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Sample records for based geopolymer concretes

  1. Creep Behaviour of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Wallah S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash-based geopolymer concrete is manufactured using fly ash as its source material and does not use Portland cement at all. Beside fly ash, alkaline solution is also utilized to make geopolymer paste which binds the aggregates to form geopolymer concrete. This paper presents the study of creep behaviour of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete. Four series of specimens with various compressive strengths were prepared to study its creep behaviour for the duration of test up to one year. The te...

  2. Creep Behaviour of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallah S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash-based geopolymer concrete is manufactured using fly ash as its source material and does not use Portland cement at all. Beside fly ash, alkaline solution is also utilized to make geopolymer paste which binds the aggregates to form geopolymer concrete. This paper presents the study of creep behaviour of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete. Four series of specimens with various compressive strengths were prepared to study its creep behaviour for the duration of test up to one year. The test method followed the procedures applied for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete. Test results show that fly ash-based geopolymer concrete undergoes low creep which is generally less than that of OPC concrete. After one year of loading, the results for specific creep of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete in this study ranges from 15 to 29 microstrain for concrete compressive strength 67–40 MPa respectively. From the test results, it is also found out that the creep coefficient of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete is about half of that predicted using Gilbert’s Method for OPC concrete.

  3. Experimental Studies on Punching Shear and Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Slag Based Geopolymer Concrete

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    Srinivasan Karunanithi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was focused on slag based geopolymer concrete with the addition of steel fibre. The slag based geopolymer concrete was under shear load and sudden impact load to determine its response. The punching shear represents the load dissipation of the material and the energy absorption capacity of the geopolymer concrete to impact load. The various percentage of steel fibre in the slag based geopolymer concrete was 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%. Overall the dosage 0.5% of steel fibre reinforced slag based geopolymer shows better results with a punching shear of 224 kN and 1.0% of steel fibre incorporated geopolymer concrete had the better energy absorption capacity with 3774.40 N·m for first crack toughness and 4123.88 N·m for ultimate failure toughness.

  4. An Investigation of Bond Strength of Reinforcing Bars in Fly Ash and GGBS Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopalan C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous aluminosilicate materials. Geopolymers are binders formed by alkali activation of Geopolymer Source Materials (GSM using an alkaline activator solution. Concretes made using Geopolymer binders are excellent alternative to the Ordinary Portland Cement concretes from strength, durability, and ecological considerations. Especially, usage of industrial waste materials such as Fly Ash and Slags as GSMs considerably lower the carbon footprint of concrete and mitigate the damage due to the unscientific dumping/disposal of these materials. To use the Geopolymer concrete (GPC for reinforced structural members, the composite action of reinforcing bars with Geopolymer concrete i.e. the bond behaviour should be well understood. This paper describes the bond behaviour of 12mm and 16mm dia. bars embedded in Fly ash and GGBS based Geopolymer concrete and conventional Portland Pozzolana cement concrete specimens investigated using the pull-out tests as per Indian Standard Code IS:2770(Part-I; the bond stresses and corresponding slips were found out. The bond stress increased with increase in compressive strength. The peak bond stress was found to be 4.3 times more than the design bond stress as per IS:456-2000. The Geopolymer concretes possess higher bond strength compared to the conventional cement concretes.

  5. Durability Study on High Calcium Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete

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    Ganesan Lavanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an investigation into the durability of geopolymer concrete prepared using high calcium fly ash along with alkaline activators when exposed to 2% solution of sulfuric acid and 5% magnesium sulphate for up to 45 days. The durability was also assessed by measuring water absorption and sorptivity. Ordinary Portland cement concrete was also prepared as control concrete. The grades chosen for the investigation were M20, M40, and M60. The alkaline solution used for present study is the combination of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution with the ratio of 2.50. The molarity of sodium hydroxide was fixed as 12. The test specimens were 150×150×150 mm cubes, 100×200 mm cylinders, and 100×50 mm discs cured at ambient temperature. Surface deterioration, density, and strength over a period of 14, 28, and 45 days were observed. The results of geopolymer and ordinary Portland cement concrete were compared and discussed. After 45 days of exposure to the magnesium sulfate solution, the reduction in strength was up to 12% for geopolymer concrete and up to 25% for ordinary Portland cement concrete. After the same period of exposure to the sulphuric acid solution, the compressive strength decrease was up to 20% for geopolymer concrete and up to 28% for ordinary Portland cement concrete.

  6. Fire Resistance of Geopolymer Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-21

    and general appearance to Portland cement concrete. Geopolymer concrete has been proposed as an alternative to Portland cement concrete in...1 Project report – Grant FA23860814096, "Fire resistance of geopolymer concretes" – J. Provis, University of Melbourne 1. Background and...experimental program This project provided funding for us to carry out fire testing of geopolymer concrete specimens and associated laboratory

  7. Effect of Crashed Stone on Properties of Fly Ash Based-Geopolymer Concrete with Local Alkaline Activator in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    O. M. Omar; G. D. Abd Elhameed; A. M. Heniegal H. A. Mohamadien

    2015-01-01

    Green concrete are generally composed of recycling materials as hundred or partial percent substitutes for aggregate, cement, and admixture in concrete. To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, efforts are needed to develop environmentally friendly construction materials. Using of fly ash based geopolymer as an alternative binder can help reduce CO2 emission of concrete. The binder of geopolymer concrete is different from the ordinary Portland cement concrete. Geopolymer Concr...

  8. Effect of nano materials in geopolymer concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Naskar, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    In general, cement based concrete can be replaced by low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete regarding the adverse effect of the manufacture of ordinary Portland cement on environment. Nowadays, nano technology has an important role in the field of construction industries. It has been seen that several properties of cement based concrete are affected by different nano materials. As low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete is an alternate option for cement based concrete, nano mater...

  9. Effect Of Crumb Rubber On Compressive Strength Of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete

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    Azmi Ahmad Azrem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effect of different percentage of crumb rubber on compressive strength of fly ash based geopolymer concrete. This research attempted to produce rubberized geopolymer concrete as an environmentally friendly, lightweight and durable product. Crumb rubber with ranged size from 73 μm to 375 μm was used in order to replace fine aggregates in geopolymer concrete. The replacements of crumb rubber were 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% in the fly ash based geopolymer concrete. The ratio of fly ash to alkaline activator was 2.5 and the ratio of Na2SiO3 to NaOH was fixed at 2.0. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 7 and 28. The results show that there is a reduction in all compressive strength for crumb rubber mixture, but still higher than normal rubberized concrete. Rubberized geopolymer concrete is a suitable solution in some non structural applications.

  10. Compressive Strength of Fly ash-based Geopolymer Concrete with a Variable of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH Solution Molarity

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    Herwani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer concrete is a new material made by activating the raw materials which contain many elements of silica and alumina. Compressive strength of geopolymer concrete produced was influenced by the concentration of the activator solution. This paper presents an experimental investigation into fly ash-based geopolymer concrete. Research objective was to investigate the effects of alkaline activator solution (AAS molarity on compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. Variable of the test were a solution to sodium hydroxide was chosen as the activator solution. Concentration of sodium hydroxide solution used was 10 M, 12 M and 14 M with ambient curing. The specimen is made of concrete cylinder with diameter 10 cm and height 20 cm as many as 9 pieces each variable. Compressive strength tests is performed when the concrete is 7, 14, and 28 days old. Results of the test are indicated that the increasing of sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution concentration leads to improve the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The optimal compressive strength of geopolymer concrete was achieved at a concentration of sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH of 12 M. Geopolymer concretes compressive strength only achieves around 50-60% of the planned.

  11. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  12. Effect of nano materials in geopolymer concrete

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    Sudipta Naskar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, cement based concrete can be replaced by low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete regarding the adverse effect of the manufacture of ordinary Portland cement on environment. Nowadays, nano technology has an important role in the field of construction industries. It has been seen that several properties of cement based concrete are affected by different nano materials. As low calcium fly-ash based geopolymer concrete is an alternate option for cement based concrete, nano materials may also have some influence on it. An experimental program has been taken up on low calcium fly-ash based M25 grade geopolymer concrete having 16 (M concentration of activator liquid. Different percentage of nano materials viz. nano silica, carbon nano tube, titanium di-oxide were also used to investigate the effect of nano materials on geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer concrete with 1% titanium di-oxide shows appreciable improvement in compressive strength although pH remains almost same in all cases.

  13. Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Using Foaming Agent

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    Rafiza Abdul Razak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH, and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature, for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2 produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  14. The effect of foaming agent doses on lightweight geopolymer concrete metakaolin based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risdanareni, Puput; Hilmi, Aldi; Susanto, Prijono Bagus

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study is to obtain optimal doses of foaming agent on lightweight geopolymer concrete using fly Ash (FA) and metakaolin (MK) as raw materials. Several test was conducted in order to obtained characteristics of geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent with different doses. The levels of foaming agent used was 0%, 0.3%, 0.6% and 0.9% from the binder weight. Level of metakolin content of 25% by precursor mass were applied in this research. In addition, activator solution with the ratio of Na2SiO3 / NaOH of 2 and Concentration of NaOH of 10 Molar were performed in this research. Doses of foaming agent of 0%, 0.3%, 0.6% and 0.9% by weight of the binder was used. Based on test results obtained, the best mechanical and physical properties of lightweight concrete was owned by speciment with doses of foam 0%. The recommended foam dosage is 0.3% due to its fair enough mechanical and physical properties of lightweight geopolymer concrete produced.

  15. Corrosion of Steel Reinforcements in Fly Ash- and Kaolin-based Geopolymer Concrete Immersed in Distilled Water and ASTM Seawater

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    Astutiningsih S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion behavior of steel bar in fly ash- and kaolin-based geopolymer concrete immersed in aggressive media of distilled water and ASTM seawater was compared to Portland cement concrete having similar mix design. An accelerated corrosion by applying 3 V potential on the steel bar was performed to obtain reasonable test results in a relatively short time. The potential and pH of the immersing media were measured from day 1 to day 10 and then plotted on Pourbaix diagram to predict passivation or corrosion state. At day 10, steel bar in Portland cement concrete were in corroded state both in distilled water and seawater. The best corrosion performance was for kaolin- based geopolymer concrete in which at day-10 the steel bar was passivated in both media. Steel bar in fly ash- based geopolymer concrete was passivated in distilled water but corroded in seawater.

  16. Effect of fire exposure on cracking, spalling and residual strength of fly ash geopolymer concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarker, Prabir Kumar; Kelly, Sean; Yao, Zhitong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fire endurance of fly ash geopolymer concrete has been studied. • No spalling in geopolymer concrete cylinders up to 1000 °C fire. • Less cracking and better fire endurance of geopolymer concrete than OPC concrete. • Geopolymer microstructure remained stable up to 1000 °C fire. - Abstract: Fly ash based geopolymer is an emerging alternative binder to cement for making concrete. The cracking, spalling and residual strength behaviours of geopolymer concrete were studied in order to understand its fire endurance, which is essential for its use as a building material. Fly ash based geopolymer and ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete cylinder specimens were exposed to fires at different temperatures up to 1000 °C, with a heating rate of that given in the International Standards Organization (ISO) 834 standard. Compressive strength of the concretes varied in the range of 39–58 MPa. After the fire exposures, the geopolymer concrete specimens were found to suffer less damage in terms of cracking than the OPC concrete specimens. The OPC concrete cylinders suffered severe spalling for 800 and 1000 °C exposures, while there was no spalling in the geopolymer concrete specimens. The geopolymer concrete specimens generally retained higher strength than the OPC concrete specimens. The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of geopolymer concrete showed continued densification of the microstructure with the increase of fire temperature. The strength loss in the geopolymer concrete specimens was mainly because of the difference between the thermal expansions of geopolymer matrix and the aggregates

  17. Review on Potential of Geopolymer for Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation

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    Warid Wazien A.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracking, spalling, surface deterioration, seepage and other concrete damage of the existing infrastructure have raised concern among residents, local authorities and developers. Dealing with concrete infrastructure rehabilitation is an important issue due to most of infrastructures today are concrete based. To simply patch up the spalling concrete as temporary solution and sooner or later, the cracks will return to haunt. This paper reviewed the current research and studies on concrete repair materials, highlighting the properties of geopolymer. It covers geopolymer repair materials which addressed in the field of concrete infrastructure rehabilitation. Geopolymer had good repair characteristics and displays the potential as an excellent repair material.

  18. Performance of fly ash based geopolymer incorporating palm kernel shell for lightweight concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abd; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Yahya, Zarina; Jian, Ang Zhi; Nasri, Armia

    2017-09-01

    A concrete which cement is totally replaced by source material such as fly ash and activated by highly alkaline solutions is known as geopolymer concrete. Fly ash is the most common source material for geopolymer because it is a by-product material, so it can get easily from all around the world. An investigation has been carried out to select the most suitable ingredients of geopolymer concrete so that the geopolymer concrete can achieve the desire compressive strength. The samples were prepared to determine the suitable percentage of palm kernel shell used in geopolymer concrete and cured for 7 days in oven. After that, other samples were prepared by using the suitable percentage of palm kernel shell and cured for 3, 14, 21 and 28 days in oven. The control sample consisting of ordinary Portland cement and palm kernel shell and cured for 28 days were prepared too. The NaOH concentration of 12M, ratio Na2SiO3 to NaOH of 2.5, ratio fly ash to alkaline activator solution of 2.0 and ratio water to geopolymer of 0.35 were fixed throughout the research. The density obtained for the samples were 1.78 kg/m3, water absorption of 20.41% and the compressive strength of 14.20 MPa. The compressive strength of geopolymer concrete is still acceptable as lightweight concrete although the compressive strength is lower than OPC concrete. Therefore, the proposed method by using fly ash mixed with 10% of palm kernel shell can be used to design geopolymer concrete.

  19. Strength and Durability of Fly Ash-Based Fiber-Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete in a Simulated Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    This research is aimed at investigating the corrosion durability of polyolefin fiberreinforced fly ash-based geopolymer structural concrete (hereafter referred to as GPC, in contradistinction to unreinforced geopolymer concrete referred to as simply geopolymer concrete), where cement is completely replaced by fly ash, that is activated by alkalis, sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. The durability in a marine environment is tested through an electrochemical method for accelerated corrosion. The GPC achieved compressive strengths in excess of 6,000 psi. Fiber reinforced beams contained polyolefin fibers in the amounts of 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% by volume. After being subjected to corrosion damage, the GPC beams were analyzed through a method of crack scoring, steel mass loss, and residual flexural strength testing. Fiber reinforced GPC beams showed greater resistance to corrosion damage with higher residual flexural strength. This makes GPC an attractive material for use in submerged marine structures.

  20. Structural Behaviour and Design of Geopolymer Concrete Members

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    Sarker P.K.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide production of concrete is on the increase in order to meet the increasing rate of construction. Since cement production contributes to the greenhouse gas emission, it is vital to develop alternative low-emission binders to reduce the carbon footprint of concrete. Fly ash based geopolymer is an alternative binder that has potential to reduce the CO2 emission of concrete production. It has been shown in different studies that the mechanical properties of geopolymer concrete are comparable to those of ordinary Portland cement (OPC concrete. This paper describes the behaviour and design aspects of geopolymer concrete structural members. The design aspects presented in this paper are bond of reinforcing steel in pull-out and spliced bars in beams, beams in shear and flexure, and columns in uniaxial and biaxial bending. It is shown that the current provisions for OPC concrete can be conservatively used for design of reinforced geopolymer concrete members.

  1. Experimental study on workability of alkali activated fly ash and slag-based geopolymer concretes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbi, K.A.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Zuo, Y.; Grunewald, S.; Keulen, A.; Ye, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on workability and strength of geopolymer concrete made of fly ash (FA), blast furnace slag (BFS) and a multicompound activator of Na2SiO3 and NaOH solutions. The FA/BFS ratios were 100:0, 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, 30:70 and 0:100. The workability of geopolymer

  2. Development of various curing effect of nominal strength Geopolymer concrete

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    S. Kumaravel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer concrete is an innovative method and is produced by complete elimination of ordinary Portland cement byproduced in fly ash. This study on different condition of curing in geopolymer concrete suitable for curing at ambient and heat-cured condition of temperature will widen its application to concrete structures. Low lime fly ash is used as the base material, which is reacted by alkaline solution and additional use of ground granulated blast furnace slag. Workability of fresh concrete and compressive strength of geopolymer concrete was investigated. The curing effect of geopolymer concrete is steam, hot air and ambient cubes specimens are tested in different days. Results are compared for various curing and strength of concrete.

  3. Ductility Of fly ash - slag based reinforced geopolymer concrete elements cured at room temperature.

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    Mahantesh N.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ductility of the flexural element is the main governing property for healthy performance of structural element. Although numerous factors contribute towards the ductility of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete (RGPC elements, low calcium based fly ash and GGBS have chemical proportions which make RGPC develop significant ductility along with steel reinforcement – when mixed in an intelligent way satisfying structural and economic conditions. In the present research work influence of low calcium fly ash, GGBS, River sand, M-sand, Steel Grade, manufactured fibres and natural fibres are used to study the ductile behaviour of RGPC sections by load testing 51 under reinforced flexural elements. The study reveals that fly ash - slag based reinforced flexural elements behave in line with OPC based RCC elements. The provisions mentioned in Indian RC designer IS:456-2000 can be used to predict the flexural behaviour of reinforced geopolymer concrete elements. The average flexural ductility of these test specimens observed to lie in between 2 & 3.

  4. Optimum Mix for Pervious Geopolymer Concrete (GEOCRETE Based on Water Permeability and Compressive Strength

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    Abdulsalam Arafa Salaheddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC consumes considerable natural resources and energy, and it also affects the emission of a significant quantity of CO2 in the atmosphere. This pervious geopolymer concrete study aims to explore an alternative binder without OPC. Pervious geopolymer concretes were prepared from fly ash (FA, sodium silicate (NaSiO3, sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution, and coarse aggregate (CA. The effects of pervious geopolymer concrete parameters that affect water permeability and compressive strength are evaluated. The FA to CA ratios of 1:6, 1:7,1:8, and 1:9 by weight, CA sizes of 5–10, 10–14, and 14–20 mm, constant NaSiO3/NaOH ratio of 2.5, alkaline liquid to fly ash (AL/FA ratios of 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, and NaOH concentrations of 8, 10, and 12 M were the pervious geopolymer concrete mix proportions. The curing temperature of 80 °C for 24 h was used. The results showed that a pervious geopolymer concrete with CA of 10 mm achieved water permeability of 2.3 cm/s and compressive strength of 20 MPa with AL/FA ratio of 0.5, NaOH concentration of 10 M, and FA:CA of 1:7. GEOCRETE is indicated to have better engineering properties than does pervious concrete that is made of ordinary Portland cement.

  5. Flyash Based Geopolymer Concrete – A State of the Art Review

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    G. Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete usage around the world is second only to water. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC is conventionally used as the primary binder to produce concrete. But the amount of carbon dioxide released during the manufacture of OPC due to the calcinations of lime stone and combustion of fossil fuel is in the order of 600 kg for every ton of OPC produced. In addition, the extent of energy requires to produce OPC is only next to steel and aluminum. On the other hand, the abundant availability of fly ash worldwide creates opportunity to utilize (by – product of burning coal, regarded as a waste material as substitute for OPC to manufacture concrete. Binders could be produced by polymeric reaction of alkali liquids with the silicon and the aluminum in the source materials such as fly ash and rice husk ash and these binders are termed as Geopolymer. In Geopolymer Concrete, fly ash and aggregates are mixed with alkaline liquids such as a combination of Sodium Silicate and Sodium Hydroxide. United Nation’s Intergovernmental panel on Climate Change (IPCC prepared a report on global warming during April 2007 which enlists various methods of reduction of CO2 emissions into atmosphere. As per that report, unmindful pumping of CO2 into the atmosphere is the main culprit for the climate change. Large volume of fly ash is being produced by thermal power stations and part of the fly ash produced is used in concrete industry, low laying area fill, roads and embankment, brick manufacturing etc. The balance amount of fly ash is being stored in fly ash ponds. Hence it is imperative on the part of Scientists and Engineers to devise suitable methodologies for the disposal of fly ash. Disposal of fly ash has the objective of saving vast amount of land meant for ash pond to store fly ash. Further, use of fly ash as a value added material as in the case of geopolymer concrete, reduces the consumption of cement. Reduction of cement usage will reduce the production of

  6. Mechanical Properties of Geopolymer Concrete Exposed to Combustion

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    Rahmadina Annisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the change of material properties, such as decreasing of the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and porosity. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the mechanical properties of fly ash-based geopolymer concrete after being exposed to high temperature. The 28th-day test specimens were burned for one hour at specified temperature variation of 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, and 800°C. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete was used as a comparison. After burning at 400°C, the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete was surprisingly increased up to 27% of its normal strength. On the other hand, the compressive strength of OPC concrete decreased 67% from its normal strength. The splitting tensile strength of geopolymer concrete also decreased at the range of 50-70%. The porosity of concrete has a sufficient effect to compressive strength and splitting strength. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD test of geopolymer concrete at temperature 400°C until 600°C showed some minerals change. Geopolymer concrete is proved to have better fire resistance compares to Portland Cement Concrete.

  7. Durability of Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Infilled LECA in Seawater Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, R. A.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Yahya, Z.; Hamid, M. S. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes a development of lightweight concrete using lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) in fly ash (FA) based geopolymer immersed in seawater. The objective of this research is to compare the performance of geopolymer concrete (GPC) with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete infilled lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA) in seawater exposure. Geopolymer concrete is produced by using alkaline activator to activate the raw material, FA. The highest compressive strength of this study is 42.0 MPa at 28 days and 49.8 MPa at 60 days. The density for this concrete is in the range of 1580 kg/m3 to 1660 kg/m3. The result for water absorption is in the range of 6.82% to 14.72%. However, the test results of weight loss is in the range between 0.30% to 0.43%.

  8. Fly ash/Kaolin based geopolymer green concretes and their mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, F N; Durgaprasad, J; Singh, N B

    2015-12-01

    Geopolymer concrete mixes were cast using fly ash, kaolin, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate and aggregates. Portland cement concrete (M30) was used as a reference sample. The effect of silica fume, temperature (40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C, 100 °C and 120 °C), sodium and potassium hydroxides and different superplasticizers on the compressive strength are reported [1]. Maximum strength was found at 100 °C and 14 M alkali solution [1].

  9. Fly ash/Kaolin based geopolymer green concretes and their mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N. Okoye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer concrete mixes were cast using fly ash, kaolin, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate and aggregates. Portland cement concrete (M30 was used as a reference sample. The effect of silica fume, temperature (40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C, 100 °C and 120 °C, sodium and potassium hydroxides and different superplasticizers on the compressive strength are reported [1]. Maximum strength was found at 100 °C and 14 M alkali solution [1].

  10. Fly ash/Kaolin based geopolymer green concretes and their mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, F.N.; Durgaprasad, J.; Singh, N.B.

    2015-01-01

    Geopolymer concrete mixes were cast using fly ash, kaolin, sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate and aggregates. Portland cement concrete (M30) was used as a reference sample. The effect of silica fume, temperature (40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C, 100 °C and 120 °C), sodium and potassium hydroxides and different superplasticizers on the compressive strength are reported [1]. Maximum strength was found at 100 °C and 14 M alkali solution [1]. PMID:26693505

  11. Self-compacting geopolymer concrete-a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukesh Praveen, P.; Srinivasan, K.

    2017-11-01

    In this construction world, Geopolymer concrete is a special concrete which doesn’t requires the Ordinary Portland Cement and also reduces the emission of carbon-dioxide. The Geopolymer Concrete is made up of industrial by-products (which contains more Silica and Alumina) and activated with the help of Alkaline solution (combination of sodium hydroxide & sodium silicate or potassium hydroxide & potassium silicate). The high viscosity nature of Geopolymer Concrete had the ability to fail due to lack of compaction. In improvising the issue, Self Compacting Geopolymer Concrete has been introduced. The SCGC doesn’t require any additional compaction it will flow and compacted by its own weight. This concrete is made up of industrial by-products like Fly ash, GGBFS and Silica Fume and activated with alkaline solution. The earlier research was mostly on Fly ash based SCGC. In few research works Fly ash was partially replaced with GGBS and Silica Fume. They evaluated the compressive strength of concrete with varying molarities of NaOH; curing time and curing temperature. The flexural behaviour of the concrete also examined. The Fly ash based SCGC was got high compressive strength in heat curing as well as low compressive strength in ambient curing. The presence of GGBS improves the strength in ambient curing. For aiming the high strength in ambient curing Fly ash will be completely replace and examine with different mineral admixtures.

  12. Bond characteristics of reinforcing steel embedded in geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvel, Parthiban; Thangavelu, Manju; Gopalan, Rashmi; Raja Mohan Kaliyaperumal, Saravana

    2017-07-01

    The force transferring between reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete in reinforced concrete is influenced by several factors. Whereas, the study on bond behaviour of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is lagging. In this paper, an experimental attempt has been made to evaluate the geopolymer concrete bond with reinforcing steel of different diameter and embedded length using standard pull out test. The geopolymer concrete is made of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) as geopolymer source material (GSM). The tests were conducted to evaluate the development of bond between steel and concrete of grade M40 and M50 with 12 and 16 mm diameter reinforcing steel for geopolymer and cement concrete mixes and to develop a relation between bond strength and compressive strength. From the experimental results, it has been observed that the bond strength of the geopolymer concrete mixes was more compared to the cement concrete mixes and increases with the reduction in the diameter of the bar.

  13. Some Durability Aspects of Ambient Cured Bottom Ash Geopolymer Concrete

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    Saravanakumar R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines some durability aspects of ambient cured bottom ash geopolymer concrete (BA GPC due to accelerated corrosion, sorptivity, and water absorption. The bottom ash geopolymer concrete was prepared with sodium based alkaline activators under ambient curing temperatures. The sodium hydroxide used concentration was 8M. The performance of BA GPC was compared with conventional concrete. The test results indicate that BA GPC developes a strong passive layer against chloride ion diffusion and provides better protection against corrosion. Both the initial and final rates of water absorption of BA GPC were about two times less than those of conventional concrete. The BA GPC significantly enhanced performance over equivalent grade conventional concrete (CC.

  14. COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH AND MICROSTRUCTURE STUDIES ON CEMENT ADDED GEOPOLYMER CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Vanga Renuka; Kolluri Dharani

    2017-01-01

    Geopolymer results from the reaction of a source material that is rich in silica and alumina with alkaline liquid. It is essentially cement free concrete. This material is being studied extensively and shows promise as a greener substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement concrete in some applications. Research is shifting from the chemistry domain to engineering applications and commercial production of geopolymer concrete. It has been found that geopolymer concrete has good engineering properti...

  15. Behavior of concrete cylinders confined by a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression

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    Kothay Heng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is beneficial to utilize geopolymers for their potential properties to rehabilitate concrete structures. These properties include high adhesion to Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete even at low degrees of interfacial roughness, high durability and good fire resistance. This paper introduces use of a ferro-geopolymer jacket to strengthen concrete columns. It is a kind of jacket constructed with a geopolymer mortar reinforced with a wire mesh. This study was conducted to investigate the behavior of concrete cylinders confined with a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression. OPC concrete cylinders with 100 mm diameter and 200 mm height were fabricated. High calcium fly ash-based geopolymer mortar, activated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3, cured at a temperature of 25 ºC was used. Ferro-geopolymer jackets with a25 mm thickness, were reinforced with 1, 2 and 3 layers of expanded metal mesh and cast around concrete cylinders. The study results revealed that the compressive load carrying capacity and axial stiffness of concrete cylinders were improved. A monolithic failure mode was obtained as a result of a strong adhesion between the geopolymer and the concrete core. Enhancement of compressive load carrying capacity of the jacketed concrete cylinders was caused by a combination of a confinement effect and the compressive load resistance of the jacket transferred from concrete core through bonding.

  16. Workability enhancement of geopolymer concrete through the use of retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Zein, Fahmi Tarmizi Zulfikar

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer concrete is a type of concrete manufactured without the addition of cement. In geopolymer concrete, along with an activator, cement as the concrete binder can be replaced by the fly ash. This will reduce global demand on cement, and therefore will reduce CO2 emission due to cement production. Thus, geopolymer concrete is commonly known as an eco-friendly concrete. Geopolymer concrete also offers a solution concerning with the utilization of the fly ash waste. However, despite of its environmental advantages, geopolymer concrete has a drawback, namelygeopolymer concrete set quickly, thus reducing its workability. This research aimed to increase the workability of geopolymer concrete by using retarder admixture (Plastocrete RT6 Plus). Retarder used varies within 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% of fly ash mass. As a control, geopolymer concrete without retarder (0%) were also made. Activator used in this research was Na2SiO3 mixed with NaOH 10 M solution, with ratio of 1:5. The results showed an optimum composition of geopolymer concrete with 0.6% retarder, where initial setting time occured after 6.75 hours, and the final setting time reached after 9.5 hours. Moreover, the slump of the geopolymer concrete was 8.8 cm, and the slump flow was 24 cm. The compressive strength of the geopolymer concrete at 28 days was 47.21 MPa. The experiment showed that the more retarder added, the setting time of the geopolymer concrete will be increased, thus increasing its workability.

  17. The Spalling of Geopolymer High Strength Concrete Wall Panels and Cylinders Under Hydrocarbon Fire

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    Mohd Ali Ahmad Zurisman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures were designed to withstand various types of environment conditions from mild to very severe conditions. Fire represents one of the most severe environmental conditions to which concrete structures may be subjected especially in close conduct structure like tunnel. This paper focuses on the spalling of geopolymer high strength concrete exposed to hydrocarbon fire for minimum 2 hours. From the fire test, geopolymer concrete can be classified as a good fire resistance construction materials based on spalling performance of high strength concrete when exposed to hydrocarbon fire. A maximum of 1% (excluding water moisture loss of spalling recorded for high strength geopolymer concrete wall panel. No explosive spallings were observed for high strength geopolymer concrete.

  18. Self-cleaning geopolymer concrete - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsaffirah Zailan, Siti; Mahmed, Norsuria; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Sandu, Andrei Victor

    2016-06-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction materials for building technology. However, cement production releases high amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere that leads to increasing the global warming. Thus, an alternative, environmental friendly construction material such as geopolymer concrete has been developed. Geopolymer concrete applies greener alternative binder, which is an innovative construction material that replaces the Portland cement. This technology introduced nano-particles such as nanoclay into the cement paste in order to improve their mechanical properties. The concrete materials also have been developed to be functioned as self-cleaning construction materials. The self-cleaning properties of the concrete are induced by introducing the photocatalytic materials such as titania (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO). Self-cleaning concrete that contains those photocatalysts will be energized by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and accelerates the decomposition of organic particulates. Thus, the cleanliness of the building surfaces can be maintained and the air surrounding air pollution can be reduced. This paper briefly reviews about self-cleaning concrete.

  19. Geopolymer concrete for structural use: Recent findings and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuruddin, M. F.; Malkawi, A. B.; Fauzi, A.; Mohammed, B. S.; Almattarneh, H. M.

    2016-06-01

    Geopolymer binders offer a possible solution for several problems that facing the current cement industry. These binders exhibit similar or better engineering properties compared to cement and can utilize several types of waste materials. This paper presents the recent research progress regarding the structural behaviour of reinforced geopolymer concrete members including beams, columns and slabs. The reported results showed that the structural behaviour of the reinforced geopolymer concrete members is similar to the known behaviour of the ordinary reinforced concrete members. In addition, the currently available standards have been conservatively used for analysis and designing of reinforced geopolymer concrete structures. On the other hand, the main hurdles facing the spread of geopolymer concrete was the absence of standards and the concerns about the long-term properties. Other issues included the safety, cost and liability.

  20. The Effect of Corrosive Environment on Geopolymer Concrete Tensile Strength

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    Bayuaji Ridho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose to explore the potential of geopolymer concrete tensile strength in particular on the effects of corrosive environments. Geopolymer concrete, concrete technology used no OPC that has advantages, one of which is durability, especially for corrosive seawater environment. In addition, geopolymer concrete with polymerization mechanism does not require large energy consumption or an environmentally friendly concept. Geopolymer concrete in this study is using a type C fly ash from PT. International Power Mitsui Operation & Maintenence Indonesia (IPMOMI Paiton. The type of alkaline activator used NaOH (14 molar and Na2SiO3. Coarse and fine aggregate used are local aggregate. Geopolymer concrete molded test specimen with dimensions of (10 × 20 cm cylinder, further heating and without heating, then maintained at room temperature and seawater up to 28 days. Then to determine the mechanical properties, the tensile strength testing is done with reference. This result of study indicates the curing of geopolymer concrete at 60 ° C for 24 hours to raise the tensile strength of geopolymer concrete.

  1. Experimental Study on Rise Husk Ash & Fly Ash Based Geo-Polymer Concrete Using M-Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda Kishore, G.; Gayathri, B.

    2017-08-01

    Serious environmental problems by means of increasing the production of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), which is conventionally used as the primary binder to produce cement concrete. An attempt has been made to reduce the use of ordinary Portland cement in cement concrete. There is no standard mix design of geo-polymer concrete, an effort has been made to know the physical, chemical properties and optimum mix of geo-polymer concrete mix design. Concrete cubes of 100 x 100 x 100 mm were prepared and cured under steam curing for about 24 hours at temperature range of 40°C to 60°C. Fly ash is replaced partially with rice husk ash at percentage of 10%, 15% and 25%. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate are of used as alkaline activators with 5 Molar and 10 Molar NaOH solutions. Natural sand is replaced with manufacture sand. Test results were compared with controlled concrete mix of grade M30. The results shows that as the percentage of rice husk ash and water content increases, compressive strength will be decreases and as molarity of the alkaline solution increases, strength will be increases.

  2. The Influence of Salt Water on Chloride Penetration in Geopolymer Concrete

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    Halim Like Novia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of chloride ion penetration in geopolymer concrete. Fly ash as based material for geopolymer concrete was used in this mixture. Fly ash was mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH 8 M and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 as the alkali solution. The sizes of cylindrical specimens were prepared with a diameter of 100 mm and 200 mm high. Some specimens were immersed in salt water at a concentration of 3.5%, and other control specimens were cured in tap water for 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. The mechanical properties were determined with compressive test which was conducted at 28, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Some durability tests were performed for porosity, chloride penetration, and pH measurement. It was found that geopolymer concrete has higher compressive strength than concrete made with Ordinary Portland cement (OPC. However, chloride penetration in geopolymer concrete is higher than OPC. The pH measurement showed that geopolymer concrete has less pH than OPC concrete. The porosity of concrete has been found to influence chloride penetration and pH of concrete.

  3. Preparation and Properties of Alkali Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Zaiqin; Wang, Yuanyi; Feng, Jing

    2016-09-08

    The effective activation and utilization of metakaolin as an alkali activated geopolymer precursor and its use in concrete surface protection is of great interest. In this paper, the formula of alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was studied using an orthogonal experimental design. It was found that the optimal geopolymer was prepared with metakaolin, sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate and water, with the molar ratio of SiO₂:Al₂O₃:Na₂O:NaOH:H₂O being 3.4:1.1:0.5:1.0:11.8. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were adopted to investigate the influence of curing conditions on the mechanical properties and microstructures of the geopolymers. The best curing condition was 60 °C for 168 h, and this alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer showed the highest compression strength at 52.26 MPa. In addition, hollow micro-sphere glass beads were mixed with metakaolin particles to improve the thermal insulation properties of the alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer. These results suggest that a suitable volume ratio of metakaolin to hollow micro-sphere glass beads in alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was 6:1, which achieved a thermal conductivity of 0.37 W/mK and compressive strength of 50 MPa. By adjusting to a milder curing condition, as-prepared alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers could find widespread applications in concrete thermal protection.

  4. Preparation and Properties of Alkali Activated Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effective activation and utilization of metakaolin as an alkali activated geopolymer precursor and its use in concrete surface protection is of great interest. In this paper, the formula of alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was studied using an orthogonal experimental design. It was found that the optimal geopolymer was prepared with metakaolin, sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate and water, with the molar ratio of SiO2:Al2O3:Na2O:NaOH:H2O being 3.4:1.1:0.5:1.0:11.8. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR were adopted to investigate the influence of curing conditions on the mechanical properties and microstructures of the geopolymers. The best curing condition was 60 °C for 168 h, and this alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer showed the highest compression strength at 52.26 MPa. In addition, hollow micro-sphere glass beads were mixed with metakaolin particles to improve the thermal insulation properties of the alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymer. These results suggest that a suitable volume ratio of metakaolin to hollow micro-sphere glass beads in alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers was 6:1, which achieved a thermal conductivity of 0.37 W/mK and compressive strength of 50 MPa. By adjusting to a milder curing condition, as-prepared alkali activated metakaolin-based geopolymers could find widespread applications in concrete thermal protection.

  5. Volcanic ash-based geopolymer cements/concretes: the current state of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djobo, Jean Noël Yankwa; Elimbi, Antoine; Tchakouté, Hervé Kouamo; Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    The progress achieved with the use of volcanic ash for geopolymer synthesis has been critically reviewed in this paper. This consists of an overview of mineralogy and chemistry of volcanic ash. The role of chemical composition and mineral contents of volcanic ash on their reactivity during geopolymerization reaction and, consequently, mechanical properties have been accessed. An attempt has been made to establish a relationship between synthesis factors and final properties. A critical assessment of some synthesis conditions has been addressed and some practical recommendations given along with suggestions of future works that have to be done. All this has shown that there are still many works such as durability tests (carbonation, freeze-thaw, resistance, etc.), life cycle analysis, etc. that need to be done in order to satisfy both suitability and sustainability criteria for a large-scale or industrial application.

  6. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  7. Performance of steel wool fiber reinforced geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Ariffin, Nurliayana

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, performance of geopolymer concrete was studied by mixing of Class F fly ash from Manjung power station, Lumut, Perak, Malaysia with alkaline activator which are combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. Steel wool fiber were added into the geopolymer concrete as reinforcement with different weight percentage vary from 0 % - 5 %. Chemical compositions of Malaysian fly ash was first analyzed by using X-ray fluorescence. All geopolymer concrete reinforced with steel wool fiber with different weight percentage were tested in terms of density, workability, and compression. Result shows Malaysian fly ash identified by using XRF was class F. Density of geopolymer concrete close to density of OPC which is approximately 2400 kg/m3 and the density was increase gradually with the additions of steel fiber. However, the inclusions of steel fibers also shows some reduction to the workability of geopolymer concrete. Besides, the compressive strength was increased with the increasing of fibers addition until maximum of 18.6 % improvement at 3 % of steel fibers.

  8. The effect of steam curing on chloride penetration in geopolymer concrete

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    Jaya Ekaputri Januarti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the result of our study on the effect of steam curing to chloride ion penetration in geopolymer concrete. Class F fly ash was activated using sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. The concrete specimens were then steam-cured at 40°C, 60°C, 80°C and room temperature at 24 hours. The treatment was followed by wet curing for 28 days, and then followed by immersion of all specimens in salt water for the durations of 30, 60, and 90 days. Cylindrical specimens were then prepared for compressive strength, chloride ion penetration, pH, and porosity tests. A 16 mm-steel bar was fixed at the center of the specimen concrete blocks (specimen size: 10cm × 10cm × 15cm. Corrosion probability was determined by conducting Half Cell Potential test. Our result showed that increasing the curing temperature to 80°C induced chloride ion penetration into the concrete’s effective pores, despite improvements in compressive strength. We also found that chloride ingress on the geopolymer concrete increases commensurately with the increase of the curing temperature. The corrosion potential measurement of geopolymer concrete was higher than OPC concrete even if corrosion was not observed in reinforcing. Based on our result, we suggest that the corrosion categorization for geopolymer concretes needs to be adjusted.

  9. The Effect of Temperature Curing on Geopolymer Concrete

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    Triwulan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents curing temperature influences to behaviors of geopolymer concrete. The concrete was fly ash based, with the ratio of fly ash to alkaline activator was 65%:35%. Ratio coarse aggregate to fine aggregate was 60%:40%, ratios Na2SiO3/NaOH were 1.5:2 and 2.5. A polycarboxilate superplasticizer with ratio was 2% to fly ash weight. Form of the test specimens were cylinder with diameter of 10 cm and 20 cm high. Steam curing conducted were at 40°C, 60°C and 80°C for 24 hours. The control specimens were treated at normal moist curing. Tests conducted were compressive strength, tensile strength, porosity and elasticity modulus. The results indicated that at the elevated temperature the compressive strength increases as well as tensile strength but decreases the closed porosity of specimens. The elasticity modulus had a similar tendency.

  10. Compressive and bonding strength of fly ash based geopolymer mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailani, Warid Wazien Ahmad; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Razak, Rafiza Abd.; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer which is produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promotes sustainable and excellent properties of binder. The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimum binder to sand ratio of geopolymer mortars based on mechanical properties. In order to optimize the formulation of geopolymer mortar, various binder to sand ratios (0.25, 0.33, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0) are prepared. The investigation on the effect of sand inclusion to the compressive and bonding strength of geopolymer mortar is approached. The experimental results show that the bonding strength performance of geopolymer is also depends on the various binder to sand ratio, where the optimum ratio 0.5 gives a highest strength of 12.73 MPa followed by 12.35 MPa, which corresponds the ratio 1.0 for geopolymer, while the compared value of OPC bonding strength is given by 9.3 MPa. The morphological structure at the interface zone is determined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the homogenous bonding between geopolymer and substrate can be observed. Fly ash based geopolymers reveal a new category of mortar which has high potential to be used in the field of concrete repair and rehabilitation.

  11. Synergetic use of lignite fly ash and metallurgical converter slag in geopolymer concrete

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    Gábor Mucsi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The application and utilization of the industrial wastes and by-products in the construction industry is a key issue from an environmental and economic point of view. The increased use of lignite has substantially increased the available quantities of lignite fired power plant fly ash, which can be mainly classified as class C fly ash. The utilization of such raw material however has some difficulties. In the present paper lignite fired power station fly ash and metallurgical converter slag were used for the production of geopolymer concrete. The fly ash was used as a geopolymer based binder material, and a converter slag as aggregate, thus created a geopolymer concrete which contains mainly industrial wastes. As preliminary test experimental series were carried out using andesite as aggregate. The optimal aggregate/binder ratio was determined. The effect of the amount of alkaline activator solution in the binder, the aggregate type on the geopolymer concretes’ compressive strength and density was investigated. Furthermore, the physical properties - freeze-thaw resistance and particle size distribution - of the applied aggregates were measured as well. As a result of the experiments it was found that physical properties of the andesite and converter slag aggregate was close. Therefore andesite can be replaced by converter slag in the concrete mixture. Additionally, geopolymer concrete with nearly 20 MPa compressive strength was produced from class C fly ash and converter slag.

  12. Deformational behaviour of fly-ash based geopolymer concrete at temperatures of up to 150°c

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    Junaid M Talha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geopolymer Concrete (GP*C has been on the rise over the last few decades owing to its lower carbon emissions as compared to Ordinary Portland Cement Concrete (OPC. Recent research has also established the superior thermal properties of GPC and makes it an ideal construction material for specialized application. However, the deformational behaviour of GPC at elevated temperatures has not fully understood. If GPC is to be used as a main stream construction material for specialized applications, the exact deformational behaviour of the material under thermal loading needs to be investigated. This paper looks into the deformational characteristics of GPC (with natural crushed siliceous aggregates when dry heated up to 150°C at near zero loading. The deformations recorded using a clip-on extensometer are used to determine the strains developed in the GPC samples due to thermal loads. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE for the tested GPC samples was found and was comparable to OPC concrete at the tested temperatures. Between ambient (20°C and 80°C the CTE for GPC was determined to be between 10.3-10.9x10−6mm/mm/°C which is similar to OPC concretes. CTE for temperatures between 80°C and 150°C was determined to be 9.3-10.0x10−6 mm/mm/°C. First heating cycles resulted in much lower CTE which may be due to the presence of evaporable water in the samples. Like OPC, GPC is a non-homogeneous material and the variation in the materials between samples account for the slight variation in the CTE values determined.

  13. Mechanical and durability properties of fly ash geopolymer concrete containing recycled coarse aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh, Faiz Uddin Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents mechanical and durability properties of geopolymer concrete containing recycled coarse aggregate (RCA). The RCA is sourced from local construction and demolition (C&D) waste in Perth, Australia. The RCA is used as a partial replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) in geopolymer concrete at 15%, 30% and 50% by wt. which corresponds to series two, three and four, respectively, while the geopolymer concrete containing 100% NCA is control and is considered as the first se...

  14. Low carbon building: Experimental insight on the use of fly ash and glass fibre for making geopolymer concrete

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    Thangaraj Sathanandam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental impacts resulting from the production of Ordinary Portland cement (OPC, the drive to develop alternative binders that can totally replace OPC is gaining huge consideration in the construction field. In the current study, attempt was made to determine the strength characteristics of glass fibre-reinforced fly ash based geopolymer concrete. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 were used as alkaline solutions (for activation of geopolymer reaction at 12, 16, 20 M. Glass fibres were added to the geopolymer concrete in varying proportions of 0.1–0.5% (in steps of 0.1% by weight of concrete. A constant weight ratio of alkaline solution to fly ash content of 0.43 was adopted for all mixes. British standard concrete test specimens were cast for measuring compressive strength, split-tensile strength, and flexural strength. Concrete specimens were cured by heating in oven at 90 °C for 24 h and natural environment, respectively. From the results, thermally cured concrete samples had better mechanical properties than the ambient (natural cured samples. Thermally cured concrete specimen, containing 0.3% glass fibre and 16 M NaoH, achieved a maximum compressive strength of 24.8 MPa after 28 d, while naturally cured samples achieved a strength of 22.2 MPa. There was substantial increase in tensile strength of geopolymer concrete due to the addition of glass fibres. Split tensile strength increased by 5–10% in glass fibre-reinforced geopolymer concrete, containing 0.1–0.5% glass fibre and 16 M NaoH when compared to the unreinforced geopolymer concrete (1.15 MPa.

  15. Experimental Study on Flexural Strength of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Khoa Tan Nguyen; Tuan Anh Le; Kihak Lee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the flexural response of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete (RGPC) beams. A commercial finite element (FE) software ABAQUS has been used to perform a structural behavior of RGPC beams. Using parameters such: stress, strain, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio obtained from experimental results, a beam model has been simulated in ABAQUS. The results from experimental tests and ABAQUS simulation were compared. Due to friction forces at the supports and loading rollers; slip occ...

  16. Performance of geopolymer concrete in fire

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ren

    2017-01-01

    Portland cement concrete is a world-wide used construction material. However, when Portland cement concrete is exposed to fire, its mechanical properties are deteriorated. The deterioration of concrete is generally caused by the decomposition of the Portland cement hydrate or the thermal incompatibility between cement paste and aggregate. Spalling, which is a violent or non-violent breaking off of layers or pieces of concrete from the surface of a structural element, may also occur when the c...

  17. Characterization of Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer (Briefing chart)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    High Strain Rate Dynamic Characterization of Metakaolin and Fly Ash Bsed Geopolymers for Structural Applications The concrete community has...mechanical properties and microstructure of metakaolin geopolymer , obtain the static properties of metakaolin geopolymer for high strain rate Hopkinson...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Metakaolin, fly ash, geopolymer , characterization, high strain rate

  18. Development of Geopolymer Concrete with Different Curing Conditions

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    M.F. Nuruddin Nuruddin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental issues resulted from cement production have become a major concern today. To develop a sustainable future it is encouraged to limit the use of this construction material that can affect the environment. Cement replacement material was proposed to partially replace cement portion in concrete. Geopolymer is a part of inorganic polymer material that has similar bonding function like cement in concrete. It consists of alkaline solutions and geological source material. Alkaline liquids used in this research are 8 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH solution and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 solutions, while source materials are fly ash and microwave incinerated rice husk ash (MIRHA. Three different curing regimes, namely hot gunny curing, ambient curing, and external exposure curing, were applied to obtain suitable method that was suitable with cast in situ application. Geopolymer concrete samples were tested on their compressive strength and microstructure properties. It was found that external exposure curing had the highest compressive strength compared to other two curing methods. Scanning electron microscopy analysis also showed better improvement in interfacial transition zone for concrete sample with external exposure curing.

  19. Study on The Geopolymer Concrete Properties Reinforced with Hooked Steel Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Tahir, M. F. M.; Tajudin, M. A. F. M. A.; Ekaputri, J. J.; Bayuaji, R.; Khatim, N. A. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this research, Class F fly ash and a mixture of alkaline activators and different amount of hooked steel fiber were used for preparing geopolymer concrete. In order to analyses the effect of hooked steel fiber on the geopolymer concrete, the analysis such as chemical composition of fly ash, workability of fresh geopolymer, water absorption, density, compressive strength of hardened geopolymer concrete have been carried out. Mixtures were prepared with fly ash to alkaline liquid ratio of 2.0 with hooked steel fibers were added to the mix with different amounts which are 1%, 3%, 5% and 7% by the weight of the concrete. Experimental results showed that the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete increases as the hooked steel fibers increases. The optimum compressive strength obtained was up to 87.83 MPa on the 14th day. The density of geopolymer concrete are in the range between 2466 kg/m3 to 2501 kg/m3. In addition, the workability value of geopolymer without hooked steel fibers is 100 mm while the workability value of geopolymer with hooked steel fibers are between 60 mm to 30 mm.

  20. The effect of slag addition on strength development of Class C fly ash geopolymer concrete at normal temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhono, Arie; Law, David W.; Sutikno, Dani, Hasan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of slag addition on strength development and workability of fly ash/slag based geopolymer (FASLG) concrete cured at normal temperature. Class C fly ash with high ferrite (Fe) content was used as the primary material. The proportions of fly ash (FA) to slag (SL) are: 1 FA : 0 SL, 0.9 FA : 0.1 SL, 0.7 FA : 0.3 SL, and 0.5 FA : 0.5 SL. The workability and strength properties were determined by slump, vikat, and compressive strength tests. The result shows that the highest compressive strength was achieved by FASLG-3 concrete with 30% slag addition and exhibited a comparable strength to that normal concrete at 28 days. The 30% slag addition also improve the workability and increase the setting time of FASLG concrete specimens. It can be concluded that the slag inclusion on fly ash will improve the performance of geopolymer concrete at normal temperature.

  1. Comparative study between structural and electrical properties of geopolymers applied to a green concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Pérez, J.; Royero, C.; Sandoval, D.; Gutiérrez, J.

    2013-11-01

    This work shows a comparative analysis of geopolymers obtained by alkaline activation of two aluminosilicates: bentonite and metakaolin. With the goal of to replace some cement percentage, both aluminosilicates were added in several proportions (10, 20 and 30%) to concrete mixes. Portland Type I cement was used to prepare the reference concrete (without geopolymer). X-ray diffraction of geopolymers allowed to find new crystallographic phases that was not present in precursor's minerals. To evaluate mechanical properties of concrete prepared with geopolymers, test tubes with 7, 14, 28 and 90 days as setting time were used. Chemical resistance and Electrical impedance of concrete mixes were also measured. Results shows that cementitious material obtained from metakaolin exhibit the best compressive strength. On the other hand, those materials derived from bentonite, have a high electrical resistance so that, they protected reinforced concrete better that Portland does.

  2. Sulphuric Acid Resistant of Self Compacted Geopolymer Concrete Containing Slag and Ceramic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiq I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is a one of the developing countries where the constructions of infrastructure is still ongoing, resulting in a high demand for concrete. In order to gain sustainability factors in the innovations for producing concrete, geopolymer concrete containing granulated blast-furnace slag and ceramics was selected as a cement replacement in concrete for this study. Since Malaysia had many ceramic productions and uses, the increment of the ceramic waste will also be high. Thus, a new idea to reuse this waste in construction materials have been tested by doing research on this waste. Furthermore, a previous research stated that Ordinary Portland Cement concrete has a lower durability compared to the geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer binders have been reported as being acid resistant and thus are a promising and alternative binder for sewer pipe manufacture. Lack of study regarding the durability of the geopolymer self-compacting concrete was also one of the problems. The waste will be undergoing a few processes in the laboratory in order to get it in the best form before undergoing the next process as a binder in geopolymer concrete. This research is very significant in order to apply the concept of sustainability in the construction field. In addition, the impact of this geopolymer binder is that it emits up to nine times less CO2 than Portland Cement.

  3. A Study on Marble-Based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ta-Wui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement manufacturing is one of the highest carbon dioxide emission industries. It releases 880 kg carbon dioxide for every ton of cement produced. In Taiwan, the carbon dioxide emission from cement industry is more than 10 million tons per year. The development of low carbon dioxide emission green cement can be a solution to replace part of OPC for civil applications and reduce carbon dioxide emission. Geopolymer consists of a polymeric Si–O–Al framework, similar to zeolites which can be formed by mixing aluminosilicate materials, sodium hydroxide and sodium silicates. Geopolymers have advantage of high compressive strength, fire resistance, low shrinkage, acid resistance and low thermal conductivity. In this study, marble-based geopolymer was studied by mixing marble powder, blast furnace slag (BFS and alkali solution. Physical/mechanical properties of marble-based geopolymer prepared with different marble/BFS weight ratio and SiO2/Na2O mole ratio were tested. The experimental results indicated that the compressive strength of marble-based geopolymer can reach 44 MPa within 120 minutes setting time. The microstructure of geopolymeric green cement contains C-S-H gel and aluminosilicate in the framework. According to the experiment results, marble-based geopolymer has the potential to be used as a new civil engineering construction material.

  4. A review on the effect of fly ash characteristics and their variations on the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattimena, Oswyn K.; Antoni, Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    There are more than four decades since the last 1970s where geopolymers concrete was first introduced and developed to use as a replacement to conventional concrete material which uses cement as a binder. And since the last two decades, geopolymers which utilized fly ash as aluminosilicate source material, i.e. fly ash based geopolymers, have been investigated. Many researchers present how to produce the best fly ash based geopolymer with a various source of constituent material as well as mixing formula to achieve exceptional concrete performance. Although there is a similar trend towards factors affecting the result of fly ash based geopolymer synthesis, there is still remain a wide range in mixture proportion. The considerable variation in fly ash characteristics as source material in the synthesis can very likely be one of the causes of this problem. This paper attempts to identify the effect of source material variation of geopolymer concrete, particularly which use fly ash as source material and focuses on the variation of its characteristics and the effects to properties of concrete. From the reviews it concluded that different sources (and even the same source, but different batch) of fly ash materials will give some different characteristics of the fly ash, where it would affect the synthesis process of the fly ash based geopolymer concretes.

  5. Long Term Corrosion Experiment of Steel Rebar in Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Concrete in NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Asmara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on an experimental investigation to identify the effects of fly ash on the electrochemical process of concrete during the curing time. A rebar was analysed using potentiostat to measure the rest potential, polarization diagram, and corrosion rate. Water-to-cement ratio and amount of fly ash were varied. After being cured for 24 hours at a temperature of 65°C, the samples were immersed in 3.5% of NaCl solution for 365 days for electrochemical measurement. Measurements of the half-cell potential and corrosion current density indicated that the fly ash has significant effects on corrosion behaviour of concrete. Although fly ash tends to create passivity on anodic current, it increases corrosion rate. The corrosion potential of this concrete mixture decreases compared to concrete without fly ash. From the result, it can be summarized that concrete mixture with 70% of OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement and 30% fly ash has shown the best corrosion resistance.

  6. Effect of different sintering temperature on fly ash based geopolymer artificial aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Alida; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd

    2017-04-01

    This research was conducted to study the mechanical and morphology of fly ash based geopolymer as artificial aggregate at different sintering temperature. The raw material that are used is fly ash, sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate, geopolymer artificial aggregate, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), coarse aggregate and fine aggregate. The research starts with the preparation of geopolymer artificial aggregate. Then, geopolymer artificial aggregate will be sintered at six difference temperature that is 400°C, 500°C, 600°C, 700°C, 800°C and 900°C to known at which temperature the geopolymer artificial aggregate will become a lightweight aggregate. In order to characterize the geopolymer artificial aggregate the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) was done. The testing and analyses involve for the artificial aggregate is aggregate impact test, specific gravity test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). After that the process will proceed to produce concrete with two type of different aggregate that is course aggregate and geopolymer artificial aggregate. The testing for concrete is compressive strength test, water absorption test and density test. The result obtained will be compared and analyse.

  7. Performance and Characterization of Geopolymer Concrete Reinforced with Short Steel Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Faris, M. A.; Tahir, M. F. M.; Kadir, A. A.; Sandu, A. V.; Mat Isa, N. A. A.; Corbu, O.

    2017-06-01

    In the recent years, geopolymer concrete are reporting as the greener construction technology compared to conventional concrete that made up of ordinary Portland cement. Geopolymer concrete is an innovative construction material that utilized fly ash as one of waste material in coal combustion industry as a replacement for ordinary Portland cement in concrete. The uses of fly ash could reduce the carbon dioxide emission to the atmosphere, redundant of fly ash waste and costs compared to ordinary Portland cement concrete. However, the plain geopolymer concrete suffers from numerous drawbacks such as brittleness and low durability. Thus, in this study the addition of steel fiber is introduced in plain geopolymer concrete to improve its mechanical properties especially in compressive and flexural strength. Characterization of raw materials also determined by using chemical composition analysis. Short type of steel fiber is added to the mix in weight percent of 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt% with fixed molarity of sodium hydroxide of 12M and solid to liquid ratio as 2.0. The addition of steel fiber showed the excellent improvement in the mechanical properties of geopolymer concrete that are determined by various methods available in the literature and compared with each other.

  8. Bond behaviour of GFRP reinforced geopolymer cement concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Tekle Biruk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bond plays a key role in the performance of reinforced concrete structures. Glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforcing bar and Geopolymer cement (GPC concrete are promising alternative construction materials for steel bars and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete respectively. In this study, the bond behaviour between these two materials is investigated by using beam-end specimen tests. The bond behaviour of 15.9 mm diameter sand-coated GFRP bar was investigated. An embedment length of six and nine times the bar diameter were used. The free end and the loaded end bond-slip-relationships, the bond failure mode and the average bond stress were used to analyse each of the specimens. Additionally, the distribution of tensile and bond stress along the embedment length was investigated by installing strain gauges along the embedment length in some of the specimens. Test results indicate that a significant difference exists between the free end and loaded end bond-slip curves, which is due to the lower elastic modulus of the GFRP bars. Furthermore, it was found that the tensile and bond stress distribution along the embedment length is nonlinear and the nonlinearity changes with the load.

  9. Properties and Behavior of Geopolymer Concrete Subjected to Explosive Air Blast Loading: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Mortar Nurul Aida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The severe damage to civilian buildings, public area, jet aircraft impact and defense target under explosive blast loading can cause a huge property loss. Most of researcher discusses the topics on design the concrete material model to sustain againts the explosive detonation. The implementation of modern reinforcement steels and fibres in ordinary Portland cement (OPC concrete matrix can reduce the extreme loading effects. However, most researchers have proved that geopolymer concrete (GPC has better mechanical properties towards high performance concrete, compared to OPC. GPC has the high early compressive strength and high ability to resist the thermal energy from explosive detonation. In addition, OPC production is less environmental friendly than geopolymer cement. Geopolymer used can lead to environmental protection besides being improved in mechanical properties. Thus, this paper highlighted on an experimental, numerical and the analytical studies cause of the explosive detonation impact to concrete structures.

  10. Long Term Corrosion Experiment of Steel Rebar in Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Concrete in NaCl Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Asmara, Y. P.; Siregar, J. P.; Tezara, C.; Nurlisa, Wan; Jamiluddin, J.

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on an experimental investigation to identify the effects of fly ash on the electrochemical process of concrete during the curing time. A rebar was analysed using potentiostat to measure the rest potential, polarization diagram, and corrosion rate. Water-to-cement ratio and amount of fly ash were varied. After being cured for 24 hours at a temperature of 65°C, the samples were immersed in 3.5% of NaCl solution for 365 days for electrochemical measurement. Measurements of ...

  11. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  12. Effect of adding acid solution on setting time and compressive strength of high calcium fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Herianto, Jason Ghorman; Anastasia, Evelin; Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    Fly ash with high calcium oxide content when used as the base material in geopolymer concrete could cause flash setting or rapid hardening. However, it might increase the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. This rapid hardening could cause problems if the geopolymer concrete is used on a large scale casting that requires a long setting time. CaO content can be indicated by pH values of the fly ash, while higher pH is correlated with the rapid setting time of fly ash-based geopolymer. This study investigates the addition of acid solution to reduce the initial pH of the fly ash and to prolong the setting time of the mixture. The acids used in this study are hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2 SO4), nitric acid (HNO3) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH). It was found that the addition of acid solution in fly ash was able to decrease the initial pH of fly ash, however, the initial setting time of geopolymer was not reduced. It was even faster than that of the control mixture. The acid type causes various influence, depending on the fly ash properties. In addition, the use of acid solution in fly ash reduces the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar. It is concluded that the addition of acid solution cannot prolong the rapid hardening of high calcium fly ash geopolymer, and it causes adverse effect on the compressive strength.

  13. Application-Oriented Chemical Optimization of a Metakaolin Based Geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Roviello, Giuseppina; Asprone, Domenico; Menna, Costantino; Balsamo, Alberto; Prota, Andrea; Cioffi, Raffaele; Manfredi, Gaetano

    2013-05-10

    In this study the development of a metakaolin based geopolymeric mortar to be used as bonding matrix for external strengthening of reinforced concrete beams is reported. Four geopolymer formulations have been obtained by varying the composition of the activating solution in terms of SiO₂/Na₂O ratio. The obtained samples have been characterized from a structural, microstructural and mechanical point of view. The differences in structure and microstructure have been correlated to the mechanical properties. A major issue of drying shrinkage has been encountered in the high Si/Al ratio samples. In the light of the characterization results, the optimal geopolymer composition was then applied to fasten steel fibers to reinforced concrete beams. The mechanical behavior of the strengthened reinforced beams was evaluated by four-points bending tests, which were performed also on reinforced concrete beams as they are for comparison. The preliminary results of the bending tests point out an excellent behavior of the geopolymeric mixture tested, with the failure load of the reinforced beams roughly twice that of the control beam.

  14. Application-Oriented Chemical Optimization of a Metakaolin Based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the development of a metakaolin based geopolymeric mortar to be used as bonding matrix for external strengthening of reinforced concrete beams is reported. Four geopolymer formulations have been obtained by varying the composition of the activating solution in terms of SiO2/Na2O ratio. The obtained samples have been characterized from a structural, microstructural and mechanical point of view. The differences in structure and microstructure have been correlated to the mechanical properties. A major issue of drying shrinkage has been encountered in the high Si/Al ratio samples. In the light of the characterization results, the optimal geopolymer composition was then applied to fasten steel fibers to reinforced concrete beams. The mechanical behavior of the strengthened reinforced beams was evaluated by four-points bending tests, which were performed also on reinforced concrete beams as they are for comparison. The preliminary results of the bending tests point out an excellent behavior of the geopolymeric mixture tested, with the failure load of the reinforced beams roughly twice that of the control beam.

  15. Inclusion of geopolymers derivate from fly ash and pumice in reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Castro, D.; Gualdron, G.; Atencio, R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents results of a research project related to the development of alkali-activated geopolymers, synthesized from alumina-silicate minerals (fly ash and pumice) which are added to concrete. Alkali sources used in geopolymer synthesis were sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution. New materials were structurally characterized by Infra-Red spectroscopy (IR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Concretes obtained after geopolymers addition as Portland cement substitutes at 10%, 20% and 30%, were mechanically analysed by compression resistance at 7, 14, 28 and 90 drying days. Results were referred to standard (concrete of Portland cement) allows to know cementitious characteristics of geopolymers are lower than those for standard, but it keeps growing at longer drying time than Portland cement. By Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) it is found that this new material shows high electrical resistance and have been proved as a protection agent against corrosion in reinforced concrete exhibiting anticorrosive properties higher than those showed by the conventional concrete mixture.

  16. The influence of plain bar on bond strength of geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Evrianti Syntia; Ekaputri, Januarti Jaya

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents some results of experimental study of bond strength of plain bar embedded in geopolymer concrete. Fly ash class F was used as a raw material activated with alkali solutions. The combination of 8 Molar of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) as alkali activators was examined in the mixture with ratio of 2.5 by weight. Nine cubical specimens with a size of 150 × 150 × 150 mm were prepared to measure bond strength and slip between reinforcement and concrete. The influential factors studied for the experimental investigation were the diameter of reinforcement bar, bond area, and concrete cover to diameter (c/d) of reinforcement. The result showed that the average bond strength decreased as the diameter of plain bar and bonded length were increased from 16 mm to 19 mm. However, the 12 mm showed the different result allegedly caused by the effect of bond area and the passive confined provided by the concrete. Based on several equations used to compare the bond strength, it is clear that deformed bar of 12 mm in diameter is potential to increase the bond strength.

  17. Determination of anisotropy and multimorphology in fly ash based geopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M. Irfan, E-mail: mirfanwazir@gmail.com; Azizli, Khairun, E-mail: khairun-azizli@petronas.com.my; Sufian, Suriati, E-mail: suriati@petronas.com.my; Man, Zakaria, E-mail: zakaman@petronas.com.my; Siyal, Ahmer Ali, E-mail: ahmersiyal@gmail.com; Ullah, Hafeez, E-mail: Hafeez-wazir@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, Malaysian coal fly ash-based geopolymers were investigated for its morphology and chemical composition using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-rays (SEM-EDX). Geopolymer was synthesized using sodium hydroxide as activator. SEM studies revealed multiphasous structure of the material, composed of geopolymeric gel, partially reacted fly ashparticles and selectively leached particles. EDX analysis confirmed the chemical composition of different regions. Infra red spectroscopic studies supported the SEM-EDX analysis by confirming presence of unreacted quartzite and mullite in geopolymers. It is concluded that geopolymers possese a non uniform chemistry through out the structure.

  18. Synthesis and heavy metal immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunsheng, Zhang; Wei, Sun; Qianli, Chen; Lin, Chen

    2007-05-08

    In this paper, two aspects of studies are carried out: (1) synthesis of geopolymer by using slag and metakaolin; (2) immobilization behaviors of slag based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions. As for the synthesis of slag based geopolymer, four different slag content (10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) and three types of curing regimes (standard curing, steam curing and autoclave curing) are investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength. The testing results showed that geopolymer mortar containing 50% slag that is synthesized at steam curing (80 degrees C for 8h), exhibits higher mechanical strengths. The compressive and flexural strengths of slag based geopolymer mortar are 75.2 MPa and 10.1 MPa, respectively. Additionally, Infrared (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques are used to characterize the microstructure of the slag based geopolymer paste. IR spectra show that the absorptive band at 1086 cm(-1) shifts to lower wave number around 1007 cm(-1), and some six-coordinated Als transforms into four-coordination during the synthesis of slag based geopolymer paste. The resulting slag based geopolymeric products are X-ray amorphous materials. SEM observation shows that it is possible to have geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel forming simultaneously within slag based geopolymer paste. As for immobilization of heavy metals, the leaching tests are employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the slag based geopolymer mortar synthesized under the above optimum condition. The leaching tests show that slag based geopolymer mortar can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions, and the immobilization efficiency reach 98.5% greater when heavy metals are incorporated in the slag geopolymeric matrix in the range of 0.1-0.3%. The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu in the case of large dosages of heavy metals.

  19. Effect of GGBS and curing temperature on microstructure characteristics of lightweight geopolymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hassan Hilal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement replacement by supplementary cementitious materials has been gaining momentum as a sustainable mechanism to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also recycling industrial by-products. This paper presents the development and microstructure characterization of fly ash-based lightweight geopolymer concrete incorporating ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS. Concrete samples were prepared with 0%, 25% and 50% GGBS replacement and cured at 30°C, 60°C, and ambient temperature. While dune sand and lightweight expanded clay were used as aggregates, a mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide served as the alkaline activation solution. Microstructure evaluation was carried out at 7 and 28 days employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Residual fly ash and GGBS were identified in the concrete and bonded to geopolymeric reaction products. The microstructure highlighted the formation and coexistence of aluminosilicate hydrate and aluminum-rich calcium silicate hydrate with traces of sodium. Subsequent polymerization was also verified by an increase in FTIR and DSC peaks.

  20. Earthquake Response of Reinforced Concrete Building Retrofitted with Geopolymer Concrete and X-shaped Metallic Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madheswaran, C. K.; Prakash vel, J.; Sathishkumar, K.; Rao, G. V. Rama

    2017-06-01

    A three-storey half scale reinforced concrete (RC) building is fixed with X-shaped metallic damper at the ground floor level, is designed and fabricated to study its seismic response characteristics. Experimental studies are carried out using the (4 m × 4 m) tri-axial shake-table facility to evaluate the seismic response of a retrofitted RC building with open ground storey (OGS) structure using yielding type X-shaped metallic dampers (also called as Added Damping and Stiffness-ADAS elements) and repairing the damaged ground storey columns using geopolymer concrete composites. This elasto-plastic device is normally incorporated within the frame structure between adjacent floors through chevron bracing, so that they efficiently enhance the overall energy dissipation ability of the seismically deficient frame structure under earthquake loading. Free vibration tests on RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper is carried out. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of RC building without and with yielding type X-shaped metallic damper are determined. The retrofitted reinforced concrete building is subjected to earthquake excitations and the response from the structure is recorded. This work discusses the preparation of test specimen, experimental set-up, instrumentation, method of testing of RC building and the response of the structure. The metallic damper reduces the time period of the structure and displacement demands on the OGS columns of the structure. Nonlinear time history analysis is performed using structural analysis package, SAP2000.

  1. Optimization and influence of parameter affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate: using full factorial design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Thulasirajan; Purushothaman, Revathi

    2017-07-01

    There are several parameters that influence the properties of geopolymer concrete, which contains recycled concrete aggregate as the coarse aggregate. In the present study, the vital parameters affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate are analyzedby varying four parameters with two levels using full factorial design in statistical software Minitab® 17. The objective of the present work is to gain an idea on the optimization, main parameter effects, their interactions and the predicted response of the model generated using factorial design. The parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (8M and 12M), curing time (6hrs and 24 hrs), curing temperature (60°C and 90°C) and percentage of recycled concrete aggregate (0% and 100%) are considered. The results show that the curing time, molarity of sodium hydroxide and curing temperature were the orderly significant parameters and the percentage of Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was statistically insignificant in the production of geopolymer concrete. Thus, it may be noticeable that the RCA content had negligible effect on the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The expected responses from the generated model showed a satisfactory and rational agreement to the experimental data with the R2 value of 97.70%. Thus, geopolymer concrete comprising recycled concrete aggregate can solve the major social and environmental concerns such as the depletion of the naturally available aggregate sources and disposal of construction and demolition waste into the landfill.

  2. Utilization of Palm Oil Fuel Ash as Binder in Lightweight Oil Palm Shell Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Yong Jing Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally fly ash (FA has been used to replace cement as binder in the geopolymer concrete. The utilization of palm oil industrial waste materials known as palm oil fuel ash (POFA and oil palm shell (OPS that are abundantly available in South East Asia as binder and coarse aggregate in geopolymer concrete would give an added advantage in both the environmental and economic aspects. The mechanical properties of the OPS geopolymer concrete (OPSGC through the use of POFA, FA, and OPS are investigated and reported. A total of ten OPSGC mixtures were prepared with varying percentages of POFA and FA such as 0, 10, 20, 40, and 100%. The specimens prepared with two alkaline solution to binder (AK/B ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 were oven cured at 65°C for 48 hours. The experimental results showed that the highest compressive strength of 30 MPa was obtained for the mix with 20% replacement of FA by POFA and AK/B ratio of 0.55, which underwent oven curing. Further, the mix of up to 20% POFA (with AK/B ratio of 0.55 can be categorized as structural lightweight concrete. An increase of the POFA content beyond 20% decreases the mechanical properties, and hence this mix is recommended to be used.

  3. An investigation of the effect of migratory type corrosion inhibitor on mechanical properties of zeolite-based novel geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auqui, Nestor Ulloa; Baykara, Haci; Rigail, Andres; Cornejo, Mauricio H.; Villalba, Jose Luis

    2017-10-01

    The effects of migratory type corrosion inhibitor and curing time on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of Ecuadorian natural zeolite-based geopolymers were evaluated. Geopolymer samples were prepared by alkali activation of the natural zeolite by 8 M NaOH solution and calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 1-3 wt%, with an activator/binder ratio of 0.6. The geopolymer samples cured for 24 h at 40 °C and then for 6 days more at room temperature showed the compressive strength values in a range of 3-5,5 MPa. Mineralogical analysis of natural zeolite obtained by XRD is as follows: Mordenite (∼67%), quartz (∼27%) and amorphous (∼6%). SEM-EDS micrographs analysis of geopolymers revealed the presence of Na and Ca which proves the incorporation of the activators, NaOH and Ca(OH)2. The compressive strength values obtained indicate that the use of alkali activation of natural zeolites is an effective method for the synthesis of geopolymers. The mechanical properties of geopolymers were slightly but not adversely affected by the addition of the migratory corrosion inhibitor, MCI-2005 NS. These results will be used in future research on geopolymer concrete with embedded reinforcing steel.

  4. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  5. Mechanical and Microstructural Evaluations of Lightweight Aggregate Geopolymer Concrete before and after Exposed to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Omar A; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2013-10-09

    This paper presents the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of a lightweight aggregate geopolymer concrete (LWAGC) synthesized by the alkali-activation of a fly ash source (FA) before and after being exposed to elevated temperatures, ranging from 100 to 800 °C. The results show that the LWAGC unexposed to the elevated temperatures possesses a good strength-to-weight ratio compared with other LWAGCs available in the published literature. The unexposed LWAGC also shows an excellent strength development versus aging times, up to 365 days. For the exposed LWAGC to the elevated temperatures of 100 to 800 °C, the results illustrate that the concretes gain compressive strength after being exposed to elevated temperatures of 100, 200 and 300 °C. Afterward, the strength of the LWAGC started to deteriorate and decrease after being exposed to elevated temperatures of 400 °C, and up to 800 °C. Based on the mechanical strength results of the exposed LWAGCs to elevated temperatures of 100 °C to 800 °C, the relationship between the exposure temperature and the obtained residual compressive strength is statistically analyzed and achieved. In addition, the microstructure investigation of the unexposed LWAGC shows a good bonding between aggregate and mortar at the interface transition zone (ITZ). However, this bonding is subjected to deterioration as the LWAGC is exposed to elevated temperatures of 400, 600 and 800 °C by increasing the microcrack content and swelling of the unreacted silicates.

  6. Microencapsulated phase change materials for enhancing the thermal performance of Portland cement concrete and geopolymer concrete for passive building applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Vinh Duy; Pilehvar, Shima; Salas-Bringas, Carlos; Szczotok, Anna M.; Rodriguez, Juan F.; Carmona, Manuel; Al-Manasir, Nodar; Kjøniksen, Anna-Lena

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microencapsulated phase change materials give high energy storage capacity concrete. • Microcapsule addition increases the porosity of concrete. • Thermal and mechanical properties are linked to the enhanced concrete porosity. • Agglomerated microcapsules have strong impact on the concrete properties. • Microcapsules caused geopolymer to become more energy efficient than Portland cement. - Abstract: Concretes with a high thermal energy storage capacity were fabricated by mixing microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) into Portland cement concrete (PCC) and geopolymer concrete (GPC). The effect of MPCM on thermal performance and compressive strength of PCC and GPC were investigated. It was found that the replacement of sand by MPCM resulted in lower thermal conductivity and higher thermal energy storage, while the specific heat capacity of concrete remained practically stable when the phase change material (PCM) was in the liquid or solid phase. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity of GPC as function of MPCM concentration was reduced at a higher rate than that of PCC. The power consumption needed to stabilize a simulated indoor temperature of 23 °C was reduced after the addition of MPCM. GPC exhibited better energy saving properties than PCC at the same conditions. A significant loss in compressive strength was observed due to the addition of MPCM to concrete. However, the compressive strength still satisfies the mechanical European regulation (EN 206-1, compressive strength class C20/25) for concrete applications. Finally, MPCM-concrete provided a good thermal stability after subjecting the samples to 100 thermal cycles at high heating/cooling rates.

  7. Rice husk (RH) as additive in fly ash based geopolymer mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abd; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Rahim, Mohd Azrin Adzhar; Nasri, Armia

    2017-09-01

    In recent year, the Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete is vastly used as main binder in construction industry which lead to depletion of natural resources in order to manufacture large amount of OPC. Nevertheless, with the introduction of geopolymer as an alternative binder which is more environmental friendly due to less emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and utilized waste materials can overcome the problems. Rice husk (RH) is an agricultural residue which can be found easily in large quantity due to production of paddy in Malaysia and it's usually disposed in landfill. This paper investigated the effect of rice husk (RH) content on the strength development of fly ash based geopolymer mortar. The fly ash is replaced with RH by 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% where the sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide was used as alkaline activator. A total of 45 cubes were casted and their compressive strength, density and water absorption were evaluated at 1, 3, and 7 days. The result showed compressive strength decreased when the percentage of RH increased. At 5% replacement of RH, the maximum strength of 17.1MPa was recorded at day 7. The geopolymer has lowest rate of water absorption (1.69%) at 20% replacement of RH. The density of the sample can be classified as lightweight geopolymer concrete.

  8. Influence of gamma ray irradiation on metakaolin based sodium geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertin, D., E-mail: david.lambertin@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Boher, C. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Dannoux-Papin, A. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LCFI, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Galliez, K.; Rooses, A.; Frizon, F. [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SPDE/LP2C, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2013-11-15

    Effects of gamma irradiation on metakaolin based Na-geopolymer have been investigated by external irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a gamma irradiator with {sup 60}Co sources up to 1000 kGy. Various Na-geopolymer with three H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O ratios have been studied in terms of hydrogen radiolytic yield. The results show that hydrogen production increases linearly with water content. Gamma irradiation effects on Na-geopolymer microstructure have been investigated with porosity measurements and X-ray pair distribution function analysis. A change of pore size distribution and a structural relaxation have been found after gamma ray irradiation.

  9. Geopolymer materials based on natural zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolov, A.; Rostovsky, Ivan; Nugteren, H.W.

    2017-01-01

    One of the potential raw materials for preparation of geopolymers is the natural zeolite. In the present report, the used natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) is from huge deposit near Beli Plast, Bulgaria. Geopolymer pastes and mortars are prepared by using three different alkaline activators—sodium

  10. Formulation of caesium based and caesium containing geo-polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, S.; Joussot-Dubien, C.; Frizon, F. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN, Decontamination and Conditioning Department, DEN/DTCD/SPDE/L2ED, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2009-10-15

    Cement encapsulation is widely used as a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste immobilisation process. Among these wastes, caesium ions are poorly immobilised by Portland cement based materials. This work consists of an experimental investigation into the ability of geo-polymers to effectively encapsulate this chemical species and to determine the impact of caesium incorporation on the geo-polymer properties. Geo-polymers were synthesised with several compositions based on the activation of metakaolin with an alkali hydroxide solution containing caesium. The setting time, mineralogy, porosity and mechanical properties of the samples were examined for one month. Leach tests were conducted during the same period to determine the immobilisation efficiency. The results depend to a large extent on the composition of the activation solution in terms of soluble silica content and alkali used. These parameters determine both the degree of condensation and the geo-polymer composition. (authors)

  11. Formulation of caesium based and caesium containing geo-polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Joussot-Dubien, C.; Frizon, F.

    2009-01-01

    Cement encapsulation is widely used as a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste immobilisation process. Among these wastes, caesium ions are poorly immobilised by Portland cement based materials. This work consists of an experimental investigation into the ability of geo-polymers to effectively encapsulate this chemical species and to determine the impact of caesium incorporation on the geo-polymer properties. Geo-polymers were synthesised with several compositions based on the activation of metakaolin with an alkali hydroxide solution containing caesium. The setting time, mineralogy, porosity and mechanical properties of the samples were examined for one month. Leach tests were conducted during the same period to determine the immobilisation efficiency. The results depend to a large extent on the composition of the activation solution in terms of soluble silica content and alkali used. These parameters determine both the degree of condensation and the geo-polymer composition. (authors)

  12. Thermal Characterization of Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sneha; Thanh, Nhan Phan; Marvalova, Bohdana; Petrikova, Iva

    2017-12-01

    Thermal characterization of geopolymer powder was investigated at room and elevated temperatures. The physical, chemical and mass change with respect to various temperatures have been studied. The physical properties such as density, porosity, and particle size were analyzed in geopolymer powder. The chemical and phase compositions were determined by x-ray fluorescence. The surface images of solid blocks of geopolymer were examined at room and elevated temperatures using scanning electron microscopy. Thermal expansion, shrinkage, and mass loss behavior towards the elevated temperatures were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The endothermic peak arising in the DSC curve is due to evaporation of water, chemical, gases and weight loss.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Thermal and Hygrometric Characteristics of Building Structures Employing Recycled Plastic Aggregates and Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Colangelo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The correct estimation of building energy consumptions is assuming an always increasing importance, and a detailed reproduction of building structures, with all the single components involved, is necessary to achieve this aim. In addition, the current ecological development tries to limit the use of natural raw materials as building components, in favor of alternative (waste materials, which ensure significant advantages from the economic, energetic and environmental point of views. In this work, dynamic heat and vapor transport in a typical three-dimensional (3D building structure, involving different types of environmental-friendly concrete mixtures, have been simulated by using finite elements. In particular, the authors propose to substitute part of the aggregates with plastic waste and to use a fly ash based geopolymeric binder for the production of low conductivity concrete, to be employed in eco-efficient buildings. Concrete produced with natural limestone aggregates has been considered as the reference benchmark. The whole characterization of the different types of concrete tested in the present work has been obtained through laboratory experiments. The structure taken into account in the simulations is a 3D thermal bridge, typical of building envelopes. The thermal and hygrometric transient behavior of this structure, employing plastic waste in different percentages and geopolymer concrete, has been analyzed by the authors.

  14. The Application of PVA Fiber to Improve the Mechanical Properties of Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfaluthy Muhammad Lutfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation on the improvement of geopolymer concrete properties through the use of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA fibers mixed in the fresh concrete. For the purpose of obtaining the optimum mechanical properties, the volume fraction of PVA fibers was varied at 0%; 0.3%; 0.5%; ad 0.8%. All mixtures were cast by mixing fly ash, alkali activator, and aggregates. The activator used in this study was a combination of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH. The mechanical properties of geopolymer concrete were obtained from the results of compressive strength, splitting strength, uniaxial tensile strength, elastic modulus, and flexural strength. It is found that the variation of 0.8% PVA fibers resulted in the highest strength for overall test. The utilization of 0.8% PVA fibers also contributed to increasing the direct tensile up to 50%. However, it is noticed that the elastic modulus was more prone to decrease as the fiber content in the mixture increased.

  15. Study of Fly Ash Geopolymer Based Composites with Polyester Waste Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Sotiriadis; Olesia Mikhailova

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, fly ash geopolymer based composites including polyester (PES) waste were studied. Specimens of three compositions were prepared: (a) fly ash geopolymer with 5% PES waste; (b) fly ash geopolymer mortar with 5% PES waste; (c) fly ash geopolymer mortar with 6.25% PES waste. Compressive and bending strength measurements, water absorption test and determination of thermal conductivity coefficient were performed. The results showed that the addition of sand...

  16. Strength Performance of Blended Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahib, Zaidahtulakmal M.; Kamaruddin, Kartini; Saman, Hamidah M.

    2018-03-01

    Geopolymer is a based on inorganic alumino-silicate binder system. Geopolymeric materials are formed using materials that containing silica and aluminium such as fly ash and rice husk ash, which activated by alkaline solution. This paper presents the study on the effect of replacement of SSA in RHA based geopolymer, types of curing and different molarity of NaOH used on the strength of Sewage Sludge Ash (SSA) and Rice Husk Ash (RHA) based geopolymer mortar incorporating with three (3) different mix proportions. Based geopolymer mortar was synthesized from treated sewage sludge and rice husk undergoing incineration process in producing ashes, activated with sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution by ratio of 2.5:1 and solution to ash ratio of 1:1. Molarity of 8M and 10M NaOH were used. The percentages of SSA replacement were 0%, 10% and 20% by weight. Compressive strength was conducted at age 7, 14 and 28 days to see the development of strength with two curing regimes, which are air curing and oven curing (60°C for 24 hours). From the research conducted, the ultimate compressive strength (6.28MPa) was obtained at zero replacement of SSA taken at 28 days of oven curing with 10M of NaOH. This shows that RHA, which is rich in silica content is enough to enhance the strength of geopolymer mortar especially with high molarity of NaOH.

  17. Compressive strength and hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of geopolymerization involves the reaction of solid aluminosilicate materials with highly alkaline silicate solution yielding an aluminosilicate inorganic polymer named geopolymer, which may be successfully applied in civil engineering as a replacement for cement. In this paper we have investigated the influence of synthesis parameters: solid to liquid ratio, NaOH concentration and the ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH, on the mechanical properties and hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers in distilled water, sea water and simulated acid rain. The highest value of compressive strength was obtained using 10 mol dm-3 NaOH and at the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 1.5. Moreover, the results have shown that mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymers are in correlation with their hydrolytic stability. Factors that increase the compressive strength also increase the hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers. The best hydrolytic stability of fly ash based geopolymers was shown in sea water while the lowest stability was recorded in simulated acid rain. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172054 i Nanotechnology and Functional Materials Center, funded by the European FP7 project No. 245916

  18. Effect of Molarity of Sodium Hydroxide and Curing Method on the Compressive Strength of Ternary Blend Geopolymer Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish Kumar, V.; Ganesan, N.; Indira, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete plays a vital role in the development of infrastructure and buildings all over the world. Geopolymer based cement-less concrete is one of the current findings in the construction industry which leads to a green environment. This research paper deals with the results of the use of Fly ash (FA), Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) and Metakaolin (MK) as a ternary blend source material in Geopolymer concrete (GPC). The aspects that govern the compressive strength of GPC like the proportion of source material, Molarity of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and Curing methods were investigated. The purpose of this research is to optimise the local waste material and use them effectively as a ternary blend in GPC. Seven combinations of binder were made in this study with replacement of FA with GGBS and MK by 35%, 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5% and 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, 35% respectively. The molarity of NaOH solution was varied by 12M, 14M and 16M and two types of curing method were adopted, viz. Hot air oven curing and closed steam curing for 24 hours at 60°C (140°F). The samples were kept at ambient temperature till testing. The compressive strength was obtained after 7 days and 28 days for the GPC cubes. The test data reveals that the ternary blend GPC with molarity 14M cured by hot air oven produces the maximum compressive strength. It was also observed that the compressive strength of the oven cured GPC is approximately 10% higher than the steam cured GPC using the ternary blend.

  19. TiO₂-Based Photocatalytic Geopolymers for Nitric Oxide Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Alberto; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Messina, Francesco; Schiavi, Luca; Corsaro, Davide; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2016-06-24

    This study presents an experimental overview for the development of photocatalytic materials based on geopolymer binders as catalyst support matrices. Particularly, geopolymer matrices obtained from different solid precursors (fly ash and metakaolin), composite systems (siloxane-hybrid, foamed hybrid), and curing temperatures (room temperature and 60 °C) were investigated for the same photocatalyst content (i.e., 3% TiO₂ by weight of paste). The geopolymer matrices were previously designed for different applications, ranging from insulating (foam) to structural materials. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated as NO degradation in air, and the results were compared with an ordinary Portland cement reference. The studied matrices demonstrated highly variable photocatalytic performance depending on both matrix constituents and the curing temperature, with promising activity revealed by the geopolymers based on fly ash and metakaolin. Furthermore, microstructural features and titania dispersion in the matrices were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analyses. Particularly, EDS analyses of sample sections indicated segregation effects of titania in the surface layer, with consequent enhancement or depletion of the catalyst concentration in the active sample region, suggesting non-negligible transport phenomena during the curing process. The described results demonstrated that geopolymer binders can be interesting catalyst support matrices for the development of photocatalytic materials and indicated a large potential for the exploitation of their peculiar features.

  20. Application of a clay-slag geopolymer matrix for repairing damaged concrete: Laboratory and industrial-scale experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Boura, P.; Lučaník, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 10 (2017), s. 929-937 ISSN 0025-5300 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : blast-furnace slag * geopolymer * scanning electron microscopy (SEM) * damaged concrete repair * long-term monitoring Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2016

  1. Beneficial use of fly ash and red mud in geopolymer concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Coal-fired power plants generate millions of tons of fly ash on a yearly basis. Fly ash is a fine particulate aluminosilicate residue mainly composed of spherical micron-sized particles collected from dust collection systems. The management of fly ash is a significant area of concern because only 20 to 30 per cent of the generated fly ash is utilized, primarily in cement and concrete and as filling material, while a much larger portion is deposited in landfills. Red mud is an alkaline industrial residue generated during the Bayer process for alumina production. This paper exhaustively characterized the chemical and mineralogical properties of solid-waste materials. The study investigated the behaviour of geopolymer pastes made using sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate activators. The paper presented the materials and methods as well as results and discussion of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, setting time and other early age properties of concrete. It was concluded that fly ash and red mud can be used as the main raw material for the making of geopolymer, a new generation of binder. 10 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  2. Thermal characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samal, Sneha Manjaree; Thanh, N.P.; Marvalová, B.; Petrikova, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 12 (2017), s. 2480-2484 ISSN 1047-4838 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermal * characterization * geopolymer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.860, year: 2016

  3. Performance and Behaviour of Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag Imparted to Geopolymer Concrete Structural Elements and Analyzed with ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rajesh Antonyamaladhas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the behaviour of geopolymer concrete using ground granulated blast furnace slag and steel fibre to compare with M40 grade cement concrete. The cast GPC specimens were placed in a hot curing chamber at 60∘C temperature for 24 hours and tested after 1, 7, 14, and 28 days of ambient curing to find the strength and durability of hardened concrete. The optimum value of compressive strength was attained at 12 Molarities. Fly ash was replaced by GGBS in GPC with different proportions such as 0% to 60% at 5% interval; the optimum strength value was obtained on 40% replacement. From the test results, the compressive, split-tensile, and flexural strength of GPC specimens were 20%, 43%, and 53% higher than those of the control specimens. Based on the optimum strength mix proportion, the structural elements were cast to investigate the stress-strain relations. The GPC beam and L-section showed 33% and 16% higher value. From the results of acid and sulphate resistance tests, it was found that the strength and weight ratio of GPC were higher than the control specimens. From the simulations, it was found that the experimental test results were approximately equal to the ANSYS.

  4. Review on supplymentary cementitious materials used in inorganic polymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasreddy, K.; Srinivasan, K.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a review on various supplementary cementitious materials generated from industries are used in concrete, which one is considered a waste material. These materials are rich in aluminosilicates and are activated by sodium/potassium based alkaline solution to form geopolymer concrete. When these geopolymer concrete is used in civil engineering applications has showed better or similar mechanical properties and durability properties than ordinary Portland cement concrete. This paper also given the overview on sodium hydroxide (NaOH) & sodium silicate solution (Na2SiO3) ratios, curing adopted for different geopolymer concretes and the effect of adding fibres in geopolymer concretes.

  5. A Study on Marble-Based Geopolymer

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Ta-Wui; Ding Yung-Chin; Lee Wei-Hao; Lu Po-chang

    2017-01-01

    Cement manufacturing is one of the highest carbon dioxide emission industries. It releases 880 kg carbon dioxide for every ton of cement produced. In Taiwan, the carbon dioxide emission from cement industry is more than 10 million tons per year. The development of low carbon dioxide emission green cement can be a solution to replace part of OPC for civil applications and reduce carbon dioxide emission. Geopolymer consists of a polymeric Si–O–Al framework, similar to zeolites which can be form...

  6. Experimental Tests on Bending Behavior of Profiled Steel Sheeting Dry Board Composite Floor with Geopolymer Concrete Infill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Isa Jaffar

    Full Text Available Abstract Profiled Steel Sheet Dry Board (PSSDB system is a lightweight composite structure comprises Profiled Steel Sheeting and Dry Board connected by self-drilling and self-tapping screws. This study introduced geopolymer concrete, an eco-friendly material without cement content as an infill material in the PSSDB floor system to highlight its effect onto the PSSDB (with full and half-size dry boards floor system's stiffness and strength. Experimental tests on various full scale PSSDB floor specimens were conducted under uniformly distributed transverse loads. Results illustrate that the rigidity of the panel with geopolymer concrete infill with half-size dry board (HBGPC increases by 43% relative to that of the panel with normal concrete infill with full-size dry board (FBNC. The developed finite-element modeling (FEM successfully predicts the behavior of FBGPC model with 94.8% accuracy. Geopolymer concrete infill and dry board size influence the strength panel, infill contact stiffness, and mid-span deflection of the profiled steel sheeting/dry board (PSSDB flooring system.

  7. Immobilization of simulated radionuclide 133Cs{sup +} by fly ash-based geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qin; Sun, Zengqing; Tao, Dejing; Xu, Yan; Li, Peiming; Cui, Hao; Zhai, Jianping, E-mail: jpzhai@nju.edu.cn

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fly ash-based geopolymer was used to immobilize 133Cs{sup +}, with cement as comparison. • Less Cs{sup +} was leached out from geopolymer in deionized water, acid and salt solutions. • Geopolymer showed more excellent acid resistance than cement blocks. • Geopolymer maintained superior mechanical strength to cement matrices. • Geopolymer showed good freeze–thaw and high-temperature performances. -- Abstract: The recent nuclear leak in Japan once again attracted people's attention to nuclear safety problems. Because of their poor thermal stability, those low-cost materials such as cement and asphalt cannot be used for the solidification of the radioactive wastes. In this work, the solidification behavior of 133Cs{sup +} by fly ash-based geopolymer was investigated. Leaching tests (carried out in deionized water, sulfuric acid and magnesium sulfate solutions) revealed that the geopolymer solidification had lower cumulative fraction leaching concentration (CFLC) of 133Cs{sup +} than that of cemented form. The thermal stability (high-temperature and freeze–thaw resistance) and acid-resistance of the geopolymer were also both better than that of cement. The geopolymer solidification block can acquire a compressive strength up to 30 MPa after 2 h calcination at 1000 °C. The morphology and mineral phases of the geopolymer and the geopolymer solidification block were characterized by SEM and XRD, and EDX analysis indicated that most of Cs associated with the amorphous geopolymer gel. These results gave encouragement for the idea that the fly ash-based geopolymer could be used as a low-cost and high-efficiency material for the immobilization of radioactive wastes.

  8. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  9. Alkali-activated fly ash-based geopolymers with zeolite or bentonite as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyu Hu; Xiaomin Zhu; Fumei Long [Nanchang University, Nanchang (China). College of Civil Engineering

    2009-11-15

    Geopolymers were synthesized by using fly ash as the main starting material, zeolite or bentonite as supplementary materials, and NaOH and CaO together as activator. An orthogonal array testing protocol was used to analyze the influence of the mix proportion on the properties of the geopolymers. The results indicate that the concentration of NaOH solution and the CaO content play an important role on the strength of the materials. Especially, with zeolite as additive, the fly ash-based geopolymer shows the highest strength and the best sulfate resistance. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray, and SEM-EDX demonstrate that supplementary zeolite may involve the process of geopolymerization to form a stable zeolitic structure and improve the properties of the geopolymer. Bentonite simply acts as a filler to make the geopolymer more compact, but shows no improvement on the compositions and the microstructures of the geopolymer.

  10. Deterioration and Microstructural Evolution of the Fly Ash Geopolymer Concrete against MgSO4 Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Long

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash geopolymer concrete (FAGC and ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPCC specimens were immersed in 5% MgSO4 solution undergoing 32 wetting-drying and heating-cooling cycles. Their compressive behavior was investigated after every 8 cycles. Several microstructure analysis techniques were applied on the samples to identify the materials formed due to magnesium sulfate attack, including XRD, FTIR, SEM, and EDS. Experimental results elucidated that the compressive strength loss ratio in the heating group of FAGC was 12.7%, while that of OPCC was 17.8%, which means that FAGC had better magnesium sulfate resistance than OPCC. The compressive strength loss of OPCC was due to the formation of gypsum under the magnesium sulfate attack exposed to wetting-drying and heating-cooling cycles. The deterioration mechanisms of FAGC against MgSO4 solution were discovered to be that sodium aluminum silicate hydrate (N-A-S-H gels reacted with MgSO4, leading to the creation of low strength magnesium aluminum silicate hydrate (M-A-S-H gels.

  11. Spectroscopic studies of fly ash-based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożek, Piotr; Król, Magdalena; Mozgawa, Włodzimierz

    2018-03-13

    In the present work fly-ash based geopolymers with different contents of alkali-activator and water were prepared. Alkali-activation was conducted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at the SiO 2 /Na 2 O molar ratio of 3, 4, and 5. Water content was at the ratio of 30, 40, and 50wt% in respect to the weight of the fly ash. Structural and microstructural characterization (FT-IR spectroscopy, 29 Si and 27 Al MAS NMR, X-ray diffraction, SEM) of the specimens as well as compressive strength and apparent density measurements were carried out. The obtained geopolymers are mainly amorphous due to the presence of disordered aluminosilicate phases. However, hydroxysodalite have been identified as a crystalline product of geopolymerization. The major band in the mid-infrared spectra (at about 1000cm -1 ) is related to SiO(Si,Al) asymmetric stretching vibrations and is an indicator of the geopolymeric network formation. Several component bands in this region can be noticed after the decomposition process. Decomposition of band at 1450cm -1 (vibrations of CO bonds in bicarbonate group) has been also conducted. Higher NaOH content favors carbonation, inasmuch as the intensity of the band then increases. Both water and alkaline activator contents have an influence on compressive strength and microstructure of the obtained fly-ash based geopolymers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis and heavy metal immobilization behaviors of fly ash based geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunsheng Zhang; Wei Sun; Wei She; Guowei Sun [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Jiangsu Civil Engineering Materials Key Laboratory

    2009-10-15

    Two aspects of studies were carried out: 1) synthesis of geopolymer by using fly ash and metakaolin; 2) Immobilization behaviors of fly ash based geopolymer in a presence of Pb and Cu ions. As for the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer, 4 different fly ash content (10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) and 3 types of curing regimes (standard curing, steam curing and autoclave curing) were investigated to obtain the optimum synthesis condition based on the compressive and flexural strength. The experimental results show that geopolymer, containing 30% fly ash and synthesized at steam curing (80{sup o}C for 8 h), exhibits higher mechanical strengths. The compressive and flexural strengths of fly ash based geopolymer reach 32.2 MPa and 7.15 MPa, respectively. Additionally, Infrared (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterize the microstructure of the fly ash geopolymer. IR spectra shows that the absorptive band at 1086 cm{sup -1} shifts to lower wave number around 1033 cm{sup -1}, and the 6-coordinated Al transforms into 4-coordination during the synthesis of fly ash based geopolymer. The resulting geopolymeric products were X-ray amorphous materials. As for immobilization of heavy metals, leaching tests were employed to investigate the immobilization behaviors of the fly ash based geopolymer synthesized under the above optimum condition. The leaching tests showed that fly ash based geopolymer can effectively immobilize Cu and Pb heavy metal ions, and the immobilization efficiency reached 90% greater when heavy metals were incorporated in the fly ash geopolymer in the range of 0.1% to 0.3%. The Pb exhibits better immobilization efficiency than the Cu, especially in the case of large dosages of heavy metals.

  13. Immobilization of simulated radionuclide 133Cs+ by fly ash-based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Sun, Zengqing; Tao, Dejing; Xu, Yan; Li, Peiming; Cui, Hao; Zhai, Jianping

    2013-11-15

    The recent nuclear leak in Japan once again attracted people's attention to nuclear safety problems. Because of their poor thermal stability, those low-cost materials such as cement and asphalt cannot be used for the solidification of the radioactive wastes. In this work, the solidification behavior of 133Cs(+) by fly ash-based geopolymer was investigated. Leaching tests (carried out in deionized water, sulfuric acid and magnesium sulfate solutions) revealed that the geopolymer solidification had lower cumulative fraction leaching concentration (CFLC) of 133Cs(+) than that of cemented form. The thermal stability (high-temperature and freeze-thaw resistance) and acid-resistance of the geopolymer were also both better than that of cement. The geopolymer solidification block can acquire a compressive strength up to 30 MPa after 2h calcination at 1000 °C. The morphology and mineral phases of the geopolymer and the geopolymer solidification block were characterized by SEM and XRD, and EDX analysis indicated that most of Cs associated with the amorphous geopolymer gel. These results gave encouragement for the idea that the fly ash-based geopolymer could be used as a low-cost and high-efficiency material for the immobilization of radioactive wastes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The influence of Pb addition on the properties of fly ash-based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Violeta; Komljenović, Miroslav; Džunuzović, Nataša; Miladinović, Zoran

    2018-05-15

    Preventing or reducing negative effects on the environment from the waste landfilling is the main goal defined by the European Landfill Directive. Generally geopolymers can be considered as sustainable binders for immobilization of hazardous wastes containing different toxic elements. In this paper the influence of addition of high amount of lead on structure, strength, and leaching behavior (the effectiveness of Pb immobilization) of fly ash-based geopolymers depending on the geopolymer curing conditions was investigated. Lead was added during the synthesis of geopolymers in the form of highly soluble salt - lead-nitrate. Structural changes of geopolymers as a result of lead addition/immobilization were assessed by means of XRD, SEM/EDS, and 29 Si MAS NMR analysis. Investigated curing conditions significantly influenced structure, strength and leaching behavior of geopolymers. High addition of lead caused a sizeable decrease in compressive strength of geopolymers and promoted formation of aluminum-deficient aluminosilicate gel (depolymerization of aluminosilicate gel), regardless of the curing conditions investigated. According to the EUWAC limitations, 4% of lead was successfully immobilized by fly ash-based geopolymers cured for 28 days in a humid chamber at room temperature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin-based geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantarel, V.; Nouaille, F.; Rooses, A.; Lambertin, D., E-mail: david.lambertin@cea.fr; Poulesquen, A.; Frizon, F.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Formulation with 20 vol.% of oil in a geopolymer have been successful tested. • Oil waste is encapsulated as oil droplets in metakaolin-based geopolymer. • Oil/geopolymer composite present good mechanical performance. • Carbon lixiviation of oil/geopolymer composite is very low. - Abstract: The solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin based geopolymer was studied in the present work. The process consists of obtaining a stabilised emulsion of oil in a water-glass solution and then adding metakaolin to engage the setting of a geopolymer block with an oil emulsion stabilised in the material. Geopolymer/oil composites have been made with various oil fraction (7, 14 and 20 vol.%). The rigidity and the good mechanical properties have been demonstrated with compressive strength tests. Leaching tests evidenced the release of oil from the composite material is very limited whereas the constitutive components of the geopolymer (Na, Si and OH{sup −}) are involved into diffusion process.

  16. Flow properties of MK-based geopolymer pastes. A comparative study with standard Portland cement pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Aurélie; Hot, Julie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-02-28

    Geopolymers are presented in many studies as alternatives to ordinary Portland cement. Previous studies have focused on their chemical and mechanical properties, their microstructures and their potential applications, but very few have focussed on their rheological behaviour. Our work highlights the fundamental differences in the flow properties, which exist between geopolymers made from metakaolin and Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). We show that colloidal interactions between metakaolin particles are negligible and that hydrodynamic effects control the rheological behaviour. Metakaolin-based geopolymers can then be described as Newtonian fluids with the viscosity controlled mainly by the high viscosity of the suspending alkaline silicate solution and not by the contribution of direct contacts between metakaolin grains. This fundamental difference between geopolymers and OPC implies that developments made in cement technology to improve rheological behaviour such as plasticizers will not be efficient for geopolymers and that new research directions need to be explored.

  17. Flexural Test of Fly Ash based Geopolimer Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindyawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is a by-product from the coal industry, which is widely available in Indonesia. Fly ash contains quite high silicate and alumina. Silica and alumina reacts with alkaline solution to produce alumina silicate gel which binds the aggregate to produce geopolymer concrete. Geopolymer concrete is introduced as an environmental concrete with high compressive strength. The use of geopolymer concrete beams is a solution to reduce the effects of greenhouse gases. This research uses experimental designs. The data are obtained from the testing of 4 pieces of reinforced geopolymer concrete beams and reinforced ordinary concrete beams with a / d of 1.11 and 2.24. The results are obtained from the maximum load that can be accepted by the beam. The results of this study are: (1 Geopolymer concrete cylinder has 26.78% higher compressive strength than ordinary concrete cylinders (2 Ordinary concrete beams can withstand 34.8% load higher compared to the geopolymer concrete beam (3 Reinforced ordinary concrete beams experience bending shear collapse while reinforced geopolymer concrete beam experience pure bending collapse.

  18. An investigation of waste glass-based geopolymers supplemented with alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Mary U.

    An increased consideration of sustainability throughout society has resulted in a surge of research investigating sustainable alternatives to existing construction materials. A new binder system, called a geopolymer, is being investigated to supplement ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete, which has come under scrutiny because of the CO2 emissions inherent in its production. Geopolymers are produced from the alkali activation of a powdered aluminosilicate source by an alkaline solution, which results in a dense three-dimensional matrix of tetrahedrally linked aluminosilicates. Geopolymers have shown great potential as a building construction material, offering similar mechanical and durability properties to OPC. Additionally, geopolymers have the added value of a considerably smaller carbon footprint than OPC. This research considered the compressive strength, microstructure and composition of geopolymers made from two types of waste glass with varying aluminum contents. Waste glass shows great potential for mainstream use in geopolymers due to its chemical and physical homogeneity as well as its high content of amorphous silica, which could eliminate the need for sodium silicate. However, the lack of aluminum is thought to negatively affect the mechanical performance and alkali stability of the geopolymer system. 39 Mortars were designed using various combinations of glass and metakaolin or fly ash to supplement the aluminum in the system. Mortar made from the high-Al glass (12% Al2O3) reached over 10,000 psi at six months. Mortar made from the low-Al glass (use in geopolymers, when care is given to consider the compositional and physical properties of the glass in mixture design.

  19. Compressive strength and microstructural analysis of fly ash/palm oil fuel ash based geopolymer mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Behnia, Arash; Alengaram, U. Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results show POFA is adaptable as replacement in FA based geopolymer mortar. • The increase in POFA/FA ratio delay of the compressive development of geopolymer. • The density of POFA based geoploymer is lower than FA based geopolymer mortar. - Abstract: This paper presents the effects and adaptability of palm oil fuel ash (POFA) as a replacement material in fly ash (FA) based geopolymer mortar from the aspect of microstructural and compressive strength. The geopolymers developed were synthesized with a combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate as activator and POFA and FA as high silica–alumina resources. The development of compressive strength of POFA/FA based geopolymers was investigated using X-ray florescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). It was observed that the particle shapes and surface area of POFA and FA as well as chemical composition affects the density and compressive strength of the mortars. The increment in the percentages of POFA increased the silica/alumina (SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 ) ratio and that resulted in reduction of the early compressive strength of the geopolymer and delayed the geopolymerization process

  20. Benefits of Sealed-Curing on Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujeong; van Riessen, Arie; Chon, Chul-Min

    2016-01-01

    There is no standardized procedure for producing geopolymers; therefore, many researchers develop their own procedures for mixing and curing to achieve good workability and strength development. The curing scheme adopted is important in achieving maximum performance of resultant geopolymers. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sealed and unsealed curing on mechanical strength of geopolymers. Fly ash-based geopolymers cured in sealed and unsealed moulds clearly revealed that retention of water during curing resulted in superior strength development. The average compressive strength of sealed-cured geopolymers measured after 1 day of curing was a modest 50 MPa, while after 7 day curing the average compressive strength increased to 120~135 MPa. In the unsealed specimens the average compressive strength of geopolymers was lower; ranging from 60 to 90 MPa with a slight increase as the curing period increased. Microcracking caused by dehydration is postulated to cause the strength decrease in the unsealed cured samples. These results show that water is a crucial component for the evolution of high strength three-dimensional cross-linked networks in geopolymers. PMID:28773720

  1. Mechanical and physical properties of metakaolin based geopolymer paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risdanareni Puput

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the result of studies on utilizing metakaolin obtained from Belitung as fly ash substitute material to produce geopolymer paste. Mechanical properties were assessed by compressive strength while physical properties were assessed by setting time, porosity, microstructure test and density test. The experiment was performed on geopolymer paste with 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% fly ash replacement with metakaolin. Sodium Hidroxide (NaOH with concentration of 10 Molars and Sodium Silicate (Na2SiO3 were used as alkaline activator. In addition, activator ratio between sodium silicate to sodium hidroxide of 2 was applied. The result obtains that increasing metakaolin contain in mixture deliver longer setting time, higher open pore number, lower density and lower compressive strength of geopolymer paste. However, adding metakaolin up to 25 % into geopolymer paste mixture could increase mechanical and physical properties of geopolymer paste.

  2. Coal fly ash-slag-based geopolymers: Microstructure and metal leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo, Maria; Querol, Xavier; Davidovits, Joseph; Antenucci, Diano; Nugteren, Henk; Fernandez-Pereira, Constantino

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the use of fly ash as a starting material for geopolymeric matrices. The leachable concentrations of geopolymers were compared with those of the starting fly ash to evaluate the retention of potentially harmful elements within the geopolymer matrix. Geopolymer matrices give rise to a leaching scenario characterised by a highly alkaline environment, which inhibits the leaching of heavy metals but may enhance the mobilization of certain oxyanionic species. Thus, fly ash-based geopolymers were found to immobilise a number of trace pollutants such as Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Nb, Ni, Pb, Sn, Th, U, Y, Zr and rare earth elements. However, the leachable levels of elements occurring in their oxyanionic form such as As, B, Mo, Se, V and W were increased after geopolymerization. This suggests that an optimal dosage, synthesis and curing conditions are essential in order to obtain a long-term stable final product that ensures an efficient physical encapsulation.

  3. Performance of Fly ash Based Geopolymer Mortars in Sulphate Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was conducted to study the performance of fly ash based geopolymer mortar specimens inMagnesium Sulphate solution. Specimens were manufactured from low calcium fly ash by activation with a mixture of SodiumHydroxide and Sodium Silicate solution and cured thermally. 10% by weight Magnesium Sulphate solution was usedto soak the specimen up to 24 weeks. Performance of the specimens was evaluated in terms of visual appearance, variationof pH of solution, change in weight, and change in compressive strength over the exposure period. White deposits occurredon the surface of specimen which was initially soft but later converted to hard crystals. pH of solution increased noticeablyduring the initial weeks which indicate migration of alkalis from mortar specimens. At the end of 24 weeks samples experiencedvery little weight gain and recorded a loss of compressive strength by up to 56%.

  4. Fire Related Temperature Resistance of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyalakshmi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper is on the effect of heat treatment on fly ash based geopolymer mortar synthesized from fly ash (Class F –Low lime using alkaline binary activator solution containing sodium hydroxide (18 M and sodium silicate solution (MR 2.0, cured at 80oC for 24 h. 7 days aged specimen heated at elevated temperature (200°C, 400°C, 600°C and 800°C for the sustained period of 2hrs. The TGA/DTA analysis and thermal conductivity measurement as per ASTM C113 were carried out besides the compressive strengths. The thermal stability of the fly ash mortar at elevated temperature was found to be high as reflected in the observed value of f800°C/f30°C being more than 1 and this ratio was raised to about 1.3 with the addition of 2% Zirconium di oxide (ZrO2. No visible cracks were found on the specimens with and without ZrO2 when 800°C was sustained for 4 hrs in smaller specimens of size: 50 mm diameter x 100 mm height and in also bigger size specimens: 22 cm × 11 cm × 7 cm specimens. TGA/DTA analysis of the geopolymer paste showed that the retention of mass was around 90%. The addition of ZrO2 improved thermal resistance. The micro structure of the matrix found to be intact even at elevated temperature that was evident from the FESEM studies.

  5. Effects of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution concentration on fly ash-based lightweight geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, W. M. W.; Hussin, K.; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Kadir, A. A.; Deraman, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effects of NaOH concentration on properties of fly ash-based lightweight geopolymer were investigated. Lightweight geopolymer was produced using fly ash as source materials and synthetic foaming agents as air entraining agent. The alkaline solutions used in this study are combination of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) solution. Different molarities of NaOH solution (6M, 8M, 10M, 12M, and 14M) are taken for preparation of 50 x 50 x 50 mm cubes of lightweight geopolymer. The ratio of fly ash/alkaline solution, Na2SiO3/NaOH solution, foaming agent/water and foam/geopolymer paste were kept constant at 2.0, 2.5, 1:10 and 1:1 respectively. The samples were cured at 80°C for 24 hours and left at room temperature for tested at 7 days of ageing. Physical and mechanical properties such as density, water absorption, compressive strength and microstructure property were determined from the cube dried samples. The results show that the NaOH molarity had effects on the properties of lightweight geopolymer with the optimum NaOH molarity found is 12M due to the high strength of 15.6 MPa, lower water absorption (7.3%) and low density (1440 kg/m3). Microstructure analysis shows that the lightweight geopolymer contain some porous structure and unreacted fly ash particles remains.

  6. Performance characterization of geopolymer composites for hot sodium exposed sacrificial layer in fast breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneefa, K. Mohammed, E-mail: mhkolakkadan@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai (India); Santhanam, Manu [Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai (India); Parida, F.C. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Performance evaluation of geopolymers subjected to hot liquid sodium is performed. • Apart from mechanical properties, micro-analytical techniques are used for material characterization. • The geopolymer composite showed comparatively lesser damage than conventional cement composites. • Geopolymer technology can emerge as a new choice for sacrificial layer in SCFBRs. - Abstract: A sacrificial layer of concrete is used in sodium cooled fast breeder reactors (SCFBRs) to mitigate thermo-chemical effect of accidentally spilled sodium at and above 550 °C on structural concrete. Performance of this layer is governed by thermo-chemical stability of the ingredients of sacrificial layer concrete. Concrete with limestone aggregate is generally used as a sacrificial layer. Conventional cement based systems exhibit instability in hot liquid sodium environment. Geo-polymer composites are well known to perform excellently at elevated temperatures compared to conventional cement systems. This paper discusses performance of such composites subjected to exposure of hot liquid sodium in air. The investigation includes comprehensive evaluation of various geo-polymer composites before any exposure, after heating to 550 °C in air, and after immersing in hot liquid sodium initially heated to 550 °C in air. Results from the current study indicate that hot liquid sodium produces less damage to geopolymer composites than to the existing conventional cement based system. Hence, the geopolymer technology has potential application in mitigating the degrading effects of sodium fires and can emerge as a new choice for sodium exposed sacrificial layer in SCFBRs.

  7. The effect of different parameters on the development of compressive strength of oil palm shell geopolymer concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials--low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)--as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength.

  8. EFFECT OF SODIUM HYDROXIDE CONCENTRATION ON FRESH PROPERTIES AND COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF SELF-COMPACTING GEOPOLYMER CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAREED AHMED MEMON

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of the laboratory tests conducted to investigate the effect of sodium hydroxide concentration on the fresh properties and compressive strength of self-compacting geopolymer concrete (SCGC. The experiments were conducted by varying the concentration of sodium hydroxide from 8 M to 14 M. Test methods such as Slump flow, V-Funnel, L-box and J-Ring were used to assess the workability characteristics of SCGC. The test specimens were cured at 70°C for a period of 48 hours and then kept in room temperature until the day of testing. Compressive strength test was carried out at the ages of 1, 3, 7 and 28 days. Test results indicate that concentration variation of sodium hydroxide had least effect on the fresh properties of SCGC. With the increase in sodium hydroxide concentration, the workability of fresh concrete was slightly reduced; however, the corresponding compressive strength was increased. Concrete samples with sodium hydroxide concentration of 12 M produced maximum compressive strength.

  9. Formation of zeolites in metakaolin-based geopolymers and their potential application for Cs immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel Haddad, M.; Ofer-Rozovsky, E.; Bar-Nes, G.; Borojovich, E. J. C.; Nikolski, A.; Mogiliansky, D.; Katz, A.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali-activated aluminisilicate materials, also known as geopolymers, have been considered as attractive candidates for nuclear waste immobilization, due to their ability to incorporate cations, combined with high chemical resistance and suitable mechanical and thermal properties. The goal of the present research was to study the incorporation and immobilization of Cs in low-Si geopolymers (SiO2:Al2O3 molar ratio ≤ 2) which are known to have a relatively high crystalline phase content. A series of low-Si geopolymers was prepared from metakaolin using activating solutions containing CsOH and NaOH at different proportions. The structural evolution of the resulting products was followed using X-ray diffraction, the incorporation of Cs in the geopolymer was followed by pore water analysis, and its immobilization efficiency was determined from leaching tests following the ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard procedure. Like low-Si NaOH-based geopolymers, the mixed CsOH-NaOH geopolymers contain a significant amount of crystalline material which is imbedded within an amorphous matrix. Formulations with 1%Cs yielded the crystalline phases zeolite A and zeolite X. At 50%Cs the Cs-bearing zeolite F was formed. All three phases were observed at an intermediate Cs content (7%Cs). Pore water analysis indicated a preference for Cs uptake from the activating solution, while leaching experiments indicated selectivity for Cs immobilization in the mixed CsOH-NaOH geopolymers. Correlation of the apparent diffusion constants for both Na and Cs, as obtained from the leaching experiments, with the structural data lead to the conclusion that Cs is more efficiently bound by zeolite F, whereas Na binding is preferred by zeolites A and X. Nevertheless, the leachability indices for both Cs and Na were well above 6, indicating that such matrices may be considered as waste forms for 137Cs.

  10. Geopolymers: Structures, Processing, Properties and Industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provis, J.L.; van Deventer, J.S.J. (eds.) [University of Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    A geopolymer is a solid aluminosilicate material usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of a solid precursor such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Part one discusses the synthesis and characterisation of geopolymers with chapters on topics such as fly ash chemistry and inorganic polymer cements, geopolymer precursor design, nanostructure/microstructure of metakaolin and fly ash geopolymers, and geopolymer synthesis kinetics. Part two reviews the manufacture and properties of geopolymers including accelerated ageing of geopolymers, chemical durability, engineering properties of geopolymer concrete, producing fire and heat-resistant geopolymers, utilisation of mining wastes and thermal properties of geopolymers. Part three covers applications of geopolymers with coverage of topics such as commercialisation of geopolymers for construction, as well as applications in waste management. Chapters of particular relevance are: Fly ash glass chemistry and inorganic polymer cements by L.M. Keyte, University of Melbourne, Australia; Nanostructure/microstructure of metakaolin geopolymers by A. Fernanez-Jimenez and A. Palomo, Eduardo Torroja Institute, Spain; Utilisation of mining wastes to produce geopolymer binders by F. Pacheco-Torgal and S. Jalali, University of Minho and J.P. Castro-Gomes, University of Beira Interior, Portugal.

  11. Evaluation of the resistance of a geopolymer-based drug delivery system to tampering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2014-04-25

    Tamper-resistance is an important property of controlled-release formulations of opioid drugs. Tamper-resistant formulations aim to increase the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug molecules from extended-release formulations for the purpose of non-medical use. In this study, the resistance of a geopolymer-based formulation to tampering was evaluated by comparing it with a commercial controlled-release tablet using several methods commonly used by drug abusers. Because of its high compressive strength and resistance to heat, much more effort and time was required to extract the drug from the geopolymer-based formulation. Moreover, in the drug-release test, the geopolymer-based formulation maintained its controlled-release characteristics after milling, while the drug was released immediately from the milled commercial tablets, potentially resulting in dose dumping. Although the tampering methods used in this study does not cover all methods that abuser could access, the results obtained by the described methods showed that the geopolymer matrix increased the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug, suggesting that the formulation has improved resistance to some common drug-abuse tampering methods. The geopolymer matrix has the potential to make the opioid product less accessible and attractive to non-medical users. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

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    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  13. Geopolymer Coating of Bacteria-containing Granules for Use in Self-healing Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Koster, S.A.L.; Mors, R.M.; Nugteren, H.W.; Jonkers, H.M.; Meesters, G.M.H.; Van Ommen, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Concrete structures are often reinforced with steel. In order for the reinforcement to take over tensile forces, concrete has to crack. Through such cracks, water and compounds that are harmful to concrete can enter. This can cause durability issues like leakage, concrete degradation and

  14. TiO2-Based Photocatalytic Geopolymers for Nitric Oxide Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Strini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental overview for the development of photocatalytic materials based on geopolymer binders as catalyst support matrices. Particularly, geopolymer matrices obtained from different solid precursors (fly ash and metakaolin, composite systems (siloxane-hybrid, foamed hybrid, and curing temperatures (room temperature and 60 °C were investigated for the same photocatalyst content (i.e., 3% TiO2 by weight of paste. The geopolymer matrices were previously designed for different applications, ranging from insulating (foam to structural materials. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated as NO degradation in air, and the results were compared with an ordinary Portland cement reference. The studied matrices demonstrated highly variable photocatalytic performance depending on both matrix constituents and the curing temperature, with promising activity revealed by the geopolymers based on fly ash and metakaolin. Furthermore, microstructural features and titania dispersion in the matrices were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS analyses. Particularly, EDS analyses of sample sections indicated segregation effects of titania in the surface layer, with consequent enhancement or depletion of the catalyst concentration in the active sample region, suggesting non-negligible transport phenomena during the curing process. The described results demonstrated that geopolymer binders can be interesting catalyst support matrices for the development of photocatalytic materials and indicated a large potential for the exploitation of their peculiar features.

  15. TiO2-Based Photocatalytic Geopolymers for Nitric Oxide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strini, Alberto; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Messina, Francesco; Schiavi, Luca; Corsaro, Davide; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an experimental overview for the development of photocatalytic materials based on geopolymer binders as catalyst support matrices. Particularly, geopolymer matrices obtained from different solid precursors (fly ash and metakaolin), composite systems (siloxane-hybrid, foamed hybrid), and curing temperatures (room temperature and 60 °C) were investigated for the same photocatalyst content (i.e., 3% TiO2 by weight of paste). The geopolymer matrices were previously designed for different applications, ranging from insulating (foam) to structural materials. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated as NO degradation in air, and the results were compared with an ordinary Portland cement reference. The studied matrices demonstrated highly variable photocatalytic performance depending on both matrix constituents and the curing temperature, with promising activity revealed by the geopolymers based on fly ash and metakaolin. Furthermore, microstructural features and titania dispersion in the matrices were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analyses. Particularly, EDS analyses of sample sections indicated segregation effects of titania in the surface layer, with consequent enhancement or depletion of the catalyst concentration in the active sample region, suggesting non-negligible transport phenomena during the curing process. The described results demonstrated that geopolymer binders can be interesting catalyst support matrices for the development of photocatalytic materials and indicated a large potential for the exploitation of their peculiar features. PMID:28773634

  16. Flexural Toughness Properties of Reinforced Steel Fibre Incorporated Alkali Activated Slag Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Karunanithi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of steel fibre addition on the flexural properties of geopolymer based cementitious matrix was investigated in the present study. Slag based geopolymer mixtures were prepared with different binder and aggregate combinations. Strength gain and hardened properties of different geopolymer concrete mixtures were evaluated using accelerated curing techniques subjected to hot air oven and steam curing. Further, the steel fibre additions on the mechanical strength properties of a high strength geopolymer mixture were studied. A comprehensive evaluation on the post-crack toughness properties was assessed using four-point bend test. Test results exhibited that a geopolymer concrete of maximum compressive strength of 56.6 MPa can be achieved with steam curing. Experimental observations also demonstrated that the steel fibre inclusions in geopolymer concrete provided adequate improvement on post-crack toughness properties and showed higher composite performance with increased volume fraction of steel fibres.

  17. Sulfate resistance of fly ash-based geopolymer mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloma, Iqbal, Maulid Muhammad; Aqil, Ibnu

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents sulfuric acid attack of fly ash-based geopolymer mortar. Precursor used in this study was fly ash, and activator used was NaOH and Na2SiO3. The ratio of activator/precursor, ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH, and ratio of fine aggregate/precursor is 0.42, 2.00, and 2.00, respectively. The molar concentration of NaOH which was used were 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 M. This study used cube specimen with 5 cm x 5 cm x 5 cm. The results showed that the higher the molar concentration of NaOH, the lower the weight loss. Maximum percentage of weight loss is 3.54% occured for the specimen with molar concentration of NaOH 8 M. The compressive strength for all specimens decreased due to the longer duration of immersion in sulfuric acid solution. However, this percentage of decreasing for compressive strength will be as lower as increasing the molar concentration of NaOH used. The maximum percentage of decreasing is 35.49% for specimen with NaOH 8 M with 90 days of immersion.

  18. Optimum mix for fly ash geopolymer binder based on workability and compressive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, S. A.; Ali, A. Z. M.; Awal, A. S. M. A.; Loon, L. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The request of concrete is increasing every day for sustaining the necessity of development of structure. The production of OPC not only consumes big amount of natural resources and energy, but also emit significant quantity of CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is necessary to find alternatives like Geopolymer to make the concrete environment friendly. Geopolymer is an inorganic alumino-silicate compound, produced from fly ash. This paper describes the experimental work conducted by casting 40 geopolymer paste mixes, and was cured at 80°C for 24 h to evaluate the effect of various parameters affecting the workability and compressive strength. Alkaline solution to fly ash ratio and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration were chosen as the key parameters of strength and workability. Laboratory investigation with different percentage of sodium hydroxide concentration and different alkaline liquid to fly ash ratio reveals that the optimum ratios are 10 M, AL/FA=0.5. It has generally been found that the workability decreased and the compressive strength increased with an increase in the concentration of sodium hydroxide solution. However, workability was increased and the compressive strength was decreased with the increase in the ratio of fly ash to alkaline solution.

  19. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer with Added TiO2 Particles: Physicomechanical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Guzmán-Aponte

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the TiO2 addition on the physicomechanical properties of a geopolymer system based on metakaolin (MK and hydroxide and potassium silicate as activators is presented in this article. Three different liquid-solid systems (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 and two titanium additions were investigated (5% and 10% of the cement content. The flowability, setting time, and mechanical strength of the geopolymer mixtures and their microstructural characteristics were evaluated using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was concluded that a percentage of up to 10% TiO2 does not affect the mechanical properties of the geopolymer, although it does reduce the fluidity and setting times of the mixture.

  1. Geopolymers based on the valorization of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Formosa, J.; Barbieri, L.; Chimenos, J. M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2017-10-01

    The proper management of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) has become one of the main environmental commitments for developed countries due to the uncontrolled growth of waste caused by the consumption patterns of modern societies. Nowadays, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is one of the most feasible solutions and it is estimated to increase in Europe where the accessibility of landfill is restricted. Bottom ash (BA) is the most significant by-product from MSWI as it accounts for 85 - 95 % of the solid product resulting from combustion, which is classified as a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate in road sub-base, bulk lightweight filler in construction. In this way, revalorization of weathered BA (WBA) for the production of geopolymers may be a good alternative to common reuse as secondary aggregate material; however, the chemical process to obtain these materials involves several challenges that could disturb the stability of the material, mainly from the environmental point of view. Accordingly, it is necessary that geopolymers are able to stabilize heavy metals contained in the WBA in order to be classified as non-hazardous materials. In this regard, the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio plays an important role for the encapsulation of heavy metals and other toxic elements. The aim of this research is to formulate geopolymers starting from the 0 - 2 mm particle size fraction of WBA, as a unique raw material used as aluminumsilicate precursor. Likewise, leaching tests of the geopolymers formulated were performed to assess their environmental impact. The findings show that it is possible to formulate geopolymers using 100 % WBA as precursor, although more investigations are needed to sustain that geopolymer obtained can be considered as non-hazardous materials.

  2. Comparative study on early strength of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) activated fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Zarina; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Talib, Siti Zulaikha Abd; Razak, Rafiza Abd

    2017-09-01

    The urge to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emission has encourage researchers to introduce environmental friendly binder or known as geopolymer. This new binder was produced by mixing source materials rich in silica and alumina with alkaline liquids. For this study, class F fly ash was used as source material with two different types of alkaline activator; sodium hydroxide (NaOH) only and a combination of water glass with NaOH. The different concentration of the NaOH solutions (8M, 10M, 12M and 14M) is used in the production of geopolymer. The parameters such as curing regime, solid/liquid ratio, and water glass/NaOH ratio are controlled in the study. The samples with combination of NaOH and water glass as alkaline activator were prepared by mixing these two solution and stirred for 2 minutes. Then this solution were mixed together with fly ash for 3 minutes and casted in the mould. The performance of the fly ash based geopolymer are evaluated by the compressive strength, water absorption and density at the early age of 1th, 3th and 7th days. Based on the study, at a concentration of 14M on 7th days had achieved the maximum compressive strength of 7.1 MPa for samples activated with NaOH only. Meanwhile, for geopolymer samples activated with a combination of the water glass and NaOH, the maximum strength of 33.33 MPa was recorded on 7th days of testing with NaOH concentration of 12 M. The water absorption for all geopolymer samples were ranging from 2.04 % to 2.78%, which are below the limit (3%). While the density of the geopolymer paste were in the range of 1552 kg/m3 to 1680 kg/m3, which are below the limit (2400 kg/m3). From the standpoint of strength of hardened geopolymer samples, the most effective alkaline activator in geopolymer is the combination of NaOH and water glass.

  3. A Comprehensive Study of the Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Fly Ash Based Geopolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Behnia, Arash

    2016-01-01

    and long term impacts of different volume percentages of polypropylene fiber (PPF) reinforcement on fly ash based geopolymer composites. Different characteristics of the composite were compared at fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state by variation of shrinkage over time to assess the response...

  4. FREEZE-THAW AND FIRE RESISTANCE OF GEOPOLYMER MORTAR BASED ON NATURAL AND WASTE POZZOLANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Nurhayat Degirmenci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the resistance of pozzolan-based geopolymer mortars subjected to high temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles. Low calcium fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag as waste pozzolans and natural zeolite as a natural pozzolan were used as base materials for producing geopolymer mortar. The other purpose the research was to study the effect of alkaline activator ratio (Na₂SiO₃/NaOH on the performance of pozzolan-based geopolymer mortar specimens subjected to extreme temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on the properties of mortars was investigated at 300°C, 600°C, and 900°C. Fire and freeze-thaw and resistance of mortars were investigated in terms of visual appearance, weight loss and residual compressive strength. The minimal values of the residual compressive strength were obtained at 900°C for all mixtures. The residual compressive strength of all specimens was lower than the values obtained for specimens not subjected to any freeze-thaw resistance test, except those containing GGBS. The Na₂SiO₃/NaOH ratios of the alkaline activator solution used to prepare the geopolymer mortars have an effect on the weight losses and residual compressive strengths of the specimens subjected to high temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles. As the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratios increased, the weight and strength losses decreased.

  5. Bond Strength Mechanism of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Mortars: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailani, W. W. A.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Razak, R. A.; Zainol, M. R. R. M. A.; Tahir, M. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Geopolymer possess many excellent properties such as high compressive and bond strength, long term durability, better acid resistance and also known as a “Sustainable Material” due to its low carbon emission and low energy consumption. Thus, it is a good opportunity to develop and explore not only for cement and concrete but also as geopolymeric repair materials. This reviews showed that good bonding properties between geopolymeric repair material and concrete substrate is important in order to acquire an enhanced resistance against penetration of harmful substances and avoiding respalling of the repair material by understanding the bonding behaviour. Bond strength depends to the properties of the repair materials itself and also the surface preparations of concrete substrate.

  6. A Novel MK-based Geopolymer Composite Activated with Rice Husk Ash and KOH: Performance at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Villaquirán-Caicedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers were produced using an environmentally friendly alkali activator (based on Rice Husk Ash and potassium hydroxide. Aluminosilicates particles, carbon and ceramic fibres were used as reinforcement materials. The effects of reinforcement materials on the flexural strength, linear-shrinkage, thermophysical properties and microstructure of the geopolymers at room and high temperature (1200 ÅãC were studied. The results indicated that the toughness of the composites is increased 110.4% for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres (G-AF at room temperature. The presence of particles improved the flexural behaviour 265% for geopolymer reinforced by carbon fibres and particles after exposure to 1200 .C. Linear-shrinkage for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres and particles and the geopolymer G-AF compared with reference sample (without fibres and particles is improved by 27.88% and 7.88% respectively at 900 ÅãC. The geopolymer materials developed in this work are porous materials with low thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties with potential thermal insulation applications for building applications.

  7. A Novel MK-based Geopolymer Composite Activated with Rice Husk Ash and KOH: Performance at High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaquirán-Caicedo, M.A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, R.; Gallego, N.C.

    2017-01-01

    Geopolymers were produced using an environmentally friendly alkali activator (based on Rice Husk Ash and potassium hydroxide). Aluminosilicates particles, carbon and ceramic fibres were used as reinforcement materials. The effects of reinforcement materials on the flexural strength, linear-shrinkage, thermophysical properties and microstructure of the geopolymers at room and high temperature (1200 °C) were studied. The results indicated that the toughness of the composites is increased 110.4% for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres (G-AF) at room temperature. The presence of particles improved the flexural behaviour 265% for geopolymer reinforced by carbon fibres and particles after exposure to 1200 .C. Linear-shrinkage for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres and particles and the geopolymer G-AF compared with reference sample (without fibres and particles) is improved by 27.88% and 7.88% respectively at 900 °C. The geopolymer materials developed in this work are porous materials with low thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties with potential thermal insulation applications for building applications. [es

  8. Flexural Toughness Properties of Reinforced Steel Fibre Incorporated Alkali Activated Slag Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Karunanithi, Srinivasan; Anandan, Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    The influence of steel fibre addition on the flexural properties of geopolymer based cementitious matrix was investigated in the present study. Slag based geopolymer mixtures were prepared with different binder and aggregate combinations. Strength gain and hardened properties of different geopolymer concrete mixtures were evaluated using accelerated curing techniques subjected to hot air oven and steam curing. Further, the steel fibre additions on the mechanical strength properties of a high ...

  9. Waste stabilization/solidification of an electric arc furnace dust using fly ash-based geopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Fernandez Pereira; Y. Luna; X. Querol; D. Antenucci; J. Vale [University of Seville, Seville (Spain). School of Industrial Engineering

    2009-07-15

    The stabilization/solidification (S/S) of a carbon steel electric arc furnace (EAF) dust containing hazardous metals such as Pb, Cd, Cr or Zn using geopolymerization technology is described in this paper. Different reagents such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, potassium silicate, kaolinite, metakaolinite and blast furnace slag have been used. Mixtures of EAF waste with these geopolymeric materials and class F fly ash have been processed for studying the potential of geopolymers as waste immobilizing agents. Compressive strength tests and leaching tests for determining the efficiency of heavy metal immobilisation have been carried out. Comparison of fly ash-based geopolymer systems with classic Portland cement stabilization methods has also been accomplished. Compressive strength values far better than those achieved by hydraulic S/S methods were easily obtained by geopolymer solids at 28 days. Regarding leachability, the geopolymer S/S solids also manifested in general a better behaviour, showing very promising results. 40 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  10. Geopolymer based catalysts-New group of catalytic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sazama, Petr; Bortnovsky, O.; Dědeček, Jiří; Tvarůžková, Zdenka; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 1 (2011), s. 92-99 ISSN 0920-5861. [Joint International Conference /1./ of the Tokyo Conference on Advanced Catalytic Science and Technology /11./ Asia Pacific Congress on Catalysis /5./. Sapporo, 18.07.2010-23.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA4/068; GA AV ČR KAN100400702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : geopolymers * redox catalysis * SCR- NOx Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2011

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF PHOSPHORUS SLAG ADDITION ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF METAKAOLIN-BASED GEOPOLYMER PASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. SOLEIMANI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, metakaolin plus different weight percent of phosphorus slag (10-100 wt. % were used in preparation of geopolymer. The compressive strength, phase analysis and microstructure changes were compared with a metakaolin based geopolymer control sample. Results showed that the substitution of slag up to 40 wt. % instead of metakaolin increase the 28 days compressive strength (14.5 % compared with control sample. This enhancement of strength is related to coexistence of geopolymeric gel and C‒S‒H gel or C‒A‒S‒H phase by XRD and FTIR study. In slag containing geopolymer samples some microcracks were observed at microstructure that established by volume change during formation of new phase or mismatching of unreacted particle with geopolymeric gel. These microcrack can dominate at high content of slag (above 40 wt. % substitution and decrease the strength of samples. These results show that it is possible to produce geopolymer cement from waste phosphorus slages.

  12. Concrete lunar base investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Manganese Slag and Fly Ash-based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ya-guang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series of manganese slag and fly ash-based geopolymers were prepared though alkali activation by varing the amount of manganese slag. The 3-day, 7-day and 14-day compressive strengths of these samples were tested. The maximum strength of 42.78 MPa was obtained at 14th days of testing when 455 g of fly ash, 195g of manganese slag, 20% of the alkali content , the curing temperature of 100°C, the curing time of 12h were used. XRD and FTIR characterization results shown that the polymerization reaction occurs between the glassiness in the manganese slag and the fly ash while adding alkali activator, and the main structure formed was Ca-A-S-H, which contributed the major strength in manganese slag and fly ash-based geopolymer.

  14. The pore characteristics of geopolymer foam concrete and their impact on the compressive strength and modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuhua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The pore characteristics of GFCs manufactured in the laboratory with 0-16% foam additions were examined using image analysis (IA) and vacuum water saturation techniques. The pore size distribution, pore shape and porosity were obtained. The IA method provides a suitable approach to obtain the information of large pores, which are more important in affecting the compressive strength of GFC. By examining the applicability of the existing models of predicting compressive strength of foam concrete, a modified Ryshkevitch’s model is proposed for GFC, in which only the porosity that is contributed by the pores over a critical diameter (>100 μm) is considered. This “critical void model” is shown to have very satisfying prediction capability in the studied range of porosity. A compression-modulus model for Portland cement concrete is recommended for predicting the compression modulus elasticity of GFC. This study confirms that GFC have similar pore structures and mechanical behavior as those Portland cement foam concrete and can be used alternatively in the industry for the construction and insulation purposes.

  15. The pore characteristics of geopolymer foam concrete and their impact on the compressive strength and modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhua Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The pore characteristics of GFCs manufactured in the laboratory with 0-16% foam additions were examined using image analysis (IA and vacuum water saturation techniques. The pore size distribution, pore shape and porosity were obtained. The IA method provides a suitable approach to obtain the information of large pores, which are more important in affecting the compressive strength of GFC. By examining the applicability of the existing models of predicting compressive strength of foam concrete, a modified Ryshkevitch’s model is proposed for GFC, in which only the porosity that is contributed by the pores over a critical diameter (>100 μm is considered. This critical void model is shown to have very satisfying prediction capability in the studied range of porosity. A compression-modulus model for Portland cement concrete is recommended for predicting the compression modulus elasticity of GFC. This study confirms that GFC have similar pore structures and mechanical behavior as those Portland cement foam concrete and can be used alternatively in the industry for the construction and insulation purposes.

  16. Microstructure Assessment of Metakaolin Based-Geopolymers Produced with Alternative Silica Sources Exposed to High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Villaquirán-Caicedo Mónica Alejandra; Rodríguez Erich David; Mejía-De Gutiérrez Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials more environment friendly and with similar or even better performance than traditional ones can be produced by alkali activation of natural minerals, wastes or industrial by-products. The present study assesses the effect of exposure at 600° and 1200°C of a MK-based geopolymers. Rice husk ash (RHA) and silica fume were modified chemically in order to obtain an alternative alkali activator. Exposure to elevated temperatures leads to dehydration of the reaction products and st...

  17. Preparation of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement under heat and vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gabrielle; Montes, Carlos; Eklund, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Ever since the beginning of the space program, lunar habitation has always been on peoples' minds. Prior researchers have explored habitat building materials - some based on earth-based construction materials, some based on in-situ lunar resources. Geopolymer cement is a cementitious binder made of aluminosilicate materials such as lunar regolith. A cementitious binder made of lunar regolith as the main geopolymer precursor, instead of as an added aggregate, is a solution that has not been deeply explored in prior works. This research explores the curing process of lunar regolith based geopolymer cement in an environment that loosely approximates the lunar environment, using the lunar average daytime temperature and a vacuum. The results did not show much promise for the samples cured under both heat and vacuum as the longest-cured data point did not meet compressive strength standards, but another pathway to lunar habitation may be found in a separate set of samples that cured under heat and ambient atmospheric pressure.

  18. Characterisation of metakaolin-based geopolymers using beam-based and conventional PALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guagliardo, P; Sergeant, A D; Howie, A; Wilkie, P; Williams, J; Samarin, S [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009 (Australia); Roberts, J; Weed, R; Went, M; Sullivan, J; Buckman, S [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 2600 (Australia); Vance, E R, E-mail: guaglp01@student.uwa.edu.au [Institute for Materials Engineering, ANSTO, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    The nano-porosity of metakaolin-based geopolymers and the effect of heat-treatment on porosity have been studied with conventional and beam-based positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). Conventional PALS found significant nano-porosity in the geopolymers, as indicated by the presence in the PALS spectrum of two long lifetime components, {tau}{sub 3} = 1.58 ns and {tau}{sub 4} = 47 ns, associated with pore diameters of approximately 0.5 and 3 nm respectively. The lifetime of the shorter component was found to decrease monotonically with successive heat treatments of 300{sup o}C and 600{sup o}C. Beam-based PALS, conducted at 5 keV, also indicated two long lifetime components, {tau}{sub 3} = 4.84 ns and {tau}{sub 4} = 54.6 ns. These are significantly longer than those observed by conventional PALS and the monotonic decrease of {tau}{sub 3} with successive heat treatments was not observed. As the beam-based PALS probed only the near-surface region, with an average implantation depth of about 350 nm, these results suggest that the near-surface structure may vary significantly from that of the bulk. This could be an inherent property of the samples or an artefact caused by surface effects or sample outgassing.

  19. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF OIL PALM ASH IN METAKAOLIN BASED GEOPOLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research reports on the microstructure, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and sulfate expansion of metakaolin (MK based geopolymers produced by partially replacing MK by oil palm ash (OPA in proportions of 0 %, 5 %, 10 % and 15 % by weight. The specimens were cured at a temperature of 80°C for 1, 2 and 4 hours, and compressive strength test were conducted at ambient temperature at 2, 6, 24 hours, 7 and 28 day. The testing results revealed that the geopolymer with 5 % OPA gave the highest compressive strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM indicated that the 5 % OPA sample had a dense-compact matrix and less unreacted raw materials which contributed to the higher compressive strength. In the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, the change of the crystalline phase for higher strength was easily detectable compared lower strength.

  20. Immobilisation of lead smelting slag within spent aluminate-fly ash based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundiran, M B; Nugteren, H W; Witkamp, G J

    2013-03-15

    This study presents the solidification/stabilisation and immobilisation of lead smelting slag (LSS) by its incorporation in coal fly ash - blast furnace slag based geopolymers. It also explores the use of a spent aluminium etching solution (AES) as geopolymer activator instead of the commonly used silicate solutions. The compressive strength of the geopolymers produced with the AES was lower than when applying a K-silicate solution as activator (100MPa versus 80MPa after 28 days). Compressive strength was not affected when up to 10% of the FA was replaced by LSS. NEN 12457-4, TCLP, SPLP and NEN 7375 leaching tests indicated that mobile Pb from LSS was highly immobilised. The diffusion leaching test NEN 7375 revealed exceeding of the Dutch Soil Quality Regulation threshold limits only for Se and Sb. On the condition that the remaining excess leaching can be reduced by further refinement of the mixture recipes, the proposed process will have the potential of producing waste-based construction materials that may be applied under controlled conditions in specific situations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comprehensive Study of the Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Fly Ash Based Geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Behnia, Arash; Javadi Pordsari, Alireza; Mehrali, Mohammad; Alengaram, U Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2016-01-01

    As a cementitious material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and a relatively low fracture energy. To overcome such a weakness, incorporation of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known technique to enhance the flexural properties. This study comprehensively evaluates the short and long term impacts of different volume percentages of polypropylene fiber (PPF) reinforcement on fly ash based geopolymer composites. Different characteristics of the composite were compared at fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state by variation of shrinkage over time to assess the response of composites under flexural and compressive load conditions. The fiber-matrix interface, fiber surface and toughening mechanisms were assessed using field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that incorporation of PPF up to 3 wt % into the geopolymer paste reduces the shrinkage and enhances the energy absorption of the composites. While, it might reduce the ultimate flexural and compressive strength of the material depending on fiber content.

  2. A Comprehensive Study of the Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Fly Ash Based Geopolymer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Ranjbar

    Full Text Available As a cementitious material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and a relatively low fracture energy. To overcome such a weakness, incorporation of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known technique to enhance the flexural properties. This study comprehensively evaluates the short and long term impacts of different volume percentages of polypropylene fiber (PPF reinforcement on fly ash based geopolymer composites. Different characteristics of the composite were compared at fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state by variation of shrinkage over time to assess the response of composites under flexural and compressive load conditions. The fiber-matrix interface, fiber surface and toughening mechanisms were assessed using field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The results show that incorporation of PPF up to 3 wt % into the geopolymer paste reduces the shrinkage and enhances the energy absorption of the composites. While, it might reduce the ultimate flexural and compressive strength of the material depending on fiber content.

  3. Performance evaluation and microstructure characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer containing oil palm ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawa, Abideng; Tonnayopas, Danupon; Prachasaree, Woraphot

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the microstructure, compressive strength, and drying shrinkage of metakaolin (MK) based geopolymers produced by partially replacing MK by oil palm ash (OPA). The OPA was used as raw material producing different molar ratios of SiO₂/Al₂O₃ and CaO/SiO₂. The geopolymer samples were cured at 80°C for 1, 2, or 4 hours and kept at ambient temperature until testing. The compressive strength was measured after 2, 6, and 24 hours and 7 and 28 days. The testing results revealed that the geopolymer with 5% OPA (SiO₂  : Al₂O₃ = 2.88 : 1) gave the highest compressive strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the 5% OPA sample had a dense-compact matrix and less unreacted raw materials which contributed to the higher compressive strength. In the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, the change of the crystalline phase after heat curing for 4 hours was easily detectable compared to the samples subjected to a shorter period of heat curing.

  4. Performance Evaluation and Microstructure Characterization of Metakaolin-Based Geopolymer Containing Oil Palm Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abideng Hawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the microstructure, compressive strength, and drying shrinkage of metakaolin (MK based geopolymers produced by partially replacing MK by oil palm ash (OPA. The OPA was used as raw material producing different molar ratios of SiO2/Al2O3 and CaO/SiO2. The geopolymer samples were cured at 80°C for 1, 2, or 4 hours and kept at ambient temperature until testing. The compressive strength was measured after 2, 6, and 24 hours and 7 and 28 days. The testing results revealed that the geopolymer with 5% OPA (SiO2 : Al2O3 = 2.88 : 1 gave the highest compressive strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM indicated that the 5% OPA sample had a dense-compact matrix and less unreacted raw materials which contributed to the higher compressive strength. In the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, the change of the crystalline phase after heat curing for 4 hours was easily detectable compared to the samples subjected to a shorter period of heat curing.

  5. A Comprehensive Study of the Polypropylene Fiber Reinforced Fly Ash Based Geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Behnia, Arash; Javadi Pordsari, Alireza; Mehrali, Mohammad; Alengaram, U. Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2016-01-01

    As a cementitious material, geopolymers show a high quasi-brittle behavior and a relatively low fracture energy. To overcome such a weakness, incorporation of fibers to a brittle matrix is a well-known technique to enhance the flexural properties. This study comprehensively evaluates the short and long term impacts of different volume percentages of polypropylene fiber (PPF) reinforcement on fly ash based geopolymer composites. Different characteristics of the composite were compared at fresh state by flow measurement and hardened state by variation of shrinkage over time to assess the response of composites under flexural and compressive load conditions. The fiber-matrix interface, fiber surface and toughening mechanisms were assessed using field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that incorporation of PPF up to 3 wt % into the geopolymer paste reduces the shrinkage and enhances the energy absorption of the composites. While, it might reduce the ultimate flexural and compressive strength of the material depending on fiber content. PMID:26807825

  6. High-efficiency cogeneration boiler bagasse-ash geochemistry and mineralogical change effects on the potential reuse in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, cements, mortars, and concretes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malcolm W; Despland, Laure M; Lake, Neal J; Yee, Lachlan H; Anstoetz, Manuela; Arif, Elisabeth; Parr, Jeffery F; Doumit, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse ash re-utilisation has been advocated as a silica-rich feed for zeolites, pozzolans in cements and concretes, and geopolymers. However, many papers report variable success with the incorporation of such materials in these products as the ash can be inconsistent in nature. Therefore, understanding what variables affect the ash quality in real mills and understanding the processes to characterise ashes is critical in predicting successful ash waste utilisation. This paper investigated sugarcane bagasse ash from three sugar mills (Northern NSW, Australia) where two are used for the co-generation of electricity. Data shows that the burn temperatures of the bagasse in the high-efficiency co-generation boilers are much higher than those reported at the temperature measuring points. Silica polymorph transitions indicate the high burn temperatures of ≈1550 °C, produces ash dominated α -quartz rather than expected α-cristobilite and amorphous silica; although α-cristobilite, and amorphous silica are present. Furthermore, burn temperatures must be ≤1700 °C, because of the absence of lechatelierite where silica fusing and globulisation dominates. Consequently, silica-mineralogy changes deactivate the bagasse ash by reducing silica solubility, thus making bagasse ash utilisation in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, or a pozzolanic material in mortars and concretes more difficult. For the ashes investigated, use as a filler material in cements and concrete has the greatest potential. Reported mill boiler temperatures discrepancies and the physical characteristics of the ash, highlight the importance of accurate temperature monitoring at the combustion seat if bagasse ash quality is to be prioritised to ensure a usable final ash product.

  7. High-efficiency cogeneration boiler bagasse-ash geochemistry and mineralogical change effects on the potential reuse in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, cements, mortars, and concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm W. Clark

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane bagasse ash re-utilisation has been advocated as a silica-rich feed for zeolites, pozzolans in cements and concretes, and geopolymers. However, many papers report variable success with the incorporation of such materials in these products as the ash can be inconsistent in nature. Therefore, understanding what variables affect the ash quality in real mills and understanding the processes to characterise ashes is critical in predicting successful ash waste utilisation. This paper investigated sugarcane bagasse ash from three sugar mills (Northern NSW, Australia where two are used for the co-generation of electricity. Data shows that the burn temperatures of the bagasse in the high-efficiency co-generation boilers are much higher than those reported at the temperature measuring points. Silica polymorph transitions indicate the high burn temperatures of ≈1550 °C, produces ash dominated α −quartz rather than expected α-cristobilite and amorphous silica; although α-cristobilite, and amorphous silica are present. Furthermore, burn temperatures must be ≤1700 °C, because of the absence of lechatelierite where silica fusing and globulisation dominates. Consequently, silica-mineralogy changes deactivate the bagasse ash by reducing silica solubility, thus making bagasse ash utilisation in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, or a pozzolanic material in mortars and concretes more difficult. For the ashes investigated, use as a filler material in cements and concrete has the greatest potential. Reported mill boiler temperatures discrepancies and the physical characteristics of the ash, highlight the importance of accurate temperature monitoring at the combustion seat if bagasse ash quality is to be prioritised to ensure a usable final ash product. Keywords: Materials Science, Civil Engineering

  8. The Effect of Alkaline Activator Ratio on the Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lăzărescu, A. V.; Szilagyi, H.; Baeră, C.; Ioani, A.

    2017-06-01

    Alkaline activation of fly ash is a particular procedure in which ash resulting from a power plant combined with a specific alkaline activator creates a solid material when dried at a certain temperature. In order to obtain desirable compressive strengths, the mix design of fly ash based geopolymer pastes should be explored comprehensively. To determine the preliminary compressive strength for fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material source, various ratios of Na2SiO3 solution/ NaOH solution were produced, keeping the fly ash/alkaline activator ratio constant. All the mixes were then cured at 70 °C for 24 hours and tested at 2 and 7 days, respectively. The aim of this paper is to present the preliminary compressive strength results for producing fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material sources, the effect of alkaline activators ratio on the compressive strength and studying the directions for future research.

  9. High calcium fly ash geopolymer stabilized lateritic soil and granulated blast furnace slag blends as a pavement base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phummiphan, Itthikorn; Horpibulsuk, Suksun; Rachan, Runglawan; Arulrajah, Arul; Shen, Shui-Long; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2018-01-05

    Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) was used as a replacement material in marginal lateritic soil (LS) while class C Fly Ash (FA) was used as a precursor for the geopolymerization process to develop a low-carbon pavement base material at ambient temperature. Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) tests were performed to investigate the strength development of geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis were undertaken to examine the role of the various influencing factors on UCS development. The influencing factors studied included GBFS content, Na 2 SiO 3 :NaOH ratio (NS:NH) and curing time. The 7-day soaked UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at various NS:NH ratios tested was found to satisfy the specifications of the Thailand national road authorities. The GBFS replacement was found to be insignificant for the improvement of the UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at low NS:NH ratio of 50:50. Microstructural analysis indicated the coexistence of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) and Sodium Alumino Silicate Hydrate products in FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. This research enables GBFS, which is traditionally considered as a waste material, to be used as a replacement and partially reactive material in FA geopolymer pavement applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of thermal treatment on the nano-structure and phase transformation of metakaolin-based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsung; Kang, Seunggu

    2014-11-01

    Enhancement of the mechanical strength of metakaolin-based geopolymers activated with NaOH was attempted by calcining metakaolin at a higher temperature than that commonly reported. Increasing the calcination temperature from 750 degrees C to 1150 degrees C promoted the recrystallization of mullite. Two type of zeolite of sodium aluminum silicate hydrates were found in the geopolymers made of metakaolin calcined at 750 degrees C-1050 degrees C. The h-zeolite [Na6(AlSiO4)6 x H2O] was not found in the geopolymer made of metakaolin calcined above 900 degrees C, while Z-zeolite [Na2O x Al2O3 x SiO2 x H2O] remained in specimens calcined at up to 1050 degrees C, All zeolite disappeared above 1150 degrees C. The pozzolanic reaction generates very small particles of 10-30 nm on the surface of metakaolin grains of 0.2-0.6 μm, rendering the matrix denser by binding the grains. The maximum compressive strength was revealed with the geopolymer made of metakaolin calcined at 1050 degrees C. The reason for the increased strength of the geopolymer obtained using higher calcination temperature is thought to be the combined effects of matrix hardening by geopolymeric reaction and reinforcement by mullite crystal phases.

  11. The influence of α-Al2O3 addition on microstructure, mechanical and formaldehyde adsorption properties of fly ash-based geopolymer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Han, Minfang

    2011-10-15

    Fly ash-based geopolymer with α-Al(2)O(3) addition were synthesized and used to remove formaldehyde from indoor air. The microstructure, mechanical and formaldehyde adsorption properties of the geopolymer products obtained were investigated. The results showed that α-Al(2)O(3) addition with appropriate amount (such as 5 wt%) increased the geopolymerization extent, resulting in the increase of surface area and compressive strength. In addition, the improvement of structural ordering level for geopolymer sample with 5 wt% α-Al(2)O(3) addition was found through FTIR analysis. By contrast, excessive addition (such as 10 wt%) had the opposite effect. The test of formaldehyde adsorption capacity confirmed that fly ash-based geopolymer product exhibited much better property of adsorbing indoor formaldehyde physically and chemically than fly ash itself. The surface area was an important but not unique factor influencing the adsorption capacity of geopolymers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Geopolymer Composites for Potential Applications in Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ricciotti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new class of geopolymer composites, as materials alternative to traditional binders, was synthesized and its potentialities as restoration material in Cultural Heritage has been explored. This material has been prepared through a co-reticulation reaction in mild conditions of a metakaolin-based geopolymer inorganic matrix and a commercial epoxy resin. The freshly prepared slurry displays a consistency, workability and thixotropic behavior that make it suitable to be spread on different substrates in restoration, repair and reinforcement actions, even on walls and ceilings. Applicability and compatibility tests on tuff and concrete substrates were carried out and the microstructure of the samples in correspondence of the transition zone was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS mapping. Our studies pointed out the formation of a continuous phase between the geopolymer composite and tuff and concrete substrates, highlighting a high compatibility of the geopolymer binder with different kinds of materials. These features indicate a large potential for applications of these materials in Cultural Heritage.

  13. The Effect of Variation of Molarity of Alkali Activator and Fine Aggregate Content on the Compressive Strength of the Fly Ash: Palm Oil Fuel Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftekhair Ibnul Bashar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molarity of alkali activator, manufactured sand (M-sand, and quarry dust (QD on the compressive strength of palm oil fuel ash (POFA and fly ash (FA based geopolymer mortar was investigated and reported. The variable investigated includes the quantities of replacement levels of M-sand, QD, and conventional mining sand (N-sand in two concentrated alkaline solutions; the contents of alkaline solution, water, POFA/FA ratio, and curing condition remained constant. The results show that an average of 76% of the 28-day compressive strength was found at the age of 3 days. The rate of strength development from 3 to 7 days was found between 12 and 16% and it was found much less beyond this period. The addition of 100% M-sand and QD shows insignificant strength reduction compared to mixtures with 100% N-sand. The particle angularity and texture of fine aggregates played a significant role in the strength development due to the filling and packing ability. The rough texture and surface of QD enables stronger bond between the paste and the fine aggregate. The concentration of alkaline solution increased the reaction rate and thus enhanced the development of early age strength. The use of M-sand and QD in the development of geopolymer concrete is recommended as the strength variation between these waste materials and conventional sand is not high.

  14. Lightweight geopolymer composites as structural elements with improved insulation capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakali Glikeria

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the development of lightweight fly ash based geopolymers which can be applied as alternatives to the traditional lightweight concrete. Different kinds of expanded polystyrene were used as lightweight agents. The results showed that lightweight geopolymers were successfully prepared, exhibiting compressive strength and density in the range 7.70 – 29.57 MPa and 0.97 – 1.57 g/cm3, respectively. The product containing 3% w/w of commercial expanded polystyrene possesses low thermal conductivity (0.16 W/mK combined with sufficient mechanical strengths (11 MPa, excellent stability and fire resistance while its water absorption is comparable to that of conventional construction materials (cement mortars, concrete.

  15. Review: Potential Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste with Substitution of Local Waste Materials with High-Temperature Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subekti, S.; Bayuaji, R.; Darmawan, M. S.; Husin, N. A.; Wibowo, B.; Anugraha, B.; Irawan, S.; Dibiantara, D.

    2017-11-01

    This research provided an overview of the potential fly ash based geopolymer paste for application in building construction. Geopolymer paste with various variations of fly ash substitution with local waste material and high-temperature influence exploited with the fresh and hardened condition. The local waste material which utilized for this study were sandblasting waste, carbide waste, shell powder, bagasse ash, rice husk and bottom ash. The findings of this study indicated that fly-based geopolymer paste with local waste material substitution which had high-temperature influence ash showed a similar nature of OPC binders potentially used in civil engineering applications.

  16. Development of Paper Sludge Ash-Based Geopolymer and Application to Treatment of Hazardous Water Contaminated with Radioisotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuguo; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Ko

    2016-07-28

    Ambient temperature geopolymerization of paper sludge ashes (PS-ashes) discharged from paper mills was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), induction coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Two varieties of alkaline liquors were used in the PS-ash based geopolymers, corresponding to aqueous Na-metasilicate and Na-disilicate compositions. PS-ashes were found to be semi-crystalline and to have porous structures that make it possible to absorb much liquor. Flexural strengths of PS-ash-based geopolymers with liquor/filler ratios (L/F) of 1.0-1.5 ranged from 0.82 to 1.51 MPa at 4 weeks age, depending on PS-ashes and liquors used. The reaction process of the constituent minerals of the PS-ash is discussed. Furthermore, we attempted to solidify hazardous water contaminated with radioisotopes. Non-radioactive strontium and cesium nitrates were added as surrogates at a dosage of 1% into the PS-ash-based geopolymers. Generally, high immobilization ratios up to 99.89% and 98.77% were achieved for Sr 2+ and Cs⁺, respectively, depending on the source of PS-ashes, alkaline liquors, and material ages. However, in some cases, poor immobilization ratios were encountered, and we further discussed the causes of the instability of derived geopolymer gels on the basis of XANES spectra.

  17. Effect of glass microfibre addition on the mechanical performances of fly ash-based geopolymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer Alomayri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, various amounts of glass microfibres were introduced into a geopolymer for reinforcement purposes. The influence of these microfibres on the performance of the geopolymer composites was investigated. Results show that the appropriate addition of glass microfibres can improve the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites. In particular, the flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength increase at an optimum fibre content of 2 wt%. Further, adding glass microfibres to a plain geopolymer matrix has a significant effect on the pre-cracking behaviour. It substantially enhances the post-cracking response.

  18. Stabilization/solidification of a municipal solid waste incineration residue using fly ash-based geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Galiano, Y; Fernández Pereira, C; Vale, J

    2011-01-15

    The stabilization/solidification (S/S) of a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash containing hazardous metals such as Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn or Ba by means of geopolymerization technology is described in this paper. Different reagents such as sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, potassium silicate, kaolin, metakaolin and ground blast furnace slag have been used. Mixtures of MSWI waste with these kinds of geopolymeric materials and class F coal fly ash used as silica and alumina source have been processed to study the potential of geopolymers as waste immobilizing agents. To this end, the effects of curing conditions and composition have been tested. S/S solids are submitted to compressive strength and leaching tests to assess the results obtained and to evaluate the efficiency of the treatment. Compressive strength values in the range 1-9 MPa were easily obtained at 7 and 28 days. Concentrations of the metals leached from S/S products were strongly pH dependent, showing that the leachate pH was the most important variable for the immobilization of metals. Comparison of fly ash-based geopolymer systems with classical Portland cement stabilization methods has also been accomplished. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of New Geopolymer-Epoxy Resin Hybrid Mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-07-17

    The preparation and characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer mortars containing an organic epoxy resin are presented here for the first time. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative in situ co-reticulation process, in mild conditions, of commercial epoxy based organic resins and geopolymeric slurry. In this way, geopolymer based hybrid mortars characterized by a different content of normalized sand (up to 66% in weight) and by a homogeneous dispersion of the organic resin have been obtained. Once hardened, these new materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the neat geopolymer and the hybrid pastes since the organic polymer provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced amount of microcracks. The microstructural characterization allows to point out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars and concretes. A correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties has been studied too.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of New Geopolymer-Epoxy Resin Hybrid Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of metakaolin-based geopolymer mortars containing an organic epoxy resin are presented here for the first time. The specimens have been prepared by means of an innovative in situ co-reticulation process, in mild conditions, of commercial epoxy based organic resins and geopolymeric slurry. In this way, geopolymer based hybrid mortars characterized by a different content of normalized sand (up to 66% in weight and by a homogeneous dispersion of the organic resin have been obtained. Once hardened, these new materials show improved compressive strength and toughness in respect to both the neat geopolymer and the hybrid pastes since the organic polymer provides a more cohesive microstructure, with a reduced amount of microcracks. The microstructural characterization allows to point out the presence of an Interfacial Transition Zone similar to that observed in cement based mortars and concretes. A correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties has been studied too.

  1. The Effects of Bottom Ash on Setting Time and Compressive Strength of Fly Ash Geopolymer Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandhie, B. A.; Kurniasari, P. T.; Darmawan, M. S.; Subekti, S.; Wibowo, B.; Husin, N. A.; Bayuaji, R.; Irawan, S.

    2017-11-01

    This research is to find out the contribution of waste energy utilization of fly ash and bottom ash coal as binding agent of geopolymer concrete. This research methodology uses experimental approach in laboratory by making cylinder paste test object with dimension diameter of 2.5 cm x height 5 cm with some combination of fly ash and bottom ash mix with time setting test (ASTM C 191-04a) and compressive strength (ASTM C 39-04a). The research concludes that the effect of bottom ash on fly ash-based geopolymer paste shows good results in setting time and compressive strength.

  2. Hot-pressed geopolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the use of simultaneous heating and pressing techniques in order to enhance the mechanical properties of fly ash (FA) based geopolymer under relatively low temperature conditions to ensure minimum-porosity. Four effective parameters of pressing force, alkali activator...

  3. Lightweight Heat Resistant Geopolymer-based Materials Synthesized from Red Mud and Rice Husk Ash Using Sodium Silicate Solution as Alkaline Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoc Thang Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite with potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in our study, the raw materials we used are red mud and rice husk ash, which are are industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash combined with sodium silicate (water glass solution were mixed to form geopolymer materials. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength after exposed at high temperature.

  4. Natural pozzolan-and granulated blast furnace slag-based binary geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robayo, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the synthesis at ambient temperature (25±3 °C of binary geopolymer systems based on natural volcanic pozzolan and granulated blast furnace slag. Na2SiO3 and NaOH were used as alkaline activators. The effects of the SiO2/Al2O3, Na2O/Al2O3 ratio and the amount of slag added (from 0 to 30% on the reaction kinetics, compressive strength and microstructure of the final product were studied. To characterise the geopolymer pastes, techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used. The results indicate the possibility of obtaining a geopolymer cement with a compressive strength of up to 48.11 MPa after 28 days of curing at ambient temperature whose characteristics are comparable to those of commercial portland cement.Este trabajo describe la síntesis a temperatura ambiente (25±3 °C de sistemas geopoliméricos de tipo binario basados en una puzolana natural de origen volcánico y escoria siderúrgica de alto horno usando activadores alcalinos basados en la combinación de Na2SiO3 y NaOH. Se estudió el efecto de la relación SiO2/Al2O3, Na2O/Al2O3 y la cantidad de escoria adicionada en niveles entre el 0 y 30% sobre la cinética de reacción, la resistencia a la compresión y la microestructura del producto final. Para la caracterización de las pastas geopoliméricas se utilizaron técnicas como difracción de rayos X (DRX, espectroscopia infrarroja (FTIR y microscopia electrónica de barrido (MEB. Los resultados conseguidos revelan la posibilidad de obtener un cementante geopolimérico con una resistencia a la compresión de hasta 48,11 MPa a los 28 días de curado a temperatura ambiente cuyas características son comparables a las de un cemento portland comercial.

  5. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Les; Pan, Zhu; Tao, Zhong; van Riessen, Arie

    2016-06-03

    In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress). Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen.

  6. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Vickers

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress. Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen.

  7. Microstructure Assessment of Metakaolin Based-Geopolymers Produced with Alternative Silica Sources Exposed to High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villaquirán-Caicedo Mónica Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials more environment friendly and with similar or even better performance than traditional ones can be produced by alkali activation of natural minerals, wastes or industrial by-products. The present study assesses the effect of exposure at 600° and 1200°C of a MK-based geopolymers. Rice husk ash (RHA and silica fume were modified chemically in order to obtain an alternative alkali activator. Exposure to elevated temperatures leads to dehydration of the reaction products and structural reorganization associated with the crystallization of the gel to leucite (KAlSi2O6 and kalsilite (KAlSiO4. The structural changes associated with the thermal treatment also promote a densification and reduction of porosity. The unreacted MK particles embedded into the geopolymeric gel lead to the formation of mullite (2Al2O3 × SiO2 after the thermal treatment at 1200°C.

  8. Screening coal combustion fly ashes for application in geopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Pipilikaki, P.; Sarabér, A.J.; Fischer, H.R.; Nugteren, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Driven by cost and sustainability, secondary resource materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, and bottom ash are increasingly used for alternative types of concrete binders, such as geopolymers. Because secondary resources may be highly variable from the perspective of geopolymers, it is

  9. Strength and durability performance of alkali-activated rice husk ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Yong; Lee, Byung-Jae; Saraswathy, Velu; Kwon, Seung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation carried out to develop the geopolymer concrete based on alkali-activated rice husk ash (RHA) by sodium hydroxide with sodium silicate. Effect on method of curing and concentration of NaOH on compressive strength as well as the optimum mix proportion of geopolymer mortar was investigated. It is possible to achieve compressive strengths of 31 N/mm(2) and 45 N/mm(2), respectively for the 10 M alkali-activated geopolymer mortar after 7 and 28 days of casting when cured for 24 hours at 60°C. Results indicated that the increase in curing period and concentration of alkali activator increased the compressive strength. Durability studies were carried out in acid and sulfate media such as H2SO4, HCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4 environments and found that geopolymer concrete showed very less weight loss when compared to steam-cured mortar specimens. In addition, fluorescent optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have shown the formation of new peaks and enhanced the polymerization reaction which is responsible for strength development and hence RHA has great potential as a substitute for ordinary Portland cement concrete.

  10. Strength and Durability Performance of Alkali-Activated Rice Husk Ash Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experimental investigation carried out to develop the geopolymer concrete based on alkali-activated rice husk ash (RHA by sodium hydroxide with sodium silicate. Effect on method of curing and concentration of NaOH on compressive strength as well as the optimum mix proportion of geopolymer mortar was investigated. It is possible to achieve compressive strengths of 31 N/mm2 and 45 N/mm2, respectively for the 10 M alkali-activated geopolymer mortar after 7 and 28 days of casting when cured for 24 hours at 60°C. Results indicated that the increase in curing period and concentration of alkali activator increased the compressive strength. Durability studies were carried out in acid and sulfate media such as H2SO4, HCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4 environments and found that geopolymer concrete showed very less weight loss when compared to steam-cured mortar specimens. In addition, fluorescent optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD studies have shown the formation of new peaks and enhanced the polymerization reaction which is responsible for strength development and hence RHA has great potential as a substitute for ordinary Portland cement concrete.

  11. Contribution of Fineness Level of Fly Ash to the Compressive Strength of Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of geopolymers has allowed the flash as the substitution of cement in the application of concrete. Therefore, this will be very useful considering the quite abundant by-product materials from power plants burning coal in South Sumatera. However, the untreated fly ash from the source caused its fineness level unpredictable, whereas the fineness of binder in cementitious material significantly affects the mechanical properties of the harden. Therefore, this study aims to determine the contribution of the fineness level of fly ash to the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar, as well as its excellent composition. Type F fly ash from Tanjung Enim Power Plant was treated by filtering to obtain different fineness levels based on the fall zones of the ash. Activators used in geopolymer mixing were sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 with three activator/fly ash ratios which was 0.25, 0.35 and 0.45. The results showed that the fineness level based on fall zone as well as the activator to fly ash ratio significantly influenced the compressive strength of the geopolymer mortar. The compressive strength of the F4-P4 specimen of geopolymer mortar with zone-4 fly ash and an activator ratio of 0.45 achieved 28.2 MPa at 28 days.

  12. Review on Various Types of Geopolymer Materials with the Environmental Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain Hariz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of green technology in the construction industry since 10 years ago is something to be proud of Malaysia. Several alternative geopolymer materials were invented in Malaysia such as fly ash, POFA, kaolin, metakaolin, and dolomite based geopolymer materials to achieve sustainable development especially in the building and construction sector. Those alternative materials are very important to replace the application of OPC, which is said to be the main cause of global warming. A review on the content of the chemical differences with the environmental impact resulting from the production of geopolymer is carried out in this study. In conclusion, fly ash based geopolymer material showed the best performance in terms of aluminosilicate content and also it is the best practice in the environmental protection applications for the moment. However, when compared with the OPC, fly ash geopolymer concrete was still able to reduce the effects of global warming potentials, but it is rather gave a negative impact on some aspects of the environment such as abiotic depletions, human toxicity, freshwater ecotoxicity, terrestrial ecotoxicity and acidification.

  13. Alkaline Activator Impact on the Geopolymer Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyński, Tomasz Z.; Król, Maciej R.

    2017-10-01

    Concrete structures are constantly moving in the direction of improving the durability. Durability depends on many factors, which are the composition of concrete mix, the usage of additives and admixtures and the place, where material will work and carry the load. The introduction of new geopolymer binders for geopolymer structures adds a new aspect that is type of used activator. This substance with strongly alkaline reaction is divided because of the physical state, the alkaline degree and above all the chemical composition. Taking into account, that at present the geopolymer binders are made essentially from waste materials or by-products from the combustion of coal or iron ore smelting, unambiguous determination of the effect of the activator on the properties of the geopolymer material requires a number of trials, researches and observation. This paper shows the influence of the most alkaline activators on the basic parameters of the durability of geopolymer binders. In this study there were used highly alkaline hydroxides, water glasses and granules, which are waste materials in a variety of processes taking place in chemical plants. As the substrate of geopolymer binders there were used fly ash which came from coal and high calcareous ash from the burning of lignite.

  14. STRENGTH AND SHORT-TERM DURABILITY OF 6M, 8M, 10M GEO-POLYMERS CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Gladwin Vimal Raj.P*, Tamilvanan.K, Jose Ravindra Raj.B

    2017-01-01

    India is a developing country concentrated to develop the infrastructure and implement new construction techniques. Concrete is a main source of developing structure. It makes a great demand second only after water. So need an alternative to prevent this demand. Concrete is the mixture of cement, river sand and coarse aggregate. Cement manufacture produce carbon-di oxide and make ozone layer depletion cause global warming. Scarcity of river sand makes a demand in construction. So need an alte...

  15. Impact of activator type on the immobilisation of lead in fly ash-based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujeong; van Riessen, Arie; Chon, Chul-Min; Kang, Nam-Hee; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Kim, Youn-Joong

    2016-03-15

    Immobilisation of heavy metals in geopolymers has attracted attention as a potential means of treating toxic wastes. Lead is known to be effectively immobilised in a geopolymer matrix, but detailed explanation for the mechanisms involved and the specific chemical form of lead are not fully understood. To reveal the effect of the activator types on the immobilisation of lead in geopolymers, 0.5 and 1.0wt% lead in the form of lead nitrate was mixed with fly ash and alkaline activators. Different alkaline activators (either combined sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate or sodium aluminate) were used to achieve the target Si:Al ratios 2.0 and 5.0 in geopolymers. Zeolite was formed in aluminate-activated geopolymers having a Si:Al ratio of 2.0, but the zeolite crystallization was suppressed as lead content increased. No specific crystalline phase of lead was detected by X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction or FT-IR spectrometry. In fact, double Cs corrected TEM analysis revealed that lead was evenly distributed with no evidence of formation of a specific lead compound. A sequential extraction procedure for fractionation of lead showed that lead did not exist as an exchangeable ion in geopolymers, regardless of activator type used. Aluminate activation is shown to be superior in the immobilisation of lead because about 99% of extracted lead existed in the oxidizing and residual fractions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IR spectral similarity studies of geothermal silica-bentonite based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvianas, Muhammad; Widiyatmoko, Achmad; Petrus, Himawan Tri Bayu Murti

    2017-09-01

    The geopolymer structures are formed through polymerization of silicate and aluminate species. The resulted structure is predicted to be similar with zeolite. In this study, geopolymer samples were made from mix powder of geothermal silica and bentonite, then activated with sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. The effect of silica content, NaOH molarity and curing temperature effect were investigated on geopolymer IR spectra and compared with 3A zeolite IR spectra. Pearson correlation value (r) and spectral similarity correlation (Corr) were used to assess spectra similarity between geopolymer samples and zeolite. The development of geopolymer bond and microstructure of samples were then investigated by FTIR technique. IR spectra of geopolymer samples show that Si-O-Al absorption bands are formed around 900-1300 cm-1 and 400-800 cm-1. The optimum of silica contents, NaOH molarity and curing temperature obtained from the experiment were 140 grams, 10 M and 80°C with Corr value of 922 and compressive strength of 7,59 MPa. Corr value is proven to have relation with material strength. Higher Corr value is identified to have higher aluminosilicate species which contributes to higher compressive strength.

  17. Studies on eco-friendly concrete incorporating industrial waste as aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitendra Palankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present day research is focussed on development of alternative binder materials to Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC due to huge emissions of green house gases associated with production of OPC. GGBFS-FA based geopolymer binders are an innovative alternative to OPC which can obtain high strengths apart from being eco-friendly; since its production does not involve high energy and also contributes to sustainability by using the industrial waste materials. Steel slag, an industrial by-product obtained from manufacture of steel can be identified as an alternative to natural aggregates for concrete production, since there is a possibility of acute shortage of natural aggregates in future. The present study is conducted to evaluate the performance of weathered steel slag coarse aggregates in GGBFS-FA based geopolymer concrete. GGBFS-FA geopolymer concrete with steel slag coarse aggregates are prepared by replacing natural granite aggregates at different replacement levels i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% (by volume and various fresh and mechanical properties are studied. The flexural fatigue behaviour of GGBFS-FA geopolymer concrete with steel slag is also studied in detail. Efforts are also made to model the probabilistic distribution of fatigue data of GGBFS-FA geopolymer concrete at different stress levels using two parameters Weibull distribution. The results indicated that incorporation of steel slag in GGBFS-FA geopolymer concrete resulted in slight reduction in mechanical strength. The water absorption and volume of permeable voids displayed higher values with inclusion of steel slag. Reduction in number of cycles for fatigue failure was observed in geopolymer concrete mixes containing steel slag as compared to granite aggregates. Overall, the performance of steel slag was found to be satisfactory for structural and pavement application and steel slag can be recognised as new construction material.

  18. Impact of activator type on the immobilisation of lead in fly ash-based geopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sujeong [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Riessen, Arie van, E-mail: A.VanRiessen@curtin.edu.au [Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia); Chon, Chul-Min [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Nam-Hee [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Jou, Hyeong-Tae [Maritime Security Research Center, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youn-Joong [Division of Electron Microscopic Research, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The type of alkaline activator critically influences the lead immobilisation capability. • Aluminate-activated geopolymers are more suitable for binding lead in the gel. • When a greater amount of Al contributes to the localized negative charge the tight lead is more tightly bound. • Lead disperses randomly forming no specific chemical compound with silicon. - Abstract: Immobilisation of heavy metals in geopolymers has attracted attention as a potential means of treating toxic wastes. Lead is known to be effectively immobilised in a geopolymer matrix, but detailed explanation for the mechanisms involved and the specific chemical form of lead are not fully understood. To reveal the effect of the activator types on the immobilisation of lead in geopolymers, 0.5 and 1.0 wt% lead in the form of lead nitrate was mixed with fly ash and alkaline activators. Different alkaline activators (either combined sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate or sodium aluminate) were used to achieve the target Si:Al ratios 2.0 and 5.0 in geopolymers. Zeolite was formed in aluminate-activated geopolymers having a Si:Al ratio of 2.0, but the zeolite crystallization was suppressed as lead content increased. No specific crystalline phase of lead was detected by X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction or FT-IR spectrometry. In fact, double Cs corrected TEM analysis revealed that lead was evenly distributed with no evidence of formation of a specific lead compound. A sequential extraction procedure for fractionation of lead showed that lead did not exist as an exchangeable ion in geopolymers, regardless of activator type used. Aluminate activation is shown to be superior in the immobilisation of lead because about 99% of extracted lead existed in the oxidizing and residual fractions.

  19. Design bases - Concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Llanos Ros, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most suitable title for Section 2 is 'Design Bases', which covers not only calculation but also the following areas: - Structural design concepts. - Project criteria. - Material specifications. These concepts are developed in more detail in the following sections. The numbering in this document is neither complete nor hierarchical since, for easier cross referencing, it corresponds to the paragraphs of Eurocode 2 Part 1 (hereinafter 'EUR-2') which are commented on. (author)

  20. The effects of alkaline dosage and Si/Al ratio on the immobilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash-based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yunchun

    2010-04-01

    The present research explored the application of geopolymerization for the immobilization and solidification of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. The influence of alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al molar ratio on the compressive strength and microstructure of MSWI fly ash-based geopolymer was investigated. A geopolymer with the highest strength was identified to occur at an intermediate alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al ratio, and the optimal Na/MSWI fly ash and Si/Al molar ratio was close to 2.8 mol kg(-1) and 2.0, respectively. IR spectra showed that higher alkaline activator dosage enhanced the structural disruption of the original aluminosilicate phases and a higher degree of polymerization of the geopolymer networks. At low Si/Al ratio, there was an increasing number of tetrahedral Al incorporating into the silicate backbone. As the Na/MSWI fly ash ratio increased, the microstructure changed from containing large macropores to more mesopores and micropores, indicating that more geopolymers are formed. Furthermore, the pore volume distribution of geopolymers was observed to shift to larger pores as the Si/Al ratio increased, which suggests that the soluble silicon content serves to reduce the amount of geopolymers. Heavy metal leaching was successfully elucidated using the first-order reaction/reaction-diffusion model. Combining the results from the microstructure of samples with the kinetic analysis, the immobilization mechanism of Cr, Cu, and Zn was inferred in this study. The methodologies described could provide a powerful set of tools for the systematic evaluation of element release from geopolymers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Behaviour of Passive Fire Protection K-Geopolymer under Successive Severe Fire Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Konstantinos; Sofianos, Alexandros; Nomikos, Pavlos; Panias, Dimitrios

    2015-09-11

    The performance of a fire resistant coating for tunnel passive fire protection under successive severe thermal loading is presented. The material falls under the class of potassium based geopolymers (K-geopolymer) and was prepared by mixing ferronickel (FeNi) slag, doped with pure alumina, with a highly alkaline potassium hydroxide aqueous phase. Its performance was assessed by subjecting a concrete slab with a five cm thick K-geopolymer coating layer into successive RijksWaterStaat (RWS) fire incidents. During the first test, the maximum measured temperature in the K-geopolymer/concrete interface was 250 °C, which is 130 °C lower than the RWS test requirement, while, during the second fire test, the maximum temperature was almost 370 °C, which is still lower than the RWS requirement proving the effectiveness of the material as a thermal barrier. In addition, the material retained its structural integrity, during and after the two tests, without showing any mechanical or thermal damages.

  2. Adsorption of cationic dye onto fly ash-based geopolymer: Batch and fixed bed column studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alouani Marouane

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cationic dye adsorption from aqueous solution onto synthesized geopolymer was investigated by batch and fixed bed column experiments. The geopolymer material was elaborated by alkali solution and fly ash supplied by Jorf Lasfar power plant of Morocco. Physical and chemical characteristics of samples were determined by FX, DRX, SEM, 29Si MAS NMR and Zeta potential methods. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET technique is used to determine the surface area. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH method was performed to obtain pore size distribution curves and average pore diameter. Kinetics data were analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. To predict the breakthrough curves and determine the main fixed bed column parameters, three kinetic models; Tomas, Bohart–Adams and Yoon-Nelson models are applied to fitting the experimental data. The kinetic study showed that the pseudo-second-order can be used to describe the methylene blue (MB adsorption process on the geopolymer matrix. The kinetic models of the adsorption in dynamic column are suitable to describe the continuous adsorption process of dyestuff by the geopolymer. The results of this study indicated that geopolymer derived from fly ash can be used as a low cost effective adsorbent for cationic dye removal from industrial aqueous effluent.

  3. Leaching behavior and effectiveness of curing days (7& 28) of solidified/stabilized fly ash based geopolymer (multi-metal bearing sludge): experimental and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rubina; Khaleb, Divya; Badur, Smita

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the study of the immobilization of heavy metals like Pb, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn by fly ash based geopolymers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of fly ash based geopolymeric solidification/stabilization technology. For S/S of waste, geopolymer as a binding agent was mixed with waste at different ratios. For initial waste characterization, contaminants concentration and some physical waste characterization such as dry density, bulk density, specific gravity, porosity, moisture holding capacity, and moisture content were determined. Waste and geopolymer mixture were cured for 7 and 28 days to study the effect of curing days on the solidified/ stabilized product. Diffusion leaching test was performed on the geopolymers containing industrial sludge to determine the leaching mechanism of binders to entrap the waste constituents within their matrix. Movement of the elements was identified with the help of leachability index. S/S through geopolymer was found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metals present in the sludge. Zn was 100% and other metals like Pb, Fe, Mn and Cu were in the range 80-99% immobilized. The order of fixation of metals was Zn >Cu > Fe > Mn > Pb.

  4. Comparative performance of geopolymers made with metakaolin and fly ash after exposure to elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel L.Y. Kong; Jay G. Sanjayan; Kwesi Sagoe-Crentsil [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Department of Civil Engineering

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of elevated temperatures on geopolymers manufactured using metakaolin and fly ash of various mixture proportions. Both types of geopolymers (metakaolin and fly ash) were synthesized with sodium silicate and potassium hydroxide solutions. The strength of the fly ash-based geopolymer increased after exposure to elevated temperatures (800{sup o}C). However, the strength of the corresponding metakaolin-based geopolymer decreased after similar exposure. Both types of geopolymers were subjected to thermogravimetric, scanning electron microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry tests. The paper concludes that the fly ash-based geopolymers have large numbers of small pores which facilitate the escape of moisture when heated, thus causing minimal damage to the geopolymer matrix. On the other hand, metakaolin geopolymers do not possess such pore distribution structures. The strength increase in fly ash geopolymers is also partly attributed to the sintering reactions of un-reacted fly ash particles.

  5. CRYSTALLINE PHASE REACTIVITY IN THE SYNTHESIS OF FLY ASH-BASED GEOPOLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Atmaja

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminosilicate, alkaline solution and fly ash from a power plant have been used to synthesize geopolymer at ambient temperature. SiO2/Al2O3 mole ratio of the starting materials was varied by the addition of pure, insoluble corundum and quartz. The geopolymer exhibited some differences in the ratio of initial reaction mixtures and that of final products. The corundum gave no influence to the compressive strength while the quartz at SiO2/Al2O3=4.0-6.0 produced significant change in the strength. The highest compressive strength achieved was 65 MPa. XRD using analysis Rietveld method proved that quartz has been found both in starting materials as well as in the geopolymer indicating the involvement of crystalline phases, to some extent, in geopolymerization process.

  6. Preparation of geopolymer-based inorganic membrane for removing Ni{sup 2+} from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Kaituo; He, Yan; Cui, Xuemin, E-mail: cui-xm@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A type free-sintering geopolymer membrane for waste water treatment was fabricated. • The geopolymer inorganic membrane held good strength and appropriate water flux. • The mechanism of removing Ni{sup 2+} combined actions of the adsorption and rejection. • The geopolymer membrane is a promising way to remove heavy metal ions in industry. - Abstract: A type of novel free-sintering and self-supporting inorganic membrane for wastewater treatment was fabricated in this study. This inorganic membrane was synthesised using metakaolin and sodium silicate solutions moulded according to a designed molar ratio (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 2.96, Na{sub 2}O/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 0.8 and H{sub 2}O/Na{sub 2}O = 19) which formed a homogenous structure and had a relative concentration pore size distribution, via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. In this work, the Ni{sup 2+} removal effect of geopolymer inorganic membrane was studied under different pH value, initial concentration of Ni{sup 2+} solutions and initial operation temperature. Results showed that geopolymer inorganic membrane efficiently removes Ni{sup 2+} from wastewater because of the combined actions of the adsorption and rejection of this membrane on Ni{sup 2+} during membrane separation. Therefore, geopolymer inorganic membrane may have positive potential applications in removing Ni{sup 2+} or other heavy metal ions from aqueous industrial wastewater.

  7. The Influence of Sintering Method on Kaolin-Based Geopolymer Ceramics with Addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene as Binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romisuhani, A.; AlBakri, M. M.; Kamarudin, H.; Andrei, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of sintering method on kaolin-based geopolymer ceramics with addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene as binder were studied. Geopolymer were formed at room temperature from kaolin and sodium silicate in a highly alkaline medium, followed by curing and drying at 80 °C. 12 M of sodium hydroxide solution were mixed with sodium silicate at a ratio of 0.24 to form alkaline activator. Powder metallurgy technique were used in order to produce kaolin geopolymer ceramics with addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene. The samples were heated at temperature of 1200 °C with two different sintering method which are conventional method and two-step sintering method. The strength and density were tested.

  8. Fly ash-based geopolymer for Pb removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Kamel; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad S; Hani, Falah Bani

    2011-04-15

    The aim of this work was to synthesis highly amorphous geopolymer from waste coal fly ash, to be used as an adsorbent for lead Pb(II) removal from aqueous wastewater. The effect of various parameters including geopolymer dosage, initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature on lead adsorption were investigated. The major components of the used ash in the current study were SiO(2), Al(2)O(3) and Fe(2)O(3) representing 91.53 wt% of its mass. It was found that the synthesized geopolymer has higher removal capacity for lead ions when compared with that of raw coal fly ash. The removal efficiency increases with increasing geopolymer dosage, contact time, temperature, and the decrease of Pb(2+) initial concentration. The optimum removal efficiency was obtained at pH 5. Adsorption isotherm study indicated that Langmuir isotherm model is the best fit for the experimental data than Freundlich model. It was found also that the adsorption process is endothermic and more favorable at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of the rate of calcination of kaolin on the properties of metakaolin-based geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kenne Diffo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaolin samples of the same mass were treated at 700 °C for the same duration of 30 min by varying the rate of calcination (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min in order to obtain metakaolins which were used to produce geopolymers. Depending on the nature of each type of material, kaolin, metakaolins and geopolymers were characterized using thermal analysis, chemical analysis, XRD, FTIR, particle size distribution, specific surface area, bulk density, setting time and compressive strength. FTIR and XRD analyses showed that metakaolins except at 1 °C/min contained residual kaolinite whose quantity increased with the rate of calcination of kaolin and which influenced the characteristics of geopolymers. Thus as the rate of calcination of kaolin increased, the setting time increased (226 min (rate of 1 °C/min–773 min (rate of 20 °C/min while the compressive strength reduced (49.4 MPa (rate of 1 °C/min–20.8 MPa (rate of 20 °C/min. From the obtained results the production of geopolymers having high compressive strength along with low setting time requires that the calcination of kaolin be carried out at a low rate.

  10. The Manufacture of the Grinding Wheels Based on the Ca–K Geopolymer Matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Boura, P.; Lučaník, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 5 (2016), s. 667-672 ISSN 1042-6914 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : geopolymer * grinding * wheel * low-temperature * industrial * manufacturing * technology Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 2.274, year: 2016

  11. Characterization and acid resistance test of one-part geopolymer from fly ash and water treatment sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orbecido Aileen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of geopolymers from wastes or by-products introduces a sustainable approach to replace ordinary Portland cement (OPC-based concrete with an eco-material of lower green-house gases emissions. However, safety concerns related to the conventional two-part geopolymer has limited large-scale applications of the product. In this context, a novel one-part geopolymer from coal fly ash and water treatment sludge has been presented. The transformation of raw materials to geopolymer was observed by FTIR, SEM and XRD analyses. Acid resistance test has proved that the new binder had great durability against sulphuric acid attack. After 28 days immersion in 5% H2SO4 solution, weight of all samples was hardly changed. Compressive strength, on the other hand, has not decreased but significantly increased as curing time increased. The properties were also compared to those of control samples cured in water. It was demonstrated that strong acid immersion did not create any noticeable effect on the weight and strength of one-part geopolymer system developed from coal fly ash and water treatment sludge.

  12. Effect of mixing geopolymer and peat on bearing capacity in Ogan Komering Ilir (OKI) by California bearing ratio (CBR) test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharja, Danang S.; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit P.; Rahayu, Wiwik; Zain, Nasuhi

    2017-06-01

    Geopolymer is binder material that consists of solid material and the activator solution. Geopolymer material has successfully replaced cement in the manufacture of concrete with aluminosilicate bonding system. Geopolymer concrete has properties similar to cement concrete with high compressive strength, low shrinkage value, relatively low creep value, as well as acid-resistant. Based on these, the addition of polymers in peat soils is expected to improve the bearing capacity of peat soils. A study on the influence of geopolymer addition in peat soils was done by comparing before and after the peat soil was mixed with geopolymer using CBR (California Bearing Ratio) test in unsoaked and soaked conditions. 10% mixture content of the peat dry was used, weighted with a variety of curing time 4 hours, 5 days, and 10 days. There were two methods of mixing: first, peat was mixed with fly ash geopolymer activators and mixed solution (waterglass, NaOH, water), and second, peat was mixed with fly ash and mixed geopolymer (waterglass, NaOH, water, fly ash). Changes were observed in specific gravity, dry density, acidity (pH), and the microscopic structure with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Curing time did not significantly affect the CBR value. It even shows a tendency to decline with longer curing time. The first type mixture obtained CBR value of: 5.4% for 4 hours curing, 4.6% for 5 days curing and 3.6% for 10 days curing. The second type mixture obtained CBR value of: 6.1% for 4 hours curing, 5.2% for 5 days curing and 5.2% for 10 days curing. Furthermore, the specific gravity value, dry density, pH near neutral and swelling percentage increased. From both variants, the second type mixture shows better results than the first type mixture. The results of SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) show the structure of the peat which became denser with the fly ash particles filling the peat microporous. Also, the reaction of fly ash with geopolymer is indicated by the solid

  13. Selected Properties Of Geopolymers With Different Portions Of Ground Fly-Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Želinková Miroslava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are polymeric materials resulting from the polycondensation reaction of alumino-silicate materials in a strongly alkaline environment. In consequence, stable polymeric networks of aluminosilicates are formed. The binding potential of FA (fly ash amorphous component can also be “activated” by mechanical activation, which unfolds new possibilities of FA utilization. Mechanical activation, such as the method, which can improve FA reactivity, is often applied for different applications for geopolymers based on ground fly ash. This paper presents possibilities of preparation of geopolymer mixtures based on modified (ground FA (TEKO – produced by the Heating plant Kosice, which was used in varying percentages to unground (original FA. The particle size of the original unground FA (PVT was 84.7μm and particle size of the ground FA (T60S1 was 52.8μm. Properties to be evaluated were selected from the expected application point of view – protective coating of concrete. Next properties of geopolymer mixtures after 28 days of hardening were tested and evaluated: dry density, absorptivity, capillarity, compressive and flexural strength.

  14. Correlation between Compressive Strength and Fire Resistant Performance of Rice Husk Ash-Based Geopolymer Binder for Panel Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Basri Mohd Salahuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Panel structures which are mainly used as insulation materials should possess high fire resistance characteristic. In addition, their mechanical requisites for walls and doors such as compressive strength must not be unduly compromised. Rice husk ash (RHA was used as an aluminosilicate source and two factors namely RHA/AA ratio and NaOH concentration were analyzed using statistical tool to study the effect of both factors on the compressive strength. Surface morphology and fire resistant behavior of four selected samples based on their compressive strength (brittle, semi-brittle, ductile, and semi-ductile samples were studied to determine the correlation between compressive strength and fire resistant performance of those selected samples. Results showed that RHA-based geopolymer sample recorded high compressive strength above 28 MPa when its RHA/AA ratio and NaOH concentration were high ranging from 0.7 to 0.8 and 12M to 14M, respectively. Brittle geopolymer sample (GS with low Si/Al ratio shows high compressive strength together with high degree of geopolymerization. Ductile GS in comparison, shows low compressive strength irrespective of its degree of geopolymerization. Semi-ductile GS showed the best fire resistant properties with a maximum non-exposed surface temperature of only 50°C after 50 minutes (after it was exposed to a direct fire with temperature of 900°C followed by semi-brittle and brittle GS.

  15. Mix design and mechanical performance of geopolymer binder for sustainable construction and building material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeli, Manfredi; Novais, Rui M.; Seabra, Maria Paula; Labrincha, João A.

    2017-11-01

    Sustainability in construction is a major concern worldwide, due to the huge volume of materials and energy consumed by this sector. Associated supplementing industries (e.g. Portland cement production) constitute a significant source of CO2 emissions and global warming. Valorisation and reuse of industrial wastes and by-products make geopolymers a solid and sustainable via to be followed as a valid alternative to Portland cement. In this work the mix design of a green fly ash-based geopolymer is evaluated as an environmentally friendly construction material. In the pursuit of sustainability, wastes from a regional kraft pulp industry are exploited for the material processing. Furthermore, a simple, reproducible, and low-cost manufacture is used. The mix design is hence optimised in order to improve the desirable mechanical performance of the material intended for structural applications in construction. Tests indicate that geopolymers may efficiently substitute the ordinary Portland cement as a mortar/concrete binder. Furthermore, valorisation and reuse of wastes in geopolymers is a suboptimal way of gaining financial surplus for the involved industrial players, while contributes for the implementation of a desirable circular economy.

  16. The First 20 Hours of Geopolymerization: An in Situ WAXS Study of Flyash-Based Geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross P. Williams

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study followed the first 20 h of flyash geopolymerization at 70 °C using time resolved Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS. The extent of dissolution of the amorphous phase of the flyash was determined to range from 29% to 54% for the different formulations trialed. The dissolution rate of the flyash significantly reduced after the first 5 h for all samples. During the formation stage of the geopolymer there were significant temporal variations in the chemistry of the dissolved solution due to the rate of flyash dissolution, with a relative standard deviation of 20%, 57% and 24% for the Si/Al, Na/Al and H/Si ratios, respectively. Utilizing the Power Law, scattering in the low angle region of the WAXS pattern combined with the geopolymer peak area yielded a measure which correlated with the compressive strength—providing a new method to measure the flyash dissolution and geopolymer formation processes independently. The evolution of several zeolite-like phases was followed, noting there are different formation mechanisms involved even within the same sample. Four samples were examined with compressive strengths ranging from 14(2–50(9 MPa, each was synthesized with flyash from Collie Power Station (Western Australia activated with sodium silicate solution of varying concentrations.

  17. Preparation of geopolymer-based inorganic membrane for removing Ni(2+) from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Kaituo; He, Yan; Cui, Xuemin

    2015-12-15

    A type of novel free-sintering and self-supporting inorganic membrane for wastewater treatment was fabricated in this study. This inorganic membrane was synthesised using metakaolin and sodium silicate solutions moulded according to a designed molar ratio (SiO2/Al2O3=2.96, Na2O/Al2O3=0.8 and H2O/Na2O=19) which formed a homogenous structure and had a relative concentration pore size distribution, via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. In this work, the Ni(2+) removal effect of geopolymer inorganic membrane was studied under different pH value, initial concentration of Ni(2+) solutions and initial operation temperature. Results showed that geopolymer inorganic membrane efficiently removes Ni(2+) from wastewater because of the combined actions of the adsorption and rejection of this membrane on Ni(2+) during membrane separation. Therefore, geopolymer inorganic membrane may have positive potential applications in removing Ni(2+) or other heavy metal ions from aqueous industrial wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrosion Studies of Fly Ash and Fly Ash-Slag Based Geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, F. F.; Amli, S. F. M.; Hussin, K.; Rahmat, A.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.

    2017-06-01

    Abstract This paper presents the results of corrosion studies between Fly Ash Geopolymer (FG) paste and Fly Ash-Slag Geopolymer (FSG) paste. Geopolymer was made from aluminosilicate inorganic polymers mixed with the alkaline activator in order to reduce the carbon dioxide (CO2) to the ecosystem. Samples then were cured at 60ºC for 24 hours in the oven. Reinforcement bar is placed at the center of the paste. The samples were examined after 7, 14 and 28 days in terms of Open Circuit Potential (OCP) test, phase analysis and morphology analysis. The potential values regarding OCP test for FSG paste from 7 days until 28 days are 0.464 V, 0.474 V and 0.498 V more positive than FG paste which the potential values are 0.087 V, 0.133 V and 0.206 V respectively. From the Pourbaix diagram, all the potential values for FG paste and FSG paste were located in the same Fe2O3, passivity region. Passive layer which is the oxide form exists in this region to protect the reinforcement bar from corrosion agents. It can be proved from phase analysis results which iron oxide hydroxide (FeOOH), hematite (Fe2O3) and magnetite (Fe3O4) peaks exist. The differences of morphological structures of these pastes were observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It shows that FSG paste had good corrosion resistance and low corrosion rate compared to FG paste.

  19. Development and analysis of low calcium flyash based geopolymer for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalia, Gaurav

    Geopolymers are an innovative ceramic material composed of long chains and networks of inorganic molecules are being used as an alternative to conventional Portland cement for infrastructure construction, replacement of intersection and localized repairs. Some of the advantages of this material is due to its ultra-fast setting time, rapid strength development and the phenomenal reduction in carbon foot print as compared to Portland cement. However, this material is yet to be commercialized due to the variability in its mechanical strength when using flyash from different sources. In this study aluminosilicate geopolymers with different alkali oxides (feldspars) have been prepared by mixing class F-flyash and alkaline solution. The samples were cured under different experimental conditions and then tested for compressive strength. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) have been used to identify the new phases formed in geopolymeric matrix. In addition, these techniques were used to follow the curing process and the formation of these phases and to map the underlying relationship between the flyash properties and mechanical properties of the geopolymer.

  20. Physicochemical Characterization of Geopolymer Binders and Foams Made from Tunisian Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Ben Messaoud

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Illito-kaolinitic clay rich in hematite from south Tunisia was investigated in view of producing geopolymer materials. Geopolymers with two different densities were elaborated: cement and foam. The effects of activator concentrations on compressive strength, water absorption (durability, open porosity, and bulk density of geopolymers cement were examined, in order to assure optimal geopolymerization conditions. Geopolymer cements aged 28 days with optimum performances were achieved for 13 M of alkaline solution concentration. At these conditions, the compressive strength of prepared geopolymer reaches 27.8 MPa. The addition of silica fume to reactant geopolymer mixture induces modification of geopolymer density and decrease in the compressive strength of the final product. Geopolymer materials based on calcined Tunisian clay can be suggested as sustainable and cost-effective cement that may be applied to alternate Portland cement in many construction applications.

  1. Mineral assemblage transformation of a metakaolin-based waste form after geopolymer encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin D., E-mail: Benjamin.Williams@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Neeway, James J., E-mail: James.Neeway@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Snyder, Michelle M.V., E-mail: Michelle.ValentaSnyder@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bowden, Mark E., E-mail: Mark.Bowden@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Amonette, James E., E-mail: Jim.Amonette@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arey, Bruce W., E-mail: Bruce.Arey@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pierce, Eric M., E-mail: pierceem@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, MS-6035, Room 372, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Brown, Christopher F., E-mail: Christopher.Brown@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P., E-mail: Nik.Qafoku@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-54, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Mitigation of hazardous and radioactive waste can be improved through conversion of existing waste to a more chemically stable and physically robust waste form. One option for waste conversion is the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process. The resulting FBSR granular material was encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix referred to here as Geo-7. This provides mechanical strength for ease in transport and disposal. However, it is necessary to understand the phase assemblage evolution as a result of geopolymer encapsulation. In this study, we examine the mineral assemblages formed during the synthesis of the multiphase ceramic waste form. The FBSR granular samples were created from waste simulant that was chemically adjusted to resemble Hanford tank waste. Another set of samples was created using Savannah River Site Tank 50 waste simulant in order to mimic a blend of waste collected from 68 Hanford tank. Waste form performance tests were conducted using the product consistency test (PCT), the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the structure of a previously unreported NAS phase and indicate that monolith creation may lead to a reduction in crystallinity as compared to the primary FBSR granular product. - Highlights: • Simulated Hanford waste was treated by the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. • The FBSR granular product was encapsulated in a geopolymer monolith. • Leach tests were performed to examine waste form performance. • XRD revealed the structure of a previously unreported sodium aluminosilicate phase. • Monolithing of granular waste forms may lead to a reduction in crystallinity.

  2. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    and chemical processes of hydration of clinker minerals allowed developing technological bases for special-purpose concrete.

  3. Mechanical and chemical properties of composite materials made of dredged sediments in a fly-ash based geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirer, S; Liguori, B; Capasso, I; Flora, A; Caputo, D

    2017-04-15

    Dredging activity in harbours and channels produces huge quantities of sediments, generally considered as waste soil (WS) to be disposed: the management of such sediments is a great environmental problem for many countries worldwide. Among the recycling possibilities, the use of dredged sediments for the manufacture of geopolymer-based materials seems to be an interesting alternative to disposal, due to their low cost and easy availability. In order to analyse the possibility to use these geopolymer materials as building materials - for instance as precast construction elements in maritime projects - a multi-disciplinary research activity has been developed at the Federico II University of Napoli (Italy). Some experimental tests have been carried out on different geopolymeric specimens made by mixing sediments from Napoli 'harbour and industrial fly ashes produced by a power plant in the South of Italy. A siliceous sand was used for comparison as an inert reference material. Chemical, morphological and mechanical properties of different specimens have been studied by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and finally unconfined compression tests. The experimental results highlight that the use of dredged sediments in combination with fly ash can lead to geopolymeric matrices with interesting mechanical performances. Some differences in the microstructure of the geocomposite built with the siliceous sand or the dredged materials were found. In terms of environmental impacts, on the basis of standard leaching tests and according to Italian thresholds, the adopted dredged mixtures satisfy the prescribed limit for inert or non hazardous waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface decoration of polyimide fiber with carbon nanotubes and its application for mechanical enhancement of phosphoric acid-based geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Han, Enlin; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Dezhen

    2017-09-01

    A new methodology to decorate the surface of polyimide (PI) fiber with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed in this study. This surface decoration was carried out through a surface alkali treatment, a carboxylation modification, surface functionalization with acyl chloride groups and then with amino groups, and a surface graft of CNTs onto PI fiber. Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic characterizations confirmed that CNTs were chemically grafted onto the surface of PI fiber, and scanning electron microscopic observation demonstrated the fiber surface was uniformly and densely covered with CNTs. The surface energy and wettability of PI fiber were improved in the presence of CNTs on the fiber surface, which made a contribution to enhance the interfacial adhesion of PI fiber with other inorganic matrices when used as a reinforcing fiber. The application of CNTs-decorated PI fiber for the reinforcement of phosphoric acid-based geopolymers was investigated, and the results indicated that the geopolymeric composites gained a noticeable reinforcement. Compared to unreinforced geopolymer, the geopolymeric composites achieved a remarkable increase in compressive strength by 120% and in flexural strength by 283%. Fractography investigation demonstrated that the interaction adhesion between the fibers and matrix was enhanced due to the surface decoration of PI fiber with CNTs, which contributed to an improvement in fracture-energy dissipation by fiber pullout and fiber debonding from the matrix. As a result, a significant reinforcement effect on geopolymeric composites was achieved through a fiber-bridging mechanism. This study provided an effective methodology to improve the interracial bonding force for PI fiber and also proves a highly efficient application of CNTs-decorated PI fiber for the mechanical enhancement of geopolymeric composites.

  5. Pyramids and geopolymers?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švarcová, J.; Koloušek, D.; Schweigstillová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2011), s. 5-13 ISSN 1210-2520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : limestone * geopolymer * pyramides Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.silis.cz/cz/casopis/index.php?novinka=pyramids-and- geopolymer s

  6. K-Based Geopolymer from metakaolin: roles of K/Al ratio and water or steam Curing at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik, A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available K-based geopolymer binder was prepared by reacting metakaolin with alkaline solutions having different potassium contents and by water curing at room temperature and 80 °C as well as steam curing at 150 and 180 °C. The phase formation, microstructure and Al and Si nearest neighbor environments were studied using XRD, TEM and 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, respectively. The results revealed that amorphous alumino-silicates were predominant in geopolymer prepared by curing up to 28 days at room temperature or at 80 °C. The amorphous alumino-silicates persisted after hydrothermal treatment at 150 °C/48 hrs and even at 180 °C/30 hrs. However, the samples cured hydrothermally at 180 °C/48 hrs revealed formation of crystalline potassium aluminum silicate and chabazite phases. The Al nearest neighbor environments was not significantly affected by increasing the K/Al ratio up to 1.55 or by the curing temperatures. On the other hand, the geopolymer reaction appears to have increased when cured at 80 °C or steam cured at 150° and 180 °C and crystalline aluminosilicates resulted when the geopolymer sample was hydrothermally treated at 180 °C/48 hrs.Se prepararon geopolímeros por reacción de metacaolín con disoluciones alcalinas con diferentes contenidos de potasio. Se realizó un curado con agua a temperatura ambiente y a 80 °C, y con vapor de agua a 150 y 180 °C. La formación de las diferentes fases así como la microestructura y entornos del Al y Si se estudiaron mediante DRX, TEM y espectroscopia de RMN MAS de 27Al y 29Si. Los aluminosilicatos amorfos fueron predominantes en aquellos geopolímeros sometidos a curado de hasta 28 días a temperatura ambiente o a 80 °C. Los aluminosilicatos amorfos persistieron tras el tratamiento hidrotermal a 150 °C/48 horas e incluso a 180 °C/30 h. Sin embargo, las muestras curadas hidrotermalmente a 180 °C/48 h revelaron la formación de fases cristalinas de silicatos de aluminio y potasio, as

  7. Properties of fly ash and metakaolín based geopolymer panels under fire resistance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna-Galiano, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study about the effect of fire on geopolymer paste composed of fly ashes, metakaolin and sodium silicate. 2 cm thick, 28 cm high and 18 cm wide panels were filled with the paste obtained. After 28 days of curing at 20 °C and 45% of relative humidity, different tests were carried out in the geopolymers: physico-chemical (density, water absorption, porosity, mechanical (flexural and compressive strength, fire resistance and environmental (leaching and radioactivity. The panels manufactured have been compared with other commercial panels in order to determine the recycling possibilities of fly ashes in manufacturing new fire-insulating geopolymers. The panels obtained can be utilized for the production of interior wall materials, with a good physical, mechanical, fire resistant properties without any environmental problem.Este documento presenta los resultados de un estudio sobre el efecto del fuego sobre pastas de geopolímeros compuestas de cenizas volantes, metacaolín y silicato sódico. Con la pasta obtenida se han rellenado paneles de dimensiones 2 cm de espesor, 28 cm de altura y 18 cm de ancho. Tras 28 días de curado a 20 °C y un 45% de humedad relativa, diferentes ensayos fueron realizados en los geopolímeros obtenidos: fisicoquímicos (densidad, absorción de agua, porosidad, mecánicos (resistencia a compresión y a flexión, de resistencia al fuego y medioambientales (lixiviación y radioactividad. Los paneles fabricados han sido comparados con paneles comerciales para determinar las posibilidades de reciclaje de las cenizas volantes para la fabricación de nuevos productos geopoliméricos con propiedades aislantes al fuego. Los paneles obtenidos pueden ser utilizados para la producción de paredes interiores, con buenas propiedades físicas, mecánicas y de resistencia al fuego sin ningún problema medioambiental.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Class C Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste and Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueying; Ma, Xinwei; Zhang, Shoujie; Zheng, Enzu

    2013-04-09

    This paper presents workability, compressive strength and microstructure for geopolymer pastes and mortars made of class C fly ash at mass ratios of water-to-fly ash from 0.30 to 0.35. Fluidity was in the range of 145-173 mm for pastes and 131-136 mm for mortars. The highest strengths of paste and mortar were 58 MPa and 85 MPa when they were cured at 70 °C for 24 h. In XRD patterns, unreacted quartz and some reacted product were observed. SEM examination indicated that reacted product has formed and covered the unreacted particles in the paste and mortar that were consistent with their high strength.

  9. Effect of Na2SiO3/NaOH on mechanical properties and microstructure of geopolymer mortar using fly ash and rice husk ash as precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloma, Hanafiah, Elysandi, Debby Orjina; Meykan, Della Garnesia

    2017-11-01

    Geopolymer concrete is an eco-friendly concrete that can reduce carbon emissions on the earth surface because it used industrial waste material such as fly ash, rice husk ash, bagasse ash, and palm oil fuel. Geopolymer is semi-crystalline amorphous materials which has irregular chemical bonds structure. The material is produced by geosynthesis of aluminosilicates and alkali-silicates which produce the Si-O-Al polymer structure. This research used the ratio of fly ash and rice husk ash as precursors e.g. 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, and 25:75. NaOH solutions of 14 M and Na2SiO3 solutions with the variation e.g. 2.5, 2.75, 3.00, and 3.25 were used as activators on mortar geopolymer mixture. The tests of fresh mortar were slump flow and setting time. The optimum compressive strength is 68.36 MPa for 28 days resulted from mixture using 100% fly ash and Na2SiO3 and NaOH with ratio 2.75. The largest value of slump flow test resulted from mixture using Na2SiO3 and NaOH with ratio 2.50 is 17.25 cm. Based on SEM test results, mortar geopolymer microstructure with mixture RHA 0% has less pores and denser CSH structure.

  10. The evolution of strength and crystalline phases for alkali-activated ground blast furnace slag and fly ash-based geopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae Eun Oh; Paulo J.M. Monteiro; Ssang Sun Jun; Sejin Choi; Simon M. Clark [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-02-15

    The increase in strength and evolution of crystalline phases in inorganic polymer cement, made by the alkali activation of slag, Class C and Class F fly ashes, was followed using compressive strength test and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. In order to increase the crystallinity of the product the reactions were carried out at 80{sup o}C. We found that hydrotalcite formed in both the alkali-activated slag cements and the fly ash-based geopolymers. Hydroxycancrinite, one member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites, was found only in the fly ash geopolymers. Assuming that the predominantly amorphous geopolymer formed under ambient conditions relates to the crystalline phases found when the mixture is cured at high temperature, we propose that the structure of this zeolitic precursor formed in Na-based high alkaline environment can be regarded as a disordered form of the basic building unit of the ABC-6 group of zeolites which includes poly-types such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite and chabazite-Na.

  11. The evolution of strength and crystalline phases for alkali-activated ground blast furnace slag and fly ash-based geopolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2010-02-01

    The increase in strength and evolution of crystalline phases in inorganic polymer cement, made by the alkali activation of slag, Class C and Class F fly ashes, was followed using compressive strength test and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. In order to increase the crystallinity of the product the reactions were carried out at 80 °C. We found that hydrotalcite formed in both the alkali-activated slag cements and the fly ash-based geopolymers. Hydroxycancrinite, one member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites, was found only in the fly ash geopolymers. Assuming that the predominantly amorphous geopolymer formed under ambient conditions relates to the crystalline phases found when the mixture is cured at high temperature, we propose that the structure of this zeolitic precursor formed in Na-based high alkaline environment can be regarded as a disordered form of the basic building unit of the ABC-6 group of zeolites which includes poly-types such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite and chabazite-Na. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The evolution of strength and crystalline phases for alkali-activated ground blast furnace slag and fly ash-based geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Eun; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Jun, Ssang Sun; Choi, Sejin; Clark, Simon M.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in strength and evolution of crystalline phases in inorganic polymer cement, made by the alkali activation of slag, Class C and Class F fly ashes, was followed using compressive strength test and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. In order to increase the crystallinity of the product the reactions were carried out at 80 deg. C. We found that hydrotalcite formed in both the alkali-activated slag cements and the fly ash-based geopolymers. Hydroxycancrinite, one member of the ABC-6 family of zeolites, was found only in the fly ash geopolymers. Assuming that the predominantly amorphous geopolymer formed under ambient conditions relates to the crystalline phases found when the mixture is cured at high temperature, we propose that the structure of this zeolitic precursor formed in Na-based high alkaline environment can be regarded as a disordered form of the basic building unit of the ABC-6 group of zeolites which includes poly-types such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite and chabazite-Na.

  13. [Immobilization of heavy metal Pb2+ with geopolymer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Man-tong; Jin, Zan-fang; Huang, Cai-ju

    2011-05-01

    A series of geopolymers were synthesized by mixing metakaolinite, water glass, sodium hydroxide and water, and the lead ion solidification experiments were performed with the geopolymer. Then, the immobilization efficiency was characterized by monitoring the leaching concentration and compressive strength of solidified products. Additionally, the structure and properties of the solidified products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scan electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Furthermore, based on the analysis of immobilization efficiency, microstructure and mineral structure, the difference between geopolymer and cement on the performance of immobilizing heavy metals was discussed. The results of lead ion immobilization experiments showed that over 99.7% of heavy metal was captured by the geopolymer as the doping concentration of lead ion was less than 3%. Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the solidified product ranged from 40 MPa to 50 MPa. Furthermore, by using the same Pb2+ concentration, the geopolymer showed higher compressive strength and lower leaching concentration compared to the cement. Because lead ion participated in constitution of structure of geopolymer, or Pb2+ was adsorbed by the aluminium ions on the geopolymeric skeleton and held in geopolymer. However, cement mainly solidified lead ion by physical encapsulation and adsorption mechanism. Therefore, both from the compressive strength and leaching concentration and from the microstructure characterization as well as the mechanism of the geopolymerization reaction, the geopolymer has more advantages in immobilizing Pb2+ than the cement.

  14. Superplasticizer Addition to Carbon Fly Ash Geopolymers Activated at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabba, Lorenza; Manzi, Stefania; Bignozzi, Maria Chiara

    2016-07-18

    Present concerns about global warming due to the greenhouse emissions in the atmosphere have pushed the cement industry to research alternatives to ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Geopolymer binder may constitute a possible breakthrough in the development of sustainable materials: understanding the effectiveness and the influences of superplasticizers on geopolymer systems is one of the essential requirements for its large-scale implementation. This study aims to investigate the possibility of using commercially available chemical admixtures designed for OPC concrete, to improve fresh properties of fly ash-based geopolymers and mortars. A special emphasis is laid upon evaluating their influence on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the hardened material realized under room-temperature curing conditions. Results indicate that the addition of a polycarboxylic ether-based superplasticizer, in the amount of 1.0 wt. % by mass of fly ash, promotes an improvement in workability without compromising the final strength of the hardened material. Moreover, the addition of the polycarboxylic ether- and acrylic-based superplasticizers induces a refinement in the pore structure of hardened mortar leading to a longer water saturation time.

  15. Superplasticizer Addition to Carbon Fly Ash Geopolymers Activated at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Carabba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Present concerns about global warming due to the greenhouse emissions in the atmosphere have pushed the cement industry to research alternatives to ordinary Portland cement (OPC. Geopolymer binder may constitute a possible breakthrough in the development of sustainable materials: understanding the effectiveness and the influences of superplasticizers on geopolymer systems is one of the essential requirements for its large-scale implementation. This study aims to investigate the possibility of using commercially available chemical admixtures designed for OPC concrete, to improve fresh properties of fly ash-based geopolymers and mortars. A special emphasis is laid upon evaluating their influence on mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the hardened material realized under room-temperature curing conditions. Results indicate that the addition of a polycarboxylic ether-based superplasticizer, in the amount of 1.0 wt. % by mass of fly ash, promotes an improvement in workability without compromising the final strength of the hardened material. Moreover, the addition of the polycarboxylic ether- and acrylic-based superplasticizers induces a refinement in the pore structure of hardened mortar leading to a longer water saturation time.

  16. Characterization of geopolymer fly-ash based foams obtained with the addition of Al powder or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as foaming agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducman, V., E-mail: vilma.ducman@zag.si; Korat, L.

    2016-03-15

    Recent innovations in geopolymer technology have led to the development of various different types of geopolymeric products, including highly porous geopolymer-based foams, which are formed by the addition of foaming agents to a geopolymer fly-ash based matrix. These agents decompose, or react with the liquid matrix or oxygen in the matrix, resulting in the release of gases which form pores prior to the hardening of the gel. The hardened structure has good mechanical and thermal properties, and can therefore be used for applications in acoustic panels and in lightweight pre-fabricated components for thermal insulation purposes. This study presents the results of the pore-forming process in the case when two different foaming agents, i.e. aluminium powder amounting to 0.07, 0.13 and 0.20 mass. % and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amounting to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mass. %, were added to a fly-ash geopolymer matrix. The physical, mechanical, and microstructural properties of the thus obtained foams, and the effects of the type and amount of the added foaming agent, are presented and discussed. Highly porous structures were obtained in the case of both of the investigated foaming agents, with overall porosities up to 59% when aluminium powder was added, and of up 48% when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was added. In the latter case, when 2% of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} foaming agent was added, finer pores (with diameters up to 500 μm) occurred in the structure, whereas somewhat larger pores (some had diameters greater than 1 mm) occurred when the same amount of aluminium powder was added. The mechanical properties of the investigated foams depended on their porosity. In the case of highly porous structures a compressive strength of 3.3 MPa was nevertheless achieved for the samples containing 0.2% of aluminium powder, and 3.7 MPa for those containing 2.0% of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Preparation of geopolymer foams based on fly ash with the addition of Al powder or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as

  17. Encapsulation of Cs/Sr contaminated clinoptilolite in geopolymers produced from metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenzel, C., E-mail: c.kuenzel08@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom); Cisneros, J.F. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom); Neville, T.P. [Centre for CO_2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E6JE (United Kingdom); Vandeperre, L.J. [Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom); Simons, S.J.R.; Bensted, J. [Centre for CO_2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E6JE (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, C.R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW72AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The encapsulation of caesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) contaminated clinoptilolite in Na and K based metakaolin geopolymers is reported. When Cs or Sr loaded clinoptilolite is mixed with a metakaolin geopolymer paste, the high pH of the activating solution and the high concentration of ions in solution cause ion exchange reactions and dissolution of clinoptilolite with release of Cs and Sr into the geopolymer matrix. The leaching of Cs and Sr from metakaolin-based geopolymer has therefore been investigated. It was found that Na-based geopolymers reduce leaching of Cs compared to K-based geopolymers and the results are in agreement with the hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) theory. Cs ions are weak Lewis acids and aluminates are a weak Lewis base. During the formation of the geopolymer matrix Cs ions are preferentially bound to aluminate phases and replace Na in the geopolymer structure. Sr uptake by Na-geopolymers is limited to 0.4 mol Sr per mole of Al and any additional Sr is immobilised by the high pH which causes precipitation of Sr as low solubility hydroxide and carbonate phases. There was no evidence of any other phases being formed when Sr or Cs are added to metakaolin geopolymers. - Highlights: • Leaching. • Encapsulation of Cs and Sr. • Nuclear waste. • Clinoptilolite.

  18. Comparative study of illite clay and illite-based geopolymer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperberga, I; Sedmale, G; Zeila, K; Ulme, D; Stinkulis, G

    2011-01-01

    Quaternary (Q-clay) clayey deposits are one of the dominating parts of mineral raw materials of the sedimentary cover at present area of Latvia. These clays can be characterised by illite content up to 75-80 %. Two ways for use of illite clays were studied: conventional and geopolymers method. Purpose of the second mentioned method was showing the influence of alkali (KOH) on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure. Obtained products were investigated by IR-spectroscopy, DTA and XRD, pore size distribution was determined as well. Some ceramic properties and compressive strength were determined and compared. IR-spectrum showed the effect of alkali on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure in three main absorption bands: 3620-3415 cm -1 which is related to the vibrational modes of adsorbed water between SiO 4 and AlO 6 layers; new stronger absorption bands at 1635 cm -1 and 1435 cm -1 indicate on the appearance of vibrations in Q-KOH and are related to the K-O-Si bonds; the most essential changes are vibrations at 850 cm -1 showing the changes in the coordination number of Al from 6 to 4 for Q-KOH. Investigations of the bulk density in dependence on temperature showed the small increase of bulk density for Q-clay while - the relatively remarkable decrease for Q-clay/KOH. Mentioned values correlate with the compressive strength of Q-clay and Q-KOH products.

  19. EFFECTS OF BLAST-FURNACE SLAG ON NATURAL POZZOLAN-BASED GEOPOLYMER CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHSHAD YAZDANIPOUR

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of geopolymer cement mixes were designed and produced by alkali-activation of a pumice-type natural pozzolan. Effects of blast-furnace slag on basic engineering properties of the mixes were studied. Different engineering properties of the mixes such as setting times and 28-day compressive strength were studied at different amounts of blast-furnace slag, sodium oxide content, and water-to-cement ratio. The mix comprising of 5 wt.% blast-furnace slag and 8 wt.% Na2O with a water-to-dry binder ratio of 0.30 exhibits the highest 28-day compressive strength, i.e. 36 MPa. Mixes containing 5 wt.% of ground granulated blast furnace slag showed the least efflorescence or best soundness. Laboratory techniques of X-ray diffractometry (XRD, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were utilized for characterizing a number of mixes and studying their molecular and micro-structure. Investigations done by scanning electron microscopy confirm that smaller blast-furnace slag particles react totally while the larger ones react partially with alkaline activators and contribute to the formation of a composite microstructure.

  20. Geopolymer as an adsorbent of heavy metal: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Nurliyana; Abdullah, Mohamad Mustafa Al Bakri; Zainol, Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Murshed, Mohd Fared

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews about geopolymer based adsorbent focusing in the removal of heavy metal. The reviews include fundamental and types of material used in the formation of adsorbents. Geopolymer based adsorbent got attention recently due to its unique three-dimensional network structure, with fixed size pores and paths that allow certain heavy metal to pass through. Most materials that applied as adsorbent such as fly ash, metakaolin, kaolin and dolomite. A lot of sludge nowadays only dumped in the landfill which can be used as one of new materials as geopolymer based adsorbent.

  1. Variations in Compressive Strength of Geopolymer due to the CaO Added Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuqing; Koumoto, Tatsuya; Kondo, Fumiyoshi

    Recently, geopolymer has been a noteworthy material which can be used as a replacement for portland cement. The mechanical characteristics and consistency of the geopolymer are strongly affected by its chemical components of fly ash. The variations in compressive strength of geopolymer due to the CaO added fly ash were investigated in this paper. The compressive strengths of geopolymer were increased with an increase in the curing period, and the characteristics changed from the one of plastic soil material to brittle material such as concrete, regardless of CaO content. Also, the results of compressive strength and modulus of deformation showed their maximum value in the case of 8-10% CaO content. From this result, the maximum characteristics of the strengths were assumed to be exerted in case which the water draining process of geopolymer was balanced with the water absorbing process of additional CaO.

  2. Benefits of aggregates surface modification in concrete production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junak, J.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    In our study, recycled concrete aggregates (RCA), which surfaces had been modified by geopolymer material based on coal fly ash, were used to produce the concrete samples. In these samples, fraction 4/8 mm was replaced by recycled concrete aggregate with a range of 100%. To modify the surface of RCA was “Solo” and “Triple stage” modification used. On these samples real density, total water absorption and compressive strength were examined after 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of hardening. The highest compressive strength 56.8 MPa, after 365 days hardening, reached sample which had improved RCA surface by “Triple stage mixing”.

  3. Durability studies on the high calcium flyash based GPC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geopolymer concrete is an environment friendly green concrete which is comparatively of lower carbon footprint. Most of the studies reported is about the development of low calcium flyash based GPC only and and that too mostly on achieving the compressive strength and not much on its durability related properties. In this ...

  4. Formation of one-part-mixing geopolymers and geopolymer ceramics from geopolymer powder

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Y-M; Heah, C-Y; Li, L-Y; Jaya, NA; Abdullah, MMAB; Tan, SJ; Hussin, K

    2017-01-01

    publisher: Elsevier articletitle: Formation of one-part-mixing geopolymers and geopolymer ceramics from geopolymer powder journaltitle: Construction and Building Materials articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2017.08.110 content_type: article copyright: © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coal fly ash as raw material for the manufacture of geopolymer-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andini, S; Cioffi, R; Colangelo, F; Grieco, T; Montagnaro, F; Santoro, L

    2008-01-01

    In this work coal fly ash has been employed for the synthesis of geopolymers. Two different systems with silica/alumina ratios stoichiometric for the formation of polysialatesiloxo (PSS, SiO2/Al2O3=4) and polysialatedisiloxo (PSDS, SiO2/Al2O3=6) have been prepared. The alkali metal hydroxide (NaOH or KOH) necessary to start polycondensation has been added in the right amount as concentrated aqueous solution to each of the two systems. The concentration of each alkali metal solution has been adjusted in order to have the right liquid volume to ensure constant workability. The systems have been cured at four different temperatures (25, 40, 60, and 85 degrees C) for several different times depending on the temperature (16-672 h at 25 degrees C; 72-336 h at 40 degrees C; 16-120 h at 60 degrees C and 1-6h at 85 degrees C). The products obtained in the different experimental conditions have been submitted to the quantitative determination of the extent of polycondensation through mass increase and loss on ignition, as well as to qualitative characterization by means of FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, physico-structural and mechanical characterization has been carried out through microscopic observations and the determination of unconfined compressive strength, elasticity modulus, apparent density, porosity and specific surface area. The results have indicated that the systems under investigation are suited for the manufacture of pre-formed building blocks at room temperature.

  6. Mineral assemblage transformation of a metakaolin-based waste form after geopolymer encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin D.; Neeway, James J.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Bowden, Mark E.; Amonette, James E.; Arey, Bruce W.; Pierce, Eric M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.

    2016-05-01

    Current plans for nuclear waste vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) lack the capacity to treat all of the low activity waste (LAW) that is not encapsulated in the vitrified product. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is one of the supplemental technologies under consideration to fill this gap. The FBSR process results in a granular product mainly composed of feldspathoid mineral phases that encapsulate the LAW and other contaminants of concern (COCs). In order to better understand the characteristics of the FBSR product, characterization testing has been performed on the granular product as well as the granular product encapsulated in a monolithic geopolymer binder. The non-radioactive simulated tank waste samples created for use in this study are the result of a 2008 Department of Energy sponsored Engineering Scale Technology Demonstration (ESTD) in 2008. These samples were created from waste simulant that was chemically shimmed to resemble actual tank waste, and rhenium has been used as a substitute for technetium. Another set of samples was created by the Savannah River Site Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) using a chemical shim of Savannah River Site Tank 50 waste in order to simulate a blend of 68 Hanford tank wastes. This paper presents results from coal and moisture removal tests along with XRD, SEM, and BET analyses showing that the major mineral components are predominantly sodium aluminosilicate minerals and that the mineral product is highly porous. Results also show that the materials pass the short-term leach tests: the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Product Consistency Test (PCT).

  7. Impact of Blending on Strength Distribution of Ambient Cured Metakaolin and Palm Oil Fuel Ash Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliat Ola Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of blending of metakaolin with silica rich palm oil fuel ash (POFA on the strength distribution of geopolymer mortar. The broadness of strength distribution of quasi-brittle to brittle materials depends strongly on the existence of flaws such as voids, microcracks, and impurities in the material. Blending of materials containing alumina and silica with the objective of improving the performance of geopolymer makes comprehensive characterization necessary. The Weibull distribution is used to study the strength distribution and the reliability of geopolymer mortar specimens prepared from 100% metakaolin, 50% and 70% palm and cured under ambient condition. Mortar prisms and cubes were used to test the materials in flexure and compression, respectively, at 28 days and the results were analyzed using Weibull distribution. In flexure, Weibull modulus increased with POFA replacement, indicating reduced broadness of strength distribution from an increased homogeneity of the material. Modulus, however, decreased with increase in replacement of POFA in the specimens tested under compression. It is concluded that Weibull distribution is suitable for analyses of the blended geopolymer system. While porous microstructure is mainly responsible for flexural failure, heterogeneity of reaction relics is responsible for the compression failure.

  8. THE EFFECT OF FLY ASH ON FLEXURAL CAPACITY CONCRETE BEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammad Amiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the flexural response of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete (RGPC beam. A commercial finite element (FE software ABAQUS has been used to perform a structural behavior of RGPC beam. Using parameters such: stress, strain, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio obtained from experimental results, a beam model has been simulated in ABAQUS. The results from experimental test and ABAQUS simulation were compared. Due to friction forces at the supports and loading rollers; slip occurring, the actual deflection of RGPC beam from experimental test results were slightly different from the results of ABAQUS. And there is good agreement between the crack patterns of fly-ash based geopolymer concrete generated by FE analysis using ABAQUS, and those in experimental data.

  9. Application features of additives based on metakaolin in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanova, A. A.; Kramar, L. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the influence of additives based on metakaolin (U- YF, UM-YF and YF-UMD) on speed concrete strength development in the early stages of concrete hardening, as well as the strength increase in 28 days. The authors have proved that metakaolin gauging in concrete should not exceed 3%. Introduction of 5% of metakaolin or more entails the fault in concrete strength in the later stages of concrete hardening and decreases its resistance to the influence of sulfate and frosty environments. The most effective of the developed additives are UM-YF and UMD-YF which provide high sulfate and frost resistance to the concrete (up to 800 ... 1000 cycles). The above mentioned influence of additives on concrete properties is connected with an intended formation of structure of the cement matrix of concrete that is resistant to various aggressive environments.

  10. An Experimental Study in the Mechanical Response of Polymer Modified Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2012-0057 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF POLYMER MODIFIED GEOPOLYMERS Benjamin Valera...03-JUN-2010 -- 02-MAR-2012 An Experimental Study in the Mechanical Response of Polymer Modified Geopolymers FA4819-10-C-0020 0909999F GOVT D0 QD101005...molecular weight of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG), Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC) on metakaolin and F type fly ash sodium based geopolymers in heir mechanical

  11. Geopolymer Porous Nanoceramics for Structural Smart and Thermal Shock Resistant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    Surfaces A – Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 269 [1-3] 47-58 (2005). 4. “Use of Geopolymeric Cements as a Refractory Adhesive for Metal...Plenary Lectures - 9 1. “ Geopolymers : More than just a Cement ,” W. M. Kriven (Plenary lecture). Presented at Geopolymer 2005, Int. Conf. on...8. “Microstructure and Properties of Metakaolin-based Geopolymers ,” W. M. Kriven,* presented at Annual Meeting of the Cements Division of the

  12. Geopolymer Porous Nanoceramics for Structural, for Smart and Thermal Shock Resistant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    Deventer, Colloids and Surfaces A – Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 269 [1-3] 47-58 (2005). 4. “Use of Geopolymeric Cements as a Refractory...Champaign Keynote/Plenary Lectures - 9 1. “ Geopolymers : More than just a Cement ,” W. M. Kriven (Plenary lecture). Presented at Geopolymer ...June 6 – 11 (2010). 8. “Microstructure and Properties of Metakaolin-based Geopolymers ,” W. M. Kriven,* presented at Annual Meeting of the Cements

  13. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Fly Ash as Geopolymer Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risdanareni Puput

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on finding suitable cement substitute material becomes massive due to environmental effect. Geopolymer as inorganic material is potential to be the smart solution to overcome global warming issue. Fly ash is a waste material rich in silica and alumina becomes popular raw material to produce geopolymer. The best properties ofgeopolymer paste come from the high quality of fly ash. Therefore, it is important to investigate various types of fly ash and geopolymer properties. Their chemical and physical properties characterized by XRF, pH value, XRD and SEM. The results showed that type of fly ash depended on amount of Si-based of Ca-based compound which consisted of spherical morphology. Geopolymer paste produced from the ash with different compound has bulky and irregular shape morphology. The pH value of each ash has also a correlation with the setting time of fresh paste.

  14. Effect of air-cooled slag and granulated blast furnace slag addition as substitutor on fly ash based geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmaji, Andrie; Imran, Aishah Mahyarni; Sunendar, Bambang; Lazuardi, Muhammad Sofyan; Khairunnasari, Ikhsan; Sobandi, Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Air Cooled Slag and Granulated Blast Furnace Slag is a waste material from steelmaking process that not utilized, even though it rich in silica and CaO that can increase mechanical properties of building materials. Therefore, this material is potential as substitutor for geopolymer. Geopolymer is an alkali activated material consists of aluminosilicate precursor activated by NaOH and waterglass as activator. One of the common aluminosilicate binder used is fly ash. Geopolymer was made by mixing fly ash and air cooled slag or granulated blast furnace slag in certain ratio with alkali activator solution. The aim for this study is to obtain the best ratio of slag to fly ash binder that produces the highest compressive strength. The best compressive strength was 29.80 MPa achieved in fly ash:air cooled slag 40:60 ratio and 31.33 MPa achieved in fly ash:granulated blast furnace slag 40:60 ratio. X-Ray Diffraction test showed the appearance of anorthite (Ca, Na (Al, Si)4 O8). FTIR characterization showed the appearance of siloxo and sialate bonding which commonly found in geopolymerization.

  15. Contributions to the study of porosity in fly ash-based geopolymers. Relationship between degree of reaction, porosity and compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luna-Galiano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper relates to the development of a systematic study involving a set of parameters which could potentially have an impact on geopolymer properties: curing temperature, type of activating solution, alkali metal in solution, incorporation of slag (Ca source and type of slag used. The microstructures, degrees of reaction, porosities and compressive strengths of geopolymers have been evaluated. Geopolymers prepared with soluble silicate presented a more compacted and closed structure, a larger amount of gel, lower porosity and greater compressive strength than those prepared with hydroxides. On the other hand, Na-geopolymers were more porous but more resistant than K-geopolymers. Although there is an inverse relation between degree of reaction and porosity, between compressive strength and porosity it is not always inversely proportional and could, in some cases, be masked by changes produced in other influencing parameters.

  16. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  17. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  18. The effect Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to specific gravity and water absorption of artifiticial geopolymer aggregate dolomite based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Aiman Mahmad; Yahya, Zarina; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    Industry such as construction and materials had depended a lot on the available aggregate. The use of aggregate need to be designed so that it have a well sustainable system with good physical properties. This paper is using dolomite to produce an artificial aggregate. The dolomite based artificial aggregate is produced using geopolymer as a hardened process. The dolomite base artificial aggregate is tested with a different alkaline activator to find water absorption and density. The lowest water absorption of dolomite artificial aggregate is 14%. The specific gravity of the artificial aggregate tested are lower when the sodium silicate is decreasing. The lowest density of artificial aggregate obtain are with 2.03 g/cm3.

  19. Modelling of autogenous shrinkage of concrete based on paste measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, E.; Leegwater, G.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2006-01-01

    In order to be able to improve concrete modelling based on its constituent, more knowledge is needed about the material behaviour of these constituents. In this research the focus is on the behaviour of hardening concrete, therefore the properties of hardening cement are of most relevance.

  20. Influence of Molarity and Chemical Composition on the Development of Compressive Strength in POFA Based Geopolymer Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Alamgir Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation concerns the use of the optimum mix proportion of two locally available pozzolanic waste materials, namely, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS and palm oil fuel ash (POFA, together with metakaolin (MK as binders. In addition, another local waste material, manufactured sand (M-sand, was used as a replacement for conventional sand in the development of green geopolymer mortar. Twenty-four mortar mixtures were designed with varying binder contents and alkaline activators. The oven dry curing was also kept consistent for all the mix proportions at a temperature of 65°C for 24 hours. The highest 28-day compressive strength of about 48 MPa was obtained for the mortar containing 20% of MK, 35% of GGBS, and 45% of POFA. The increment of MK beyond 20% leads to reduction of the compressive strength. The GGBS replacement beyond 35% also reduced the compressive strength. The entire specimen achieved average 80% of the 28-day strength at the age of 3 days. The density decreased with the increase of POFA percentage. The finding of this research by using the combination of MK, GGBS, and POFA as binders to wholly replace conventional ordinary Portland cement would lead to alternate eco-friendly geopolymer matrix.

  1. Evaluation of crushed concrete base strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This research project was conducted with two primary objectives, which include: 1) determine whether current Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) requirements for recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) provide adequate materials for a roadway ...

  2. Reinforcement of the concrete base slab of the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 05: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 07: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 09: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 10: UX15 cavern, view into PX14 shaft above. Photo 12: UX15 cavern, temporary access platform of RB16 tunnel. Photo 15: UJ17 chamber, invert excavation.

  3. Performance of Lightweight Concrete based on Granulated Foamglass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M.; Zakrevskaya, L.; Vaganov, V.; Hempel, S.; Mechtcherine, V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents an investigation of lightweight concretes properties, based on granulated foamglass (GFG-LWC) aggregates. The application of granulated foamglass (GFG) in concrete might significantly reduce the volume of waste glass and enhance the recycling industry in order to improve environmental performance. The conducted experiments showed high strength and thermal properties for GFG-LWC. However, the use of GFG in concrete is associated with the risk of harmful alkali-silica reactions (ASR). Thus, one of the main aims was to study ASR manifestation in GFG-LWC. It was found that the lightweight concrete based on porous aggregates, and ordinary concrete, have different a mechanism of ASR. In GFG-LWC, microstructural changes, partial destruction of granules, and accumulation of silica hydro-gel in pores were observed. According to the existing methods of analysis of ASR manifestation in concrete, sample expansion was measured, however, this method was found to be not appropriate to indicate ASR in concrete with porous aggregates. Microstructural analysis and testing of the concrete strength are needed to evaluate the damage degree due to ASR. Low-alkali cement and various pozzolanic additives as preventive measures against ASR were chosen. The final composition of the GFG-LWC provides very good characteristics with respect to compressive strength, thermal conductivity and durability. On the whole, the potential for GFG-LWC has been identified.

  4. GEOPOLYMER MATERIALS ON THE FLYASH BASIS – LONG-TERM PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANTIŠEK ŠKVÁRA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the external environment on the properties of geopolymers on the basis of fly ashes exposed to various conditions (environments of different humidity levels, autoclave, dry conditions at 80°C, immersed in water has been investigated for two years. The strength values of geopolymers kept under various conditions do not drop during the period of two years. The maximum values could be achieved if the geopolymers were kept under dry conditions at 80°C and in the air at a relative humidity ranging from 40 to 50 percent. The strength values do not change practically if the geopolymers are kept in water, in an autoclave or in an environment with the relative humidity of 95 percent. The long-term exposure of fly ash-based geopolymers does not result in any change in their microstructure and practically no new phases arise. The exposure to water is accompanied by a gradual leaching of sodium until its almost complete transition to water. The exposure of geopolymers to alternating humid and dry conditions gives rise to efflorescences. The NMR 23Na, 27Al and 29Si spectra of fly ash-based geopolymers revealed a practically unchanged occurrence of structures in samples after their long-term exposure to various conditions as compared with the initial structures. Practically no evidence (X-ray diffraction and IR analyses of any formation of new phases after various exposure conditions. No significant morphological changes (the formation of crystalline phases in samples kept under above mentioned conditions could be identified after two years as compared to the initial state; hence, the original amorphous character of the geopolymers is preserved. The structure of man-made geopolymers can probably be deduced rather from the amorphous mineral allophane than from crystaline zeolites. Therefore, thanks to a comprehensive long-term investigation, the fly ash-based geopolymers can be regarded as stable hydraulic binders.

  5. The carbonaceous concrete based on sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today there are many requirements for strength, ecology and economy of produced concretes. The authors of the paper study attenuation of electromagnetic radiation of carbonaceous powders in the concrete composition. Carbon black was selected as a carbon powder for addition in concrete composition. Carbon black is a nanomaterial with disoriented structure of particles (average size is about 50 nm. The composition of the carbon black contains at least 90 wt.% amorphous carbon, more than 5 wt. % chemisorbed oxygen and about 4 wt.% of impurities. Materials with the addition of carbon black have electrical conductivity due to the high content of carbon. These materials are able to absorb electromagnetic radiation. For cement composition with addition of carbon black (more than 30 wt. % and water transmission coefficient of electromagnetic radiation is about –10 dB, for cement composition with 20 wt. % of carbon black the reflection coefficient is –8 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. The concretes with a saturated aqueous solution of calcium chloride and 10% of carbon black possess minimal reflection coefficient (–14... –8 dB. Electromagnetic radiation shielding of concrete with the addition of sawdust was investigated. The concrete with sawdust (40 wt. % impregnated with an aqueous solution with carbon black has the reflection coefficient less than –8 dB and transmission coefficient –40 dB in the frequency range 8–12 GHz. These concretes can be used for creation of a shielded room with the technical equipment for information processing to prevent data leakage through the compromising emanations and crosstalk.

  6. Structural and mechanical study of concrete made from cementitious materials of low environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, A. K.; Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Santos, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work shows the results obtained by replacing Type I Portland®, by cementitious geopolymers materials, derived from minerals, in concrete mixtures. Synthesis of both geopolymers through alkaline activation of two alluminosilicates: Bentonite and Pumice with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3). XRD, SEM and XRDE are used to structural study of new geopolymers. Concrete mixtures with replacement of Portland have 10% and 30% of geopolymer. Finally, concrete mortars formed were mechanically analysed according to ICONTEC 220 at 7, 14, 28, 41, 90 and 120 days of cure. Results shows that compressive strength of concrete from Bentonite and Pumice are almost the same for the standard concrete at 28 days of cure. At 90 days of cure, compression resistance of concrete from Pumice at 10% is even higher than those that standard concrete shows.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Epoxy Geopolymer Hybrid Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Cioffi, Raffaele; Tarallo, Oreste

    2013-09-09

    The preparation and the characterization of novel geopolymer-based hybrid composites are reported. These materials have been prepared through an innovative synthetic approach, based on a co-reticulation in mild conditions of commercial epoxy based organic resins and a metakaolin-based geopolymer inorganic matrix. This synthetic strategy allows the obtainment of a homogeneous dispersion of the organic particles in the inorganic matrix, up to 25% in weight of the resin. The materials obtained present significantly enhanced compressive strengths and toughness with respect to the neat geopolymer, suggesting their wide utilization for structural applications. A preliminary characterization of the porous materials obtained by removing the organic phase from the hybrid composites by means of heat treatments is also reported. Possible applications of these materials in the field of water purification, filtration, or as lightweight insulating materials are envisaged.

  8. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  9. Resilient modulus characteristics of soil subgrade with geopolymer additive in peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Nasuhi; Hadiwardoyo, Sigit Pranowo; Rahayu, Wiwik

    2017-06-01

    Resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil are generally very low with high potential of deformation and low bearing capacity. The efforts to improve the peat subgrade resilient modulus characteristics is required, one among them is by adding the geopolymer additive. Geopolymer was made as an alternative to replace portland cement binder in the concrete mix in order to promote environmentally friendly, low shrinkage value, low creep value, and fire resistant material. The use of geopolymer to improve the mechanical properties of peat as a road construction subgrade, hence it becomes important to identify the effect of geopolymer addition on the resilient modulus characteristics of peat soil. This study investigated the addition of 0% - 20% geopolymer content on peat soil derived from Ogan Komering Ilir, South Sumatera Province. Resilient modulus measurement was performed by using cyclic triaxial test to determine the resilience modulus model as a function of deviator stresses and radial stresses. The test results showed that an increase in radial stresses did not necessarily lead to an increase in modulus resilient, and on the contrary, an increase in deviator stresses led to a decrease in modulus resilient. The addition of geopolymer in peat soil provided an insignificant effect on the increase of resilient modulus value.

  10. Concrete evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provis, J.; Duxson, P.; van Deventer, J. [University of Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

    2008-11-15

    The time is right for a revolution in the cement industry which is responsible for 5-8% of all human-derived carbon dioxide emissions. Zeobond, an Australian company, has developed E-Crete which is a geopolymer concrete using fly ash and blast furnace slags which reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 80% from the 0.67t of CO{sub 2} per ton of cement emitted by the Australian triple blend of cement, fly ash and slag. The article discusses the products development, standards for cements and challenges to the commercialization of E-Crete. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to demands on higher loads, degradation, re-construction etc. there is a constant need for repair or strengthening of existing concrete structures. Many varying methods exist to strengthen concrete structures, one such commonly used technique utilizes surface epoxy bonded FRPs (Fibre Reinforced...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  12. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions.

  13. Performance and Compatibility of Phosphonate-Based Superplasticizers for Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Coppola

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the effectiveness of an innovative phosphonate-based superplasticizer (PNH for ready mixed concrete. Concrete specimens were manufactured by considering a constant initial workability, equal to 220 mm slump at the end of the mixing procedure. Workability was measured at 0, 30, and 60 min to evaluate the workability retention performances of the innovative superplasticizer. Compressive tests at 1, 7, and 28 days were carried out to evaluate the influence of the phosphonate-based superplasticizer on concrete setting and hardening. The concrete mixes were designed by considering 13 different cements to assess the superplasticizer-cement compatibility. The PNH-based admixture showed a better performance in terms of water reduction and workability retention with respect to napthalenesulphonate based admixtures (NSF; however, a higher dosage of PNH with respect to polycarboxylate ethers (PCEs was needed to get the same initial fluidity.

  14. Effect of chloride-based deicers on reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We conducted an extensive literature review and performed laboratory tests to assess the effect of chloride-based deicers on the rebars and dowel bars in concrete and to determine whether or not deicer corrosion inhibitors help preserve the transport...

  15. Production of fly ash-based geopolymers using activator solutions with different Na{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} compositions; Producao de geopolimeros a base de cinza volante usando solucoes ativadoras com diferentes composicoes de Na{sub 2}O e Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, A.G. de S.; Strecker, K.; Araujo Junior, A.G. de; Silva, C.A. da [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    Geopolymers are a new class of binder with high mechanical strength, chemical inertia and can be made of by-products. In this work fly ash from a Brazilian power station was used to produce the geopolymer cement. To produce the geopolymers, different activator solutions were used in order to study the influence of the chemical composition of these solutions on the production of the fly ash-based geopolymers. The results showed that the Brazilian fly ash has the potential to be used in the geopolymerization process. The specimens presented high compression strength, 28 MPa after 24 h and 48 MPa after 28 days of cure. The X-ray diffraction of the original fly ash and the geopolymers samples exhibited some mineral phases presents in the fly ash and new zeolitic phases formed after the geopolymerization process. The infrared spectroscopic of all samples showed some modifications of absorption bands besides new bands corresponding to the geopolymerization process. The physical properties, such as the water absorption, porosity and permeability, changed when the activator solution changed and the curing time was modified. (author)

  16. Geopolymer obtained from coal ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, V.; Bissari, E.S.; Uggioni, E.; Bernardin, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Geopolymers are three-dimensional alumino silicates that can be rapidly formed at low temperature from naturally occurring aluminosilicates with a structure similar to zeolites. In this work coal ash (Tractebel Energy) was used as source of aluminosilicate according a full factorial design in eight formulations with three factors (hydroxide type and concentration and temperature) and two-levels. The ash was dried and hydroxide was added according type and concentration. The geopolymer was poured into cylindrical molds, cured (14 days) and subjected to compression test. The coal ash from power plants belongs to the Si-Al system and thus can easily form geopolymers. The compression tests showed that it is possible to obtain samples with strength comparable to conventional Portland cement. As a result, temperature and molarity are the main factors affecting the compressive strength of the obtained geopolymer. (author)

  17. Bacteria-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    A typical durability-related phenomenon in many concrete constructions is crack formation. While larger cracks hamper structural integrity, also smaller sub-millimeter sized cracks may result in durability problems as particularly connected cracks increase matrix permeability. Ingress water and

  18. Geopolymers for Structural Ceramic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-31

    Stow, Ohio 44224 Abstract Geopolymers , also called geo- cements and low-temperature synthesized glasses, are a class of cementious materials that do...Applications of geopolymers have included ceramic matrix composites,ŕ, 3 waste encapsulation 9-11and alternative cements .7,12,14 As adhesives...and H. Schneider, The American Ceramic Society, Westerville, OH, 2003. 3J. Bell and W. M. Kriven, "Nanoporosity in geopolymeric cements " pp. 590-591

  19. Studying the effect of thermal and acid exposure on alkali activated slag Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater H.M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports a study about thermal stability as well as acid resistance of geopolymer materials prepared from Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS, Air Cooled Slag (ACS, Silica fume (SF and cement kiln dust (CKD using 6% (weight of equal mix from alkaline sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate activators. Study of addition of ACS, SF and CKD as partial replacement of GGBFS is investigated so as to improve the mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymer mixes. Compressive strength and SEM were utilized in these studies. Materials were prepared using water/binder of 0.30 at 38°C and 100% RH. Results showed that geopolymer materials prepared using alkali activated slag exhibit large changes in compressive strength with increasing the firing temperature from 300 to 1000°C and exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability as compared to concrete specimens. Materials prepared by replacing GGBFS by 15% ACS resist thermal deterioration up to 1000°C. It was suggested to be suitable for refractory insulation applications as well as for production of nuclear concrete reactors. On the other hand, geopolymer mixes exhibit low stability upon subjecting to different concentration from the mix of nitric and hydrochloric acid in equal ratio (1:1. Current studies of geopolymer microstructure were focused on the morphology as well as the relationship between compositions and mechanical properties.

  20. FT-IR and 29 Si-NMR for evaluating aluminium silicate precursors for geopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Pipilikaki, P.; Fischer, H.R.; Verkuijlen, M.H.W.; Eck, E.R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Geopolymers are systems of inorganic binders that can be used for sustainable, cementless concrete and are formed by alkali activation of an aluminium–silicate precursor (often secondary resources like fly ash or slag). The type of aluminium– silicate precursor and its potential variations within

  1. Correlation between hardness and water absorption properties of Saudi kaolin and white clay geopolymer coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Shamala; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Huang, Yue; Hussin, Kamarudin; Wang, Jin; Shahedan, Noor Fifinatasha

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer is an uprising technology that is being studied worldwide. Geopolymer raw materials are basically aluminosilicate source materials. However, this technology is yet to infiltrate into pipelines and coating industries which initiated our research idea. The idea of creating universal geopolymer based coating material is mainly to help oil and gas industry reduce its maintenance cost. Kaolin based geopolymer paste was coated on glass reinforced epoxy (GRE) substrates which are majorly used as pipeline material in the oil and gas industry at Saudi Arabia. Kaolin and white clay was chosen as raw material to study the possibilities of utilizing underused aluminosilicate raw materials for geopolymer coating. To obtain suitable formulation, Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio was varied from 0.40 untill 0.60 while other parameters such as solid/liquid ratio and NaOH molarity were kept constant at values as per previous works. Geopolymer coated GRE substrates were then subjected to water absorption, flexural strength and hardness test to validate our findings. Water absorption is a crucial test as for coating materials which justifies the pratical usability of the coating product. Upon testing, kaolin and white clay based geopolymer coating each shows promising properties at Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.45 and 0.50 each.

  2. Review of Geopolymer Behaviour in Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifly, K.; Yong, H. C.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Ming, L. Y.; Panias, D.; Sakkas, K.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the thermal resistance of geopolymers towards the fire and elevated temperature. Geopolymers are one of the new class materials, emerging in far-reaching potential in fire and thermal resistance areas. The review includes thethermal performance of geopolymers before and after the thermal exposure. An overview on the recent progress of the geopolymers in high-temperature application is discussed in detail to keep pace with the development in this field. The characterization of geopolymers before and after the thermal treatment in term of microstructural, and crystallographic are also reviewed.

  3. Effect of hydrated lime on compressive strength mortar of fly ash laterite soil geopolymer mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangsa, F. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Djamaluddin, A. R.; Muhiddin, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper explored the suitability of fly ash, hydrated lime, and laterite soil with several activator (sodium hydroxide and sodium tiosulfate) to produce geopolymer mortar. Furthermore, the heat that released by hydrated lime was used instead of oven curing. In order to produce geopolymer mortar without oven curing, three variations of curing condition has been applied. Based on the result, all the curing condition showed that the hardener mortar can be produced and exhibited the increasing of compressive strength of geopolymer mortar from 3 days to 7 days without oven curing.

  4. Investigating the Nanoporous Structure of Aluminosilicate Geopolymers with Small Angle Scattering and Imaging Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maitland, C.F.; Buckley, C.E.; O'Connor, B.H.; Rowles, M.R.; Hart, R.D.; Gilbert, E.P.; Connolly, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Rowles and O'Connor optimised the compressive strength of a geopolymer produced by sodium silicate-activation of metakaolinite, and found that this material may have a greater compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement. It has been observed that similar metakaolin-based geopolymers have a multiscale structure that consists of partially dissolved metakaolinite embedded in a nanoporous matrix. The characteristics of the nanostructure within this matrix influence the physical properties of the geopolymer. An investigation, using small-angle neutron scattering and imaging techniques, into how the matrix nanostructure varies with chemical composition of the starting material has been undertaken. The results of this investigation will be reported. (authors)

  5. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2018-01-09

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer material, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  6. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  7. Testing a Novel Geopolymer Binder as a Refractory Material for Rocket Plume Environments at SSC Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project involved the development and testing of a new alumina-silicate based multi-purpose, cost-effective, ‘green’ cementitious binder (geopolymer)...

  8. A review in geopolymer binder with dry mixing method (geopolymer cement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, Ridho; Yasin, Abdul Karim; Susanto, Tri Eddy; Darmawan, M. Sigit

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews and explains the potential of more applicable geopolymer binder for use. This method is called: "Dry Mixing Method of Geopolymer Binder-Cement Geopolymer". The mean is that the geopolymer binder is presented in a dry form (like cement powder), which is contains some solid alkali activator and pozzolan materials. How to use it exactly the same as mixing portland cement in general. Through this dry mixing method, it is expected to create a new industry that produces geopolymer cement. With the presence of geopolymer cement, people no longer need to calculate the composition of molarity ratio of the chemicals in the form of the activator alkali solution and pozzolan materials commonly used (wet method of geopolymer binder). In this paper the author will briefly explain the concept in calculating the composition of dry mixing method of geopolymer binder

  9. Reliability - Based Design of Reinforced Concrete Two-Way Solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, a FORTRAN-based computer program was developed to aid the design of reinforced concrete slabs to Eurocode 2 (EC 2)[1]design requirements at constant reliability levels using First Order Reliability Method (FORM).The design variables for the design of the slab were considered random with safety indices ...

  10. On Reliability Based Optimal Design of Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In recent years important progress has been made in assessment of the lifetime behaviour of concrete bridges. Due to the large uncertainties related to the loading and the deterioration of such bridges, an assessment based on stochastic modelling of the significant parameters seems to be only rel...

  11. Synthesis of geopolymer from biomass-coal ash blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Wulandari, Winny; Prasetyo, Muhammad Iqbal; Fernando, Muhammad Rizki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer is an environmentally attractive Portland cement substitute, owing to its lower carbon footprint and its ability to consume various aluminosilicate waste materials as its precursors. This work describes the development of geopolymer formulation based on biomass-coal ash blends, which is predicted to be the prevalent type of waste when biomass-based thermal energy production becomes mainstream in Indonesia. The ash blends contain an ASTM Class F coal fly ash (FA), rice husk ash (RHA), and coconut shell ash (CSA). A mixture of Na2SiO3 and concentrated KOH is used as the activator solution. A preliminary experiment identified the appropriate activator/ash mass ratio to be 2.0, while the activator Na2SiO3/KOH ratio varies from 0.8 to 2.0 with increasing ash blend Si/Al ratio. Both non-blended FA and CSA are able to produce geopolymer mortars with 7-day compressive strength exceeding the Indonesian national SNI 15-2049-2004 standard minimum value of 2.0 MPa stipulated for Portland cement mortars. Ash blends have to be formulated with a maximum RHA content of approximately 50 %-mass to yield satisfactory 7-day strength. No optimum ash blend composition is identified within the simplex ternary ash blend compositional region. The strength decreases with Si/Al ratio of the ash blends due to increasing amount of unreacted silicate raw materials at the end of the geopolymer hardening period. Overall, it is confirmed that CSA and blended RHA are feasible raw materials for geopolymer production..

  12. Application of thermodynamics-based rate-dependent constitutive models of concrete in the seismic analysis of concrete dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Fei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the seismic analysis of concrete dams with consideration of material nonlinearity. Based on a consistent rate-dependent model and two thermodynamics-based models, two thermodynamics-based rate-dependent constitutive models were developed with consideration of the influence of the strain rate. They can describe the dynamic behavior of concrete and be applied to nonlinear seismic analysis of concrete dams taking into account the rate sensitivity of concrete. With the two models, a nonlinear analysis of the seismic response of the Koyna Gravity Dam and the Dagangshan Arch Dam was conducted. The results were compared with those of a linear elastic model and two rate-independent thermodynamics-based constitutive models, and the influences of constitutive models and strain rate on the seismic response of concrete dams were discussed. It can be concluded from the analysis that, during seismic response, the tensile stress is the control stress in the design and seismic safety evaluation of concrete dams. In different models, the plastic strain and plastic strain rate of concrete dams show a similar distribution. When the influence of the strain rate is considered, the maximum plastic strain and plastic strain rate decrease.

  13. PZT-Based Detection of Compactness of Concrete in Concrete Filled Steel Tube Using Time Reversal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A smart aggregate-based approach is proposed for the concrete compactness detection of concrete filled steel tube (CFST columns. The piezoceramic-based smart aggregates (SAs were embedded in the predetermined locations prior to the casting of concrete columns to establish a wave-based smart sensing system for the concrete compactness detection purpose. To evaluate the efficiency of the developed approach, six specimens of the CFST columns with the rectangular cross-section were produced by placing some artificial defects during casting of concrete for simulating various uncompacted voids such as cavities, cracks, and debond. During the test, the time reversal technology was applied to rebuild the received signals and launch the reversed signals again by SAs, to overcome the issue of the lack of the prototype. Based on the proposed nonprototype, two indices of time reversibility (TR and symmetry (SYM were applied to relatively evaluate the level of concrete compactness in the range of the two SAs. The experimental results show that the developed method can effectively detect the compactness of concrete in CFST columns.

  14. Geopolymer Mortar with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry accounts for about 7% of all CO2 emissions caused by humans. Therefore, it is necessary to find another material in order to support sustainable material. An alternative way is replacing cement material with alternative material as fly ash. Fly ash as binder need to be added alkaline activator in the form of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 or potassium silicate (K2SiO3 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH or potassium hydroxide (KOH. The purpose of this research is to analyze the effect of activator liquid concentration on geopolymer mortar properties and to know the value of compressive strength. Molarity variation of NaOH are 8, 12, 14, and 16 M with ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH = 1.0. Ratio of sand/fly ash = 2.75 and ratio of activator/fly ash = 0.8. The cube-shaped specimen 50 × 50 × 50 mm is cured by steam curing with a temperature of 60°C for 48 hours. The experimental result of fresh mortar reported that the molarity of NaOH affect the slump flow and setting time, higher of NaOH produces the smaller value of slump and the faster time of setting. The experimental of density results reported that the increase of specific gravity when the molarity of NaOH increased. The experimental results of the compressive strength are showed that the maximum compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 14 M is 10.06 MPa and the lowest compressive strength produced by geopolymer mortar 8 M is 3.95 MPa. Testing the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 16 M produces compressive strength lower than 14 M geopolymer mortar is 9.16 MPa.

  15. Comparison of strength and durability characteristics of a geopolymer produced from fly ash, ground glass fiber and glass powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rashidian-Dezfouli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Strength and durability characteristics of geopolymers produced using three precursors, consisting of fly ash, Ground Glass Fiber (GGF, and glass-powder were studied. Combinations of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as the activator solutions, and the effect of different sodium and silica content of the activators on the workability and compressive strength of geopolymers was investigated. The parameters used in this study were the mass ratio of Na2O-to-binder (for sodium content, and SiO2-to-Na2O of the activator (for silica content. Geopolymer mixtures that achieved the highest compressive strength from each precursor were assessed for their resistance to alkali-silica reaction and compared against the performance of portland cement mixtures. Test results revealed that GGF and fly ash-based geopolymers performed better than glass-powder-based geopolymer mixtures. The resistance of GGF-based and fly ash-based geopolymers to alkali-silica reaction was superior to that of portland cement mixtures, while glass-powder-based geopolymer showed inferior performance.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF SUPERPLASTICIZER C-3 BASED ON THE PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE MIXES AND CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available On the example of fine-grained concrete with addition of superplasticizer C-3 and constituents of its factions of different molecular weight the influence of molecular weight and dosage of additions on the mobility of concrete mixture and the hardening of concrete is studied.

  17. Improved Concrete Materials with Hydrogel-Based Internal Curing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Krafcik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research article will describe the design and use of polyelectrolyte hydrogel particles as internal curing agents in concrete and present new results on relevant hydrogel-ion interactions. When incorporated into concrete, hydrogel particles release their stored water to fuel the curing reaction, resulting in reduced volumetric shrinkage and cracking and thus increasing concrete service life. The hydrogel’s swelling performance and mechanical properties are strongly sensitive to multivalent cations that are naturally present in concrete mixtures, including calcium and aluminum. Model poly(acrylic acid(AA-acrylamide(AM-based hydrogel particles with different chemical compositions (AA:AM monomer ratio were synthesized and immersed in sodium, calcium, and aluminum salt solutions. The presence of multivalent cations resulted in decreased swelling capacity and altered swelling kinetics to the point where some hydrogel compositions displayed rapid deswelling behavior and the formation of a mechanically stiff shell. Interestingly, when incorporated into mortar, hydrogel particles reduced mixture shrinkage while encouraging the formation of specific inorganic phases (calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate within the void space previously occupied by the swollen particle.

  18. Determination of the reactive component of fly ashes for geopolymer production using XRF and XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross P. Williams; Arie van Riessen [Curtin University, Perth, WA (Australia). Centre for Materials Research

    2010-12-15

    Geopolymers are a class of versatile materials that have the potential for utilisation as a cement replacement, fireproof barriers, materials for high temperatures, and biological implant applications. This study investigated methods for determining the formulation for manufacturing geopolymers made with fly ash from coal-fired power stations. The accepted method of determining the formulation of geopolymers to get the desired matrix chemistry uses the bulk composition of the feedstock materials. This formulation method is widely used in investigations using feedstock materials that almost completely react during processing. It is widely considered that amorphous components of fly ash are the reactive components in the geopolymerisation reaction. However, quantification of the amorphous components is challenging and generally avoided with the concomitant problem that the formulation is far from optimum. For the work presented here, the composition of the amorphous part is determined accurately and this information utilised to synthesise geopolymers. The bulk composition is first determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and then the amorphous composition determined using XRF and quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD). Formulating the mixture based on amorphous composition produced samples with a significantly higher compressive strength than those formulated using the bulk composition. Using the amorphous composition of fly ash produced geopolymers with similar physical properties to that of metakaolin geopolymers with the same targeted composition. We demonstrated a new quantitative formulation method that is superior to the accepted method. 37 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Advances in concrete materials for sewer systems affected by microbial induced concrete corrosion: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Ukrainczyk, Neven; Koraimann, Günther; Kienesberger, Sabine; Dietzel, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Microbial induced concrete corrosion (MICC) is recognized as one of the main degradation mechanisms of subsurface infrastructure worldwide, raising the demand for sustainable construction materials in corrosive environments. This review aims to summarize the key research progress acquired during the last decade regarding the understanding of MICC reaction mechanisms and the development of durable materials from an interdisciplinary perspective. Special focus was laid on aspects governing concrete - micoorganisms interaction since being the central process steering biogenic acid corrosion. The insufficient knowledge regarding the latter is proposed as a central reason for insufficient progress in tailored material development for aggressive wastewater systems. To date no cement-based material exists, suitable to withstand the aggressive conditions related to MICC over its entire service life. Research is in particular needed on the impact of physiochemical material parameters on microbial community structure, growth characteristics and limitations within individual concrete speciation. Herein an interdisciplinary approach is presented by combining results from material sciences, microbiology, mineralogy and hydrochemistry to stimulate the development of novel and sustainable materials and mitigation strategies for MICC. For instance, the application of antibacteriostatic agents is introduced as an effective instrument to limit microbial growth on concrete surfaces in aggressive sewer environments. Additionally, geopolymer concretes are introduced as highly resistent in acid environments, thus representing a possible green alternative to conventional cement-based construction materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fly-Ash-Based Geopolymers: How the Addition of Recycled Glass or Red Mud Waste Influences the Structural and Mechanical Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toniolo, N.; Taveri, Gianmarco; Hurle, K.; Roether, J. A.; Ercole, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2017), s. 411-420 ISSN 2190-9385 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 642557 - CoACH Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Geopolymers * Fly ash * Red mud * Waste glass Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016 https://www.ceramic-science.com/articles/all-articles.html?article_id=100566

  1. A Study on Ductility of Prestressed Concrete Pier Based on Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ductility of prestressed concrete pier is studied based on response surface methodology. Referring to the pervious prestressed concrete pier, based on Box-Behnken design, the ductility of 25 prestressed concrete piers is calculated by numerical method. The relationship between longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear reinforcement ratio, prestressed tendon quantity, concrete compressive strength and ductility factor is gotten. The influence of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio, the shear reinforcement ratio, the prestressed tendon quantity and concrete compressive strength to curvature ductility is discussed. Then the ductility regression equation is deduced. The result showed that the influence of the prestressed tendon quantity to the ductility of prestressed concrete pier is significant. With the increasing of the prestressed tendon quantity, the curvature ductility curved reduces. With the increasing of shear reinforcement ratio and compressive strength of concrete, the curvature ductility increases linearly. And the influence of the longitudinal reinforcement ratio to ductility of the prestressed concrete pier is insignificant.

  2. Protection of aged concrete structures : Application of bio-based impregnation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiktor, V.A.C.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses particularly on the ageing of concrete due to micro-crack formation or freeze/thaw which results in an increased permeability of the concrete. The bacteria-based repair system presented in this paper aims at recovering the concrete permeability thanks to bacteria-induced calcium

  3. Numerical Simulation of Monitoring Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Based on Ultrasonic Guided Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhupeng Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation based on finite element method is conducted to predict the location of pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete. Simulation results show that it is feasible to predict corrosion monitoring based on ultrasonic guided wave in reinforced concrete, and wavelet analysis can be used for the extremely weak signal of guided waves due to energy leaking into concrete. The characteristic of time-frequency localization of wavelet transform is adopted in the corrosion monitoring of reinforced concrete. Guided waves can be successfully used to identify corrosion defects in reinforced concrete with the analysis of suitable wavelet-based function and its scale.

  4. INORGANIC CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Clay Rios Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a Geopolymeric Cement Concrete (GCC was developed through adequate portions of geopolymer components. Its characteristics were compared with Portland Cement Concrete (PCC, through of the establishment of some parameters of design, as consumption of binders, water/aggregates ratio and mortar content. The concrete mechanical performance was evaluated with emphasis to the fatigue behavior. Were tested the effects of different tensile strength maximum (increasing and decreasing. The results of fatigue tests had shown that GCC presents a better performance when compared to PCC. Its fatigue strength was 15% higher than that of PCC, when 70% of rupture tension of the concrete in static bending (SR, was applied. Tensions of about 80% SR resulted in 96% of increase, when compared to GCC. The SEM microstructural analysis showed that the GCC has a matrix/aggregate bonding very strong, when compared to PCC, probably due to the massive nature of the geopolymeric matrix.

  5. Mechanical properties of fly ash geopolymer mortar reinforced with polypropylene fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qais J Frayyeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are new ceramic substances with the possibility to supplant Portland concrete in a wide scope of uses, from immobilization of substantial metals to concerts for structural designing. They rely on the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates, for example, blast furnace slag, pulverized fly ash, and metakaolin. Notwithstanding their high mechanical strength what's more, chemical durability, geopolymer concretes are in as a rule set apart with high permeability and porosity, which could contrarily influence the long-term durability or performance of concretes. This paper utilizes polypropylene fibers to enhance the geopolymer mechanical properties. Four percentage of polypropylene fibers where utilized which were 0.2, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% by weight of fly ash. The impact of these percentage on flow, dry density, mechanical strength, in expansion to flexural strength, were resolved. Results have demonstrated that the addition of polypropylene fibers lead very slightly decreased in the dry density, and decreased the flow, while it lead to enhance the flexural and compressive strength. The best percentage that give higher compressive and flexural strength was the one with a 0.5% addition by weight of fly ash.

  6. A Novel MK-based Geopolymer Composite Activated with Rice Husk Ash and KOH: Performance at High Temperature; Nuevo material compuesto de matriz geopolimérica activado con ceniza de cascarilla de arroz y KOH: Desempeño a alta temperatura.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaquirán-Caicedo, M.A.; Mejía de Gutiérrez, R.; Gallego, N.C.

    2017-07-01

    Geopolymers were produced using an environmentally friendly alkali activator (based on Rice Husk Ash and potassium hydroxide). Aluminosilicates particles, carbon and ceramic fibres were used as reinforcement materials. The effects of reinforcement materials on the flexural strength, linear-shrinkage, thermophysical properties and microstructure of the geopolymers at room and high temperature (1200 °C) were studied. The results indicated that the toughness of the composites is increased 110.4% for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres (G-AF) at room temperature. The presence of particles improved the flexural behaviour 265% for geopolymer reinforced by carbon fibres and particles after exposure to 1200 .C. Linear-shrinkage for geopolymer reinforced by ceramic fibres and particles and the geopolymer G-AF compared with reference sample (without fibres and particles) is improved by 27.88% and 7.88% respectively at 900 °C. The geopolymer materials developed in this work are porous materials with low thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties with potential thermal insulation applications for building applications. [Spanish] Compuestos geopoliméricos fueron producidos usando un activador alcalino alternativo (basado en ceniza de cascarilla de arroz e hidróxido de potasio), partículas aluminosilicatos, fibras de carbono y cerámicas. Se estudió el efecto de fibras y partículas en la resistencia a la flexión, contracción lineal, propiedades termofísicas y microestructura de los geopolímeros a temperatura ambiente y 1200 °C. Los resultados indican que la tenacidad se incrementó 110.4% para el geopolímero reforzado con fibras cerámicas (G-AF) a temperatura ambiente. La presencia de partículas mejora el comportamiento a la flexión 265% para el geopolímero reforzado con fibras de carbono y partículas después de la exposición a 1200 °C. La contracción lineal para el geopolímero reforzado con fibras cerámicas y partículas y el geopolímero G

  7. Rheology of Cementitious Materials: Alkali-Activated Materials or Geopolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Puertas F.; Alonso M.M:; Gismera S.; Lanzón M.; Blanco-Varela M.T.

    2018-01-01

    A clear alternative to reach the goal of sustainable development in the Construction Sector is the development of alternative building materials to Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) in a more energetically as well as environmentally eco-efficient way. Alkaline cements (Alkali-Activated Materials, AAMs) and geopolymers meet these requirements; and they are based on the alkali activation of aluminosilicates (mainly waste and industrial by-products, such as blast furnace slag, fly ash and ceramic w...

  8. STRENGTH STUDIES ON FLY ASH BASED MAGNETIC WATER CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbani Raghu; Ch. Kireety

    2017-01-01

    The usage of concrete is growing with the exploding scope of construction industry. This called for the extensive production and usage of cement. Among all the ingredients of concrete, cement has deleterious effects on environment. As the usage of concrete is inevitable, pre-emptive measures should be taken to reduce the usage of cement in concrete while maintaining the same engineering properties. To address this cause, research has been carried out on various constituents and parameters of ...

  9. Predictive equations for compressive strength of concrete based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The compressive strength of concrete is assessed to ensure uniformity of the placed concrete and adequacy of the strength. Non-destructive test (NDT) techniques of ultrasonic pulse velocity and Schmidt rebound hammer tests are commonly used to estimate concrete strength, but the applicability is dependent on ...

  10. Ultrahigh Self-Sensing Performance of Geopolymer Nanocomposites via Unique Interface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuguang; Liu, Ming; Shen, Jingjing; Hu, Xiao Matthew; Zhang, Liying

    2017-04-12

    Monitoring and assessment of the health of a civil structural material are the critical requirements to ensure its safety and durability. In this work, a coating strategy on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was employed for the dispersion of CNTs in geopolymer matrix. The geopolymer nanocomposites prepared exhibited ultrahigh self-sensing performance based on the unique behaviors of SiO 2 coating on CNTs in the geopolymer matrix. The SiO 2 layer on CNTs was partially or fully removed during the fabrication process to restore the conductive nature of CNTs, facilitating the dispersion of CNTs and forming well-connected 3D electrical conductive networks. The gauge factor (GF) of geopolymer nanocomposites reached up to 663.3 and 724.6, under compressive and flexural loading, respectively, with the addition of only 0.25 vol % of SiO 2 -coated CNTs (SiO 2 -CNTs). The values were at least twice higher than those recently reported self-sensing structural materials containing different types of carbon-based fillers. The underlying mechanisms on the electrical signal change with respect to ionic conduction and electronic conduction were explored and correlated to the self-sensing performance. Additionally, the uniform dispersion of CNTs and good interaction between CNTs and geopolymer matrix contributed to the improvement in flexural and compressive strengths.

  11. Ceramic-like open-celled geopolymer foam as a porous substrate for water treatment catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářík, T.; Křenek, T.; Pola, M.; Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results from experimental study on microstructural and mechanical properties of geopolymer-based foam filters. The process for making porous ceramic-like geopolymer body was experimentally established, consists of (a) geopolymer paste synthesis, (b) ceramic filler incorporation, (c) coating of open-celled polyurethane foam with geopolymer mixture, (d) rapid setting procedure, (e) thermal treatment. Geopolymer paste was based on potassium silicate solution n(SiO2)/n(K2O)=1.6 and powder mixture of calcined kaolin and precipitated silica. Various types of ceramic granular filler (alumina, calcined schistous clay and cordierite) were tested in relation to aggregate gradation design and particle size distribution. The small amplitude oscillatory rheometry in strain controlled regime 0.01% with angular frequency 10 rad/s was applied for determination of rheology behavior of prepared mixtures. Thermal treatment conditions were applied in the temperature range 1100 - 1300 °C. The developed porous ceramic-like foam effectively served as a substrate for highly active nanoparticles of selected Fe+2 spinels. Such new-type of nanocomposite was tested as a heterogeneous catalyst for technological process of advanced oxidative degradation of resistive antibiotics occurring in waste waters.

  12. Characterization of the properties of perlite geopolymer pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Tsaousi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characterization of perlite-based geopolymer pastes, using fine perlite as raw material. The present study examined the effects of the main synthesis parameters such as perlite to activator ratio, NaOH concentration, the addition of soluble silica to the activator, and curing temperatureon the setting time, the stability in an aquatic environment, the viscosity of the paste, and the compressive strength of the solidified geopolymers. The results showed that these inorganic polymer pastes are non-Newtonian shear thinning fluids that achieve low viscosities at high shear stresses. The optimum synthesis conditions for the geopolymer pastes proved to be a a low initial NaOH concentration in the alkaline phase (2–5 M and b a solid to liquid ratio of 1.2–1.4 g/mL. If very fast setting is necessary, the pastes should be prepared with a soluble silica-doped alkaline activating phase and cured at high temperatures around 90 °C.

  13. Prediction of Torsional Strength for Very High Early Strength Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot PRACHASAREE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Very early high strength geopolymers are gaining acceptance as alternative repair materials for highways and other infrastructure. In this study, a very rapid geopolymer binder based on Metakaolin (MK and Parawood ash (PWA, developed by the authors, was experimentally tested and a prediction model for its torsional strength is proposed. The geopolymer samples were subjected to uniaxial compression, flexural beam, and torsion tests. The modulus of rupture and torsional strength in terms of compression strength were found to be well approximated by 0.7(f’c1/2 and 1/7(x2y (f’c1/2, respectively. Also an interaction relation to describe combined bending and torsion was developed in this study. In addition, the effects of aspect ratio (y/x were studied on both torsional strength and combined bending and torsion. It was found that an aspect ratio of y/x = 3 significantly reduced the torsional resistance, to about 50 % of the torsional strength of a square section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.4.17280

  14. Innovative Fly Ash Geopolymer-Epoxy Composites: Preparation, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Tarallo, Oreste; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Roviello, Valentina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2016-06-09

    The preparation and characterization of composite materials based on geopolymers obtained from fly ash and epoxy resins are reported for the first time. These materials have been prepared through a synthetic method based on the concurrent reticulation of the organic and inorganic components that allows the formation of hydrogen bonding between the phases, ensuring a very high compatibility between them. These new composites show significantly improved mechanical properties if compared to neat geopolymers with the same composition and comparable performances in respect to analogous geopolymer-based composites obtained starting from more expensive raw material such as metakaolin. The positive combination of an easy synthetic approach with the use of industrial by-products has allowed producing novel low cost aluminosilicate binders that, thanks to their thixotropicity and good adhesion against materials commonly used in building constructions, could be used within the field of sustainable building.

  15. Innovative Fly Ash Geopolymer-Epoxy Composites: Preparation, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Roviello

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of composite materials based on geopolymers obtained from fly ash and epoxy resins are reported for the first time. These materials have been prepared through a synthetic method based on the concurrent reticulation of the organic and inorganic components that allows the formation of hydrogen bonding between the phases, ensuring a very high compatibility between them. These new composites show significantly improved mechanical properties if compared to neat geopolymers with the same composition and comparable performances in respect to analogous geopolymer-based composites obtained starting from more expensive raw material such as metakaolin. The positive combination of an easy synthetic approach with the use of industrial by-products has allowed producing novel low cost aluminosilicate binders that, thanks to their thixotropicity and good adhesion against materials commonly used in building constructions, could be used within the field of sustainable building.

  16. A polyethylene-B4C based concrete for enhanced neutron shielding at neutron research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Perrey, H.; Fissum, K.; Rofors, E.; Scherzinger, J.; Bentley, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the development of a specialized concrete for neutron shielding at neutron research facilities, based on the addition of hydrogen atoms in the form of polyethylene and also B4C for enhancing the neutron capture properties of the concrete. We show information on the mechanical properties of the concrete and the neutronics, in particular its relevance to modern spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The new concrete exhibits a 15% lower mass density, a compressible strength of 50% relative to a standard concrete and a significant increase in performance of shielding against MeV neutrons and lower energies. The concrete could find application at the ESS in for example common shielding components, individual beamline shielding and instrument caves. Initial neutronic tests of the concrete, carried out at Lund University, have also verified the performance in the MeV neutron energy range and the results are presented.

  17. EFFECT OF SODIUM SILICATE TO SODIUM HYDROXIDE RATIOS ON DURABILITY OF GEOPOLYMER MORTARS CONTAINING NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL POZZOLANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nurhayat Degirmenci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide the experimental data on the sulphate and acid performance of geopolymer mortar containing pozzolanic materials such as fly ash (FA, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS and natural zeolite (NZ. The alkaline solution was the combination of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution with the ratio (Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0. The molarity of sodium hydroxide was fixed as 10. The performances of geopolymer mortar were measured in terms of sodium and magnesium sulphate resistance and sulphuric and hydrochlorich acid resistance with 5% and 10 % concentration after 24 weeks. The evaluations were measured as visual observation, measurement of weight change and residual compressive strength. It has been observed that Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH ratio is effective on residual compressive strength of geopolymer mortar in both sulphate and acid exposure. The higher ratio of Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH results in a higher residual compressive strength. The GGBS based geopolymer mortar has a very good resistance in acid media in terms of weight loss and residual compressive strength. The inclusion of FA in the GGBS based geopolymer mixture was found to be a suitable base of geopolymer mortar under ambient curing conditions.

  18. Comparative analysis of the influence of creep of concrete composite beams of steel - concrete model based on Volterra integral equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partov Doncho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents analysis of the stress-strain behaviour and deflection changes due to creep in statically determinate composite steel-concrete beam according to EUROCODE 2, ACI209R-92 and Gardner&Lockman models. The mathematical model involves the equation of equilibrium, compatibility and constitutive relationship, i.e. an elastic law for the steel part and an integral-type creep law of Boltzmann - Volterra for the concrete part considering the above mentioned models. On the basis of the theory of viscoelastic body of Maslov-Arutyunian-Trost-Zerna-Bažant for determining the redistribution of stresses in beam section between concrete plate and steel beam with respect to time 't', two independent Volterra integral equations of the second kind have been derived. Numerical method based on linear approximation of the singular kernel function in the integral equation is presented. Example with the model proposed is investigated.

  19. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on leaching of simulated 133Cs+ radionuclides from geopolymer wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Ning; An, Hao; Cui, Hao; Pan, Yang; Wang, Bing; Mao, Linqiang; Zhai, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • γ-ray irradiation caused more Cs + leaching out from geopolymer wasteform. • Pore structure change induced by irradiation caused the increase of leachability. • Fly-ash-based geopolymer is a potential material for radionuclide immobilization. - Abstract: Leaching of simulated 133 Cs + radionuclides from geopolymer wasteforms was examined with regard to effects from gamma-ray irradiation. Specifically, the compressive strengths, microstructures, pore structures, and leaching resistance of geopolymer wasteforms before and after irradiation were characterized. The leaching experiments were performed by immersion of wasteforms in deionized water, ground water, and seawater. It was found that gamma rays did not produce significant morphological changes, except for changes in the pore size distribution. The cumulative leaching fraction of all the leachants from the irradiated samples increased relative to the non-radiated samples, particularly during long leaching periods (11–42 days). These results, and those from a mercury intrusion porosimeter analysis, can be attributed to irradiation-induced changes in pore structure. All the leaching indexes were greater than the minimum acceptable value of 6.0 set by the American Nuclear Society Standards committee, which indicated that the fly-ash geopolymers are suitable for radionuclide immobilization. However, the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the immobilization of radionuclides cannot be ignored

  20. Correlation of the Processing Parameters in the Formation of Granulated Ground Blast Furnace Slag Geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, I. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Yong, H. C.; Ming, L. Y.; Panias, D.; Sakkas, K.

    2017-06-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic materials with huge potential applications including building material, fire resistant materials, and agricultural construction materials. Various parameters influenced the final properties of these geopolymer concretes. This study developed the effects of several factors such as solid-to-liquid ratio, NaOH concentration, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio on the compressive strength of granulated ground blast furnace slag (GGBFS) by statistical design of experiment (DOE) approach. Analysis of the experimental results through ANOVA exhibited that the specimen with NaOH concentration of 10M, Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio equals to 2.5, and solid-to-liquid ratio of 3.0 curing at room temperatures for 28 days was potential of highest strength (168.705 MPa) in the considered procedure. Besides, the relationship between compressive strength and influential factors could be suitably by fraction factorial design method.

  1. Performance-Based Evaluation of Joint Sealants for Concrete Pavements

    OpenAIRE

    Khuri, Ramzi Emile

    1998-01-01

    Pavement concrete joints are the weakest locations in concrete pavement systems. They are man-made cracks to accommodate concrete slab expansion and contraction due to temperature fluctuations. Sealant is usually used in pavement joints to prevent roadway debris, deicing chemicals, and moisture from entering the joint. When sealant fails, the pavement deteriorates rapidly; and when joint sealant performs adequately, the pavement preserves its intended performance. In the field, joint seala...

  2. Influence of metakaolin purities on potassium geopolymer formulation: The existence of several networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autef, A; Joussein, E; Poulesquen, A; Gasgnier, G; Pronier, S; Sobrados, I; Sanz, J; Rossignol, S

    2013-10-15

    Geopolymer materials are obtained by the alkaline activation of aluminosilicate sources, the best of which is metakaolin. However, every raw material is different, and very few comparative studies have been done on different metakaolin sources. The aim of this work is to develop methods for the prediction of the working properties of geopolymer materials based on the reactivity of the metakaolin employed. Infrared spectroscopy showed direct relationships between the wettability, the Si/Al ratio and the kinetics of conversion of Si-O-Si bonds to Si-O-Al bonds. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the presence of impurities and the reactivity of the metakaolin can generate the formation of one or several networks. Finally, a descriptive model of the mechanism of geopolymer formation was proposed that takes into account the quality of metakaolin used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear numerical methods to calculate structures of reinforced concrete or of prestressed concrete are mostly based on two idealizing assumptions: tension stiffness perpendicular to cracks is equal to the stiffness of reinforcement alone and shear modulus is taken as constant. In real reinforced concrete structures concrete contributes to the tension-stiffness perpendicular to cracks and thus to the global stiffness matrix because of bond action between concrete and reinforcement and shear transfer in cracks is depending on stresses acting in cracks. Only few authors are taking these aspects into account and only with rough semiempirical assumptions. In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include these effects, hitherto neglected, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u - uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r - reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c - crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). (Auth.)

  4. Elaboration and characterization of self-compacting concrete based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The building industry is increasingly using self-compacting concrete (SCC) in order to improve many aspects of buildings construction. If the limestone filler is traditionally used in the SCC, marble powder and granulated blast furnace slag are the less. The valorization of such wastes in self-compacting concrete as mineral ...

  5. Stohastic Properties of Plasticity Based Constitutive Law for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1998-01-01

    -off criterion. The statistics of the material parameters are obtained by applying biaxial test results for plane concrete slabs to the constitutive model using the maximum likelihood method. Response surfaces are used to obtain the statistics for a parameter depending on other previously obtained parameters....... Finally an illustrative example of a reliability analysis of a plane concrete panel is given....

  6. Bacteria-based self-healing concrete : An introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mors, R.M.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Crack formation in concrete is common, but a typical phenomenon related to durability. Percolation of cracks may lead to leakage problems or ingress of deleterious materials, causing deterioration of the concrete matrix or corrosion of embedded steel reinforcement. Durability can be enhanced by

  7. Risk based management of concrete structures using advanced corrosion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Reinlorced concrete is a very cost elfective construction material, used for a large part of the world's physícal ínfrastructure. The durable collaboration between steel and concrele is essential for its safe and serviceable funclioning. Normally, the physícal and chemÍcal nature of concrete

  8. Two innovative solutions based on fibre concrete blocks designed for building substructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderka, J.; Hájek, P.

    2017-09-01

    Using of fibers in a high-strength concrete allows reduction of the dimensions of small precast concrete elements, which opens up new ways of solution for traditional construction details in buildings. The paper presents two innovative technical solutions for building substructure: The special shaped plinth block from fibre concrete and the fibre concrete elements for new technical solution of ventilated floor. The main advantages of plinth block from fibre concrete blocks (compared with standard plinth solutions) is: easier and faster assembly, higher durability and thanks to the air cavity between the vertical part of the block, the building substructure reduced moisture level of structures under the waterproofing layer and a comprehensive solution to the final surface of building plinth as well as the surface of adjacent terrain. The ventilated floor based on fibre concrete precast blocks is an attractive structural alternative for tackling the problem of increased moisture in masonry in older buildings, lacking a functional waterproof layer in the substructure.

  9. Performance based analysis of hidden beams in reinforced concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helou Samir H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Local and perhaps regional vernacular reinforced concrete building construction leans heavily against designing slabs with imbedded hidden beams for flooring systems in most structures including major edifices. The practice is distinctive in both framed and in shear wall structures. Hidden beams are favoured structural elements due to their many inherent features that characterize them; they save on floor height clearance; they also save on formwork, labour and material cost. Moreover, hidden beams form an acceptable aesthetic appearance that does not hinder efficient interior space partitioning. Such beams have the added advantage of clearing the way for horizontal electromechanical ductwork. However, seismic considerations, in all likelihood, are seldom seriously addressed. The mentioned structural system of shallow beams is adopted in ribbed slabs, waffle slabs and at times with solid slabs. Ribbed slabs and waffle slabs are more prone to hidden beam inclusion due to the added effective height of the concrete section. Due to the presence of a relatively high reinforcement ratio at the joints the sections at such location tend to become less ductile with unreliable contribution to spandrel force resistance. In the following study the structural influence of hidden beams within slabs is investigated. With the primary focus on a performance based analysis of such elements within a structure. This is investigated with due attention to shear wall contribution to the overall behaviour of such structures. Numerical results point in the direction that the function of hidden beams is not as adequate as desired. Therefore it is strongly believed that they are generally superfluous and maybe eliminated altogether. Conversely, shallow beams seem to render the overall seismic capacity of the structure unreliable. Since such an argument is rarely manifested within the linear analysis domain; a pushover analysis exercise is thus mandatory for behaviour

  10. Research on Mechanical Properties of Concrete Constructs Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology is broadly accepted as a structural health monitoring device for reinforced concrete (RC composite structures. Both experiments and numerical analysis are considered. In this submit, measurements were conducted for the composite concrete beams. The emphasis in numerical simulation is given on finite element methods (FEM which is corrected by the response surface methodology (RSM. Aspects considered are effects of material parameters and variation in geometry. This paper describes our recent progress on FEM modeling of damages in concrete composite structures based on the TLS measurement. We also focus on the research about mechanical properties of concrete constructs here.

  11. Reliability-based design code calibration for concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.K.; Cho, H.N.; Chang, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, a load combination criteria for design and a probability-based reliability analysis were proposed on the basis of a FEM-based random vibration analysis. The limit state model defined for the study is a serviceability limit state of the crack failure that causes the emission of radioactive materials, and the results are compared with the case of strength limit state. More accurate reliability analyses under various dynamic loads such as earthquake loads were made possible by incorporating the FEM and random vibration theory, which is different from the conventional reliability analysis method. The uncertainties in loads and resistance available in Korea and the references were adapted to the situation of Korea, and especially in case of earthquake, the design earthquake was assessed based on the available data for the probabilistic description of earthquake ground acceleration in the Korea peninsula. The SAP V-2 is used for a three-dimensional finite element analysis of concrete containment structure, and the reliability analysis is carried out by modifying HRAS reliability analysis program for this study. (orig./GL)

  12. Review of Dolomite as Precursor of Geopolymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azimi E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an environmentally friendly cementitious binder that does not require the existence of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. Geopolymer has many excellent advantages, including high early strength, low shrinkage, good thermal resistance and good chemical resistance. Previous commonly used materials include fly ash, clay and slag. The used of dolomite as precursor material in geopolymer field is still new and at the early stage of study. Only a few researchers have done studies on dolomite in geopolymer. Dolomite (CaMg(CO32 is abundant and generally inexpensive natural minerals. The possible use of these bulk calcium carbonate materials in improving the mechanical properties of geopolymers will therefore be of great interest. This paper summarizes some research outcomes on dolomite in geopolymer along with the potential of dolomite as geopolymer composites.

  13. Development of Alkali Activated Geopolymer Masonry Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod

    2016-09-01

    Cement masonry units are not considered as sustainable since their production involves consumption of fuel, cement and natural resources and therefore it is essential to find alternatives. This paper reports on making of geopolymer solid & hollow blocks and masonry prisms using non conventional materials like fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and manufactured sand and curing at ambient temperature. They were tested for water absorption, initial rate of water absorption, dry density, dimensionality, compressive, flexural and bond-strength which were tested for bond strength with and without lateral confinement, modulus of elasticity, alternative drying & wetting and masonry efficiency. The properties of geopolymer blocks were found superior to traditional masonry blocks and the masonry efficiency was found to increase with decrease in thickness of cement mortar joints. There was marginal difference in strength between rendered and unrendered geopolymer masonry blocks. The percentage weight gain after 7 cycles was less than 6% and the percentage reduction in strength of geopolymer solid blocks and hollow blocks were 26% and 28% respectively. Since the properties of geopolymer blocks are comparatively better than the traditional masonry they can be strongly recommended for structural masonry.

  14. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research....... The present paper uses the prior research results to optimize a test-setup for concrete hinge testing by means of a universal method taking into account the application of the hinge in an arch structure. 3D CAD is utilized in all steps of the planning to reduce errors during assembly of the parts in the test...

  15. Prestress Force Identification for Externally Prestressed Concrete Beam Based on Frequency Equation and Measured Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A prestress force identification method for externally prestressed concrete uniform beam based on the frequency equation and the measured frequencies is developed. For the purpose of the prestress force identification accuracy, we first look for the appropriate method to solve the free vibration equation of externally prestressed concrete beam and then combine the measured frequencies with frequency equation to identify the prestress force. To obtain the exact solution of the free vibration equation of multispan externally prestressed concrete beam, an analytical model of externally prestressed concrete beam is set up based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the function relation between prestress variation and vibration displacement is built. The multispan externally prestressed concrete beam is taken as the multiple single-span beams which must meet the bending moment and rotation angle boundary conditions, the free vibration equation is solved using sublevel simultaneous method and the semi-analytical solution of the free vibration equation which considered the influence of prestress on section rigidity and beam length is obtained. Taking simply supported concrete beam and two-span concrete beam with external tendons as examples, frequency function curves are obtained with the measured frequencies into it and the prestress force can be identified using the abscissa of the crosspoint of frequency functions. Identification value of the prestress force is in good agreement with the test results. The method can accurately identify prestress force of externally prestressed concrete beam and trace the trend of effective prestress force.

  16. Asphalt Concrete Overlay Optimization Based on Pavement Performance Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mikolaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle length of pavement with asphalt concrete material (ACM surfacing is significantly influenced, in addition to transport loading and climatic conditions, by design method and rehabilitation timing. Appropriate overlay thickness calculation and estimation of optimal rehabilitation time are crucial to maximizing life cycle length and, concurrently, reducing road administration costs and road user costs. This article describes a comprehensive method of ACM rehabilitation design. For optimization of life cycle cost analysis (LCCA based design, mathematical analytical solution in combination with experimental verification of physical, mechanical, and fatigue characteristics is utilized. Pavement performance, that is, functions mathematically describing pavement’s degradation characteristics of operational capability, is represented by longitudinal and transverse unevenness; these are used to describe relations between traffic loading and pavement’s bearing capacity on 1 : 1 scale. Optimizing of rehabilitation plan is carried out by making a cost benefit analysis (CBA for several rehabilitation scenarios in which different rehabilitation timing produces different capital cost requirements and social benefits. Rehabilitation scenarios differ in technology, the design of which needs to be mathematically optimized, and timing of rehabilitation execution. This article includes a case study for the sake of illustration of practical results and verification of applicability of used methodology.

  17. Mechanical properties on geopolymer brick: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraman, L. M.; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Ming, L. Y.; Ibrahim, W. M. W.; Tahir, M. F. M.

    2017-09-01

    Bricks has stand for many years as durable construction substantial, especially in the area of civil engineering to construct buildings. Brick commonly used in the structure of buildings as a construction wall, cladding, facing perimeter, paving, garden wall and flooring. The contribution of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in cement bricks production worldwide to greenhouse gas emissions. Due to this issue, some researchers have done their study with other materials to produce bricks, especially as a by-product material. Researchers take effort in this regard to synthesizing from by-product materials such as fly ash, bottom ash and kaolin that are rich in silicon and aluminium in the development of inorganic alumina-silicate polymer, called geopolymer Geopolymer is a polymerization reaction between various aluminosilicate oxides with silicates solution or alkali hydroxide solution forming polymerized Si-O-Al-O bonds. This paper summarized some research finding of mechanical properties of geopolymer brick using by-product materials.

  18. Development of geopolymers from phyllite and kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Kaline Dantas; Rabelo, Adriano Alves; Fagury Neto, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Geopolymer materials are obtained from the polycondensation of solid aluminosilicates, activated by an aqueous alkaline solution. The main application of geopolymers is as binding, replacing Portland cement. The aim of this work was to produce geopolymeric materials from raw and calcined phyllite using as curing agent commercial NaOH, of varying concentrations, to evaluate the mechanical strength of the blends and the influence of the calcination of phyllite and the addition of metakaolin in the geopolymerization process. The specimens were cured for 3, 7 and 28 days at room temperature and at 50 °C. The raw materials were characterized by XRF. The products were evaluated by their mineralogical composition, technological properties, as well as their microstructural characteristics. The results showed that the formulations developed excellent potential for partial replacement of metakaolin geopolymer, for industrial applications due to the excellent results. (author)

  19. Influence of adjuvants on the properties of underwater cast concrete on base of cement (HRS 32.5 N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouis Mohamed Jamel

    2014-04-01

    *The characterization tests of concrete in the hardened state including destructive and non destructive tests performed on specimens made in concrete (based on portland cement, with varying dosages and adjuvants at different times (28d and 90d.

  20. Comparative Study on the Performance of Blended and Nonblended Fly Ash Geopolymer Composites as Durable Construction Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Dutta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article represents that the mechanical and microstructural properties and durability of fly ash-based geopolymers blended with silica fume and borax are better than those of conventional fly ash-based geopolymers. Fly ash itself contains the sources of silica and alumina which are required for geopolymerisation. But a sufficient amount of high-reactive silica is able to rapidly initiate geopolymerisation with activation. Pure potassium hydroxide pellets and sodium silicate solution were used for preparation of alkaline activator solution. Fly ash geopolymer paste exhibited better mechanical properties in the presence of silica fume with slight portion of borax. The effect of silica fume-blended geopolymer paste on temperature fluctuation (heating and cooling cycle at certain temperatures showed better performance than nonblended fly ash-based specimens. Durability property was evaluated by immersion of geopolymer specimens in 10% magnesium sulfate solution for a period of one year. The change in weight, strength, and microstructure was studied and compared. In the magnesium sulfate solution, a significant drop of strength to around 37.26% occurred after one year for nonblended fly ash-based specimens. It is evident that specimens prepared incorporating silica fume had the best performance in terms of their properties.

  1. Strength and durability of concrete modified by sulfur-based impregnating compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASSALIMOV Ismail Alexandrovich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine how sulfur-containing compound impregnation influences on concrete compressive strength and the impact resistance of concrete tiles. The results of these studies indicate that impregnation of vibropressed concrete paving tiles and concrete samples of dif-ferent strength classes with aqueous solutions based on calcium polysulfide leads to a significant increase of compressive strength and impact resistance. These data show that the strength of the products can be controlled by varying duration and frequency of the impregnation and by using pre-vacuum method. Impregnation with a solution of calcium polysulfide density of 1,23 g/cm³ can be recommended to increase strength of concrete products that are exposed to intense hydration and mechanical stress.

  2. Stress-based topology optimization of concrete structures with prestressing reinforcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Deng, Zichen

    2013-11-01

    Following the extended two-material density penalization scheme, a stress-based topology optimization method for the layout design of prestressed concrete structures is proposed. The Drucker-Prager yield criterion is used to predict the asymmetrical strength failure of concrete. The prestress is considered by making a reasonable assumption on the prestressing orientation in each element and adding an additional load vector to the structural equilibrium function. The proposed optimization model is thus formulated as to minimize the reinforcement material volume under Drucker-Prager yield constraints on elemental concrete local stresses. In order to give a reasonable definition of concrete local stress and prevent the stress singularity phenomenon, the local stress interpolation function and the ɛ -relaxation technique are adopted. The topology optimization problem is solved using the method of moving asymptotes combined with an active set strategy. Numerical examples are given to show the efficiency of the proposed optimization method in the layout design of prestressed concrete structures.

  3. Experimental study of sodium fires on concrete based on the sodium-concrete reaction and its consequences: study of the behavior of various concretes under metallic sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin; Colome, J.; Malet, J.C.

    The problem created by the violent reaction between hot sodium and concrete has only recently been recognized. Its importance was evidenced during experiments in which the sodium-barium oxide concrete reactions led to violent explosions. SESR approached this question during its experimental programs Cassandre and Lucifer. The Cassandre 01 experiment demonstrated the sodium-ordinary concrete reaction, where sodium was burned directly in a concrete vat. The consequences of this fire, pulverization of sodium particles, explosions and deterioration of the concrete led to consideration of protecting the concrete. Among possible shieldings sheath metal appeared to be the safest solution. The Cassandre 08, Lucifer 01 and Lucifer 04 experiments were used to study the behavior of various qualities of concrete protected from fire by a metal wall. The results show that a metal cladding efficiently protects concrete from sodium leaks

  4. Crack Risk Evaluation of Early Age Concrete Based on the Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks often appear in concrete arch dams, due to the thermal stress and low tensile strength of early age concrete. There are three commonly used temperature controlling measures: controlling the casting temperature, burying cooling pipe, and protecting the surface. However, because of the difficulty to obtain accurate temperature and thermal stress field of the concrete, the rationality and economy of these measures are not assessed validly before and after construction. In this paper, a crack risk evaluation system for early age concrete is established, including distributed optical fiber temperature sensing (DTS, prediction of temperature and stress fields, and crack risk evaluation. Based on the DTS temperature data, the back-analysis method is applied to retrieve the thermal parameters of concrete. Then, the temperature and thermal stress of early age concrete are predicted using the reversed thermal parameters, as well as the laboratory test parameters. Finally, under the proposed cracking risk evaluation principle, the cracking risk level of each concrete block is given; the preliminary and later temperature controlling measures were recommended, respectively. The application of the proposed system in Xiluodu super high arch dam shows that this system works effectively for preventing cracks of early age concrete.

  5. The Vibration Based Fatigue Damage Assessment of Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC Composite Girder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The steel-concrete composite girder has been usually applied in the bridge and building structures, mostly consisting of concrete slab, steel girder, and shear connector. The current fatigue damage assessment for the composite girder is largely based on the strain values and concrete crack features, which is time consuming and not stable. Hence the vibration-based fatigue damage assessment has been considered in this study. In detail, a steel-steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC composite girder was tested. The steel fiber reinforced concrete is usually considered for dealing with the concrete cracks in engineering practice. The composite girder was 3.3m long and 0.45m high. The fatigue load and impact excitation were applied on the specimen sequentially. According to the test results, the concrete crack development and global stiffness degradation during the fatigue test were relatively slow due to the favourable performance of SFRC in tension. But on the other hand, the vibration features varied significantly during the fatigue damage development. Generally, it confirmed the feasibility of executing fatigue damage assessment of composite bridge based on vibration method.

  6. Strengthening of concrete structures using carbon fibre reinforced polymers and cement-based adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, Siavash

    2017-01-01

    The research project conducted in this study concerns the investigation of the application of cement-based adhesives in CFRP strengthening of reinforced concrete members. The results demonstrate that mineral-based adhesives can provide the desired matrices for CFRP reinforcement. The literature review covers the background of CFRP application with conventional techniques. The bond characteristics of CFRP to concrete substrate, the flexural performance of retrofitted RC beams, and the fa...

  7. Reuse of Coconut Shell, Rice Husk, and Coal Ash Blends in Geopolymer Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmiki Samadhi, Tjokorde; Wulandari, Winny; Prasetyo, Muhammad Iqbal; Rizki Fernando, Muhammad

    2017-10-01

    Mixtures of biomass and coal ashes are likely to be produced in increasing volume as biomass-based energy production is gaining importance in Indonesia. This work highlights the reuse of coconut shell ash (CSA), rice husk ash (RHA), and coal fly ash (FA) for geopolymer synthesis by an activator solution containing concentrated KOH and Na2SiO3. Ash blend compositions are varied according to a simplex-centroid mixture experimental design. Activator to ash mass ratios are varied from 0.8 to 2.0, the higher value being applied for ash compositions with higher Si/Al ratio. The impact of ash blend composition on early strength is adequately modeled by an incomplete quadratic mixture model. Overall, the ashes can produce geopolymer mortars with an early strength exceeding the Indonesian SNI 15-2049-2004 standard minimum value of 2.0 MPa. Good workability of the geopolymer is indicated by their initial setting times which are longer than the minimum value of 45 mins. Geopolymers composed predominantly of RHA composition exhibit poor strength and excessive setting time. FTIR spectroscopy confirms the geopolymerization of the ashes by the shift of the Si-O-Si/Al asymmetric stretching vibrational mode. Overall, these results point to the feasibility of geopolymerization as a reuse pathway for biomass combustion waste.

  8. Development of Coconut Trunk Fiber Geopolymer Hybrid Composite for Structural Engineering Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, F.; Akifah, N.; Nurfadilla; Subaer

    2017-03-01

    A research on the influence of coconut fiber trunk on mechanical properties based on fly ash has been conducted. The aims of this study was to examine the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites by varrying the concentration of coconut trunk fiber. Geopolymer synthesized by alkali activated (NaOH+H2O+Na2O.3SiO2) and cured at the temperature 700C for one hour. Specimens were synthesized into 5 different mass of fiber 0 g, 0.25 g, 0.50 g, 0.75 g, and 1.00 g keeping fly ash constant. The highest compressive strength was 89.44 MPa for specimen added with 0.50 g of fiber. The highest flexural strength was 7.64 MPa for the same sample. The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between the matrix of geopolymers and coconut fiber was conducted by using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The chemical composition of the specimen was examined by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The thermal properties of coconut fiber trunk was analyzed using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). It was found that coconut fiber was able to improve the mechanical and microstructure properties of geopolymers composites.

  9. Improving the properties of geopolymer containing oil-contaminated clay, metakaolin, and blast furnace slag by applying nano-SiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Deng-Fong; Chen, Shih-Chieh

    2017-07-01

    In this study, geopolymer specimens based on calcined oil-contaminated clays (OCCs), metakaolin replacements of OCCs, and blast furnace slag were manufactured by the addition of nano-SiO 2 to improve their properties. The effects of adding 0, 1, 2, or 3% nano-SiO 2 on the properties and microstructures of the geopolymer specimens were determined using compressive strength tests, flow tests, setting time tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Si-NMR). The results showed that the setting time and flowability of the geopolymer specimens decreased and the compressive strength increased as the amount of nano-SiO 2 increased. These results were supported by the SEM and Si-NMR assays. This study suggests that the addition of nano-SiO 2 was beneficial and improved the properties of the geopolymer specimens containing calcined OCC.

  10. Bacteria-based self-healing concrete : Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mors, R.M.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete in most structures is designed to crack in order to let embedded steel reinforcement take over tensile stresses. Crack formation is also a typical phenomenon related to durability. Percolation of cracks may lead to leakage problems or ingress of deleterious materials, causing deterioration

  11. Stochastic Properties of Plasticity Based Constitutive Law for Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    -off criterion. The statistics of the material parameters are obtained by applying biaxial test results for plane concrete slabs to the constitutive model using the maximum likelihood method. Response surfaces are used to obtain the statistics for a parameter depending on other previously obtained parameters...

  12. Risk-based replacement strategies for redundant deteriorating reinforced concrete pipe networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adey, B.; Bernard, O.; Gerard, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an example of how predictive models of the deterioration of reinforced concrete pipes and the consequences of failure can be used to develop risk-based replacement strategies for redundant reinforced concrete pipe networks. It also shows how an accurate deterioration prediction can lead to a reduction of agency costs, and illustrates the limitation of the incremental intervention step algorithm. The main conclusion is that the use of predictive models, such as those developed by Oxand S.A., in the determination of replacement strategies for redundant reinforced concrete pipe networks can lead to a significant reduction in overall costs for the owner of the structure. (author)

  13. Concretes of low environmental impact obtained by geopolymerization of Metakaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, D. C.; Montaño, A. M.; González, C. P.; Gutiérrez, J.

    2018-04-01

    This work shows results of partial replacement of Portland Type I cement®, by geopolymers obtained through alkaline activation of Metakaolin, in concrete mixtures. Replacement was made with 10%, 20% and 30% of geopolymers at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days of setting. Cement samples was mechanical and electrically tested. Mechanical resistance to compression assay shows that the best percentage of replacement is 10% for every setting time; highest value is 26.75MPa at 90 days. Nyquist diagrams at different times of immersion exhibit same trend: decreasing of electrical resistance as time of assay goes by.

  14. Bulk modulus of basic sodalite, Na8[AlSiO4]6(OH)2.2H2O, a possible zeolitic precursor in coal-fly-ash-based geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Eun; Moon, Juhyuk; Mancio, Mauricio; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic basic sodalite, Na 8 [AlSiO 4 ] 6 (OH) 2 .2H 2 O, cubic, P43n, (also known as hydroxysodalite hydrate) was prepared by the alkaline activation of amorphous aluminosilicate glass, obtained from the phase separation of Class F fly ash. The sample was subjected to a process similar to geopolymerization, using high concentrations of a NaOH solution at 90 o C for 24 hours. Basic sodalite was chosen as a representative analogue of the zeolite precursor existing in Na-based Class F fly ash geopolymers. To determine its bulk modulus, high-pressure synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction was applied using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to a pressure of 4.5 GPa. A curve-fit with a truncated third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a fixed K' o = 4 to pressure-normalized volume data yielded the isothermal bulk modulus, K o = 43 ± 4 GPa, indicating that basic sodalite is more compressible than sodalite, possibly due to a difference in interactions between the framework host and the guest molecules.

  15. Bulk modulus of basic sodalite, Na8[AlSiO4]6(OH)2·2H2O, a possible zeolitic precursor in coal-fly-ash-based geopolymers

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic basic sodalite, Na8[AlSiO4] 6(OH)2•2H2O, cubic, P43n, (also known as hydroxysodalite hydrate) was prepared by the alkaline activation of amorphous aluminosilicate glass, obtained from the phase separation of Class F fly ash. The sample was subjected to a process similar to geopolymerization, using high concentrations of a NaOH solution at 90 °C for 24 hours. Basic sodalite was chosen as a representative analogue of the zeolite precursor existing in Na-based Class F fly ash geopolymers. To determine its bulk modulus, high-pressure synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction was applied using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to a pressure of 4.5 GPa. A curve-fit with a truncated third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a fixed K\\'o = 4 to pressure-normalized volume data yielded the isothermal bulk modulus, K o = 43 ± 4 GPa, indicating that basic sodalite is more compressible than sodalite, possibly due to a difference in interactions between the framework host and the guest molecules. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Characteristics of Commercial SiC and Synthetic SiC as an Aggregate in Geopolymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfanita, R.; Afifah, K. N.; Asrianti; Subaer

    2017-03-01

    This main objective of this study is to investigate the effect silicon carbide (SiC) as an aggregate on the mechanical strength and microstructure of the geopolymer composites. The geopolymers binder were produced by using alkaline activation method of metakaolin and cured at 70oC for 2 hours. In this study commercial and synthetic SiC were used as aggregate to produce composite structure. Synthetic SiC was produced from rice husk ash and coconut shell carbon calcined at 750oC for 2 hours. The addition of SiC in geopolymers paste was varied from 0.25g, 0.50g to 0.75g to form geopolymers composites. The chemical compositions and crystallinity level of SiC and the resulting composites were measured by means of Rigaku MiniFlexII X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of SiC and the composites were examined by using Tescan Vega3SB Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The physical and mechanical properties of the samples were determined based on apparent porosity, bulk density, and three bending flexural strength measurements. The results showed that the commercial and synthetic SiC were effectively produced geopolymers composites with different microstructure, physical and mechanical strength.

  17. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on leaching of simulated {sup 133}Cs{sup +} radionuclides from geopolymer wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ning; An, Hao; Cui, Hao, E-mail: cuihao@nju.edu.cn; Pan, Yang; Wang, Bing; Mao, Linqiang; Zhai, Jianping

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • γ-ray irradiation caused more Cs{sup +} leaching out from geopolymer wasteform. • Pore structure change induced by irradiation caused the increase of leachability. • Fly-ash-based geopolymer is a potential material for radionuclide immobilization. - Abstract: Leaching of simulated {sup 133}Cs{sup +} radionuclides from geopolymer wasteforms was examined with regard to effects from gamma-ray irradiation. Specifically, the compressive strengths, microstructures, pore structures, and leaching resistance of geopolymer wasteforms before and after irradiation were characterized. The leaching experiments were performed by immersion of wasteforms in deionized water, ground water, and seawater. It was found that gamma rays did not produce significant morphological changes, except for changes in the pore size distribution. The cumulative leaching fraction of all the leachants from the irradiated samples increased relative to the non-radiated samples, particularly during long leaching periods (11–42 days). These results, and those from a mercury intrusion porosimeter analysis, can be attributed to irradiation-induced changes in pore structure. All the leaching indexes were greater than the minimum acceptable value of 6.0 set by the American Nuclear Society Standards committee, which indicated that the fly-ash geopolymers are suitable for radionuclide immobilization. However, the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the immobilization of radionuclides cannot be ignored.

  18. Effects of carbonation on the leachability and compressive strength of cement-solidified and geopolymer-solidified synthetic metal wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bhishan; Kinrade, Stephen D; Catalan, Lionel J J

    2012-06-30

    The effects of accelerated carbonation on the compressive strength and leachability of fly ash-based geopolymer and ordinary portland cement (OPC) doped with Cd(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Pb(II) or Zn(II) salts were investigated. Cement was effective at immobilizing Cd, Cr(III), Cu, Pb and Zn under both the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), but ineffective for retaining Cr(VI). Carbonated cement maintained its ability to immobilize Cd, Cr(III), Pb and Zn, but, under acidic TCLP conditions, was much worse at retaining Cu. Geopolymer was effective at immobilizing Cr(III) and Cu, and, to a lesser degree, Cd, Pb and Zn in SPLP leaching tests. Only Cr(III) was immobilized under comparatively acidic TCLP testing conditions. Carbonation did not change the metal retention capacity of the geopolymer matrix. Metal doping caused compressive strengths of both geopolymer and cement to decrease. Carbonation increased the compressive strength of cement, but decreased that of the geopolymer. Geochemical equilibrium modeling provided insight on the mechanisms of metal immobilization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acoustic absorption of geopolymer/sand mixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Straka, Pavel; Steinerová, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2009), s. 48-51 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : acoustic absorption coefficient * geopolymer Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009 www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2009/pdf/2009_01_48.pdf

  20. New composites of nanoparticle Cu (I) oxide and titania in a novel inorganic polymer (geopolymer) matrix for destruction of dyes and hazardous organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Mahroo; MacKenzie, Kenneth J D; Knibbe, Ruth; Page, Samuel J; Hanna, John V

    2016-11-15

    New photoactive composites to efficiently remove organic dyes from water are reported. These consist of Cu2O/TiO2 nanoparticles in a novel inorganic geopolymer matrix modified by a large tertiary ammonium species (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) whose presence in the matrix is demonstrated by FTIR spectroscopy. The CTAB does not disrupt the tetrahedral geopolymer structural silica and alumina units as demonstrated by (29)Si and (27)Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. SEM/EDS, TEM and BET measurements suggest that the Cu2O/TiO2 nanoparticles are homogenously distributed on the surface and within the geopolymer pores. The mechanism of removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from solution consists of a combination of adsorption (under dark conditions) and photodegradation (under UV radiation). MB adsorption in the dark follows pseudo second-order kinetics and is described by Freundlich-Langmuir type isotherms. The performance of the CTAB-modified geopolymer based composites is superior to composites based on unmodified geopolymer hosts, the most effective composite containing 5wt% Cu2O/TiO2 in a CTAB-modified geopolymer host. These composites constitute a new class of materials with excellent potential in environmental protection applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Design of Space Truss Based Insulating Walls for Robotic Fabrication in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    DUBALLET, Romain; Baverel, Olivier; Dirrenberger, Justin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This work focuses on the design of ultra-light concrete walls for individual or collective housing, the normative context being constrained masonry. It is stated that current block work building is very inefficient in terms of quantity of concrete used for cinderblocks and mortar joints, and with regards to thermal insulation. Here is proposed a robotic manufacturing technique based on mortar extrusion that allows producing more efficient walls. First we present the fa...

  2. Shear design and assessment of reinforced and prestressed concrete beams based on a mechanical model

    OpenAIRE

    Marí Bernat, Antonio Ricardo; Bairán García, Jesús Miguel; Cladera Bohigas, Antoni; Oller Ibars, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Safe and economical design and assessment of reinforced (RC) and prestressed concrete (PC) beams requires the availability of accurate but simple formulations which adequately capture the structural response. In this paper, a mechanical model for the prediction of the shear-flexural strength of PC and RC members with rectangular, I, or T sections, with and without shear reinforcement, is presented. The model is based on the principles of concrete mechanics and on assumptions supported by the ...

  3. HTGR Base Technology Program. Task 2: concrete properties in nuclear environment. A review of concrete material systems for application to prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.

    1981-05-01

    Prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) are designed to serve as primary pressure containment structures. The safety of these structures depends on a correct assessment of the loadings and proper design of the vessels to accept these loadings. Proper vessel design requires a knowledge of the component (material) properties. Because concrete is one of the primary constituents of PCPVs, knowledge of its behavior is required to produce optimum PCPV designs. Concrete material systems are reviewed with respect to constituents, mix design, placing, curing, and strength evaluations, and typical concrete property data are presented. Effects of extreme loadings (elevated temperature, multiaxial, irradiation) on concrete behavior are described. Finally, specialty concrete material systems (high strength, fibrous, polymer, lightweight, refractory) are reviewed. 235 references.

  4. Very early age concrete hydration characterization monitoring using piezoceramic based smart aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Song, Gangbing; Hou, Shuang; Ji, Qing; Mo, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Very early age (0–20 h) concrete hydration is a complicated chemical reaction. During the very early age period, the concrete condition dramatically changes from liquid state to solid state. This paper presents the authors’ recent research on monitoring very early age concrete hydration characterization by using piezoceramic based smart aggregates. The smart aggregate (SA) transducer is designed as a sandwich structure using two marble blocks and a pre-soldered lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patch. Based on the electromechanical property of piezo materials, the PZT patches function as both actuators and sensors. In addition, the marble blocks provide reliable protection to the fragile PZT patch and develop the SA into a robust embedded actuator or sensor in the structure. The active-sensing approach, which involved a pair of smart aggregates with one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor, was applied in this paper’s experimental investigation of concrete hydration characterization monitoring. In order to completely understand the hydration condition of the inhomogeneous, over-cluttering, high-scattering characteristics of concrete (specifically of very early concrete), a swept sine wave and several constant frequency sine waves were chosen and produced by a function generator to excite the embedded actuating smart aggregate. The PZT vibration induced ultrasonic wave propagated through the concrete and was sent to the other smart aggregate sensor. The electrical signal transferred from the smart aggregate sensor was recorded during the test. As the concrete hydration reaction was occurring, the characteristic of the electrical signal continuously changed. This paper describes the successful investigation of the three states (the fluid state, the transition state, and the hardened state) of very early age concrete hydration based on classification of the received electrical signal. Specifically, the amplitude and frequency response of the electrical

  5. A study on hardness behavior of geopolymer paste in different condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Farah Farhana; Hussin, Kamarudin; Rahmat, Azmi; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Shamsudin, Shaiful Rizam

    2016-07-01

    This study has been conducted to understand the hardness behavior of geopolymer paste in different conditions; with and without being immersed in water. Geopolymer paste has been used nowadays as an alternative way to reduce global warming pollution by carbon dioxide (CO2) released to the air caused from the production of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Geopolymer has many advantages such as high compressive strength, lower water absorption and lower porosity. Geopolymer paste in this study was made from a mixture of fly ash and alkaline activators. The alkaline activators that have been used were sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) solution. Then the mixture was allowed to harden for 24hrs at ambient temperature and then placed in the oven for 24hrs with 60°C for the curing process. The hardness testing was conducted after a few months when the samples already achieved the optimum design. The samples were divided to two conditions; without immersion which was placed at ambient temperature (S1) and immersed in water for one week (S2). The samples then are divided into two at the center and testing was conducted into 4 parts which are part 1, part 2, part 3 and part 4. Various methods of non-destructively testing concrete and mortar have been in use for many years such as Vickers hardness test, Rockwell hardness test, Brinell hardness test and many more. The Rockwell hardness test method as defined in ASTM E-18 is the most commonly used hardness test method which is also used in this study. From the results, S1 has higher hardness value than S2 for all parts with the maximum value of S1 is 118.6 and the minimum value is 71.8. The maximum value of S2 is 114.4 and the minimum value is 0. The central part of the geopolymer paste also showed greater hardness values than the edge area of the samples.

  6. Steel Fibre Reinforcing Characteristics on the Size Reduction of Fly Ash Based Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sounthararajan Vallarasu Manoharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of glued steel fibres in high strength concrete with size reduction properties of concrete has been attempted. Glued steel fibres with both ends hooked having length to diameter ratio of 70 was added at a dosage level of 0.5% to 1.5% by volume fraction. The study was carried out to analyze the effects of fibre addition on the thickness reduction of concrete element. A high strength concrete mixture was designed and various thicknesses of concrete prisms were casted for different volume fraction of steel fibres. The hardened concrete properties were determined based on the mix constituents such as water to binder ratio 0.3 (w/b, superplasticizer dosage, fine to coarse aggregate ratio 0.6 (F/c, and fly ash replacement level at 25% and 50% by weight of binder content. The experimental test results showed that the flexural strength varies with respect to the depth of concrete specimen. It can be observed that the reduction in size up to 10% size containing 25% fly ash with 1.5% steel fibres showed better strength enhancement of 4.70 MPa and 6.69 MPa for 7 days and 28 days, respectively. Also, the addition of steel fibres at higher percentage of fly ash containing 50% showed better improvement in the flexural strength for the size reduction at 5%, when compared to plain concrete beam which exhibited higher stress carrying capacity of 6.08 MPa at 28 days and showed an increase of 7.99%.

  7. An international data base of nuclear concrete containment ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seni, C.; Ianko, L.

    1994-01-01

    The ageing of nuclear structures is of special interest because of the extended service life expected of these structures, and the potential impact of their deterioration on safety and reliability. Although there are databases about concrete, they address properties in general, not performance. In 1992, the IAEA, in collaboration with AECL, set out to create a new database that would fill the gap. Functional ageing, i.e. deterioration of leak-tightness, was to be included, not just structural ageing, i.e. deterioration of load-bearing capacity. This paper outlines the project of creating the database

  8. The Use of Alkaliphilic Bacteria-based Repair Solution for Porous Network Concrete Healing Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangadji, S.; Wiktor, V.A.C.; Jonkers, H.M.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria induced calcium carbonate precipitation based on metabolic conversion of nutrients has been acknowledged for having potentials in self-healing cement-based materials. Recent studies have shown the development of bacteria-based repair solution (liquid) for concrete surface repair. This

  9. Very heavy iron-punching concretes; Betons tres lourds a base de riblons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The present report deals with all the heavy iron-punching concretes, metallic wastes produced by the transformation industry. After a detailed description of the physical properties of metallic aggregates, a classification of heavy mortars is given, into three main categories: steel-shot grouts d = 5,3 - 6; steel-shot grouts mixed with a mineral d = 3,7 - 4,2; injection heavy grouts d = 3,5 - 4. The following chapter describes iron-punching concretes the most used in the atomic industry: iron-punching concretes mixed with cast-iron - iron-punching concretes mixed with magnetite; iron-punching concretes mixed with barite; iron-punching concretes mixed with limonite; iron-punching concretes mixed with boron. The compositions of these concretes are given together with their physical and mechanical characteristics. Numerous diagrams make it possible to find rapidly the proportions of the constituents of these concretes as a function of the required density. Technical advice and specifications are given in an appendix together with a bibliography of these heavy concretes. (author) [French] Le present rapport traite de l'ensemble des betons lourds realises a l'aide de riblons, dechets metalliques fournis par l'industrie de transformation. Apres une description detaillee des proprietes physiques des agregats metalliques, les mortiers lourds sont d'abord presentes en les classant en trois grandes categories: les mortiers a base de grenailles d 5,3 a 6; les mortiers a base de grenailles avec addition d'un mineral d 3,7 a 4,2; les mortiers lourds injectables d = 3,5 a 4. Le chapitre suivant decrit les betons a base de riblons les plus utilises, dans l'industrie atomique: les betons de riblons avec addition de fonte; les betons de riblons avec addition de magnetite; les betons de riblons avec addition de barytine; les betons de riblons avec addition de limonite; les betons de riblons avec addition de bore. Les compositions de ces betons ainsi que

  10. Fiber Bragg grating sensors as a tool to evaluate the influence of filler on shrinkage of geopolymer matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campopiano, Stefania; Iadicicco, Agostino; Messina, Francesco; Ferone, Claudio; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2015-05-01

    Geopolymer matrices represent one of the main sustainable alternatives to ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and other clinker-based blended cements. Real scale applications are limited and a relevant amount of data is still needed to assess the early age and long-term behavior of these systems. Particularly, the early-age monitoring of geopolymers represent a key parameter for mix design optimization. Most of the available methods for the measurement of temperature evolution due to polycondensation kinetics and early age deformations are related to laboratory activities. The upscaling to in situ techniques represents a crucial step toward technological assessment. To this aim, authors propose to use Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) embedded in the geopolymer matrices. Starting from a case study by authors related to the design of externally bonded fiber reinforced geopolymers for strengthening of existing structures, the matrix was optimized in terms of quartz filler content. The measurements carried out by means of FBG sensors allowed to reduce filler content respect to the abovementioned work. Particularly, quartz content can be reduced by 50%. The temperature associated to polycondensation was slightly below 65°C for the three studied systems, limiting the use of designed metakaolin geopolymer to non-massive structures, since thermal cracking could occur, unless further research will be able to assess the viability of retardants. The experimental results confirm that FBG represent an accurate method for simultaneous shrinkage and temperature measurements for geopolymers and the application in real scale structures for remote sensing could help to create database on inner temperatures and early age deformations.

  11. Critical Quality Source Diagnosis for Dam Concrete Construction Based on Quality Gain-loss Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In dam concrete construction process, it not only has quality loss arising from quality fluctuation, but also gains quality compensation effect due to the mutual cooperation and adaptation coupling between working procedures (WPs. The calculation and transmission complexity of the quality loss and quality compensation affect the quality management of dam concrete construction. As the quality compensation effect existing in the production practice cannot be described by Taguchi quality loss function, the concept of quality gain-loss function was presented in this paper, which was based on endowing the constant term in the expansion of Taylor series with physical meaning—quality compensation. Based on quality gain-loss function theory, a new quality gain-loss transmission model of dam concrete construction based on GERT network was constructed and its effective algorithm was designed. WP quality gain-loss and its impact on the final product were reasonably measured, and the critical quality routes and critical quality WPs were detected and diagnosed in dam concrete construction network. Summer temperature-controlled concrete construction in the third phase of Three Gorges Project (TGP was taken as an example to carry out the study, and the calculation results showed the validity and practicability of the presented model and algorithm.

  12. Compact Embedded Wireless Sensor-Based Monitoring of Concrete Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Joaquín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Trinidad; González Carvajal, Ramón

    2018-01-01

    This work presents the design, construction and testing of a new embedded sensor system for monitoring concrete curing. A specific mote has been implemented to withstand the aggressive environment without affecting the measured variables. The system also includes a real-time monitoring application operating from a remote computer placed in a central location. The testing was done in two phases: the first in the laboratory, to validate the functional requirements of the developed devices; and the second on civil works to evaluate the functional features of the devices, such as range, robustness and flexibility. The devices were successfully implemented resulting in a low cost, highly reliable, compact and non-destructive solution. PMID:29543765

  13. Performance Based Evaluation of Concrete Strength under Various Curing Conditions to Investigate Climate Change Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Kyun Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the manifestation of global warming-induced climate change has been observed through super typhoons, heavy snowfalls, torrential rains, and extended heat waves. These climate changes have been occurring all over the world and natural disasters have caused severe damage and deterioration of concrete structures and infrastructure. In an effort to deal with these problems due to extreme and abnormal climate changes, studies have been conducted to develop construction technologies and design guidelines. Nevertheless, study results applicable to construction sites continue to be ineffective and insufficient. Therefore, this study proposes ways to cope with climate change by considering the effect of concrete curing condition variations on concrete material performance. More specifically, the 3-, 7- and 28-day compressive and split tensile strength properties of concrete mix cured under various climatic factors including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and sunlight exposure time were evaluated to determine whether the concrete meets the current design requirements. Thereafter, a performance based evaluation (PBE was performed using satisfaction probabilities based on the test values to understand the problems associated with the current mix proportion design practice and to identify countermeasures to deal with climate change-induced curing conditions.

  14. Study on the compressive strength of fly ash based geo polymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand Khanna, Pawan; Kelkar, Durga; Papal, Mahesh; Sekar, S. K.

    2017-11-01

    Introduction of the alternative materials for complete replacement of cement in ordinary concrete will play an important role to control greenhouse gas and its effect. The 100% replacement of binder with fly ash (in integration with potassium hydroxide (koh) and potassium silicate (k2sio3) solutions) in concrete gives a significant alternative to conventional cement concrete. This paper focuses on the effect of alkaline solutions koh and k2sio3 on strength properties of fly ash based geo polymer concrete (fgpc); compared the strength at different molarities of alkaline activator koh at different curing temperature. Fly ash based geo polymer concrete was produced from low calcium fly ash, triggered by addition of koh and k2sio3 solution and by assimilation of superplasticizer for suitable workability. The molarities of potassium hydroxide as 8m, 10m and 12m molarities were used at various curing temperatures such as 60°c, 70 °c and 80°c. Results showed that for given proportion to get maximum compressive strength the optimum molarity of alkaline solution is 12m and optimum curing temperature is 70 °c.

  15. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Liang, Zhen; Zhou, Shuangxi

    2017-06-22

    This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF) communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL)-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple.

  16. Assessing the yield point of concrete steels based upon known chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Šiško Kuliš

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research is based on both, theoretical and experimental work and aims to assessment the yield point of concrete steels, based on the known alloy chemical composition. The experimental portion of the work was performed at the Split steelmaking factory, which produces concrete steels from the waste iron. The theoretical portion of this study involves mathematical modelling carried out using the software package MATLAB. The work presented here provides both a scientific and practical contribution to the field. By using mathematical modelling, the accuracy of the estimation of the yield point is improved by 8,5%. Using this correlation enables the reduction of the concrete steel production costs because it is possible to reduce the use of expensive tests for the characterization of strength and mechanical properties.

  17. Diffusion under water-saturated conditions in PFA/OPC-based structural concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Nickerson, A.K.

    1990-05-01

    A substantial proportion of the volume of the UK radioactive waste repository is likely to be composed of materials based on hydraulic cements. This includes the structural components, which are likely to be manufactured from concrete. The mass transport characteristics of dissolved species for a typical structural concrete, based on a mixture of pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cement, have been measured in a water-saturated condition. Both the water permeability and the diffusion parameters (for caesium, strontium and iodide ion and tritiated water diffusion) are low compared to values obtained for other structural concretes. The intrinsic diffusion coefficients for iodide and caesium ions are in the range 2-5x10 -14 m 2 s -1 . There is no evidence of significant sorption of any of the diffusants studied. (author)

  18. Testing Silica Fume-Based Concrete Composites under Chemical and Microbiological Sulfate Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current design practices based on descriptive approaches to concrete specification may not be appropriate for the management of aggressive environments. In this study, the durability of cement-based materials with and without the addition of silica fume, subjected to conditions that leach calcium and silicon, were investigated. Chemical corrosion was simulated by employing various H2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions, and biological corrosion was simulated using Acidithiobacillus sp. bacterial inoculation, leading to disrupted and damaged surfaces; the samples’ mass changes were studied following both chemical and biological attacks. Different leaching trends were observed via X-ray fluorescence when comparing chemical with biological leaching. Lower leaching rates were found for concrete samples fortified with silica fume than those without silica fume. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy confirmed a massive sulfate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to bacterial exposure.

  19. Recent and future of cement and concrete industries- a root of our development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ts Erdenebat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers that cement and concrete industry is contributing to our country development positively, and cement and concrete industry also can be reduced environmental pressure by;- Continuously reducing the CO2 emission from cement production by increased use of biofuels and alternative raw materials as well as introducing modified low energy clinker types and cement with reduced clinker content or geopolymer cement and a new type concrete.- Exploiting the potential of waste bricks, cement and concrete recycling to decrease the emission of CO2.- Exploiting the thermal mass of concrete to create energy optimized solutions for heating and cooling residential and office buildings.

  20. New composites of nanoparticle Cu (I) oxide and titania in a novel inorganic polymer (geopolymer) matrix for destruction of dyes and hazardous organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falah, Mahroo [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); MacKenzie, Kenneth J.D., E-mail: Kenneth.mackenzie@vuw.ac.nz [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); Knibbe, Ruth [Robinson Research Institute, Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); Page, Samuel J.; Hanna, John V. [Department of Physics, Warwick University, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis reported of new photoactive nano-oxide composites in a geopolymer matrix. • The novel aluminosilicate matrix is expanded with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. • The photoactive component consists of a Cu(I) oxide and titania heterostructure. • Composites remove the model pollutant by both adsorption and photodegradation. • These new photocatalysts are extremely efficient and ecologically friendly. - Abstract: New photoactive composites to efficiently remove organic dyes from water are reported. These consist of Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in a novel inorganic geopolymer matrix modified by a large tertiary ammonium species (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) whose presence in the matrix is demonstrated by FTIR spectroscopy. The CTAB does not disrupt the tetrahedral geopolymer structural silica and alumina units as demonstrated by {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectroscopy. SEM/EDS, TEM and BET measurements suggest that the Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are homogenously distributed on the surface and within the geopolymer pores. The mechanism of removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from solution consists of a combination of adsorption (under dark conditions) and photodegradation (under UV radiation). MB adsorption in the dark follows pseudo second-order kinetics and is described by Freundlich-Langmuir type isotherms. The performance of the CTAB-modified geopolymer based composites is superior to composites based on unmodified geopolymer hosts, the most effective composite containing 5 wt% Cu{sub 2}O/TiO{sub 2} in a CTAB-modified geopolymer host. These composites constitute a new class of materials with excellent potential in environmental protection applications.

  1. Practical approach for production of bacteria-based agent-contained light weight aggregates to make concrete self-healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mors, R.M.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    A functional experimental concrete system has been developed in our lab, in which a two component bacteria-based healing agent contained in a protective reservoir is included in the concrete mixture. Incorporated bacteria have the potential to produce copious amounts of calcium carbonate based

  2. Optimization-Based Inverse Identification of the Parameters of a Concrete Cap Material Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Král, Petr; Hokeš, Filip; Hušek, Martin; Kala, Jiří; Hradil, Petr

    2017-10-01

    Issues concerning the advanced numerical analysis of concrete building structures in sophisticated computing systems currently require the involvement of nonlinear mechanics tools. The efforts to design safer, more durable and mainly more economically efficient concrete structures are supported via the use of advanced nonlinear concrete material models and the geometrically nonlinear approach. The application of nonlinear mechanics tools undoubtedly presents another step towards the approximation of the real behaviour of concrete building structures within the framework of computer numerical simulations. However, the success rate of this application depends on having a perfect understanding of the behaviour of the concrete material models used and having a perfect understanding of the used material model parameters meaning. The effective application of nonlinear concrete material models within computer simulations often becomes very problematic because these material models very often contain parameters (material constants) whose values are difficult to obtain. However, getting of the correct values of material parameters is very important to ensure proper function of a concrete material model used. Today, one possibility, which permits successful solution of the mentioned problem, is the use of optimization algorithms for the purpose of the optimization-based inverse material parameter identification. Parameter identification goes hand in hand with experimental investigation while it trying to find parameter values of the used material model so that the resulting data obtained from the computer simulation will best approximate the experimental data. This paper is focused on the optimization-based inverse identification of the parameters of a concrete cap material model which is known under the name the Continuous Surface Cap Model. Within this paper, material parameters of the model are identified on the basis of interaction between nonlinear computer simulations

  3. Finite element model updating of concrete structures based on imprecise probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, S.; Ramaswamy, A.

    2017-09-01

    Imprecise probability based methods are developed in this study for the parameter estimation, in finite element model updating for concrete structures, when the measurements are imprecisely defined. Bayesian analysis using Metropolis Hastings algorithm for parameter estimation is generalized to incorporate the imprecision present in the prior distribution, in the likelihood function, and in the measured responses. Three different cases are considered (i) imprecision is present in the prior distribution and in the measurements only, (ii) imprecision is present in the parameters of the finite element model and in the measurement only, and (iii) imprecision is present in the prior distribution, in the parameters of the finite element model, and in the measurements. Procedures are also developed for integrating the imprecision in the parameters of the finite element model, in the finite element software Abaqus. The proposed methods are then verified against reinforced concrete beams and prestressed concrete beams tested in our laboratory as part of this study.

  4. Mechanical properties of non-woven glass fiber geopolymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Pola, M.; Kovářík, T.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This experimental research focuses on mechanical properties of non-woven glass fabric composites bound by geopolymeric matrix. This study investigates the effect of different matrix composition and amount of granular filler on the mechanical properties of final composites. Matrix was selected as a metakaolin based geopolymer hardened by different amount of potassium silicate activator. The ceramic granular filler was added into the matrix for investigation of its impact on mechanical properties and workability. Prepared pastes were incorporated into the non-woven fabrics by hand roller and final composites were stacked layer by layer to final thickness. The early age hardening of prepared pastes were monitored by small amplitude dynamic rheology approach and after 28 days of hardening the mechanical properties were examined. The electron microscopy was used for detail description of microstructural properties. The imaging methods revealed good wettability of glass fibers by geopolymeric matrix and results of mechanical properties indicate usability of these materials for constructional applications.

  5. Influence of calcium compounds on the mechanical properties of fly ash geopolymer pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuujin, J; van Riessen, A; Williams, R

    2009-08-15

    The influence of calcium compounds (CaO and Ca(OH)(2)) on the mechanical properties of fly ash based geopolymers has been studied. Calcium compounds were substituted in fly ash at 1, 2 and 3 wt%, respectively. Curing of the geopolymers was performed at ambient temperature (20 degrees C) and 70 degrees C. Addition of calcium compounds as a fly ash substitute improved mechanical properties for the ambient temperature cured samples while decreasing properties for the 70 degrees C cured samples. Seven days compressive strength of the ambient temperature cured samples increased from 11.8 (2.9) to 22.8 (3.8)MPa and 29.2 (1.1)MPa for 3% CaO and 3% Ca(OH)(2) additions, respectively.

  6. SSI analysis of a massive concrete structure based on a novel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 7 April 2006; revised 6 July 2006. Abstract. Investigations conducted based on seismic soil-structure interaction analysis of a massive concrete structure supported on a raft foundation are presented in this paper. Linear transient dynamic analysis is carried out using finite element method and imposing ...

  7. A 3D constitutive model for concrete based on a co-rotational concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, P.H.; Rots, J.G.; Arnesen, A.; Teigen, J.G.; Hoiseth, K.V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of the co-rotational elasticity-based crack model and the assumptions made on the behavior of concrete, in specific on the lateral stress effects. The formulation of the constitutive model is given, including the consistent formulation of the tangent stiffness

  8. Probability based design of concrete mixes with cow-bone ash admixed cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud ABUBAKAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A probability-based procedure for design of concrete mixes with cow-cone ash admixed cement has been developed considering the strength as a random variable. However, the compressive strength of concrete in turn, depends on the properties of its constituent materials: cement, fine aggregate, coarse aggregate and cow-bone ash. The compressive strength data generated experimentally has been analysed using normal-probability distribution functions based on 95% confidence interval. The proposed probability based design was compared to the method of trial mixture. It was observed that for reliability index (β of 1.3, the proposed probability methodology uses 10.2% less cement content than the method of trial mixture; thus, indicating that the method is conservative. It was also observed that, for concrete grade 25, the proposed methodology gives higher compressive strength at both 7 and 28 days. Hence, the probability-based design procedure was found appropriate and is therefore recommended for the design of concrete mixes with cow-bone ash admixed cement.

  9. A new smart additive of reinforced concrete based on modified hydrotalcites: Preparation, characterization and anticorrosion applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Fischer, H.; Polder, R.

    2012-01-01

    A carbonate form of Mg-Al-hydrotalcite and its p-aminobenzoate (pAB) modified derivative (i.e.,Mg(2)Al-pAB) were synthesized and characterized by means of XRD and FT-IR. The anticorrosion behavior was evaluated based on open circuit potential (OCP) of carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solution

  10. Properties of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortars for masonry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shiqin; Sagoe-Crentsil, Kwesi

    2012-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of wastepaper sludge in geopolymer mortar systems for manufacturing construction products. The investigation was driven by the increasing demand for reuse options in paper-recycling industry. Both fresh and hardened geopolymer mortar properties are evaluated for samples incorporating dry wastepaper sludge, and the results indicate potential end-use benefits in building product manufacture. Addition of wastepaper sludge to geopolymer mortar reduces flow properties, primarily due to dry sludge absorbing water from the binder mix. The average 91-day compressive strength of mortar samples incorporating 2.5 wt% and 10 wt% wastepaper sludge respectively retained 92% and 52% of the reference mortar strength. However, contrary to the normal trend of increasing drying shrinkage with increasing paper sludge addition to Portland cement matrices, the corresponding geopolymer drying shrinkage decreased by 34% and 64%. Equally important, the water absorption of hardened geopolymer mortar decreased with increasing paper sludge content at ambient temperatures, providing good prospects of overall potential for wastepaper sludge incorporation in the production of building and masonry elements. The results indicate that, despite its high moisture absorbance due to the organic matter and residual cellulose fibre content, wastepaper sludge appears compatible with geopolymer chemistry, and hence serves as a potential supplementary additive to geopolymer cementitious masonry products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of simplified methods and data bases for radiation shielding calculations for concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.; Marable, J.H.; Bartine, D.A.

    1986-06-01

    Two simplified methods have been developed which allow rapid and accurate calculations of the attenuation of neutrons and gamma rays through concrete shields. One method, called the BEST method, uses sensitivity coefficients to predict changes in the transmitted dose from a fission source that are due to changes in the composition of the shield. The other method uses transmission factors based on adjoint calculations to predict the transmitted dose from an arbitrary source incident on a given shield. The BEST method, utilizing an exponential molecule that is shown to be a significant improvement over the traditional linear model, has been successfully applied to slab shields of standard concrete and rebar concrete. It has also been tested for a special concrete that has been used in many shielding experiments at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility, as well as for a deep-penetration sodium problem. A comprehensive data base of concrete sensitivity coefficients generated as part of this study is available for use in the BEST model. For problems in which the changes are energy independent, application of the model and data base can be accomplished with a desk calculator. Larger-scale calculations required for problems that are energy dependent are facilitated by employing a simple computer code, which is included, together with the data base and other calculational aids, in a data package that can be obtained from the ORNL Radiation Shielding Information Center (request DLC-102/CONSENT). The transmission factors used by the second method are a byproduct of the sensitivity calculations and are mathematically equivalent to the surface adjoint function phi*, which gives the dose equivalent transmitted through a slab of thickness T due to one particle incident on the surface in the gth energy group and jth direction. 18 refs., 1 fig., 50 tabs.

  12. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  13. Effects of fiber length on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tiesong; Jia Dechang; He Peigang; Wang Meirong; Liang Defu

    2008-01-01

    A kind of sheet-like carbon fiber preform was developed using short fibers (2, 7 and 12 mm, respectively) as starting materials and used to strengthen a geopolymer. Mechanical properties, fracture behavior, microstructure and toughening mechanisms of the as-prepared composites were investigated by three-point bending test, optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the short carbon fibers disperse uniformly in geopolymer matrix. The C f /geopolymer composites exhibit apparently improved mechanical properties and an obvious noncatastrophic failure behavior. The composite reinforced by the carbon fibers of 7 mm in length shows a maximum flexural strength as well as the highest work of facture, which are nearly 5 times and more than 2 orders higher than that of the geopolymer matrix, respectively. The predominant strengthening and toughening mechanisms are attributed to the apparent fiber bridging and pulling-out effect based on the weak fiber/matrix interface as well as the sheet-like carbon fiber preform

  14. Geopolymer encapsulation of a chloride salt phase change material for high temperature thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Rhys; Trout, Neil; Raud, Ralf; Clarke, Stephen; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost and increase the material compatibility of encapsulated phase change materials (EPCMs) a new encapsulated system has been proposed. In the current study a molten salt eutectic of barium chloride (53% wt.), potassium chloride (28% wt.) and sodium chloride (19% wt.) has been identified as a promising candidate for low cost EPCM storage systems. The latent heat, melting point and thermal stability of the phase change material (PCM) was determined by DSC and was found to be in good agreement with results published in the literature. To cope with the corrosive nature of the PCM, it was decided that a fly-ash based geopolymer met the thermal and economic constraints for encapsulation. The thermal stability of the geopolymer shell was also tested with several formulations proving to form a stable shell for the chosen PCM at 200°C and/or 600°C. Lastly several capsules of the geopolymer shell with a chloride PCM were fabricated using a variety of methods with several samples remaining stable after exposure to 600°C testing.

  15. Density and morphology studies on bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraman, Laila Mardiah; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ming, Liew Yun; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2017-04-01

    This paper studies the finding density and morphology analysis of geopolymer bricks using bottom ash and fly ash as a geopolymer raw material. The study has been conducted to produce bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer bricks by varying the ratio of fly ash/bottom ash, ratio solid/liquid and ratio sodium silicate (Na2SiO3)/ sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the mix design. The compressive strength range between 3.8-4.5 Mpa was obtained in theprevious study [9]. The density and morphology analysis are done based on the optimum ratio selected from bottom ash/fly ash, solid/liquidand Na2SiO3/NaOH which is 1:2, 2.0 and 4.0 respectively for non-loading application brick. The morphology analysis of the bricks is closely related to the density recorded. The highest density shows the highest value of compressive strength and a denser microstructure of morphology.

  16. Geopolymers from lunar and Martian soil simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiadis, Alessio; Alberini, Federico; Meyer, Marit E.

    2017-01-01

    This work discusses the geopolymerization of lunar dust simulant JSC LUNAR-1A and Martian dust simulant JSC MARS-1A. The geopolymerization of JSC LUNAR-1A occurs easily and produces a hard, rock-like, material. The geopolymerization of JSC MARS-1A requires milling to reduce the particle size. Tests were carried out to measure, for both JSC LUNAR-1A and JSC MARS-1A geopolymers, the maximum compressive and flexural strengths. In the case of the lunar simulant, these are higher than those of conventional cements. In the case of the Martian simulant, they are close to those of common building bricks.

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis of fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X.S. [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Collins, F.G.; Zhao, X.L. [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); Wang, Q.Y., E-mail: wangqy@scu.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium silicate solution and sodium hydroxide solution were used to activate fly ash, which substitute cement totally in the concrete. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilizing two kinds of waste materials (fly ash and recycled aggregates) at the same time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied and compared with different recycled aggregates replacement ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such concrete has greater compressive strength and better microstructure than ordinary concrete and also geopolymer concrete. - Abstract: Six mixtures with different recycled aggregate (RA) replacement ratios of 0%, 50% and 100% were designed to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) and alkali-activated fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete (GRC). The physical and mechanical properties were investigated indicating different performances from each other. Optical microscopy under transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were carried out in this study in order to identify the mechanism underlying the effects of the geopolymer and RA on concrete properties. The features of aggregates, paste and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) were compared and discussed. Experimental results indicate that using alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer as replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) effectively improved the compressive strength. With increasing of RA contents in both RAC and GRC, the compressive strength decreased gradually. The microstructure analysis shows that, on one hand, the presence of RA weakens the strength of the aggregates and the structure of ITZs; on the other hand, due to the alkali-activated fly ash in geopolymer concrete, the contents of Portlandite (Ca(OH){sub 2}) and voids were reduced, as well as improved the matrix homogeneity. The microstructure of GRC was changed by different reaction products, such

  18. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis of fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, X.S.; Collins, F.G.; Zhao, X.L.; Wang, Q.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sodium silicate solution and sodium hydroxide solution were used to activate fly ash, which substitute cement totally in the concrete. ► Utilizing two kinds of waste materials (fly ash and recycled aggregates) at the same time. ► The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied and compared with different recycled aggregates replacement ratios. ► Such concrete has greater compressive strength and better microstructure than ordinary concrete and also geopolymer concrete. - Abstract: Six mixtures with different recycled aggregate (RA) replacement ratios of 0%, 50% and 100% were designed to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) and alkali-activated fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete (GRC). The physical and mechanical properties were investigated indicating different performances from each other. Optical microscopy under transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were carried out in this study in order to identify the mechanism underlying the effects of the geopolymer and RA on concrete properties. The features of aggregates, paste and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) were compared and discussed. Experimental results indicate that using alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer as replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) effectively improved the compressive strength. With increasing of RA contents in both RAC and GRC, the compressive strength decreased gradually. The microstructure analysis shows that, on one hand, the presence of RA weakens the strength of the aggregates and the structure of ITZs; on the other hand, due to the alkali-activated fly ash in geopolymer concrete, the contents of Portlandite (Ca(OH) 2 ) and voids were reduced, as well as improved the matrix homogeneity. The microstructure of GRC was changed by different reaction products, such as aluminosilicate gel.

  19. Investigation of Usability Potential Geopolimer Concrete at Animal Barns Abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Memiş

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Portland cement, which causes significant energy and raw material consumption, is responsible for about 7% of CO2 emissions. In order to reduce CO2 emissions from cement production, with the aim of using a binder with a lower CO2 release or investigation of different methods, alternative materials to cement are required. In contrast to portland cement (PO, which is used in concrete production; geopolimer is a material that is potentially useful as an alternative to cement and is still being explored provides a very low CO2 emission, a high resistance to salts and acids, and a high temperature and fire resistance. In this study, the effects of geopolymer concrete were investigated in animal barn. For this purpose, samples were prepared using calcite aggregate, alkali activator and activation solution. As alkali activator of geopolymer material ceramic sludge (ST is used at 20% of blast furnace slag (YFC. Sodium silicate (Na2SiO4 and sodium hydroside (NaOH were used as the activation solution in 60-40% mixing ratio. Bending and compressive strengths were determined in 4×4×16 cm specimens and shrinkage ratios were determined on 25×25×285 mm specimens. In order to determine the conditions of the animal shelters of the geopolymer concrete, the strengths of the samples in 10% sulfuric acid (H2SO4 and sulphate (SO4 solution were compared with 28th, 56th and 90th days. It has been seen that the use of geopolymer concrete in animal barn can provide advantages.

  20. THE EFFECT OF FLY ASH ON FLEXURAL CAPACITY CONCRETE BEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Mohammad Amiri; Amin Olfati; Shima Najjar; Peyman Beiranvand; M.H. Naseri Fard

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the flexural response of Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete (RGPC) beam. A commercial finite element (FE) software ABAQUS has been used to perform a structural behavior of RGPC beam. Using parameters such: stress, strain, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio obtained from experimental results, a beam model has been simulated in ABAQUS. The results from experimental test and ABAQUS simulation were compared. Due to friction forces at the supports and loading rollers; slip occurr...

  1. A Solitary Wave-Based Sensor to Monitor the Setting of Fresh Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piervincenzo Rizzo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a proof-of-principle study about the use of a sensor for the nondestructive monitoring of strength development in hydrating concrete. The nondestructive evaluation technique is based on the propagation of highly nonlinear solitary waves (HNSWs, which are non-dispersive mechanical waves that can form and travel in highly nonlinear systems, such as one-dimensional particle chains. A built-in transducer is adopted to excite and detect the HNSWs. The waves are partially reflected at the transducer/concrete interface and partially transmitted into the concrete. The time-of-flight and the amplitude of the waves reflected at the interface are measured and analyzed with respect to the hydration time, and correlated to the initial and final set times established by the penetration test (ASTM C 403. The results show that certain features of the HNSWs change as the concrete curing progresses indicating that it has the potential of being an efficient, cost-effective tool for monitoring strengths/stiffness development.

  2. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-02-25

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures.

  3. The solidification of aluminum production waste in geopolymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 84, DEC 1 (2014), s. 657-662 ISSN 0959-6526 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : aluminum waste * solidification * recycling * geopolymer Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 3.844, year: 2014

  4. The Performance of Geopolymers Activated by Sodium Hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyeontaek; Kang, Seunggu

    2015-08-01

    Geopolymers, a group of promising environmentally friendly materials that can work as cement substitutes, should be fabricated from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO mixtures containing large amounts of amorphous phases to ensure optimal chemical and physical properties. In this study, it was shown that geopolymers with enhanced mechanical strengths, as high as 115 MPa, could be obtained from perfectly amorphous slag from spent catalyst (SSC) discharged during automobile catalyst recycling. Geopolymer processing involved alkali-activation using a 16 M NaOH solution of pH13. The varying SSC grain size was the main experimental factor of interest, in combination with curing temperature and aging time. Variations in the mechanical strengths of the resulting geopolymers are explained by the occurrence of 10-50 nm-sized crystals and the presence of voids and pores dozens to hundreds of micrometers in size.

  5. Effect of Alkali Concentration on Fly Ash Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah Azzahran Abdullah, Siti; Yun-Ming, Liew; Bakri, Mohd Mustafa Al; Cheng-Yong, Heah; Zulkifly, Khairunnisa; Hussin, Kamarudin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of NaOH concentration on fly ash geopolymers with compressive up to 56 MPa at 12M. The physical and mechanical on fly ash geopolymer are investigated. Test results show that the compressive strength result complied with bulk density result whereby the higher the bulk density, the higher the strength. Thus, the lower water absorption and porosity due to the increasing of NaOH concentration.

  6. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: Correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantitative correlations firstly established for cementitious waste forms. • Quantitative correlations firstly established for geopolymeric materials. • Ternary DuraLith geopolymer waste forms for Hanford radioactive wastes. • Extended setting times which improve workability for geopolymer waste forms. • Reduced hydration heat release from DuraLith geopolymer waste forms. - Abstract: The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results

  7. DuraLith geopolymer waste form for Hanford secondary waste: Correlating setting behavior to hydration heat evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hui; Gong, Weiliang, E-mail: gongw@vsl.cua.edu; Syltebo, Larry; Lutze, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative correlations firstly established for cementitious waste forms. • Quantitative correlations firstly established for geopolymeric materials. • Ternary DuraLith geopolymer waste forms for Hanford radioactive wastes. • Extended setting times which improve workability for geopolymer waste forms. • Reduced hydration heat release from DuraLith geopolymer waste forms. - Abstract: The binary furnace slag-metakaolin DuraLith geopolymer waste form, which has been considered as one of the candidate waste forms for immobilization of certain Hanford secondary wastes (HSW) from the vitrification of nuclear wastes at the Hanford Site, Washington, was extended to a ternary fly ash-furnace slag-metakaolin system to improve workability, reduce hydration heat, and evaluate high HSW waste loading. A concentrated HSW simulant, consisting of more than 20 chemicals with a sodium concentration of 5 mol/L, was employed to prepare the alkaline activating solution. Fly ash was incorporated at up to 60 wt% into the binder materials, whereas metakaolin was kept constant at 26 wt%. The fresh waste form pastes were subjected to isothermal calorimetry and setting time measurement, and the cured samples were further characterized by compressive strength and TCLP leach tests. This study has firstly established quantitative linear relationships between both initial and final setting times and hydration heat, which were never discovered in scientific literature for any cementitious waste form or geopolymeric material. The successful establishment of the correlations between setting times and hydration heat may make it possible to efficiently design and optimize cementitious waste forms and industrial wastes based geopolymers using limited testing results.

  8. Physicochemical Characterization of Geopolymer Binders and Foams Made from Tunisian Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Messaoud, Imen; Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2018-01-01

    Illito-kaolinitic clay rich in hematite from south Tunisia was investigated in view of producing geopolymer materials. Geopolymers with two different densities were elaborated: cement and foam. The effects of activator concentrations on compressive strength, water absorption (durability), open porosity, and bulk density of geopolymers cement were examined, in order to assure optimal geopolymerization conditions. Geopolymer cements aged 28 days with optimum performances were achieved for 13 M ...

  9. Nanotechnology-based system for damage-resistant concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The focus of this study was to explore the use of nanotechnology-based nanofilaments, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement for improving the mechanical properties of Portland cement paste and creating multifunctiona...

  10. Characteristics of alkali activated material (geopolymer) in sulfuric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simatupang, Partogi H.

    2017-09-01

    Alkali Activated Material (AAM) or Geopolymer is a solid material which made by mixing rich silica alumina material with alkaline activator. AAM is a well known candidate to replace cement based material. Many researches have claimed that AAM has better durability compared to cement based material in agressive environment. However, there was rare paper presented the direct comparison of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM in such aggresive environment. Because of that, this paper present material characteristics of Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM if the materials were immersed in 10% sulfuric acid solution for 65 days. Material characteristics evaluated were (1) weight loss, (2) mineral of the material which evaluated by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), (3) morphology and oxide compounds of material which evaluated by SEM/EDXA (Scanning Electron Microscopic/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analyzer) and (4) compound bond which evaluated by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) Spectroscopy Testing. Alkali Activated Material used were Class F fly ash based AAM Mortar and Class C fly ash based AAM Mortar. The result is a quite difference of material characteristics between Class F fly ash based AAM and Class C fly ash based AAM.

  11. Research based teaching as a model for developing complex pre-cast concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm Pedersen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the potentials of utilising research-based teaching as a method for developing advanced concrete structures in an architectural context. A novel technique for casting concrete elements in PETG plastic is described as a body of research that formed the basis of a case in which...... master students assisted in the development and realisation of an amorphous, catenary grid-shell. Development in many areas simultaneously was essential for the success of the case studies, which made them suitable for a research-based teaching setup, where didactic considerations on a general...... and specific level were important: On a general level, three didactic tools were used: the first being the presentation of knowledge generation as something that happens between researcher and student. The second involved presenting students with a narrow focus before presenting a wide one, and the third...

  12. Temperature Measurement and Damage Detection in Concrete Beams Exposed to Fire Using PPP-BOTDA Based Fiber Optic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Hoehler, Matthew S; Smith, Christopher M; Bundy, Matthew; Chen, Genda

    2017-10-01

    In this study, distributed fiber optic sensors based on pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis (PPP-BODTA) are characterized and deployed to measure spatially-distributed temperatures in reinforced concrete specimens exposed to fire. Four beams were tested to failure in a natural gas fueled compartment fire, each instrumented with one fused silica, single-mode optical fiber as a distributed sensor and four thermocouples. Prior to concrete cracking, the distributed temperature was validated at locations of the thermocouples by a relative difference of less than 9 %. The cracks in concrete can be identified as sharp peaks in the temperature distribution since the cracks are locally filled with hot air. Concrete cracking did not affect the sensitivity of the distributed sensor but concrete spalling broke the optical fiber loop required for PPP-BOTDA measurements.

  13. Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Petrographic Analysis of Portland Cement Concrete Cores from Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire E n g in e e r R e s e a rc h a n d...coarse aggregate boundary, (c) crack in coarse aggregate into the paste, (d) view of cement and fine aggregate, with infilling of voids...infilling crack and voids, (d) view of cement and fine aggregate, with infilling of voids

  14. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced p...

  15. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  16. Algorithm for Concrete Mix Design Based on British Method | Ezeh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained from the algorithm were compared with those obtained based on the British method and the differences between them were found to be less than 10% in each example. Hence, the algorithm developed in this paper is working with minimum error. It is recommended for use in obtaining good results for ...

  17. An embedded stress sensor for concrete SHM based on amorphous ferromagnetic microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Jesús; González, Margarita; Fuente, José Vicente; Varga, Rastislav; Zhukov, Arkady; Anaya, José Javier

    2014-10-24

    A new smart concrete aggregate design as a candidate for applications in structural health monitoring (SHM) of critical elements in civil infrastructure is proposed. The cement-based stress/strain sensor was developed by utilizing the stress/strain sensing properties of a magnetic microwire embedded in cement-based composite (MMCC). This is a contact-less type sensor that measures variations of magnetic properties resulting from stress variations. Sensors made of these materials can be designed to satisfy the specific demand for an economic way to monitor concrete infrastructure health. For this purpose, we embedded a thin magnetic microwire in the core of a cement-based cylinder, which was inserted into the concrete specimen under study as an extra aggregate. The experimental results show that the embedded MMCC sensor is capable of measuring internal compressive stress around the range of 1-30 MPa. Two stress sensing properties of the embedded sensor under uniaxial compression were studied: the peak amplitude and peak position of magnetic switching field. The sensitivity values for the amplitude and position within the measured range were 5 mV/MPa and 2.5 µs/MPa, respectively.

  18. An Embedded Stress Sensor for Concrete SHM Based on Amorphous Ferromagnetic Microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Olivera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new smart concrete aggregate design as a candidate for applications in structural health monitoring (SHM of critical elements in civil infrastructure is proposed. The cement-based stress/strain sensor was developed by utilizing the stress/strain sensing properties of a magnetic microwire embedded in cement-based composite (MMCC. This is a contact-less type sensor that measures variations of magnetic properties resulting from stress variations. Sensors made of these materials can be designed to satisfy the specific demand for an economic way to monitor concrete infrastructure health. For this purpose, we embedded a thin magnetic microwire in the core of a cement-based cylinder, which was inserted into the concrete specimen under study as an extra aggregate. The experimental results show that the embedded MMCC sensor is capable of measuring internal compressive stress around the range of 1–30 MPa. Two stress sensing properties of the embedded sensor under uniaxial compression were studied: the peak amplitude and peak position of magnetic switching field. The sensitivity values for the amplitude and position within the measured range were 5 mV/MPa and 2.5 µs/MPa, respectively.

  19. Integral procedure to assess crack filling and mechanical contribution of polymer-based healing agent in encapsulation-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilabert Villegas, Francisco Antonio; Van Tittelboom, Kim; Van Stappen, J.; Cnudde, Veerle; De Belie, Nele; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an experimental and numerical study to analyze the crack filling process in encapsulation-based self-healing concrete. A specimen consisting of two small concrete blocks has been designed containing capsules filled with a polyurethane-based healing agent. This design enables to

  20. The necessity of recovering soluble phosphorus from sewage sludge ashes before use in concrete based on concrete setting and workability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigvardsen, Nina Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2016-01-01

    on the setting and workability. When adding soluble phosphorus salts to a mortar the setting process is extended with no pronounced difference between different soluble phosphorus salts. It is therefore assumed, that the soluble phosphorus (SP) influences the concrete setting. A logarithmic relationship between......By replacing cement with alternative ashes, such as sewage sludge ashes (SSA) from mono-incineration plants, it is possible to reduce the CO2-emmision from the production of cement. SSA contains a large amount of phosphate which can be extracted before addition in concrete. The Danish Standard DS...... the increased addition of SP and the initial setting time is seen. By comparison with the limit for initial setting time established in DS/EN 450-1 it is possible to establish a limit for SP of 0.54 wt% cement. When studying the workability an objective limit for SP of 0.16 wt% cement can be established. SSA...

  1. Shear Strengthening of Concrete Structures with the use of mineral based composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanksvärd, Thomas; Täljsten, Björn; Carolin, Anders

    2009-01-01

    for rehabilitation. In addition, more traffic and heavier loads lead to the need for upgrading. Existing externally bonded strengthening systems using FRP (fiber reinforced polymers) and epoxy as bonding agents have been proven to be a good approach to repair and strengthen concrete structures. However, the use...... concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with the use of cementitious bonding agents and carbon fiber grids, denoted mineral based composites (MBC). In this study it is shown that the MBC system has a strengthening effect corresponding to that of strengthening systems using epoxy bonding agents and carbon...... fiber sheets. Different designs and material properties of the MBC system have been tested. An extensive monitoring set-up has been carried out using traditional strain gauges and photometric strain measurements to obtain strains in steel reinforcement, in FRP and strain fields on the strengthened...

  2. Predicted carbonation of existing concrete building based on the Indonesian tropical micro-climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmy, M.; Prabowo, H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper is aimed to predict the carbonation progress based on the previous mathematical model. It shortly explains the nature of carbonation including the processes and effects. Environmental humidity and temperature of the existing concrete building are measured and compared to data from local Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency. The data gained are expressed in the form of annual hygrothermal values which will use as the input parameter in carbonation model. The physical properties of the observed building such as its location, dimensions, and structural material used are quantified. These data then utilized as an important input parameter for carbonation coefficients. The relationships between relative humidity and the rate of carbonation established. The results can provide a basis for repair and maintenance of existing concrete buildings and the sake of service life analysis of them.

  3. Mixture proportioning of fly ash-concretes based on mortar strength and flow data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusrat, A.; Tahir, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    A method of mixture proportioning of fly ash concretes is presented. The method is based on the strength and flow data of a minimum of nine fly ash-cement mortars. The essence of the method is that three fly ash-binder ratios are to be combined with three water-binder ratios in the range of interest. The strength and water demand data are analyzed for constructing mixture proportion charts. The strength vs. water-binder ratio charts are prepared by down-scaling the 50-mm mortar strength to the 150-mm standard concrete cylinders. The method is illustrated with the help of examples. The trial mixtures proportioned using the proposed methods have reasonably achieved the 28 day target strengths. (author)

  4. Image-based method for monitoring of crack opening on masonry and concrete using Mobile Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Martins

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automatic method based on the computing vision, implemented in a mobile platform, to inspect cracks in masonry and concrete. The developed algorithm for image processing performs this task from images of the cracks evolution. The contribution of this paper is the development of a mobile tool with quick response aiming to assist technicians in periodic visits when monitoring the crack opening in masonry and concrete. The obtained results show, successfully, the dimensional alterations of cracks detected by mobile phone in a faster and accurate way compared with the conventional measurement technique. Regardless the irregular shape of the cracks, the proposed method has the advantage of producing results statistically significant in measurement repetition by decreasing the subjectivity inherent to manual measurement technique.

  5. Porous concrete basic property criteria as rigid pavement base layer in indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Aldila Melania Care Frisky

    2018-01-01

    moment of rainfall or after rainfall. In that condition, the present of traffic might also create movement below the foundation layer and reduce its bearing capacity. Nevertheless, the foundation material that contain large fine creates base layer with low permeability and slow water movement. This paper presented the procedure and result of laboratory experimental study to obtain basic property criteria for rigid pavement base layer.The porous concrete mixture was successfully designed and surpassed the minimum requirements required by Directorate General of Highways [11] [12]. It was found that there was very strong correlation between void content and permeability which created fine likelihood to use void content to represent porous concrete permeability behavior. High void content with good connection resulting weaker aggregate interlocking inside the mixture so that permeability rose whereas compressive strength fell. Solid fresh density and more filled by cement paste created a smaller void that would reduce permeability and improve compressive strength. Strong correlation between fresh density towards void content and permeability opened potency to use the fresh density as a reference to set the desired porous concrete void content on the field.

  6. Magnetic-based NDE of steel in prestressed and post-tensioned concrete bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpoor, Al

    1998-03-01

    This paper addresses a study, funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), that is currently underway at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. The objective of the study is to develop an automated non-destructive testing system based on the magnetic flux leakage principle that would allow assessment of the condition of reinforcing and prestressing steels in concrete bridge components. Corrosion or cracking of steel within concrete members will be detected and evaluated. The system will be used as a self clamping and moving sensing device that can be installed on a concrete girder. Data from the sensing device is transmitted via a wireless communication system to data recording/analysis equipment on the ground. The sensing device may also be operated manually to allow inspection of local areas such as the end bearing or cable anchorage locations in cable bridges. Through performing a correlation analysis of recorded data, an assessment of the condition of the member under test is made. Reference data base for the correlation analysis is established through laboratory and field testing with known conditions.

  7. Fibre Concrete 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  8. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Hardjito, Djwantoro; Yahya, Zarina

    2015-05-21

    This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA) using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud) and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value) of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA) ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced.

  9. Optimization of NaOH Molarity, LUSI Mud/Alkaline Activator, and Na2SiO3/NaOH Ratio to Produce Lightweight Aggregate-Based Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiza Abdul Razak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mechanical function and characterization of an artificial lightweight geopolymer aggregate (ALGA using LUSI (Sidoarjo mud and alkaline activator as source materials. LUSI stands for LU-Lumpur and SI-Sidoarjo, meaning mud from Sidoarjo which erupted near the Banjarpanji-1 exploration well in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia on 27 May 2006. The effect of NaOH molarity, LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA ratio, and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio to the ALGA are investigated at a sintering temperature of 950 °C. The results show that the optimum NaOH molarity found in this study is 12 M due to the highest strength (lowest AIV value of 15.79% with lower water absorption and specific gravity. The optimum LUSI mud/Alkaline activator (LM/AA ratio of 1.7 and the Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio of 0.4 gives the highest strength with AIV value of 15.42% with specific gravity of 1.10 g/cm3 and water absorption of 4.7%. The major synthesized crystalline phases were identified as sodalite, quartz and albite. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM image showed more complete geopolymer matrix which contributes to highest strength of ALGA produced.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Fly Ash Geopolymer for Water Absorbent Material

    OpenAIRE

    Anggarini Ufafa; Sukmana Ndaru Candra; Prasetya Fandi Angga

    2017-01-01

    Geopolymer as a water absorbent material has been synthesized from fly ash. This research aims to determine the ability of geopolymer to save water content with variations of NaOH molar ratio. In this research, the synthesis of geopolymer was conducted by setting NaOH molar ratio at 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 M. The resulting material characterization was done by using XRD, FTIR and SEM in order to characterize the geopolymer structures. Water absorption capacity was measured by immersing the geopolyme...

  11. Morphology and Properties of Geopolymer Coatings on Glass Fibre-Reinforced Epoxy (GRE pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahedan Noor Fifinatasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer coatings were coated on glass fibre-reinforced epoxy (GRE pipe by using kaolin, white clay and silica sand as source materials and sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 as alkaline solution. The microstructure and mechanical property of geopolymer coating on GRE pipe were methodically investigated through morphology analysis, and flexural strength test. The result indicates the microstructure and interfacial layer between geopolymer coating and GRE pipe significantly influence the mechanical property of geopolymer coating. However, different source materials gave different microstructure and property in geopolymer coating.

  12. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  13. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  14. A heat transfer correlation based on a surface renewal model for molten core concrete interaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourniaire, B. . E-mail bruno.tourniaire@cea.fr

    2006-01-01

    The prediction of heat transfer between corium pool and concrete basemat is of particular significance in the framework of the study of PWR's severe accident. Heat transfer directly governs the ablation velocity of concrete in case of molten core concrete interaction (MCCI) and, consequently, the time delay when the reactor cavity may fail. From a restricted hydrodynamic point of view, this issue is related to heat transfer between a heated bubbling pool and a porous wall with gas injection. Several experimental studies have been performed with simulant materials and many correlations have been provided to address this issue. The comparisons of the results of these correlations with the measurements and their extrapolation to reactor materials show that strong discrepancies between the results of these models are obtained which probably means that some phenomena are not well taken into account. The main purpose of this paper is to present an alternative heat transfer model which was originally developed for chemical engineering applications (bubble columns) by Deckwer. A part of this work is devoted to the presentation of this model, which is based on a surface renewal assumption. Comparison of the results of this model with available experimental data in different systems are presented and discussed. These comparisons clearly show that this model can be used to deal with the particular problem of MCCI. The analyses also lead to enrich the original model by taking into account the thermal resistance of the wall: a new formulation of the Deckwer's correlation is finally proposed

  15. Research on the imaging of concrete defect based on the pulse compression technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Zheng; Zhang, Bi-Xing; Shi, Fang-Fang; Xie, Fu-Li

    2013-06-01

    When the synthetic aperture focusing technology (SAFT) is used for the detection of the concrete, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and detection depth are not satisfactory. Therefore, the application of SAFT is usually limited. In this paper, we propose an improved SAFT technique for the detection of concrete based on the pulse compression technique used in the Radar domain. The proposed method first transmits a linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal, and then compresses the echo signal using the matched filtering method, after which a compressed signal with a narrower main lobe and higher SNR is obtained. With our improved SAFT, the compressed signals are manipulated in the imaging process and the image contrast is improved. Results show that the SNR is improved and the imaging resolution is guaranteed compared with the conventional short-pulse method. From theoretical and experimental results, we show that the proposed method can suppress noise and improve imaging contrast, and can also be used to detect multiple defects in concrete.

  16. Experience-based training of students on concretes reinforced by recycled carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgun, Cumhur; Patlolla, Vamsidhar R.; Alzahrani, Naif; Zeineddine, Hatim F.; Asmatulu, Eylem

    2017-04-01

    Fiber reinforcement increases many properties of the concretes, such as toughness, strength, abrasion, and resistance to corrosion. Use of recycled carbon fibers from industrial waste offers many advantages because it will reduce the waste, contribute the economy, protect natural resources and improve the property of structural units. The City of Wichita, KS is known to be "Air Capital of the World" where many aircraft companies have been producing aircraft, parts and components. Due to the superior properties of composites (e.g., light weight, low density, high impact resistance), they have been highly used by aircraft industry. Prepreg is the most preferred combination of the fiber and resin due to the easy application, but it has a limited shelf life (e.g., three months to one year at most) and scrap has no use after all in the same industry. Every year tons of un-used prepreg or after use scrap are being collected in Wichita, KS. Recycling prepreg from the post-consumer waste offers great advantages of waste reduction and resource conservation in the city. Reusing the carbon fibers obtained from outdated prepreg composites for concrete reinforcement will offer double advantages for our environment and concrete structures. In this study, recycled carbon fibers of the outdated prepreg composites were collected, and then incorporated with concretes at different ratios prior to the molding and mechanical testing. An undergraduate student was involved in the project and observed all the process during the laboratory studies, as well as data collection, analysis and presentation. We believe that experience based learning will enhance the students' skills and interest into the scientific and engineering studies.

  17. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    -linear material model of concrete properties in tension until the load-deformation response matched the one of experimental testing. Based on the results of finite element simulations the mathematical expressions for the material constitutive law for concrete composite were obtained using the least squares approach. Internal moments, shear and thrust forced developed in the pipe under the three-edge bearing were determined. In addition, finite element model of pipe-soil interaction was developed to determine the deflections of the pipe under a range of backfill heights. A part of this research was a qualitative evaluation of fiber distribution in concrete pipe using statistical approach. The study revealed that the variation of fiber distribution varies with the fiber content in concrete. This study has resulted in the development of a stand-alone performance based specification (ASTM C1765-13) for steel fiber reinforced concrete pipes, which has been approved in 2013.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of geopolymer from bottom ash and rice husk ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggarini, Ufafa; Sukmana, Ndaru C.

    2016-02-01

    All Geopolymer (GP) has been synthesized from bottom ash and rice husk ash. This research aims to determine the effect of Si/Al ratio on geopolymer synthesis. Geopolymer was synthesized with various Si/Al ratio of 2, 3 and 4. The characterization result using XRD and SEM indicated that by using a different ratio of Si/A, it will produce geopolymer with varied structure and morphology. Diffractogram result shows that polymerization has been done for all samples (GP2, GP3, Gp4) with the presence of hump peak at 2θ = 27-35°. In GP4, no peak at 2θ = 18° indicating sodalite phase forming. Besides that, the morphology of geopolymer with a varied ratio of Si/Al shows that higher ratio will produce geopolymer with higher particle size. The highest compressive strength of geopolymer was obtained at a ratio of Si/Al = 4, with a maximum load of 12866 kgf.

  19. Effect of Grinding Fineness of Fly Ash on the Properties of Geopolymer Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the development of geopolymer foam prepared from ground F class power station fly ash. The effect of the fly ash fineness on the rheology of the geopolymer paste and the foam properties have been investigated. The raw fly ash was ground in a ball mill for various duration, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min. Geopolymer paste was prepared from the raw and ground fly ash with NaOH – sodium silicate mixture as alkaline activator. Geopolymer foam production was made using H2O2 as foaming agent. Additionally, the geopolymer material structure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, the foam cell structure was monitored using optical microscopy. The rheological behaviour of the geopolymer paste changed due to the grinding of fly ash (from Bingham plastic to Newtonian liquid. Grinding of fly ash has a significant effect on the physical properties as well as on the cell structure of the geopolymer foam.

  20. Characterisation of irradiation effect on geo-polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to improve knowledge about the radiation effect on geo-polymer behavior in terms of dihydrogen release and general strength in order to consider them as an alternative to usual nuclear waste cementitious coating matrices. Using various characterization techniques (nitrogen adsorption, low temperature DSC, FTIR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy) and by means of simulation irradiations (gamma, heavy ions), it has been shown that all the water present in the geo-polymer could be radiolyzed and that there was a confinement effect on the water radiolysis under low LET irradiation, probably due to efficient energy transfers from the solid matrix to the interstitial solution. Three dihydrogen production rates have been identified with the absorbed dose, depending on the concentration of dissolved dioxygen and the dihydrogen accumulation in the geo-polymer matrix. The good mechanical strength of the geo-polymer has been shown up to 9 MGy under gamma irradiation and is due to its high stability under irradiation. This could be explained by the fast recombination of the defects observed by EPR spectroscopy. However, phase crystallization was revealed during irradiation with heavy ions, which may induce some weakening of the geo-polymer network under alpha irradiation. The overall results helped to understand the phenomenology in a waste package under storage conditions. (author) [fr

  1. Encapsulation of aluminium in geopolymers produced from metakaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, C.; Neville, T. P.; Omakowski, T.; Vandeperre, L.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Bensted, J.; Simons, S. J. R.; Cheeseman, C. R.

    2014-04-01

    Magnox swarf contaminated with trace levels of Al metal is an important UK legacy waste originated from the fuel rod cladding system used in Magnox nuclear power stations. Composite cements made from Portland cement and blast furnace slag form a potential encapsulation matrix. However the high pH of this system causes the Al metal to corrode causing durability issues. Geopolymers derived from metakaolin are being investigated as an alternative encapsulation matrix for Magnox swarf waste and the corrosion kinetics and surface interactions of Al with metakaolin geopolymer are reported in this paper. It is shown that the pH of the geopolymer paste can be controlled by the selection of metakaolin and the sodium silicate solution used to form the geopolymer. A decrease in pH of the activation solution reduces corrosion of the Al metal and increases the stability of bayerite and gibbsite layers formed on the Al surface. The bayerite and gibbsite act as a passivation layer which inhibits further corrosion and mitigates H2 generation. The research shows that optimised metakaolin geopolymers have potential to be used to encapsulate legacy Magnox swarf wastes.

  2. Encapsulation of aluminium in geopolymers produced from metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenzel, C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Neville, T.P. [Centre for CO_2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Omakowski, T. [Flowcrete, Group Ltd., Cheshire (United Kingdom); Vandeperre, L. [Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, A.R. [Institute of Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bensted, J.; Simons, S.J.R. [Centre for CO_2 Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, C.R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Magnox swarf contaminated with trace levels of Al metal is an important UK legacy waste originated from the fuel rod cladding system used in Magnox nuclear power stations. Composite cements made from Portland cement and blast furnace slag form a potential encapsulation matrix. However the high pH of this system causes the Al metal to corrode causing durability issues. Geopolymers derived from metakaolin are being investigated as an alternative encapsulation matrix for Magnox swarf waste and the corrosion kinetics and surface interactions of Al with metakaolin geopolymer are reported in this paper. It is shown that the pH of the geopolymer paste can be controlled by the selection of metakaolin and the sodium silicate solution used to form the geopolymer. A decrease in pH of the activation solution reduces corrosion of the Al metal and increases the stability of bayerite and gibbsite layers formed on the Al surface. The bayerite and gibbsite act as a passivation layer which inhibits further corrosion and mitigates H{sub 2} generation. The research shows that optimised metakaolin geopolymers have potential to be used to encapsulate legacy Magnox swarf wastes.

  3. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  4. Aqueous dissolution of sodium aluminosilicate geopolymers derived from metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Z., E-mail: zaynab.aly@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Vance, E.R. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Perera, D.S. [School of Materials Science, University of NSW, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dilute solutions, Na, Al and Si releases were not sensitive to pH in range 4-10. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating from 18 to 90 Degree-Sign C in DIW, Na dissolution rate increased by a factor of {approx}4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental extractions in DIW at 18 Degree-Sign C increased linearly with time over 1-7 days. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Na release kinetics in DIW followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contact with KCl, KHCO{sub 3} and phthalate buffers (pH6 and 10) resulted in Na{sup +} {r_reversible} K{sup +} exchange. - Abstract: In dilute aqueous solutions, the elemental releases of Na, Al and Si from a metakaolin-based sodium aluminosilicate geopolymer were not very sensitive to pH in the range of 4-10 but increased outside this range, particularly on the acidic side. To minimise pH drifts, experiments were carried out using small amounts of graded powders in relatively large volumes of water. In deionised water, the Na dissolution rate in 7 days was dominant and increased by at least a factor of {approx}4 on heating from 18 to 90 Degree-Sign C, with greater increases in the extractions of Al and Si. At 18 Degree-Sign C the elemental extractions in deionised water increased approximately linearly with time over the 1-7 days period. Further exposure led to a slower extraction into solution for Na and Si, with a decrease in extraction of Al. It was deduced that framework dissolution was important in significantly acidic or alkaline solutions, but that contributions from water transfer from pores to elemental extractions were present, even at low temperatures in neutral solutions. It was also deduced from the Na release data that the Na leaching kinetics of geopolymer in deionised water (dilute solutions) followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the pseudo-second-order rate constant evaluated. Contact with KCl, KHCO{sub 3}, and pH {approx}6 and 10

  5. The influence of kind of coating additive on the compressive strength of RCA-based concrete prepared by triple-mixing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper deals with the use of alternative powder additives (fly ash and fine fraction of recycled concrete) to improve the recycled concrete aggregate and this occurs directly in the concrete mixing process. Specific mixing process (triple mixing method) is applied as it is favourable for this goal. Results of compressive strength after 2 and 28 days of hardening are given. Generally, using powder additives for coating the coarse recycled concrete aggregate in the first stage of triple mixing resulted in decrease of compressive strength, comparing the cement. There is no very important difference between samples based on recycled concrete aggregate and those based on natural aggregate as far as the cement is used for coating. When using both the fly ash and recycled concrete powder, the kind of aggregate causes more significant differences in compressive strength, with the values of those based on the recycled concrete aggregate being worse.

  6. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  7. Economical concrete mix design utilizing blended cements, performance-based specifications, and pay factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This report showcases several new approaches of using materials science and structural mechanics to accomplish : sustainable design of concrete materials. The topics addressed include blended cements, fiber-reinforced concrete : (FRC), internal curin...

  8. Reactive powder based concretes: Mechanical properties, durability and hybrid use with OPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwirzen, A.; Penttala, V.; Vornanen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The basic mechanical properties, frost durability and the bond strength with normal strength concretes of the ultra high strength (UHS) mortars and concretes were studied. The produced mixes had plastic or fluid-like consistency. The 28-day compressive strength varied between 170 and 202 MPa for the heat-treated specimens and between 130 and 150 MPa for the non-heat-treated specimens. The shrinkage values were two times higher for the UHS mortars in comparison with the UHS concretes. After the initial shrinkage, swelling was noticed in the UHS mortars. The lowest creep values were measured for the non-heat-treated UHS concretes. The frost-deicing salts durability of the UHS mortars and concretes appeared to be very good even despite the increased water uptake of the UHS concretes. The study of the hybrid concrete beams indicated the formation of low strength transition zone between the UHS mortar and normal strength concrete

  9. Field site leaching from recycled concrete aggregates applied as sub-base material in road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsen, Christian J; Wibetoe, Grethe; van der Sloot, Hans A; Lund, Walter; Petkovic, Gordana

    2012-06-15

    The release of major and trace elements from recycled concrete aggregates used in an asphalt covered road sub-base has been monitored for more than 4 years. A similar test field without an asphalt cover, directly exposed to air and rain, and an asphalt covered reference field with natural aggregates in the sub-base were also included in the study. It was found that the pH of the infiltration water from the road sub-base with asphalt covered concrete aggregates decreased from 12.6 to below pH 10 after 2.5 years of exposure, whereas this pH was reached within only one year for the uncovered field. Vertical temperature profiles established for the sub-base, could explain the measured infiltration during parts of the winter season. When the release of major and trace elements as function of field pH was compared with pH dependent release data measured in the laboratory, some similar pH trends were found. The field concentrations of Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn were found to be low throughout the monitoring period. During two of the winter seasons, a concentration increase of Cr and Mo was observed, possibly due to the use of de-icing salt. The concentrations of the trace constituents did not exceed Norwegian acceptance criteria for ground water and surface water Class II. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The application of experimental design models in order to optimize the synthesis of geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kioupis Dimitris

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to propose the methodology and the mathematical tools for the design and development of geopolymeric materials from industrial wastes and by-products. The applied methodology follows the Taguchi fractional experimental design allowing the investigation of the combining effect of selected parameters in the response of the experimental system by conducting the minimum number of experiments. Two cases of geopolymer synthesis optimization based on the mechanical strength and the apparent density of the products, to which the Taguchi methodology has been successfully applied, are presented in the paper.

  11. Chemical composition and strength of dolomite geopolymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizat, E. A.; Al Bakri, A. M. M.; Liew, Y. M.; Heah, C. Y.

    2017-09-01

    The chemical composition of dolomite and the compressive strength of dolomite geopolymer composites were studied. The both composites prepared with mechanical mixer manufactured by with rotor speed of 350 rpm and curing in the oven for 24 hours at 80˚C. XRF analysis showThe dolomite raw materials contain fewer amounts of Si and Al but high Ca in its composition. Dolomite geopolymer composites with 20M of NaOH shows greater and optimum compressive strength compared to dolomite geopolymer with other NaOH molarity. This indicated better interaction of dolomite raw material and alkaline activator need high molarity of NaOH in order to increase the reactivity of dolomite.

  12. Ductile behavior of polyethylene fibre reinforced geopolymer composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shaikh Faiz Uddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of various volume fractions of polyethylene (PE fibres of 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and 2% on tensile, flexure and compressive behavior of PE fibres reinforced geopolymer composites (PE-FRGC. Results show that the 1% PE fibre by volume is the optimum fibre volume fraction for fly ash geopolymer composite, which exhibit superior strain and deflection hardening behavior in uni-axial tension and three-point bending, respectively. Results also show that the compressive strength of the composites decreases with increase in volume fractions of PE fibre. The fibre surface examination of PE fibre in the gopolymer matrix using scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS revealed no significant damage of PE fibre in the alkaline geopolymer matrix.

  13. Use of advanced corrosion monitoring for risk based management of concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Klinghoffer, O.; Eri, J.; Leggedoor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Reinforced concrete is a cost effective material used widely in our infrastructure. The durable combination of steel and concrete provides safety and serviceability. Normally, the physics and chemistry of concrete protects reinforcing steel against corrosion. Over time this protection can be lost

  14. Portland cement based fast-setting concrete demonstration, district 07, Los Angeles County

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The California Department of Transportation currently uses fast-setting concrete to accommodate short working windows. The current special provision for fast-setting concrete requires that the concrete reach a flexural strength of 2.8 MPa (400 psi) b...

  15. Reinforcement layout design for concrete structures based on continuum damage and truss topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Oded; Sigmund, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a new procedure for the layout design of reinforcement in concrete structures. Concrete is represented by a gradient-enhanced continuum damage model with strain-softening and reinforcement is modeled as elastic bars that are embedded into the concrete domain. Adjoint...

  16. Viscoelastic monitoring of curing geo-polymer by ultrasonic rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, Julien; Poulesquen, Arnaud; Frizon, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The suggested method is based on the exploitation of the ultrasonic shear waves reflection phenomenon from an interface which consists in an elastic reference medium and a viscoelastic material of interest. We applied this method to the geo-polymer; this polymer-like material is inorganically synthesized by the alkaline activation of an aluminosilicate source (metakaolin) in an aqueous solution. This work aims to understand the geo-polymerization mechanisms from the early fresh paste up to the hardened state. A dedicated self-made cell was built to transmit a broadband pulse in the mega-hertz range to study the reflected shear wave from the elastic/viscoelastic interface. An important issue of this method is the accurate determination of the phase angle and the module of the acoustic reflection coefficient. Both parameters are directly linked to the viscoelastic evolution and, thus, to physicochemical properties. The complex shear modulus is obtained with this method. At present, the percolation time is well correlated with standard dynamic rheology characterization. (authors)

  17. POROUS MICROSTRUCTURE OF THE INTERFACIAL TRANSITION ZONE IN GEOPOLYMER COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinerová M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with a comparison of the differences in the structure, composition and micromechanical properties of a metakaolinite geopolymer composite matrix, inside and outside of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ with quartz grains of added silica sand. The microstructure is investigated by a measurement of the mercury porosimetry, microscopy and by a measurement in SEM and AFM, completed by Raman spectroscopy. Weaker mechanical properties, micropores in the ITZ, a higher concentration of Al atoms and hydroxyl groups than in the ambient matrix were detected. The water transport is probably the reason for the micropore formation, caused by disequilibrium in the course of solid-phase building from geopolymer dispersion.

  18. Temperature measurement and damage detection in concrete beams exposed to fire using PPP-BOTDA based fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi; Hoehler, Matthew S.; Smith, Christopher M.; Bundy, Matthew; Chen, Genda

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Brillouin scattering-based distributed fiber optic sensor is implemented to measure temperature distributions and detect cracks in concrete structures subjected to fire for the first time. A telecommunication-grade optical fiber is characterized as a high temperature sensor with pulse pre-pump Brillouin optical time domain analysis (PPP-BODTA), and implemented to measure spatially-distributed temperatures in reinforced concrete beams in fire. Four beams were tested to failure in a natural gas fueled compartment fire, each instrumented with one fused silica, single-mode optical fiber as a distributed sensor and four thermocouples. Prior to concrete cracking, the distributed temperature was validated at locations of the thermocouples by a relative difference of less than 9%. The cracks in concrete can be identified as sharp peaks in the temperature distribution since the cracks are locally filled with hot air. Concrete cracking did not affect the sensitivity of the distributed sensor but concrete spalling broke the optical fiber loop required for PPP-BOTDA measurements.

  19. Predictive equations for compressive strength of concrete based on Schmidt hammer rebound and ultrasonic pulse velocity data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arum, C; Omoare, A.

    2013-01-01

    The compressive strength of concrete is assessed to ensure uniformity of the placed concretc and adequacy of thc strcngth. Non-destructive test (NDT) techniques of ultrasonic pulse velocity and Schmidt rebound hammer tests are commonly used to estimate concrete strength, but the applicability is dependent on correlation of the data with the compressive strength of concrete, the equipment calibration and interpretation of the data. Twenty four standard concrcte cubes were cast respectively from 3 concrete mixes, and tested after 28 days of curing by ultrasonic velocity, rebound hammer and crushing tests. The data were analysed by regression methods to obtain equations for predicting the compression strength of concrete based on the ultrasonic pulse velocity and rebound number. Accurate prediction of the strength of concrete was made when the ultrasonic pulse velocity and the rebound hammer data were combined than when used separately, as the standard error was least. Comparison on the calibration curves of the prediction equations with published plots showed very good agreement. (au)

  20. CircleBoard-Pro: Concrete manipulative-based learning cycle unit for learning geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamhari, Wongkia, Wararat

    2018-01-01

    Currently, a manipulative is commonly used in mathematics education as a supported tool for teaching and learning. With engaging natural interaction of a concrete manipulative and advantages of a learning cycle approach, we proposed the concrete manipulative-based learning cycle unit to promote mathematics learning. Our main objectives are to observe possibilities on the use of a concrete manipulative in learning geometry, and to assess students' understanding of a specific topic, angle properties in a circle, of secondary level students. To meet the first objective, the concrete manipulative, called CricleBoard-Pro, was designed. CircleBoard-Pro is built for easy to writing on or deleting from, accurate angle measurement, and flexible movement. Besides, learning activities and worksheets were created for helping students to learn angle properties in a circle. Twenty eighth graders on a lower secondary school in Indonesia were voluntarily involved to learn mathematics using CircleBoard-Pro with the designed learning activities and worksheets. We informally observed students' performance by focusing on criteria of using manipulative tools in learning mathematics while the learning activities were also observed in terms of whether they work and which step of activities need to be improved. The results of this part showed that CircleBoard-Pro complied the criteria of the use of the manipulative in learning mathematics. Nevertheless, parts of learning activities and worksheets need to be improved. Based on the results of the observation, CircleBoard-Pro, learning activities, and worksheets were merged together and became the CircleBoardPro embedded on 5E (Engage - Explore - Explain - Elaborate - Evaluate) learning cycle unit. Then, students understanding were assessed to reach the second objective. Six ninth graders from an Indonesian school in Thailand were recruited to participate in this study. Conceptual tests for both pre-and post-test, and semi

  1. Effect of Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE pipe filled with Geopolymer Materials for Piping Application: Compression Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hashim Mohammad Firdaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to achieve the highest compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with the geopolymer filler content of weight percentage that were used in glass reinforced epoxy pipe. The samples were prepared by using the filament winding method. The effect of weight percentage of geopolymer materials in epoxy hardener was studied under mechanical testing, which is using the compression test. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 – 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is white clay were prepared. The compression strength of the glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled geopolymer materials is determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples with white clay geopolymer filler are much higher compare to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. Moreover, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with white clay geopolymer filler was increased from 10 wt% to 30 wt% of geopolymer content. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with white clay geopolymer filler suddenly decreased when added to 40 wt%. The results indicated that the blending of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  2. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis of fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X S; Collins, F G; Zhao, X L; Wang, Q Y

    2012-10-30

    Six mixtures with different recycled aggregate (RA) replacement ratios of 0%, 50% and 100% were designed to manufacture recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) and alkali-activated fly ash geopolymeric recycled concrete (GRC). The physical and mechanical properties were investigated indicating different performances from each other. Optical microscopy under transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were carried out in this study in order to identify the mechanism underlying the effects of the geopolymer and RA on concrete properties. The features of aggregates, paste and interfacial transition zone (ITZ) were compared and discussed. Experimental results indicate that using alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer as replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) effectively improved the compressive strength. With increasing of RA contents in both RAC and GRC, the compressive strength decreased gradually. The microstructure analysis shows that, on one hand, the presence of RA weakens the strength of the aggregates and the structure of ITZs; on the other hand, due to the alkali-activated fly ash in geopolymer concrete, the contents of Portlandite (Ca(OH)(2)) and voids were reduced, as well as improved the matrix homogeneity. The microstructure of GRC was changed by different reaction products, such as aluminosilicate gel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A neurosemantic theory of concrete noun representation based on the underlying brain codes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Adam Just

    Full Text Available This article describes the discovery of a set of biologically-driven semantic dimensions underlying the neural representation of concrete nouns, and then demonstrates how a resulting theory of noun representation can be used to identify simple thoughts through their fMRI patterns. We use factor analysis of fMRI brain imaging data to reveal the biological representation of individual concrete nouns like apple, in the absence of any pictorial stimuli. From this analysis emerge three main semantic factors underpinning the neural representation of nouns naming physical objects, which we label manipulation, shelter, and eating. Each factor is neurally represented in 3-4 different brain locations that correspond to a cortical network that co-activates in non-linguistic tasks, such as tool use pantomime for the manipulation factor. Several converging methods, such as the use of behavioral ratings of word meaning and text corpus characteristics, provide independent evidence of the centrality of these factors to the representations. The factors are then used with machine learning classifier techniques to show that the fMRI-measured brain representation of an individual concrete noun like apple can be identified with good accuracy from among 60 candidate words, using only the fMRI activity in the 16 locations associated with these factors. To further demonstrate the generativity of the proposed account, a theory-based model is developed to predict the brain activation patterns for words to which the algorithm has not been previously exposed. The methods, findings, and theory constitute a new approach of using brain activity for understanding how object concepts are represented in the mind.

  4. Lightweight concrete masonry units based on processed granulate of corn cob as aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino, J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A research work was performed in order to assess the potential application of processed granulate of corn cob (PCC as an alternative lightweight aggregate for the manufacturing process of lightweight concrete masonry units (CMU. Therefore, CMU-PCC were prepared in a factory using a typical lightweight concrete mixture for non-structural purposes. Additionally, lightweight concrete masonry units based on a currently applied lightweight aggregate such as expanded clay (CMU-EC were also manufactured. An experimental work allowed achieving a set of results that suggest that the proposed building product presents interesting material properties within the masonry wall context. Therefore, this unit is promising for both interior and exterior applications. This conclusion is even more relevant considering that corn cob is an agricultural waste product.En este trabajo de investigación se evaluó la posible aplicación de granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz como un árido ligero alternativo en el proceso de fabricación de unidades de mampostería de hormigón ligero. Con esta finalidad, se prepararon en una fábrica diversas unidades de mampostería no estructural con granulado procesado de la mazorca de maiz. Además, se fabricaran unidades de mampostería estándar de peso ligero basado en agregados de arcilla expandida. Este trabajo experimental permitió lograr un conjunto de resultados que sugieren que el producto de construcción propuesto presenta interesantes propiedades materiales en el contexto de la pared de mampostería. Por lo tanto, esta solución es prometedora tanto para aplicaciones interiores y exteriores. Esta conclusión es aún más relevante teniendo en cuenta que la mazorca de maíz es un producto de desecho agrícola.

  5. Development of polystyrene-geopolymer composite for thermal insulating material and its properties with special regards to flame resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucsi, G.; Szabó, R.; Nagy, S.; Bohács, K.; Gombkötő, I.; Debreczeni, Á.

    2017-10-01

    As a first part of the research, systematic experimental series were conducted in order to develop an appropriate fly ash-based geopolymer binder focusing on the workability of the paste. In these series, the NaOH molar ratio and water glass/NaOH ratio were investigated and the fineness of the fly ash was optimized presented in a recent paper. Based on these results the effect of metakaolin on the mechanical properties was studied. After developing the appropriate binder, experimental series were carried out using ground polystyrene as light aggregate in various concentration (from 30 V/V% up to 98 V/V%) and geopolymer as a binder in order to develop a heat insulating material. Compressive and flexural strength, specimen density, flammability, freeze-thaw resistance were determined in order to characterize the composite product. As a result of the experimental investigation, it was found that the flexural strength of the composite was found to be ~400 kPa which is as high as the original polystyrene heat insulating panel. Additionally, the flammability was much better than the original pure PS product, the sample was not ignited even at higher PS content (90%). Furthermore, the freeze-thaw resistance of the composite improved compared with the neat geopolymer.

  6. Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures With Spring Base Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun Myint Aung; Tin Tin Win, Nyan Myint Kyaw

    2008-06-01

    In the study, analysis and design of four storey reinforced concrete building and it's isolations which is located in seismic zone 4. Then comparison of analysis result between fixed base condition and isolated condition of the building due to multi direction earthquake motions such as horizontal and vertical earthquake. Firstaly, static analysis is used for fixed base condition due to gravity unfactored load to design the helical spring. Secondly spectrum analysis is only utilized for horizontal earthquake and time history analysis is used for both horizontal earthquake and vertical earthquake respectively. Finally, comparison of the analysis results as forces, displacements, drifts, accelerations and shear at various levels of building are presented. The static period of fixed base is 0.4 sec. According to the base isolated concept, base isolated period is lengthened to 0.8 sec, 1 sec and 1.2sec for design earthquake level. The results which are especially compared to base isolated (1.2 sec) and fixed base building show that the displacements of base isolated is more than fixed base building but other seismic response such as acceleration of base isolated is significantly reduced compared to fixed base as well as base isloated building has capacity for reducing of member force of the structure with fixed base building

  7. The High Teperature Influence on Geopolymer Fly Ash Mixture’s Compressisive Strength with Insudtrial Waste Material Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, R.; Wibowo, B.; Subekti, S.; Santoso, S. E.; Hardiyanto, E.; Kaelani, Y.; Mallu, L. L.

    2017-11-01

    This research aimed to figure out the influence of fly ash mixture from the industrial waste at the temperatures of 150°C, 450°C, 750°C viewed from the strength and resistance of geopolymer paste. As a result, cement will be substituted by industrial waste like fly ash. This experimental research was conducted on the mix design of geopolymer concrete which was made by dimension with 2.5 cm in diameter and 5 cm in height from four mixture composition of fly ash and industrial waste i.e. 100% fly ash, 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash, 50% fly ash+50% sandblast, and 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste. Each mixture was tested in terms of porosity and compressive strength. In conclusion, in the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% Sandblast and 50% fly ash+50% bottom ash in 12 molars, 1.5 activator comparison can be used to substitute fly ash at high temperature. Meanwhile, the mixture of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste in 8 molars, 0.5 activator comparison has very small strength remaining if it is compared to the mixture of fly ash and other industrial waste (Bottom ash and Sandblast). The performance of mixture paste of 50% fly ash+50% carbide waste was very vulnerable after being burnt. Consequently, it cannot be used as the main structure at high temperature.

  8. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ernesto Kalaw

    2016-07-01

    , scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Using a Scheffé-based mixture design, targeting applications with low thermal conductivity, light weight and moderate strength and allowing for a maximum of five percent by mass of rice hull ash in consideration of the waste utilization of all three components, it has been determined that an 85-10-5 by weight ratio of CFA-CBA-RHA activated with 80-20 by mass ratio of 12 M NaOH and sodium silicate (55% H2O, modulus = 3 produced geopolymers with a compressive strength of 18.5 MPa, a volumetric weight of 1660 kg/m3 and a thermal conductivity of 0.457 W/m-°C at 28-day curing when pre-cured at 80 °C for 24 h. For this study, the estimates of embodied energy and CO2 were all below 1.7 MJ/kg and 0.12 kg CO2/kg, respectively.

  9. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-07-15

    electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Using a Scheffé-based mixture design, targeting applications with low thermal conductivity, light weight and moderate strength and allowing for a maximum of five percent by mass of rice hull ash in consideration of the waste utilization of all three components, it has been determined that an 85-10-5 by weight ratio of CFA-CBA-RHA activated with 80-20 by mass ratio of 12 M NaOH and sodium silicate (55% H₂O, modulus = 3) produced geopolymers with a compressive strength of 18.5 MPa, a volumetric weight of 1660 kg/m³ and a thermal conductivity of 0.457 W/m-°C at 28-day curing when pre-cured at 80 °C for 24 h. For this study, the estimates of embodied energy and CO₂ were all below 1.7 MJ/kg and 0.12 kg CO₂/kg, respectively.

  10. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaw, Martin Ernesto; Culaba, Alvin; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Gallardo, Susan; Promentilla, Michael Angelo

    2016-01-01

    electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Using a Scheffé-based mixture design, targeting applications with low thermal conductivity, light weight and moderate strength and allowing for a maximum of five percent by mass of rice hull ash in consideration of the waste utilization of all three components, it has been determined that an 85-10-5 by weight ratio of CFA-CBA-RHA activated with 80-20 by mass ratio of 12 M NaOH and sodium silicate (55% H2O, modulus = 3) produced geopolymers with a compressive strength of 18.5 MPa, a volumetric weight of 1660 kg/m3 and a thermal conductivity of 0.457 W/m-°C at 28-day curing when pre-cured at 80 °C for 24 h. For this study, the estimates of embodied energy and CO2 were all below 1.7 MJ/kg and 0.12 kg CO2/kg, respectively. PMID:28773702

  11. ''Geopolymers": same basic chemistry, different microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomo, A.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the effect of certain working variables on the microstructural evolution of oven-dried, alkali-activated fly ash. The results show that the main reaction product in the activation process (in all the systems studied is an amorphous aluminosilicate gel with a three-dimensional structure. Nonetheless, the type and concentration of the activator used as well as the natural ageing of the materials and origin of the prime materials were also found to have a substantial impact on microstructural development in the "geopolymers " synthesised, particularly from the morphological standpoint.

    Este trabajo describe el efecto de determinadas variables de trabajo sobre la evolución microestructural de sistemas basados en cenizas volantes térmica y alcalínamente activadas. Los resultados demuestran que el principal producto de reacción en el proceso de activación (en todos los sistemas estudiados es un aluminosilicato amorfo con características de gel y con estructura tridimensional. Sin embargo el tipo y la concentración del activador usado, así como el envejecimiento natural de los materiales y el origen diferente de las materias primas han demostrado también ser variables que afectan sustancialmente al desarrollo microestructural de los ''geopolimeros" sintetizados, especialmente desde el punto de vista morfológico.

  12. Seismic Damage Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dam Based on Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunben Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to the dam damage assessment is analyzing the remaining seismic carrying capacity after an earthquake occurs. In this paper, taking Koyna concrete gravity dam as the object of study, the dynamic response and damage distribution of the dam are obtained based on the concrete damage plastic constitutive model. By using time-frequency localization performance of wavelet transform, the distribution characteristics of wavelet energy for gravity dam dynamic response signal are revealed under the action of different amplitude earthquakes. It is concluded by numerical study that the wavelet energy is concentrated in low-frequency range with the improving of seismic amplitude. The ultimate peak seismic acceleration is obtained according to the concentration degree of low-frequency energy. The earthquake damage of the dam under the moderate-intensity earthquake is simulated and its residual seismic bearing capacity is further analyzed. The new global damage index of the dam is proposed and the overall damage degree of the dam can be distinguished using defined formula under given earthquake actions. The seismic bearing capacity of the intact Koyna dam is 591 gal considering the dam-water interaction and its residual seismic bearing capacity after simulating earthquake can be calculated.

  13. Properties of concretes and wood composites using a phosphate-based binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Luong Thanh

    Magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics are from the family of phosphate-based cements which can be used as alternatives to Portland cements. In this study, concretes and wood composites were produced using magnesium potassium phosphate ceramic binders and supplementary materials including fly ash, sand, silica fume and sawdust. Bentonite, Delvo Stabilizer and baking soda were used as additives to increase the workability and the setting time of the fresh mixutres and decrease the density of the hardened products. The materials were then reinforced with chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics to increase their hardened properties. At 50% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the concretes had compressive strength and density of 33 MPa and 2170 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days of simple curing. At 20% fly ash by total mass of the binder, the wood composites had compressive strength and density of 13 MPa and 1320 kg/m3, respectively, after 90 days. The flexural strengths were about 10% to 47% of the corresponding cylinder compressive strengths for these mixes. Increases in both compressive and flexural strengths for these mixes were observed with the addition of chopped glass-fibers or textile glass-fabrics.

  14. GPR identification of voids inside concrete based on the support vector machine algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xiongyao; Li, Pan; Qin, Hui; Liu, Lanbo; Nobes, David C

    2013-01-01

    Voids inside reinforced concrete, which affect structural safety, are identified from ground penetrating radar (GPR) images using a completely automatic method based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The entire process can be characterized into four steps: (1) the original SVM model is built by training synthetic GPR data generated by finite difference time domain simulation and after data preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction. (2) The classification accuracy of different kernel functions is compared with the cross-validation method and the penalty factor (c) of the SVM and the coefficient (σ2) of kernel functions are optimized by using the grid algorithm and the genetic algorithm. (3) To test the success of classification, this model is then verified and validated by applying it to another set of synthetic GPR data. The result shows a high success rate for classification. (4) This original classifier model is finally applied to a set of real GPR data to identify and classify voids. The result is less than ideal when compared with its application to synthetic data before the original model is improved. In general, this study shows that the SVM exhibits promising performance in the GPR identification of voids inside reinforced concrete. Nevertheless, the recognition of shape and distribution of voids may need further improvement. (paper)

  15. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  16. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  17. Time-resolved and spatially-resolved infrared spectroscopic observation of seeded nucleation controlling geopolymer gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimohammadi, Ailar; Provis, John L; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2011-05-15

    The effect of seeded nucleation on the formation and structural evolution of one-part ("just add water") geopolymer gels is investigated. Gel-forming systems are seeded with each of three different oxide nanoparticles, and seeding is shown to have an important role in controlling the silica release rate from the solid geothermal silica precursor, and in the development of physical properties of the gels. Nucleation accelerates the chemical changes taking place during geopolymer formation. The nature of the seeds affects the structure of the growing gel by affecting the extent of phase separation, identified by the presence of a distinct silica-rich gel in addition to the main, more alumina-rich gel phase. Synchrotron radiation-based infrared microscopy (SR-FTIR) shows the effect of nucleation on the heterogeneous nanostructure and microstructure of geopolymer gels, and is combined with data obtained by time-resolved FTIR analysis to provide a more holistic view of the reaction processes at a level of detail that has not previously been available. While spatially averaged (ATR-FTIR) infrared results show similar spectra for seeded and unseeded samples which have been cured for more than 3 weeks, SR-FTIR results show marked differences in gel structure as a result of seeding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Basic Physical – Mechanical Properties of Geopolymers Depending on the Content of Ground Fly Ash and Fines of Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sičáková Alena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The binding potential of fly ash (FA as a typical basic component of building mixtures can be improved in mechanical way, which unfolds new possibilities of its utilization. This paper presents the possibilities of preparing the geopolymer mixtures based on ground (dm = 31.0 μm FA, used in varying percentages to the original (unground; dm = 74.1 μm one. As a modification, fine-grain sludge from the process of washing the crushed aggregates was used as filler in order to obtain mortar-type material. The basic physical-mechanical properties of mixtures are presented and discussed in the paper, focusing on time dependence. The following standard tests were executed after 2, 7, 28, and 120 days: density, total water absorption, flexural strength, and compressive strength. Ground FA provided for positive effect in all tested parameters, while incorporation of fine portion of sludge into the geopolymer mixture does not offer a significant technical profit. On the other hand, it does not cause the decline in the properties, so the environmental effect (reduction of environmental burden can be applied through its incorporation into the geopolymer mixtures.

  19. Basic Physical - Mechanical Properties of Geopolymers Depending on the Content of Ground Fly Ash and Fines of Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sičáková, Alena; Števulová, Nadežda

    2017-06-01

    The binding potential of fly ash (FA) as a typical basic component of building mixtures can be improved in mechanical way, which unfolds new possibilities of its utilization. This paper presents the possibilities of preparing the geopolymer mixtures based on ground (dm = 31.0 μm) FA, used in varying percentages to the original (unground; dm = 74.1 μm) one. As a modification, fine-grain sludge from the process of washing the crushed aggregates was used as filler in order to obtain mortar-type material. The basic physical-mechanical properties of mixtures are presented and discussed in the paper, focusing on time dependence. The following standard tests were executed after 2, 7, 28, and 120 days: density, total water absorption, flexural strength, and compressive strength. Ground FA provided for positive effect in all tested parameters, while incorporation of fine portion of sludge into the geopolymer mixture does not offer a significant technical profit. On the other hand, it does not cause the decline in the properties, so the environmental effect (reduction of environmental burden) can be applied through its incorporation into the geopolymer mixtures.

  20. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Fly Ash Based Concrete Exposed to Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagadgar, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Saha, Suman; Rajasekaran, C.

    2017-06-01

    Efforts over the past few years for improving the performance of concrete suggest that cement replacement with mineral admixtures can enhance the strength and durability of concrete. Feasibility of producing good quality concrete by using alccofine and fly ash replacements is investigated and also the potential benefits from their incorporation were looked into. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the performance of concrete in severe marine conditions exposed upto a period of 150 days. This work investigates the influence of alccofine and fly ash as partial replacement of cement in various percentages (Alccofine - 5% replacement to cement content) and (fly ash - 0%, 15%, 30%, 50% & 60% to total cementitious content) on mechanical and durability properties (Permit ion permeability test and corrosion current density) of concrete. Usage of alccofine and high quantity of fly ash as additional cementitious materials in concrete has resulted in higher workability of concrete. Inclusion of alccofine shows an early strength gaining property whereas fly ash results in gaining strength at later stage. Concrete mixes containing 5% alccofine with 15% fly ash replacement reported greater compressive strength than the other concrete mixes cured in both curing conditions. Durability test conducted at 56 and 150 days indicated that concrete containing higher percentages of fly ash resulted in lower permeability as well lesser corrosion density.

  1. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Fly Ash Based Concrete Exposed to Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagadgar Sarfaraz Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Efforts over the past few years for improving the performance of concrete suggest that cement replacement with mineral admixtures can enhance the strength and durability of concrete. Feasibility of producing good quality concrete by using alccofine and fly ash replacements is investigated and also the potential benefits from their incorporation were looked into. In this study, an attempt has been made to assess the performance of concrete in severe marine conditions exposed upto a period of 150 days. This work investigates the influence of alccofine and fly ash as partial replacement of cement in various percentages (Alccofine - 5% replacement to cement content and (fly ash - 0%, 15%, 30%, 50% & 60% to total cementitious content on mechanical and durability properties (Permit ion permeability test and corrosion current density of concrete. Usage of alccofine and high quantity of fly ash as additional cementitious materials in concrete has resulted in higher workability of concrete. Inclusion of alccofine shows an early strength gaining property whereas fly ash results in gaining strength at later stage. Concrete mixes containing 5% alccofine with 15% fly ash replacement reported greater compressive strength than the other concrete mixes cured in both curing conditions. Durability test conducted at 56 and 150 days indicated that concrete containing higher percentages of fly ash resulted in lower permeability as well lesser corrosion density.

  2. Utilization of cement treated recycled concrete aggregates as base or subbase layer in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, environmental protection has a great concern in Egypt where recycling of increased demolition debris has become a viable option to be incorporated into roads applications. An extensive laboratory program is conducted to study the feasibility of using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA mixed with traditional limestone aggregate (LSA which is currently being used in base or subbase applications in Egypt. Moreover, the influence of mixture variables on the mechanical properties of cement treated recycled aggregate (CTRA is investigated. Models to predict the compressive and tensile strengths based on mixture parameters are established. The results show that the adding of RCA improves the mechanical properties of the mixture where the unconfined compressive strength (UCS is taken as an important quality indicator. Variables influencing the UCS such as cement content, curing time, dry density play important roles to determine the performance of CTRA.

  3. Durability of metakaolin geopolymers with various sodium silicate/sodium hydroxide ratios against seawater exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Nur Ain; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Li, Long-Yuan; Sandu, Andrei Victor; Hussin, Kamarudin; Ming, Liew Yun

    2017-09-01

    This work presents an investigation of the performance of metakaolin geopolymers exposed to the continuous immersion of seawater. The geopolymers were prepared from metakaolin by activating with a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions and cured at 80°C. The ratios of sodium silicate to sodium hydroxide were varied from 0.20 to 0.32. The result showed that metakaolin geopolymers reduce in strength after immersion in seawater for 28 days. The unexposed samples with highest compressive strength attained greatest strength retention. White deposits were formed on the surface of the geopolymers after the exposure to seawater which was believed due to the depolymerisation process of the geopolymer network. Even so, the metakaolin geopolymers did not substantially change in dimension and remain structurally intact.

  4. EFFECT OF CALCINATION TEMPERATURE OF TUNISIAN CLAYS ON THE PROPERTIES OF GEOPOLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essaidi N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous three dimensional aluminosilicate materials that may be synthesized at room or slightly higher temperature by alkaline activation of aluminosilicates obtained from industrial wastes, calcined clays and natural minerals. Among the different family of geopolymers, two Tunisian clays (a kaolinite clay from Tabarka and illito/kaolinitic clay from Medenine are tested for their feasibility of geopolymers at low temperature. The unfired and calcined clays were dissolved in strongly alkaline solution in order to produce consolidated materials whose pastes were characterized by their compressive strength. Hardened geopolymer samples were also submitted to X-Ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The geopolymer strength is related to the structure and reactivity of the clay generated by thermal treatment and to the role of associated minerals in clays. The amorphous character of obtained geopolymers and the displacement of the IR wavenumber are signature of geopolymerisation reaction.

  5. Geopolymers and their potential applications in the nuclear waste management field. A bibliographical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarel, Vincent; Motooka, Takafumi; Yamagishi, Isao

    2017-06-01

    After a necessary decay time, the zeolites used for the water decontamination will eventually be conditioned for their long-term storage. Geopolymer is considered as a potential matrix to manage radioactive cesium and strontium containing waste. For such applications, a correct comprehension of the binder structure, its macroscopic properties, its interactions with the waste and the physico-chemical phenomena occurring in the wasteform is needed to be able to judge of the soundness and viability of the material. Although the geopolymer is a young binder, a lot of research has been carried out over the last fifty years and our understanding of this matrix and its potential applications is progressing fast. This review aims at gathering the actual knowledge on geopolymer studies about geopolymer composites, geopolymer as a confinement matrix for nuclear wastes and geopolymer under irradiation. This information will finally provide guidance for the future studies and experiments. (author)

  6. Reinforcement of the terracotta sculpture by geopolymer composite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Steinerová, Michaela; Straka, Pavel; Perná, Ivana; Siegl, P.; Švarcová, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 8 (2009), s. 3229-3234 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : reinforcement * geopolymer * ceramic Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2009

  7. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Evan; Kealley, Catherine S.; van Riessen, Arie; Hart, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud) each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash). Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers. PMID:28773513

  8. Development of Abaca Fiber-reinforced Foamed Fly Ash Geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Pauline S. Ngo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental and economic concerns have led to the need for more sustainable construction materials. The development of foamed geopolymer combines the benefit of reduced environmental footprint and attractive properties of geopolymer technology with foam concrete’s advantages of being lightweight, insulating and energy-saving. In this study, alkali-treated abaca fiber-reinforced geopolymer composites foamed with H2O2 were developed using fly ash as the geopolymer precursor. The effects of abaca fiber loading, foaming agent dosage, and curing temperature on mechanical strength were evaluated using Box-Behken design of experiment with three points replicated. Volumetric weight of samples ranged from 1966 kg/m3 to 2249 kg/m3. Measured compressive strength and flexural ranged from 19.56 MPa to 36.84 MPa, and 2.41 MPa to 6.25 MPa, respectively. Results suggest enhancement of compressive strength by abaca reinforcement and elevated temperature curing. Results, however, indicate a strong interaction between curing temperature and foaming agent dosage, which observably caused the composite’s compressive strength to decline when simultaneously set at high levels. Foaming agent dosage was the only factor detected to significantly affect flexural strength.

  9. Porous microstructure of the interfacial transition zone in geopolymer composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinerová, Michaela; Schweigstillová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2013), s. 328-335 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP104/12/P477 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : geopolymer matrix * filler aggregates * boundary * porosity Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 0.434, year: 2013 http://www.ceramics-silikaty.cz/2013/2013_04_328.htm

  10. Effect of fly ash calcination in geopolymer synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Jatiningrum, Mirna; Arisiani, Gresia

    2015-12-01

    Geopolymer, a largely amorphous class of inorganic polymer consisting of aluminosilicate repeat units, is an environmentally attractive engineering material due to its ability to consume aluminosilicate waste as raw materials. This work studies the effect of the calcination temperature of a coal fly ash generated by a low-efficiency boiler on the mechanical strength of geopolymer mortar synthesized using a mixture of the fly ash, potassium hydroxide as the alkali activator, and locally available sand as the filler aggregate. The calcination temperature is varied between 500-700 °C, with a calcination period of 2 hours in an electric furnace. Two sand samples with different particle size distributions are used. The key response variable is the compressive strength at room temperature, measured after curing at 80 °C for 7 and 14 days. Uncalcined ash, with a carbon content of approximately 31.0%, is not amenable for geopolymer synthesis. Analysis of experimental data using the ANOVA method for general factorial design identifies significant main effects for all three experimental variables. Two-way interactions are significant, except that between sand type and curing period. Higher calcination temperature significantly improves the strength of the mortar. However, the strength of the obtained geopolymer mortars are still significantly lower than that of ordinary Portland cement mortar.

  11. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Evan; Kealley, Catherine S; van Riessen, Arie; Hart, Robert D

    2016-05-19

    The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud) each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash). Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers.

  12. Advances in 27Al MAS NMR studies of geopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Abbrent, Sabina; Kobera, Libor; Urbanová, Martina; Cuba, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 2016 (2016), s. 79-147 ISSN 0066-4103 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-24155S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : geopolymers * aluminosilicates * solid-state NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.600, year: 2016

  13. Geopolymers as potential repair material in tiles conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Catarina F. M.; Lima, Augusta M.; Delgado-Rodrigues, José; Mimoso, João Manuel; Pereira, Sílvia R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The restoration materials currently used to fill gaps in historical architectural tiles (e.g. lime or organic resin pastes) usually show serious drawbacks in terms of compatibility, effectiveness or durability. The existing solutions do not fully protect Portuguese faïence tiles ( azulejos) in outdoor conditions and frequently result in further deterioration. Geopolymers can be a potential solution for tile lacunae infill, given the chemical-mineralogical similitude to the ceramic body, and also the durability and versatile range of physical properties that can be obtained through the manipulation of their formulation and curing conditions. This work presents and discusses the viability of the use of geopolymeric pastes to fill lacunae in tiles or to act as "cold" cast ceramic tile surrogates reproducing missing tile fragments. The formulation of geopolymers, namely the type of activators, the alumino-silicate source, the quantity of water required for adequate workability and curing conditions, was studied. The need for post-curing desalination was also considered envisaging their application in the restoration of outdoor historical architectural tiles frequently exposed to adverse environmental conditions. The possible advantages and disadvantages of the use of geopolymers in the conservation of tiles are also discussed. The results obtained reveal that geopolymers pastes are a promising material for the restoration of tiles, when compared to other solutions currently in use.

  14. Optimising Ambient Setting Bayer Derived Fly Ash Geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Jamieson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bayer process utilises high concentrations of caustic and elevated temperature to liberate alumina from bauxite, for the production of aluminium and other chemicals. Within Australia, this process results in 40 million tonnes of mineral residues (Red mud each year. Over the same period, the energy production sector will produce 14 million tonnes of coal combustion products (Fly ash. Both industrial residues require impoundment storage, yet combining some of these components can produce geopolymers, an alternative to cement. Geopolymers derived from Bayer liquor and fly ash have been made successfully with a compressive strength in excess of 40 MPa after oven curing. However, any product from these industries would require large volume applications with robust operational conditions to maximise utilisation. To facilitate potential unconfined large-scale production, Bayer derived fly ash geopolymers have been optimised to achieve ambient curing. Fly ash from two different power stations have been successfully trialled showing the versatility of the Bayer liquor-ash combination for making geopolymers.

  15. The Experience on Geopolymer Technology in Semi-Industrial Production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boura, P.; Ertl, Z.; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Perná, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 300-305 ISSN 2161-6221 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : geopolymer * semi-industrial * production Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials http://davidpublishing.org/journals_show_abstract.html?5272-0

  16. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  17. Morphology and Properties of Geopolymer Coatings on Glass Fibre-Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe

    OpenAIRE

    Shahedan Noor Fifinatasha; Abdullah Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Ghazali Che Mohd Ruzaidi; Binhussain Mohammed; Al Husaini Mohammed; Hussin Kamarudin; Ramasamy Shamala

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymer coatings were coated on glass fibre-reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe by using kaolin, white clay and silica sand as source materials and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) as alkaline solution. The microstructure and mechanical property of geopolymer coating on GRE pipe were methodically investigated through morphology analysis, and flexural strength test. The result indicates the microstructure and interfacial layer between geopolymer coating and GRE pipe significant...

  18. Investigation into Suitability of Geopolymers (Illite & Metakaolin) for the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    years as replacements for traditional cements because of lower densities and easier curing conditions. Generally, geopolymers have fewer effluents than... geopolymers up to this point are in the production of so-called ―green cements ‖ which are environmentally friendlier to produce than the traditional...Portland cement , and as coatings for fire resistant materials. Since geopolymers have an easy application process and a low toxicity, as well as the

  19. Properties of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) Geopolymer Mortar Cured at Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Olivia Monita; Mona Tambunan Lora; Saputra Edy

    2017-01-01

    Geopolymer material needs high temperature curing to produce good microstructure, high strength, and durable product. However, curing at ambient temperature is more preferable and practical in application for cast in situ geopolymer. In order to allow curing at ambient temperature, the geopolymer is mixed with mineral additives that has high calcium content such as slag, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and high calcium fly ash. In this study, the Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was added in the...

  20. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkyeong Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process.