersed the scaffolds in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 28 d and analyzed the evolution of the scaffold mechanical properties and microstructure. Even if, after sintering, partial de-vitrification occurred, immersion in SBF caused ion release and the formation of a Ca-P coating within 2 d, which reached a thickness of 10-15 μm after 28 d. This coating contained both hydroxyapatite and an amorphous background, indicating microstructural amorphization of the base material. Scaffolds retained a good compressive strength and structural integrity also after 28 d of immersion (6 MPa compressive strength). The decrease in mechanical properties was mainly related to the increase in porosity, caused by its dissolution, rather than to the amorphization process and the formation of a Ca-P coating. These results suggest that Bioglass(®) based scaffolds produced via powder metallurgy-inspired technique are excellent candidates for bone regeneration applications. PMID:26836444

  10. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  11. Remedial processing of oil shale fly ash (OSFA) and its value-added conversion into glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes such as sewage sludge, coal fly ash and slag have been recycled into various products such as sintered bricks, ceramics and cement concrete. Application of these recycling approaches is much better and greener than conventional landfills since it can solve the problems of storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for construction materials to protect the environment. Therefore, in this study, an attempt was made to recycle oil shale fly ash (OSFA), a by-product obtained from the extracting of shale oil in the oil shale industry, into a value-added glass-ceramic material via melting and sintering method. The influence of basicity (CaO/SiO2 ratio) by adding calcium oxide on the performance of glass-ceramics was studied in terms of phase transformation, mechanical properties, chemical resistances and heavy metals leaching tests. Crystallization kinetics results showed that the increase of basicity reduced the activation energies of crystallization but did not change the crystallization mechanism. When increasing the basicity from 0.2 to 0.5, the densification of sintering body was enhanced due to the promotion of viscous flow of glass powders, and therefore the compression strength and bending strength of glass-ceramics were increased. Heavy metals leaching results indicated that the produced OSFA-based glass-ceramics could be taken as non-hazardous materials. The maximum mechanical properties of compression strength of 186 ± 3 MPa, bending strength of 78 ± 6 MPa, good chemical resistances and low heavy metals leaching concentrations showed that it could be used as a substitute material for construction applications. The proposed approach will be one of the potential sustainable solutions in reducing the storage of oil shale fly ash as well as converting it into a value-added product. PMID:26387050

  12. MAS-NMR study of lithium zinc silicate glasses and glass-ceramics with various ZnO content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses of composition (mol%): 17.5Li2O-(72-x)SiO2-xZnO-5.1Na2O-1.3P2O5-4.1B2O3, 5.5≤x≤17.7, were prepared by conventional melt-quenched technique and converted to glass-ceramic by controlled crystallization process. 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR was used to characterize the structure of both glass and glass-ceramic samples. Despite the complex glass composition, Q2, Q3 and Q4 sites are identified from 29Si MAS-NMR, which relative intensities are found to vary with the ZnO content, indicating a network depolymerization by ZnO. Moreover, well separated Q3 and Q4 resonances for low ZnO content indicates the occurrence of phase separation. From 31P MAS-NMR, it is seen that phosphorus is mainly present in the form of ortho-(Q0) and pyro-phosphate (Q1) structural units and variation of ZnO content did not have much effect on these resonances, which provides an additional evidence for phase separation in the glass. On conversion to glass-ceramics, lithium disilicate (Li2Si2O5), lithium zinc ortho-silicate (Li3Zn0.5SiO4), tridymite (SiO2) and cristobalite (SiO2) were identified as major silicate crystalline phases. Using 29Si MAS-NMR, quantification of these silicate crystalline phases is carried out and correlated with the ZnO content in the glass-ceramics samples. In addition, 31P spectra unambiguously revealed the presence of crystalline Li3PO4 and (Na,Li)3PO4 in the glass-ceramics. - Graphical abstract: 29Si and 31P MAS-NMR analyses were carried out on multi-component Li2O-SiO2-ZnO-Na2O-P2O5-B2O3 glasses and glass-ceramics developed for sealing application. Structural data are reported, including phase separation process and quantification of amorphous and crystalline phases

  13. Treatment of osteomyelitis with antibiotic-soaked porous glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, K; Okada, Y; Matsusue, Y; Iida, H; Nakamura, T

    1998-05-01

    We have developed a new drug delivery system using porous apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic (A-W GC) to treat osteomyelitis. A-W GC (porosity, 70% and 20% to 30%), or porous hydroxyapatite (HA) blocks (porosity 35% to 48%) used as controls, were soaked in mixtures of two antibiotics, isepamicin sulphate (ISP) and cefmetazole (CMZ) under high vacuum. We evaluated the release concentrations of the antibiotics from the blocks. The bactericidal concentration of ISP from A-W GC was maintained for more than 42 days, but that from HA decreased to below the detection limit after 28 days. The concentrations of CMZ from both materials were lower than those of ISP. An in vivo study using rabbit femora showed that an osseous concentration of ISP was maintained at eight weeks after implantation. Osteoconduction of the A-W GC block was good. Four patients with infected hip arthroplasties and one with osteomyelitis of the tibia have been treated with the new delivery system with excellent results. PMID:9619951

  14. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verné, Enrica, E-mail: enrica.verne@polito.it [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruno, Matteo [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Miola, Marta [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta [Traumatology Orthopedics and Occupational Medicine Dept., Università di Torino, Via G. Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Cochis, Andrea [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Rimondini, Lia [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–FeO–Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and contains magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests

  15. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO2–Na2O–CaO–P2O5–FeO–Fe2O3 and contains magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests show hydroxyapatite precipitates on the cement

  16. Effect of binder burnout on the sealing performance of glass ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Tugrul Y.; Celik, Selahattin; Mat, Mahmut D.

    2013-11-01

    The glass ceramics composite sealants are among few materials suitable for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) due to their high operating temperatures (600 °C-850 °C). The glass ceramics chemically bond to both the metallic interconnector and the ceramic electrolyte and provide a gas tight connection. A careful and several stages manufacturing procedure is required to obtain a gas tight sealing. In this study, effects of binder burnout process on the sealing performance are investigated employing commercially available glass ceramic powders. The glass ceramic laminates are produced by mixing glass ceramic powders with the organic binders and employing a tape casting method. The laminates are sandwiched between the metallic interconnectors of an SOFC cell. The burnout and subsequent sealing quality are analyzed by measuring leakage rate and final macrostructure of sealing region. The effects of heating rate, dead weight load, solid loading, carrier gas and their flow rates are investigated. It is found that sealing quality is affected from all investigated parameters. While a slower heating rate is required for a better burnout, the mass flow rate of sweep gas must be adequate for removal of the burned gas. The leakage rate is reduced to 0.1 ml min-1 with 2 °C min-1 + 1 °C min-1 heating rate, 86.25% solid loading, 200 N dead weight load and 500 ml min-1 sweep gas flow rate.

  17. Preparation and properties of Li2O-BaO-Al2O3 -SiO2 glass-ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gamal A. Khater; Maher H. Idris

    2014-01-01

    The crystallization of some glasses, based on celsian-spodumene glass-ceramics, was investigated by different techniques including differential thermal analysis, optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, indentation, microhardness, bending strengths, water absorption and density measurement. The batches were melted and then cast into glasses, which were subjected to heat treatment to induce controlled crystallization. The resulting crystalline materials were mainly composed of β-eucryptite solid...

  18. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-06-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  19. Surfaces and interfaces of glass and ceramics; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Special Topics in Ceramics, Alfred University, Alfred, N.Y., August 27-29, 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechette, V. D. (Editor); Lacourse, W. C.; Burdick, V. L.

    1974-01-01

    The characterization of surfaces and interfaces is considered along with the infrared spectra of several N-containing compounds absorbed on montmorillonites, applications of surface characterization techniques to glasses, the observation of electronic spectra in glass and ceramic surfaces, a method for determining the preferred orientation of crystallites normal to a surface, and the friction and wear behavior of glasses and ceramics. Attention is given to the wear behavior of cast surface composites, an experimental investigation of the dynamic and thermal characteristics of the ceramic stock removal process, a dynamic elastic model of ceramic stock removal, and the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  20. Research study for gel precursors as glass and ceramic starting materials for space processing applications research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, R. L.; Miller, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The development of techniques for the preparation of glass and ceramic starting materials that will result in homogeneous glasses or ceramic products when melted and cooled in a containerless environment is described. Metal-organic starting materials were used to make compounds or mixtures which were then decomposed by hydrolysis reactions to the corresponding oxides. The sodium tungstate system was chosen as a model for a glass with a relatively low melting temperature. The alkoxide tungstates also have interesting optical properties. For all the compositions studied, comparison samples were prepared from inorganic starting materials and submitted to the same analyses.

  1. Study of phase composition on resorption glass-ceramic соatings for titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Шадріна, Галина Миколаївна; Саввова, Оксана Вікторівна; Шемет, Дарина Юріївна

    2014-01-01

     The problem of long-term knitting of bioactive glass-ceramic calcium silicate-phosphate coatings for titanium with a bone that constitutes about 6 months today, using foreign implants of this kind is considered in the paper. The solution to this problem by providing an appropriate resorption level of glass-ceramic coatings due to reproducing a certain ratio of phase-forming components is proposed.The purpose of this work was to study the effect of phase composition on resorption of glass-cer...

  2. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased

  3. A New Biocompatible and Antibacterial Phosphate Free Glass-Ceramic for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Belén; Alou, Luís; Cafini, Fabio; Couceiro, Ramiro; Sevillano, David; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Guitián, Francisco; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-06-01

    In the attempt to find valid alternatives to classic antibiotics and in view of current limitations in the efficacy of antimicrobial-coated or loaded biomaterials, this work is focused on the development of a new glass-ceramic with antibacterial performance together with safe biocompatibility. This bactericidal glass-ceramic composed of combeite and nepheline crystals in a residual glassy matrix has been obtained using an antimicrobial soda-lime glass as a precursor. Its inhibitory effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation were proved against five biofilm-producing reference strains. The biocompatibility tests by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone indicate an excellent biocompatibility.

  4. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ► Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ► Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ► Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UV–visible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO2 wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO2 used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  5. Structural and optical properties of Tb-doped Na-Gd metaphosphate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moretti, F.; Vedda, A.; Nikl, Martin; Nitsch, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 15 (2009), 155103/1-155103/7. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200100626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Na-Gd metaphosphate glass * glass-ceramics * NaGd(PO 3 ) 4 * optical properties * structural properties * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2009

  6. An 8-year evaluation of sintered ceramic and glass ceramic inlays processed by the Cerec CAD/CAM system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Dijken van, J.W.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cerec CAD/CAM inlays processed of two industrially made machinable ceramics during an 8-yr follow-up period. Each of 16 patients received two similar ceramic inlays. Half the number of the inlays were made of a feldspathic (Vita Mark II) and the other...... of a glass ceramic (Dicor MGC) block. The inlays were luted with a dual resin composite and evaluated clinically using modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 8 months, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8 yr, and indirectly using models. At baseline, 84% of the inlays were estimated as optimal and 16% as acceptable. Postoperative...... sensitivity was reported by one patient for 8 months. Of the 32 inlays evaluated during the 8 yr, 3 failed due to fracture of the material. No secondary caries was found adjacent to the inlays. No significant differences in the clinical performance were found between inlays made of the two ceramics. It can...

  7. UK program: glasses and ceramics for immobilization of radioactive wastes for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Research Program on Radioactive Waste Management includes the development of processes for the conversion of high-level-liquid-reprocessing wastes from thermal and fast reactors to borosilicate glasses. The properties of these glasses and their behavior under storage and disposal conditions have been examined. Methods for immobilizing activity from other wastes by conversion to glass or ceramic forms are described. The UK philosophy of final solutions to waste management and disposal is presented

  8. Thermal analyses to assess diffusion kinetics in the nano-sized interspaces between the growing crystals of a glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Macroscopic, routine laboratory methods of the 'Thermal Analysis' type (DSC, DMA) allow a rough description of the kinetics in the nano-sized interstitial spaces of glass ceramics. → These macroscopic measurements support the idea of a rigid zone around the crystals which builds up during ceramization and is part of a negative feedback loop which finally stops crystal growth and Ostwald ripening within the time window of observation. → Ostwald ripening may be provoked by thermally softening said rigid zone. Under certain conditions, this gives rise to a characteristic peak in the DSC. - Abstract: According to a hypothesis by Ruessel and coworkers, the absence of Ostwald ripening during isothermal crystallization of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) and other glass ceramics indicates the existence of a kinetic hindrance of atomic reorganization in the interstitial spaces between the crystals. Methods of Thermal Analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA)) which are sensitive to the local atomic rearrangements in the interstitial spaces (including viscous flow) are applied to find support for the idea of kinetic hindrance and the formation of a core shell structure acting as diffusion barrier. Both the DSC-measured calorimetric glass transition and the DMA-measured viscoelastic properties indicate an increase in the time constants of atomic rearrangements and diffusion by at least two orders of magnitude during ceramization. This fits to the above idea. Based on these findings, thermo analytic studies have been performed in order to find out how Ostwald ripening may be provoked.

  9. Precipitation of ZnO in Al 2O 3-doped zinc borate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hirokazu; Ueno, Takahiro; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2011-10-01

    Crystallization behavior of the oxide semiconductor ZnO in zinc borate glass was investigated. The precipitated crystalline phase of glass ceramics containing a small amount of Al 2O 3 was α-Zn 3B 2O 6 whereas that of the glass ceramics containing a large amount of Al 2O 3 was ZnO. It was found that the c-oriented precipitation of ZnO in a glass ceramic was brought about by the in-plane crystal growth of needle-like ZnO crystallites along the a-axis. Amount of Al 2O 3 that can make glass network affected the coordination state of B 2O 3 in the glass, and a three-coordinated BO 3 unit was preferentially formed in the glass containing a higher amount of Al 2O 3. The present results suggest that crystallization of ZnO from multi-component glass is dominated by the local coordination state of the mother glass.

  10. Glass ceramic of high hardness and fracture toughness developed from iron-rich wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixin HAN

    2009-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the feasibility of using high iron content wastes, gen-erated during steel making, as a raw material for the production of glass ceramic. The iron-rich wastes were mixed and melted in different proportions with soda-lime glass cullet and sand. The devitrification of the parent glasses produced from the different mixtures was investigated using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were assessed by hardness and indentation fracture toughness measurement. A glass ce-ramic with mixture of 60 wt pct iron-rich wastes, 25 wt pct sand, and 15 wt pct glass cullet exhibited the best combination of properties, namely, hardness 7.9 GPa and fracture toughness 3.75 MPa.m1/2, for the sake of containing magnetite in marked dendritic morphology. These new hard glass ceramics are candidate materials for wear resistant tiles and paving for heavy industrial floors.

  11. The Fabrication and Characterization of PCL/Rice Husk Derived Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Composite Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Naghizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to fabricate a 3D scaffold using polycaprolactone (PCL and silicate based bioactive glass-ceramic (R-SBgC. Different concentrations of R-SBgC prepared from rice husk ash (RHA were combined with PCL to fabricate a composite scaffold using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS method. The products were then characterized using SEM and EDX. The results demonstrated that R-SBgC in PCL matrix produced a bioactive material which has highly porous structure with interconnected porosities. There appears to be a relationship between the increase in R-SBgC concentration and increased material density and compressive modulus; however, increasing R-SBgC concentration result in reduced scaffold porosity. In conclusion, it is possible to fabricate a PCL/bioactive glass-ceramic composite from processed rice husk. Varying the R-SBgC concentrations can control the properties of this material, which is useful in the development of the ideal scaffold intended for use as a bone substitute in nonload bearing sites.

  12. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10-11-10-10 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour

  13. Wear behavior of pressable lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Izzat Abdul Rahman, Muhammad; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Ling

    2016-07-01

    This article reports effects of surface preparation and contact loads on abrasive wear properties of highly aesthetic and high-strength pressable lithium disilicate glass-ceramics (LDGC). Abrasive wear testing was performed using a pin-on-disk device in which LDGC disks prepared with different surface finishes were against alumina pins at different contact loads. Coefficients of friction and wear volumes were measured as functions of initial surface finishes and contact loads. Wear-induced surface morphology changes in both LDGC disks and alumina pins were characterized using three-dimensional laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that initial surface finishes of LDGC specimens and contact loads significantly affected the friction coefficients, wear volumes and wear-induced surface roughness changes of the material. Both wear volumes and friction coefficients of LDGC increased as the load increased while surface roughness effects were complicated. For rough LDGC surfaces, three-body wear was dominant while for fine LDGC surfaces, two-body abrasive wear played a key role. Delamination, plastic deformation, and brittle fracture were observed on worn LDGC surfaces. The adhesion of LDGC matrix materials to alumina pins was also discovered. This research has advanced our understanding of the abrasive wear behavior of LDGC and will provide guidelines for better utilization and preparation of the material for long-term success in dental restorations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 968-978, 2016. PMID:25980530

  14. Upconversion emissions in YAG glass ceramics doped with Tm3+/Yb3+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► YAG micro-crystals present primary and secondary particle sizes of ∼46 nm and ∼8 μm. ► Crystal grains grow with several preferred orientations and a dominant one (4 4 4). ► Efficient NIR, weak red, intense blue and rare UV emissions of Tm3+ are captured. ► Obvious Stark splitting in the levels of Tm3+ is confirmed in the glass ceramics. - Abstract: Tm3+/Yb3+ doped glass ceramics, containing single phase of YAG micro-crystals with several preferred orientations and a dominant one (4 4 4) in the matrix, which present the primary particle size of ∼46 nm and the secondary particle size of ∼8 μm, have been prepared by heat-treating the Li2O–Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 (LYAS) precursor glasses. Judd-Ofelt parameters Ωt (t = 2, 4, 6) are derived to be 5.14 × 10−20, 1.11 × 10−20, and 1.19 × 10−20 cm2, respectively, indicating high inversion asymmetry and strong covalent environment in the precursor glasses. Efficient near-infrared (NIR), weak red, intense blue and rare UV multi-photon upconversion emissions of Tm3+ are captured in Tm3+/Yb3+ doped LYAS glasses and YAG glass ceramics. Obvious Stark splitting in the glass ceramics manifests that rare earth ions have been incorporated into YAG lattices. The comparison of spectral behaviors of the glass and glass ceramic samples will be helpful for further exploring the novel phosphors applied to illumination and display.

  15. Potentiality of a frit waste from ceramic sector as raw material to glass-ceramic material production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work consists of studying the devitrification capacity of a residue from sodium-calcium frit, using the vitreous powder sintering method, which follows the traditional ceramic processing route, including a specific heat treatment to generate the appearance of crystals from the original glass phase. Initially the frit residue has been characterized by instrumental techniques such as XRF, XRD and DTA/TG. Furthermore, the chemical analysis (XRF) has allowed the prediction of devitrification potentiality of this residue by theoretical approaches represented by Gingsberg, Raschin-Tschetverikov and Lebedeva ternary diagrams. Then, this residue was subjected to traditional ceramic method, by changing the grinding time, the pressing pressure and prepared samples were obtained at different temperatures. In this part, the techniques for measuring particle size by laser diffraction and XRD and SEM to evaluate the generated crystalline phases, were applied. Finally, it has been found that this frit residue works as glass-ceramic precursor, devitrifying in wollastonite crystals as majority phase and without being subjected to the melting step of the glass-ceramic typical method. (Author)

  16. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  17. Influence of glass additives on the microwave dielectric properties of Ca5Nb2TiO12 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation was made to correlate the effect of composition and concentration of glass content on the sintering temperature and microwave dielectric properties of polycrystalline Ca5Nb2TiO12 ceramics. Glass systems, such as B2O3, SiO2, B2O3-SiO2, ZnO-B2O3, Al2O3-SiO2, Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2, BaO-B2O3-SiO2, MgO-B2O3-SiO2, ZnO-B2O3-SiO2, PbO-B2O3-SiO2, and 2MgO-Al2O3-5SiO2 were added to calcined Ca5Nb2TiO12 powder in different weight percentages. The structure and microstructure of the sintered ceramics were studied using powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopic methods. The specimens were characterized in the microwave frequency range (3-6 GHz). The study revealed that alumina and silica based glasses were more effective in improving the dielectric properties of Ca5Nb2TiO12 ceramics, whereas borate glasses are more suited for lowering the sintering temperature

  18. Study of an anisotropic ferrimagnetic bioactive glass ceramic for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Hashmi, M. U.; Shamim, A.; Alam, S.

    2010-07-01

    For the hyperthermia therapy of cancer, ferrimagnetic glass ceramics are a potential candidate. Ferrimagnetic zinc-ferrite-containing bioactive glass ceramics were prepared by quenching the glass ceramics from sintering temperature. Then the samples were heated to 600°C and cooled in an aligning magnetic field of 1 Tesla to cause anisotropy. The magnetically aligned samples were compared with non-aligned samples. Vibrating sample magnetometry measurements at 10 kOe showed that the magnetic properties were enhanced by the aligning magnetic field and it led to an enhancement of the magnetic heat generation under a magnetic induction furnace operating at 500 Oe and 400 kHz for 2 min. Data showed that the maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 31.5 W/g and 45°C, respectively, for the aligned sample of maximum zinc-ferrite crystalline content. The glass ceramics were immersed in simulated body fluid for 3 weeks. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared and atomic absorption spectroscopy results indicated the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to living tissues in physiological environment.

  19. Effect of B2O3 on iron phosphate glass-ceramic wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of doping iron phosphate glass-ceramic wasteforms containing high level waste (HLW) with different B2O3 contents on their structures and properties were investigated. The chemical durability of glass-ceramic wasteforms was measured by dissolution rate (DR) method. The structure of the glass-ceramic wasteforms was analyzed by Fourier turning infrared (FTIR) and X-radiation diffraction (XRD). The results show that glass-ceramic wasteforms have the main crystalline phase of monazite. There are great effects of wasteforms on the chemical durability. The 28 d leaching rate of glass-ceramic wasteforms is 7.81 x 10-9 g/(cm2·min) when 10% (mole percent) Fe2O3 is replaced by B2O3 in wasteforms. Samples exist a large number of [PO4]3-, a small amount of [O2O7]4- and no [PO3]-. Boron in wasteforms samples is present as tetrahedral [BO4] units. (authors)

  20. Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Uranium and Plutonium Residues Wastes - 13164

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program of work has been undertaken to treat plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield. These have arisen from past fuel development work and are highly variable in both physical and chemical composition. The principal radiological elements present are U and Pu, with small amounts of Th. The waste packages contain Pu in amounts that are too low to be economically recycled as fuel and too high to be disposed of as lower level Pu contaminated material. NNL and ANSTO have developed full-ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms in which hot-isostatic pressing is used as the consolidation step to safely immobilize the waste into a form suitable for long-term disposition. We discuss development work on the glass-ceramic developed for impure waste streams, in particular the effect of variations in the waste feed chemistry glass-ceramic. The waste chemistry was categorized into actinides, impurity cations, glass formers and anions. Variations of the relative amounts of these on the properties and chemistry of the waste form were investigated and the waste form was found to be largely unaffected by these changes. This work mainly discusses the initial trials with Th and U. Later trials with larger variations and work with Pu-doped samples further confirmed the flexibility of the glass-ceramic. (authors)

  1. Magnetic glass ceramics for sustained 5-fluorouracil delivery: Characterization and evaluation of drug release kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, magnetic glass ceramics in the system Fe2O3 ∙ TiO2 ∙ P2O5 ∙ SiO2 ∙ MO (M = Mg, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn or Ce) are prepared. The effect of adding different cations on the thermal behavior, developed phases, microstructure and magnetic properties is studied using differental thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), FT-infrared transmission (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) respectively. The magnetic glass ceramics are tested as delivery systems for 5-fluorouracil. Modeling and analysis of release kinetics are addressed. The application of Higuchi square root of time model and the first order release model indicated that, 5-FU is released by diffusion controlled mechanisms, and that its released rate depends greatly on the concentration of loaded drug during the loading stage. The obtained results suggested that, the prepared magnetic glass ceramics can be used for cancer treatment by hyperthermia and/or by localized delivery of therapeutic doses of 5-fluorouracil. - Highlights: • Preparation of magnetic glass ceramics in the system Fe2O3 ∙ TiO2 ∙ P2O5 ∙ SiO2 ∙ MO • The magnetic glass ceramics were tested as delivery systems for 5-fluorouracil. • Drug release profiles follow Higuchi square root of time and first order model

  2. Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Uranium and Plutonium Residues Wastes - 13164

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Martin W.A.; Moricca, Sam A.; Zhang, Yingjie; Day, R. Arthur; Begg, Bruce D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Scales, Charlie R.; Maddrell, Ewan R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, UK, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Hobbs, Jeff [Sellafield Limited, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, UK, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A program of work has been undertaken to treat plutonium-residues wastes at Sellafield. These have arisen from past fuel development work and are highly variable in both physical and chemical composition. The principal radiological elements present are U and Pu, with small amounts of Th. The waste packages contain Pu in amounts that are too low to be economically recycled as fuel and too high to be disposed of as lower level Pu contaminated material. NNL and ANSTO have developed full-ceramic and glass-ceramic waste forms in which hot-isostatic pressing is used as the consolidation step to safely immobilize the waste into a form suitable for long-term disposition. We discuss development work on the glass-ceramic developed for impure waste streams, in particular the effect of variations in the waste feed chemistry glass-ceramic. The waste chemistry was categorized into actinides, impurity cations, glass formers and anions. Variations of the relative amounts of these on the properties and chemistry of the waste form were investigated and the waste form was found to be largely unaffected by these changes. This work mainly discusses the initial trials with Th and U. Later trials with larger variations and work with Pu-doped samples further confirmed the flexibility of the glass-ceramic. (authors)

  3. Novel cordierite nanopowders of new crystallization aspects and its cordierite-based glass ceramics of improved mechanical and electrical properties for optimal use in multidisciplinary scopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline α-cordierite Mg2Al4Si5O18 powders have been synthesized via a novel and facile co-precipitation method using MgCl2.6H2O, NaAlO2, Na2SiO3.5H2O as starting materials. XRD, SEM, HR-TEM and EDS techniques were employed to investigate the phase structure and crystal morphology of the synthesized powders at various annealing temperatures. The kinetics of cordierite crystallization was studied under non-isothermal conditions using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The apparent activation energy (Ea) of μ-cordierite crystallization, calculated by modified Kissinger model was equal 286.1 K J mol−1 and comparable with the literature. The dielectric measurements revealed that the cordierite ceramic samples sintered at 1300 and 1350 °C could be successfully applied for electronic packaging under the microwave and radiowave frequency regions, respectively. - Highlights: • Novel α-cordierite nanoparticles (13.3–46.7 nm) prepared by co-precipitation route. • The mechanism of μ-cordierite crystallization obeys the surface chemical kinetics. • Phase transformation of μ-to α-cordierite greatly affects densification properties. • The cordierite ceramics show good dielectric performance under GHz or MHz ranges

  4. Novel cordierite nanopowders of new crystallization aspects and its cordierite-based glass ceramics of improved mechanical and electrical properties for optimal use in multidisciplinary scopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanad, M.M.S., E-mail: mustafa_sanad2002@yahoo.com [Central Metallurgical R & D Institute, P.O. Box 87, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rashad, M.M.; Abdel-Aal, E.A. [Central Metallurgical R & D Institute, P.O. Box 87, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Powers, K. [Particle Engineering Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Nanocrystalline α-cordierite Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 4}Si{sub 5}O{sub 18} powders have been synthesized via a novel and facile co-precipitation method using MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O, NaAlO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}.5H{sub 2}O as starting materials. XRD, SEM, HR-TEM and EDS techniques were employed to investigate the phase structure and crystal morphology of the synthesized powders at various annealing temperatures. The kinetics of cordierite crystallization was studied under non-isothermal conditions using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The apparent activation energy (E{sub a}) of μ-cordierite crystallization, calculated by modified Kissinger model was equal 286.1 K J mol{sup −1} and comparable with the literature. The dielectric measurements revealed that the cordierite ceramic samples sintered at 1300 and 1350 °C could be successfully applied for electronic packaging under the microwave and radiowave frequency regions, respectively. - Highlights: • Novel α-cordierite nanoparticles (13.3–46.7 nm) prepared by co-precipitation route. • The mechanism of μ-cordierite crystallization obeys the surface chemical kinetics. • Phase transformation of μ-to α-cordierite greatly affects densification properties. • The cordierite ceramics show good dielectric performance under GHz or MHz ranges.

  5. Development of High Strength Fly Ash Glass-ceramics by Concrete Sludge Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kiyohiko; Yoshikawa, Akira; Hiratsuka, Akira; Tsujino, Ryoji; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Iguchi, Manabu

    A large amount of fly ash is exhausted from the thermal powder plant and it is a poisonous substance including the heavy metals and dioxin. The glass solidification is an effective method as one of the waste solidification technologies. Further, producing new materials by mixing together more than two kinds of raw materials is a more useful method. However, a number of trials are required in this method. We selected glass-ceramics with the crystal structure of an Anorthite (CaO·Al2O3·2SiO2), fly ash as inorganic wastes and concrete sludge for construction materials. It is necessary to clarify the optimum production method. Batches were prepared by mixing these raw materials with various weight ratios. Glass samples were produced by melting the batches at 1450°C and quenching. They were reheated in the region of 950-1100°C to make into glass-ceramic. The properties of obtained glass-ceramics were examined by XRD analysis, SEM observation, and some material tests for the strength, hardness, toughness, and so on. The XRD analysis and SEM observation showed that the crystallized phase of the produced glass-ceramics were identified as an Anorthite. The material tests showed that the Vickers hardness was very high, while the chemical resistance was relatively low.

  6. Glass ceramics containment matrix for insoluble residues coming from spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel reprocessing by hydrometallurgical process generates insoluble residues waste streams called fines solution. Considering their radioactivity, fines solution could be considered as Intermediate Level Waste. This waste stream is usually mixed with fission products stream before vitrification. Thus fines are incorporated in glass matrix designed for High Level Waste. The withdrawal of fines from high level glass could decrease the volume of high level waste after conditioning. It could also decrease the reaction time between high level waste and additives to obtain a homogeneous melt and then increase the vitrification process capacity. Separated conditioning of fines in glass matrices has been tested. The fines content targeted value is 16 wt%. To achieve this objective, two types of glass ceramic formulations have been tested. 700 g of the two selected glass ceramics have been prepared using simulated fines. Additives used were ground glass. Melting is achieved at 1100 °C. According to the type of glass ceramic, reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed during melting. Due to their composition and the melting redox conditions, different phases have been observed. These crystalline phases are typically RuO2, metallic Ru, metallic Pd, MoO2 and CaMoO4. In view of melting these matrices in an in can process the corrosiveness of one of the most oxidizing borosilicate glass ceramic formulation has been tested. This one has been remelted at 1100 °C in inconel 601 pot for 3 days. The oxygen fugacity measurement performed in the remelted glass leads to an oxidizing value, indicating that no significant reaction occurred between the inconel pot and the glass melt had occurred

  7. Glass ceramics containment matrix for insoluble residues coming from spent fuel reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet, O.; Boën, R.

    2014-04-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing by hydrometallurgical process generates insoluble residues waste streams called fines solution. Considering their radioactivity, fines solution could be considered as Intermediate Level Waste. This waste stream is usually mixed with fission products stream before vitrification. Thus fines are incorporated in glass matrix designed for High Level Waste. The withdrawal of fines from high level glass could decrease the volume of high level waste after conditioning. It could also decrease the reaction time between high level waste and additives to obtain a homogeneous melt and then increase the vitrification process capacity. Separated conditioning of fines in glass matrices has been tested. The fines content targeted value is 16 wt%. To achieve this objective, two types of glass ceramic formulations have been tested. 700 g of the two selected glass ceramics have been prepared using simulated fines. Additives used were ground glass. Melting is achieved at 1100 °C. According to the type of glass ceramic, reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed during melting. Due to their composition and the melting redox conditions, different phases have been observed. These crystalline phases are typically RuO2, metallic Ru, metallic Pd, MoO2 and CaMoO4. In view of melting these matrices in an in can process the corrosiveness of one of the most oxidizing borosilicate glass ceramic formulation has been tested. This one has been remelted at 1100 °C in inconel 601 pot for 3 days. The oxygen fugacity measurement performed in the remelted glass leads to an oxidizing value, indicating that no significant reaction occurred between the inconel pot and the glass melt had occurred.

  8. Comparison of the corrosion behaviors of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and reference HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form is being developed for the long-term immobilization of salt wastes that are generated during spent nuclear fuel conditioning activities. A durable waste form is prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. A mechanistic description of the corrosion processes is being developed to support qualification of the CWF for disposal. The initial set of characterization tests included two standard tests that have been used extensively to study the corrosion behavior of high level waste (HLW) glasses: the Material Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) Test and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Direct comparison of the results of tests with the reference CWF and HLW glasses indicate that the corrosion behaviors of the CWF and HLW glasses are very similar

  9. Glass-ceramic joining and coating of SiC/SiC for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is the joining and the coating of SiC/SiC composites by a simple, pressureless, low cost technique. A calcia-alumina glass-ceramic was chosen as joining and coating material, because its thermal and thermomechanical properties can be tailored by changing the composition, it does not contain boron oxide (incompatible with fusion applications) and it has high characteristic temperatures (softening point at about 1400 C). Furthermore, the absence of silica makes this glass-ceramic compatible with ceramic breeder materials (i.e. lithium-silicates, -alluminates or -zirconates). Coatings and joints were successfully obtained with Hi-Nicalon fiber-reinforced CVI silicon carbide matrix composite. Mechanical shear strength tests were performed on joined samples and the compatibility with a ceramic breeder material was examined. (orig.)

  10. Glass and glass–ceramic coatings, versatile materials for industrial and engineering applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Majumdar; Sunirmal Jana

    2001-02-01

    Among various coating systems for industrial and engineering applications, glass and glass–ceramic coatings have advantages of chemical inertness, high temperature stability and superior mechanical properties such as abrasion, impact etc as compared to other coating materials applied by thermal spraying in its different forms viz. PVD, CVD, plasma, etc. Besides imparting required functional properties such as heat, abrasion and corrosion resistance to suit particular end use requirements, the glass and glass–ceramic coatings in general also provide good adherence, defect free surface and refractoriness. Systematic studies covering the basic science of glass and glass–ceramic coatings, the functional properties required for a particular end-use along with the various fields of application have been reviewed in this paper.

  11. Cold crucible induction melter studies for making glass ceramic waste forms: A feasibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramics are being developed to immobilize fission products, separated from used nuclear fuel by aqueous reprocessing, into a stable waste form suitable for disposal in a geological repository. This work documents the glass ceramic formulation at bench scale and for a scaled melter test performed in a pilot-scale (approximately 1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on a small set of compositions to select a formulation for melter testing. Property measurements also identified a temperature range for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form. Bench scale and melter run results successfully demonstrate the processability of the glass ceramic using the CCIM melter technology

  12. Cold crucible induction melter studies for making glass ceramic waste forms: A feasibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramics are being developed to immobilize fission products, separated from used nuclear fuel by aqueous reprocessing, into a stable waste form suitable for disposal in a geological repository. This work documents the glass ceramic formulation at bench scale and for a scaled melter test performed in a pilot-scale (∼1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on a small set of compositions to select a formulation for melter testing. Property measurements also identified a temperature range for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form. Bench scale and melter run results successfully demonstrate the processability of the glass ceramic using the CCIM melter technology

  13. Leaching of uranium from glass and ceramic foodware and decorative items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Edward R.; Councell, Terry B.

    1992-01-01

    Beginning as early as the first century A. D. and continuing until at least the 1970s, uranium was used as a coloring agent in glass and in ceramic glazes. The leaching of uranium from such items is of interest as some were designed for food storage or serving. Thirty-three glass items and two ceramic items were leached sequentially with deionized water, dilute acetic acid, and 1 M nitric acid to assess realistic and worst-case scenario leaching by foods and beverages. The maximum quantity of uranium leached from the uranium-bearing glasses was about 30 µg L-1, while that from the ceramic-glazed items was about 300,000 µg L-1.

  14. Ionic conductivity in glass and glass-ceramics of the Na/sub 3/YSi/sub 4/O/sub 12/ type materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, E.; Kim, C.H.

    1985-11-01

    The ionic conductivities in glass and glass-ceramics were studied for Na /SUB 3.2/ M /SUB 0.7/ Si /SUB 2.9/ P /SUB 0.1/ O /SUB 8.7/ (M = Er, Y, Ho, Dy, Gd, Eu, and Sm) compounds. The results showed comparable conductivity values, in the range of 10/sup -4/ (..mu..-cm)/sup -1/ at 280/sup 0/C, with the glasses being somewhat better conductors. Compounds of the type Na/sub 5/MSi/sub 4/O/sub 12/ (M = Fe, In, Er, Y, Gd, and Sm), which yielded highly conductive phases in the crystalline ceramic form, were also studied in glassy and glass-ceramic states. In compositions of the latter type, the glasses showed lower conductivity than that in the glass-ceramic or the conventional ceramic phase. However, glass-ceramic samples with M = Er, Y showed lower activation energies (4.0-4.4 kcal/mol) compared with those in the conventional crystalline phase prepared by Shannon et al. (1) The greater conductivity of the glass-ceramic state in the Na/sub 5/MSi/sub 4/O/sub 12/ phases, compared to the glassy state, is understood in terms of the favorable structure for ionic transport in the crystalline state.

  15. Radioactive waste immobilization using ion-exchange materials which form glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a process for the production of a glass-ceramic composite product in which the crystalline phase is thermodynamically stable and compatible with the host rock. The process comprises: (a) passing liquid radioactive waste materials through an inorganic ion exchange medium; (b) heating the ion exchange materials with sufficient glass-forming materials to form a melt; (c) cooling the melt to form a glass; and (d) heat treating the glass to crystallize sphene crystallites in a protective glassy matrix that contains the radioactive materials. There is also provided a cartridge containing the ion exchange medium

  16. Tempered glass and thermal shock of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, L. Roy

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that shows students the different strengths and fracture toughnesses between tempered and untempered glass. This paper also describes how glass is tempered and the materials science aspects of the process.

  17. Dissolution of sphene and sphene glass-ceramics in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sphene (CaTiSiO/sub 5/) and sphene-based glass-ceramics were leached in different aqueous media over a wide range of pH values at 900C. Proton-Ca/sup 2+/ exchange and silica dissolution were the dominant leaching mechanisms for sphene in neutral and HCI solutions. In citric acid solutions, sphene dissolution was nearly congruent. The dissolution rate based on calcium extraction varied approximately as [H/sup +/]/sup 0.2/ in the pH range of 1 to 8.5. Anatase surface-layer formation in acid and neutral media did not greatly inhibit leaching. Alkaline (NaOH) or chloride solutions did not significantly enhance sphene dissolution relative to deionized water

  18. Wide colour gamut generated in triply lanthanide doped sol-gel nano-glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of a wide colour gamut, based on up-conversion of cheap near-infrared photons into the visible range, is of great importance for general lighting appliances and integrated optical devices. Here, we report for the first time on up-conversion luminescence under infrared excitation at 980 nm in Yb3+-Er3+-Tm3+ triply doped sol-gel derived SiO2-LaF3 based nano-glass-ceramics (SOL-YET), containing LaF3 nanocrystals with a size about 13 nm. Efficient simultaneous up-conversion emission of the three primary colours (blue, green and red) gives rise to a balanced white overall emission. The ratio between up-conversion emission bands can be varied by changing pump power intensity resulting in colour tuneable up-conversion phosphor.

  19. Preparation and properties of Li2O-BaO-Al2O3 -SiO2 glass-ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Khater

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization of some glasses, based on celsian-spodumene glass-ceramics, was investigated by different techniques including differential thermal analysis, optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, indentation, microhardness, bending strengths, water absorption and density measurement. The batches were melted and then cast into glasses, which were subjected to heat treatment to induce controlled crystallization. The resulting crystalline materials were mainly composed of β-eucryptite solid solution, β-spodumene solid solution, hexacelsian and monoclinic celsian, exhibiting fine grains and uniform texture. It has been found that an increasing content of celsian phase in the glasses results in increased bulk crystallization. The obtained glass-ceramic materials are characterized by high values of hardness ranging between 953 and 1013 kg/mm2, zero water absorption and bending strengths values ranging between 88 and 126 MPa, which makes them suitable for many applications under aggressive mechanical conditions.

  20. Optical Property Requirements for Glasses, Ceramics and Plastics in Spacecraft Window Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Lynda

    2011-01-01

    This is a preliminary draft of a standard published by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) that is intended to provide uniform window optical design requirements in support of the development of human-rated spaceflight hardware. The material covered in this standard is based on data from extensive testing by the Advanced Sensing and Optical Measurement Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, and compiled into requirements format by the NASA JSC Structural Engineering Division. At the time of this initial document release, a broader technical community has not reviewed this standard. The technical content of this standard is primarily based on the Constellation Program Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Window Optical Properties Requirements, CxP 72407, Baseline. Unlike other optical requirements documents available for human rated spacecraft, this document includes requirements that ensure functionality for windows that contain glass/ceramic and/or plastic window substrate materials. These requirements were derived by measuring the optical properties of fused silica and aluminosilicate glass window assemblies and ensuring that the performance of any window assembly that includes a plastic pane or panes will meet the performance level of the all-glass assemblies. The resulting requirements are based upon the performance and parameter metrology testing of a variety of materials, including glass, transparent ceramics, acrylics, and polycarbonates. In general, these requirements are minimum specifications for each optical parameter in order to achieve the function specified for each functional category, A through D. Because acrylic materials perform at a higher level than polycarbonates in the optics regime, and CxP/Orion is planning to use acrylic in the Orion spacecraft, these requirements are based heavily on metrology from that material. As a result, two of the current Category D requirements for plastics are cited in

  1. Crystallisation of a zirconium-based glaze for ceramic tiles coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Acosta, Anselmo

    2003-01-01

    The effect of iron oxide content on the crystallisation of a zirconium-based glass-ceramic glaze was investigated using a glass-ceramic “white of zirconium” frit and a granite waste glass. Measurements by X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX microanalysis showed that Fe2O3 gives rise to the crystallisation of an iron-zinc ferrite, which is acting as nucleating agent of feather-like crystals of pyroxene while granite frit enhances the partial dissolu...

  2. Glass and Glass-Ceramic Materials from Simulated Composition of Lunar and Martian Soils: Selected Properties and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, C. S.; Sen, S.; Reis, S. T.; Kim, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    In-situ resource processing and utilization on planetary bodies is an important and integral part of NASA's space exploration program. Within this scope and context, our general effort is primarily aimed at developing glass and glass-ceramic type materials using lunar and martian soils, and exploring various applications of these materials for planetary surface operations. Our preliminary work to date have demonstrated that glasses can be successfully prepared from melts of the simulated composition of both lunar and martian soils, and the melts have a viscosity-temperature window appropriate for drawing continuous glass fibers. The glasses are shown to have the potential for immobilizing certain types of nuclear wastes without deteriorating their chemical durability and thermal stability. This has a direct impact on successfully and economically disposing nuclear waste generated from a nuclear power plant on a planetary surface. In addition, these materials display characteristics that can be manipulated using appropriate processing protocols to develop glassy or glass-ceramic magnets. Also discussed in this presentation are other potential applications along with a few selected thermal, chemical, and structural properties as evaluated up to this time for these materials.

  3. Synthesis and optical properties of transparent glass ceramics with Eu,Yb:PbF2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiko, P. A.; Rachkovskaya, G. E.; Zakharevich, G. B.; Yumashev, K. V.

    2015-02-01

    Transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing Eu,Yb:PbF2 nanocrystals (average diameter 6.5 nm) is synthesized by secondary heat treatment of the initial SiO2-PbO-PbF2-CdF2 glass doped with YbF3 (1 mol %) and Eu2O3 (1 mol %); the optical absorption and the upconversion luminescence of this ceramics are studied. Intense orange luminescence (the CIE color coordinates are x = 0.602, y = 0.398) is obtained under excitation by a laser diode at a wavelength of 960 nm.

  4. Optical absorption and luminescence study of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarevich, A. M.; Denisov, I. A.; Yumashev, K. V.; Dymshits, O. S.; Zhilin, A. A.

    2002-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate transparent glass ceramics that were prepared under different conditions have been studied. It has been shown that absorption and luminescence spectra and absorption bleaching of these glass ceramics are defined mainly by tetrahedrally coordinated Co 2+ ions located in magnesium aluminum spinel nanocrystals. The lifetimes of the 4 T 1 ( 4 F) and 4 T 2 ( 4 F) excited states of the tetrahedral Co 2+ ions were found to be in the ranges 2540 and 120450 ns, respectively, depending on the Co concentration. 2002 Optical Society of America

  5. Intense Green Upconversion Luminescence in Er3+:Yb3+ Codoped Fluorophosphate Glass Ceramic Containing SrTe5O11 Nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Yan; XU Shi-Qing; HU Li-Li

    2007-01-01

    Er3+ :Yb3+ codoped tellurite-fluorophosphate (TFP) glass ceramic exhibits much stronger upconversion luminescence. The intensity of the 540nm green light and 651 nm red light of the TFP glass ceramic is 120 times and 44 times stronger than that of the fluorophospahte (FP) glass, respectively. XRD analysis shows that the nanocrystal in TFP glass ceramic is SrTesO11. TFP glass ceramic alsc displays much higher upconversion fluorescence lifetime and crystallization stability. The narrow and strong peak at 540 nm is very ideal for practical upconversion luminescence realization. This work is a new trial for exploring non-PbF2 involved nanocrystal upconversion glass ceramics.

  6. Fabrication of porous ceramic via recycling of glass with paper fiber as sacrificial fugitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarulzaman, N. A.; Hamidon, A.; Nor, M. A. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Recycled glass powder was added with ball clay and feldspar using ratio 90:5:5. The blend were mixed into different amount of paper fiber and cast into porous ceramic. Samples prepared with different compositions (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt % of paper fiber) were heat treated at constant temperature (750 °C) for an hour. Samples with high percentage of paper fiber gave the largest pore size in the ceramic body, meanwhile lower percentage of paper fiber produced ceramic body with smaller pore size.

  7. The research of ceramic materials for applications in the glass industry including microwave heating techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, K.; Kasprzyk, K.; Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz, B.; Ruziewicz, T.

    2016-02-01

    The melting of a glass is a very energy-intensive process. Selection of energy sources, the heating technique and the method of heating recovery are a fundamental issue from the furnace design point of view of and economic effectiveness of the process. In these processes the problem constitutes the lack of the appropriate ceramic materials that would meet the requirements. In this work the standard ceramic materials were examined and verified. The possibilities of application of microwave techniques were evaluated. In addition the requirements regarding the parameters of new ceramic materials applied for microwave technologies were determined.

  8. Bioactivity of CaO-MgO-SiO2 glass ceramics synthesized using transferred arc plasma (TAP) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass ceramic with a nominal composition of 35.6% CaO, 12.8% MgO and 51.6% SiO2 was prepared by transferred arc plasma processing. The in vitro bioactivity of the plasma synthesized CaO-MgO-SiO2 glass ceramic was examined for its biomedical applicability which was evaluated by immersion in simulated body fluid at 36.5 deg. C for several days. The apatite particles were found to be formed on the surface of the glass ceramic and grew with the passage of soaking time. The simulated body fluid test results showed the formation of carbonated hydroxyapatite like layer on the surface of the glass ceramic. The cytocompatibility was evaluated through human fibroblast proliferation. The fibroblasts adhere, spread, and proliferate on the CaO-MgO-SiO2 glass ceramic, and the cell proliferation was more obvious.

  9. Dielectric relaxation investigations in barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics: Thermally stimulated depolarization current technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different dielectric relaxation processes in barium strontium titanate glass-ceramics have been investigated using the thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) technique. The TSDC results obtained from the glass-ceramics polarized under various polarization conditions show the presence of two peaks designated as A and B in ascending order of temperature, respectively. The peak A is determined to be of dipole origin and assumed to be associated with a defect complex. In addition, the peak B is due to space-charge polarization arising from the interface between the crystalline phases and the glass matrix. It is supposed to be associated with the relaxation of oxygen vacancies. The TSDC characteristics demonstrate that the degree of crystallinity in glass-ceramics is a predominant factor in deciding the features of dielectric relaxation mechanisms. TSDC plots for the BST glass-ceramic samples sintered at various temperatures with the same polarization conditions. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Structural characteristics and spectral properties of novel transparent lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics containing (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics based on nanosized crystals of β-quartz solid solutions and Er,Yb orthoniobates are prepared for the first time, to our knowledge. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, parent Er,Yb-codoped glass contains (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals with the defected fluorite structure while the single Yb-doped glass is X-ray amorphous. The Er,Yb orthoniobates with the tetragonal structure crystallize under heat-treatments at 800–900 °C; and at 1000 °C the transformation to a monoclinic form begins. β-quartz solid solutions are the main crystalline phase of glass-ceramics prepared in the temperature range of 800–1000 °C. These structural transformations are confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The structure evolution is illustrated by the TEM study of the Yb-doped glass and glass-ceramics. The spectral-luminescent properties of glass-ceramics are directly linked to their structure; an appearance of the monoclinic phase has a crucial effect on these properties. Glass-ceramics with tetragonal (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanophase are characterized by the high efficiency of Yb3+→Er3+ energy transfer (85%), strong absorption in the vicinity of 0.98 μm and shorter lifetime of 4I13/2 state (as compared with the parent glass), so they look promising for laser operation in the eye-safe region around 1.53 μm. - Highlights: • Transparent glass-ceramics based on β-quartz ss and (Er,Yb)NbO4 nanocrystals were prepared. • Fluorite-to-tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transition for (Er,Yb)NbO4 was observed. • The spectral-luminescent properties of materials are directly linked to their structure. • High efficiency of Yb3+→Er3+ energy transfer (85%). • Glass-ceramics with tetragonal (Er,Yb)NbO4 are promising for laser operation at 1.53 μm

  11. Luminescence study of mixed valence Eu-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Ruchika; Achanta, Venu Gopal; Goel, Ashutosh; Ferreira, José M. F.; Singh, Narinder Pal; Singh, Davinder Paul; Contini, Vittoria; Falconieri, Mauro; Sharma, Gopi

    2013-12-01

    Eu-doped nanocrystalline NaAlSiO4/NaY9Si6O26 glass-ceramics have been prepared by controlled crystallization of melt quenched bulk glasses. XRD, SEM and FTIR spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the crystallization process and the structural properties of the precursor glass and corresponding glass-ceramics. The formation of divalent europium (Eu2+) from Eu3+ ions during high temperature synthesis under ambient atmosphere was analyzed by photoluminescence spectroscopy and is discussed using the optical basicity model. The observed luminescence properties of Eu: NaY9Si6O26 are compared with that of Eu: β-PbF2 nanocrystals and their marked differences are discussed.

  12. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  13. Microstructural characterization of halite inclusions in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glass-bonded ceramic waste form is being developed to immobilize high-level chloride waste salts generated during the conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal. The waste salt is loaded into zeolite cavities, mixed with a borosilicate glass, and consolidated at 800--900 C by hot isostatic pressing. During this process, small amounts of halite are generated, whereas the zeolite converts to the mineral sodalite, which retains most of the waste salt. In this work, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the halite inclusions in the final waste form. The halite inclusions were detected within micron- to submicron-sized pores that form within the glass phase in the vicinity of the sodalite/glass interface. The chemical nature and distribution of the halite inclusions were determined. The particular microstructure of the halite inclusions has been related to the corrosion of the ceramic waste form

  14. Preparation and properties of {beta}-wollastonite glass-ceramic from fire resistant stone; Kokaseki wo genryo to shita {beta} wollastonite kesshoka glass no sakusei to sono seishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S. [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    In order to develop high-quality inexpensive glass-ceramics for building material, {beta}-wollastonite glass-ceramics was prepared by homogeneous nucleation using fire resistant stone from Niijima island of Izu islands as main material. {Beta}-wollastonite glass-ceramics with excellent strength and acid resistance was prepared successfully using fire resistant stone of nearly 60wt%. Iron sulfide was useful as crystalline nucleus, and iron in fire resistant stone was useful for nucleation, while addition of small amounts of anhydrous mirabilite and graphite was effective. Iron sulfide caused black glass-ceramics, while addition of a small amount of zinc oxide caused non-colored glass-ceramics during heat treatment. The high-temperature viscosity and crystallization of the glass-ceramics were strongly affected by amount of lime stone added as sub-material. The high strength was obtained in a crystallinity range of 30-50%, while the strength decreased remarkably due to voids over 50%. The prototype compact direct electro-melting furnace was able to melt efficiently the glass-ceramics. 8 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Application of some radiometric methods for identification of antique glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two radiometric methods: low resolution X-ray fluorescence and β-ray backscattering were used for determination of PbO content in antique glasses and ceramics. It was found that obtained accuracy of about ±5% PbO is sufficient for semi-quantitative analysis and selection of glass museum pieces ''in situ'', without necessity of caring out measurements in laboratories. (author)

  16. Photoluminescence of Eu3+, Tb3+ and Tm3+-doped transparent SiO2-Al2O3-LiF-GdF3 glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present the photoluminescence properties of Eu3+, Tb3+ and Tm3+-doped oxyfluoride alumino-silicate glasses and glass ceramics. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) profiles of these glasses have been carried out, to confirm their structure and thermal stability. Compared to Eu3+, Tb3+ and Tm3+-doped glasses, their respective glass ceramics have shown stronger emissions due to the presence of LiGdF4 crystalline phase. For Eu3+-doped glass and glass ceramics, five emission bands centered at 578 nm (5D0 → 7F0), 592 nm (5D0 → 7F1), 614 nm (5D0 → 7F2), 652 nm (5D0 → 7F3) and 698 nm (5D0 → 7F4) have been observed with 394 nm (5D0 → 7L6) excitation wavelength. Of them, 614 nm (5D0 → 7F2) has shown bright reddish-orange emission. With regard to the Tb3+-doped glass and glass ceramic, four emission bands centered at 491 nm (5D4 → 7F6), 545 nm (5D4 → 7F5), 587 nm (5D4 → 7F4) and 622 nm (5D4 → 7F3) have been observed with an excitation at 377 nm (3F6 → 5G6) wavelength. Of them, 545 nm (5D4 → 7F5) has shown bright green emission. Emission bands of 1G4 → 3F4 (650 nm) and 3F3 → 3H6 (708 nm) transitions for the Tm3+:glass and glass ceramic, with an excitation at 3H6 → 1G4 (469 nm) have been observed. The stimulated emission cross-sections of all the emission bands of Eu3+, Tb3+ and Tm3+:glasses and glass ceramics have been computed based on their measured full-width at half maximum (FWHM, Δλ) and lifetimes (τm).

  17. Continuing the Validation of CCIM Processability for Glass Ceramic HLLW Forms: Plan for Test AFY14CCIM-GC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vince Maio

    2014-04-01

    This test plan covers test AFY14CCIM-GC1which is the first of two scheduled FY-2014 test runs involving glass ceramic waste forms in the Idaho National Laboratory’s Cold Crucible Induction Melter Pilot Plant. The test plan is based on the successes and challenges of previous tests performed in FY-2012 and FY-2013. The purpose of this test is to continue to collect data for validating the glass ceramic High Level Liquid Waste form processability advantages using Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology. The major objective of AFYCCIM-GC1 is to complete additional proposed crucible pouring and post tapping controlled cooling experiments not completed during previous tests due to crucible drain failure. This is necessary to qualify that no heat treatments in standard waste disposal canisters are necessary for the operational scale production of glass ceramic waste forms. Other objectives include the production and post-test analysis of surrogate waste forms made from separate pours into the same graphite mold canister, testing the robustness of an upgraded crucible bottom drain and drain heater assembly, testing the effectiveness of inductive melt initiation using a resistive starter ring with a square wave configuration, and observing the tapped molten flow behavior in pans with areas identical to standard High Level Waste disposal canisters. Testing conditions, the surrogate waste composition, key testing steps, testing parameters, and sampling and analysis requirements are defined.

  18. Nucleation and crystallization of Ca doped basaltic glass for the production of a glass-ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrago, Mariona; Royo, Irene; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martínez, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants is a waste with a composition roughly similar to that of a basalt. It may contain potentially toxic elements that can be inertized by vitrification. Using a glass-ceramic process, these elements will be emplaced in newly formed mineral phases. Glass-ceramic production requires an accurate knowledge of the temperatures of nucleation (TN) and crystal growth of the corresponding minerals. This work arises from the study of the addition of ions to a basaltic matrix in order to establish a model of vitrification of sewage sludge. In this case a glass-ceramic is obtained from a glass made with a basalt that has been doped with 16% CaO. Two glasses which underwent different cooling processes have been produced and compared. The first was annealed at 650oC (AG) and the second was quenched (QG). The chemical composition of the glasses is SiO2 36.11 wt%, Al2O312.19 wt%, CaO 24.44 wt%, FeO 10.06 wt%, MgO 9.19 wt%, Na2O 2.28 wt%, TiO2 2.02 wt%, K2O 1.12 wt%, P2O5 0.46 wt%. Glass transition temperature obtained by dilatometry varies from 640 oC (AG) to 700 oC (QG). The temperatures of nucleation and crystal growth of the glass have been determined by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). The phases formed after these treatments were identified by X-Ray Diffraction. The temperatures of exothermic and endothermic peaks measured in the quenched glass are, in average, 10 oC higher than those found for the annealed glass. The exothermic peaks provide crystallization temperatures for different phases: a first event at 857 oC corresponds to the growth of magnetite, pyroxene and nepheline, whereas a second event at 1030 oC is due to the crystallization of melilite from the reaction between previous minerals and a remaining amorphous phase. The complete melting of this system occurs at 1201 oC. This glass has been nucleated inside the DTA furnace (500-850° C/3 hours) and then heated up to 1300 oC using the fraction between 400-500μm. TN

  19. Preliminary study in development of glass-ceramic based on SiO{sub 2}-LiO{sub 2} system, starting of different SiO{sub 2} starting powders; Um estudo preliminar do desenvolvimento de materiais vitroceramicos do sistema SiO{sub 2}-LiO{sub 2} obtidos a partir de diferentes fontes de silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daguano, J.K.M.F.; Santos, F.A.; Santos, C.; Marton, L.F.M.; Conte, R.A.; Rodrigues Junior, D. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de Lorena. Dept. de Materiais; Melo, F.C.L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (AMR/CTA/IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco. Div. de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    In this work, lithium disilicate glass-ceramics were developed starting of the rice ash- SiO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} powders. The results were compared with glass ceramics based on the lithium disilicate obtained by commercial SiO{sub 2} powders. Glass were melted at 1580 deg C, and annealed at 850 deg C. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for characterization of the materials, and hardness and fracture toughness were evaluated using Vickers indentation method. Glasses with amorphous structure were obtained in both materials. After annealing, 'rice-ash' samples presented Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and residual SiO{sub 2} as crystalline phases. On the other side, commercial SiO{sub 2}- Samples presented only Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5} as crystalline phases and the better results of hardness and fracture toughness. (author)

  20. Gadolinium borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite: a glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gd-rich crystalline phase precipitated in a sodium gadolinium alumino-borosilicate glass during synthesis. The glass has a chemical composition of 45.4-31.1 wt% Gd2O3, 28.8-34.0 wt% SiO2,10.8-14.0 wt% Na2O, 4.3-5.9 wt% Al2O3, and 10.8-14.9 wt% B2O3. Backscattered electron images revealed that the crystals are hexagonal, elongated, acicular, prismatic, skeletal or dendritic, tens of μm in size, some reaching 200 μm in length. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed that the crystals are chemically homogeneous and have a formula of NaGd9(SiO4)6O2 with minor B substitution for Si. The X-ray diffraction pattern of this phase is similar to that of lithium gadolinium silicate apatite. Thus, this hexagonal phase is a rare earth silicate with the apatite structure. We suggest that this Gd-silicate apatite in a Gd-borosilicate glass is a potential glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinide disposition. Am, Cm and other actinides can easily occupy the Gd-sites. The potential advantages of this glass-ceramic waste form include: 1) both the glass and apatite can be used to immobilize actinides, 2) silicate apatite is thermodynamically more stable than the glass, 3) borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite is easily fabricated, and 4) the Gd is an effective neutron absorber.Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  1. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  2. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study.

  3. Bone-bonding behavior under load-bearing conditions of an alumina ceramic implant incorporating beads coated with glass-ceramic containing apatite and wollastonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z L; Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Chang, Y S; Senaha, Y; Takagi, H; Nakamura, T; Oka, M

    1995-09-01

    Alumina ceramic with a porous surface coated with glass-ceramic containing apatite and wollastonite (AW-GC) was implanted in a state of press-fit under load-bearing conditions in the femoral condylus of the mongrel dog and compared with a non-glass-ceramic-coated alumina ceramic. A trapezoid alumina ceramic implant (7 x 10 x 5 mm) with a lateral recess (0.9 mm deep) coated with alumina ceramic beads (mean diameter, 750 microns) in a single layer was prepared. The alumina ceramic beads were bonded to the alumina ceramic substratum using an identical alumina binder. The thickness of coating was 10-50 microns (mean, 30 microns). The surface of the beads and the substratum of the alumina implant were coated with AW-GC. A pull-out test and histologic examination were performed at 4, 8, and 24 weeks after implantation. The interfacial shear load was significantly increased from 8 to 24 weeks in both groups. The shear load of the glass-ceramic-coated implant was significantly greater than that of the noncoated implant at every stage. The interface shear load of the noncoated implant was 12.13 +/- 2.76 kg at 4 weeks, 13.92 +/- 4.18 kg at 8 weeks, and 24.17 +/- 5.17 kg at 24 weeks after implantation. The interface shear load of the glass-ceramic-coated implant was 17.96 +/- 2.81 kg at 4 weeks, 24.92 +/- 9.87 kg at 8 weeks, and 34.83 +/- 4.12 kg at 24 weeks after implantation. Histologic examination showed more ingrown bone tissue in the glass-ceramic-coated implants. It is suggested that AW-GC stimulated the bone ingrowth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567706

  4. Study of powellite-rich glass-ceramics for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MoO3 is poorly soluble in borosilicate glasses which can lead to the crystallization of undesired phases when its concentration or the charge load (minor actinides and fission products concentration) is too high. Crystallization control is needed to guarantee good immobilization properties. We studied powellite-rich glass-ceramics obtained from a simplified nuclear glass in the system SiO2 - B2O3 - Na2O - CaO - Al2O3 - MoO3 - RE2O3 (RE = Gd, Eu, Nd) by various heat treatments. Rare earth elements (REE) were added as minor actinides surrogates and as spectroscopic probes. The influence of MoO3 and RE2O3 content on powellite (CaMoO4) crystallization was investigated. Various glass-ceramics (similar residual glass + powellite) were obtained with large crystal size distributions. Phase separation due to molybdenum occurs during quenching when [MoO3] ≥ 2.5 mol%. We showed that increasing the rare earth content can suppress the phase separation due to molybdenum but it leads to spinodal decomposition of the residual glass. Furthermore, we studied the effects of parent glass complexifying and the insertion of Gd3+ ions into the powellite structure. In order to understand the influence of microstructure on evolutions under β-irradiation, we studied point defects creation and structural changes. We showed that the damage induced by electronic excitations in the glass-ceramics is driven by the damage in the residual glass. (author)

  5. Results of Mechanical Testing for Pyroceram(tm) Glass-Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical testing for Pyroceram (trademark) 9606 glass-ceramic fabricated by Corning was conducted to determine mechanical properties of the material including slow crack growth.Valid testing was not achieved in tension, compression, and shear testing due to inappropriate test specimen configurations provided and primarily due to the existence of fortified layer( in tension).

  6. Thermodynamics of non-bridging oxigen in silica bio-compatible glass-ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koga, N.; Strnad, Z.; Šesták, Jaroslav; Strnad, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2003), s. 927-937. ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4010101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : bio-compatible * bone-like apatite * glass-ceramics * mimetic material * thermodynamic s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  7. Structural study of some gadolinium glass ceramics obtained by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased interest in silicate systems containing different rare earth oxides has resulted from their important applications in various fields of technology including laser, optical fiber and optical waveguides in telecommunication applications, microelectronics and catalysis. Glass-ceramics of 0.95 SiO2-0.05 Na2O composition containing up to 15% molar Gd2O3 were obtained by the sol-gel method. We chose the sol-gel method because this offers the advantage of a good chemical homogeneity and a better control of physical and chemical properties in comparison with traditional methods used to obtain glasses and ceramics. The obtained samples were pressed at 200 kgf/cm2 as disks with a diameter of Φ=22 mm and a thickness of around 1 mm. Then, they were heat-treated at 250 deg C, 500 deg C and 1000 deg C for about 48 hours. The structural study was made using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and IR spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction patterns show that addition of Gd2O3 exerts an important influence on the crystallization process of the studied samples. The crystalline phase decreases with increasing the Gd2O3 concentration. SEM data support this assertion. IR spectra point out also that the increasing of the gadolinium oxide content and the thermal treatment temperature produce the strengthening of the glass ceramic network. Thus, the gadolinium ions play the role of network modifier of the glass ceramic structure. (authors)

  8. INTERFACES IN SiC FIBER-REINFORCED GLASS-CERAMIC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Mazerolles, L.; D. Michel; Ulmer, L.; Pastol, J.; Parlier, M.; Ritti, M.

    1990-01-01

    Interfaces between SiC Nicalon fibers and a lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramic matrix were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Minor additive elements in the matrix, like niobium, can modify the mechanical properties of the composite because of the formation of niobium carbide at the fiber-matrix interface.

  9. Glass ceramic obtained by tailings and tin mine waste reprocessing from Llallagua, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancibia, Jony Roger Hans; Villarino, Cecilia; Alfonso, Pura; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador; Parcerisa, David

    2014-05-01

    In Bolivia Sn mining activity produces large tailings of SiO2-rich residues. These tailings contain potentially toxic elements that can be removed into the surface water and produce a high environmental pollution. This study determines the thermal behaviour and the viability of the manufacture of glass-ceramics from glass. The glass has been obtained from raw materials representative of the Sn mining activities from Llallagua (Bolivia). Temperatures of maximum nucleation rate (Tn) and crystallization (Tcr) were calculated from the differential thermal analyses. The final mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction and textures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline phases are nefeline occurring with wollastonite or plagioclase. Tn for nepheline is between 680 ºC and 700 ºC, for wollastonite, 730 ºC and for plagioclase, 740 ºC. Tcr for nefeline is between 837 and 965 ºC; for wollastonite, 807 ºC and for plagioclase, 977 ºC. In order to establish the mechanical characteristics and efficiency of the vitrification process in the fixation of potentially toxic elements the resistance to leaching and micro-hardness were determined. The obtained contents of the elements leached from the glass ceramic are well below the limits established by the European legislation. So, these analyses confirm that potentially toxic elements remain fixed in the structure of mineral phases formed in the glass-ceramic process. Regarding the values of micro-hardness results show that they are above those of a commercial glass. The manufacture of glass-ceramics from mining waste reduces the volume of tailings produced for the mining industry and, in turn enhances the waste, transforming it into a product with industrial application. Acknowledgements: This work was partly financed by the project AECID: A3/042750/11, and the SGR 2009SGR-00444.

  10. Luminescence properties of Pr{sup 3+}-doped transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Mu, E-mail: mgu@mail.tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Gao Qingchun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Shiming, E-mail: smhuang2008@yahoo.com.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu Xiaolin; Liu Bo; Ni Chen [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, Department of Physics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Transparent oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by appropriate heat-treatment on the SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-BaF{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} precursor glass. The structure and luminescence properties of the precursor glass and glass-ceramics were investigated by DSC, XRD, TEM, optical transmission, photoluminescence, decay time and radioluminescence spectra. The XRD results indicate that the BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals can percitated in the precursor glass and the sharper emission peaks of Pr{sup 3+} in glass ceramic suggests that Pr{sup 3+} ions are incorporated into the BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals. The higher the heat-treatment temperature is, the more the Pr{sup 3+} ions are centered into BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals, which results in the optimal concentration of Pr{sup 3+} in glass ceramic changes on heat-treatment temperature. It is notable that the emission intensity of both photoluminescence and radioluminescence for 0.1 mol% Pr{sup 3+} in the glass ceramic (GC665) are stronger than those in the precursor glass. The mechanism of enhanced luminescence is also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Pr{sup 3+} ions have been incorporated into BaYF{sub 5} nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimal concentration of Pr{sup 3+} in glass ceramic changes on temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lifetime of Pr{sup 3+} in the glass ceramic is slightly shorter than that in glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The luminescence intensity of Pr{sup 3+} in nanocrystals is stronger than that in glass.

  11. Bioactive glass-ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Xinyu [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Cai Shu, E-mail: caishu@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dou Ying [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xu Guohua [Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai 200003 (China); Huang Kai; Ren Mengguo; Wang Xuexin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sol-gel derived 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was prepared on Mg alloy substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion resistance of glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy was markedly improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion behavior of the coated sample varied due to the cracking of coating. - Abstract: In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass-ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol-gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass-ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}, with the thickness of {approx}1.0 {mu}m, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (E{sub corr}) form -1.60 V to -1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (i{sub corr}) from 4.48 {mu}A cm{sup -2} to 0.16 {mu}A cm{sup -2}, due to the protection provided by the glass-ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass-ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass-ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  12. Transparent glass-ceramics containing Eu3+ and Dy3+ ions for visible optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2011-06-01

    Selected oxyfluoride glasses containing Eu3+ and Dy3+ were heat treated in order to obtain transparent glass-ceramics. Visible emission spectra corresponding to 5D0 - 7FJ (J = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4) transitions of Eu3+ and 4F9/2 - 6HJ/2 (J = 11, 13, 15) transitions of Dy3+ in glass samples before and after heat treatment were registered. The luminescence intensity ratios R (Eu3+) and Y/B (Dy3+) have been analyzed in details. Their values are reduced due to part incorporation of rare earth ions into cubic β-PbF2 crystalline phase.

  13. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    OpenAIRE

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5 mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644 K, a glass transition temperature of 401 K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58 K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system...

  14. Optimization of the Processing Parameters of High Temperature Superconducting Glass-Ceramics: Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Kaukler, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    A number of promising glass forming compositions of high Tc superconducting Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) materials were evaluated for their glass-ceramic crystallization ability. The BSCCO ceramics belonging to the class of superconductors in the Ba-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system were the focus of this study. By first forming the superconducting material as a glass, subsequent devitrification into the crystalline (glass-ceramic) superconductor can be performed by thermal processing of the glass preform body. Glass formability and phase formation were determined by a variety of methods in another related study. This study focused on the nucleation and crystallization of the materials. Thermal analysis during rapid cooling aids in the evaluation of nucleation and crystallization behavior. Melt viscosity is used to predict glass formation ability.

  15. The effects of CeO2 addition on crystallization behavior and pore size in microporous calcium titanium phosphate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We prepare a phosphate glass ceramic in the system of CaO–TiO2–P2O5 and add 2 to 6 mol% CeO2 to it. We determine the optimum percentage of CeO2 addition. ► We study phase separation, suitable time and temperature for crystallization in the microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics utilizing DTA, SEM and XRD. ► We investigate on pore size utilizing BET and SEM techniques before and after CeO2 addition. ► CeO2 increases the pore size in the Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics. -- Abstract: In this research the effect of the addition of CeO2 to microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate glass ceramics was studied. Different molar percentages of CeO2 were added to three samples of a base glass whose composition was P2O5 30, CaO 45, TiO2 25 (mol%). The first sample had 2 mol% CeO2, the second sample had 4 mol% CeO2, and the third sample had 6 mol% CeO2. The fourth sample did not contain any CeO2. The glass samples were melted and crystallized to bulk glass ceramics by a conventional method. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) was utilized to determine the appropriate nucleation and crystallization temperatures. Among the samples, the DTA curve of the sample which had 2 mol% CeO2 had the sharpest crystallization peak. Therefore, this sample was chosen to prepare the glass ceramics. Using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) it was found that in all samples β-Ca3(PO4)2 and CaTi4(PO4)6 were the major phases. The β-Ca3(PO4)2 phase was dissolved away by soaking the glass ceramics in HCl, leaving a porous skeleton of CaTi4(PO4)6. CeO2 addition increased the glass transition temperature and decreased the crystallization time and temperature. It was shown that CeO2 addition resulted in an increase in the mean pore diameter while the specific surface area decreased. The median pore diameter and specific surface area were determined as 27 nm and 14 m2/g, respectively, for the sample containing 2 mol% CeO2.

  16. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  17. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanfeng; Song Lei; Liu Xiaoguang; Huang Yi; Huang Tao; Wu Yao; Chen Jiyong [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Wu Fang, E-mail: fwu@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO-SiO{sub 2} bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO-SiO{sub 2} bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  18. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Wu, Yao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  19. Enhanced emissions in Tb{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluoride scintillating glass ceramics containing BaF{sub 2} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lihui, E-mail: huanglihui@cjlu.edu.cn; Jia, Shijie; Li, Yang; Zhao, Shilong; Deng, Degang; Wang, Huanping; Jia, Guohua; Hua, Youjie; Xu, Shiqing, E-mail: shiqingxu@cjlu.edu.cn

    2015-07-11

    Transparent Tb{sup 3+}-doped glass ceramics containing BaF{sub 2} nanocrystals were prepared by melt-quenching method with subsequent heat treatment. The XRD and EDS results showed the precipitated crystalline phase in the glass matrix was BaF{sub 2}. Under 376 nm light, Tb{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaF{sub 2} nanocrystals showed more intense green emission than the as-made glass, and the emission intensity increased with increasing heat treatment temperature and time. The lifetimes of 541 nm emission of Tb{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics were longer than that of as-made glass, which are in the range from 3.00 ms to 3.55 ms. Under X-ray excitation, the green emission was enhanced in the glass ceramics compared to the as-made glass. The results indicate Tb{sup 3+} doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaF{sub 2} nanocrystals could be a material candidate for X-ray glass scintillator for slow event detection.

  20. Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danewalia, Satwinder Singh; Sharma, Gaurav; Thakur, Samita; Singh, K.

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

  1. Calcium phosphate glass-ceramics for bioactive coating on a β-titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of a porous coating is the decisive feature for the bio-compatibility of silica-free calcium phosphate glass ceramics on alloy surfaces like the β-Ti structured Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr used in this work. The ceramic composition is highly important: 50CaO-40P2O5-7Na2O-3TiO2 glass powder produces a pore-free coating unable to bind hydroxyapatite, whereas 60CaO-30P2O5-7Na2O-3TiO2 glass incorporates pores from which a crystalline hydroxyapatite phase can grow over the surface from simulated body fluid (see Figure). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Indirect selective laser sintering of apatite-wollostonite glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, K; Dalgarno, K W; Wood, D J; Goodridge, R D; Ohtsuki, C

    2008-10-01

    This paper develops an indirect selective laser sintering (SLS) processing route for apatite-wollastonite (A-W) glass-ceramic, and shows that the processing route, which can create porous three-dimensional products suitable for bone implants or scaffolds, does not affect the excellent mechanical and biological properties of the glass-ceramic. 'Green parts' with fine integrity and well-defined shape have been produced from glass particles of single-size range or mixed-size ranges with acrylic binder in various ratios by weight. A subsequent heat treatment process has been developed to optimize the crystallization process, and an infiltration process has been explored to enhance mechanical strength. Three-point bending test results show flexural strengths of up to 102 MPa, dependent on porosity, and simulated body fluid (SBF) tests show that the laser sintered porous A-W has comparable biological properties to that of conventionally produced A-W. PMID:19024158

  3. The microstructure of erbium-ytterbium co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyn, Elżbieta; Żelechower, Michał; Stróż, Danuta; Chrapoński, Jacek

    2012-04-01

    Oxyfluoride transparent glass-ceramics combine some features of glasses (easier shaping or lower than single crystals cost of fabrication) and some advantages of rare-earth doped single crystals (narrow absorption/emission lines and longer lifetimes of luminescent levels). Since the material seems to be promising candidate for efficient fiber amplifiers, the manufacturing as well as structural and optical examination of the oxyfluoride glass-ceramic fibers doped with rare-earth ions seems to be a serious challenge. In the first stage oxyfluoride glasses of the following compositions 48SiO2-11Al2O3-7Na2CO3-10CaO-10PbO-11PbF2-3ErF3 and 48SiO2-11Al2O3-7Na2CO3-10CaO-10PbO-10PbF2-3YbF3-1ErF3 (in molar%) were fabricated from high purity commercial chemicals (Sigma-Aldrich). The fabricated glass preforms were drawn into glass fibers using the mini-tower. Finally, the transparent Er3+ doped and Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glass-ceramic fibers were obtained by controlled heat treatment of glass fibers. The preceding differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies allowed estimating both the fiber drawing temperature and the controlled crystallization temperature of glass fibers. X-ray diffraction examination (XRD) at each stage of the glass-ceramic fibers fabrication confirmed the undesirable crystallization of preforms and glass fibers has been avoided. The fibers shown their mixed amorphous-crystalline microstructure with nano-crystals of size even below 10 nm distributed in the glassy host. The crystal structure of the grown nano-crystals has been determined by XRD and confirmed by electron diffraction (SAED). Results obtained by both techniques seem to be compatible: Er3FO10Si3 (monoclinic; ICSD 92512), Pb5Al3F19 (triclinic; ICSD 91325) and Er4F2O11Si3 (triclinic; ICSD 51510) against to initially expected PbF2 crystals.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of Er+3 doped SiO2/SnO2 glass-ceramic thin films for planar waveguide applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddala, S.; Chiappini, A.; Armellini, C.; Turell, S.; Righini, G. C.; Ferrari, M.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramics are a kind of two-phase materials constituted by nanocrystals embedded in a glass matrix and the respective volume fractions of crystalline and amorphous phase determine the properties of the glass-ceramics. Among these properties transparency is crucial in particular when confined structures, such as, dielectric optical waveguides, are considered. Moreover, the segregation of dopant rare-earth ions, like erbium, in low phonon energy crystalline medium makes these structures more promising in the development of waveguide amplifiers. Here we are proposing a new class of low phonon energy tin oxide semiconductor medium doped silicate based planar waveguides. Er3+ doped (100-x) SiO2-xSnO2 (x= 10, 20, 25 and 30mol%), glass-ceramic planar waveguide thin films were fabricated by a simple sol-gel processing and dip coating technique. XRD and HRTEM studies indicates the glass-ceramic phase of the film and the dispersion of ~4nm diameter of tin oxide nanocrystals in the amorphous phase of silica. The spectroscopic assessment indicates the distribution of the dopant erbium ions in the crystalline medium of tin oxide. The observed low losses, 0.5±0.2 dB/cm, at 1.54 μm communication wavelength makes them a quite promising material for the development of high gain integrated optical amplifiers.

  5. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129I, 85Kr and 14C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  6. Near-infrared Luminescence Properties of Bi2O3-SiO2 Glasses and Glass Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jun-Fang, SU Liang-Bi, XU Jun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi2O3-SiO2 glasses and glass ceramics were prepared by melting method. Infrared and VIS luminescence spectra, excitation spectra and fluorescence decay curves were measured. Near infrared (NIR luminescence ofBi2O3-SiO2 glasses and glass ceramics was observed under 808 nm Laser Diode pumping. When the content of Bi2O3 is low (30mol%, 40mol%, 50mol%, NIR luminescence peak at 1336 nm (or 1300 nm with full width at half maximum (FWHM about 200 nm is observed. With the increase of Bi2O3 content, another peak at about 1070 nm with narrow FWHM appears and becomes the main peak, while the FWHM of the NIR emission centered at 1336 nm (or 1300 nm decreases to only tens of nanometer. Two emission bands have different excitation bands and lifetime. We propose NIR emissions located at 1070 nm and 1336 nm (or 1300 nm originate from different bismuth centers. The infrared emission peaked at about 1336 nm (or 1300 nm derives from low valence Bi ions.

  7. Nanoparticles size effects in thermoluminescence of oxyfluoride glass-ceramics containing Sm3+-doped CaF2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxyfluoride glass-ceramic in the system SiO2–Al2O3–CaF2–SmF3 containing Sm3+-doped CaF2 nanocrystals in the range from 15 to 150 nm size were produced by using the controlled ceramization of the precursor glass. The incorporation of the Sm3+-dopant ion in the glass ceramic creates new electron-trapping centers and thermoluminescence (TL) method has been used in order to trace their evolution during glass ceramization. The 370 °C TL peak observed in precursor glass has been assigned to the recombination of the electrons released from the Sm2+-traps in the amorphous glass network. In the glass-ceramic sample containing nanocrystals with about 15 nm size the new weak TL peaks at 270, 290, and 310 °C were attributed to the recombination of the electrons released from the Sm2+-traps located mainly at the surface of the CaF2 nanocrystals. In the glass-ceramic sample containing nanocrystals with about 150 nm size, the new TL peaks at 232, 270, and 302 °C size have been assigned to the recombination of the electrons released from the Sm2+-traps located inside the CaF2 nanocrystals.

  8. Luminescent properties of Eu{sup 3+}-Tb{sup 3+}-doped SiO{sub 2}-SnO{sub 2}-based nano-glass-ceramics prepared by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, J. del [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: fjvargas@ull.es; Yanes, A.C. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Velazquez, J.J.; Mendez-Ramos, J.; Rodriguez, V.D. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2009-04-03

    Transparent nano-glass-ceramics of composition 95SiO{sub 2}-5SnO{sub 2} mol%, single doped with 0.4 mol% of Tb{sup 3+} and co-doped with 0.4 mol% of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} have been obtained by thermal treatment of precursor sol-gel glasses. The segregated SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals, precipitated in the insulator SiO{sub 2} glass matrix during heat treatment, constitute a wide band gap quantum-dot system with mean radius of nanocrystals around 2.2-2.8 nm, comparable to the bulk exciton Bohr radius. A fraction of the rare earth ions is incorporated to the SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals and can be excited by energy transfer from the semiconductor host. The efficiency of this energy transfer process is strongly dependent on the nanocrystal radius in the case of the Tb{sup 3+} ions, whereas the dependence is not appreciable in the case of Eu{sup 3+} ions. These results can be explained taking into account the variations of the overlap of the SnO{sub 2} broad visible emission due to oxygen vacancies with the rare earth excitation spectra.

  9. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajek, M; Lis, J; Partyka, J; Wojczyk, M, E-mail: mgajek@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramic, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-10-29

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6{approx}8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm{sup 2} (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5{approx}6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  10. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, M.; Lis, J.; Partyka, J.; Wójczyk, M.

    2011-10-01

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5 on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6~8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm2 (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5~6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO2-Al2O3, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  11. Floor tile glass-ceramic glaze for improvement of the resistance to surface abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of research aimed at the study on frits and glass-ceramic glazes for floor tiles, based on compositions located in the primary field of cordierite crystallization within the system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, have been presented. The results comprise investigations on the frits crystallization abilities, stability of the crystallizing phase under conditions of single-stage a fast firing cycle (time below 60 minutes) depending on their chemical composition and the influence of the nucleation agents. The influence of the nucleating agents namely TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5 on phase composition of obtained crystalline glazes, mechanical parameters and microstructure, has been examined. The strength tests proved increased mechanical resistance of crystalline glazes. Obtained glazes are characterized by high microhardness in range 6∼8 GPa, as well as the increased wear resistance measured by the loss of weight below 100 mg / 55 cm2 (PN-EN ISO 10545-7). Significant increase of these parameters as compared with non-crystalline glazes, where micro-hardness values range between 5∼6 GPa and the wear resistance values range from 120 to 200 mg, has been proved. Starting glasses (frits) and glazes of the ternary system MgO-SiO2-Al2O3, were examined with use of DTA, XRD and SEM methods.

  12. Neodymium Partitioning in Glass-Ceramic Designed for Actinides Immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>In the backend of nuclear fuel cycle, plutonium-containing wastes are inevitable to be produced. Glass as the matrix for HLLW is not appropriate for immobilize the plutonium waste due the poor solubility of

  13. Study of glass ceramic material on the base of ash group simulating slag of plasma shaft furnace for high temperature reprocessing of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the methods of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and micro-probe analysis it is shown that the processes of minerals formation and homogenization in ash residue based charge under the heating up to 1450 deg C take place with a high rate and completely finish during 10 minutes. Homogeneous materials containing besides glassy phase crystalline phases and metallic shots are formed in this process. The products obtained with fluxes (dolomite and clay) additions are more homogeneous than a flux-less fused slag. Losses of α-radioactive nuclides during the melting of ash residue at 1300 deg C do not exceed 1.5% and is likely attributed with the products of uranium decay. Hydrolytic stability of the slags estimated from the rate of α-radioactive elements lixiviation is on the level of (1.4-5.7)x10-4 g/(cm2 x day) at 95 deg C

  14. Preparation and studies on surface modifications of calcium-silico-phosphate ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and magnetic behaviour of 34SiO2-(45 - x) CaO-16P2O5-4.5 MgO-0.5 CaF2 - x Fe2O3 (where x = 5, 10, 15, 20 wt.%) glasses have been investigated. Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics are prepared by melt quench followed by controlled crystallization. The surface modification and dissolution behaviour of these glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) have also been studied. Phase formation and magnetic behaviour have been studied using XRD and SQUID magnetometer. The room temperature Moessbauer study has been done to monitor the local environment around Fe cations and valence state of Fe ions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the surface modification in glass-ceramics when immersed in simulated body fluid. Formation of bioactive layer in SBF has been ascertained using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SBF solutions were analyzed using an absorption spectrophotometer. The magnetic measurements indicated that all these glasses possess paramagnetic character and the [Fe2+/Fe3+] ions ratio depends on the composition of glass and varied with Fe2O3 concentration in glass matrix. In glass-ceramics saturation magnetization increases with increase in amount of Fe2O3. The nanostructure of hematite and magnetite is formed in the glass-ceramics with 15 and 20 wt.% Fe2O3, which is responsible for the magnetic property of these glass-ceramics. Introduction of Fe2O3 induces several modifications at the glass-ceramics surface when immersed in SBF solution and thereby affecting the surface dissolution and the formation of the bioactive layer.

  15. Proof Test Diagrams for a Lithia-Alumina-Silica Glass-Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    2003-01-01

    The glass-ceramic (Zerodur, Schott Glaswerke, Mainz, Germany) contains 70% to 78% by weight crystalline phase of high-quartz structure with a mean crystal size of 50-55 nm. The vitreous phase has a positive thermal expansion coefficient which is practically balanced by the negative coefficient of the crystalline phase. This results in a material which can maintain longitudinal stability during thermal cycling. This was one of the reasons for its choice as the material for the grazing incidence mirrors for the Chandra X-Ray Facility. Brittle materials such as glass and glass-ceramics which exhibit slow crack growth and subsequent fast fracture to failure exhibit a time dependence in strength. The decrease in strength for a constant applied load is known as static fatigue. In many cases, environment plays a major role in the material lifetime. It has been shown for silicate glasses that crack velocity will increase as the amount of water vapor in the environment surface finish and rate of loading. A rough surface finish leads to a lower tensile strength than for an optically polished surface. The strength of glass is observed in general to increase with increasing load rate. This phenomena is known as dynamic fatigue. This was observed for Zerodur by Tucker and Gent and Tucker in previous dynamic fatigue studies, in which lifetimes were obtained. All of the above named factors need to be considered when glass is to be used in load bearing applications.

  16. Development and testing of matrices for the encapsulation of glass and ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the results of research on the matrix encapsulation of high level wastes at PML over the past few years. The demonstrations and tests described were designed to illustrate how the waste materials are effected when encapsulated in an inert matrix. Candidate materials evaluated for potential use as matrices for encapslation of pelletized ceramics or glass marbles were categorized into four groups: metals, glasses, ceramics, and graphite. Two processing techniques, casting and hot pressing, were investigated as the most promising methods of formation or densification of the matrices. The major results reported deal with the development aspects. However, chemical durability tests (leach tests) of the matrix materials themselves and matrix-waste form composites are also reported. Matrix waste forms can provide a low porosity, waste-free barrier resulting in increased leach protection, higher impact strength and improved thermal conductivity compared to unencapsulated glass or ceramic waste materials. Glass marbles encapsulated in a lead matrix offer the most significant improvement in waste form stability of all combinations evaluated. This form represents a readily demonstrable process that provides high thermal conductivity, mechanical shock resistance, radiation shielding and increased chemical durability through both a chemical passivation mechanism and as a physical barrier. Other durable matrix waste forms evaluated, applicable primarily to ceramic pellets, involved hot-pressed titanium or TiO2 materials. In the processing of these forms, near 100% dense matrices were obtained. The matrix materials had excellent compatibility with the waste materials and superior potential chemical durability. Cracking of the hot-pressed ceramic matrix forms, in general, prevented the realization of their optimum properties

  17. A New Technology of Microcrystallizing Leucite to Reinforce Dental Glass Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Biao; PENG Bin; DUAN Xing-long; QIAN Fa-tang; WU Bo-lin

    2004-01-01

    The key technology and the main mechanism of microcrystallizing leucite to reirforce dentalglass ceramics were investigated. The feedstock powders were selected, mixed according to the ratios of the theoreti-cal composition of leucite, ball - milled, melted at 1600℃ and then cooled to room temperature quickly. Thecooled clinkers were ball - milled again to 4 μm. After cold - isostatic pressure molded and air sintered at 1 500℃for 1 h, the dental glass ceramics were fabricated. They have following characteristics: excellent mechanical prop-erties ( mean compressive strength is 206.6 MPa ), low sintering temperature and good reoccurrence to keep steadyquality.

  18. Enhanced upconversion in Ho3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel Ho3+-doped transparent oxyfluoride SiO2–Al2O3–Na2CO3–CaO–BaF2–YbF3 glass ceramics (GC) containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals were fabricated via melt-quenching technique with subsequent heat treatment. The formation of crystalline fluoride phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compared to precursor glasses, the greatly enhanced green emission (40-fold), new emission band at ultraviolet-blue region and stark splittings of emission in GC, indicate that Ho3+ enters into BaYbF5 nanocrystals with low phonon energy. Besides, the origin of the previously unconfirmed emission band at 440–460 nm is clearly identified by measuring spectra from thermally coupled luminescent levels at various temperatures. The outstanding upconversion properties of Ho3+ in GC may present potential application in all-solid-state upconversion lasers operating in the visible and ultraviolet range. - Highlights: • Novel transparent glass ceramics containing BaYbF5 nanocrystals were fabricated. • The green upconversion intensity increases greatly (40-fold) in glass ceramics. • The origin of the previously unconfirmed emission is clearly identified in our work

  19. Transformation Mechanism of Fluormica to Fluoramphibole in Fluoramphibole Glass Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Si

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During isothermal sintering at 820°C, the transformation mechanism of fluormica to fluoramphibole in powder compacts of fluormica and soda-lime glass was investigated using differential thermal analysis, infrared reflection spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and so forth. Results show that an interaction between fluormica and glass occurred during isothermal heating; O2−, Na+, and Ca2+ ions were diffused from glass to fluormica. This diffusion facilitates the transformation of the sheet structures of fluormica crystals to double-chain structures by the breakage of bridge oxygen bonds in the sheet. Subsequently, the broken two parallel double chains were rearranged by relative displacement along the c-axis direction of the fluormica crystal and were linked by Na+ and Ca2+ ions to form fluoramphibole. A crystallography model of fluormica-fluoramphibole transformation was established in this study.

  20. Crystallization and dielectric properties of lead-free glass-ceramic composites with Gd_2O_3 addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free glass-ceramic composites in barium sodium niobate silica system with Gd2O3 addition were synthesized through melt-casting fol-lowed by controlled crystallization technique. Crystallization and dielectric properties of the Gd2O3 adding glass-ceramic composites were investigated. With the increase in the concentration of Gd2O3, the glass transition temperature and the crystallization temperature of the pre-cursor glass shift towards the higher temperature. The crystallization behavior that occurred ...

  1. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose I. Peña

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the ball to the porous glass-ceramic layer was observed in the wear tests carried out against the AISI316 ball counterface whereas, in the case of the corundum ball, the wear volume loss was concentrated in the porous layer. Wear rate and friction coefficient presented higher values than expected for dense glass-ceramics.

  2. Microstructural characterization of glass and ceramic simulated waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructures of three nonradioactive glass samples simulating three Hanford process waste forms were characterized. Two samples of iodine sodalite which simulate the fixation of radioactive iodine were also characterized. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy + x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, and electron microprobe analysis were used in the characterization

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopy of europium-doped fluorochlorozirconate glasses and glass ceramics: optimization of storage phosphors in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eu2+-doped fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glasses and glass ceramics, which are being developed for medical and photovoltaic applications, have been analysed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The oxidation state and chemical environment of the europium ions, which are important for the performance of these materials, were investigated. Routes for maximizing the divalent europium content were also investigated. By using EuCl2 instead of EuF2 in the starting material a fraction of about 90% of the europium was maintained in the Eu2+ state as opposed to about 70% when using EuF2. The glass ceramics produced by subsequent thermal processing contain BaCl2 nanocrystals in which Eu2+ is incorporated, as shown by the narrower linewidth in the Mössbauer spectrum. Debye temperatures of 147 K and 186 K for Eu2+ and Eu3+, respectively, were determined from temperature dependent Mössbauer measurements. The f-factors were used to obtain the Eu2+/Eu3+ ratio from the area ratio of the corresponding absorption lines. (paper)

  4. Structural and physical characteristics of CeO2-GeO2-PbO glasses and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of the xCeO2(100 - x)[GeO2.PbO] system with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol% were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigation revealed the presence of a crystalline phase for samples with x ≥ 3 mol%, namely that of Ce1.88Pb2.12O6.53. The structural role of germanium, lead and cerium ions was discussed. The presence of the CeO4, GeO4, GeO6 and PbO4 structural units was evidenced by FT-IR spectrocopy in the studied glasses and glass ceramics. It was shown that the ratio of the mentioned structural units depends on the CeO2 content of the xCeO2(100 - x)[GeO2.PbO] system. As a part of an on-going investigation of the physical properties of xCeO2(100 - x)[GeO2.PbO] glass ceramics, the magnetic behavior of this system was studied. The fractions of the cerium ions in the 3+ and 4+ valence states were determined.

  5. Determination of the mechanical behavior of lithium disilicate glass ceramics by nanoindentation and scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the mechanical behavior of high-strength dental ceramics, lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) using nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli of LDGC were measured as a function of the applied indentation load. The indentation load/size effect (ISE) was analyzed for both measured nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli. The true hardness, i.e., the load-independent hardness, was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging of the indented volumes and by measuring pile-up heights of indented cross-sections. The results show that both nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus are load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law using a power series. At the nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events. This unusual behavior, for nominally brittle materials, influences the mode of contact damage in applications such as machining, polishing, wear, impact damage and hardness testing for dental restorations. - Highlights: • Both hardness and Young's modulus of LDGC were load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law. • The true hardness of LDGC was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. • Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging. • At low nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events

  6. Determination of the mechanical behavior of lithium disilicate glass ceramics by nanoindentation and scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Calvin M. [Matter and Materials, College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, James Cook Drive, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Jiang, Danyu [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Gong, Jianghong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yin, Ling, E-mail: ling.yin@jcu.edu.au [Matter and Materials, College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, James Cook Drive, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    This paper reports on the mechanical behavior of high-strength dental ceramics, lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) using nanoindentation and in situ scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli of LDGC were measured as a function of the applied indentation load. The indentation load/size effect (ISE) was analyzed for both measured nanoindentation hardness and Young's moduli. The true hardness, i.e., the load-independent hardness, was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging of the indented volumes and by measuring pile-up heights of indented cross-sections. The results show that both nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus are load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law using a power series. At the nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events. This unusual behavior, for nominally brittle materials, influences the mode of contact damage in applications such as machining, polishing, wear, impact damage and hardness testing for dental restorations. - Highlights: • Both hardness and Young's modulus of LDGC were load-dependent following the expended Meyer's law. • The true hardness of LDGC was determined based on the proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model. • Nanoindentation-induced plasticity in LDGC was characterized by in situ SPM imaging. • At low nanoindentation loads, indented LDGC can be mainly plastically deformed by limiting cracking events.

  7. Corrosion behaviors of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form and its constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ceramic waste form (CWF) of glass bonded sodalite is being developed as a waste form for the long-term immobilization of fission products and transuranic elements from the U.S. Department of Energy's activities on spent nuclear fuel conditioning. A durable waste form was prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) a mixture of salt-loaded zeolite powders and glass frit. During HIP the zeolite is converted to sodalite, and the resultant CWF is been completed for durations of up to 182 days. Four dissolution modes were identified: dissolution of free salt, dissolution of the aluminosilicate matrix of sodalite and the accompanying dissolution of occluded salt, dissolution of the boroaluminosilicate matrix of the glass, and ion exchange. Synergies inherent to the CWF were identified by comparing the results of the tests with pure glass and sodalite with those of the composite CWF

  8. Effect of Ti(+4) on in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Ikhram, Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    A novel glass-ceramic series in (48-x) SiO2-36 CaO-4 P2O5-12 Na2O-xTiO2 (where x=0, 3.5, 7, 10.5 and 14mol %) system was synthesized by crystallization of glass powders, obtained by melt quenching technique. The differential scanning calorimetric analysis (DSC) was used to study the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the as prepared glasses. The crystallization behaviour of glasses was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions, and qualitative phase analysis of glass-ceramics was made by X-ray diffraction. The in vitro bioactivity of synthesized glass-ceramics was studied in stimulated body fluid at 37°C under static condition for 24days. The formation of hydroxyl-carbonated apatite layer; evident of bioactivity of the material, was elucidated by XRD, FTIR, AAS, SEM and EDX analysis. The result showed that partial substitution of TiO2 with SiO2 negatively influenced bioactivity; it decreased with increase in concentration of TiO2. As Ti(+4) having stronger field strength as compared to Si(+4) so its replacement became the cause for reduction in degradation that in turn improved the chemical stability. The compressive strength was also enhanced with progress addition of TiO2 in the system. The antibacterial properties were examined against Staphylococcus Epidermidis. Strong antibacterial efficacy was observed with the addition of TiO2 in the system. PMID:27612803

  9. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  10. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5 mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644 K, a glass transition temperature of 401 K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58 K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ∼350 Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry

  11. Effect of ZnO on phase emergence, microstructure and surface modifications of calcium phosphosilicate glass/glass-ceramics having iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ZnO on phase emergence and microstructure properties of glass and glass-ceramics with composition 25SiO2-50CaO-15P2O5-(10 - x)Fe2O3-xZnO (where x = 0, 2, 5, 7 mol%) has been studied. They have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Surface modifications of these glass-ceramics in simulated body fluid have been studied using Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR), XPS and SEM. Results have shown a decrease in the fraction of non-bridging oxygen with increase in zinc oxide content. Emergence of crystalline phases in glass-ceramics at different heat treatment temperatures was studied using XRD. When glass is heat treated at 800 deg. C calcium phosphate, hematite and magnetite are developed as major phases in the glass-ceramics samples with ZnO up to 5 mol%. In addition to these, calcium silicate (Ca3Si2O7) phase is also observed when glass is heat treated at 1000 deg. C. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics heat treated at 800 deg. C exhibits the formation of nano-size (40-50 nm) grains. On heat treatment at 1000 deg. C crystallites grow to above 50 nm size and more than one phase are observed in the microstructure. The formation of thin flake-like structure with coarse particles is observed at high zinc oxide concentration (x = 7 mol%). In vitro studies have shown the surface modifications and formation of Ca-P-rich layer on the glass-ceramics when immersed in simulated body fluids (SBF) for different durations. The bioactive response was found to depend on ZnO content.

  12. A Glass Ceramic Derived from High TiO2-Containing Slag – Microstructure Development and Mechanical Behaviour

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, J. P.; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 8 (2006), s. 2426-2433. ISSN 1551-2916 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0495 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : glass ceramic s * fracture toughness * flexural strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  13. Cooperative Quantum Cutting of Nano-Crystalline BaF2:Tb3+, Yb3+ in Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing-Xin; YE Song; WANG Xi; QIU Jian-Rong

    2008-01-01

    We report on cooperative quantum cutting in Tb3+-Yb3+ codoped glass ceramics. Precipitation of BaF2 nano-crystals is confirmed by XRD and HRTEM analysis. Near-infrared emission due to transition of Yb3+ ions under 485nm excitation indicates cooperative energy transfer from Tb3+ to Yb3+. The quantum efficiency of this process reaches 145%. The realization of quantum cutting in glass ceramics may have promising applications in solar cells.

  14. Microstructural and Wear Behavior Characterization of Porous Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Irradiation in Glass-Ceramics Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Jose I. Peña; Elena Gracia-Escosa; de Damborenea, Juan J.; Daniel Sola; Ana Conde; Iñaki García

    2013-01-01

    In this work, wear behavior and microstructural characterization of porous layers produced in glass-ceramic substrates by pulsed laser irradiation in the nanosecond range are studied under unidirectional sliding conditions against AISI316 and corundum counterbodies. Depending on the optical configuration of the laser beam and on the working parameters, the local temperature and pressure applied over the interaction zone can generate a porous glass-ceramic layer. Material transference from the...

  15. Modeling of water absorption induced cracks in resin-based composite supported ceramic layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D; Soboyejo, W O

    2008-01-01

    Cracking patterns in the top ceramic layers of the modeled dental multilayers with polymer foundation are observed when they are immersed in water. This article developed a model to understand this cracking mechanism. When water diffuses into the polymer foundation of dental restorations, the foundation will expand; as a result, the stress will build up in the top ceramic layer because of the bending and stretching. A finite element model based on this mechanism is built to predict the stress build-up and the slow crack growth in the top ceramic layers during the water absorption. Our simulations show that the stress build-up by this mechanism is high enough to cause the cracking in the top ceramic layers and the cracking patterns predicted by our model are well consistent with those observed in experiments on glass/epoxy/polymer multilayers. The model is then used to discuss the life prediction of different dental ceramics. PMID:17497681

  16. High infrared radiance glass-ceramics obtained from fly ash and titanium slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuming; Liang, Kaiming

    2007-11-01

    A new glass-ceramic was synthesized by crystal growth from a homogenous glass obtained by melting a mixture of fly ash collected from a power plant in Hebei province of China, titanium slag collected from a titanium factory in Sichuan province of China, and MgCO(3) as an additive. According to the measurement results of differential thermal analysis, a thermal treatment of nucleating at 850 degrees C for 2h and crystallizing at 985 degrees C for 1.5h was used to obtain the crystallized glass. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy measurements showed that the main crystalline phase of this material was iron-ion substituted cordierite, (Mg,Fe)(2)Al(4)Si(5)O(18), which is homogeneously dispersed within the parent glass matrix. The infrared radiance and thermal expansion coefficient of this material have been examined, and the results demonstrate that this glass-ceramic material has potential for application in a wide range of infrared heating and drying materials. PMID:17640707

  17. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  18. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  19. The microstructure and mechanical properties of sintered celsian and strontium-celsian glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, L.; Bomartini Corradi, A.; Leonelli, C.; Manfredini, T.; Romagnoli, M.; Siligardi, C. (Univ. of Modena (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the capability of surface nucleated barium and strontium feldspars glass-ceramics of being sintered was investigated by means of density and porosity measurements, X-ray diffraction measurements, microscopic observations and indentation testing and the results compared with those recorded on the corresponding bulk crystallized samples. The densification degree, higher than 95% of the theoretical density, and the favored formation of thermally stable crystalline phases, such as celsian and Sr-celsian, with respect to those which present non-linear thermal expansion, hexacelsian, make sintering very useful for the production of low porosity, less than 3 vol%, materials. The microhardness values (470--780 Kg/mm[sup 2]) and elastic modulus (57--115 GPa) of the sintered glass-ceramics, together with the refractoriness of the developed phases make these systems particularly suitable for structural applications.

  20. Tensile behavior of glass/ceramic composite materials at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.; Jacobs, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the tensile behavior of high-temperature composite materials containing continuous Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforcement and glass and glass/ceramic matrices. The longitudinal properties of these materials can approach theoretical expectations for brittle matrix composites, failing at a strength and ultimate strain level consistent with those of the fibers. The brittle, high-modulus matrices result in a nonlinear stress-strain curve due to the onset of stable matrix cracking at 10 to 30 percent of the fiber strain to failure, and at strains below this range in off-axis plies. Current fibers and matrices can provide attractive properties well above 1000 C, but composites experience embrittlement in oxidizing atmospheres at 800 to 1000 C due to oxidation of a carbon interface reaction layer.The oxidation effect greatly increases the interface bond strength, causing composite embrittlement.

  1. A method for developing design diagrams for ceramic and glass materials using fatigue data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslin, T. M.; Magida, M. B.; Forrest, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    The service lifetime of glass and ceramic materials can be expressed as a plot of time-to-failure versus applied stress whose plot is parametric in percent probability of failure. This type of plot is called a design diagram. Confidence interval estimates for such plots depend on the type of test that is used to generate the data, on assumptions made concerning the statistical distribution of the test results, and on the type of analysis used. This report outlines the development of design diagrams for glass and ceramic materials in engineering terms using static or dynamic fatigue tests, assuming either no particular statistical distribution of test results or a Weibull distribution and using either median value or homologous ratio analysis of the test results.

  2. Thermal decomposition of polyurethane foams for manufacturing LZSA cellular glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of the thermal decomposition of polyurethane (PUR) foams was performed by Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Three main weight loss paths were observed by TGA, the residue being lower than 3 wt.% for 3 different PUR foams analyzed. FT-IR spectra indicated CO2, CO, NH3 and isocyanides as main decomposition products. PUR foams of different cell sizes were immersed in a slurry of the parent glass ceramic of composition Li2O-ZrO2-SiO2-Al2O3 (LZSA) and submitted to heat treatment. The LZSA cellular glass ceramics obtained after sintering and crystallization resembled the original morphology of the PUR foams. (author)

  3. Halogen Containing Gases as Lubricants for Crystallized Glass Ceramic Metal Combinations at Temperatures to 1500 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    Pyroceram 9608 (a crystallized glass ceramic) has been considered for use in high-temperature bearing and seal applications. One of the problems encountered with Pyroceram is the lack of availability of lubricants for the temperature range in which this material becomes practical. Experiments were conducted with Pyroceram sliding on various nickel- and cobalt-base alloys using reactive halogen-containing gases as lubricants. Friction and wear data were obtained as a function of sliding velocity and temperature. Studies were made with a hemispherical rider (3/16-in. rad., Pyroceram 9608) sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (2(1/2) in. diam., nickel- or cobalt-base alloys). The specimens were run in an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, a sliding velocity of 3200 feet per minute, and temperatures from 75 to 1500 F. The gas CF2Br-CF2Br was found to be an effective lubricant for Pyroceram 9608 sliding on Hastelloy R-235 and Inconel X up to 1400 F. The gas CF2Cl-CF2Cl provided effective lubrication for Pyroceram sliding on various cobalt-base alloys at 1000 F.

  4. Building ceramic based on sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöke, A.-M.; Muntean, M.; Dumitrescu, O.; Bartalis, I.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century.

  5. Building ceramic based on sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the rapid evolution in the last decade of science and engineering materials, development of new advanced materials, particularly in construction, we must find solutions, namely, new performed materials, with functional and aesthetic qualities. In recent years, there have been made alternative attempts to reuse various types of wastes, including the incorporation of products in ceramic clay. This theme concerning the achievement of some durable, economic and ecological materials represents a high-level preoccupation in this domain, the problems related to the ecosystem being permanent issues of the century

  6. Dissolution studies of hydroxyapatite and glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the continuous agitation assays, glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite (GR-HA) was shown to form a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer, but hydroxyapatite (HA) only formed dispersed precipitates. The formation of this layer was first detected on the GR-HA with a 7.5% glass addition (7.5 GR-HA) after only 3 days of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The time required for layer formation decreased as the amount of glass added to the HA increased. The dissolution rate of the materials followed a similar pattern, i.e. the dissolution rate for GR-HA was higher than for HA, and increased with the addition of glass. The immersion of 7.5 GR-HA in water showed almost linear dissolution kinetics over the immersion periods (3, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days). The concentration of calcium ions in solution and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the 7.5 GR-HA specimens immersed in water and in SBF revealed a clear competition between the material dissolution and the precipitation of a CaP phase. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy with alternated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) analysis indicated that the CaP phase that formed during longer immersion times (30 and 60 days) could be a carbonate-substituted CaP precipitate. As expected from previous work, the GR-HA behavior in terms of its in vitro bioactivity is higher than HA because a homogeneous CaP layer is formed and the precipitation occurs faster. From the dissolution test and in accordance with the chemical composition of the samples, GR-HA was more soluble than HA

  7. Structural investigations on Eu-doped fluorobromozirconate glass ceramics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, Marie-Christin [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, 33100 Paderborn (Germany); Ahrens, Bernd [Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics, Walter-Huelse-Str. 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Henke, Bastian; Schweizer, Stefan [Fraunhofer Center for Silicon Photovoltaics, Walter-Huelse-Str. 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Centre for Innovation Competence SiLi-nano, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Modified Eu-doped fluorozirconate glasses are regarded as promising materials for photovoltaic and medical applications. In these glasses, a substantial fraction of the fluorine ions was replaced by bromine ions resulting in the formation of BaBr{sub 2} nanocrystals upon subsequent thermal treatment of the as-made glass. Interestingly, the metastable hexagonal phase of BaBr{sub 2} is always formed first before further annealing leads to the formation of orthorhombic phase BaBr{sub 2}, i.e., a phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic phase BaBr{sub 2} occurs upon annealing. During the annealing a part of the doped Eu{sup 2+} is incorporated into the BaBr{sub 2} nanocrystals enabling fluorescent transitions of Eu{sup 2+} in hexagonal and orthorhombic BaBr{sub 2}, respectively, upon ultraviolet excitation. The nanocrystal size and the structural phase depend on the addition of InF{sub 3} and YF{sub 3} and on the Br/(F+Br)-ratio, which was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction. In addition, photoluminescence experiments were performed to monitor the phase transition by optical means.

  8. Cubic to tetragonal phase transition of Tm3+ doped nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Yiming Li; Lijuan Zhao; Yuting Fu; Yahui Shi; Xiaoyu Zhang; Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Tm3+ ions doped β-PbF2 nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics with different doping concentrations and thermal temperatures are prepared by a traditional melt-quenching and thermal treatment method to investigate the structure and the phase transition of Tm3+ doped nanocrystals. The structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis and confirmed with numerical simulation. The phase transitions are proved further by the emission spectra. Both of the doping concentration a...

  9. Erbium environment in glass-ceramics investigated by atom probe tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc, Wilfried; François Saint-Cyr, Hugues; Martin, Isabelle,; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Hombourger, Chystel; Neuville, D. R.; Larson, D.J.; Prosa, T.J.; Guillermier, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    Glass-ceramics (considered here as a glassy host containing crystalline or amorphous nanoparticles) are of interest for luminescent properties as they can combine the sturdiness and low cost of a matrix host with particular spectroscopic behavior that would not appear in this host [1]. Ideally, nanoparticles would fully encapsulate luminescent ions to produce engineered spectroscopic properties. This approach is particularly promising for optical fibers. Indeed, silica is the most common glas...

  10. Use of vitrified urban incinerator waste as raw material for production of sintered glass-ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María; Rawlings, Rees D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    The crystallisation behaviour of vitrified industrial waste (fly ash from domiciliary solid waste incineration) was examined by differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. It was demonstrated that powder processing route was required to transform the vitrified industrial waste into glass-ceramics products. Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) diagrams were drawn for the two main crystalline phases, diopside and wollastonite. The wollastonite existed...

  11. Primary Research of MSCs on AW Glass Ceramic with Different Surface Roughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionTissue engineering can be defined as the use of composite of cells and materials to promote a replace new tissue formation. The surface topography of the composite including surface texture and surface roughness, can directly influence cellular adsorb, attachment, proliferation differentiation and migradtion. Roughened surfaces were achieved through processes such as machining, particle blasting, chemical/electrochemical etching.Apatite-wallastonite glass-ceramic(AW GC) was developed in 1982 b...

  12. Effects of surface treatments on bond strength of glass-infiltrated ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y C; Tseng, H; Shih, Y H; Lee, S Y

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various surface treatments on the bond strength at the In-Ceram/resin composite interface. Ninety-eight In-Ceram specimens were divided into seven groups and exposed to various surface treatments as follows: (A) control (B) saliva contamination (C) saliva contamination plus aluminum oxide sandblasting (D) glove powder contamination (E) glove powder contamination plus aluminum oxide sandblasting (F) rough aluminum oxide sandblasting and (G) excess glass infiltration. A resin composite cylinder was cemented to each In-Ceram specimen with Panavia 21 resin luting cement. Half of the cemented specimens in each group were stored in water for 24 h, and the other half were stored in water for 2 weeks and then were thermo-cycled for 2000 cycles. Shear bond strengths (SBS) of seven specimens in each subgroup were determined and analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD test as well as Student's t-test. Scanning electronic microscopy was used to identify the type of bond failure. Shear bond strength was significantly decreased by saliva and glove powder contaminations (P contaminated specimens. However, the glove powder plus sandblasting group showed no significant difference in SBS compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in SBS between the excess glass-infiltrating group and the control group. The SBS was significantly decreased by rough aluminum oxide sandblasting (P contaminants may significantly influence the bond strength of In-Ceram restorative in clinical use. PMID:11580818

  13. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  14. Failure analysis of glass-ceramic insulators of shock tested vacuum (neutron) tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, R.K.

    1980-08-25

    Eight investigative techniques were used to examine the glass-ceramic insulators in vacuum (neutron) tubes. The insulators were extracted from units that had been subjected to low temperature mechanical shock tests. Two of the three units showed reduced neutron output after these tests and an insulator on one of these two was cracked completely through which probably occurred during shock testing. The objective of this study was to determine if any major differences existed between the insulators of these tubes. After eight analyses, it was concluded that no appreciable differences existed. It appeared that cracking of the one glass-ceramic sample was initiated at inner-sleeve interface voids. For this sample, the interface void density was much higher than is presently acceptable. All insulators were made with glass-ceramic having a Na/sub 2/O content of 4.6 wt%. An increased Na/sub 2/O content will cause an increase in the coefficient of expansion and will reduce the residual stress level since the molybdenum has a higher coefficient of thermal expansion than the insulator. Thus, it is believed that a decrease in interface voids and an increase in Na/sub 2/O should aid in reduced cracking of the insulator during these tests.

  15. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Stefan, R.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd2O3)xṡ(B2O3)(60-x)ṡ(ZnO)40 glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB4O7, Zn4O(B6O12), Zn3(BO3)2 and GdBO3. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO3, BO4 and ZnO4 are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  16. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd2O3)x⋅(B2O3)(60−x)⋅(ZnO)40 glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB4O7, Zn4O(B6O12), Zn3(BO3)2 and GdBO3. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO3, BO4 and ZnO4 are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed

  17. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, G. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Pascuta, P.; Dan, V.; Pop, V. [Technical University, 28 Memorandumului, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Stefan, R. [Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine University, 3-5 Calea Manastur, 400372 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Radulescu, D. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, 8 Victor Babes, 400012 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Zn{sub 4}O(B{sub 6}O{sub 12}), Zn{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and GdBO{sub 3}. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4} and ZnO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  18. Highly matched spectrum needed for photosynthesis in Ce3+/Er3+/Yb3+ tri-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing CaF2 nano-crystals tri-doped with Ce3+/Er3+/Yb3+ ions were prepared by high temperature melting method and subsequent heat treatment. The structural properties were examined by X-ray diffraction measurements. The absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass ceramics were investigated. Difference in erbium emission spectra between glass and glass ceramics had been studied. The emission bands originating from the 4F9/2 state of Er3+ were enhanced when the CaF2 nano-crystal created. By down-converting the ultraviolet wavelength region (280∼400 nm) light and up-converting the near-infrared wavelength region (900∼1100 nm) light, the glass ceramics can also emit strong reddish orange emission. The emission spectra consisting of bluish violet (400∼500 nm) and reddish orange (640∼680 nm) bands match well with the action spectrum of photosynthesis and absorption spectra of chlorophylls. Our materials will be favored to promote the development of glass greenhouses for green plant. - Highlights: • Ce3+/Er3+/Yb3+ tri-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics were prepared by high temperature melting method. • 668 nm red emission was obtained under 320 nm, 380 nm and 980 nm excitation, respectively. • The emission of samples matched well with the spectrum for photosynthesis

  19. Glass-ceramic materials of system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 from rice husk ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This wok shows the results of a valorisation study to use rice husk ash as raw material to develop glass-ceramic materials. An original glass has been formulated in the base system MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 with addition of B2O3 and Na2O to facilitate the melting and poring processes. Glass characterization was carried out by determining its chemical composition. Sintering behaviour has been examined by Hot Stage Microscopy (HSM). Thermal stability and crystallization mechanism have been studied by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Mineralogy analyses of the glass-ceramic materials were carried out using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Results show that it is possible to use ash rice husk to produce glass-ceramic materials by a sintercrystallization process, with nepheline (Na2OxAl2O3xSiO2) as major crystalline phase in the temperature interval 700-950 degree centigrade and forsterite (2MgOxSiO2) at temperatures above 950 degree centigrade. (Author) 15 refs.

  20. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. Bioactivity of Sodium Free Fluoride Containing Glasses and Glass-Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bioactivity of a series of fluoride-containing sodium-free calcium and strontium phosphosilicate glasses has been tested in vitro. Glasses with high fluoride content were partially crystallised to apatite and other fluoride-containing phases. The bioactivity study was carried out in Tris and SBF buffers, and apatite formation was monitored by XRD, FTIR and solid state NMR. Ion release in solutions has been measured using ICP-OES and fluoride-ion selective electrode. The results show that glasses with low amounts of fluoride that were initially amorphous degraded rapidly in Tris buffer and formed apatite as early as 3 h after immersion. The apatite was identified as fluorapatite by 19F MAS-NMR after 6 h of immersion. Glass degradation and apatite formation was significantly slower in SBF solution compared to Tris. On immersion of the partially crystallised glasses, the fraction of apatite increased at 3 h compared to the amount of apatite prior to the treatment. Thus, partial crystallisation of the glasses has not affected bioactivity significantly. Fast dissolution of the amorphous phase was also indicated. There was no difference in kinetics between Tris and SBF studies when the glass was partially crystallised to apatite before immersion. Two different mechanisms of apatite formation for amorphous or partially crystallised glasses are discussed.

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment Conditions on Properties of Lead-Free Bi2GeO5 Ferroelectric Glass Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, lead-free ferroelectric materials have attracted much interest among materials scientists as a result of environmental concern. The bismuth germanate (Bi2GeO5) phase, one of the lead-free ferroelectric crystals, is of particular interest as its composition already contains good glass former (GeO2) and can be prepared by an alternative glass ceramic route. In this work, the conventional melt-quenching method was used to produce the parent glass with composition of 60 mol% BiO1.5:20 mol% GeO2:20 mol% BO1.5. The as-received glass pieces were subjected to the heat treatment schedule at various crystallization temperatures and dwell-times. The glass and glass ceramics samples were then investigated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and their dielectric properties were also measured. The XRD and Raman spectroscopy showed that the crystallinity of the prepared glass ceramics depended very much on crystallization temperature and dwell-time. The larger dielectric constant and lower dielectric loss were obtained as crystallinity of the glass ceramics enhanced. The highest dielectric constant (εr) was found at 77 with a low dielectric loss of about 0.005.

  3. Formation of nanostructures in Eu3+ doped glass-ceramics: an XAS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Porres, J.; Segura, A.; Martínez-Criado, G.; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Lavín, V.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of x-ray absorption experiments carried out to deduce structural and chemical information in Eu3+ doped, transparent, oxyfluoride glass and nanostructured glass-ceramic samples. The spectra were measured at the Pb and Eu-LIII edges. The Eu environment in the glass samples is observed to be similar to that of EuF3. Complementary x-ray diffraction experiments show that thermal annealing creates β-PbF2 type nanocrystals. X-ray absorption indicates that Eu ions act as seeds in the nanocrystal formation. There is evidence of interstitial fluorine atoms around Eu ions as well as Eu dimers. X-ray absorption at the Pb-LIII edge shows that after the thermal treatment most lead atoms form a PbO amorphous phase and that only 10% of the lead atoms remain available to form β-PbF2 type nanocrystals. Both x-ray diffraction and absorption point to a high Eu content in the nanocrystals. Our study suggests new approaches to the oxyfluoride glass-ceramic synthesis in order to further improve their properties.

  4. Structural and magnetic properties of glass-ceramics containing silver and iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The particles of 20–30 nm size are obtained in glassy matrix. ► Relaxation of magnetic particles is observed. ► Magnetic properties are improved by Ag addition. ► Materials show silver release and antibacterial activity against E. coli. - Abstract: Glass-ceramics with a nominal composition of 25SiO2–(50 − x)CaO–15P2O5–8Fe2O3–2ZnO–xAg (where x = 0, 2 and 4 mol%) have been prepared. Structural features of glass-ceramics have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. Magnetic properties were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Ca3(PO4)2, hematite and magnetite are formed as major crystalline phases. The microstructure reveals the formation of 25–30 nm size particles. Mössbauer spectroscopy has shown the relaxation of magnetic particles. Saturation magnetization value is increased with an increase of Ag content up to 4 mol%, which has been attributed to the formation of magnetically ordered particles. The antibacterial response was found to depend on Ag ions concentration in the glass matrix and samples with 4 mol% Ag in glass matrix have shown effective antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli.

  5. Improved densification and properties of pressureless-sintered lithium disilicate glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ting; Qin, Yi; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wangbo_1@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Jian-Feng, E-mail: yang155@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-01-03

    Lithium disilicate glass-ceramics were pressureless sintered with glass powders derived from the SiO{sub 2}–Li{sub 2}O–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–ZrO{sub 2}–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–K{sub 2}O–CeO{sub 2} system. The effects of sintering temperature near the melting point of Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5} crystalline phases and particle size on the sintering behavior, microstructure, flexural strength and translucency of the Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass-ceramics were studied. The specimens obtained from the coarse-glass powder with particle size of 50 μm (S50) presented much higher relative density, improved flexural strength and translucency. Melting of Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5} crystals and crystallization of the melted liquids took place in the sintering temperature range. The melting increased the relative density while it decreased the crystallinity. The crystallization of the melted liquids played an opposite role. Due to the proper crystals size, crystallinity (70.47±3.02%) and higher relative density (97.68±0.22%), good flexural strength (282±14 MPa) and comparable translucency as the commercially used Emax{sup ®} materials were achieved for the S50 specimens sintered at 910 °C.

  6. 锌硼玻璃基低温共烧陶瓷的微波介电性能研究%Microwave dielectric properties of zinc borate glass-based low temperature co-fired ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周东祥; 孙荣光; 胡云香

    2011-01-01

    Zinc borate glass/ceramic composites for low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) were prepared from the mixtures of zinc borate glass, Al203 and TiO2. The effects of the mass ratio of TiO2 to Al203 on the phase evolution and dielectric properties of prepared composites were investigated. The results show that the content of ZnAl2O4, TiO2 and 4ZnO · 3B203 in the composites increases, decreases,remains essentially unchanged respectively with the decrease of the mass ratio of TiO2 to Al203. The permittivity and dielectric loss of these composites increase significantly with the increase of the mass ratio of TiO2 to Al203. A near-zero temperature coefficient of resonant frequency of the composite is obtained when the mass fraction ofTiO2 is 8%.%采用3ZnO-2B2O3玻璃与Al2O3和TiO2复合烧结制备了锌硼玻璃基低温共烧陶瓷复合材料,研究了TiO2/Al2O3质量比对所制复合材料相组成和微波介电性能的影响.结果表明:随着TiO2/Al2O3质量比减少,复合材料中ZnAl2O4相含量增多,TiO2相含量减少,4ZnO·3B2O3相的含量基本不变.随着TiO2/Al2O3质量比增大,复合材料的介电常数和介质损耗增大.当TiO2的质量分数为8%时,复合材料的谐振频率温度系数接近于零.

  7. Natural radioactivity in zirconia-based dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconia-based ceramics are being increasingly used in dental prosthetics in substitution of metal cores, which are known to induce local toxic reactions and delayed allergic responses in the oral tissues. Some concerns have been however raised about the use of zirconia, since it is known that unpurified zirconia materials may contain non negligible levels of natural radionuclides of the U/Th series. Combined measurements of alpha and gamma spectrometry as well as beta dosimetry were conducted on zirconia samples used for dental applications. Samples were available in form of powder and/or solid blocks. The results showed that the beta dose rate in zirconia ceramics was on average only slightly higher than the levels measured in natural teeth, and generally lower than the values measured in feldspatic and glass ceramics. These materials are indeed known to deliver a beta dose significantly higher than that measured from natural teeth, due to the relatively high levels of 40K (between 2 and 3 kBq.kg-1). The content of radionuclides of the U/Th series in the zirconia sample was estimated to be lower than 15 Bq.kg-1, i.e. doubtlessly below the exclusion level of 1 kBq.kg-1 recommended by IAEA in the Safety Standard Series. Beta dosimetry measurements, however, gave indications of possible inhomogeneous clusters of radioactivity, which might give rise to local doses above the background. (author)

  8. Natural radioactivity in zirconia-based dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconia-based ceramics are being increasingly used in dental prosthetics in substitution of metal cores, which are known to induce local toxic reactions and delayed allergic responses in the oral tissues. Some concerns have been however raised about the use of zirconia, since it is known that unpurified zirconia materials may contain non negligible levels of natural radionuclides of the U/Th series. Combined measurements of alpha and gamma spectrometry as well as beta dosimetry were conducted on zirconia samples used for dental applications. Samples were available in form of powder and/or solid blocks. The results showed that the beta dose rate in zirconia ceramics was on average only slightly higher than the levels measured in natural teeth, and generally lower than the values measured in feldspatic and glass ceramics. These materials are indeed known to deliver a beta dose significantly higher than that measured from natural teeth, due to the relatively high levels of 40K (between 2 and 3 kBq·kg-1). The content of radionuclides of the U/Th series in the zirconia sample was estimated to be lower than 15 Bq·kg-1, i.e. doubtlessly below the exclusion level of 1 kBq·kg-1 recommended by IAEA in the Safety Standard Series. Beta dosimetry measurements, however, gave indications of possible inhomogeneous clusters of radioactivity, which might give rise to local doses above the background. (author)

  9. Effect of Crystallisation Degree on Hardness of Basaltic Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The dependence of hardness of basaltic glass-ceramics on their crystallisation degree has been explored by means of differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Vickers indentation. Different degrees of crystallisation in the basaltic glasses have been obtained by...... the augite crystals is in the range of the hardness of a similar pyroxene, i.e., a pure diopside crystal. The hardness of diopside has been both measured and calculated. The calculation has been done by considering the strength of each individual bond and the amount of bonds per volume, i.e., by using...... first principle calculations. It is found that the hardness of the glass phase decreases slightly with an increase in the degree of crystallisation, while that of the augite phase drastically decreases....

  10. Structure and magnetic behaviour of the sol-gel derived iron aluminosilicate glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased interest in glass-ceramics has resulted from their potential applications. In comparison with ordinary glasses, gel-derived glasses offer the advantage of good chemical homogeneity and purity and a better control of physical and chemical properties. In this paper the 0.10Fe2O3-0.90(0.90SiO20.1Al2O3) gel-derived glass-ceramic was studied. The samples were prepared starting from tetraethoxysilane as source of silica, iron and alumina nitrates. The obtained gel was heat-treated at different temperatures: 250 deg. C, 500 deg. C and 1000 deg. C in air for 48 hours. The structure and properties of the samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out on a DRON 3 diffractometer using CuKα radiation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed using a Weiss type magnetic balance in the 80-300 K temperature range. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the 0.10Fe2O3-0.90(0.90SiO20.1Al2O3) glass-ceramic points out that the heat-treatment has a great importance for the crystallization process. α Fe2O3 (hematite) was the main crystalline phase formed. This crystalline phase, that has a trigonal structure (A=5.0317 A, B=13.737 A), grew with increasing heat-treatment temperatures. The magnetic susceptibility data of the 0.10Fe2O3-0.90(0.90SiO20.1Al2O3) glass-ceramic indicate a Curie-Weiss type behaviour. These data were used to determine some important magnetic parameters: the molar Curie constant, Cm, the paramagnetic Curie temperature, θp, and the effective magnetic moment per iron ion, μeff , of the 0.10Fe2O3-0.90(0.90SiO20.1Al2O3) samples. The paramagnetic Curie temperature θp is a rough indicator of magnetic interaction between Fe3+ ions. The negative values obtained for θp suggests that the interactions between the magnetic Fe3+ ions are antiferromagnetic and their intensity becomes higher with increasing the heat-treatment temperature. (authors)

  11. Analysis of archaeological ceramics and glass samples by microPIXE and LA-ICP-MS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of a proton microprobe at ATOMKI and LA-ICP-MS and SEM techniques at the French institutes made it possible to start a joint research of archaeological ceramics and glass samples in the framework of COST-GI program about one year ago. Concerning ceramics the task has been the determination of provenance of some roman amphorae samples. In another project glass samples found in the royal palaces of Buda and Visegrad were analyzed. The results may be utilized both in exact dating and determination of provenance of glass artefacts of unknown origin. (K.A.)

  12. Tb3+/Eu3+: YF3 nanophase embedded glass ceramics: Structural characterization, tunable luminescence and temperature sensing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tb3+/Eu3+ co-doped transparent bulk glass ceramics containing orthorhombic β-YF3 nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by melt-quenching and subsequent heating. The partition of the active centers into the YF3 crystalline lattice was confirmed by elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscope, emission spectra and decay curves. As a consequence, Tb3+ → Eu3+ energy transfer was demonstrated to be more efficient in the glass ceramic than in the precursor glass, which resulted in color tunable luminescence by simply modifying Eu3+ content and induced the linearly temperature-dependent fluorescence intensity ratio between the Tb3+: 5D4 → 7F5 transition and the Eu3+: 5D0 → 7F4 one in the Tb3+/Eu3+ co-doped glass ceramic. It is expected that the investigated glass ceramic might be a promising candidate for solid-state lighting as well as optical temperature sensor. - Highlights: • Lanthanide doped glass ceramics containing YF3 nanocrystals were fabricated. • Tb3+ and Eu3+ dopants were confirmed to incorporate into YF3 lattice. • Tunable luminescence was realized via Tb3+ → Eu3+ energy transfer. • Linearly temperature-dependent fluorescence intensity ratio was detected

  13. Crystallization kinetics and spectroscopic investigations on Tb3+ and Yb3+ codoped glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent Tb3+ and Yb3+ codoped oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing CaF2 nanocrystals were prepared by melt quenching and subsequent heat treatment. Crystallization kinetics of CaF2 nanocrystals was investigated by differential scanning calorimetric method. The average apparent activation energy Ea of the crystallization was ∼498 kJ/mol. Moreover, the value of the Avrami exponent n was 1.01. These results suggest that the crystallization mechanism of CaF2 is a diffusion controlled growth process of needles and plates of finite long dimensions. X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy image confirmed the CaF2 nanocrystals in the glass ceramic. Ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission spectra of the as-made glass and the glass ceramic with an excitation of a 974 nm laser diode were recorded at room temperature. An intense UV emission at 381 nm was observed in the glass ceramic. The origin of the enhancement of the emission at 381 nm was investigated using spectroscopic technique and Judd-Ofelt analysis. The enhancement of the emission at 381 nm could be attributed to the change of the ligand field of Tb3+ ions due to the incorporation of some Tb3+ and Yb3+ ions into CaF2 nanocrystals in the glass ceramic

  14. Blocking effect of crystal–glass interface in lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The blocking effect of the crystal–glass interface on the carrier transport behavior in the lanthanum doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics: preparation and characterization. - Highlights: • La2O3 addition promotes the crystallization of the major crystalline phase. • The Z″ and M″ peaks exist a significant mismatch for 0.5 mol% La2O3 addition. • The Z″ and M″ peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La2O3 addition. • Crystallite impedance decreases while crystal–glass interface impedance increases. • La2O3 addition increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface. - Abstract: The microstructures and dielectric properties in La2O3-doped barium strontium titanate glass–ceramics have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. SEM analysis indicated that La2O3 additive decreases the average crystallite size. Impedance spectroscopy revealed that the positions of Z″ and M″ peaks are close for undoped samples. When La2O3 concentration is 0.5 mol%, the Z″ and M″ peaks show a significant mismatch. Furthermore, these peaks separate obviously for 1.0 mol% La2O3 addition. With increasing La2O3 concentration, the contribution of the crystallite impedance becomes smaller, while the contribution of the crystal–glass interface impedance becomes larger. More interestingly, it was found that La2O3 additive increases blocking factor of the crystal–glass interface in the temperature range of 250–450 °C. This may be attributed to a decrease of activation energy of the crystallite and an increase of the crystal–glass interface area

  15. Progress in rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics for laser cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Krishnaiah, Kummara; Ledemi, Yannick; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Loranger, Sebastien; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling with anti-Stokes fluorescencewas predicted by Pringsheim in 1929, but for solids was only demonstrated in 1995. There are many difficulties which have hindered laser assisted cooling, principally the chemical purity of a sample and the availability of suitable hosts. Recent progress has seen the cooled temperature plummet to 93K in Yb:YLF. One of the challenges for laser cooling to become ubiquitous, is incorporating the rare-earthcooling ion in a more easily engineered material, rather than a pure crystalline host. Rare-earth-doped nanocrystalline glass-ceramics were first developed by Wang and Ohwaki for enhanced luminescence and mechanical properties compared to their parent glasses. Our work has focused on creating a nanocrystalline environment for the cooling ion, in an easy to engineer glass. The glasses with composition 30SiO2-15Al2O3-27CdF2-22PbF2-4YF3-2YbF3 (mol%), have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. By a simple post fabrication thermal treatment, the rare-earth ions are embedded in the crystalline phase within the glass matrix. Nanocrystals with various sizes and rare-earth concentrations have been fabricated and their photoluminescence properties assessed in detail. These materials show close to unity photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) when pumped above the band. However, they exhibit strong up-conversion into the blue, characteristic of Tm trace impurity whose presence was confirmed. The purification of the starting materials is underway to reduce the background loss to demonstrate laser cooling. Progress in the development of these nano-glass-ceramics and their experimental characterization will be discussed.

  16. Recent progress on upconversion luminescence enhancement in rare-earth doped transparent glass-ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱建备; 焦清; 周大成; 杨正文

    2016-01-01

    The upconversion (UC) of the rare earth doped glass-ceramics has been extensively investigated due to their potential ap-plications in many fields, such as color display, high density memories, optical data storage, sensor and energy solar cell, etc. Many series of them, especially the oxyfluorides glasses containing Ba2LaF7 nanocrystals were studied in this review work, due to the ther-mal and mechanical toughness, high optical transmittance from the ultraviolet to the infrared regions, and a low nonlinear refractive index compared to the other commercial laser glasses. Moreover, the energy transfer (ET) between the rare earth ions and transition metals plays an important role in the upconversion process. The cooperative ET has been researched very activly in UC glasses due to applications in the fields of solar cells, such as in the Er/Yb, Tm/Yb, Tb/Yb, Tb/Er/Yb and Tm/Er/Yb couples. The present article re-views on the recent progress made on: (i) upconversion materials with fluoride microcrystals in glasses and the mechanisms involved, including the UC in double and tri-dopant RE ions activated fluoride microcrystal, energy transfer process; and (ii) the effect of the metal Mn and nanoparticles of Au, Ag, Cu on the enhancement of UC emissions. Discussions have also been made on materials, ma-terial synthesis, the structural and emission properties of glass-ceramics. Additionally, the conversion efficiency is still a challenge for the spectra conversion materials and application; challenge and future advances have also been demonstrated.

  17. Luminescence properties of Na3YSi3O9:M3+ (M = Sm, Tb, Tm) glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Sm3+, Tb3+, or Tm3+ doped-Na3YSi3O9 GC emit reddish, green, or blue light, respectively. •Emission intensities of these glass ceramics are superior to corresponding phosphors. •Color tones of Na3YSi3O9:Sm3+, Tb3+, Tm3+ GC can be changed from warm white to cool white. •These glass ceramics have potential application in white LED devices. -- Abstract: The transparent Na3YSi3O9:M3+ (M = Sm, Tb, Tm) glass ceramics were prepared by high temperature melting with a heat-treatment at 750 °C. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to investigate their structure and optical properties. The M3+ ions were introduced as luminescence centers into the Na3YSi3O9 glass ceramics. Under ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the Na3YSi3O9:Sm3+, Na3YSi3O9:Tb3+, and Na3YSi3O9:Tm3+ glass ceramics exhibited the characteristic transitions of Sm3+ (4G5/2 → 6HJ, J = 5/2 and 7/2), Tb3+ (5D4 → 7FJ, J = 6, 5 and 4), and Tm3+ (1D2 → 3F4), respectively. The color tones of Na3YSi3O9:Sm3+, Tb3+, Tm3+ glass ceramic changed from cool white (0.2589, 0.3119) to warm white (0.3231, 0.4491) by adjusting the excitation wavelength. The results indicated that the Na3YSi3O9:M3+ (M = Sm, Tb, Tm) glass ceramic is a potential matrix material for white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under UV-LED excitation

  18. The Preparation and Photoluminescence Properties of Fluorosilicate Glass Ceramics Containing CeF3:Dy3+ Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ce3+ and Dy3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glasses and glass ceramics containing CeF3 nanocrystals are prepared in a reducing atmosphere. XRD measurements and the calculated lattice parameters suggest that Dy3+ ions are incorporated with precipitated CeF3 nanocrystals along with a rise in the Dy3+ concentration or an increase in the annealing temperature. The glass ceramics emit white light close to the CIE coordinates of (0.3,0.3), derived from a combination of Ce3+ and Dy3+ emission. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of the Ce3+ and Dy3+ co-doped glass ceramics can be tuned by varying the ratio of Ce3+/Dy3+, while the luminescence intensity can be enhanced by heat treatment above 620°C. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Study of parameters of heat treatment in obtaining glass ceramic materials with addition of the industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of materials from crystallization of glass, called glass ceramic, have proved interesting by the possibility of development of different microstructures, with reduced grain size and the presence of residual amorphous phase in different quantities. The method that uses the differential thermal analysis (DTA) provides research on the material properties over a wide temperature range, it's widely applied to crystallization processes of glass ceramic materials. Within this context, this paper aims to study the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in glass ceramic materials in the system SiO2- Al2O3-Li2O, obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ash as source of aluminosilicates, through the technique of differential thermal analysis. (author)

  20. Glasses and Glass-Ceramic Components from Inorganic Waste and Novel Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Ponsot, Inès

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to European environmental rules and regulations establishment, waste recycling has become a more and more relevant problematic. For manufacturing plants, especially those producing hazardous wastes, expenses linked to waste production have drastically increased over the last decades. In the proposed work, various hazardous and non-hazardous wastes, among: soda-lime and borosilicate glass cullet, cathode ray tubes glass, exhausted lime from fume abatement systems residues, sludge and sl...

  1. Bioactivity of Sodium Free Fluoride Containing Glasses and Glass-Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojing Chen; Xiaohui Chen; Brauer, Delia S.; Rory M. Wilson; Hill, Robert G.; Natalia Karpukhina

    2014-01-01

    The bioactivity of a series of fluoride-containing sodium-free calcium and strontium phosphosilicate glasses has been tested in vitro. Glasses with high fluoride content were partially crystallised to apatite and other fluoride-containing phases. The bioactivity study was carried out in Tris and SBF buffers, and apatite formation was monitored by XRD, FTIR and solid state NMR. Ion release in solutions has been measured using ICP-OES and fluoride-ion selective electrode. The results show that...

  2. Synthesis, IR, crystallization and dielectric study of (Pb, Sr)TiO3 borosilicate glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven glass compositions were prepared by melt and quench method with progressive substitution of SrO for PbO (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) with a step-wise increment of 0.10 in the glass ((PbxSr1-x)OTiO2)-((2SiO2B2O3))-(BaO.K2O).Nb2O5 (mol percentage) system. The infrared spectra (IR) of various glass compositions in the above mentioned glass system was recorded over a continuous spectral range 400-4000 cm-1 to study their different oxides structure systematically. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was recorded from room temperature (∼27°C) to 1400°C employing a heating rate of 10°C/min to determine glass transition temperature, Tg and crystallization temperature, Tc. The melting temperature, Tm, of these glass compositions was found to be in the range 597-1060°C depending on the composition under normal atmospheric conditions. Tg and Tm of glasses were found to increase with increasing SrO content. X-ray diffraction analysis of these glass-ceramic samples shows that major crystalline phase of the glass-ceramic sample with x ≤ 0.5 was found to have cubic structure similar to SrTiO3 ceramic. Scanning electron microscopy has been carried out to see the surface morphology of the crystallites dispersed in the glassy matrix. (author)

  3. Crystallization and fluorescence properties of Ce:YAG glass-ceramics with low SiO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ce3+ doped YAG (Ce:YAG) glass-ceramics with 20 mol% SiO2 were fabricated by the method of amorphous sintering followed by controlled crystallization (ASCC). An investigation on the crystallization process of as-sintered glasses revealed that surface crystallization occurred first and YAlO3 (YAP) was precipitated as the main crystalline phase; then bulk crystallization continued inside these glasses and YAP phase transited to YAG. The phase transition from YAP to YAG could be promoted by an inert atmosphere instead of reductive one and by the increase of the crystallization temperature and holding time. By combining the Ce:YAG glass-ceramics with a blue-emitting InGaN chip, white LEDs with a relatively high color rendering index of 80.3 and low color temperature of 5098 K were produced. Their luminous efficacy decreased with the increasing annealing temperatures, which was probably caused by the degradation of transparency. -- Highlights: ► Translucent SiO2-low Ce:YAG glass-ceramics were successfully obtained. ► A white LED (CIR, 80.3 and CT, 5098 K) was equipped with the obtained glass-ceramic. ► Controlled surface and bulk crystallizations of the glass were observed. ► Three Ce3+ emission centers were possibly involved during the luminescence decay. ► Luminous efficacy decreased with elevated annealing temperatures

  4. Microstructure and leach rates of apatite glass-ceramics as a host for Sr high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apatite glass-ceramic wasteform with 21 wt% SrO loading was fabricated for immobilizing Sr high-level liquid waste. The normalized leach rates of Sr, K, Mo, Al, P, Si are 6.9x10-4, 1.09x10-1, 2.7x10-3, 3.22x10-2, 2.84x10-2, 3.26x10-2 g/m2 day, respectively. Component Fe in all leachates is not detectable in the 28-day static leaching test procedure in MCC-1. Instead of leaching, component Ca is adsorbed by testing samples. All the component Mo concentrates in the glass matrix of the well crystallized apatite glass-ceramics. For an apatite glass-ceramic wasteform, the optimum microstructure should be one in which poorly crystallized apatite crystallites distribute evenly in the glass phase. Perfect crystallization makes the crystal phase more stoichiometric and significantly changes the composition of the coexisting glass phase in the system, which, in our case, decreases the chemical stability of the apatite glass-ceramics

  5. AFM Surface Roughness and Topography Analysis of Lithium Disilicate Glass Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pantić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is presenting AFM analysis of surface roughness of Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD under different finishing procedure (techniques: polishing, glazing and grinding. Lithium disilicate glass ceramics is all-ceramic dental system which is characterized by high aesthetic quality and it can be freely said that properties of material provide all prosthetic requirements: function, biocompatibility and aesthetic. Experimental tests of surface roughness were investigated on 4 samples with dimensions: 18 mm length, 14 mm width and 12 mm height. Contact surfaces of three samples were treated with different finishing procedure (polishing, glazing and grinding, and the contact surface of the raw material is investigated as a fourth sample. Experimental measurements were done using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM of NT-MDT manufacturers, in the contact mode. All obtained results of different prepared samples are presented in the form of specific roughness parameters (Rа, Rz, Rmax, Rq and 3D surface topography.

  6. Glass-ceramics of alkaline earth chloroaptites as matrices for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrochemical reprocessing is the best suited process for irradiated metallic fuel. Molten salt electro-refining is the most important step to remove U and Pu from the spent metallic fuel by this process. After the electro-refining process the radioactive waste (chloride salts) need to be disposed of in suitable matrices. The current process to treat the chloride waste is to incorporate it in glass-bonded sodalites. In the present study, attempts are made to develop a suitable matrix to immobilize chloride wastes with simple and relatively low temperature processes. Apatites are naturally occurring minerals with a general formula of M10(PO4)6X2, (M= Ca, Sr, Ba; X= OH,CI,F) with a hexagonal crystal structure (S.G : P63/m). Apatites can accommodate alkaline earth and various other aliovalent cations (rare earth etc.) into its crystal structure along with Cl. Apatites are also known to have high resistance to leaching of the constituent elements under geological conditions. It may not be possible to immobilize the whole spectrum of the pyrochemical waste in a single phase M10(PO4)6Cl2, M=Ca, Sr, Ba. However, M-chloroapatite encapsulated in borosilicate glass (BSG) can immobilize most of the radwaste elements in the composite matrix (glass bonded chloroapatite), thus utilizing the immobilizing efficiency of both the ceramic phase and BSG. The apatite glass-ceramics were prepared by mixing and heat-treating stoichiometric concentrations of apatite forming reagents, 20 wt. % borosilicate glass (BSG), and known concentrations (10-15 wt %) of simulated chloride wastes. The mixture of reactants was heated in a platinum crucible at 1023 K for 5h in air. The powders were characterized by XRD to confirm the formation of M10(PO4)6Cl2 (abbreviated to MApCI, M=Ca,Sr,Ba) and glass bonded chloroapatite composites. The surface morphology and qualitative chemical composition of the powders were examined by SEM and EDX. Thermal expansion and glass transition temperature of the matrices

  7. Investigation of Er3+ coordination in zinc-lead tellurite bulk glasses and silica-hafnia glass ceramics waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a comparison of the local structure of erbium in zinc-lead tellurite glasses and in silica-hafnia glass ceramics waveguides prepared using the melt quenching or sol-gel and dip coating techniques respectively. The local environment of Er3+ions was probed using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the L3-edge of erbium at room temperature. Significative differences in the first Er-O coordination shells are evidenced. In tellurite glasses, independently on the ZnO/PbO content, the erbium co-ordination number (N) is constant at about 6.5, the distance (R) remains the same at 2.34 Å and the Debye-Waller (σ2) is about 0.0150 Å2. On the other hand, N is lower at about 5.2 for all the silica-hafnia waveguides, whereas the Er-O distance and the DW factors are changed with time and temperature of thermal annealing.

  8. Electrochemical characterization and structure of tungsten–lead–germanate glasses and glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of tungsten–lead–germanate glasses with the xWO3·(100 − x)[7GeO2·3PbO] composition where x = 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 mol% WO3 were synthesized using melt quenching technique. Tungsten ions seem to exist in these glasses in the W+5 state acting as glass modifiers; this is evidenced from UV–vis, EPR spectra and cyclic voltametry measurements, too. Our results show that the lead and germanium atoms do not accommodate with the non-bridging oxygens and the excess of the oxygen ions. The accommodation of the network is possible by the increase of the amount of [WOn] structural units and the formation of PbWO4 crystalline phase, in agreement with IR and XRD data, respectively. The cyclic voltammogram of the glass electrode with x = 10 mol%WO3 exhibits two pairs of distinct maxima attributed to the reduction of Ag+1 to Ag0, W+6 to W0 and the oxidation of Pb+2 to Pb+4, W+5 to W+6. The semiconducting properties of these glasses are due to electron transfer between tungsten and lead ions with different valence states

  9. Luminescence property and phase-separation texture of phase-separated glasses and glass-ceramics in Mn-doped ZnO-SiO2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve fine phosphor materials with high efficiency, phase-separated glasses and glass-ceramics in Mn-doped ZnO-SiO2 system, of which composition was xZnO-(100-x) SiO2 mol% (x=10, 20, 30) in the immiscibility region, were prepared by melting and subsequent heat-treatment process. All the melt-quenched glasses were phase-separated into two phases, i.e. a ZnO-rich phase and a SiO2-rich one. The SiO2-rich particles were formed into the ZnO-rich phase in the composition of x=20 and x=30, while the ZnO-rich particles were formed in the SiO2-rich phase in the composition of x=10. The melt-quenched glass showed the orange-emission at around 625 nm of its peak wavelength. After the heat-treatment on the melt-quenched glasses, the Zn2SiO4 (willemite) phase were precipitated, and the glass-ceramics gave strong green-emission at around 525 nm. The intensity of the green-emission of the glass-ceramics in the composition of x=10 was higher than those in the composition of x=20 and x=30 in spite of the same amount of precipitated Zn2SiO4 phase. (author)

  10. Archaeometric investigation of medieval Bulgarian glasses and sgraffito ceramics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine the content of Au, Ba, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Co, Cs, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Rb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, Sb, V and Yb in glass samples excavated from medieval glassworkshops in Pliska and Preslav and in 20 glass finds from Preslav. Sgraffito ceramic samples excavated in Veliko Tarnovo were also analysed and the elements Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Si, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V and Yb were determined. In order to localize the production site of the archaeological finds, the results from the analysis were subjected to cluster analysis, and stepwise discriminant analysis using the program package BMDP. A variety of the production of the medieval glass workshop in Preslav was identified and evaluated. It was proved that a part of the sgraffito ceramics samples have been produced in one and the same place and that the chemical composition might be successfully used to differentiate between the production of two workshops

  11. Structure and distortion of lead fluoride nanocrystals in rare earth doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jin; Zhao, Lijuan; Guo, Hui; Lan, Zijian; Chang, Lifen; Li, Yiming; Yu, Hua

    2013-10-28

    A series of rare earth (RE) doped oxyfluoride glasses with the composition of (45-x) SiO2-5Al2O3-40PbF2-10CdF2-xRe2O3 (x = 1, 5, 10, 15) (mol%) were prepared by a traditional melt-quenching method. Glass ceramics (GCs) were obtained after thermal treatment and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the nanocrystal structure and distortion. Both the dopant type and the doping level play an important role in the distortion of the PbF2-RE lattice. It is found that a cubic Pb3REF9 phase forms in low doping GCs, a tetragonal PbREF5 phase forms in middle doping GCs and cubic PbRE3F11 forms in high doping GCs. Accordingly, the site symmetry of RE(3+) dopants in β-PbF2 nanocrystal undergoes a transition of Oh···D4h···Oh with the increase of doping level. The change in the ligands coordinating the RE(3+) ions was further illustrated by the optical changes in Yb-doped GCs. This paper provides insights on the nanocrystal structure of RE at the atomic level and tries to make a complete description of the nanocrystal structure and distortion in these glass-ceramic materials, which will benefit the optimization of optical properties. PMID:24019159

  12. Photostimulated luminescence from a fluorobromozirconate glass-ceramic and the effect of crystallite size and phase

    CERN Document Server

    Secu, M; Spaeth, J M; Edgar, A; Williams, G V M; Rieser, U

    2003-01-01

    We report a systematic study of the photoluminescence (PL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and thermostimulated luminescence (TSL) from europium-and bromine-doped fluorozirconate glass-ceramics. Eu sup 2 sup + ions in the as-prepared glass show no PL, but after suitable thermal annealing hexagonal phase and orthorhombic phase barium bromide crystallites are precipitated and PL is observed from Eu sup 2 sup + ions in these crystallites. Room temperature PSL is observed from the orthorhombic phase, with an efficiency which is up to 9% of the well known crystalline storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu sup 2 sup +. The emission is at 404 nm, and there is a maximum in the stimulation at 580 nm. We associate the PSL with an optically quenchable peak in the glow curve, which has an activation energy of 1.20 eV and attribute this feature to a perturbed F centre. Room temperature PSL from glass-ceramics containing predominantly the hexagonal phase of BaBr sub 2 has a relative efficiency of less than 0.07%. The resultant trap...

  13. Structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics containing zirconolite and titanite crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Wu, Lang; Xu, Dong; Wang, Xin; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2015-11-01

    In order to increase the solubility of actinides in the glass matrix, the effects of CaO, TiO2, and ZrSiO4 addition (abbreviated as CTZ, in the mole ratio of 2:2:1) on crystalline phases, microstructure, and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were investigated. The results show that the samples possess both zirconolite-2M and titanite phase when the CTZ content is greater than or equal to 45 wt.%. For the glass-ceramics with 45 wt.% CTZ (CTZ-45), only zirconolite-2M phase is observed after annealing at 680-740 °C for 2 h. The CTZ-45 possess zirconolite-2M and titanite phases after annealing at 700 °C first, and then annealing at 900-1050 °C for 2 h. Furthermore, the zirconolite-2M and titanite grains show a strip and brick shape, respectively. The CTZ-45 annealing at 950 °C shows the lower normalized leaching rates of B, Na and Nd when compared to that of CTZ-0 and CTZ-55.

  14. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions

  15. Glass-ceramic coated Mg-Ca alloys for biomedical implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, J V; Antoniac, I; Fosca, M; De Bonis, A; Blajan, A I; Cotrut, C; Graziani, V; Curcio, M; Cricenti, A; Niculescu, M; Ortenzi, M; Teghil, R

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable metals and alloys are promising candidates for biomedical bone implant applications. However, due to the high rate of their biodegradation in human body environment, they should be coated with less reactive materials, such, for example, as bioactive glasses or glass-ceramics. Fort this scope, RKKP composition glass-ceramic coatings have been deposited on Mg-Ca(1.4wt%) alloy substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition method, and their properties have been characterized by a number of techniques. The prepared coatings consist of hydroxyapatite and wollastonite phases, having composition close to that of the bulk target material used for depositions. The 100μm thick films are characterized by dense, compact and rough morphology. They are composed of a glassy matrix with various size (from micro- to nano-) granular inclusions. The average surface roughness is about 295±30nm due to the contribution of micrometric aggregates, while the roughness of the fine-texture particulates is approximately 47±4nm. The results of the electrochemical corrosion evaluation tests evidence that the RKKP coating improves the corrosion resistance of the Mg-Ca (1.4wt%) alloy in Simulated Body Fluid. PMID:27127065

  16. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L.J.; Mecham, W.J.; Reedy, G.T.; Steindler, M.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions.

  17. Study of glass-nanocomposite and glass–ceramic containing ferroelectric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Glass nanocomposites was synthesized. ► Glass nanocomposites exhibit both optical transmission bands at 598 and 660 nm and broad dielectric anomalies. ► The ferroelectricity in pure single-phase oxide glass has not yet been discovered. - Abstract: Transparent glass nanocomposite in the pseudo binary system (100 − x) Li2B4O7–xBaTiO3 with x = 0 and 60 (in mol%) were prepared. Amorphous and glassy characteristics of the as-prepared samples were established via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) respectively. The precipitated BaTiO3 nanocrystal phase embedded in the glass sample at x = 60 mol% was identified by transmission electron microscopic (TEM). The optical transmission bands at 598 and 660 nm were assigned to Ti3+ ions in tetragonal distorted octahedral sites. The precipitated Li2B4O7, BaTi(BO3)2 and BaTiO3 nanocrystallites phases with heat-treatment at 923 K for 6 h (HT923) in glass–ceramic were identified by XRD, TEM and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The as-prepared at x = 60 mol% and the HT923 samples exhibit broad dielectric anomalies in the vicinity of the ferroelectric-to-paraelectric transition temperature. The results demonstrate that the method presented may be an effective way to fabricate ferroelectric host and development of multifunctional ferroelectrics.

  18. Fabrication and Crystallization of ZnO-SLS Glass Derived Willemite Glass-Ceramics as a Potential Material for Optics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Mohd Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Willemite glass-ceramics were successfully derived from conventional melt-quench ZnO-SLS precursor glass by an isothermal heat treatment process. The effect of heat treatment temperatures on the physical properties was investigated by Archimedes principle and linear shrinkage. The generation of willemite crystal phase and morphology with increase in heat treatment temperature was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM techniques. X-ray diffraction revealed that the metastable β-Zn2SiO4 and thermodynamically stable zinc orthosilicate α-Zn2SiO4 phases can be observed at temperatures above 700°C. The experimental results indicated that the density and shrinkage of the glass-ceramic vary with increasing the sintering temperature. FTIR studies showed that the structure of glass-ceramic consists of SiO2 and ZnO4 units and exhibits the structural evolution of willemite glass-ceramics. The characteristic of strong vibrational bands can be related to the SiO44- tetrahedron corresponding to reference spectra of willemite.

  19. Marginal Adaptation of Indirect Composite, Glass-Ceramic Inlays and Direct Composite: An In Vitro Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mahboub

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This experimental in vitro study compared marginal adaptation of indirect composite, glass-ceramic inlays and direct composite.Materials and Methods: Seventy-five recently extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups (n=25 and mesio-occluso-distal cavities with the same dimensions were prepared in the teeth. Indirect composite and glass-ceramic inlays were fabricatedfollowing manufacturer's instructions and the marginal gap was measured by a stereomicroscope at magnification 40× before cementation. After cementation of inlays and restoring the third group by direct composite, all the specimens were thermocycled and the marginal gaps were measured exactly as previously described. Repeated measure ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test were used for pairwise comparison of occlusal, proximal, and gingival marginal gaps in each group. One-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test wereused for comparison of mean marginal gap in the three groups and for comparison of marginal gap before and after cementation in inlays, paired T-test was used.Results: The marginal gap of direct composite (19.96 μm was significantly lower than that of indirect composite inlay (48.47 μm, which in itself was significantly lower than that of glass-ceramic inlay (60.96 μm. In all the restorations, marginal gap in the gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal and proximal margins. The marginal gap of inlays did not change after cementation and thermocycling.Conclusion: This study indicated that the marginal gaps of the evaluated restorations are less than 100 μm, which is clinically acceptable.

  20. Excitation wavelength-sensitive multi-colour fluorescence in Eu/Tb ions doped yttrium aluminium garnet glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eu/Tb doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) glass ceramics, containing single phase of YAG micro-crystals with an excellent orientation (1 1 1) in the matrix, have been prepared by heat-treating lithium–yttrium–aluminium–silicate (LYAS) precursor glasses. A group of dynamic-colour white fluorescences with different colour temperatures are achieved in Eu/Tb codoped YAG glass ceramics, attributing to the simultaneous generation of three primary colour (RGB) emissions from Eu3+ (red), Eu2+ (blue), and Tb3+ (green) by varying the UV radiation wavelength. The favourable bright white light with the colour coordinate (0.360, 0.308) close to the equal energy point is obtained under 365 nm excitation. These admirable results indicate that the Eu/Tb codoped YAG glass ceramics are a promising candidate to develop white light sources under the excitation of commercial UV-LEDs. - Highlights: ► RE doped glass ceramics (GC) have been derived by heat-treating LYAS mother glasses. ► Single phase of YAG crystals has determined in RE doped GC. ► YAG micro-crystals grow with an excellent orientation (1 1 1) in RE doped GC. ► Two distinct luminescence centres of Eu in YAG GC have been identified. ► Excitation wavelength-sensitive white light has been achieved in Eu/Tb doped YAG GC.