WorldWideScience

Sample records for based dental materials

  1. Evidence-based Update of Pediatric Dental Restorative Procedures: Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V; Hsu, K L; Coll, J A; Ginsberg, E; Ball, B M; Chhibber, S; Johnson, M; Kim, M; Modaresi, N; Tinanoff, N

    2015-01-01

    The science of dental materials and restorative care in children and adolescent is constantly evolving, and the ongoing search for ideal restorative materials has led to plethora of research. To provide an evidence base to assist dental practitioners choose appropriate restorative care for children and adolescents. This evidence-based review appraises this literature, primarily between the years 1995-2013, for efficacy of dental amalgam, composites, glass ionomer cements, compomers, preformed metal crowns and anterior esthetic restorations. The assessment of evidence for each dental material was based on a strong evidence, evidence in favor, expert opinion, and evidence against by consensus of the authors. There is varying level of evidence for the use of restorative materials like amalgam, composites, glass ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, compomers, stainless steel crowns and anterior crowns for both primary and permanent teeth. A substantial amount data is available on restorative materials used in pediatric dentistry; however, there exists substantial evidence from systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials and clinicians need to examine and understand the available literature evidence carefully to aid them in clinical decision making.

  2. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  3. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, A J; Proff, P C; Richter, E J; Jakob, P M

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus(®) (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold-ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient's mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research.

  4. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  5. Dental impression material

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-06

    eugenol paste,[10] amalgam filling,[11] and gutta‑percha.[12] The present report presents a case of dental impression material that passed through an oro‑antral fistula while in its plastic form, solidified inside the maxillary sinus, and ...

  6. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  7. How much do resin-based dental materials release? A meta-analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landuyt, K L; Nawrot, Tim; Geebelen, B; De Munck, J; Snauwaert, J; Yoshihara, K; Scheers, Hans; Godderis, Lode; Hoet, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2011-08-01

    Resin-based dental materials are not inert in the oral environment, and may release components, initially due to incomplete polymerization, and later due to degradation. Since there are concerns regarding potential toxicity, more precise knowledge of the actual quantity of released eluates is necessary. However, due to a great variety in analytical methodology employed in different studies and in the presentation of the results, it is still unclear to which quantities of components a patient may be exposed. The objective of this meta-analytical study was to review the literature on the short- and long-term release of components from resin-based dental materials, and to determine how much (order of magnitude) of those components may leach out in the oral cavity. Out of an initial set of 71 studies, 22 were included. In spite of the large statistical incertitude due to the great variety in methodology and lack of complete information (detection limits were seldom mentioned), a meta-analytical mean for the evaluated eluates was calculated. To relate the amount of potentially released material components with the size of restorations, the mean size of standard composite restorations was estimated using a 3D graphical program. While the release of monomers was analyzed in many studies, that of additives, such as initiators, inhibitors and stabilizers, was seldom investigated. Significantly more components were found to be released in organic than in water-based media. Resin-based dental materials might account for the total burden of orally ingested bisphenol A, but they may release even higher amounts of monomers, such as HEMA, TEGDMA, BisGMA and UDMA. Compared to these monomers, similar or even higher amounts of additives may elute, even though composites generally only contain very small amounts of additives. A positive correlation was found between the total quantity of released eluates and the volume of extraction solution. There is a clear need for more accurate

  8. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  9. Mechanical and antibacterial properties of benzothiazole-based dental resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Lao, Chonghui; Luo, Shuzhen; Liu, Fang; Huang, Qiting; He, Jingwei; Lin, Zhengmei

    2018-04-01

    A synthesized benzothiazole containing mono-methacrylate monomer BTTMA was incorporated into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resin system with a series of mass concentration from 5 to 30 wt.% as an antibacterial agent. The influence of BTTMA on physicochemical properties of dental resin system, such as double bond conversion (DC), volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) were investigated. Direct contact testing and agar diffusion testing were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin. The results showed that BTTMA could endow dental resin with significant antibacterial activity when its concentration reached a certain amount (20 wt.%), and the antibacterial activity of BTTMA containing dental resin was mainly attributed to the immobilized BTTMA instead of the unreacted leachable BTTMA. BTTMA had no negative effect on physicochemical properties of dental resin, and even some BTTMA containing dental resins had advantages like higher DC, lower VS and WS when compared with control resin. Therefore, BTTMA could be considered as a suitable antibacterial agent in dental material, but much more researches concerned about biocompatibility should be done in future to prove whether it could be applied in clinic.

  10. Tribology of dental materials: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z R; Zheng, J

    2008-01-01

    The application of tribology in dentistry is a growing and rapidly expanding field. Intensive research has been conducted to develop an understanding of dental tribology for successful design and selection of artificial dental materials. In this paper, the anatomy and function of human teeth is presented in brief, three types of current artificial dental materials are summarized, and their advantages and disadvantages, as well as typical clinical applications, are compared based on the literature. Possible tribological damage of tooth structure, which is induced by complex interfacial motion, and friction-wear test methods are reported. According to results obtained by the authors and from the literature, the main progress in the area of dental tribology on both natural teeth and artificial dental materials is reviewed. Problems and challenges are discussed and future research directions for dental tribology are recommended. (topical review)

  11. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    WOOLSEY 27 Zinc oxide and eugenol materials and resin cavity varnishes are contraindicated for use with all resin restorative materials. S.S. White has a...varnish of methyl cellulose which does not appear to affect the organic matrix in resin restorations. Low strength disalicylate bases, like "Dycal...34 (L.D.Caulk) and "Life" (Kerr), can be used to cover dentin surfaces in place of zinc oxide and eugenol materials ( eugenol inhibits the set of the organic

  12. Radiopacity of Dental Materials: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on the radiopacity of dental materials in order to emphasize its importance. Evidence Acquisition English-language literature was investigated using manual and electronic searches for the terms “radiopacity,” “dental material,” “cement,” “composite,” “ceramic,” “endodontic root canal sealer,” “bone graft,” and “acrylic resin” in the databases of Medline, google scholar, and Scopus up to April 2016. Seventy-nine selected publications, including review articles, original articles, and books, were evaluated. Results The radiopacity of different dental materials may be lower or higher than that of the replaced tissue depending on the restorative material used. The research revealed that highly-radiopaque materials should not be used in dental restorations, except as bone graft and endodontic root canal filling materials. For most of the dental restorative materials, moderate radiopacity within the range of the replaced dental tissue is recommended. However, the lower radiopacity of polymer-based restorative or prosthetic dental materials is still a significant clinical problem. Conclusions The author recommends using highly-radiopaque materials whenever possible for treatment of bone defects and root canals. For dental materials that replace clinical crowns, the radiopacity should be within the range of that of the replaced tooth structure (dentin or enamel. The radiopacity of dental cements should be much higher than that of the enamel in order to facilitate detection of the thin cement remnants.

  13. Cell death effects of resin-based dental material compounds and mercurials in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany); Esters, Magali; Simon, Sabine; Seiss, Mario [Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Regensburg (Germany); Folwaczny, Matthias; Glas, Juergen; Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    In order to test the hypothesis that released dental restorative materials can reach toxic levels in human oral tissues, the cytotoxicities of the resin-based dental (co)monomers hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (BisGMA) compared with methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) and the amalgam component mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) were investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) using two different test systems: (1) the modified XTT-test and (2) the modified H 33342 staining assay. The HGF were exposed to various concentrations of the test-substances in all test systems for 24 h. All tested (co)monomers and mercury compounds significantly (P<0.05) decreased the formazan formation in the XTT-test. EC{sub 50} values in the XTT assay were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found (mean [mmol/l]; s.e.m. in parentheses; n=12; * significantly different to HEMA): HEMA 11.530 (0.600); TEGDMA* 3.460 (0.200); UDMA* 0.106 (0.005); BisGMA* 0.087 (0.001); HgCl{sub 2}* 0.013 (0.001); MeHgCl* 0.005 (0.001). Following relative toxicities were found: HEMA 1; TEGDMA 3; UDMA 109; BisGMA 133; HgCl{sub 2} 887; MeHgCl 2306. A significant (P<0.05) increase of the toxicity of (co)monomers and mercurials was found in the XTT-test in the following order: HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA < HgCl{sub 2} < MeHgCl. TEGDMA and MeHgCl induced mainly apoptotic cell death. HEMA, UDMA, BisGMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrotic cell death. The results of this study indicate that resin composite components have a lower toxicity than mercury from amalgam in HGF. HEMA, BisGMA, UDMA, and HgCl{sub 2} induced mainly necrosis, but it is rather unlikely that eluted substances (solely) can reach concentrations, which might induce necrotic cell death in the human physiological situation, indicating that other (additional) factors may be involved in

  14. Mechanical behaviour of dental composite filling materials using digital holography

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, J.M.; Lopes, H.; Vaz, M.A.P.; Campos, J.C. Reis

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common clinical problems in dentistry is tooth decay. Among the dental filling materials used to repair tooth structure that has been destroyed by decay are dental amalgam and composite materials based on acrylics. Dental amalgam has been used by dentists for the past 150 years as a dental restorative material due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effects. However its safety as a filling material has been questioned due to th...

  15. Human dental pulp cell responses to new calcium silicate-based endodontic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C C; Shie, M Y; Ding, S J

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate human dental pulp cell responses to radiopaque dicalcium silicate cement and white-coloured mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA). Flow cytometry was employed to quantify the phase percentage of pulp cell cycle. Alamar Blue was used for real-time and repeated monitoring of cell proliferation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine gene expression in pulp cells cultured on the cements. The cells cultured on the radiopaque dicalcium silicate cement had similar S and G2 phases in the cell cycle and proliferation to WMTA at all culture times. In addition, the two materials presented the same evolution with similar values in interleukin-1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein gene expression at all culture times. The dental pulp cell responses to radiopaque dicalcium silicate cement were similar to those reported for WMTA in terms of cell cycle, proliferation, immunocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  16. Mechanical properties of calcium phosphate based dental filling and regeneration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-K; Lim, B-S; Kim, C-W

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate cements (CPC) for possible dental applications with varied liquid and powder compositions under the same testing condition. Cements studied in this experiment were divided into two groups of CPC not containing polymer and polymeric CPC (PCPC). Cement powder was formed by combining equimolar amounts of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and tetracalcium phosphate, or acrylic resin polymer powder mixture. The CPC specimens for the compressive strength (CS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) measurements were prepared by mixing powder and liquid for 30 s with a powder/liquid ratio of 3:1, and subsequently packing the paste into a brass mould. The specimens were kept at 37 degrees C and 100% relative humidity for 24 h before measurements were conducted on a Universal Testing Machine with a cross-head speed of 1 mm min-1. The CS of CPC was 0.14-10.29 MPa and that of PCPC was 0.26-117.58 MPa. The DTS of CPC was 0.10-4.56 MPa and that of PCPC was 0.07-22.54 MPa. The CS and DTS were very diverse depending on the composition of powder and liquid. Some compositions showed higher values than commercial liners. Thus compositions of 2% carboxymethyl cellulose + 35% citric acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 20% gelatin in PBS, 2% sodium alginate in PBS, 20-40% aqueous acrylic-maleic copolymer solution, and some of the HPMC and PMVE-Ma solutions exhibited promising formulae for dentine regenerating materials. Acrylic resin-PCPC group showed generally higher CS and DTS values. Based on this study, further studies on the reaction with odontoblast and resultant dentine regeneration should be performed using promising compositions.

  17. Influence of the Light Source and Curing Parameters on Microhardness of a Silorane-Based Dental Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malara P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the light source and the light-curing parameters (the distance of the material from the light source and time of light-curing on microhardness of Flitek Silorane dental composite material. Standardized samples of Filtek Silorane material were cured using two types of Light Curing Units (LCUs – halogen and LED. The distance of the light source and time of curing differed between samples. The Knoop’s microhardness was tested using microhardness tester Micromet 5103. Using LED light curing unit allowed to achieve significantly higher microhardness of silorane-based dental material Filtek Silorane than using halogen light curing unit. Decreasing the distance from the light source to the surface of silorane-based material Filtek Silorane improved its microhardness. A prolonged curing time could compensate the drop in microhardness of Filtek Silorane material resulting from an increased distance from the light source to the surface of the material only in a limited range of intervals.

  18. Contact angle and surface free energy of experimental resin-based dental restorative materials after chewing simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Beikler, Thomas; Janda, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    To investigate contact angle and surface free energy of experimental dental resin composites containing novel delivery systems of polymeric hollow beads and low-surface tension agents after chewing simulation test. A delivery system of novel polymeric hollow beads differently loaded with two low-surface tension agents was used in different amounts to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard. Surface roughness Ra, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS, its apolar γS(LW), polar γS(AB), Lewis acid γS(+) and base γS(-) terms were determined and the results prior to and after chewing simulation test were compared. Significance was phollow beads highly loaded with low-surface tension agents were found to significantly increase contact angle and thus to reduce surface free energy of experimental dental resin composites prior to and after chewing simulation test. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Autologous Modification of Dental Implants Based on Non-woven Titanium Material with a Through Porosity on the Primary Stability Indices in Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    A.E. Scherbovskih; S.A. Gafurov

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to compare primary stability values of dental implant models based on titanium non-woven material with a through porosity mounted by traditional technology and the technology of autologous modification in experiment. Materials and Methods. A randomized study was performed on 18 mandible models of pigs aged 9 to 13 months. Periotestometry method was used for comparative assessment of primary stability of dental implant models based on non-woven titanium mate...

  20. Environmental aspects of dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D

    1998-04-01

    In recent years, the possible environmental impact caused by certain routines in dental practice has attracted attention among regulators. As part of point source reduction strategies, the discharge of mercury/amalgam-contaminated wastes has been regulated in a number of countries, even though it has been documented that by adopting appropriate mercury hygiene measures, including installation of amalgam-separating devices, the environmental impact of amalgam use in dentistry is minimal. There are, so far, no data indicating the environmental impact of methacrylate-based dental filling materials. As to the occupational environment, recent reports have stated that when normal occupational recommendations for proper mercury hygiene routines are followed (e.g., water spray coolant and high vacuum suction during removal of amalgam restorations), no occupational health risk can be assumed. An increasing number of reports on occupational allergic reactions to components of polymer-based dental filling materials call for attention to the sensitizing potential of certain ingredients in these products.

  1. A new approach to influence contact angle and surface free energy of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify novel delivery systems and active agents which increase the water contact angle and reduce the surface free energy when added to resin-based dental restorative materials. Two delivery systems based on zeolite or novel polymeric hollow beads (Poly-Pore), loaded with two low surface tension active agents (hydroxy functional polydimethylsiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane) or a polymerizable active agent (silicone polyether acrylate) were used to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as a standard (ST). Flexural strength, flexural modulus, water sorption, solubility, polymerization shrinkage, surface roughness Ra, contact angle θ, total surface free energy γS, and the apolar γSLW, polar γSAB, Lewis acid γS+ and base γS- components, and the active agents surface tensions γL were determined (Ptension active agents were found not to influence the physical properties but to significantly increase the water contact angle and thus reduce surface free energy of dental resin composites. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of a selection of all-ceramic materials. Part II. Zirconia-based dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzato, Massimiliano; Albakry, Mohammad; Ringer, Simon P; Swain, Michael V

    2004-06-01

    The present study is the second part of an investigation of strength, fracture toughness and microstructure of nine all-ceramic materials. In the present study, DC Zirkon, an experimental yttria partially stabilized zirconia, In-Ceram Zirconia slip and In-Ceram Zirconia dry-pressed were compared. Strength was appraised on ten bar-shaped specimens for each material (20 x 4 x 1.2 mm) with the three-point bending method. The fracture toughness (Indentation Strength) was measured on twenty specimens (20 x 4 x 2 mm) for each ceramic. The volume fraction of each phase, the dimensions and shapes of the grains and the crack pattern were investigated with SEM. Phase transformation was investigated with X-ray diffraction. Data were compared with an ANOVA and Sheffé post hoc test (p = 0.05). Means of strength (MPa) and fracture toughness (MPa m(1/2)) values and their standard deviation were: In-Ceram Zirconia dry-pressed 476 (50)1, 4.9 (0.36)1; In-Ceram Zirconia slip 630 (58)2, 4.8 (0.50)1; the experimental yttria partially stabilized zirconia 680 (130)2, 5.5 (0.34)2; DC-Zirkon 840 (140)3, 7.4 (0.62)3. Values with the same superscript number showed no significant statistical difference. Microscope investigation and X-ray diffraction revealed the important role played by the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation and by the relationship between the glassy matrix and the crystalline phase in the strengthening and toughening mechanisms of these ceramics. the zirconia-based dental ceramics are stronger and tougher materials than the conventional glass-ceramics. Better properties can have positive influence on the clinical performance of all-ceramic restorations. Copyright 2003 Academy of Dental Materials

  3. A chemical activity evaluation of two dental calcium silicate-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalas Renata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate-based materials are interesting products widely used in dentistry. The study was designed to compare the chemical reaction between analyzed two preparates and dentin during cavity lining. In our work, dentinal discs were prepared from human extracted teeth filled with Biodentine and MTA+. The samples were then analyzed by way of SEM, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The obtained results revealed differences in elemental composition between both materials. Biodentine showed higher activity in contact with dentine. Moreover, the interfacial layer in the tooth filled by Biodentine was wider than that in the tooth filled with MTA+. The applied methods of analysis confirmed that both materials have a bioactive potential which is a promising ability.

  4. The strengthening of resin cemented dental ceramic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to advance the understanding of the mechanism of resin-strengthening conferred to dental ceramic materials by resin-based composite materials. The investigation is presented as a series of manuscripts. In the first study (Manuscript 3.1), dental porcelain disc-shaped specimens were resin-coated with three resin-based composite materials with different flexural moduli at discrete resin thicknesses. The discs were loaded to failure in a biaxial flexure t...

  5. Ex vivo and in vitro synchrotron-based micro-imaging of biocompatible materials applied in dental surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Knabe, C.; Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Dalügge, O.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Goebbels, J.

    2010-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as porous bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics or titanium are regularly applied in dental surgery: ceramics are used to support the local bone regeneration in a given defect, afterwards titanium implants replace lost teeth. The current gold standard for bone reconstruction in implant dentistry is the use of autogenous bone grafts. But the concept of guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a predictable and well documented surgical approach using biomaterials (bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics) which qualify as bone substitutes for this kind of application as well. We applied high resolution synchrotron microtomography and subsequent 3d image analysis in order to investigate bone formation and degradation of the bone substitute material in a three-dimensional manner, extending the knowledge beyond the limits of classical histology. Following the bone regeneration, titanium-based implants to replace lost teeth call for high mechanical precision, especially when two-piece concepts are used in order to guaranty leak tightness. Here, synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in these kind of highly attenuating objects. Therefore, we could study micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the specimen under different mechanical load. We could prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the micromechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential issue of failure, i. e. bacterial leakage which can induce an inflammatory process.

  6. Material properties of ceramics for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Janet Bernice

    2000-12-01

    Ceramic tooth-replacement materials have been greatly improved since their introduction near the end of the eighteenth century, but still have problems concerning clinical performance and aesthetics. Material property testing has advanced as well as the ability to form new dental ceramics. The purpose of this study was to test some of the new materials according to recently developed standards, and to utilize the results to better understand, predict and determine how to improve dental material performance and machinability. Aspects of this study include unique applications of testing methodology and the development of a new edge chipping test. A new brittleness parameter, B, is introduced. Unlike previously suggested brittleness parameters, B has theoretical significance as a volume energy to surface energy ratio. The ascertained properties were used to evaluate the dental ceramics. Toughness-related parameters were important in the clinical results, and correlations with microstructural characteristics indicate potential improvements as well as limitations. A good fit to a model predicting toughness increases with grain size, for example, suggests processing-induced thermal mismatch stresses as a toughening mechanism in glass-ceramics. Stresses that are too high, however, can result in local microcracking and a decrease in toughness. Machinability is of particular importance in fabricating dental components, which have complicated shapes and tight tolerances. As there is no currently accepted quantitative definition of machinability, a subjective analysis involving professional machinists and a regression analysis was used. Material properties and a theoretical model for material removal rates, based on lateral crack formation, were compared with the subjective machinability rankings. Although there were differences among the machinists' criteria, hardness was found to be the single most effective property in predicting machinability. High temperature properties

  7. Influence of the Light Source and Curing Parameters on Microhardness of a Silorane-Based Dental Composite Material

    OpenAIRE

    Malara P.; Czech Z.; Świderski W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the light source and the light-curing parameters (the distance of the material from the light source and time of light-curing) on microhardness of Flitek Silorane dental composite material. Standardized samples of Filtek Silorane material were cured using two types of Light Curing Units (LCUs) – halogen and LED. The distance of the light source and time of curing differed between samples. The Knoop’s microhardness was tested using microha...

  8. The Historical Evolution of Dental Impression Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochos, Ioannis; Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis

    The concept of impression making process in dentistry began in the mid 1800s. Dentists realized that the construction of a prosthetic restoration required both a detailed capture of the oral tissues along with stone cast fabrications. To accomplish these goals, impression materials were essential. Beeswax represents the first impression material, while important bechmarks during the historical evolution of dental impression materials are considered to be the introduction of dental trays in the early 1800s and the invention of the gutta-percha, thermoplastic resins and plaster of Paris. The double (corrective) impression technique, along with the functional impression concept that was established after mid 1800s, are also identified as pivotal innovations. During the 20th century, the advances in material development slowed significantly since the majority of the current impression materials had already been invented. However, the introduction of elastomeric impression materials in the field of prosthodontics that offered the advantages of accuracy and dimensional stability substantially upgraded both the impression accuracy and the quality of the final restoration. Presently, the dental practitioner has access to a variety of impression materials and should be aware of their properties, indications and limitations as well. Futhermore, while continuous attempts are being made to enhance these materials, the ideal impression material has yet to be developed. The purpose of this article was to provide a comprehensive review about the historical development of impression dental materials. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  9. An evaluation of dental operative simulation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Hong; Foster Page, Lyndie; Purton, David

    2012-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the performance of different materials used in dental operative simulation and compare them with those of natural teeth. Three typical phantom teeth materials were compared with extracted permanent teeth by a nanoindentation system and evaluated by students and registered dentists on the drilling sensation of the materials. Moreover, the tool life (machinability) of new cylindrical diamond burs on cutting the sample materials was tested and the burs were observed. Although student and dentist evaluations were scattered and inconclusive, it was found that elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) were not the main factors in determining the drilling sensation of the materials. The sensation of drilling is a reflection of cutting force and power consumption.An ideal material for dental simulation should be able to generate similar drilling resistance to that of natural tooth, which is the machinability of the material.

  10. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  11. Practitioner, patient and carious lesion characteristics associated with type of restorative material: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V; Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Rindal, D Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-06-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with the materials that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use when placing the first restoration on permanent posterior tooth surfaces. A total of 182 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data regarding 5,599 posterior teeth with caries. Practitioner-investigators completed an enrollment questionnaire that included the dentist's age, sex, practice workload, practice type and number of years since graduation. When patients who had provided informed consent to participate in the investigation sought treatment for a previously unrestored carious surface, the practitioner-investigator recorded patient and tooth characteristics. Practitioner-investigators used amalgam more often than they used direct resin-based composite (RBC) for posterior carious lesions. Practitioner and practice characteristics (years since graduation and type of practice); patient characteristics (sex, race, age and dental insurance status); and lesion characteristics (tooth location and surface, preoperative and postoperative lesion depth) were associated with the type of restorative material used. Several practitioner and practice, patient and lesion characteristics were associated significantly with use of amalgam and RBC: geographical region, years since dentist's graduation, patient's dental insurance status, tooth location and surface, and preoperative and postoperative lesion depth. Despite advances in esthetic dentistry, U.S. dentists still are placing amalgam on posterior teeth with carious lesions. Amalgam was used more often than RBC in older patients, who may have had deeper carious lesions.

  12. Are fluoride releasing dental materials clinically effective on caries control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; de Oliveira, Branca Heloisa; dos Santos, Ana Paula Pires; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2016-03-01

    (1) To describe caries lesions development and the role of fluoride in controlling disease progression; (2) to evaluate whether the use of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealants, bonding orthodontic agents and restorative materials, in comparison to a non-fluoride releasing material, reduces caries incidence in children or adults, and (3) to discuss how the anti-caries properties of these materials have been evaluated in vitro and in situ. The search was performed on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and on Medline via Pubmed. Caries is a biofilm-sugar dependent disease and as such it provokes progressive destruction of mineral structure of any dental surface - intact, sealed or restored - where biofilm remains accumulated and is regularly exposed to sugar. The mechanism of action of fluoride released from dental materials on caries is similar to that of fluoride found in dentifrices or other vehicles of fluoride delivery. Fluoride-releasing materials are unable to interfere with the formation of biofilm on dental surfaces adjacent to them or to inhibit acid production by dental biofilms. However, the fluoride released slows down the progression of caries lesions in tooth surfaces adjacent to dental materials. This effect has been clearly shown by in vitro and in situ studies but not in randomized clinical trials. The anti-caries effect of fluoride releasing materials is still not based on clinical evidence, and, in addition, it can be overwhelmed by fluoride delivered from dentifrices. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based dental materials: A systematic review and meta-analyses of technique protocol and photo-activation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Meereis, Carine Tais Welter; de Oliveira da Rosa, Wellington Luiz; da Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2018-03-08

    A systematic review was conducted to determine whether there were any alternative technique or additional step strategies available to reduce and control polymerization shrinkage stress development in dental resin-based restorative materials. This report followed the PRISMA Statement. A total of 36 studies were included in this review. Two reviewers performed a literature search up to December 2016, without restriction of the year of publication, in seven databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS, IBECS, and BBO. Only in vitro studies that evaluated polymerization shrinkage stress by direct testing were included. Pilot studies, reviews and in vitro studies that evaluated polymerization shrinkage stress by indirect methods (e.g., microleakage or cuspal deflection measurements), finite elemental analysis or mathematical models were excluded. Of the 6.113 eligible articles, 36 studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and the meta-analysis was performed with 25 studies. A global comparison was performed with random-effects models (α = 0.05). The strategies were subdivided as follows: the use of an alternative technique protocol of placing the material inside the tooth cavity; the modification of the irradiation intensity or total energy delivered to the material; the use of an alternative light-curing source; or the use of an alternative photo-activation mode. All alternative strategies showed statistically significant differences when compared with their respective controls (p material by means of an alternative technique protocol or by modifying the irradiant intensity or total energy delivered to the material during photo-activation. Moreover, the use of an alternative photo-activation mode (intermittent light, exponential, soft-start or pulse delay modes) was shown to be an effective strategy for reducing and controlling stress development in resin-based dental materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Influence of the fluoride releasing dental materials on the bacterial flora of dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuciennik, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Danuta; Krzemiński, Zbigniew; Piatowska, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of influence of silver-free, fluor releasing dental materials on dental plaque bacteria quantity. 17 patients were included into the study. 51 restorations were placed following manufacturers recommendations. Following materials were used: conventional glassionomer Ketac-Molar ESPE, resin modified glassionomer Fuji II LC GC and fluor containing composite Charisma Heraeus Kulzer Class V restorations were placed in following teeth of upper and lower jaw: canines, first bicuspids, second bicuspids. Sound enamel was a control. After 10 weeks the 72 hours old dental plaque was collected from surface of restorations and control using sterile probe. Total amount of 68 dental plaques were investigated. Each plaque was placed on scaled and sterile aluminum foil. The moist weight of dental plaque was scaled. Dental plaque was moved into 7 ml 0.85% NaCl solution reduced by cystein chlorine hydrogen and disintegrated by ultrasounds (power:100 Watt, wave amplitude: 5 micorm). The suspension of dental plaque was serially diluted from 10(-4) to 10(-5) in sterile 0,85% NaCl solution, and seeded with amount of 0.1 ml on appropriate base. In dental plaque trials the amount of cariogenic bacteria was calculated--Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Neisseria, and also total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was measured. Microbiologic studies were performed in Institute of Microbiology, Medical University, Łódź. Statistical analysis of collected data was accomplished. In 72 hours old dental plaques collected from the surfaces of Ketac -Molar, Fuji II LC, Charisma after 10 weeks since being placed into the class V cavity, results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Veillonella spp., Neisseria spp, in total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and in the quantity proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in comparison

  15. Dimensional changes of alginate dental impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamuthu, N; Braden, M; Patel, M P

    2006-12-01

    The weight loss and corresponding dimensional changes of two dental alginate impression materials have been studied. The weight loss kinetics indicate this to be a diffusion controlled process, but with a boundary condition at the surface of the concentration decreasing exponentially with time. This is in marked contrast to most desorption processes, where the surface concentration becomes instantaneously zero. The appropriate theory has been developed for an exponential boundary condition, and its predictions compared with experimental data; the agreement was satisfactory. The diffusion coefficients for two thicknesses of the same material were not identical as predicted by theory; the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  16. Nano materials for Medical and Dental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yub Kwon, T.; Oh, D.S.; Narayanan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to this special issue. Nano science and nano technology concepts are applicable across all fields of science and a more widespread application of nano materials and nano technologies is imminent or already occurring in many areas, including health care. Today is scientists take those cutting-edge technologies and concepts and apply them to medicine and dentistry. They are finding a wide variety of ways to make medical and dental materials at the nano scale to take advantage of their enhanced physical and biological properties.The purpose of this special issue is to publish high-quality research papers as well as review articles addressing recent advances in the field of nano materials for medical and dental applications. A particular interest is given to papers exploring or discussing nano materials and nano technologies related to delivery system, bonding substitutes, and surface modification techniques applicable in these areas. For this special issue, several investigators were invited to contribute original research findings that can stimulate continuing efforts to understand the cutting-edge applications of nano materials in medicine and dentistry.

  17. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  18. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  19. Mechanical characterization of materials for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.; Guiberteau, F.; Cumbrera, F. I.

    2001-01-01

    An study of the damage induced in dental materials and model multilayer systems by masticatory contact stresses, simulated by hertz ian indentation test, have been performed. In particular, the nature of induced damage has been identified, and quantified from stress-strain curves and critical loads for yielding or crack initiation. For multilayer systems, test have been numerically simulated using finite element techniques (FEM). FEM simulations complement indentation test, allowing to justify the observed fracture modes from calculated stress fields. Practical implications can be derived from our results, relevant to the design of multilayer structures tolerant to contact damage. (Author) 34 refs

  20. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Luiz de Oliveira ROSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed, Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States. Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers, synthetic resins (681 papers, dental cements (440 papers, dental alloys (392 papers and dental adhesives (361 papers. The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents, followed by dental implants (8 patents and composite resins (7 patents. Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development

  1. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  2. Color stability of nano-filled, micro-hybrid, and silorane-based dental composite resin materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Saud M ALShetili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the color stability of nano-hybrid, micro-hybrid, and silorane-based composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to staining agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty composites samples were prepared, 40 from each composite material (Filtek ® Z350, Filtek ® P90, and Filtek ® Z250. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (10 of each sample. The specimens were incubated for 24 h in distilled water and then for 72 h in corresponding mediums (distilled water, red grape juice, green tea, coffee. The color of all the specimens was assessed before and after exposure with a spectrophotometer and total color change (ΔE was calculated using ΔEFNx01 = [(ΔLFNx012 + (ΔaFNx012 + (ΔbFNx012]1/2. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the means of the solutions were compared by Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD (P 0.05 discoloration compared with other media. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it may be concluded that silorane-based composites are more resistant to discoloration than bis-GMA-based composites and coffee had the highest effect on composite discoloration compared to other media.

  3. In vitro effects of two silicate-based materials, Biodentine and BioRoot RCS, on dental pulp stem cells in models of reactionary and reparative dentinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Stanislas Loison-Robert

    Full Text Available Calcium silicate-based cements are biomaterials with calcium oxide and carbonate filler additives. Their properties are close to those of dentin, making them useful in restorative dentistry and endodontics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biological effects of two such calcium silicate cements, Biodentine (BD and Bioroot (BR, on dental stem cells in both direct and indirect contact models. The two models used aimed to mimic reparative dentin formation (direct contact and reactionary dentin formation (indirect contact. An original aspect of this study is the use of an interposed thin agarose gel layer to assess the effects of diffusible components from the materials.The two biomaterials were compared and did not modify dental pulp stem cell (DPSC proliferation. BD and BR showed no significant cytotoxicity, although some cell death occurred in direct contact. No apoptosis or inflammation induction was detected. A striking increase of mineralization induction was observed in the presence of BD and BR, and this effect was greater in direct contact. Surprisingly, biomineralization occurred even in the absence of mineralization medium. This differentiation was accompanied by expression of odontoblast-associated genes. Exposure by indirect contact did not stimulate the induction to such a level.These two biomaterials both seem to be bioactive and biocompatible, preserving DPSC proliferation, migration and adhesion. The observed strong mineralization induction through direct contact highlights the potential of these biomaterials for clinical application in dentin-pulp complex regeneration.

  4. In vitro effects of two silicate-based materials, Biodentine and BioRoot RCS, on dental pulp stem cells in models of reactionary and reparative dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison-Robert, Ludwig Stanislas; Tassin, Mathilde; Bonte, Eric; Berbar, Tsouria; Isaac, Juliane; Berdal, Ariane; Simon, Stéphane; Fournier, Benjamin P J

    2018-01-01

    Calcium silicate-based cements are biomaterials with calcium oxide and carbonate filler additives. Their properties are close to those of dentin, making them useful in restorative dentistry and endodontics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biological effects of two such calcium silicate cements, Biodentine (BD) and Bioroot (BR), on dental stem cells in both direct and indirect contact models. The two models used aimed to mimic reparative dentin formation (direct contact) and reactionary dentin formation (indirect contact). An original aspect of this study is the use of an interposed thin agarose gel layer to assess the effects of diffusible components from the materials. The two biomaterials were compared and did not modify dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) proliferation. BD and BR showed no significant cytotoxicity, although some cell death occurred in direct contact. No apoptosis or inflammation induction was detected. A striking increase of mineralization induction was observed in the presence of BD and BR, and this effect was greater in direct contact. Surprisingly, biomineralization occurred even in the absence of mineralization medium. This differentiation was accompanied by expression of odontoblast-associated genes. Exposure by indirect contact did not stimulate the induction to such a level. These two biomaterials both seem to be bioactive and biocompatible, preserving DPSC proliferation, migration and adhesion. The observed strong mineralization induction through direct contact highlights the potential of these biomaterials for clinical application in dentin-pulp complex regeneration.

  5. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; Silva, Tiago Machado; Lima, Giana da Silveira; Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in countries such as Brazil.

  6. Determination of dose rates from natural radionuclides in dental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronese, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy) and INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: ivan.veronese@unimi.it; Guzzi, G. [AIRMEB - Italian Association for Metal and Biocompatibility Research, Milan (Italy); Giussani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cantone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Different types of materials used for dental prosthetics restoration, including feldspathic ceramics, glass ceramics, zirconia-based ceramics, alumina-based ceramics, and resin-based materials, were investigated with regard to content of natural radionuclides by means of thermoluminescence beta dosimetry and gamma spectrometry. The gross beta dose rate from feldspathic and glass ceramics was about ten times higher than the background measurement, whereas resin-based materials generated negligible beta dose rate, similarly to natural tooth samples. The specific activity of uranium and thorium was significantly below the levels found in the period when addition of uranium to dental porcelain materials was still permitted. The high-beta dose levels observed in feldspathic porcelains and glass ceramics are thus mainly ascribable to {sup 4}K, naturally present in these specimens. Although the measured values are below the recommended limits, results indicate that patients with prostheses are subject to higher dose levels than other members of the population. Alumina- and zirconia-based ceramics might be a promising alternative, as they have generally lower beta dose rates than the conventional porcelain materials. However, the dosimetry results, which imply the presence of inhomogeneously distributed clusters of radionuclides in the sample matrix, and the still unsuitable structural properties call for further optimization of these materials.

  7. Protection and Reinforcement of Tooth Structures by Dental Coating Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Nikaido

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that a resin coating can serve as a means to protect dental structure after preparation of the tooth for indirect restorations, sealing the exposed dentin. The resin coating is applied on the cut surfaces immediately after tooth preparation and before making an impression by assembling a dentin bonding system and a flowable composite. Resin coatings minimize pulp irritation and improve the bond strength between a resin cement and tooth when bonding the restoration to tooth. Recently, thin-film coating dental materials based on all-in-one adhesive technology were introduced for resin coating of indirect restorations. The thin coating materials are applied in a single clinical step and create a barrier-like film layer on the prepared dentin. The thin coatings play an important role in protecting the dentin from physical, chemical, and biological irritation. In addition, these thin-film coating materials reportedly prevent marginal leakage beneath inlays or crown restorations. In light of the many benefits provided by such a protective layer, these all-in-one adhesive materials may therefore also have the potential to cover exposed root dentin surfaces and prevent caries formation. In this paper, recent progress of the dental coating materials and their clinical applications are reviewed.

  8. The effect of dental restorative materials on dental biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auschill, Thorsten Mathias; Arweiler, Nicole Birgit; Brecx, Michel; Reich, Elmar; Sculean, Anton; Netuschil, Lutz

    2002-02-01

    To investigate the arrangement of biofilms formed in vivo, volunteers wore splints with slabs of six different dental materials inserted to collect smooth surface plaque. After 5 d of undisturbed plaque accumulation, the specimens were vital stained and analyzed by the confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to evaluate the percentage of vital biofilm microflora (VF percentage). Further parameters were the area of the specimens covered by plaque (surface coating; SC, %) and the height of the biofilms (BH, pm). The metals amalgam and gold, the compomer, as well as the glass-ionomer cement harboured an almost entirely dead biofilm (VF composite led to vitality values between 4 and 21%, while a very thin biofilm on ceramic revealed the highest vitality values (34-86%). SC varied from 6% on glass-ionomer cement to 100% on amalgam. BH reached its highest value on amalgam and gold of 17 and 11 microm, respectively, while heights of between 1 and 6 microm were found on the ceramic, resin composite, compomer and the glass-ionomer cement. Within their limits, the present findings indicate that amalgam, gold, compomer and glass-ionomer cement exert an influence against the adhering biofilm. No general relationship could be established between the different parameters VF percentage, SC percentage and BH (microm).

  9. Development of a novel resin-based dental material with dual biocidal modes and sustained release of Ag+ ions based on photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xi; Chen, Yinyan; Li, Qiang; Xing, Xiaodong; Xiao, Yuhong; Peng, Xuefeng; Ye, Zhiwen

    2017-07-01

    Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge nano-antibacterial agent for designing dental materials with potent and long-lasting antibacterial property is demanding and provoking work. In this study, a novel resin-based dental material containing photocurable core-shell AgBr/cationic polymer nanocomposite (AgBr/BHPVP) was designed and developed. The shell of polymerizable cationic polymer not only provided non-releasing antibacterial capability for dental resins, but also had the potential to polymerize with other methacrylate monomers and prevented nanoparticles from aggregating in the resin matrix. As a result, incorporation of AgBr/BHPVP nanocomposites did not adversely affect the flexural strength and modulus but greatly increased the Vicker's hardness of resin disks. By continuing to release Ag + ions without the impact of anaerobic environment, resins containing AgBr/BHPVP nanoparticles are particularly suitable to combat anaerobic cariogenic bacteria. By reason of the combined bactericidal effect of the contact-killing cationic polymers and the releasing-killing Ag + ions, AgBr/BHPVP-containing resin disks had potent bactericidal activity against S. mutans. The long-lasting antibacterial activity was also achieved through the sustained release of Ag + ions due to the core-shell structure of the nanocomposites. The results of macrophage cytotoxicity showed that the cell viability of dental resins loading less than 1.0 wt% AgBr/BHPVP was close to that of neat resins. The AgBr/BHPVP-containing dental resin with dual bactericidal capability and long term antimicrobial effect is a promising material aimed at preventing second caries and prolonging the longevity of resin composite restorations.

  10. Evaluation of radiation effects on dental enamel hardness and dental restorative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Saiki, Mitiko; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki

    2000-01-01

    This research presents the results of the microhardness of human dental enamel and of the following dental restorative materials: three dental porcelains - Ceramco II, Finesse and Noritake, and two resin restorative materials - Artglass and Targis, for materials submitted to different times of irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear reactor under a thermal neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 .s -1 . The results obtained indicated that there is a decrease of the surface microhardness when the enamel is irradiated for 1 h and when dental materials are irradiated for 3 h. However, enamels irradiated for 30 min. did not show significant change of their surface hardness. Therefore, the selection of irradiation time is an important factor to be considered when irradiated teeth or dental materials are used in the investigations of their properties. (author)

  11. Effects of Different pH-Values on the Nanomechanical Surface Properties of PEEK and CFR-PEEK Compared to Dental Resin-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study determines the stability and durability of polyetheretherketone (PEEK and a carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK with 30% short carbon fibers, a dental composite based on Bis-GMA and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA under the influence of different pH-values of the oral environment in vitro. Nanomechanical properties were investigated by nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests before and after incubation of the specimens at 37 °C for 30 days in artificial saliva with pH-values of 3, 7 and 10, respectively. Nanoindentation and nanoscratching tests were performed using the Hysitron TI950 TriboIndenter to evaluate the reduced elastic moduli, nanohardness, viscoelasticity, friction coefficient and residual scratch profiles. After treatment, the nanomechanical properties of unfilled PEEK did not change. The reduced elastic moduli and nanohardness of the carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK increased significantly. The reduced elastic moduli and nanohardness of CHARISMA decreased. The plasticity of all materials except that of the unfilled PEEK increased. This indicates that different pH-values of the artificial saliva solutions had no obvious influences on the nanomechanical properties of the PEEK matrix. Therefore, the aging resistance of the unfilled PEEK was higher than those of other materials. It can be deduced that the PEEK matrix without filler was more stable than with filler in the nanoscale.

  12. Testing of DentStat (trademark) and Competing Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    comparisons, DS showed the highest values, and in flexural modulus, 13 it was the second stiffest among the tested dental restoratives and cements ...NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO TESTING OF DENTST AT™ AND COMPETING DENTAL MATERIALS Y OON HWANG PHD, JONATHAN STAHL DDS PHD, WAYNE M. D...LtCOL Wen Lien of the US Air Force Dental Evaluation and Consultation Service for assistance with the strength testing. 1 Reviewed and Approved by

  13. Validation of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for determining osseous or dental origin of unknown material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Michael A; Thomas, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Forensic anthropological examinations typically involve the analysis of human skeletal remains, but in cases where samples are very small and/or physically compromised, it may first be necessary to determine whether the material is even osseous or dental in origin. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a technique that reveals the elemental composition of materials and is hypothesized to have utility in such cases. XRF analysis was conducted on a variety of tissues and materials in unaltered and altered (damaged) states. With few exceptions, osseous and dental tissues in unaltered and altered conditions contained characteristic levels of calcium and phosphorus, while other materials did not. Materials could be accurately identified as osseous or dental in origin based on the calcium and phosphorus levels identified by XRF, and we therefore conclude that XRF analysis is a valid and effective means of determining osseous or dental origin of unknown material. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. The presence of antimony in various dental filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokhia, Anat; Combe, E.C.; Lilley, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Antimony was determined in a number of non-metallic dental materials currently used for tooth restoration. The method applied was instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of antimony in some of the brands tested was found to be as high as 900 fold that in the normal hard dental tissues. (author)

  15. Radiopacity of dental restorative materials and cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Byung Chul; Yang, Hong So; Chung, Hyun Ju; Oh, Won Mann

    1994-01-01

    The radiopacity of six composite resins, three resin luting cements and ten filling materials were studied. The purpose was to obtain an indication of radiopacity value of different brands within each of these groups of materials and to show differences in radiopacities of filling materials and natural tooth structures. On radiographs, the optimal densities of standardized samples were determined by computer imaging system and radiopacity values of the materials were expressed in millimeter equivalent aluminum. Within to groups of materials studied, there was considerable variation in radiopacity. The composite resins of P-50, Zl00 and prisma AP. H displayed much higher radiopacities than aluminum. Panavia resin cement was shown to be similarly radiopaque to aluminum. Generally, the radiopacity of base and filling materials appeared to combined applications for restorative treatment of teeth, lower radiopacity can interfere with the diagnosis and detection of gaps near the restoration.

  16. Application of reference point indentation for micro-mechanical surface characterization of calcium silicate based dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijević, Djordje; Milovanović, Petar; Riedel, Christoph; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Busse, Björn; Djurić, Marija

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate micromechanical properties of Biodentine and two experimental calcium silicate cements (CSCs) using Reference Point Indentation (RPI). Biomechanical characteristics of the cement type and the effects of a radiopacifier, liquid components, acid etching treatment and bioactivation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated by measuring the microhardness, average unloading slope (Avg US) and indentation distance increase (IDI). Biodentine had a greater microhardness than the experimental CSCs, while the Avg US and IDI values were not significantly different among investigated materials. There was a statistically significant difference in microhardness and IDI values between pure CSCs and radiopacified cements (p calcium chloride and CSCs' immersion in SBF are beneficial for CSCs' micromechanical performance, while the addition of radiopacifiers and acid etching treatment weaken the CSCs' surface. Application of RPI aids with the characterization of micromechanical properties of synthetic materials' surfaces.

  17. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  18. Role of dental restoration materials in oral mucosal lichenoid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental restorative materials containing silver-mercury compounds have been known to induce oral lichenoid lesions. Objectives: To determine the frequency of contact allergy to dental restoration materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions and to study the effect of removal of the materials on the lesions. Results: Forty-five patients were recruited in three groups of 15 each: Group A (lesions in close contact with dental materials, Group B (lesions extending 1 cm beyond the area of contact and Group C (no topographic relationship. Thirty controls were recruited in two groups of 15 individuals each: Group D (oral lichenoid lesions but no dental material and Group E (dental material but no oral lichenoid lesions. Patch tests were positive in 20 (44.5% patients. Mercury was the most common allergen to elicit a positive reaction in eight patients, followed by nickel (7, palladium (5, potassium dichromate (3, balsam of Peru, gold sodium thiosulphate 2 and tinuvin (2 and eugenol (1, cobalt chloride (1 and carvone (1. Seven patients elicited positive response to more than one allergen. In 13 of 20 patients who consented to removal of the dental material, complete healing was observed in 6 (30%, marked improvement in 7 (35% and no improvement in 7 (35% patients. Relief of symptoms was usually observed 3 months after removal. Limitations: Limited number of study subjects and short follow up after removal/replacement of dental restoration materials are the main limitations of this study. Conclusion: Contact allergy to amalgam is an important etiologic factor in oral lichenoid lesions and removal of restorative material should be offered to patients who have lesions in close proximity to the dental material.

  19. Synthetic Light-Curable Polymeric Materials Provide a Supportive Niche for Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Kyle H; Scherba, Jacob C; Bever, Alaina M; Alexander, Morgan R; Celiz, Adam D; Mooney, David J

    2018-01-01

    Dental disease annually affects billions of patients, and while regenerative dentistry aims to heal dental tissue after injury, existing polymeric restorative materials, or fillings, do not directly participate in the healing process in a bioinstructive manner. There is a need for restorative materials that can support native functions of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), which are capable of regenerating dentin. A polymer microarray formed from commercially available monomers to rapidly identify materials that support DPSC adhesion is used. Based on these findings, thiol-ene chemistry is employed to achieve rapid light-curing and minimize residual monomer of the lead materials. Several triacrylate bulk polymers support DPSC adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation in vitro, and exhibit stiffness and tensile strength similar to existing dental materials. Conversely, materials composed of a trimethacrylate monomer or bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate, which is a monomer standard in dental materials, do not support stem cell adhesion and negatively impact matrix and signaling pathways. Furthermore, thiol-ene polymerized triacrylates are used as permanent filling materials at the dentin-pulp interface in direct contact with irreversibly injured pulp tissue. These novel triacrylate-based biomaterials have potential to enable novel regenerative dental therapies in the clinic by both restoring teeth and providing a supportive niche for DPSCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Educational material of dental anatomy applied to study the morphology of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siéssere, Selma; Vitti, Mathias; de Sousa, Luiz Gustavo; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present educational material that would allow the dental student to learn to easily identify the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth, and how they fit together (occlusion). In order to do this, macro models of permanent teeth with no attrition were carved in wax and later molded with alginate. These molds were filled with plaster, dental stone and/or cold-cured acrylic resin. The large individual dental stone tooth models were mounted on a wax base, thus obtaining maxillary and mandibular arches which were occluded. These dental arches were molded with plaster or dental stone. The authors suggest that these types of macro models allow an excellent visualization of the morphologic characteristics of permanent teeth and occlusion. Dental students are able to carve the permanent dentition in wax with great facility when they can observe macro models.

  1. Readability of pediatric health materials for preventive dental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedy Christine A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the content and general readability of pediatric oral health education materials for parents of young children. Methods Twenty-seven pediatric oral health pamphlets or brochures from commercial, government, industry, and private nonprofit sources were analyzed for general readability ("usability" according to several parameters: readability, (Flesch-Kincaid grade level, Flesch Reading Ease, and SMOG grade level; thoroughness, (inclusion of topics important to young childrens' oral health; textual framework (frequency of complex phrases, use of pictures, diagrams, and bulleted text within materials; and terminology (frequency of difficult words and dental jargon. Results Readability of the written texts ranged from 2nd to 9th grade. The average Flesch-Kincaid grade level for government publications was equivalent to a grade 4 reading level (4.73, range, 2.4 – 6.6; F-K grade levels for commercial publications averaged 8.1 (range, 6.9 – 8.9; and industry published materials read at an average Flesch-Kincaid grade level of 7.4 (range, 4.7 – 9.3. SMOG readability analysis, based on a count of polysyllabic words, consistently rated materials 2 to 3 grade levels higher than did the Flesch-Kincaid analysis. Government sources were significantly lower compared to commercial and industry sources for Flesch-Kincaid grade level and SMOG readability analysis. Content analysis found materials from commercial and industry sources more complex than government-sponsored publications, whereas commercial sources were more thorough in coverage of pediatric oral health topics. Different materials frequently contained conflicting information. Conclusion Pediatric oral health care materials are readily available, yet their quality and readability vary widely. In general, government publications are more readable than their commercial and industry counterparts. The criteria for usability and results of the analyses

  2. Awareness about biomedical waste management and knowledge of effective recycling of dental materials among dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Pathak, Ruchi; Singh, Dhirendra K.; Jalaluddin, Md.; Kore, Shobha A.; Kore, Abhijeet R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Biomedical waste management has become a concern with increasing number of dental practitioners in India. Being health care professionals, dentists should be aware regarding safe disposal of biomedical waste and recycling of dental materials to minimize biohazards to the environment. The aim of the present study was to assess awareness regarding biomedical waste management as well as knowledge of effective recycling and reuse of dental materials among dental students. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among dental students belonging from all dental colleges of Bhubaneswar, Odisha (India) from February 2016 to April 2016. A total of 500 students (208 males and 292 females) participated in the study, which was conducted in two phases. A questionnaire was distributed to assess the awareness of biomedical waste management and knowledge of effective recycling of dental materials, and collected data was examined on a 5-point unipolar scale in percentages to assess the relative awareness regarding these two different categorizes. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences was used to analyzed collected data. Results: Forty-four percent of the dental students were not at all aware about the management of biomedical waste, 22% were moderately aware, 21% slightly aware, 7% very aware, and 5% fell in extremely aware category. Similarly, a higher percentage of participants (61%) were completely unaware regarding recycling and reusing of biomedical waste. Conclusion: There is lack of sufficient knowledge among dental students regarding management of biomedical waste and recycling or reusing of dental materials. Considering its impact on the environment, biomedical waste management requires immediate academic assessment to increase the awareness during training courses. PMID:27891315

  3. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography caused by dental materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klinke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. METHODS: Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. RESULTS: In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. SIGNIFICANCE: Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images.

  4. Evaluation of patients with oral lichenoid lesions by dental patch testing and results of removal of the dental restoration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Buket Şahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are contact stomatitis characterized by white reticular or erosive patches, plaque-like lesions that are clinically and histopathologically indistinguishable from oral lichen planus (OLP. Amalgam dental fillings and dental restoration materials are among the etiologic agents. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the standard and dental series patch tests in patients with OLL in comparison to a control group and evaluate our results. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with OLL or OLP and 30 healthy control subjects, who had at least one dental restoration material and/or dental filling, were included in the study. Both groups received standard series and dental patch test and the results were evaluated simultaneously. Results: The most frequent allergens in the dental series patch test in the patient group were palladium chloride (n=4; 12.12% and benzoyl peroxide (n=2, 6.06%. Of the 33 patients with OLL; 8 had positive reaction to allergents in the standard patch test series and 8 had positive reaction in the dental patch test series. There was no significant difference in the rate of patch test reaction to the dental and standard series between the groups. Ten patients were advised to have the dental restoration material removed according to the results of the patch tests. The lesions improved in three patients [removal of all amalgam dental fillings (n=1, replacement of all amalgam dental fillings with an alternative filling material (n=1 and replacement of the dental prosthesis (n=1] following the removal or replacement of the dental restoration material. Conclusion: Dental patch test should be performed in patients with OLL and dental restoration material. Dental filling and/or prosthesis should be removed/replaced if there is a reaction against a dental restoration material-related allergen.

  5. Amino acid derivative-mediated detoxification and functionalization of dual cure dental restorative material for dental pulp cell mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Hajime; Yamada, Masahiro; Iwasa, Fuminori; Ueno, Takeshi; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-10-01

    Current dental restorative materials are only used to fill the defect of hard tissues, such as dentin and enamel, because of their cytotoxicity. Therefore, exposed dental pulp tissues in deep cavities must be first covered by a pulp capping material like calcium hydroxide to form a layer of mineralized tissue. However, this tissue mineralization is based on pathological reaction and triggers long-lasting inflammation, often causing clinical problems. This study tested the ability of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), amino acid derivative, to reduce cytotoxicity and induce mineralized tissue conductivity in resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), a widely used dental restorative material having dual cure mechanism. Rat dental pulp cells were cultured on untreated or NAC-supplemented RMGI. NAC supplementation substantially increased the percentage of viable cells from 46.7 to 73.3% after 24-h incubation. Cell attachment, spreading, proliferative activity, and odontoblast-related gene and protein expressions increased significantly on NAC-supplemented RMGI. The mineralization capability of cells, which was nearly suppressed on untreated RMGI, was induced on NAC-supplemented RMGI. These improved behaviors and functions of dental pulp cells on NAC-supplemented RMGI were associated with a considerable reduction in the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and with the increased level of intracellular glutathione reserves. These results demonstrated that NAC could detoxify and functionalize RMGIs via two different mechanisms involving in situ material detoxification and antioxidant cell protection. We believe that this study provides a new approach for developing dental restorative materials that enables mineralized tissue regeneration.

  6. PEEK with Reinforced Materials and Modifications for Dental Implant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitria Rahmitasari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK is a semi-crystalline linear polycyclic thermoplastic that has been proposed as a substitute for metals in biomaterials. PEEK can also be applied to dental implant materials as a superstructure, implant abutment, or implant body. This article summarizes the current research on PEEK applications in dental implants, especially for the improvement of PEEK surface and body modifications. Although various benchmark reports on the reinforcement and surface modifications of PEEK are available, few clinical trials using PEEK for dental implant bodies have been published. Controlled clinical trials, especially for the use of PEEK in implant abutment and implant bodies, are necessary.

  7. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  8. DEGREE OF AWARENESS OF SOFT RELINING MATERIALS BY DENTAL TECHNICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilian Hristov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current investigation is to analyze the dental-technicians’ awareness of the soft relining materials, their characteristics, advantages, shortcomings and methods for relining. Materials and methods: For the purpose of this investigation a standard questionnaire has been presented. A direct survey method, documentary and statistical method, as well as graphical methods, including tables, charts, graphics and figures, were used. Data were analysed with the help of IBM SPSS Statistics (ver. 19. Results: One hundred and eight dental technicians were included in the survey, evenly distributed by gender. Removable and fixed prosthodontics is the most commonly mentioned spheres of dental activities. Almost all included in the investigation point out the laboratory relining method as the most frequently used. Acrylic and silicone SRM are the most used groups of relining materials. Change of colour and hardness are the most frequently noticed shortcomings of these materials. The majority of the dental technicians declare that they have never done replacement of SRM or the relining has lasted more than a year. Discussion: The correlation between the age and the years of labour service among the participants is quite obvious. Most of them start working soon after their graduation. Removable prosthodontics is among the priorities for the majority of the labs. Conclusion: Although their unambiguous advantages, the soft relining materials have lots of shortcomings as well. The major problems are connected with their change of colour and hardness. Nevertheless, the dental technicians find them useful and reliable in overcoming specific prosthetic problems.

  9. Improving access to preventive dental services through a school-based dental sealant program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Dee; Henshaw, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The lack of access to preventive dental services, such as dental sealants, can be a major barrier to optimal dental health. School-based dental sealant programs can serve as programs to improve access to preventive dental services. This school-based dental sealant program managed by a Boston dental school with collaborating partners in the metro west area of Massachusetts provides free dental sealants to second grade children. The number of second grade children having dental sealants was tracked for 6 school years and compared with the Healthy People 2010 objective of 50% of all children aged 8 years to have at least 1 dental sealant. From school years 2003 to 2004 through 2008 to 2009, 1,609 dental screenings were provided for second grade children. Of those, 1,189 received dental sealants. To determine whether or not the Healthy People 2010 objective was met, the number of children who received dental sealants from the school-based program was added to the number of children who already had their permanent first molars sealed by their own dentist at the time of the dental screening, plus children with sealants per parent report. In total, the aggregate second grade enrollment having sealants during the designated school years was 54%. The specific Healthy People 2010 objective was achieved over the designated time period. School-based dental sealant programs can help to decrease or eliminate barriers for access to preventive dental services by increasing the number of children who receive dental sealants.

  10. Creating a Successful School-Based Mobile Dental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David M.; Jahnke, Lauren R.; Kerber, Lisa; Nyer, Genie; Siemens, Kammi; Clark, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism for children. This article describes the creation and evolution of the St. David's Dental Program, a mobile school-based dental program for children. Methods: The dental program is a collaboration of community partners in Central Texas that provides free dental care to…

  11. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  12. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goro Nishigawa

    Full Text Available Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials.We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength.For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group.Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials.

  13. Reasons for placement of restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so....

  14. Designing Multiagent Dental Materials for Enhanced Resistance to Biofilm Damage at the Bonded Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne; Orrego, Santiago; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Huakun H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2016-05-11

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin-tooth bonded interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different dental materials loaded with multiagents to improve the durability of the complex dental bonding interface. A combined effect of bacterial acid attack and fatigue on the bonding interface simulated the harsh oral environment. Human saliva-derived oral biofilm was grown on each sample prior to the cyclic loading. The oral biofilm viability during the fatigue performance was monitored by the live-dead assay. Damage of the samples that developed during the test was quantified from the fatigue life distributions. Results indicate that the resultant multiagent dental composite materials were able to reduce the acidic impact of the oral biofilm, thereby improving the strength and resistance to fatigue failure of the dentin-resin bonded interface. In summary, this study shows that dental restorative materials containing multiple therapeutic agents of different chemical characteristics can be beneficial toward improving resistance to mechanical and acidic challenges in oral

  15. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yuan Tai

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment.

  16. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    fillings in posterior teeth is difficult. Apart from the difficulties in conducting a randomized, controlled long-term study comparing the longevity of direct fillings, the fact that composites and adhesives used in a study have often already been replaced by the next generation of the product at the time of study publication presents an additional problem. Not only the filling material, but also patient parameters and local, intraoral factors (e. g. localisation of the filling as well as the treating dentist have an impact on the longevity of dental fillings. In evaluating economic studies, one has to refer to the heterogeneity of data on longevity in the medical evaluation. The only effect parameter used in the studies is longevity, other aspects (e. g. long-term functionality are only referred to in discussions. Extensive counselling of patients regarding the selection of the appropriate filling material is important. Conclusions: Amalgam fillings show a longer longevity than composite fillings. Two out of six systematic reviews conclude that the expected survival time of composite fillings can be comparable to amalgam fillings. However, these conclusions are based on the results of short-term studies which usually overestimate the longevity of filling materials. From an economic standpoint, amalgam is the more economic filling material compared to direct composite fillings in posterior teeth when considering longevity as the only result parameter. Other aspects than longevity need to be considered in individually choosing the appropriate dental filling material. For future studies aiming to compare the longevity of amalgam and composite fillings, a sufficient sample size and study period, preferably in the setting of a private dental practice, should be aimed for. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings should take the functionality of teeth over a longer time period into account, as well as patients’ preferences. The rapid

  17. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Katja; Genser, Dieter; Hiebinger, Cora; Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-13

    comparing the longevity of direct fillings, the fact that composites and adhesives used in a study have often already been replaced by the next generation of the product at the time of study publication presents an additional problem. Not only the filling material, but also patient parameters and local, intraoral factors (e. g. localisation of the filling) as well as the treating dentist have an impact on the longevity of dental fillings. In evaluating economic studies, one has to refer to the heterogeneity of data on longevity in the medical evaluation. The only effect parameter used in the studies is longevity, other aspects (e. g. long-term functionality) are only referred to in discussions. Extensive counselling of patients regarding the selection of the appropriate filling material is important. Amalgam fillings show a longer longevity than composite fillings. Two out of six systematic reviews conclude that the expected survival time of composite fillings can be comparable to amalgam fillings. However, these conclusions are based on the results of short-term studies which usually overestimate the longevity of filling materials. From an economic standpoint, amalgam is the more economic filling material compared to direct composite fillings in posterior teeth when considering longevity as the only result parameter. Other aspects than longevity need to be considered in individually choosing the appropriate dental filling material. For future studies aiming to compare the longevity of amalgam and composite fillings, a sufficient sample size and study period, preferably in the setting of a private dental practice, should be aimed for. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings should take the functionality of teeth over a longer time period into account, as well as patients' preferences. The rapid development of composite materials and adhesives make short term revisions of these conclusions necessary.

  18. THE FIRST BULGARIAN STANDARDIZED SERIES FOR EPICUTANEOUS PATCH TESTING FOR ALLERGIES TO DENTAL MATERIALS AND ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The teeth and teeth rows restoration in the maxillofacial area is the last stage of the ongoing patient treatment and a basic purpose for the dental doctors. For this purpose a different set of modern and classic contemporary dental materials is used. The choice of each material during the treatment of every patient with proven allergy to different kind of allergens is very specific and strictly individual. In the everyday oral diagnostics a standardized set of allergens for diagnostics is used for proving the allergy to dental materials. The set has been developed on the base of all existing and permitted by the Bulgarian authorities dental materials, as well as professional series.The difference between the developed and standardized allergens for diagnostics used in our country and the existing ready-for-use series is that the first are made of the final product (material in the form introduced to the oral cavity and persisting there for a different period of time, sometimes for tenths of years. This enables the possibility for early or late contact allergic reactions with symptoms in the oral cavity and on the skin, maxillofacial area, head and neck, as well as the entire organism.The current article introduces the readers to the results obtained by the realization of the research project №28/2011 “Research on the type of sensibilisation to contemporary dental materials and development of set of allergens for its diagnosing through epicutaneous patch testing” funded by the Committee of Medical science of MU Sofia (CMC. Through the project became possible the creation and the initial research of the first Bulgarian series for epicutaneous testing whose aim is to prove the allergenic potential of the most frequently used by the dental doctors dental materials.

  19. Advances in Dental Materials through Nanotechnology: Facts, Perspectives and Toxicological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Gislaine C; Feitosa, Victor P; Sauro, Salvatore; Tay, Franklin R; Durán, Gabriela; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Nelson

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology is currently driving the dental materials industry to substantial growth, thus reflecting on improvements in materials available for oral prevention and treatment. The present review discusses new developments in nanotechnology applied to dentistry, focusing on the use of nanomaterials for improving the quality of oral care, the perspectives of research in this arena, and discussions on safety concerns regarding the use of dental nanomaterials. Details are provided on the cutting-edge properties (morphological, antibacterial, mechanical, fluorescence, antitumoral, and remineralization and regeneration potential) of polymeric, metallic and inorganic nano-based materials, as well as their use as nanocluster fillers, in nanocomposites, mouthwashes, medicines, and biomimetic dental materials. Nanotoxicological aspects, clinical applications, and perspectives for these nanomaterials are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reasons for placement of restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so.......The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so....

  1. Clinical Fit of Partial Removable Dental Prostheses Based on Alginate or Polyvinyl Siloxane Impressions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkinga, W.A.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical fit of metal-frame partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs) based on custom trays used with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane impression material. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifth-year students of the Nijmegen Dental School made 25 correct

  2. A reproducible oral microcosm biofilm model for testing dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudney, J D; Chen, R; Lenton, P; Li, J; Li, Y; Jones, R S; Reilly, C; Fok, A S; Aparicio, C

    2012-12-01

    Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite discs were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms was analysed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veillonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Influence of metal dental materials on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Chiba, Michiko; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Sadayuki; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi; Nakata, Minoru; Fujita, Isao

    1998-01-01

    Differences in magnetic susceptibility produce artifacts and signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was undertaken to compare the degree of artifacts on MRI caused by metallic dental materials. The influence on MRI of six types of dental alloys, a dental implant, orthodontic appliance, and magnetic attachment was investigated. Among the dental metals, nickel-chromium alloy and cobalt-chromium alloy, which have ferromagnetism, caused significant metal artifacts. Gold-platinum alloy, gold-silver-palladium alloy, silver alloy, and amalgam alloy produced slight metal artifacts. The orthodontic appliance mainly consisted of iron, and the keeper for its magnetic attachment was made of stainless steel. For these reasons, marked metal artifacts and signal loss could be seen in both of them owing to their ferromagnetism. These results suggest that orthodontic appliances and magnetic attachments impair evaluation of the GRE and EPI techniques. It is therefore preferable to use predominantly diamagnetic or paramagnetic dental materials for MRI of the head and neck. Removable keepers should be used more widely to prevent metal artifacts and enhance safety on MRI. (author)

  4. Influence of metal dental materials on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Chiba, Michiko; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Sadayuki; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). Main Hospital; Nakata, Minoru; Fujita, Isao

    1998-11-01

    Differences in magnetic susceptibility produce artifacts and signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was undertaken to compare the degree of artifacts on MRI caused by metallic dental materials. The influence on MRI of six types of dental alloys, a dental implant, orthodontic appliance, and magnetic attachment was investigated. Among the dental metals, nickel-chromium alloy and cobalt-chromium alloy, which have ferromagnetism, caused significant metal artifacts. Gold-platinum alloy, gold-silver-palladium alloy, silver alloy, and amalgam alloy produced slight metal artifacts. The orthodontic appliance mainly consisted of iron, and the keeper for its magnetic attachment was made of stainless steel. For these reasons, marked metal artifacts and signal loss could be seen in both of them owing to their ferromagnetism. These results suggest that orthodontic appliances and magnetic attachments impair evaluation of the GRE and EPI techniques. It is therefore preferable to use predominantly diamagnetic or paramagnetic dental materials for MRI of the head and neck. Removable keepers should be used more widely to prevent metal artifacts and enhance safety on MRI. (author)

  5. Copper release from dental prosthetic crowns, dental materials, and human teeth into acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicanin, Biljana M; Nikolić, Ruzica S

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dilution of the ion of copper from human teeth and dental prosthetic crowns in 4% CH(3)COOH during a period of 24 hr at room temperature. The content of the diluted copper in an acetate extract, as well as the overall content of this metal in the samples, was determined by means of a potentiometric stripping analysis. The comparative measurements were carried out using the furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique, which is recommended by the International Standards (ISO 6872:2008; ISO 24234:2004) as a method for quality control of dental-prosthetic material (dental ceramic, metal restorative materials, dental amalgams) in the process of checking for heavy metals. During a 24-hr period in 4% CH(3)COOH at a temperature of 25 degrees C, approximately 72% of the overall copper was released from the tooth. The percentage of the released copper from baby teeth is higher, ranging from 88 to 92%, which is probably a consequence of the bone tissue being in development, its infirmity, and inadequate stability. On these conditions, approximately 72% of the overall copper was released from the dental-ceramic prosthetic crowns.

  6. Endocrine disruptors and dental materials: health implications associated with their use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho Antonio Jorge Molinário

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes international historical trends in the use of different types of materials in dental practice. The author describes the chemical properties of their ingredients and the potential and observed adverse effects in patients and dental technicians resulting from clinical or occupational exposure to various metals like beryllium, used to produce metal alloys. The growing use of various products (resin cements, ionomer cements, aesthetic restorative materials, resins, endodontal cements, and others based on the compound bisphenol-A, whose chemical structure is similar to that of estrogen. Considering the demographic and contemporary work force characteristics of those involved in dental practice in the Brazil, the study highlights the possible effect of the use of these materials in both male and female patients and all age strata, as well as in health professionals with occupational exposure to products containing bisphenol-A.

  7. Endocrine disruptors and dental materials: health implications associated with their use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jorge Molinário Coelho

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes international historical trends in the use of different types of materials in dental practice. The author describes the chemical properties of their ingredients and the potential and observed adverse effects in patients and dental technicians resulting from clinical or occupational exposure to various metals like beryllium, used to produce metal alloys. The growing use of various products (resin cements, ionomer cements, aesthetic restorative materials, resins, endodontal cements, and others based on the compound bisphenol-A, whose chemical structure is similar to that of estrogen. Considering the demographic and contemporary work force characteristics of those involved in dental practice in the Brazil, the study highlights the possible effect of the use of these materials in both male and female patients and all age strata, as well as in health professionals with occupational exposure to products containing bisphenol-A.

  8. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  9. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  10. Canal atresia reconstruction with dental school impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, P C; Davis, B; Adkins, W Y

    1999-01-01

    Medium-density viscosity dental impression material has recently been used after repair of an atretic canal to stent open the newly created external auditory canal for 2 weeks, followed by a hard acrylic stent. This may provide more benefits than traditional packing, but caution must still be used. We recently have used the dental impression material to help in the reconstruction of seven ear canals. The medium-viscosity impression material hardens quickly and provides a solid, nonmobile stent, which usually pulls out without difficulty. The stent that is removed may then be used by our prosthodontist to fashion a hard, acrylic, removable stent to be worn for the next few months. This hard stent is used to prevent further stenosis. As with any technique, complications may arise and, through experience, common mistakes that can hinder a good outcome can be avoided. We will report six cases with illustrated tips on how to avoid complications when using this technique.

  11. Mechanical properties of dental investment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, D; Swain, M V

    2000-07-01

    Measurement of the elastic modulus (E) of investment materials has been difficult because of their low strength. However, these values are essential for engineering simulation and there are many methods available to assess the elasticity of materials. The present study compared two different methods with one of the methods being non-destructive in nature and can be used for specimens prepared for other tests. Two different types of investment materials were selected, gypsum-and phosphate-bonded. Method 1 is a traditional three-point bending test. Twelve rectangular bars with dimension of (70 x 9 x 3 mm) were prepared and placed on supports 56.8 mm apart. The test was conducted at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min by use of a universal testing machine. The load applied to the test specimen and the corresponding deflection were measured until the specimen fractured. The E value was calculated from a linear part of the stress-strain plot. Method 2 is an ultra micro-indentation system to determine near surface properties of materials with nanometer resolution. The measurement procedure was programmed such that the specimens were indented with an initial contact force of 5 mN then followed by a maximum force of 500 mN. Measurement consisted of 10 indentations conducted with a spherical stainless steel indenter (R = 250 microm) that were equally spaced (500 microm). The E value rose asymptotically with depth of penetration and would approach the three-point bending test value at approximately four time's maximum contact depth for both materials. Both methods are practical ways of measuring the E of investment materials. Copyright 2000 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  12. A problem with modern dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, R D

    1992-05-23

    It may come as a surprise to learn that there is more than one discipline in medicine dealing with artificial organs. The obvious one is bio-engineering, which is largely concerned with fashioning existing biologically acceptable materials into useful spare parts such as hip or knee joints. The materials themselves hardly change, and the difference between rival prostheses lies more in design than novel chemistry. This is the world of titanium or cobalt-chromium joint designs, bone screws and plates, orthotic limbs, supports and wheelchairs, and futuristic ideas such as miniature video cameras for artificial eyes.

  13. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  16. A survey on the use of techniques, materials in dental implantology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Chowdhary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present results of a survey on the status of an implantology amongst implant-practicing dentist across the world in 2009. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was sent to the members of EAO (European Association of Osseointegration, ICOI (International Congress of Osseointegrated Implants, ISOI (Indian Society of Oral Implantologists, Asian Academy of Osseointegration (AAO, Deutsche Gasellschaft Fur Orale Implantologie (DGOI, Philippines Implant Organization, Korean Society of Oral Implantologist, Japanese Association of OralIimplantologists, Chinese Dental Association, Pakistan Dental Association, asking for the personal (anonymous background data and their implantology concepts. Specific questions dealt with level of recognition of implants, use of implants, superstructures, techniques followed, and materials used. Results: A total of 1500 (63.6% of the 2358 questionnaires were answered. Dental implants were the most preferred treatment modality for restoring the missing teeth. Threaded implants were the most preferred. Cement retained implant prosthesis was the most preferred restoration procedure. Dentists believe that the general dentist should practice dental implant treatment modality, preferably teamwork. Immediate loading was the much-accepted concept among the dentists of the developed nations. Conclusion: Dental implants were much accepted treatment modality for the replacement of missing teeth. Most the dentists follow the well documented technique and proven materials, which have been documented in the literature, an evidenced based practice, thus, delivering the best to their patients. Dentists from the developing nations agreed to have standardization in implants.

  17. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  18. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yun-Yuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Su, Wei-Fang; Chen, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Novel liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced polymerization shrinkage and effectively bond to tooth structures, can be applied in esthetic dentistry, including core and post systems, direct and indirect restorations, and dental brackets. The purposes of this study were to investigate the properties of liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites including biocompatibility, microhardness, and frictional forces of bracket-like blocks with different filler contents for further clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials that exhibited various filler contents, by assessing their cell activity performance using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and their microhardness with or without thermocycling. We also evaluated the frictional force between bracket-like duplicates and commercially available esthetic bracket systems using Instron 5566. The liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials showed good biocompatibility. The materials having high filler content demonstrated greater microhardness compared with commercially available bracket materials, before and after the thermocycling treatment. Thus, manufacturing processes are important to reduce frictional force experienced by orthodontic brackets. The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  20. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, M.H.; Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  1. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, M.H. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Materials Engineering Dept., Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  2. Confirmation of theoretical colour predictions for layering dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Sarah S; Johnston, William M

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm the theoretical colour predictions for single and double layers of dental composite materials on an opaque backing. Single and double layers of composite resins were fabricated, placed in optical contact with a grey backing and measured for spectral radiance. The spectral reflectance and colour were directly determined. Absorption and scattering coefficients as previously reported, the measured thickness of the single layers and the effective reflectance of the grey backing were utilized to theoretically predict the reflectance of the single layer using corrected Kubelka-Munk reflectance theory. For double layers the predicted effective reflectance of the single layer was used as the reflectance of the backing of the second layer and the thickness of the second layer was used to predict the reflectance of the double layer. Colour differences, using both the CIELAB and CIEDE2000 formulae, measured the discrepancy between each directly determined colour and its corresponding theoretical colour. The colour difference discrepancies generally ranged around the perceptibility threshold but were consistently below the respective acceptability threshold. This theory can predict the colour of layers of composite resin within acceptability limits and generally also within perceptibility limits. This theory could therefore be incorporated into computer-based optical measuring instruments that can automate the shade selections for layers of a more opaque first layer under a more translucent second layer for those clinical situations where an underlying background colour and a desirable final colour can be measured. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, G.; Rodil, S.E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb 2 O 5 (a-Nb 2 O 5 ), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  4. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? ?Properties, Limitations Future Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GICs) are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical pr...

  5. New dental implant selection criterion based on implant design

    OpenAIRE

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I.; El-Zawahry, Mohamed M.; Ibraheem, Eman M.; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; ElGabry, Hisham

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A comparative study between threaded and plain dental implant designs was performed to find out a new criterion for dental implant selection. Materials and Methods: Several dental implant designs with a systematic increase in diameter and length were positioned in a cylindrical-shaped bone section and analyzed using finite element method. Four loading types were tested on different dental implant designs; tension of 50 N, compression of 100 N, bending of 20 N, and torque of 2 Nm, t...

  6. Embryotoxicity assays for leached components from dental restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummolo Stefano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are no suitable assays available to evaluate the embryotoxicity of leached components from restorative dental materials. Methods The effect of the medium conditioned by composites and amalgam on mouse blastocysts in vitro was tested. The materials were also subcutaneously implanted, and the effect of the medium supplemented with serum from the host blood was evaluated in the embryotoxicity assay. The embryo implantation rate in the material-transplanted mothers was also evaluated. Results The results show that while the culture in media conditioned by amalgams did not affect blastocyst development, the medium conditioned by composites caused blastocyst degeneration and apoptosis. The development of blastocysts in a medium containing serum obtained from animals after transplantation was, however, without effect. Finally, inconsistent reduction in the implantation rate in transplanted mothers was observed. Conclusions In this study, we provide examples of in vitro and in vivo tests that may be used to evaluate embryotoxicity for dental materials. Our results show that leached components from our composite-material induced embryotoxicity in vitro, however, no toxicity was observed when subcutaneously implanted in vivo. This highlights the necessity of integrated in vitro and in vivo tests for valuable predictive estimation of embryotoxicity for complex materials.

  7. Equity in children's dental caries before and after cessation of community water fluoridation: differential impact by dental insurance status and geographic material deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Lindsay; McNeil, Deborah A; Potestio, Melissa; Patterson, Steve; Thawer, Salima; Faris, Peter; Shi, Congshi; Shwart, Luke

    2016-02-11

    One of the main arguments made in favor of community water fluoridation is that it is equitable in its impact on dental caries (i.e., helps to offset inequities in dental caries). Although an equitable effect of fluoridation has been demonstrated in cross-sectional studies, it has not been studied in the context of cessation of community water fluoridation (CWF). The objective of this study was to compare the socio-economic patterns of children's dental caries (tooth decay) in Calgary, Canada, in 2009/10 when CWF was in place, and in 2013/14, after it had been discontinued. We analyzed data from population-based samples of schoolchildren (grade 2) in 2009/10 and 2013/14. Data on dental caries (decayed, missing, and filled primary and permanent teeth) were gathered via open mouth exams conducted in schools by registered dental hygienists. We examined the association between dental caries and 1) presence/absence of dental insurance and 2) small area index of material deprivation, using Poisson (zero-inflated) and logistic regression, for both time points separately. For small-area material deprivation at each time point, we also computed the concentration index of inequality for each outcome variable. Statistically significant inequities by dental insurance status and by small area material deprivation were more apparent in 2013/14 than in 2009/10. Results are consistent with increasing inequities in dental caries following cessation of CWF. However, further research is needed to 1) confirm the effects in a study that includes a comparison community, and 2) explore possible alternative reasons for the findings, including changes in treatment and preventive programming.

  8. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers.

  9. Surface Characteristics and Biofilm Development on Selected Dental Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung H. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoral adjustment and polishing of dental ceramics often affect their surface characteristics, promoting increased roughness and consequent biofilm growth. This study correlated surface roughness to biofilm development with four commercially available ceramic materials. Methods. Four ceramic materials (Vita Enamic®, Lava™ Ultimate, Vitablocs Mark II, and Wieland Reflex® were prepared as per manufacturer instructions. Seventeen specimens of each material were adjusted and polished to simulate clinical intraoral procedures and another seventeen remained unaltered. Specimens were analysed by SEM imaging, confocal microscopy, and crystal violet assay. Results. SEM images showed more irregular surface topography in adjusted specimens than their respective controls. Surface roughness (Ra values were greater in all materials following adjustments. All adjusted materials with the exception of Vitablocs Mark II promoted significantly greater biofilm growth relative to controls. Conclusion. Simulated intraoral polishing methods resulted in greater surface roughness and increased biofilm accumulation.

  10. Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological

  11. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  12. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is used ...

  13. Tribological behaviour of unveneered and veneered lithium disilicate dental material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Pina, C G; Patas, N; Canhoto, J; Cláudio, R; Olhero, S M; Serro, A P; Ferro, A C; Guedes, M

    2016-01-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of a lithium disilicate dental ceramic against natural dental enamel is studied, including the effect of the presence of a fluorapatite veneering upon the tribological properties of the material. The tribological behaviour was assessed using reciprocating pin-on-plate test configuration, at pH 3 and pH 7. The surface energy of the plates was determined, as well as the zeta potential of fluorapatite, lithium disilicate and enamel particles in artificial saliva. It was found that the friction and wear behaviour of the tested enamel/plate material tribocouples is less severe in unveneered plates. Initial surface roughness of the plate does not affect wear results. However the topography of the resulting wear track affects the corresponding wear loss: a smoother final wear track is associated with lower wear. The surface topography of the wear track, and thus the tribological performance of the tested materials, is very sensitive to the pH of the sliding solution. This is because the dissolution trend, wettability and surface charge of the used materials are pH dependent. Overall friction and wear are higher under basic pH conditions, especially when plates are veneered. A wear model is proposed that correlates the effect of the described parameters with the observed tribological behaviour at pH 7. Attained results show that fluorapatite coating of lithium disilicate dental crowns affects tooth/crown wear behaviour, resulting in increased wear of both the artificial crown and the opposing natural teeth. Coating should therefore be avoided in occlusal crown surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Updating Classifications of Ceramic Dental Materials: A Guide to Material Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Edward A; Figueira, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The indications for and composition of today's dental ceramic materials serve as the basis for determining the appropriate class of ceramics to use for a given case. By understanding the classifications, composition, and characteristics of the latest all-ceramic materials, which are presented in this article in order of most to least conservative, dentists and laboratory technicians can best determine the ideal material for a particular treatment.

  15. Tailoring of K0.8Al0.7Fe0.15Si2.25O6 Leucite Based Dental Ceramic Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Kremenović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium based ceramic materials composed from leucite in which 5 % of Al is exchanged with Fe and 4 % of hematite was synthesized by mechanochemical homogenization and annealing of K2O-SiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3 mixtures. Synthesized material was characterized by X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX. The two methods are in good agreement in regard to the specimen chemical composition suggesting that a leucite chemical formula is K0.8Al0.7Fe0.15Si2.25O6. Rietveld structure refinement results reveal that about 20 % of vacancies exist in the position of K atoms. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  16. Optimization of compressive strength of zirconia based dental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dental composites are tooth-coloured restorative material used by dentists for various applications. Restoration of a lost tooth structure requires a material having mechanical as well as aesthetic properties similar to that of tooth. This poses challenges to engineers and the dentist alike. Dental composites consist of a matrix ...

  17. Optimization of compressive strength of zirconia based dental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Dental composites are tooth-coloured restorative material used by dentists for various applica- tions. Restoration of a lost tooth structure requires a material having mechanical as well as aesthetic proper- ties similar to that of tooth. This poses challenges to engineers and the dentist alike. Dental composites consist.

  18. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  19. Mechanical characterization of materials for dental applications; Caracterizacion mecanica de materiales para aplicaciones dentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajares, A.; Miranda, P.; Guiberteau, F.; Cumbrera, F. I.

    2001-07-01

    An study of the damage induced in dental materials and model multilayer systems by masticatory contact stresses, simulated by hertz ian indentation test, have been performed. In particular, the nature of induced damage has been identified, and quantified from stress-strain curves and critical loads for yielding or crack initiation. For multilayer systems, test have been numerically simulated using finite element techniques (FEM). FEM simulations complement indentation test, allowing to justify the observed fracture modes from calculated stress fields. Practical implications can be derived from our results, relevant to the design of multilayer structures tolerant to contact damage. (Author) 34 refs.

  20. Ageing phenomenon in acrylic polymer dental materials detected by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipecki, Jacek; Chamerski, Kordian; Boyko, Olha; Kotynia, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Polymer materials based on acrylic monomers are commonly used in dentistry. It is important to research the structure of dental filling materials towards the material ageing. The study has been conducted in order to determine the presence of free volume gaps in the structure of polymer materials. Brand new, acrylic polymer based samples of dental Dipol materials were used as a research material. The study was conducted by means of the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). As a result of the conducted measurements, curves describing numbers of counts of the acts of annihilation in the time function were obtained. The conducted studies revealed the existence of four components τ1, τ2, τ3 and τ4. The τ3 and τ4 components are attributed to the pick-off annihilation of o-Ps orthopositronium trapping by free volume gaps and provide information about geometrical parameters of the volumes. LT 9 computer program was used to calculate components. Free volume holes were determined from empirical relationship between the radius of free volume and the long lifetime components. Conducted studies indicate the presence of free volume holes in the research materials. It has been noted that a new long lifetime component is assigned to a new kind of free volumes that exist in the structure of material related to the material ageing.

  1. Transmission of acoustic emission in bones, implants and dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossi, Zannar; Abdou, Wael; Reuben, Robert L; Ibbetson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    There is considerable interest in using acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound to assess the quality of implant-bone interfaces and to monitor for micro-damage leading to loosening. However, remarkably little work has been done on the transmission of ultrasonic waves though the physical and biological structures involved. The aim of this in vitro study is to assess any differences in transmission between various dental materials and bovine rib bones with various degrees of hydration. Two types of tests have been carried out using pencil lead breaks as a standard AE source. The first set of tests was configured to assess the surface propagation of AE on various synthetic materials compared with fresh bovine rib bone. The second is a set of transmission tests on fresh, dried and hydrated bones each fitted with dental implants with various degrees of fixity, which includes components due to bone and interface transmission. The results indicate that transmission through glass ionomer cement is closest to the bone. This would suggest that complete osseointegration could potentially be simulated using such cement. The transmission of AE energy through bone was found to be dependent on its degree of hydration. It was also found that perfusing samples of fresh bone with water led to an increase in transmitted energy, but this appeared to affect transmission across the interface more than transmission through the bone. These findings have implications not only for implant interface inspection but also for passive AE monitoring of implants.

  2. Dental Hetero-Graft Materials with Nano Hydroxyapatite Surface Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dai-Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Il; Yoon, Seokyoung; Kim, Hyung-Jo; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Jun, Sang Ho; Kang, Ho Chang; Pang, Changhyun; Kim, Jaeyun; Cha, Hyung Joon; Han, Kwon-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Myong; Lee, Jung Heon

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (HAp NP)-functionalized hetero-graft materials (HGMs) for dental applications. These HGMs were prepared by attaching platelet-, needle-, and sphere-shaped HAp NPs to the surface of xenograft materials through chemical conjugation. Although all three HAp NPs contributed to increase the surface area of bone graft material (BGM), the shape of the HAp NPs was a determining factor. Platelet HAp NPs were most effective, because they caused a 48.9% increase in BGM surface area whereas the influence of the spherical NP was only a 6.7% increase. This suggests that geometric factors regarding both the attached HAp NPs and graft material surface are essential in controlling the surface roughness of graft materials. Among the three HAp NPs, it was the platelet HAp NPs that helped to increase the efficacy of the BGM most significantly. Compared with BGM with no HAp NP attachment, HGM with platelet HAp NP ('platelet-HGM) treatment had ~46.1% higher cell attachment and proliferation rate. The MTT assay also showed that the HAp NP-treated hetero-graft materials had negligible cytotoxicity.

  3. Effect of verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, on the odontogenic activity of human dental pulp cells cultured with silicate-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Hung, Chi-Jr; Shie, Ming-You; Chung, Hsien-Yang

    2014-08-01

    This study examines how calcium silicate cement extracts influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through calcium channels and active mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, in particular extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK). HDPCs are treated with various silicon concentrations both with and without verapamil, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue assay and Western blot, respectively. The silicon promoted cell proliferation and inhibited calcium channel blockers. It was also found that silicon increased ERK and p38 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it raised the expression and secretion of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, and dentin matrix protein-1. In addition, statistically significant differences (P calcium silicate substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through calcium channels and modulate ERK activation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Determining the complex modulus of alginate irreversible hydrocolloid dental material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Shalinie; See, Howard; Thomas, Graham; Swain, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the visco-elastic response of an alginate irreversible hydrocolloid dental impression material during setting. A novel squeeze film Micro-Fourier Rheometer (MFR, GBC Scientific Equipment, Australia) was used to determine the complex modulus of an alginate irreversible hydrocolloid dental impression material (Algident, ISO 1563 Class A Type 1, Dentalfarm Australia Pty. Ltd.) during setting after mixing. Data was collected every 30s for 10 min in one study and every 10 min for a total of 60 min in another study. A high level of repeatability was observed. The results indicate that the MFR is capable of recording the complex shear modulus of alginate irreversible hydrocolloid for 60 min from the start of mixing and to simultaneously report the changing visco-elastic parameters at all frequencies between 1 Hz and 100 Hz. The storage modulus shows a dramatic increase to 370% of its starting value after 6 min and then reduces to 55% after 60 min. The loss modulus increases to a maximum of 175% of its starting value after 10 min and then reduces to 94% after 60 min. The MFR enables the changes in the complex modulus through the complete setting process to be followed. It is anticipated this approach may provide a better method to compare the visco-elastic properties of impression materials and assist with identification of optimum types for different clinical requirements. The high stiffness of the instrument and the use of band-limited pseudo-random noise as the input signal are the main advantages of this technique over conventional rheometers for determining the changes in alginate visco-elasticity.

  5. Sol-gel-graphene-based fabric-phase sorptive extraction for cow and human breast milk sample cleanup for screening bisphenol A and residual dental restorative material before analysis by HPLC with diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanidou, Victoria; Filippou, Olga; Marinou, Eirini; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-06-01

    Fabric-phase sorptive extraction has already been recognized as a simple and green alternative to the conventional sorbent-based sorptive microextraction techniques, using hybrid organic-inorganic sorbent coatings chemically bonded to a flexible fabric surface. Herein, we have investigated the synergistic combination of the advanced material properties offered by sol-gel graphene sorbent and the simplicity of Fabric phase sorptive extraction approach in selectively extracting bisphenol A and residual monomers including bisphenol A glycerolatedimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate derived dental restorative materials from cow and human breast milk samples. Different coatings were evaluated. Final method development employed sol-gel graphene coated media. The main experimental parameters influencing extraction of the compounds, such as sorbent chemistry used, sample loading conditions, elution solvent, sorption stirring time, elution time, impact of protein precipitation, amount of sample, and matrix effect, were investigated and optimized. Absolute recovery values from standard solutions were 50% for bisphenol A, 78% for T triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 110% for urethane dimethacrylate, and 103% for bisphenol A glycerolatedimethacrylate, while respective absolute recovery values from milk were 30, 52, 104, and 42%. Method validation was performed according to European Decision 657/2002/EC in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, and precision. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  7. Degradation of a dental filling material after high caries challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Antonio Paraizo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available New types of copolymers using monomers which form inorganic polymers network (glass-like and organic networks have been developed, known as ormocers. The aim of this work was to study how a particular dental filling material is degraded when subjected to a caries challenge by using low pH solutions. The supernadants were studied by HPLC to detect the presence of molecules from the resin, while the changes of the material surface were evaluated by contact angle. An organic modified ceromer (ormocer called Definite® (Degussa was tested. Samples were built following manufacturer's instructions. After pH cycles, solutions were injected in a HPLC. The contact angle was obtained using a goniometer after and before the cycles. HPLC results showed material degradation, only detected in acid solutions. Bis-GMA and TEGDMA were detected in Definite® residues. Means and S.D. of contact angle were (p < 0,05: baseline: 85.16° ± 3.90° and after pH cycles: 69.77° ± 7.12°. The authors concluded that an ormocer filling material degraded on a caries simulated environment.

  8. Are advertisements in dental journals supported by an appropriate evidence-base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnutt, Ivor G; Hardy, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Dental professionals are constantly exposed to advertisements in the dental literature. These promote products, either for use in the operatory or to recommend to patients. In an era of evidence-based practice, what references are provided to support claims made by the advertisers? This study aimed to determine if advertisements in four major dental journals, whose target audience is general dental practitioners, were supported by an appropriate evidence-base, readily accessible to readers. The 2010 printed volumes of the Australian Dental Journal, British Dental Journal, Dental Update and the Journal of the American Dental Association were hand searched to identify advertisements which made a claim of clinical benefit or superiority to competing products. Advertisements were categorized according to type of product being promoted and the availability, nature and number of any supporting references was recorded. Repeated advertisements were analyzed only once. A total of 390 advertisements were identified and 369 made a claim of benefit or superiority. When the 222 duplicates of the same advertisement were removed, 147 unique advertisements remained. Of these: 54 (37%) were advertisements related to dental devices for in-surgery use; 44 (30%) for dental materials, and 27 (18%) for dentifrices/medicaments. 113 (76.9%) advertisements offered no evidential support for claims made. Of the 34 advertisements that provided evidential support, only 20 provided a complete reference that could readily be sourced by an interested reader: 15 articles in refereed journals; 5 data on file; 3 in-house studies and combinations thereof. Four references were not accessible due to incomplete referencing. Two advertisements provided evidence that was not relevant to the product being advertised. The majority of advertisements in the dental literature do not provide an adequate evidence-base, readily available to readers, to support the claims being made. If evidence-based practice is

  9. ZIRCONIUM ALLERGIES CAUSED BY ORAL DENTAL MATERIALS. A GENERAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta SINIŢCHI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental materials may provoke general or local pathologies and various immune-allergic manifestations. For example, metal allergies are triggered by environmental or – mainly – occupational factors, being more numerous in recent years, particularly through the introduction, in dentistry, of new types of dentures and implants. Zirconium is a transition metal with several beneficial effects, namely: biocompatibility, good aesthetics, slightly translucent fitting, efficient cohesion with ceramics. Pathological effects of zirconium: systemic toxicity (carcinogenic potential, raising syndrome oral allergic dermatitis. Allergists recommend a thorough knowledge on the medical history of patients, on the data of personal and hereditary allergic investigations confirming a possible sensitivity. General and specific allergic investigations for establishing a possible sensitivity to zirconium are: epicutaneous tests, serological tests (TTL and, and confirmation of allergenic eviction. Equally, balancing of the benefit/cost ratio should be calculated.

  10. Japanese research and development on metallic biomedical, dental, and healthcare materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hanawa, Takao; Narushima, Takayuki

    2005-04-01

    There is considerable demand for metallic materials for use in medical and dental devices. Metals and alloys are widely used as biomedical materials and are indispensable in the medical field. In dentistry, metal is used for restorations, orthodontic wires, and dental implants. This article describes R&D on metallic biomaterials primarily conducted by the members of the Japan Institute of Metals.

  11. Biological effects of radiation from dental radiography. Council on Dental Materials, Instruments, and Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Clearly, there is ample evidence of adverse effects of radiation in sufficient doses. There is at present no proof of such effects from doses commonly employed in dental practice; however, it has not been possible to prove the absence of such effects. Most experts now agree that there may be a small, difficult to quantify risk of cancer or genetic mutation from diagnostic exposure in patients and in personnel exposed during work. Prudence dictates acceptance of this position until proof to the contrary is available. This report has presented recent attempts to quantify the risk to patients based on speculative calculations and extrapolations. Indices of population risks indicate that medical radiology is the largest source of human-made genetic and leukemogenic radiation burden to the American public. Dental radiology contributes a small-but not necessarily insignificant-portion. Of major concern is the increasing use of radiation for diagnostic purposes in both medicine and dentistry. Technological advances have reduced exposure per examination; presumably this trend will continue so that total exposure of populations to radiation in the healing arts will not increase. Recent analyses suggest that the cancer risk to a patient from a dental radiographic examination is of the order of one in a million; the genetic risk is substantially less, about one in a billion. The risks appear to be essentially equal for full-mouth intraoral and for panoramic examinations. These estimates are numerically quite small, but the effects are severe. Thus, these risks cannot be ignored. However, we currently accept risks of similar magnitude in our daily lives [Table 9]50,51 In addition, the risk of failure to make an accurate diagnosis may be greater than the risk from exposure to the radiation from a justified and properly conducted radiographic examination

  12. Laser ablation of dental materials using a microsecond Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniaeva, M. L.; Siniavsky, M. N.; Pashinin, V. P.; Mamedov, Ad. A.; Konov, V. I.; Kononenko, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    The action of microsecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 1064 nm on dental tissues (enamel and dentin) and various dental materials used for tooth replacement and filling (ceramics, metal alloys, and composites) is studied. It is demonstrated that the ablation thresholds of all of the dental materials are significantly lower than the threshold laser fluences for the dental tissue ( E thr = 200-300 J/cm2). At the laser fluences that do not allow ablation and damage of the dental tissues, the dental materials are effectively removed at a rate of no greater than 40 μm per pulse. It is shown that the laser ablation of the materials under study involves two processes (evaporation and volume explosion) depending on the optical density. The results obtained indicate that the laser radiation with a wavelength of 1064 nm and the microsecond pulse duration is promising for dental applications, since it allows effective cleaning of the tooth surface from various dental materials in the absence of the damages of dental tissues.

  13. Diamond coated dental bur machining of natural and synthetic dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W

    2004-12-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC with an average grain size 1-3 micron were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and the bur it is necessary to etch away the surface Co to prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (H.F.C.V.D.) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterised using scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, and model tooth materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining natural and synthetic dental materials such as those described above.

  14. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  15. FDI report on adverse reactions to resin-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, P L; Meyer, D M

    2007-02-01

    Resin-based restorative materials are considered safe for the vast majority of dental patients. Although constituent chemicals such as monomers, accelerators and initiators can potentially leach out of cured resin-based materials after placement, adverse reactions to these chemicals are rare and reaction symptoms commonly subside after removal of the materials. Dentists should be aware of the rare possibility that patients could have adverse reactions to constituents of resin-based materials and be vigilant in observing any adverse reactions after restoration placement. Dentists should also be cognisant of patient complaints about adverse reactions that may result from components of resin-based materials. To minimise monomer leaching and any potential risk of dermatological reactions, resin-based materials should be adequately cured. Dental health care workers should avoid direct skin contact with uncured resin-based materials. Latex and vinyl gloves do not provide adequate barrier protection to the monomers in resin-based materials.

  16. Reflective learning in community-based dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C; Naitam, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Community-based dental education (CBDE) is the implementation of dental education in a specific social context, which shifts a substantial part of dental clinical education from dental teaching institutional clinics to mainly public health settings. Dental students gain additional value from CBDE when they are guided through a reflective process of learning. We propose some key elements to the existing CBDE program that support meaningful personal learning experiences. Dental rotations of 'externships' in community-based clinical settings (CBCS) are year-long community-based placements and have proven to be strong learning environments where students develop good communication skills and better clinical reasoning and management skills. We look at the characteristics of CBDE and how the social and personal context provided in communities enhances dental education. Meaningfulness is created by the authentic context, which develops over a period of time. Structured reflection assignments and methods are suggested as key elements in the existing CBDE program. Strategies to enrich community-based learning experiences for dental students include: Photographic documentation; written narratives; critical incident reports; and mentored post-experiential small group discussions. A directed process of reflection is suggested as a way to increase the impact of the community learning experiences. We suggest key elements to the existing CBDE module so that the context-rich environment of CBDE allows for meaningful relations and experiences for dental students and enhanced learning.

  17. The Relative Patient Costs and Availability of Dental Services, Materials and Equipment in Public Oral Care Facilities in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamuryekung'e, Kasusu K; Lahti, Satu M; Tuominen, Risto J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient charges and availability of dental services influence utilization of dental services. There is little available information on the cost of dental services and availability of materials and equipment in public dental facilities in Africa. This study aimed to determine the relative cost and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania. The local factors affecting availability were also studied. Methods A survey of all dis...

  18. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  19. Influence of the casting material on the dimensional accuracy of dental dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher Antonio Queiroz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy of different materials used in the confection of dies. Two stainless steel standard models were confected. One of the models, which was 2 mm larger than the other model, was used to provide a uniform relief for the two-step putty-wash impression technique. Thirty impressions were obtained using a polyvinyl siloxane impression material and randomly divided into three groups (n = 10 according to the type of casting material: type IV dental stone, commercially available epoxy resin (Tri-Epoxy, and industrial epoxy resin (Sikadur. After the setting/polymerization of the casting material, the dimensional stability was measured in terms of the height, diameter of the base and diameter of the top from the obtained dies and from the standard metal model using a profile projector. Results were analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnet test (α = 0.05. In the height values, no significant difference was observed between the groups, except for Sikadur casts, which showed lower mean values. The Tri-Epoxi group showed statistically lower mean base diameter values, compared with the other groups, and both epoxy resin groups showed statistically lower mean top diameter values, compared with that for the type IV dental stone group. We concluded that type IV gypsum and the commercially available epoxy resin showed similar behavior in most areas. The industrial epoxy resin did not show the same characteristics, although the diameter of the base obtained with it was similar to that obtained with type IV dental stone.

  20. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  1. Determination of dose rate from natural radionuclide in porcelain dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouri, A.D.; El-Zourgany, A.; Elmashat, Alia; El-Masri, Karima

    2010-01-01

    There are three main aims that make this study particularly important and interesting to radiometric studies. Firstly, it will provides information on the concentration composition of natural and the associated man-made radioactivity of imported dental porcelain materials to be used by most dental laboratories in Great Jamahiriya. Since these materials do not pass radiation inspection tests before their entry or use and there is a large variety of supply source of these dental materials to be used for all dental works on Libyan patients, anomalies can be identified easily. Secondly, the analysis of selective elemental abundance (U, Th, and K ) and dose rate calculations may be used to calculate effective dose rates to dental laboratory technicians and also to the patient who will be using these specific materials. This research project will provide the first results of such measurements and the corresponding average annual effective dose rates equivalent to the patients using these materials and also to the dental technician and doctors work in the various dental laboratories that make use of these materials in their daily work. A total number of 30 dental powder samples were collected from a number of dental laboratories around Tripoli area will be analyzed. In this research project, the results from this preliminary survey regarding Th, U and K elemental concentrations in a wide variety of dental materials by means of high-resolution X-ray spectrometry will be presented. Further results from these investigations concerning activity concentrations and the associated dose rates, effective dose and the committed dose due to the use of these materials are going to be calculated and compared with other published data elsewhere and recommendation of their use will be derived accordingly. (author)

  2. Electronic voting in dental materials education: the impact on students' attitudes and exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michele E

    2008-09-01

    Dental materials is an integral part of any undergraduate dental curriculum and is most commonly taught in a traditional didactic, lecture-based format. It suffers from the ignominy of being viewed by many as a dry, factual subject with little to excite or engage the student. In this article, the author presents the experimental use of an electronic voting (eVoting) system in an undergraduate dental materials course. The practical and aspirational aspects of its application are described. The objective was to assess the student perception of the experiment and the impact on end-of-course examination results. The eVoting system proved overwhelmingly popular with the students with 95 percent in favor of its use at the beginning of the course and 91 percent at the end. There was, however, no statistically significant impact on the results of the examination at the end of the course, when compared to the previous year's cohort of students for whom eVoting was not used. eVoting encouraged student interaction and engagement and contributed to student satisfaction but was not seen to affect the outcome measurement (end-of-course examination result).

  3. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation on adhering properties of dental materials by means of radioactively labelled bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, W.; Kleinert, P.; Sandig, H.C.; Wutzler, P.; Ruschitschka, A.; Schaefer, U.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteria of the species Streptococcus mutans were radioactively labelled with 113 In-oxinate. Different dental materials were incubated with the labelled bacteria. Counts per minute of the dental materials could be determined as proportion of the quantity of adhering microorganisms. Silver-palladium-alloy had a lower adherence than silver-tin-alloy. Finest polished alloys had lower adhering properties than unpolished surfaces of materials. (author)

  5. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material used ...

  6. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuková, Jana; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Linetskiy, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2008), s. 715-723 ISSN 0109-5641 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : metallic dental materials * dental alloys * amalgams * MR imaging * magnetic susceptibility * electric conductivity * image artifact Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.941, year: 2008

  7. Base metal alloys used for dental restorations and implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael

    2007-07-01

    One of the primary reasons for the development of base metal alloys for dental applications has been the escalating cost of gold throughout the 20th century. In addition to providing lower cost alternatives, these nonprecious alloys were also found to provide better mechanical properties and aesthetics for some oral applications. Additionally, certain base metal alloy systems are preferred because of their superior mechanical properties, lower density, and in some cases, their capability to osseo-integrate. The base metal alloy systems most commonly used in dentistry today include stainless steels, nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium, titanium, and nickel-titanium alloys. Combined, these alloy systems provide a wide range of available properties to choose the correct material for both temporary and long-term restoration and implant applications.

  8. Natural radioactivity in zirconia-based dental ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto; Gerstmann, Udo; La Porta, Caterina; Cantone, Marie C.; Veronese, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics are being increasingly used in dental prosthetics in substitution of metal cores, which are known to induce local toxic reactions and delayed allergic responses in the oral tissues. Some concerns have been however raised about the use of zirconia, since it is known that unpurified zirconia materials may contain non negligible levels of natural radionuclides of the U/Th series. Combined measurements of alpha and gamma spectrometry as well as beta dosimetry were conducted on zirconia samples used for dental applications. Samples were available in form of powder and/or solid blocks. The results showed that the beta dose rate in zirconia ceramics was on average only slightly higher than the levels measured in natural teeth, and generally lower than the values measured in feldspatic and glass ceramics. These materials are indeed known to deliver a beta dose significantly higher than that measured from natural teeth, due to the relatively high levels of 40 K (between 2 and 3 kBq·kg -1 ). The content of radionuclides of the U/Th series in the zirconia sample was estimated to be lower than 15 Bq·kg -1 , i.e. doubtlessly below the exclusion level of 1 kBq·kg -1 recommended by IAEA in the Safety Standard Series. Beta dosimetry measurements, however, gave indications of possible inhomogeneous clusters of radioactivity, which might give rise to local doses above the background. (author)

  9. Methods used by Dental Practice-based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists to diagnose dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, V V; Riley, J L; Carvalho, R M; Snyder, J; Sanderson, J L; Anderson, M; Gilbert, G H

    2011-01-01

    To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included the use of dental radiographs, the dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying and fiber-optic devices and magnification as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries and caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75%–100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p=.040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p=.001). The use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods..

  10. Methods used by dental practice-based research network dentists to diagnose dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valerie V; Riley, Joseph L; De Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Snyder, John; Sanderson, James L; Anderson, Mary; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-04-01

    To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use, and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included the use of dental radiographs, the dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying and fiber-optic devices and magnification as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries and caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75%-100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p = .040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p = .001). The use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods.

  11. Methods used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists to diagnose dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Snyder, John; Sanderson, James L; Anderson, Mary; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To (1) identify the methods that dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) use to diagnose dental caries; (2) quantify their frequency of use; and (3) test the hypothesis that certain dentist and dental practice characteristics are significantly associated with their use. Methods A questionnaire about methods used for caries diagnosis was sent to DPBRN dentists who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry; 522 dentists participated. Questions included use of dental radiographs, dental explorer, laser fluorescence, air-drying, fiber optic devices, and magnification, as used when diagnosing primary, secondary/recurrent, or non-specific caries lesions. Variations on the frequency of their use were tested using multivariate analysis and Bonferroni tests. Results Overall, the dental explorer was the instrument most commonly used to detect primary occlusal caries as well as to detect caries at the margins of existing restorations. In contrast, laser fluorescence was rarely used to help diagnose occlusal primary caries. For proximal caries, radiographs were used to help diagnose 75-100% of lesions by 96% of the DPBRN dentists. Dentists who use radiographs most often to assess proximal surfaces of posterior teeth, were significantly more likely to also report providing a higher percentage of patients with individualized caries prevention (p = .040) and seeing a higher percentage of pediatric patients (p = .001). Conclusion Use of specific diagnostic methods varied substantially. The dental explorer and radiographs are still the most commonly used diagnostic methods. PMID:21488724

  12. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM.

  13. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoki, M., E-mail: hosoki@tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H. [General Dentistry, Tokushima University Hospital, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Asaoka, K. [Department of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Institute of Health Biosciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method for the microanalysis of dental alloys is beneficial for patients with allergies to dental materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This metal sample is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be also be used in general dental clinics. - Abstract: The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 {mu}g. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  14. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    MESTIERI,Leticia Boldrin; GOMES-CORNÉLIO,Ana Lívia; RODRIGUES,Elisandra Márcia; SALLES,Loise Pedrosa; BOSSO-MARTELO,Roberta; GUERREIRO-TANOMARU,Juliane Maria; TANOMARU-FILHO,Mário

    2015-01-01

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1...

  15. Uncompleted polymerization and cytotoxicity of dental restorative materials as potential health risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małkiewicz, Konrad; Wychowański, Piotr; Olkowska-Truchanowicz, Joanna; Tykarska, Marzena; Czerwiński, Michał; Wilczko, Marcin; Owoc, Alfred

    2017-12-23

    Composite materials used in dentistry indicate adverse biological effects in laboratory conditions. One reason for this activity is incomplete conversion of their polymer matrix, favoring chemical instability and release of biologically harmful components to the external environment. The aim of the study was to assess the degree of conversion of restorative materials commonly available on the European market and to examine the cytotoxic effects of their eluates in vitro. Using the Fournier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique of analysis, the degree of polymer matrix conversion of 6 restorative materials was examined: Gradia Direct, Arkon, Filtek Z550, Herculite XRV, Tetric Evo Ceram, Charisma, polymerized with LED light. In order to assess the cytotoxicity of eluates of the studied materials obtained after 1 hour , 24 hours and 7 days, the MTT assay was used in cultured 3T3 cells. The results were statistically analyzed at significance level of p=0.05. The conversion degree of the assessed polymers ranged from 31.56% for Tetric Evo Ceram to 75.84% for Arcon. The strongest (p=0.05) cytotoxic effect was demonstrated after 7-day observation of Tetric Evo Ceram eluates, reducing the metabolic activity of cells down to 56%. A positive correlation (r(x, y) = 0.62) between the degree of conversion of composite materials and cytotoxic effects of their eluates on cell cultures was confirmed. 1. Restorative dental materials are chemically unstable in the conditions of the present study. 2. Polymer-based restorative dental materials available on the European market demonstrate cytotoxic properties constituting a potential threat to the patients' health.

  16. IN VITRO TESTING – AN ESENTIAL METHOD FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF DENTAL MATERIALS AND DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca VIŢALARIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is unique among biomaterials specialties as to the large variety of materials used, and nature of the challenges they must resist. Intra-oral service demands materials adapted to a warm and moist environment, resisting the attack of digestive acids and enzymes. The materials subjected to mechanical forces should preserve their strength, fatigue and wear characteristics, for accomplishing their function. The wide range of materials available for restorative dentistry demands knowledge of their relative strengths and trade-offs, and offers the opportunity for many interesting lines of research. The spectrum extensively ranges from elastic impression materials to extremely stiff metal and ceramic appliances, so that familiarity with a variety of mechanical testing situations is required from a well-rounded dental materials laboratory. Evaluating the mechanical and wear characteristics of dental restorative materials and analyzing the durability of adhesives is critical to the development of improved dental devices

  17. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  18. Accuracy of a new elastomeric impression material for complete-arch dental implant impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza R; Buzayan, Muaiyed M; Yunus, Norsiah

    2018-01-18

    The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of multi-unit dental implant casts obtained from two elastomeric impression materials, vinyl polyether silicone (VPES) and polyether (PE), and to test the effect of splinting of impression copings on the accuracy of implant casts. Forty direct impressions of a mandibular reference model fitted with six dental implants and multibase abutments were made using VPES and PE, and implant casts were poured (N = 20). The VPES and PE groups were split into four subgroups of five each, based on splinting type: (a) no splinting; (b) bite registration polyether; (c) bite registration addition silicone; and (d) autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The accuracy of implant-abutment replica positions was calculated on the experimental casts, in terms of interimplant distances in the x, y, and z-axes, using a coordinate measuring machine; values were compared with those measured on the reference model. Data were analyzed using non-parametrical Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests at α = .05. The differences between the two impression materials, VPES and PE, regardless of splinting type, were not statistically significant (P>.05). Non-splinting and splinting groups were also not significantly different for both PE and VPES (P>.05). The accuracy of VPES impression material seemed comparable with PE for multi-implant abutment-level impressions. Splinting had no effect on the accuracy of implant impressions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. On stress/strain shielding and the material stiffness paradigm for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabi, Raoof; Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Stress shielding considerations suggest that the dental implant material's compliance should be matched to that of the host bone. However, this belief has not been confirmed from a general perspective, either clinically or numerically. To characterize the influence of the implant stiffness on its functionality using the failure envelope concept that examines all possible combinations of mechanical load and application angle for selected stress, strain and displacement-based bone failure criteria. Those criteria represent bone yielding, remodeling, and implant primary stability, respectively MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed numerical simulations to generate failure envelopes for all possible loading configurations of dental implants, with stiffness ranging from very low (polymer) to extremely high, through that of bone, titanium, and ceramics. Irrespective of the failure criterion, stiffer implants allow for improved implant functionality. The latter reduces with increasing compliance, while the trabecular bone experiences higher strains, albeit of an overall small level. Micromotions remain quite small irrespective of the implant's stiffness. The current paradigm favoring reduced implant material's stiffness out of concern for stress or strain shielding, or even excessive micromotions, is not supported by the present calculations, that point exactly to the opposite. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cellular Responses in Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Treated with Three Endodontic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Victoria-Escandell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human dental pulp stem cells (HDPSCs are of special relevance in future regenerative dental therapies. Characterizing cytotoxicity and genotoxicity produced by endodontic materials is required to evaluate the potential for regeneration of injured tissues in future strategies combining regenerative and root canal therapies. This study explores the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress of three endodontic materials that are widely used on HDPSCs: a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA-Angelus white, an epoxy resin sealant (AH-Plus cement, and an MTA-based cement sealer (MTA-Fillapex. Cell viability and cell death rate were assessed by flow cytometry. Oxidative stress was measured by OxyBlot. Levels of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated by Western blot. Genotoxicity was studied by quantifying the expression levels of DNA damage sensors such as ATM and RAD53 genes and DNA damage repair sensors such as RAD51 and PARP-1. Results indicate that AH-Plus increased apoptosis, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity markers in HDPSCs. MTA-Fillapex was the most cytotoxic oxidative stress inductor and genotoxic material for HDPSCs at longer times in preincubated cell culture medium, and MTA-Angelus was less cytotoxic and genotoxic than AH-Plus and MTA-Fillapex at all times assayed.

  1. Beyond food: The multiple pathways for inclusion of materials into ancient dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radini, Anita; Nikita, Efthymia; Buckley, Stephen; Copeland, Les; Hardy, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Dental calculus (mineralized dental plaque) was first recognised as a potentially useful archaeological deposit in the 1970s, though interest in human dental calculus as a resource material has increased sharply in the past few years. The majority of recent research has focused on the retrieval of plant microfossils embedded in its matrix and interpretation of these finds as largely the result of deliberate consumption of plant-derived food. However, while most of the material described in published works does represent food, dental calculus is in fact a "depositional environment" as material can enter the mouth from a range of sources. In this respect, it therefore represents an archaeological deposit that can also contain extensive non-dietary debris. This can comprise a wide variety of cultural and environmental material which reaches the mouth and can become embedded in dental calculus through alternative pathways. Here, we explore the human behaviors and activities besides eating that can generate a flux of particles into the human mouth, the broad range of additional cultural and environmental information that can be obtained through the analysis and contextualisation of this material, and the implications of the additional pathways by which material can become embedded in dental calculus. © 2017 American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

  2. An overview of case-based and problem-based learning methodologies for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Lyon, Cindy; Blaseio, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Dental education has undergone significant curriculum reform in response to the 1995 Institute of Medicine report Dental Education at the Crossroads and the series of white papers from the American Dental Education Association Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) first published in the Journal of Dental Education and subsequently collected in a volume titled Beyond the Crossroads: Change and Innovation in Dental Education. An important element of this reform has been the introduction into academic dentistry of active learning strategies such as problem-based and case-based learning. As an aide to broadening understanding of these approaches in order to support their expansion in dental education, this article reviews the major characteristics of each approach, situates each in adult learning theory, and discusses the advantages of case-based learning in the development of a multidisciplinary, integrated predoctoral dental curriculum.

  3. Potentiometric stripping analysis of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN M. NIKOLIC

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric stipping analysis (PSA was applied for the determination of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth. The soluble lead content in finished dental implants was found to be much lower than that of the individual components used for their preparation. Cadmium was not detected in dental implants and materials under the defined conditions. The soluble lead and cadmium content of teeth was slightly lower than the lead and cadmium content in whole teeth (w/w reported by other researchers, except in the case of a tooth with removed amalgam filling. The results of this work suggest that PSA may be a good method for lead and cadmium leaching studies for investigation of the biocompatibility of dental prosthetic materials.

  4. Forensic Identification Based on Tooth Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human teeth are the most robust and stable parts of the body, providing biological clue material for forensic purposes even when most of the oter means of identifcation have been seriously affected by adverse environmental conditions. In particular blood grouping, isozymes, serum proteins and DNA polymorhphisms can be detected from teeth that protect these identification markers in addition to the traditional dental records. While in general the value of traditional dental records in the forensic work is decreasing eg due to mproved dental care, the newer means of identification from tooth material provide considerable promise for effective identification in difficult cases.The DNA analysis from tooth material has been shown to ba a viable route in forensic analysis, when other material for such an analysis is unusable. However in most cases useful biologic material other than teeth is abailable, and then DNA analysis can be made from other tissue with less effort than by using teeth. Also, in cases with lacking other tissue, blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins may provide cheaper inherited combinations of blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins can be treated similary to polymorphic DNA loci as independent markers, their identification can be managed if the false positives and negatives in analysis can be minimmised, and the corresponding frequencies of occurrence are known.It was the purpose of the present work to review the methods of forensic identification from tooth material, based on analysis of blood grouping, isozymes and serum proteins. It appears that such a combined analysis provides a robust method for forensic purposes. Nevertheless, for efficient identification it is recommended that as many (multiple forensic methods as possible are combined, so that faster and cheaper methods such as imminent medical forensics are used first, and more thorough analysis is used to support and complement these methods.

  5. Physical properties and compatibility with dental stones of current alginate impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, H; Kawamura, M; Hamada, T; Chimori, H; Nikawa, H

    2004-11-01

    This study examined physical properties and compatibility with dental stones of two types of alginate impression materials. Five powder-type alginate impression materials (Alginoplast EM, Aroma Fine, Algiace Z, Coe Alginate, Jeltrate Plus) and a paste-type alginate impression material (Tokuso AP-1) were used. The dynamic viscosity immediately after mixing was measured by means of a controlled-stress rheometer. The gelation times were determined according to Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) T6505, and recovery from deformation, strain in compression and compressive strength were determined according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) specification 1563. Detail reproduction and surface roughness of type III dental stones (New Plastone, New Sunstone) and a type IV dental stone (Die Stone) were evaluated using a ruled test block as specified in the ISO specification 1563 and a profilometer, respectively. The alginate impression materials evaluated in this study were all in compliance with the ISO specification 1563 and JIS T6505. The alginate impression materials had similar mechanical properties after gelation, whilst a wide range of dynamic viscosity immediately after being mixed, gelation times and compatibility with dental stones were found among the materials. The paste-type material had a higher dynamic viscosity and a shorter gelation time than the powder-type materials. The best surface quality was obtained with the paste-type material/type III dental stone cast combinations. The materials should be selected in consideration of initial flow, setting characteristics and compatibility with dental stones. The results suggested that a paste-type material would better meet the requirements of an alginate impression material.

  6. Community-based dental education: history, current status, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the history, current status, and future direction of community-based dental education (CBDE). The key issues addressed include the reasons that dentistry developed a different clinical education model than the other health professions; how government programs, private medical foundations, and early adopter schools influenced the development of CBDE; the societal and financial factors that are leading more schools to increase the time that senior dental students spend in community programs; the impact of CBDE on school finances and faculty and student perceptions; and the reasons that CBDE is likely to become a core part of the clinical education of all dental graduates.

  7. Comparison of conventional and synchrotron-radiation-based microtomography of bone around dental implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Dalstra, Michel; Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Melsen, Birte

    2004-10-01

    This study explores the application of conventional micro tomography (μCT) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based μCT to evaluate the bone around titanium dental implants. The SR experiment was performed at beamline W2 of HASYLAB at DESY using a monochromatic X-ray beam of 50 keV. The testing material consisted of undecalcified bone segments harvested from the upper jaw of a macaca fascicularis monkey each containing a titanium dental implant. The results from the two different techniques were qualitatively compared with conventional histological sections examined under light microscopy. The SR-based μCT produced images that, especially at the bone-implant interface, are less noisy and sharper than the ones obtained with conventional μCT. For the proper evaluation of the implant-bone interface, only the SR-based μCT technique is able to display the areas of bony contact and visualize the true 3D structure of bone around dental implants correctly. This investigation shows that both conventional and SR-based μCT scanning techniques are non-destructive methods, which provide detailed images of bone. However with SR-based μCT it is possible to obtain an improved image quality of the bone surrounding dental implants, which display a level of detail comparable to histological sections. Therefore, SR-based μCT scanning could represent a valid, unbiased three-dimensional alternative to evaluate osseointegration of dental implants

  8. Effect of dental materials on gluconeogenesis in rat kidney tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichl, F.X.; Durner, J.; Mückter, H.; Elsenhans, B.; Forth, W.; Kunzelmann, K.H.; Hickel, R.; Spahl, W.; Hume, W.R.; Moes, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) on gluconeogenesis was investigated in isolated rat kidney tubules. From starved rats kidney tubules were

  9. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of metallic dental materials and their impact on MR imaging artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcuková, Jana; Starcuk, Zenon; Hubálková, Hana; Linetskiy, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dental materials vary significantly in MR-relevant material parameters-magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity, and that knowledge of these parameters may be used to estimate the quality of MR imaging in the presence of devices made of such materials. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts were evaluated for 45 standardized cylindrical samples of dental alloys and amalgams. Magnetic susceptibility was determined by fitting the phase of gradient-echo MR images to numerically modeled data. Electrical conductivity was determined by standard electrotechnical measurements. Artifact sizes were measured in spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) images at 1.5T according to the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials. It has been confirmed that dental materials differ considerably in their magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity and artifacts. For typical dental devices, magnetic susceptibility differences were found of little clinical importance for diagnostic SE/GE imaging of the neck and brain, but significant for orofacial imaging. Short-TE GE imaging has been found possible even in very close distances from dental devices made of amalgams, precious alloys and titanium alloys. Nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium artifacts were found still acceptable, but large restorations of aluminum bronzes may preclude imaging of the orofacial region. The influence of electrical conductivity on the artifact size was found negligible. MR imaging is possible even close to dental devices if they are made of dental materials with low magnetic susceptibility. Not all materials in current use meet this requirement.

  10. [Adhesion of dental silicone rubber material to thermoplastic material for mouthguards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kayoko

    2010-03-01

    A preliminary study revealed that an autopolymerization addition silicone resilient denture relining material (SI) had excellent shock absorption properties similar to those of thermoplastic materials commonly used for mouthguards (ethylene-vinyl acetate: EVA). The aim of the present study was to examine the bonding strength of SI and EVA using a newly-developed adhesive prototype. Delamination tests and tensile strength tests were performed to compare the bonding strengths of SI on EVA prepared under the following four conditions: 1) Control condition (no preparation; C), 2) Sandblasting (S), 3) Bonding with the adhesive prototype (M), and 4) Combination of sandblasting preparation and bonding with the adhesive prototype (SM). The mean bonding strength (S. D.) of the delamination tests under the C, S, M and SM conditions were 0.167 (0.003) N/mm, 0.273 (0.034) N/mm, 0.242 (0.027) N/mm and 0.506 (0.113) N/mm, respectively. The mean bonding strength (S. D.) of the tensile strength tests under the C, S, M and SM conditions were 0.006 (0.011) MPa, 0.081 (0.105) MPa, 0.231 (0.069) MPa and 0.590 (0.041) MPa, respectively. Two-way analysis of variances and Tukey's HSD test detected that the combination of sandblasting preparation and bonding with the adhesive prototype significantly improved the bonding strength between SI and EVA. The results indicate that the self-curing addition silicone resilient denture relining material may adhere to the thermoplastic material prepared by combined application of sandblasting and the adhesive prototype, suggesting the potential of the dental silicone rubber material as a material for repairing mouthguards in clinical practice.

  11. Fluoride uptake from restorative dental materials by human enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsten, L.; Rytoemaa, I.; Anttila, A.; Keinonen, J.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the uptake in vitro of fluoride from restorative materials by tooth enamel and whether prior etching of the enamel causes a change of uptake. The outermost layer of the labial surface of extracted canines was removed by grinding and the enamel was covered with five different fluoride-containing materials ; a silicate, a composite resin, an amalgam, a silicophosphate, and a polycarboxylate luting cement. The material was either removed immediately or after storing the tooth in distilled water. The fluoride content was determined using a sensitive physical method based on the 19 F (p, αγ) 16 O reaction. In addition, the fluoride content of enamel after etching for different periods of time and of etched enamel which had been in contact with silicate cement was determined. The mean fluoride content of uncovered interior enamel was 226 parts 10 6 . All materials, except the composite, increased clearly the fluoride content of the underlying enamel. Etching of interior enamel also increased the fluoride values. No difference could be shown in fluoride uptake from silicate and composite resin between etched and unetched enamel. (author)

  12. Evaluating a Team-Based Learning Method for Detecting Dental Caries in Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang E.; Kim, Junhyck; Anderson, Nina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the team-based learning environment facilitated the competency of third year dental students in caries detection and activity assessment. Corresponding data were achieved using digital radiographs to determine the carious lesions in three clinical cases. The distribution of the caries evaluations…

  13. Evaluation of workplace based assessment tools in dental foundation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieveson, B; Kirton, J A; Palmer, N O A; Balmer, M C

    2011-08-26

    The aims of this survey were to evaluate the effectiveness of workplace based assessments (WPAs) in dental foundation training (formerly vocational training [VT]). Two online questionnaire surveys were sent to 53 foundation dental practitioners (FDPs) and their 51 trainers in the Mersey Deanery at month four and month nine of the one year of dental foundation training. The questionnaires investigated the effectiveness of and trainers' and trainees' satisfaction with the WPAs used in foundation training, namely dental evaluation of performance (D-EPs), case-based discussions (DcBD) and patients' assessment questionnaires (PAQs). The questionnaires also investigated the perceived impact of reflection and feedback associated with WPAs on clinical practise and improving patient care. A total of 41 (7.4%) FDPs and 44 (86.3%) trainers responded. Of the 41 FDPs, the majority found that feedback from WPAs had a positive effect on their training, giving them insight into their development needs. Overall 84.1% of the FDPs felt the WPAs helped them improve patient care and 82.5% of trainers agreed with that outcome. The findings from this study demonstrate the value of WPAs in dental foundation training by the use of feedback and reflection in directing the learning of foundation dental practitioners and that this can lead to improved clinical practise and patient care.

  14. A novel accelerator for improving the handling properties of dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sung-Chih; Teng, Nai-Chia; Lin, Yu-Chen; Lee, Pei-Ying; Ji, Dian-Yu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Ke, En-Sheng; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Yang, Jen-Chang

    2009-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) fulfills many of the ideal properties of a root end filling material and repair material for furcal perforation. However, its low cohesive property often makes it difficult to handle. To improve the handling properties of MTA root canal filling materials, MTA-like cement was made, and calcium lactate gluconate (CLG) aqueous solution was used to shorten the setting time and enhance the paste viscosity. CLG solution was prepared by mixing lactic acid, glucono delta lactone, and calcium oxide by wet process. The crystalline property of the CLG powder was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The MTA-like cements were prepared by mixing Portland cement/bismuth oxide/gypsum (75/20/5); ProRoot white MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) was used as a control group. The influence of various liquid phases on initial setting time, handling properties, and pH value were investigated by a Vicat needle, questionnaire of operational hand feel, and pH meter, respectively. By using 23.1 wt% CLG solutions as a liquid phase, the setting time of white MTA was significantly decreased from 155.5 +/- 5.0 to 12.3 +/- 2.5 minutes. The pH values for hydrated white MTA with deionized water and 23.1 wt% CLG solutions were 12.29 +/- 0.02 and 11.81 +/- 0.04 at 72 hours. The results suggest that the addition of amorphous CLG-based liquid phase provides improvement in sealing ability as well as clinical manageability of dental filling materials.

  15. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  16. Detection of Nanoparticles Released at Finishing of Dental Composite Materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bradna, P.; Ondráčková, Lucie; Ždímal, Vladimír; Navrátil, Tomáš; Pelclová, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 531-537 ISSN 0026-9247. [International Conference on Modern Electrochemical Methods /36./. Jetřichovice, 23.05.2016-27.05.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : dental composite * grinding * nanoparticles * aerosol * health risk Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Public and environmental health ; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  17. Detection of Nanoparticles Released at Finishing of Dental Composite Materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bradna, P.; Ondráčková, Lucie; Ždímal, Vladimír; Navrátil, Tomáš; Pelclová, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 531-537 ISSN 0026-9247. [International Conference on Modern Electrochemical Methods /36./. Jetřichovice, 23.05.2016-27.05.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : dental composite * grinding * nanoparticles * aerosol * health risk Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Public and environmental health; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  18. The influence of different core material on the FEA-determined stress distribution in dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, Niek; de Kler, Marcel; van der Zel, Jef M

    2006-03-01

    All ceramic restorations without metal have great advantages in their biocompatibility and aesthetic aspects. With the introduction of new core materials, the cores are sufficiently strong to produce long lasting all-ceramic restorations; however, the stresses in the veneering porcelain could still determine the longevity. The objective of this study was to evaluate, by finite element analysis (FEA), the influence of different core materials on the stress distribution in dental crowns. The model of a multi-layer all-ceramic crown for posterior tooth 46 produced with CAD-CAM-technology was translated into a three-dimensional FEA program. This crown model was made with gold, zirconia, and alumina-based porcelain core and their matching veneering porcelains. The stress distribution due to the combined influences of bite forces, residual stresses caused by the difference in expansion coefficient of the core material and the veneering porcelain, and the influence of shrinkage of the cement was investigated. Stiffer core material does not always for various reasons result in lower stresses in the veneering porcelain. This study indicates that the actual distribution of the tensile stresses and the design of restorations must be taken into account; otherwise, the significant contribution of stronger and tougher core materials to the performance of all-ceramic restorations may be offset by the weaker veneering porcelain.

  19. Caries treatment in a dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Funkhouser, Ellen M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a venue to foster evidence-based care. We tested the hypothesis that a higher level of participation in a dental PBRN is associated with greater stated change toward evidence-based practice. METHODS: A total of 565 dental PBRN...... practitioner-investigators completed a baseline questionnaire entitled 'Assessment of Caries Diagnosis and Treatment'; 405 of these also completed a follow-up questionnaire about treatment of caries and existing restorations. Certain questions (six treatment scenarios) were repeated at follow-up a mean (SD...

  20. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and pH changes generated by various dental pulp capping materials - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczaj-Cepowicz, Elzbieta; Marczuk-Kolada, Grazyna; Pawinska, Malgorzata; Obidzinska, Marta; Holownia, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Various materials are used in direct dental pulp capping method. Their biocompatibility and alkalizing abilities are of primary importance affecting therapeutic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity of various pulp-capping materials on human gingival fibroblasts and investigate the pH changes induced by these materials. Human gingival fibroblasts were cultured with nine direct pulp materials using culture plate inserts. The cytotoxic effects were recorded by using an MTT-based colorimetric assay after 3 and 24 h. In the second part of the experiment, the materials were inserted in dialysis tubes and transferred into plastic vials containing deionized water. The changes of the medium pH were measured after 3 and 24 h. We showed differences in cell viability of gingival fibroblasts after varied time of exposition for the tested materials. Cell viability after 24 h increased for Dycal, Biopulp, and Calcipro, and decreased for Calcipulpe, Angelus, Angelus White, and ProRoot Regular. Cell viability for ProRoot and Life did not change. Non-setting calcium hydroxide preparations followed by the MTA group and setting calcium hydroxide materials produced the highest pH. All the tested materials significantly increased pH (p pH does not affect the viability of cultured cells, further investigations are required to determine physicochemical properties of these materials and the biological activity of the dental pulp.

  1. Effect of Dental Restorative Material Type and Shade on Characteristics of Two-Layer Dental Composite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Karimzadeh

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of shade and material type and shape in dental polymer composites on the hardness and shrinkage stress of bulk and two-layered restoration systems. For this purpose, some bulk and layered specimens from three different shades of dental materials were prepared and light-cured. The experiments were carried out on three types of materials: conventional restorative composite, nanohybrid composite and nanocomposite. Micro-indentation experiment was performed on the bulk and also on each layer of layered restoration specimens using a Vicker's indenter. The interface between the two layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results revealed significant differences between the values of hardness for different shades in the conventional composite and also in the nanohybrid composite. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the hardness values for different shades in the nanocomposite samples. The layered restoration specimens of different restorative materials exhibited lower hardness values with respect to their bulk specimens. The reduction in the hardness value of the layered conventional composite samples was higher than those of the nanocomposite and nanohybrid composite specimens indicating more shrinkage stresses generated in the conventional composite restorations. According to the SEM images, a gap was observed between the two layers in the layered restorations.

  2. Polyetherketoneketone (PEKK), a framework material for complete fixed and removable dental prostheses: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jonathan H; Hyde, Bart; Hurst, Mitch; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2017-11-29

    This clinical report demonstrates the use of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) as a framework material with individually luted heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns for an implant-supported complete fixed dental prosthesis (ICFDP) and a conventional complete removable dental prosthesis (CRDP). This prosthesis design provides a non-computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) option for the fabrication of ICFDPs and CRDPs with individualized ceramic crowns for optimal esthetics. The performance of PEKK as a framework material needs to be assessed in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Restored viability and function of dental pulp cells on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin supplemented with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, N; Yamada, M; Paranjpe, A; Tsukimura, N; Kubo, K; Jewett, A; Ogawa, T

    2008-12-01

    This study examines cytotoxicity of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental temporary filling resin to dental pulp cells, and the potential amelioration of the toxicity with an anti-oxidant amino-acid, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Dental pulp cells extracted from rat maxillary incisors were cultured on the resin material with or without NAC incorporation, or on the polystyrene. The cultures were supplied with osteoblastic media, containing dexamethasone. Forty five percent of cells on the PMMA dental resin were necrotic at 24h after seeding. However, this percentage was reduced to 27% by incorporating NAC in the resin, which was the level equivalent to that in the culture on polystyrene. The culture on the untreated resin was found to be negative for alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity at days 5 and 10 or von Kossa mineralized nodule formation at day 20. In contrast, some areas of the cultures on NAC-incorporated resin substrates were ALP and von Kossa positive. Collagen I and dentin sialoprotein genes were barely expressed in day 7 culture on the untreated resin. However, those genes were expressed in the culture on the resin with NAC. These results suggest that the decreased cell viability and the nearly completely suppressed odontoblast-like cell phenotype of dental pulp cells cultured on PMMA dental resin can be salvaged to a biologically significant degree by the incorporation of NAC in the resin.

  4. Alternative materials study for dental magnetics attachments applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rogerio Albuquerque

    2009-01-01

    Ferromagnetic alloys have been investigated as potential candidates for dental prosthesis applications in replacement for magnetic attachments made of noble and expensive alloys. Three stainless steels were investigated: 17-4 PH produced by powder injection (PIM), PM2000 obtained by mechanical alloying and oxide dispersion strengthened, and nickel free stainless steel 1802. In the in vitro cytotoxicity analysis, none of the three steels tested showed cytotoxic effects. The corrosion resistance of stainless steels was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic potentiodynamic polarization, in sodium phosphate buffer solutions (PBS) at 25 degree C. The AISI 316L stainless steel was also tested under the same conditions for comparison reasons. All the stainless steel samples were passive in the electrolyte used and presented susceptibility to pitting. The steel that showed the highest pitting resistance was the PM2000, whereas the 1802 had the lowest resistance to pitting among the tested ones. The Mott-Schottky diagrams suggested that the passive film over the surface of PM2000 steel is at least one decade less doped compared to 316L stainless steel, so less defective in its structure. The results pointed out to the PM2000 as a potential candidate for substitution of high cost magnetic alloys used in dental prosthesis. (author)

  5. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  6. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  7. Effectiveness of Disinfectants on Antimicrobial and Physical Properties of Dental Impression Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demajo, Jean Karl; Cassar, Valter; Farrugia, Cher; Millan-Sango, David; Sammut, Charles; Valdramidis, Vasilis; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of chemical disinfectants on alginate and silicone impression materials. The effect of chemical disinfectants on the dimensional stability of the impression materials was also assessed. For the microbiologic assessment, impressions of the maxillary arch were taken from 14 participants, 7 using alginate and 7 using an addition silicone. The impressions were divided into three sections. Each section was subjected to spraying with MD 520 or Minuten or no disinfection (control), respectively. Antimicrobial action of the chemical disinfectants was assessed by measuring microbial counts in trypticase soy agar (TSA) media and expressing the results in colony-forming units/cm2. The surface area of the dental impressions was calculated by scanning a stone cast using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture and analyzing the data using a custom computer program. The dimensional stability of the impression materials after immersion in disinfectants was assessed by measuring the linear displacement of horizontally restrained materials using a traveling microscope. The percent change in length over 3 hours was thus determined. Alginate exhibited a higher microbial count than silicone. MD 520 eliminated all microbes as opposed to Minuten. The bacterial growth after Minuten disinfection was almost twice as much for alginate than for addition silicone impressions. The chemical disinfectants affected the alginate dimensional stability. Minuten reduced the shrinkage sustained by alginate during the first hour of storage. Alginate harbors three times more microorganisms than silicone impression material. Chemical disinfection by glutaraldehyde-based disinfectant was effective in eliminating all microbial forms for both alginate and silicone without modifying the dimensional stability. Alcohol-based disinfectants, however, reduced the alginate shrinkage during the first 90 minutes of setting. The current studies

  8. A survey of U.S. prosthodontists and dental schools on the current materials and methods for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Williams, Karen

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey members of The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) to evaluate current materials and methods for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics in the United States. In addition, those methods were compared with methods and materials taught in U.S. dental schools via a second survey sent to the chairpersons of prosthodontic/restorative departments. An anonymous questionnaire was mailed to all 1762 active ACP members in the United States in 2003. A slightly modified questionnaire was also distributed to chairpersons of prosthodontic/restorative departments in the 54 U.S. dental schools. Data analysis was performed via frequency distribution and chi-square statistics. Nine hundred and forty-five questionnaires were returned by members of the ACP (54% return rate) and 42 questionnaires were returned by the U.S. dental schools (78% return rate). The majority of the reporting prosthodontists (88%) and dental schools (98%) use a border-molded custom tray for final impressions for complete denture prosthodontics. The most popular material for border molding was plastic modeling compound (67% of reporting ACP members, and 95% of the responding dental schools). Variability of the materials used for final impressions was observed, with the most popular materials being polyvinylsiloxane for the ACP members (36%) and polysulfide for the dental schools (64%). Statistically significant differences were found in the materials used for border molding by prosthodontists based on the time elapsed since completion of prosthodontic training. No differences were found in the materials used for impression of edentulous arches based on years of experience. Geographic location did not influence the materials and methods used by prosthodontists for complete denture final impressions. There was variability of the materials and techniques used for final impressions by ACP members and dental schools; however, overall there was an agreement

  9. Teaching Cell Biology to Dental Students with a Project-Based Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Silva, Daniela; Côrtes, Juliana A; Bachinski, Rober F; Spiegel, Carolina N; Alves, Gutemberg G

    2018-03-01

    Although the discipline of cell biology (CB) is part of the curricula of predoctoral dental schools, students often fail to recognize its practical relevance. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a practical-theoretical project-based course in closing the gaps among CB, scientific research, and dentistry for dental students. A project-based learning course was developed with nine sequential lessons to evaluate 108 undergraduate dental students enrolled in CB classes of a Brazilian school of dentistry during 2013-16. To highlight the relevance of in vitro studies in the preclinical evaluation of dental materials at the cellular level, the students were challenged to complete the process of drafting a protocol and performing a cytocompatibility assay for a bone substitute used in dentistry. Class activities included small group discussions, scientific database search and article presentations, protocol development, lab experimentation, and writing of a final scientific report. A control group of 31 students attended only one laboratory class on the same theme, and the final reports were compared between the two groups. The results showed that the project-based learning students had superior outcomes in acknowledging the relevance of in vitro methods during biocompatibility testing. Moreover, they produced scientifically sound reports with more content on methodological issues, the relationship with dentistry, and the scientific literature than the control group (p<0.05). The project-based learning students also recognized a higher relevance of scientific research and CB to dental practice. These results suggest that a project-based approach can help contextualize scientific research in dental curricula.

  10. Evaluation of simulation learning materials use to fill the gap in Japanese dental English education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Naoko; Moross, Janelle; Sunaga, Masayo; Hobo, Koki; Miyoshi, Tomoe; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Morio, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Even though English is most frequently the common language when the patient's native language differs from that of a dentist, the opportunities for Japanese undergraduate dental students to learn dental English are now quite limited. The purposes of our study were to investigate: the effectiveness and feasibility of the computer-assisted simulation materials as one solution strategy for dental English education in Japan, and the needs and demands for dental English from the learners' side. Interactive simulation materials for medical interviews in English and clinical cases which were translated to English, were delivered via Learning Management System (LMS) to nineteen trainee residents of dentistry (residents). Evaluation for the materials, learners' knowledge and interests in the contents, and ease of operation were obtained by post-questionnaire (response rates were 100% and 95%, respectively). Both questionnaire-surveys received positive feedback toward the materials, yet 47% answered that they lacked the level of knowledge about contents of the medical interview in English. Results were sufficient to suggest that the residents would like to have the opportunity to study or practice medical interview in English, or English related to dentistry, and that the simulation materials could be one of the solution strategies for opportunity provision.

  11. Performance assessment of Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer on colour measurement of aesthetic dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhazali, N; Burnside, G; Smith, R W; Preston, A J; Jarad, F D

    2011-12-01

    Four different shades were used to produce 20 samples of resin-based composite and 20 samples of porcelain to evaluate the performance ability of an intra oral test spectrophotometer compared to a reference spectrophotometer. The absolute colour coordinates CIELAB values measured with both spectrophotometers were significantly different (p spectrophotometers (p < 0.05). Therefore, the Easy Shade can be used in dental practice and dental research with some limitations.

  12. Evaluation of accuracy of multiple dental implant impressions using various splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Rasasubramanian; Shankar, Chitra; Rajan, Manoj; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Azhagarasan, N S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of casts obtained from nonsplinted and splinted direct impression techniques employing various splinting materials for multiple dental implants. A reference model with four Nobel Replace Select implant replicas in the anterior mandible was fabricated with denture base heat-curing acrylic resin. Impressions of the reference model were made using polyether impression material by direct nonsplinted and splinted techniques. Impressions were divided into four groups: group A: nonsplinted technique; group B: acrylic resin-splinted technique; group C: bite registration addition silicone-splinted technique; and group D: bite registration polyether-splinted technique. Four impressions were made for each group and casts were poured in type IV dental stone. Linear differences in interimplant distances in the x-, y-, and z-axes and differences in interimplant angulations in the z-axis were measured on the casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The interimplant distance D1y showed significant variations in all four test groups (P = .043), while D3x values varied significantly between the acrylic resin-splinted and silicone-splinted groups. Casts obtained from the polyether-splinted group were the closest to the reference model in the x- and y-axes. In the z-axis, D2z values varied significantly among the three test groups (P = .009). Casts from the acrylic resin-splinted group were the closest to the reference model in the z-axis. Also, one of the three angles measured (angle 2) showed significant differences within three test groups (P = .009). Casts from the nonsplinted group exhibited the smallest angular differences. Casts obtained from all four impression techniques exhibited differences from the reference model. Casts obtained using the bite registration polyether-splinted technique were the most accurate versus the reference model, followed by those obtained via the acrylic resin-splinted, nonsplinted, and

  13. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  14. Materials engineering data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The various types of materials related data that exist at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and compiled into databases which could be accessed by all the NASA centers and by other contractors, are presented.

  15. Awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants – A questionnaire-based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Hosadurga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing nations like India awareness and education about dental implants as a treatment modality is still scanty. Aim: The study was conducted to determine the awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants as a treatment modality among the general population and to assess the influence of personality characteristics on accepting dental implants as a treatment modality in general and as well as treatment group. Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire-based survey was conducted on 500 randomly selected participants attending the outpatient department. The study was conducted in 2 parts. In the first part of the study, level of awareness, knowledge, and attitude was assessed. In the second part of the study, interactive educational sessions using audiovisual aids were conducted following which a retest was conducted. The participants who agreed to undergo implant treatment were followed up to assess their change in attitude towards dental implants posttreatment. Thus pain, anxiety, functional, and esthetic benefits were measured using visual analog scale. They were further followed up for 1 year to reassess awareness, knowledge, and attitude towards dental implants. Results: A total of 450 individuals completed the questionnaires. Only 106 individuals agreed to participate in the educational sessions and 83 individuals took the retest. Out of these, only 39 individuals chose implants as a treatment option. A significant improvement in the level of information, subjective and objective need for information, was noted after 1 year. Conclusion: In this study, a severe deficit in level of information, subjective and objective need for information towards, dental implants as a treatment modality was noted. In the treatment group, a significant improvement in perception of dental implant as a treatment modality suggests that professionally imparted knowledge can bring about a change in the attitude.

  16. [Preliminary study of bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramic and veneering porcelains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-li; Gao, Mei-qin; Cheng, Yu-ye; Zhang, Fei-min

    2015-04-01

    In order to choose the best veneering porcelain for diatomite-based dental ceramic substrate, the bonding strength between diatomite-based dental ceramics and veneering porcelains was measured, and the microstructure and elements distribution of interface were analyzed. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of diatomite-based dental ceramics was detected by dilatometry. Three veneering porcelain materials were selected with the best CTE matching including alumina veneering porcelain (group A), titanium porcelain veneering porcelain (group B), and E-max veneering porcelain (group C). Shear bonding strength was detected. SEM and EDS were used to observe the interface microstructure and element distribution. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 software package. The CTE of diatomite-based dental ceramics at 25-500 degrees centigrade was 8.85×10-6K-1. The diatomite-based substrate ceramics combined best with group C. Shear bonding strength between group A and C and group B and C both showed significant differences(Pveneer.

  17. Nano-sized aerosol classification, collection and analysis--method development using dental composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Axel; Buckett, Mary I; Japuntich, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a methodical approach for generating, collecting, and analyzing nano-size (1-100 nm) aerosol from abraded dental composite materials. Existing aerosol sampling instruments were combined with a custom-made sampling chamber to create and sample a fresh, steady-state aerosol size distribution before significant Brownian coagulation. Morphological, size, and compositional information was obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). To create samples sizes suitable for TEM analysis, aerosol concentrations in the test chamber had to be much higher than one would typically expect in a dental office, and therefore, these results do not represent patient or dental personnel exposures. Results show that nano-size aerosol was produced by the dental drill alone, with and without cooling water drip, prior to abrasion of dental composite. During abrasion, aerosol generation seemed independent of the percent filler load of the restorative material and the operator who generated the test aerosol. TEM investigation showed that "chunks" of filler and resin were generated in the nano-size range; however, free nano-size filler particles were not observed. The majority of observed particles consisted of oil droplets, ash, and graphitic structures.

  18. 3D printed versus conventionally cured provisional crown and bridge dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayeri, Anthony; Morgan, MaryCatherine; Fugolin, Ana P; Bompolaki, Despoina; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Pfeifer, Carmem S; Ferracane, Jack L; Bertassoni, Luiz E

    2018-02-01

    To optimize the 3D printing of a dental material for provisional crown and bridge restorations using a low-cost stereolithography 3D printer; and compare its mechanical properties against conventionally cured provisional dental materials. Samples were 3D printed (25×2×2mm) using a commercial printable resin (NextDent C&B Vertex Dental) in a FormLabs1+ stereolithography 3D printer. The printing accuracy of printed bars was determined by comparing the width, length and thickness of samples for different printer settings (printing orientation and resin color) versus the set dimensions of CAD designs. The degree of conversion of the resin was measured with FTIR, and both the elastic modulus and peak stress of 3D printed bars was determined using a 3-point being test for different printing layer thicknesses. The results were compared to those for two conventionally cured provisional materials (Integrity ® , Dentsply; and Jet ® , Lang Dental Inc.). Samples printed at 90° orientation and in a white resin color setting was chosen as the most optimal combination of printing parameters, due to the comparatively higher printing accuracy (up to 22% error), reproducibility and material usage. There was no direct correlation between printing layer thickness and elastic modulus or peak stress. 3D printed samples had comparable modulus to Jet ® , but significantly lower than Integrity ® . Peak stress for 3D printed samples was comparable to Integrity ® , and significantly higher than Jet ® . The degree of conversion of 3D printed samples also appeared higher than that of Integrity ® or Jet ® . Our results suggest that a 3D printable provisional restorative material allows for sufficient mechanical properties for intraoral use, despite the limited 3D printing accuracy of the printing system of choice. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Some aspects of the formulation of alginate dental impression materials--setting characteristics and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamuthu, Navina A; Braden, Michael; Patel, Mangala P

    2012-07-01

    To study the role of the various components of alginate dental impression materials. Experimental materials were formulated and their physical properties characterized and compared to commercially available counterparts (Neocolloid, Palgat Plus and Blueprint Cremix). Properties examined were: dimensional stability and weight change in water and artificial saliva; setting behavior; Shore A hardness and tear energy. The role of magnesium oxide was also investigated. Weight changes in water and artificial saliva can be attributed to an initial thermodynamic potential owing to the ionic content of the alginate, causing water to diffuse into the material. Water is then driven back out following a reversal of this potential. Hardness results for experimental materials were within the range obtained from the commercial materials. The hardness value for an experimental formulation that did not contain magnesium oxide was lower than values from the other experimental materials that did. Tear energies for all three experimental materials were greater than those of the commercial products. There were statistically significant differences between the two experimental materials that contained magnesium oxide and one that did not. With regard to setting time, statistically significant differences were seen between commercial materials and two of the experimental materials. The experimental material that did not contain magnesium oxide had a considerably longer setting time than all of the other materials tested. The key role of magnesium oxide in the setting reaction and the effect on hardness have been demonstrated and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Okumura, N.; Kambara, M.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen*s egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  1. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H; Kawasaki, K; Okumura, N; Kambara, M; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen's egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  2. The performance of human dental pulp stem cells on different three-dimensional scaffold materials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Daamen, W.F.; Bian, Z.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo behavior of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from impacted third molars, when seeded onto different 3-dimensional (3-D) scaffold materials: i.e. a spongeous collagen, a porous ceramic, and a fibrous titanium mesh.

  3. SU-F-T-426: Measurement of Dose Enhancement Due to Backscatter From Modern Dental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurwitz, M; Margalit, D; Williams, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tso, T; Lee, S; Rosen, E [Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High-density materials used in dental restoration can cause significant localized dose enhancement due to electron backscatter in head-and-neck radiotherapy, increasing the risk of mucositis. The materials used in prosthetic dentistry have evolved in the last decades from metal alloys to ceramics. We aim to determine the dose enhancement caused by backscatter from currently-used dental materials. Methods: Measurements were performed for three different dental materials: lithium disilicate (Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), zirconium dioxide (ZrO{sub 2}), and gold alloy. Small thin squares (2×2×0.15 cm{sup 3}) of the material were fabricated, and placed into a phantom composed of tissue-equivalent material. The phantom was irradiated with a single 6 MV photon field. A thin-window parallel-plate ion chamber was used to measure the dose at varying distances from the proximal interface between the material and the plastic. Results: The dose enhancement at the interface between the high-density and tissue-equivalent materials, relative to a homogeneous phantom, was 54% for the gold alloy, 31% for ZrO{sub 2}, and 9% for Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}. This enhancement decreased rapidly with distance from the interface, falling to 11%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively, 2 mm from the interface. Comparisons with the modeling of this effect in treatment planning systems are performed. Conclusion: While dose enhancement due to dental restoration is smaller with ceramic materials than with metal alloys, it can still be significant. A spacer of about 2–3 mm would be effective in reducing this enhancement, even for metal alloys.

  4. Practical and theoretical considerations on the fracture toughness testing of dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; Zorzin, José I; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    An important tool in materials research, development and characterization regarding mechanical performance is the testing of fracture toughness. A high level of accuracy in executing this sort of test is necessary, with strict requirements given in extensive testing standard documents. Proficiency in quality specimen fabrication and test requires practice and a solid theoretical background, oftentimes overlooked in the dental community. In this review we go through some fundamentals of the fracture mechanics concepts that are relevant to the understanding of fracture toughness testing, and draw attention to critical aspects of practical nature that must be fulfilled for validity and accuracy in results. We describe our experience with some testing methodologies for CAD/CAM materials and discuss advantages and shortcomings of different tests in terms of errors in testing the applicability of the concept of fracture toughness as a single-value material-specific property. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. CONTACT ANGLE MEASUREMENT OF DENTAL RESTORATIVE MATERIALS BY DROP PROFILE IMAGE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rinastiti, H. D. K. Yulianto dan

    2014-01-01

    The capability of initial microbial adhesion to dental restorative composites surface is influenced by the surface wettability of the materials. The common method to evaluate surface wettability of materials is contact angle measurement. The existing conventional method to measure contact angle is by means of a contact angle (CA)-Goniometer device, which is less practically applicable in clinical circumstances. Therefore, a more practical and applicable method is needed to measure contact ang...

  6. Occupational exposure to contaminated biological material: perceptions and feelings experienced among dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila PINELLI

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental students may be a particularly vulnerable group exposed to the risk of acquiring infections through occupational injuries.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceptions with regard to their occupational exposure to potentially infectious biologic materials.MATERIAL AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted by means of a script with open questions. The speeches were recorded, transcribed and qualitative analysis was performed with the aid of QUALIQUANTISOFT® software. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD was obtained.RESULT: The feeling most frequently experienced was related to the fear of contagion. Most accidents occurred during the handling of sharp dental instruments. Respondents attributed the occurrence of accidents especially the lack of attention, carelessness while handling sharp instruments, and lack of use of Personal Protective Equipment. As regards the measures taken right after the exposure, they "washed the local area". Other respondents reported they "continued the dental treatment". They complained mostly about the fear of having been infected, and because they had to leave the faculty to take blood exams for HIV screening. As part of the learning experience the injured reported they paid more attention when handling sharp instruments. The students informed that any type of injury due to contact with contaminated material must be notified. However, they were neglectful about reporting their own injury.CONCLUSION: Education strategies for preventive measures related to occupational exposure must be restructured, because the knowledge and the fear of contagion among dental students were not always sufficient for a complete adherence to treatment protocols and notification.

  7. A dental public health approach based on computational mathematics: Monte Carlo simulation of childhood dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Marc; Kruger, Estie

    2013-02-01

    This study developed a Monte Carlo simulation approach to examining the prevalence and incidence of dental decay using Australian children as a test environment. Monte Carlo simulation has been used for a half a century in particle physics (and elsewhere); put simply, it is the probability for various population-level outcomes seeded randomly to drive the production of individual level data. A total of five runs of the simulation model for all 275,000 12-year-olds in Australia were completed based on 2005-2006 data. Measured on average decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) and DMFT of highest 10% of sample (Sic10) the runs did not differ from each other by more than 2% and the outcome was within 5% of the reported sampled population data. The simulations rested on the population probabilities that are known to be strongly linked to dental decay, namely, socio-economic status and Indigenous heritage. Testing the simulated population found DMFT of all cases where DMFT0 was 2.3 (n = 128,609) and DMFT for Indigenous cases only was 1.9 (n = 13,749). In the simulation population the Sic25 was 3.3 (n = 68,750). Monte Carlo simulations were created in particle physics as a computational mathematical approach to unknown individual-level effects by resting a simulation on known population-level probabilities. In this study a Monte Carlo simulation approach to childhood dental decay was built, tested and validated. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. Cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of cements based on calcium silicate and of dental formocresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunjung; Jeong, Youngdan; Kim, Miri

    2017-03-01

    Increasing interest is being paid to the toxicities of dental materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicities and genotoxicities of endodontic compounds to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) reproductive cells. Cultured CHO-K1 cells were treated with dental formocresol, two types of calcium hydroxide paste, and two types of mineral trioxide aggregate cement for 24h. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was performed on each culture, and the micronucleus frequency was determined by performing a micronucleus assay. Alkaline comet assay and γ-H2AX immunofluorescence assay were used to detect DNA damage. Out of the five materials tested, only dental formocresol significantly increased DNA damage. The mineral trioxide aggregate cements based on calcium silicate were not found to be potentially genotoxic. The data suggest that dental formocresol should not be recommended for use in vital pulp therapy on young teeth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of dental filling materials by Er:YAG laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1991-05-01

    In previous reports it could be shown that pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation is effective for the removal of dental enamel, dentin, and caries. Damage to the adjacent hard substances is minimal. Temperature measurements and animal studies revealed that thermal pulp damage can be avoided. The experimental results make the Er:YAG laser promising for the preparation of dental cavities. In many cases patients already have fillings which have to be removed. In the present work, investigation is made of the effect of Er:YAG laser radiation on various restorative filling materials. The experiments demonstrate that removal is possible for all tested cements, composites and amalgam. Ablation efficiency is comparable to that of enamel and dentin, and thus sufficient for practical applications. Morphology of crater walls indicates greater thermal side effects than for natural dental hard substances.

  10. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investiga...

  11. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR DENTAL APPLICATIONS SINTERED BY MICROWAVE HEATING

    OpenAIRE

    Presenda Barrera, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Zirconia has become a widely utilized structural ceramic material with important applications in dentistry due to its superb mechanical properties, biocompatibility, aesthetic characteristics and durability. Zirconia needs to be stabilized in the t-phase to obtain improved mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness. Fully dense yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) materials are normally consolidated through the energy-intensive processing of po...

  12. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit: results from The Dental Practice- Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Joseph L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; Patel, Sagar; Foy, Pat; Williams, O. Dale; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Identify components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit; and test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient, and procedural factors are associated with patient satisfaction. Methods 197 practices in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) recruited consecutive patients with defective restorations that were replaced or repaired in permanent teeth. At the end of the treatment visit, each subject was asked to complete a satisfaction survey and mail it directly to the DPBRN Regional Coordinators. Results Analysis of 5,879 satisfaction surveys revealed three satisfaction components which were interpersonal relationship-comfort attributes; material choice-value factors; and sensory-evaluative features. Satisfaction was highest among patients who received care in a private practice model; when the restoration was repaired rather than replaced; or when the restored tooth was not a molar. Conclusion These data suggest that a patient’s judgments of dentist’s skills and quality of care are based on personal interactions with the dentist, the level of comfort, and post-treatment sensitivity. These conclusions have direct implications for patient management before, during and after the procedure. Practice implications When taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the service provided, facilitating a focus on what each patient values most. PMID:22942147

  13. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A.S.; Weir, Michael D.; Reynolds, Mark A.; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2016-01-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI (p control composites (p control composites (p 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries. PMID:28774007

  14. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Melo, Mary A S; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-11-01

    A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2) investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC); the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU), and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control ( p > 0.1), and much greater than RMGI ( p biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites ( p Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI ( p > 0.1). In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  15. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  16. Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative dental material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Lawaf

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the colonization and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. Materials and methods. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with different incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Student's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. Results. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes. However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. Conclusion. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer restorative material.

  17. Rapid detection of gelatin in dental materials using attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfanita, N.; Jaswir, I.; Mirghani, M. E. S.; Sukmasari, S.; Ardini, Y. D.; Lestari, W.

    2017-08-01

    The presence of gelatin is not limited to food products but has also been found in pharmaceuticals. Most dental materials available in Malaysia are imported from other countries and might contain gelatin which is a protein derived either from porcine, bovine or other animal sources. Authentication of gelatin is crucial due to religious and health concerns. Therefore, this study aimed to detect gelatin in dental materials using ATR-FTIR. Forty two samples of dental material were purchased from dental suppliers and detection was done using ATR-FTIR. The spectrum from each sample was compared against standard bovine and porcine gelatin. Experimental dental paste containing bovine and porcine gelatin at concentrations of 5, 10, 15 and 20% were also prepared for quantification analysis. The results showed that gelatin was present in nine out of forty two samples of dental materials but the species of origin was not confirmed. Meanwhile, in the experimental bovine and porcine dental paste, it was seen that as the concentration increased, the intensity of the absorption of Amide group also increased. Thus, ATR-FTIR can be utilized as a reliable tool to detect gelatin in dental materials and other pharmaceuticals.

  18. [Chronological age estimation based on dental panoramic radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna Olga; Udvar, Orsolya; Angyal, János

    2014-09-01

    Determination of the dental age is a valuable tool in planning of orthodontic treatment and could be used to estimate the chronological age of unidentified human beings. Among the various age estimation methods one of the most accepted one is the Demirjian method, which has already been modified to selected Hungarian population. In this study we have evaluated the association between the dental age determined by panoramic radiography and the chronological age. 199 panoramic radiographs taken from persons between the ages of 2,8 and 20,3 years were selected to the study. The dental ages of persons were estimated either with the Demirjian or the modified Demirjian method adapted to Hungarian population and the results were compared to the chronological ages in selected age groups. Furthermore the angle of the mandible was registered on both sides with an image analysing software. Statistical analysis of data was performed using SPSS software. Our results show that mean values of mandibular angles exhibited a decreasing trend with age. The two age determination methods resulted in different values. Between 3 and 9 years and the age group between 15 and 17,3 years the adapted Hungarian method proved to be more accurate than the Demirjian method. We have established a mathematical function between the two methods. We could conclude that the panoramic radiography based dental age calculation is a reliable method to estimate the chronological age, but the utility of gonial angle has not been proved.

  19. Candida albicans Adherence to Glass Ionomer Restorative Dental Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawaf, Shirin; Azizi, Arash

    2009-01-01

    It is believed that adherence of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is a critical event in the coloni-zation and development of oral diseases such as candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable infor-mation about the adherence of Candida albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little infor-mation available about the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of Candida albicans adherence to glass ionomer restorative material. In this experimental study adherence of Candida albicans strains was studied with and without human whole saliva. First, glass ionomer fragments were prepared; then yeast cells were inoculated and incubated with differ-ent incubation times. After incubation, the fragments were removed from the wells and stained with 0.1% calcofluor white. Adhesion was quantified by counting the total number of cells at 40, 80 and 120 minutes. The analysis of variance and Stu-dent's test were used to assess the significance of differences between the means. In the absence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans showed an increase, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, in the presence of saliva, the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ionomer significantly decreased. The presence of human whole saliva is an important factor in the adherence of Candida albicans to glass ion-omer restorative material.

  20. ClinicAl Evaluation of Dental Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    also unique for each casting machine. Traditionally, the longer casting arms of machines used for casting partial dentures were assumed to develop...COMPOSITE RESIN RESTORATIVE MATERIAL The clinical deficiencies of silicate cements and unfilled polymethylmeth- acrylate resins prompted the... acrylic resin and then cemented with Temp-bond. Particular attention was given to obtaining correct gingival extension, marginal adaptation and

  1. Morphological characterization of ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand as restorative dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlina, E.; Susra, S.; Fatmala, Y.; Hartoyo, H. M.; Takarini, V.; Usri, K.; Febrida, R.; Djustiana, N.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. M.

    2018-02-01

    Dental composite as restorative dental materials can be reinforced using ceramic fillers. Homogeneous distribution of filler particles shall improve its mechanical properties. This paper presents the results of the preliminary study on the ZrO2-Al2O3-SiO2 ceramic fillers made from Indonesian natural sand that can increase the mechanical properties of dental composite. The synthesis was done using zirconium silicate sand (ZrSiO4) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3) precursors, which dissolved together with 70:30 weight ratios. Two types of sand were used: (1) manufactured sand (mesh #80) and (2) natural sand (mesh #400). The samples then heated in the furnace at 1100 °C for 8 hours. The morphological characterization was then evaluated using JEOL Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the surface structure that analyze particles size and distribution. Ceramic fillers made from natural sand is homogenous, well distributed with average particle size of 5-10 µm. Comparably, ceramic filler made from the manufactured sand is heterogeneous, poorly distributed and appear as agglomerates with average particle size are 30-50 µm. The results suggest that ceramic fillers made from natural sand demonstrate better character to represent as a functional restorative dental material.

  2. Students' perception of multiple dental visits for root canal treatment: Questionnaire-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Siraj Alsulaimani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal treatment (RCT is a meticulous procedure that requires focus and precision while working in a confined space such as the root canal system of the tooth. Hence, it is a challenging practice for dental students a questionnaire-based study was conducted to evaluate senior dental students' perception toward single- and multiple-visit RCT while considering tooth type and patient cooperation, and to identify the most common reasons for multiple-visit RCT. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 267 senior year dental students from three universities and one private college in Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed between May and October 2014. The questionnaire was divided into four main sections, which evaluated student perception regarding single- and multiple-visit treatment, patient cooperation, and the nontherapeutic reasons for multiple-visits treatment. The collected data were analyzed using SAS 9.3. Results: Two hundred and seventeen questionnaires were returned (response rate, 81%. Dental students perceive multiple-visit RCT for anterior and premolar teeth as a significantly more stressful event than multiple-visit RCT for molars (P < 0.0001; Bowker's test. Tooth type and patient medical status were the highest ranked reasons for multiple-visit RCT. The majority of the responders (90% considered single-visit RCT for single-rooted teeth a positive practice. Conclusions: Multiple-visit RCT is a stressful event for dental students, especially if the treated tooth was a single-rooted tooth. Dental students are aware of the negative effect of multiple-visit treatment on patient compliance. Clinical training should consider single-visit treatment for single rooted teeth.

  3. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kamell, H.; Kharbanda, A.; Dozic, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental

  4. Polymerisation efficiency and shrinkage effects in resin based dental restoratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hindi, Abdusalam M.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerisation efficiency and shrinkage effects in resin based dental restorative materials. The study highlights factors affecting the polymerisation efficiency, but the efficiency of the light curing units was first measured. The output light intensity and the temperature rise produced by two units were measured using a radiometer with a flat-response characteristic. The units were the Elipar Highlight (Espe Dental AG) and XL3000 (3M Co). The former unit has a dual-intensity mode of operation: 10 slow plus 30 s high (termed "soft-start") and a Ml-intensity mode: 40 s high. Its "high" intensity was significantly greater than the XL3000 Unit, and produced correspondingly greater temperature rises. One of the hypotheses to be tested was whether any useful network-conversion (polymerisation) was attained by application of the 10 slow-intensity phase of the "soft-start" mode. To address this question, the polymerisation efficiency of three representative resin-based restorative materials was studied by measuring depth-of-cure, exotherm, surface hardness and degree of conversion. The Elipar Unit was used principally m these studies, with four modes of radiation: "full" and "soft- start", as above, and either 10 s or 40 s of low intensity light. Most measurements were performed at 23°C, but some specimen groups were also pre-conditioned at 37°C. Depth-of-cure values obtained by "soft-start" were as great as with "full" radiation. Low- intensity irradiation alone gave significantly reduced, but non-zero cure-depths. The exotherm of the specimens cured by "soft-start" was lower than those cured by "full" light-intensity. This pattern was also apparent when the lower-intensity (XL3000) Unit was deployed. Surface hardness was measured on upper and lower surfaces of specimens radiated by different modes. The hardness was greater at upper, relative to lower surfaces with "full" intensity. The lower-surface hardness with low

  5. Novel Dental Restorative Materials having Low Polymerization Shrinkage Stress via Stress Relaxation by Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Young; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Abuelyaman, Ahmed S.; Oxman, Joe D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To produce a reduced stress dental restorative material while simultaneously maintaining excellent mechanical properties, we have incorporated an allyl sulfide functional group into norbornene-methacrylate comonomer resins. We hypothesize that the addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) enabled by the presence of the allyl sulfide relieves stress in these methacrylate-based systems while retaining excellent mechanical properties owing to the high glass transition temperature of norbornene-containing resins. Methods An allyl sulfide-containing dinorbornene was stoichiometrically formulated with a ring-containing allyl sulfide-possessing methacrylate. To evaluate the stress relaxation effect as a function of the allyl sulfide concentration, a propyl sulfide-based dinorbornene, not capable of addition-fragmentation, was also formulated with the methacrylate monomer. Shrinkage stress, the glass transition temperature and the elastic modulus were all measured. The composite flexural strength and modulus were also measured. ANOVA (CI 95%) was conducted to determine differences between the means. Results Increasing the allyl sulfide content in the resin dramatically reduces the final stress in the norbornene-methacrylate systems. Both norbornene-methacrylate resins demonstrated almost zero stress (more than 96% stress reduction) compared with the conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA 70/30 wt% control. Mechanical properties of the allyl sulfide-based dental composites were improved to the point of being statistically indistinguishable from the control BisGMA-TEGDMA by changing the molar ratio between the methacrylate and norbornene functionalities. Significance The allyl sulfide-containing norbornene-methacrylate networks possessed super-ambient Tg, and demonstrated significantly lower shrinkage stress when compared with the control (BisGMA/TEGDMA 70 to 30 wt%). Although additional development remains, these low stress materials exhibit excellent mechanical

  6. [Clinical and microbiological study regarding surface antibacterial properties of bioactive dental materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Târcă, T; Bădescu, Aida; Topoliceanu, C; Lăcătuşu, St

    2010-01-01

    In the new era of dentistry the coronal restoration materials must possess "bio-active" features represented by fluor ions release, chemical adhesion and antibacterial agents. Our study aims to determine the surface antibacterial properties of glassionomer cements and compomers. The study group included 64 patients with high cariogenic risk with 80 teeth with acute and chronic dental caries affecting proximal and occlusal dental surfaces. The teeth with cariogenic lesions were restored with zinc-oxide-eugenol (n=20), glassionomer cement GC Fuji Triage (n=20), glassionomer cement modified with resins Fuji II LC (n=20), compomer Dyract (n=20). DENTOCULT SM test (Orion Diagnostica, Finland) was used for bacterial analyses. The samples from bacterial biofilm were collected from the restorated dental surfaces (study group) and intact enamel surfaces (control group). The recorded data were processed using non-parametrical statistical tests. The lowest mean value of bacterial indices was recorded for glassionomer cement Fuji Triage (0.4), and Fuji II LC (1.2), material with highest surface antibacterial properties. The highest value (1.5) was recorded for compomer Dyract. The Kruskal-Wallis test proves the significant statistical differences between the three bioactive materials. The materials with bioactive features have the ability to inhibate the growth of Streptococcus mutans in bacterial biofilm to the surfaces of coronal restoration.

  7. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity. Copyright © 2014 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of fluoride addition on the properties of dental alginate impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Kim, Cheol-We

    2004-03-01

    Fluoride-containing dental alginate impression materials can exert a considerable reduction in enamel solubility. The objective was to evaluate the effects of fluoride addition in the alginate impression materials on the properties and subsequent release of fluoride. Four experimental alginate impression materials were studied. Materials were mixed with distilled water (control) or 100-ppm fluoride solution. One or two percent NaF, or 1% SnF2 was added to the materials, which were mixed with distilled water. Fluoride release, flexibility, recovery from deformation, setting time, compressive strength and elastic modulus were determined in accordance with the ISO 1563 and ANSI/ADA Spec. 18. Fluoride release increased after addition of fluoride, and the released amount was 0.762-14.761 ppm. Addition of NaF or SnF2 resulted in higher fluoride release than the control group (p alginate impression material may result in effective release of fluoride without deteriorating the properties of material itself.

  9. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Katarzyna; Fita, Katarzyna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Czajczyńska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piesiak-Pańczyszyn, Dagmara; Kosior, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved four composite restorative materials, one lining material and a dentine bonding agent. The polymerization was conducted with the use of a diode light-curing unit. The measurements of the external surface temperature of the samples were carried out using the Thermovision®550 thermal camera. Results. The examined materials significantly differed in terms of the maximum temperatures values they reached, as well as the time required for reaching the temperatures. A statistically significant positive correlation of the maximum temperature and the sample weight was observed. Conclusions. In clinical practice, it is crucial to bear in mind the risk of thermal damage involved in the application of light-cured materials. It can be reduced by using thin increments of composite materials. PMID:27840825

  10. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Janeczek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved four composite restorative materials, one lining material and a dentine bonding agent. The polymerization was conducted with the use of a diode light-curing unit. The measurements of the external surface temperature of the samples were carried out using the Thermovision®550 thermal camera. Results. The examined materials significantly differed in terms of the maximum temperatures values they reached, as well as the time required for reaching the temperatures. A statistically significant positive correlation of the maximum temperature and the sample weight was observed. Conclusions. In clinical practice, it is crucial to bear in mind the risk of thermal damage involved in the application of light-cured materials. It can be reduced by using thin increments of composite materials.

  11. Emerging ceramic-based materials for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I; Kelly, J R

    2014-12-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. Dental composite materials containing carolacton inhibit biofilm growth of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Christian; Barg, Andree; Rheinberg, Anke; Conrads, Georg; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2013-11-01

    Caries adjacent to restorations is one of the main causes for restoration replacement. Antimicrobial substances incorporated into dental materials would potentially be able to reduce secondary caries initiation and progression. This study investigated biofilm growth of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on the surface of composite materials containing the biomolecule carolacton compared to materials containing chlorhexidine (CHX) and triclosan. Biofilm inhibition was investigated by counting colony forming units (CFU), viability staining (Life/Dead), and real-time quantitative PCR. First, the antimicrobial substances were added to the cultivation medium at 2.5 μg/ml (0.0002%) and 0.25 μg/ml (0.00002%). CHX eliminated bacterial growth and biofilm formation completely. Triclosan was effective at 2.5 μg/ml, but at 0.25 μg/ml biofilm mass and viability were unchanged, yet the number of CFU increased due to disruption of cell chains and biofilm aggregates. Carolacton had a limited effect on biofilm growth and mass, but reduced viability significantly. When incorporated into composite materials carolacton (25 μg/ml resp. 0.002%, w/w) had no adverse effect on physical/mechanical properties and retained its biofilm inhibiting effect. Life/Dead staining revealed a reduction of biofilm viability of up to 64%. CFUs were reduced by 98% and qPCR demonstrated a mean inhibition of 87%. In contrast, materials containing CHX or triclosan showed an insignificant effect on biofilm formation, even at a 100 fold increased concentration (0.2%). The anti-biofilm activity of composite material containing carolacton was stable over a period of 42 days. Carolacton incorporated into dental filling material has a strong biofilm-inhibiting effect on S. mutans and is therefore potentially able to prevent secondary caries formation. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication and characterisation of composites materials similar optically and in composition to native dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Prutskij, T.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.

    This study investigated the luminescence characteristics of synthesized biocomposites similar in organic and mineral composition to native dental tissues, enamel and dentine. It was found that the luminescence spectrum of intact enamel is similar to that of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP) used to synthesize biomimetic materials. Despite the morphological differences between the synthesized biocomposite and native tissue, their luminescence spectra suggest that the shape of the luminescence spectrum is more influenced by defects in the crystal structure of the employed hydroxyapatite than by the structure and order of the apatite nanocrystals typical of native dental tissues. The spectrum of intact human dentine possessed a wider luminescence band, unlike that of enamel, with a maximum typical of intact dentine. Analysis of the spectra of biomimetic material modelling the properties of dentine indicated that both the organic and non-organic components contribute to their luminescence.

  14. Fabrication and characterisation of composites materials similar optically and in composition to native dental tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Seredin

    Full Text Available This study investigated the luminescence characteristics of synthesized biocomposites similar in organic and mineral composition to native dental tissues, enamel and dentine. It was found that the luminescence spectrum of intact enamel is similar to that of calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP used to synthesize biomimetic materials. Despite the morphological differences between the synthesized biocomposite and native tissue, their luminescence spectra suggest that the shape of the luminescence spectrum is more influenced by defects in the crystal structure of the employed hydroxyapatite than by the structure and order of the apatite nanocrystals typical of native dental tissues. The spectrum of intact human dentine possessed a wider luminescence band, unlike that of enamel, with a maximum typical of intact dentine. Analysis of the spectra of biomimetic material modelling the properties of dentine indicated that both the organic and non-organic components contribute to their luminescence.

  15. The Maine Sealant Manual for School-Based and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kneka, Ed.

    This manual is designed for use by school personnel and dental personnel to aid in the development and maintenance of school-based or school-linked dental sealant programs. The sections include (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Guidelines" (school selection, school contacts, dental providers, target grades, and tooth selection…

  16. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  17. Polyphosphazine-based polymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2010-05-25

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  18. Does 6 Hours of Contact With Alginate Impression Material Affect Dental Cast Properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Amna Adam; Alhajj, Mohammed Nasser; Khalifa, Nadia; Gilada, Magdi Wadie

    2017-06-01

    Alginate impression (irreversible hydrocolloid) material is commonly used in dental practice because it is easy to mix, low in cost, and well tolerated by patients. The material is not dimensionally stable, however; thus, it is necessary to pour the impression immediately after the molding is accomplished, or within 60 minutes if the impression is kept in 100% humidity. Excessive contact of the alginate impression with the cast model over time may affect the model's properties. In this study, the authors tested the effect of contact time between an alginate impression and type III dental stone on cast model properties. Sixty-seven cast models were obtained from a stainless steel cylinder by using irreversible hydrocolloid impression material and type III dental stone. Thirty-seven cast models were separated from the impression after 1 hour (control group) and 30 cast models were separated after 6 hours (study group). The samples were evaluated under light microscope for surface details and measured by digital caliper for dimensional stability. An indentation on the cast was made and the depth of the indentation was then measured with a digital caliper to measure hardness. The dimensional stability of the cast models was not affected when contact time was increased from 1 hour to 6 hours (P = .507). Surface details did not deteriorate when contact time was increased, as all of the samples could reproduce all details after the 1-hour and 6-hour interval periods. However, hardness was greater after 1 hour of contact time (P = .001) than after 6 hours of contact time. In conclusion, contact between alginate impression material and type III dental stone up to 6 hours did not affect the dimensional stability and richness of the surface; hardness, though, was significantly affected.

  19. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  20. Improved performance of diatomite-based dental nanocomposite ceramics using layer-by-layer assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu X

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Lu1,2, Yang Xia1, Mei Liu1, Yunzhu Qian3, Xuefeng Zhou4, Ning Gu4, Feimin Zhang1,41Institute of Stomatology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Nantong Stomatological Hospital, Nantong, 3Center of Stomatology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University, Suzhou, 4Suzhou Institute, Southeast University, Suzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: To fabricate high-strength diatomite-based ceramics for dental applications, the layer-by-layer technique was used to coat diatomite particles with cationic [poly(allylamine hydrochloride] and anionic [poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate] polymers to improve the dispersion and adsorption of positively charged nano-ZrO2 (zirconia as a reinforcing agent. The modified diatomite particles had reduced particle size, narrower size distribution, and were well dispersed, with good adsorption of nano-ZrO2. To determine the optimum addition levels for nano-ZrO2, ceramics containing 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 wt% nano-ZrO2 were sintered and characterized by the three-point bending test and microhardness test. In addition to scanning electron microscopy, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to examine the internal structure of the ceramics. The addition of 30 wt% nano-ZrO2 resulted in the highest flexural strength and fracture toughness with reduced porosity. Shear bond strength between the core and veneer of our diatomite ceramics and the most widely used dental ceramics were compared; the shear bond strength value for the diatomite-based ceramics was found to be significantly higher than for other groups (P < 0.05. Our results show that diatomite-based nanocomposite ceramics are good potential candidates for ceramic-based dental materials.Keywords: layer-by-layer, diatomite, nanoceramics, zirconia (ZrO2, dental materials

  1. Reliability and properties of core materials for all-ceramic dental restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Ban

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Various core materials have been used as all-ceramic dental restorations. Since many foreign zirconia product systems were introduced to the Japanese dental market in the past few years, the researches and the papers on zirconia for ceramic biomaterials have immediately drawn considerable attention. Recently, most of the manufactures supply zirconia blocks available to multi-unit posterior bridges using CAD/CAM, because zirconia has excellent mechanical properties comparable to metal, due to its microstructures. The properties of conventional zirconia were further improved by the composite in nano-scale such as zirconia/alumina nanocomposite (NANOZR. There are many interesting behaviors such as long-term stability related to low temperature degradation, effect of sandblasting and heat treatment on the microstructure and the strength, bonding to veneering porcelains, bonding to cement, visible light translucency related to esthetic restoration, X-ray opacity, biocompatibility, fracture load of clinical bridge as well as lifetime and clinical survival rates of the restoratives made with zirconia. From the recent material researches on zirconia not only in Japan but also in the world, this review takes into account these interesting properties of zirconia and reliability as core material for all-ceramic dental restorations.

  2. Sterilization Performance and Material Compatibility of Sterilizer for Dental Instruments using RF Oxygen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Liu, Zhen; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    The sterilization performance and material compatibility of low-pressure RF plasma sterilization method for dental instruments were investigated. RF electrode used in this experiment has been optimized for sterilization of dental instruments. The vial-type biological indicator (BI) simulating tiny space of dental instrument was used for evaluation of the sterilization performance. The pressure in the stainless chamber was fixed at 60 Pa. Sterilization of BI was achieved in shortest time 40 min at 80 W, and the sterilization effect was confirmed using three BIs. Light emission spectra of oxygen plasma indicated that production of atomic oxygen and excited oxygen molecule are maximum at pressure of 20 Pa and 200 Pa, respectively. Sterilization results of BIs indicated that successful rate increases with the oxygen pressure towards 200 Pa. Therefore, the excited oxygen molecule is deduced to be a major factor of the sterilization of BI. Surface morphology of dental instruments such as diamond bar was evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The deterioration of fine crystals of diamond bar has not observed after the plasma irradiation for 120 min with RF input power was 60W and pressure was 200 Pa.

  3. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  4. Robust spectrometer-based methods for characterizing radiant exitance of dental LED light curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Adrian C; Felix, Christopher J; Watts, David C

    2015-04-01

    Firstly, to assess light output, from a representative range of dental light curing units (LCUs), using a new portable spectrometer based instrument (checkMARC™) compared with a "gold standard" method. Secondly, to assess possible inconsistency between light output measurements using three different laboratory-grade thermopile instruments. The output of four blue-dental LCUs and four polywave blue-and-violet-LCUs was measured with two spectrometer-based systems: a portable spectrometer instrument and a benchtop Integrating Sphere fiber-coupled spectrometer system. Power output was also recorded with three thermopiles according to ISO 10650-2. Beam profile images were recorded of LCU output to assess for spatial and spectral beam uniformity. Power recorded with the portable spectrometer instrument closely matched the 'gold standard' Integrating Sphere apparatus calibrated according to International Standards. Radiant exitance for the eight LCUs differed significantly between the three thermopiles. Light source to thermopile sensor distance influenced recorded power significantly (pSpectrometer-based methods are capable of overcoming the limitations inherent with thermopile-based measurement techniques. Spectrometer based measurements can fulfill the intention of ISO 10650. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Longer-Term Postcure Measurement of Cuspal Deformation Induced by Dimensional Changes in Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsafi, A.; Oxman, J. D.; Tse, P.-H.; Ton, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This paper presents a simple, versatile in vitro methodology that enables indirect quantification of shrinkage and expansion stresses under clinically relevant conditions without the need for a dedicated instrument. Methods. For shrinkage effects, resulting cusp deformation of aluminum blocks with MOD type cavity, filled with novel filling compositions and commercial cements, has been measured using a bench-top micrometer and a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT, a displacement transducer) based instrument. Results. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed simple methodology. The technique was successfully used in longer-term measurements of shrinkage and expansion stress for several dental compositions. Conclusions. In contrast to in situ techniques where a measuring instrument is dedicated to the sample and its data collection, the proposed simple methodology allows for transfer of the samples to the environment of choice for storage and conditioning. The presented technique can be reliably used to quantify stress development of curing materials under clinically relevant (oral) conditions. This enables direct examination and comparison of structural properties corresponding to the final stage of formed networks. The proposed methodology is directly applicable to the study of self-curing systems as they require mouth-type conditions (temperature and humidity) to achieve their designed kinetics and reactions. PMID:26257783

  6. Impact of the Static and Radiofrequency Magnetic Fields Produced by a 7T MR Imager on Metallic Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriso, Kenta; Kobayashi, Takuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko; Kihara, Hidemichi; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    We examined safety issues related to the presence of various metallic dental materials in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 tesla. A 7T MR imaging scanner was used to examine 18 kinds of materials, including 8 metals used in dental restorations, 6 osseointegrated dental implants, 2 abutments for dental implants, and 2 magnetic attachment keepers. We assessed translational attraction forces between the static magnetic field and materials via deflection angles read on a tailor-made instrument and compared with those at 3T. Heating effects from radiofrequency during image acquisitions using 6 different sequences were examined by measuring associated temperature changes in agarose-gel phantoms with a fiber-optic thermometer. Deflection angles of the metallic dental materials were significantly larger at 7T than 3T. Among full metal crowns (FMCs), deflection angles were 18.0° for cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys, 13.5° for nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys, and 0° for other materials. Deflection angles of the dental implants and abutments were minimal, ranging from 5.0 to 6.5°, whereas the magnetic attachment keepers were strongly attracted to the field, having deflection angles of 90° or more. Increases in temperature of the FMCs were significant but less than 1°C in every sequence. The dental implant of 50-mm length showed significant but mild temperature increases (up to 1.5°C) when compared with other dental implants and abutments, particularly on sequences with high specific absorption rate values. Although most metallic dental materials showed no apparent translational attraction or heating at 7T, substantial attraction forces on the magnetic attachment keepers suggested potential risks to patients and research participants undergoing MR imaging examinations.

  7. Morphological Study Of Border Area Of Pulp-Capping Materials And Er:YAG Laser Prepared Hard Dental Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanova, Vessela P; Tomov, Georgi T; Tsanova, Snezhana Ts

    2015-01-01

    Vital pulp therapy involves biologically based therapeutic activities aimed at restoring health and preserving the vitality of cariously or traumatically damaged pulp. Adaptation of pulp-capping materials to the prepared tooth surface may be the key to the success of biological tooth treatment. To investigate the area of adaptation of synthetic tricalcium silicate cement, calcium hydroxide cement and mineral trioxide-aggregate to the dentin surface, prepared with the help of Er:YAG dental laser. Four extracted human tooth cavities were prepared with the help of Er:YAG dental laser (LiteTouch, Syneron, Israel), establishing microcommunication with the pulp chamber less than 1 mm in diameter. As pulp-capping materials in the cavities we used tricalcium silicate cement (Biodentine, Septodont, France), calcium hydroxide cement (Dycal) and mineral-trioxide aggregate (ProRoot MTA), stirred and administered according to manufacturers' instructions. The first material fills the whole cavity and the other two are spread in a thin layer and sealed with glass ionomer cement. Thus prepared, the samples were left for three days at 37°C in humidified environment. The samples were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by standard methodology. The border area surfaces of the materials and the dentin were scanned using electron microscopy. The morphological changes occurring to the Er:YAG laser prepared dentin and the structural characteristics of the studied pulp-capping materials are demonstrated using scanograms. The border areas where good contact of materials and dentinal tubules is established are thoroughly studied. Good adaptation is seen in three-calcium silicate cement, followed by mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide cement. The dentin surface, prepared with Er:YAG laser demonstrates a very good adaptation of the three tested pulp-capping materials.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of copper, nickel and bimetallic Cu–Ni nanoparticles for potential use in dental materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Argueta-Figueroa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial effect is a desirable property in dental materials. Development of simple methods for the preparation of nanosized metal particles has attracted significant attention because of their future applications due to unusual size-dependent antibacterial properties. Copper (Cu, Nickel (Ni and bimetallic Cu–Ni nanoparticles were prepared by a simple chemical method and their antibacterial activity was tested against the widely used standard human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (gram-negative and Escherichia coli (gram-positive. Additionally, these nanoparticles were tested against the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results are promising for potential use in dental materials science.

  9. Efectividad y preferencia de la rafia como material de limpieza dental interproximal

    OpenAIRE

    López Soto, Olga Patricia; Universidad Autónoma de Manizales, Manizales, Colombia; Cerezo Correa, María del Pilar; Universidad Autónoma de Manizales, Manizales, Colombia

    2011-01-01

    Antecedentes: el uso de la seda dental en programas de salud pública oral se constituye en un problema económico, debido a su alto costo. La rafia se ha propuesto como un material alternativo de limpieza interdental. Objetivo: determinar la efectividad y preferencia de la rafia usada durante dos meses como material alternativo de limpieza interproximal. Méto¬dos: se realizó un estudio experimental doble ciego, con 96 jóvenes en el grupo control y 105 en el experimental. Antes de la prueba y d...

  10. [Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts of five common dental materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yisheng; Yu, Risheng

    2015-06-01

    To compare five materials commonly used in dentistry, including three types of metals and two types of ceramics, by using different sequences of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strengths (0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T). Three types of metals and two types of ceramics that were fabricated into the same size and thickness as an incisor crown were placed in a plastic tank filled with saline. The crowns were scanned using an magnetic resonance (MR) machine at 0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T field strengths. The TlWI and T2WI images were obtained. The differences of various materials in different artifacts of field MR scans were determined. The zirconia crown presented no significant artifacts when scanned under the three types of MRI field strengths. The artifacts of casting ceramic were minimal. All dental precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain, and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy showed varying degrees of artifacts under the three MRI field strengths. Zirconia and casting ceramics present almost no or faint artifacts. By contrast, precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy display MRI artifacts. The artifact area increase with increasing magnetic field.

  11. Radiopacity of composite dental materials using a digital X-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukic, Walter; Delija, Barbara; Derossi, Doria; Dadic, Ivana

    2012-02-03

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of 32 current dental composite materials with digital technique. Digital radiographs with CCD sensor along with an aluminum step wedge, 1-mm-thick tooth slice and 1mm thick composite specimen were taken in five different combinations of exposition/voltage. The radiopacity in pixels was determined using Digora 2.6. software. The equivalent in thickness of aluminum for each material was then calculated from the calibration curve. 74.9% of all tested materials in all exposure combinations had radiopacity between 2 mm and 4 mm aluminum equivalent. The radiopacity of composites ranged from 0.61 mm Al (Gradia Direct Anterior) to 4.78 mm Al (Te-Econom). The average radiopacity for enamel and dentine was 2.05 and 1.11 mm Al. The use of digital technique for radiopacity is an easy, reliable, fast and precise way to analyze different dental materials. Most of the tested composite materials fulfill the requested criteria for radiopacity with a few exceptions.

  12. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other... Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix...

  13. Improved performance of diatomite-based dental nanocomposite ceramics using layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yang; Liu, Mei; Qian, Yunzhu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Feimin

    2012-01-01

    To fabricate high-strength diatomite-based ceramics for dental applications, the layer-by-layer technique was used to coat diatomite particles with cationic [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)] and anionic [poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)] polymers to improve the dispersion and adsorption of positively charged nano-ZrO2 (zirconia) as a reinforcing agent. The modified diatomite particles had reduced particle size, narrower size distribution, and were well dispersed, with good adsorption of nano-ZrO2. To determine the optimum addition levels for nano-ZrO2, ceramics containing 0, 20, 25, 30, and 35 wt% nano-ZrO2 were sintered and characterized by the three-point bending test and microhardness test. In addition to scanning electron microscopy, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to examine the internal structure of the ceramics. The addition of 30 wt% nano-ZrO2 resulted in the highest flexural strength and fracture toughness with reduced porosity. Shear bond strength between the core and veneer of our diatomite ceramics and the most widely used dental ceramics were compared; the shear bond strength value for the diatomite-based ceramics was found to be significantly higher than for other groups (P ceramics are good potential candidates for ceramic-based dental materials. PMID:22619551

  14. Evaluation of Survival Time of Tooth Color Dental Materials in Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Movahhed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In restorative dentistry, selecting the proper material is an important factor for clinical success. The objective of this study was clinical evaluation of survival time of three tooth color materials in primary anterior teeth. Methods: In this interventional clinical trial study, 94 deciduous anterior teeth (36 teeth in boys, 58 teeth in girls belonging to 3-5 year old children in Pediatric Department of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry, Iran were selected. Selective dental materials included compoglass, glass-ionomer Fuji II LC, and composite resin. The data were analyzed with Kaplan–Meyer and Log rank test. Results: compoglass had the highest survival time in comparison with composite and glass-ionomer. Nine months retention rate for teeth restored with compoglass, composite resin and glass-ionomer were estimated: 95%, 21%, and 12.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Compoglass can be a suitable material for anterior primary teeth restoration.

  15. A Deep Morphological Characterization and Comparison of Different Dental Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Condò

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Giomer is a relatively new class of restorative material with aesthetics, handling and physical properties of composite resins, and benefits of glass ionomers: high radiopacity, antiplaque effect, fluoride release, and recharge. To verify the superior properties of Giomers, in this study, a deep morphological characterization has been performed with an in vitro comparative study among a Giomer (Beautifil® II by Shofu Dental Corporation, Osaka, Japan, a Compomer (Dyract Extra by Dentsply, Caulk, Germany, glass ionomer cement (Ketac fil plus by 3M ESPE, and a composite resin (Tetric Evoceram by Ivoclar. In particular, mechanical and optical properties and ageing effects have been compared to investigate materials similarities and differences. Indentation tests, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and weight loss after storage in saliva or sugary drink have been carried out to analyze materials behavior in real conditions. The results confirm the high quality of Giomer material and indicate possible improvements in their usage.

  16. Evaluation of Survival Time of Tooth Color Dental Materials in Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behjat-Al-Molook Ajami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In restorative dentistry, selecting the proper material is an important factor for clinical success. The objective of this study was clinical evaluation of survival time of three tooth color materials in primary anterior teeth. Methods: In this interventional clinical trial study, 94 deciduous anterior teeth (36 teeth in boys, 58 teeth in girls belonging to 3-5 year old children in Pediatric Department of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry, Iran were selected. Selective dental materials included compoglass, glass-ionomer Fuji II LC, and composite resin. The data were analyzed with Kaplan–Meyer and Log rank test. Results: compoglass had the highest survival time in comparison with composite and glass-ionomer. Nine months retention rate for teeth restored with compoglass, composite resin and glass-ionomer were estimated: 95%, 21%, and 12.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Compoglass can be a suitable material for anterior primary teeth restoration

  17. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Dental Practitioners in Three Practice-Based Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Harbaum, Maria T.; Demko, Catherine A.; Curro, Frederick A.; Rindal, D. Brad; Collie, Damon; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Hilton, Thomas J.; Craig, Ronald G.; Wu, Juliann; Funkhouser, Ellen; Lehman, Maryann; McBride, Ruth; Thompson, Van; Lindblad, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Research on the information-seeking behaviors of dental practitioners is scarce. Knowledge of dentists’ information-seeking behaviors should advance the translational gap between clinical dental research and dental practice. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to examine the self-reported information-seeking behaviors of dentists in three dental practice-based research networks (PBRNs). A total of 950 dentists (65 percent response rate) completed the survey. Dental journals and continuing dental education (CDE) sources used and their influence on practice guidance were assessed. PBRN participation level and years since dental degree were measured. Full-participant dentists reported reading the Journal of the American Dental Association and General Dentistry more frequently than did their reference counterparts. Printed journals were preferred by most dentists. A lower proportion of full participants obtained their CDE credits at dental meetings compared to partial participants. Experienced dentists read other dental information sources more frequently than did less experienced dentists. Practitioners involved in a PBRN differed in their approaches to accessing information sources. Peer-reviewed sources were more frequently used by full participants and dentists with fifteen years of experience or more. Dental PBRNs potentially play a significant role in the dissemination of evidence-based information. This study found that specific educational sources might increase and disseminate knowledge among dentists. PMID:23382524

  18. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  19. Development of highly porous scaffolds based on bioactive silicates for dental tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudouri, O.M.; Theodosoglou, E.; Kontonasaki, E.; Will, J.; Chrissafis, K.; Koidis, P.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic via the sol–gel technique. • The heat treatment of the glass-ceramic promoted the crystallization of akermanite. • Akermanite scaffolds coated with gelatin were successfully fabricated. • An HCAp layer was developed on the surface of all scaffolds after 9 days in SBF. - Abstract: Various scaffolding materials, ceramics and especially Mg-based ceramic materials, including akermanite (Ca 2 MgSi 2 O 7 ) and diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ), have attracted interest for dental tissue regeneration because of their improved mechanical properties and controllable biodegradation. The aim of the present work was the synthesis of an Mg-based glass-ceramic, which would be used for the construction of workable akermanite scaffolds. The characterization of the synthesized material was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) X-Ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Finally, the apatite forming ability of the scaffolds was assessed by immersion in simulated body fluid. The scaffolds were fabricated by the foam replica technique and were subsequently coated with gelatin to provide a functional surface for increased cell attachment. Finally, SEM microphotographs and FTIR spectra of the scaffolds after immersion in SBF solution indicated the inorganic bioactive character of the scaffolds suitable for the intended applications in dental tissue engineering

  20. Analytical methods for the measurement of polymerization kinetics and stresses of dental resin-based composites: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrsima Ghavami-Lahiji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resin-based composites are commonly used restorative materials in dentistry. Such tooth-colored restorations can adhere to the dental tissues. One drawback is that the polymerization shrinkage and induced stresses during the curing procedure is an inherent property of resin composite materials that might impair their performance. This review focuses on the significant developments of laboratory tools in the measurement of polymerization shrinkage and stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization. An electronic search of publications from January 1977 to July 2016 was made using ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases. The search included only English-language articles. Only studies that performed laboratory methods to evaluate the amount of the polymerization shrinkage and/or stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization were selected. The results indicated that various techniques have been introduced with different mechanical/physical bases. Besides, there are factors that may contribute the differences between the various methods in measuring the amount of shrinkages and stresses of resin composites. The search for an ideal and standard apparatus for measuring shrinkage stress and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of resin-based materials in dentistry is still required. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of differences between analytical methods to make proper interpretation and indications of each technique relevant to a clinical situation.

  1. An approach to understanding tribological behaviour of dental composites through volumetric wear loss and wear mechanism determination; beyond material ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaie, Asmaa; Bubb, Nigel L; Franklin, Paul; Dowling, Adam H; Fleming, Garry J P; Wood, David J

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the fundamental wear mechanisms of six resin-based composite (RBC) formulations during short-term in vitro wear testing. RBC materials were condensed into rectangular bar-shaped specimens and light irradiated using the ISO 4049 specimen manufacture and irradiation protocol. Wear testing (n=10 specimens for each RBC) was performed on a modified pin-on-plate wear test apparatus and wear facets were analysed for wear volume loss using a white light profilometer. The wear tested RBC specimens and their corresponding antagonists were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively to determine the wear mechanism. Data generated using the profilometer showed variations in the mean total wear volume (mm 3 ) between the RBCs tested (ptribology of the system rather than relying on a simple wear ranking for the RBC materials as is routinely the case in dental research studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-06-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  3. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne D; Ulsund, Amanda H; Gjerdet, Nils R

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based restorations were retrieved and analyzed. Fractographic features were examined using optical microscopy to determine crack initiation and crack propagation of the restorations. The material comprised fractured restorations from one canine, 10 incisors, four premolars, and 11 molars. One crown was not categorized because of difficulty in orientation of the fragments. The results revealed that all core and veneer fractures initiated in the cervical margin and usually from the approximal area close to the most coronally placed curvature of the margin. Three cases of occlusal chipping were found. The margin of dental all-ceramic single-tooth restorations was the area of fracture origin. The fracture features were similar for zirconia, glass-ceramic, and alumina single-tooth restorations. Design features seem to be of great importance for fracture initiation. PMID:24698173

  4. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD, and 3D printing (3DP to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews.

  5. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tzu; Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin; Lin, CHun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews.

  6. Fabrication of a radiopaque fit-testing material to evaluate the three-dimensional accuracy of dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Yuzo; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Nakano, Yoshiro; Okamura, Shin-Ya; Nakamura, Takashi; Imazato, Satoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to fabricate a radiopaque prosthetic fit-testing material, and to develop methodology to evaluate the fitting accuracy of prostheses three-dimensionally (3D) using a combination of the silicone replica technique and micro-computed tomography (μCT). Eight types of prototype specimens of fit-testing materials were prepared by adding contrast agents (zirconia, alumina, and barium-glass) to a commercially available fit-testing material. These specimens were evaluated on their mechanical properties, X-ray absorption coefficients, reproducibility of cement space, and suitability for 3D analysis by μCT. Then, silicone replicas made from prototype specimens were assessed for accurate 3D morphology. Subsequently, color-mapping analyses of the silicone replicas were performed according to replica thickness, and the results were compared with stereomicroscopic images. The mechanical properties, X-ray absorption coefficients, and reproducibility of the cement space demonstrated that prototypes containing 20wt% zirconia (Zr-20) or barium glass (diameter 2μm; Ba2-20) were useful as fit-testing materials. However, the morphology of the Ba2-20 silicone replica was unable to be accurately described using μCT because of its low X-ray absorption threshold. Zr-20, however, could be clearly observed on μCT imaging. Furthermore, color-mapping analysis of the μCT images demonstrated that Zr-20 was the most suitable for 3D observation of prosthetic fit. This method could allow any professional to evaluate the fit of any type of dental prosthesis, such as inlays, crowns, and fixed and removable dentures. This study demonstrated that the technique presented in the current study is able to accurately describe the abutment-crown prosthetic discrepancy based on silicone replicas. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Are linear elastic material properties relevant predictors of the cyclic fatigue resistance of dental resin composites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the linear elastic material properties of direct dental resin composites and correlate them with their fatigue strength under cyclic loading. Bar specimens of twelve resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and tested for elastic modulus (Emod) in 3-point bending (n=10), flexural strength (FS) (n=15) and single-edge-notch-beam fracture toughness (FT) (n=15), both in 4-point bending. Using the same specimen geometry, the flexural fatigue strength (FFS) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz in 4-point bending (n=25). The observation of the fracture surface and fracture profiles was conducted using a scanning electron microscope in order to evaluate the respective fracture mechanisms according to the two different loading conditions. Materials were ranked differently according to the tested parameters. Only weak correlations were found between any of the initial properties and FFS or strength loss. The best correlation to FFS was found to be the Emod (r(2)=0.679), although only slightly. Crack path in both loading conditions was mainly interparticle, with the crack propagating mainly within the matrix phase for fatigued specimens and eventually through the filler/matrix interface for statically loaded specimens. Fracture of large particles or prepolymerized fillers was only observed in specimens of FS and FT. Initial properties were better associated with microstructural features, whereas the fatigue resistance showed to be more dependent on aspects relating to the matrix phase. Our results show that linear elastic properties such as elastic modulus, flexural strength and fracture toughness are not good descriptors of the fatigue resistance of dental resin composite under cyclic bending, and may therefore have limited clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  9. Palladium-based dental alloys are associated with oral disease and palladium-induced immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, J.; Scheper, R.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Rustemeyer, T.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.; von Blomberg, M.E.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palladium (Pd) and gold (Au) based dental alloys have been associated with oral disease. Objectives This study was designed to explore possible associations between the presence of Au-based and Pd-based dental alloys, and oral lesions, systemic complaints, and specific in vivo and

  10. Dental pulp vitality measurement based on multiwavelength photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkela, Ville; Kopola, Harri K.; Oikarinen, Kyosti; Herrala, Esko

    1995-01-01

    Observation of the intradental blood supply is important in cases of dental trauma, but difficult. As the methods used by dentists to measure pulp vitality are not very reliable, a dental pulp vitalometer based on fiberoptic reflectance measurement and measurement of the absorption of blood has been designed and built. In addition to the fiber optic probe and reflectance sensor electronics, the vitalometer includes a data acquisition card, a PC and data processing programs. The thick dentin and enamel layers and the small amount of blood in a tooth are major problems for optical measurement of its vitality, and scattered light from the enamel and the dentin surrounding the pulpa also causes a problem in measurements based on reflectance. These problems are assessed here by means of theoretical models and calculations. The advantage of reflectance measurement is that only one probe is used, which is easy to put against the tooth. Thus measurements are simple to make. Three wavelengths (560 nm, 650 nm, 850 nm) are used to measure photoplethysmographic signals, and these should allow the oxygen saturation of the blood in a tooth to be measured as well in the future. Series of measurements have been performed on vital and non-vital teeth by recording photoplethysmographic signals, using the vitalometer and using a commercial laser-Doppler instrument. Verifications of the laser-Doppler and vitalometer results are presented and deduced here.

  11. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  12. A Critical Review of Dental Implant Materials with an Emphasis on Titanium versus Zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham B. Osman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the current publication is to provide a comprehensive literature review on the topic of dental implant materials. The following paper focuses on conventional titanium implants and more recently introduced and increasingly popular zirconia implants. Major subtopics include the material science and the clinical considerations involving both implant materials and the influence of their physical properties on the treatment outcome. Titanium remains the gold standard for the fabrication of oral implants, even though sensitivity does occur, though its clinical relevance is not yet clear. Zirconia implants may prove to be promising in the future; however, further in vitro and well-designed in vivo clinical studies are needed before such a recommendation can be made. Special considerations and technical experience are needed when dealing with zirconia implants to minimize the incidence of mechanical failure.

  13. The relative patient costs and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamuryekung'e, Kasusu K; Lahti, Satu M; Tuominen, Risto J

    2015-07-01

    Patient charges and availability of dental services influence utilization of dental services. There is little available information on the cost of dental services and availability of materials and equipment in public dental facilities in Africa. This study aimed to determine the relative cost and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania. The local factors affecting availability were also studied. A survey of all district and regional dental clinics in selected regions was conducted in 2014. A total of 28/30 facilities participated in the study. A structured interview was undertaken amongst practitioners and clinic managers within the facilities. Daily resources for consumption (DRC) were used for estimation of patients' relative cost. DRC are the quantified average financial resources required for an adult Tanzanian's overall consumption per day. Tooth extractions were found to cost four times the DRC whereas restorations were 9-10 times the DRC. Studied facilities provided tooth extractions (100%), scaling (86%), fillings (79%), root canal treatment (46%) and fabrication of removable partial dentures (32%). The ratio of tooth fillings to extractions in the facilities was 1:16. Less than 50% of the facilities had any of the investigated dental materials consistently available throughout the year, and just three facilities had all the investigated equipment functional and in use. Dental materials and equipment availability, skills of the practitioners and the cost of services all play major roles in provision and utilization of comprehensive oral care. These factors are likely to be interlinked and should be taken into consideration when studying any of the factors individually.

  14. Nordic dentists' opinions on the safety of amalgam and other dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, E; Haugejorden, O; Sundberg, H; Birn, H

    1993-08-01

    The safety of amalgam and other restorative materials has caused concern among dental patients in recent years. The aim of this study was to obtain information on dentists' perceived competence in handling different filling materials and their opinions on the safety of these. A random sample of practising dentists in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden received a mail questionnaire in spring 1990. Answers were received from 1732 dentists (65%). The study showed that the respondents believed that their theoretic knowledge and clinical skills were generally at a high level regarding restorative materials. The risks of the side-effects of gold, ceramic materials, and glass ionomer were considered to be low by about 90% of the respondents. Amalgam was considered to be significantly more hazardous by the Swedish respondents than the others. Interestingly, composite was considered to be associated with a high risk of side-effects by about half of the dentists in all Nordic countries. The dentists' opinions were not found to be greatly influenced by their sex, age, or place of residence but rather by their country and service sector. Against the background of the present lack of scientific evidence on the hazardousness of amalgam or other restorative materials for patients' general health, these findings indicate that dentists are influenced by discussions in the mass media about dental treatment and materials and, of course, by the guidelines given by the health authorities in their own countries. Few dentists were shown to be concerned about occupational risks associated with the use of amalgam, and they had not had their own amalgam fillings replaced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 14, Materials Science and Technology A Comprehensive Treatment - Volume 14: Medical and Dental Materials Cahn,R.W.(ed.)/Haasen,P.(ed.)/Kramer,E.J.(ed.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David F.

    1996-12-01

    The applications of metals, ceramics, and polymers in medical and dental engineering is becoming ever more widespread. Technologists in these fields are provided with a unique overview of materials, performances and applications. From the Contents: Williams: Biofunctionality and Biocompatibility. Kohn/Ducheyne: Materials for Bone and Joint Replacement. Baquey: Materials in the Cardiovascular System. Aebischer/Goddard/ Galletti/ Lysaght: Biomaterials and Artificial Organs. Yannas: Materials for Skin and Nerve Regeneration. Watts: Dental Restorative Materials. Williams: Materials for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Materials for Ophthalmology. Causton: Medical and Dental Adhesives. Reichert/Saavedra: Materials Consideration in the Selection, Performance, and Adhesion of Polymeric Encapsulants for Implantable Sensors. Campbell/Jones: Materials for Implantable Electrodes and Electronic Devices. Brunstedt/Anderson: Materials for Drug Delivery. Jones: Materials for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics.

  16. Influence of aging solutions on wear resistance and hardness of selected resin-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Basa, Katarzyna; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Malara, Piotr; Nowak, Agnieszka J; Kasperski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different plasticizing aging solutions on wear resistance and hardness of selected universal resin-based dental composites. Three light cured (one nanofilled, two microhybride) and one hybride chemical cured composites were aged at 37 °C for 48 h in distillated water, ethyl alcohol solution or Listerine mouthwash. After aging the microhardness tests were carried out and then tribological tests were performed in the presence of aging solution at 37 °C. During wear testing coefficients of friction were determined. The maximal vertical loss in micrometers was determined with profilometer. Aging in all liquids resulted in a significant decrease in hardness of the test materials, with the largest values obtained successively in ethanol solution, mouthwash and water. The effect of the liquid was dependent on the particular material, but not the type of material (interpreted as the size of filler used). Introduction of mouthwash instead of water or ethanol solution resulted in a significant reduction in the coefficient of friction. The lowest wear resistance was registered after aging in ethanol and for the chemical cured hybrid composite, but the vertical loss was strongly material dependent. The effect of different aging solution, including commercial mouthrinse, on hardness and wear was material dependent, and cannot be deduced from their category or filler loading. There is no simple correlation between hardness of resin-based dental composites and their wear resistance, but softening of particular composites materials during aging leads to the reduction of its wear resistance.

  17. The American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry: a critical resource for 21st century dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Jeske, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Through its website (http:// www.ada.org/prof/resources/ebd/index.asp), the American Dental Association's Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry offers dental health professionals access to systematic reviews of oral health-related research findings, as well as Clinical Recommendations, which summarize large bodies of scientific evidence in the form of practice recommendations, e.g., the use of professionally-applied topical fluoride and pit-and-fissure sealants. Another feature of the site of great practical importance to the practicing dentist is the Critical Summary, which is a concise review of an individual systematic review's methodology and findings, as well as the importance and context of the outcomes, and the strengths and weaknesses of the systematic review and its implications for dental practice.

  18. A SEM evaluation of a 6% hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening gel on dental materials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemehorn, Bruce; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Joiner, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel 6% hydrogen peroxide gel on the surface morphology of dental gold, amalgam, porcelain and composite. Admixed high-copper amalgam and hybrid resin composite specimens were prepared in extracted teeth using standard clinical procedures. Feldspathic porcelain and type III gold specimens were prepared in a mould using standard laboratory procedures. One half of the specimens were covered with nail varnish to serve as the control side, leaving the other half exposed. The specimens were treated with pooled whole saliva (1 h), followed by the peroxide gel (20 min), rinsing with water and returning to saliva. This cycling protocol was continued until a total of 28 treatments with the peroxide gel were completed. The samples were prepared for SEM. There were no observable differences at 200x and 2000x magnifications between the control and peroxide gel treated sides on any of the materials tested. There were no significant effects of the 6% hydrogen peroxide gel on the surface morphology of any of the dental materials tested.

  19. Evaluation of effects of ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio

    2009-01-01

    This work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on materials used in dental restorations (Titanium, Amalgam, Resin Composite and Glass Ionomer) aiming the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, arising when the teeth are restored within in the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to X-ray beams of 6 MV from a linear accelerator, VARIAN 2100C model. The samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence techniques to compare the chemical composition before and after the irradiation. The sample were submitted to Geiger-Mueller detectors and the ionization chambers in order to verify any residual radiation in the samples. The samples were also analyzed by gamma spectrometry by a Germanium detector. These tests were performed to determine small changes in the composition in the samples due to the radiation interaction. The results of this study may encourage the development of new research for alternative materials in dental restorations that can contribute to improve the quality of life of those patients with tumors of the mouth. (author)

  20. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  1. Optimal selection of dental implant for different bone conditions based on the mechanical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sandipan; DAS, Mainak; Chakraborty, Pratyaya; Biswas, Jayanta Kumar; Chatterjee, Subhomoy; Khutia, Niloy; Saha, Subrata; Chowdhury, Amit Roy

    2017-01-01

    Bone quality varies from one patient to another extensively. Young's modulus may deviate up to 40% of normal bone quality, which results into alteration of bone stiffness immensely. The prime goal of this study is to design the optimum dental implant considering the mechanical response at bone implant interfaces for a patient with specific bone quality. 3D models of mandible and natural molar tooth were prepared from CT scan data, while dental implants were modelled using different diameter, length and porosity and FE analysis was carried out. Based on the variation in bone density, five different bone qualities were considered. First, failure analysis of implants, under maximum biting force of 250 N had been performed. Next, the implants that remained were selected for observation of mechanical response at bone implant interfaces under common chewing load of 120 N. Maximum Von Mises stress did not surpass the yield strength of the implant material (TiAl4V). However, factor of safety of 1.5 was considered and all but two dental implants survived the design stress or allowable stress. Under 120 N load, distribution of Von Mises stress and strain at the boneimplant interface corresponding to the rest of the implants for five bone conditions were obtained and enlisted. Implants exhibiting interface strain within 1500-3000 microstrain range show the best bone remodelling and osseointegration. So, implant models having this range of interface strains were selected corresponding to the particular bone quality. A set of optimum dental implants for each of the bone qualities were predicted.

  2. Influence of dental filling material type on the concentration of interleukin 9 in the samples of gingival crevicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Vladimir; Taso, Ervin; Petković-Ćurčin, Aleksandra; Đukić, Mirjana; Gardašević, Milka; Rakić, Mia; Xavier, Struillou; Jović, Milena; Miller, Karolina; Stanojević, Ivan; Vojvodić, Danilo

    2016-08-01

    Several cytokines and lymphokines (IL1β, ENA78, IL6, TNFα, IL8 and S100A8) are expressed during dental pulp inflammation. Analysis of gingival crevicu-lar fluid (GCF) offers a non-invasive means of studying gen-eral host response in oral cavity. Although GCF levels of various mediators could reflect the state of inflammation both in dental pulp and gingiva adjacent to a tooth, GCF samples of those without significant gingivitis could be inter-preted as reflection of pulpal process. The aim of this study was to investigate IL9 GCF values in patients with dental car-ies and to assess possible influence of various dental fillings materials on local IL9 production. The study group included 90 patients, aged 18–70, with inclusion and exclusion criteria in the prospective clinical study. Of the 6 types of material used for the restoration of prepared cavities, 3 were intended for temporary and 3 for definitive restora-tion. According to dental fillings weight, all the participants were divided into 3 groups: those with fillings lighter than 0.50 g, those with 0.50–1.00 g, and those with fillings heavier than 1.00 g. Samples were taken from gingival sulcus using the filter paper technique. Clinical parameters were deter-mined by bleeding index, plaque index (Silness-Lou, 0–3), gingival index (0–3), and gingival sulcus depth. Cytokine con-centrations were assessed using commercially available cy-tomix. According to the weight of dental fillings, there was a clear decreament trend of IL9 values meaning that dental defects greater than 1.00 g of dental filling were associated with lower GCF IL9 concentration. The IL9 val-ues correlated with the degree of gingival index and depth of gingival sulcus, being higher with more advanced gingivitis and more pronounced anatomical changes in the tooth edge. Different filling materials exerted various local IL9 responses. Zink polycarbonate cement and amalgam fillings induced a significant and long-lasting local IL9 decrement

  3. Influence of dental filling material type on the concentration of interleukin 9 in the samples of gingival crevicular fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Several cytokines and lymphokines (IL1β, ENA78, IL6, TNFα, IL8 and S100A8 are expressed during dental pulp inflammation. Analysis of gingival crevicu-lar fluid (GCF offers a non-invasive means of studying gen-eral host response in oral cavity. Although GCF levels of various mediators could reflect the state of inflammation both in dental pulp and gingiva adjacent to a tooth, GCF samples of those without significant gingivitis could be inter-preted as reflection of pulpal process. The aim of this study was to investigate IL9 GCF values in patients with dental car-ies and to assess possible influence of various dental fillings materials on local IL9 production. Methods. The study group included 90 patients, aged 18–70, with inclusion and exclusion criteria in the prospective clinical study. Of the 6 types of material used for the restoration of prepared cavities, 3 were intended for temporary and 3 for definitive restora-tion. According to dental fillings weight, all the participants were divided into 3 groups: those with fillings lighter than 0.50 g, those with 0.50–1.00 g, and those with fillings heavier than 1.00 g. Samples were taken from gingival sulcus using the filter paper technique. Clinical parameters were deter-mined by bleeding index, plaque index (Silness-Lou, 0–3, gingival index (0–3, and gingival sulcus depth. Cytokine con-centrations were assessed using commercially available cy-tomix. Results. According to the weight of dental fillings, there was a clear decreament trend of IL9 values meaning that dental defects greater than 1.00 g of dental filling were associated with lower GCF IL9 concentration. The IL9 val-ues correlated with the degree of gingival index and depth of gingival sulcus, being higher with more advanced gingivitis and more pronounced anatomical changes in the tooth edge. Different filling materials exerted various local IL9 responses. Zink polycarbonate cement and amalgam fillings induced

  4. Effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching strip gels on dental restorative materials in vitro: surface microhardness and surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of peroxide tooth bleaching, including Crest Whitestrips hydrogen peroxide gel treatments, on the surface hardness and morphology of common dental restorative treatments. American Dental Association (ADA) recommended dental restorative materials, including amalgam, dental gold, porcelain, glass ionomer, and composites, were prepared according to manufacturers' instructions. A cycling treatment methodology was employed which alternated ex vivo human salivary exposures with bleaching treatments under conditions of controlled temperature and durations of treatment. Bleaching treatments included commercial Crest Whitestrips bleaching gels, which utilize hydrogen peroxide as the in situ bleaching source, and several commercial carbamide peroxide bleaching gels. Control treatments included placebo gels and an untreated group. Crest Whitestrips bleaching included treatment exposures simulating recommended clinical exposures (14 hours), along with excess bleaching simulating exposure to five times suggested Crest Whitestrips use. At the conclusion of treatments, surface microhardness measures and surface morphological assessments with standard and variable pressure (VP-) SEMs were conducted to assess the effects of bleaching exposure on the surface morphology and structural integrity of the restoratives. Surface microhardness and SEM measures revealed no significant deleterious effects on the restoration surfaces from Whitestrips gels. These results confirm that tooth bleaching from the selected commercial hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide bleaching systems does not produce changes in surface morphology or microhardness of common dental restorative materials. These results support the clinical safety of the selected commercial bleaching systems to the oral environment, matching results obtained from long-term use of these ingredients applied in dental offices and available in commercial formulations.

  5. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement–gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhasivam, S.; Chen, Jung-Chih; Savitha, S.; Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The study describes the sol–gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)–gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC–gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC–gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC–gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: ► A new dental retrograde filling material PSC–gypsum was developed. ► PSC–gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15–35 min. ► It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa·s. ► High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. ► Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  6. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  7. Clinical Fit of Partial Removable Dental Prostheses Based on Alginate or Polyvinyl Siloxane Impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; Witter, Dick J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Creugers, Nico H

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical fit of metal-frame partial removable dental prostheses (PRDPs) based on custom trays used with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane impression material. Fifth-year students of the Nijmegen Dental School made 25 correct impressions for 23 PRDPs for 21 patients using alginate, and 31 correct impressions for 30 PRDPs for 28 patients using polyvinyl siloxane. Clinical fit of the framework as a whole and of each retainer separately were evaluated by calibrated supervisors during framework try-in before (first evaluation) and after (second evaluation) possible adjustments (score 0 = poor fit, up to score 3 = good fit). Framework fit and fit of the denture base were evaluated at delivery (third evaluation). Finally, postinsertion sessions were evaluated and total number of sessions needed, sore spots, adjustments to the denture base, and reported food-impaction were recorded. No significant differences in clinical fit (of the framework as a whole, for the retainers, or for the denture base) were found between the groups in the three evaluation sessions. Differences were not found for postinsertion sessions with one exception: in the alginate group, four subjects reported food impaction, versus none in the polyvinyl siloxane group. Clinical fit of metal-frame PRDPs based on impressions with custom trays combined with alginate or polyvinyl siloxane was similar.

  8. Design Improvement of Dental Implant-Based on Bone Remodelling

    OpenAIRE

    Solehuddin Shuib; Koay Boon Aik; Zainul Ahmad Rajion

    2016-01-01

    There are many types of mechanical failure on the dental implant. In this project, the failure that needs to take into consideration is the bone resorption on the dental implant. Human bone has its ability to remodel after the implantation. As the dental implant is installed into the bone, the bone will detect and change the bone structure to achieve new biomechanical environment. This phenomenon is known as bone remodeling. The objective of the project is to improve the ...

  9. Stickiness of dental resin composite materials to steel, dentin and bonded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Graf, Alexandra; Watts, David; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Stickiness is a vital rheological parameter for the clinical handling behavior of unset resin composite restoratives. The aim of this study was to investigate the stickiness of three different resin composites at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C tested on steel, dentin and dentin covered with different bonding agents. The stickiness instrument, used in this study consists of a vertical cylindrical stainless steel rod, with a flat circular end, and a platform with a cylindrical mold (diameter: 6.1mm, depth: 2.2mm). The test-material surface temperature and the speed of the rod can be modified. It moves slowly into the prepared mold which is filled with unset composite materials. The degree of stickiness is deducted from the height of the "elevation" the material forms when the plunger is withdrawn from the mold until the steelhead detaches itself from the composite. In this study, stickiness was tested directly to the steel plunger and to dentin slices (uncovered or covered with two different bonding agents) fixed to the plunger rod with a clamp. The coefficients of variation (CVs) were generally less than 0.10, indicating that the stickiness instrument offers an adequately reproducible way of testing stickiness. The tested composite materials varied significantly in stickiness. For all investigated materials a decrease of peak heights with increasing speed was found (for all three materials: psteel and least on bonded dentin. The order of stickiness of composites was not affected by testing the stickiness on the different materials. This method allows the characterization of composite resin materials stickiness to steel, as equivalent to dental steel instruments, and to bonded dentin as equivalent to the tooth cavity after preparation. An ideal material should have a sufficient difference between stickiness on steel and dentin so that it remains in the cavity and is not pulled back by the steel instrument.

  10. Dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  11. Evaluation of MRI artifacts caused by metallic dental implants and classification of the dental materials in use

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk jr., Zenon; Bartušek, Karel; Hubálková, H.; Bachorec, T.; Starčuková, Jana; Krupa, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2006), s. 24-27 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : magnetic resonance imaging * artifacts * metallic implants * dental alloys * magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Practitioner, patient, and caries lesion characteristics associated with type of material used to restore carious teeth: findings from The Dental PBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with material use by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) when placing the first restoration on permanent tooth surfaces. Methods A total of 182 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data on 5,599 posterior teeth with caries. Practitioner-investigators completed an enrollment questionnaire that included the dentist’s age, gender, practice workload, practice type, and years since graduation. When a consented patient presented with a previously un-restored carious surface, practitioner-investigators recorded patient and tooth characteristics. Results Amalgam was used more often than direct resin-based composite (RBC) for posterior carious lesions. Practitioner/practice characteristics (years since graduation and type of practice); patient characteristics (gender, race, age, and dental insurance); and lesion characteristics (tooth location and surface, pre-and post-operative depth) were associated with the type of restorative material used. Conclusions There are several practitioner/practice, patient, and lesion characteristics significantly associated with use of amalgam and RBC: region, years since graduation, dental insurance, tooth location and surface, and pre-and post-operative depth. Clinical implications Amalgam remains a material commonly used by United States dentists to restore posterior caries lesions. PMID:21628683

  13. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T; Padipatvuthikul, P

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si 3 N 4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si 3 N 4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si 3 N 4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si 3 N 4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder ( 2 O 3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si 3 N 4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10 -6 deg. C -1 , rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  14. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y2O3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  15. New approach in paediatric dentistry: ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of restorative dental materials. Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzano, G F; Cantile, T; Coda, M; Ingenito, A

    2015-09-01

    The ultrasonic inspection is a non invasive method which is very developed in the industrial field, for the non-destructive evaluation of materials, and in the medical field, for the ultrasound diagnostic analysis. In paediatric dentistry the most widely used non- destructive evaluation is the X-ray technique. Radiographs are valuable aids in the oral health care of infants, children, adolescents, allowing dentists to diagnose and treat oral diseases that cannot be detected during a visual clinical examination. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyse the ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (UT-NDE) technique to inspect both dental materials internal structure and the form and position of internal defects in order to obtain a diagnostic method, free of ionising radiations, in paediatric dentistry. Moreover the ultrasonic inspection (UT) could be a rapid method of diagnosis in uncooperative paediatric patients. Study Design: Experimental samples were manufactured with the characteristics of a large composite or glass ionomer cement paediatric dental restoration, in terms of either size or operative technique used. Characteristics of the common restorations were analysed and reproduced in vitro, using the same operative conditions, also adding operative defects into some samples. All the samples were subjected to an innovative UT test using the pulse echo immersion scanning technique. Both C-scans and full volume scans were carried out during the experimental programme. To enhance the data obtained from the UT scan, a digital system (Ecus Inspection software) for signal detection, archiving, processing and displaying was used. UT images showed the presence of internal defects in the dental materials. It was also possible to inspect very thin discontinuity such as the one represented by the fluid resin. In order to execute the statistical analysis, the values of electric voltage measured in five higher white points and in five higher grey points of the pictures

  16. Developing the continuum of dental education: including dental foundation trainers in the delivery of a community-based clinical teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Ash, P J; Chadwick, B L; Herbert, R A; Cowpe, J G

    2012-11-01

    Despite advances in evidence-based dental school educational programmes, the charge is sometimes made that dental students are 'no longer as good as they used to be'. Recent modifications have meant that dental education is now a 'life-long experience', of which dental school is the initial, albeit very important, component. Contemporary dental students will normally enter dental foundation (DF) training on completion of dental school. As such there may be value in including DF trainers in dental school teaching programmes. The aim of this paper is to report the experiences, feedback and opinions of these DF trainers following their first-hand experience of the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff, and assess if their perspectives of contemporary dental student education changed following this. DF trainers were invited to attend the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff on an observer basis. Twenty-four DF trainers attended, following which evaluation questionnaires were completed. Information sought included opinions and attitudes to the teaching programme, the physical environment in which the teaching programme took place, knowledge and attitudes towards community-based clinical teaching and modifications that DF trainers would make to the teaching programme to further improve the knowledge, skills and attributes of dental school graduates for DF training. Responses were received from 20 DF trainers (response rate = 83%). All 20 respondents felt that the teaching provided within the community-based clinical teaching programme was appropriate, with one respondent noting that it was like 'a day in the life of a dental practice', 'where anything could present'. Sixteen respondents were satisfied with the scope and content of the community-based clinical teaching programme, with a small number recommending inclusion of teaching in relation to inlays/onlays (n = 2), simple orthodontics (n = 1) and splinting (n = 1). Eighteen

  17. Microcomputed tomography-based assessment of retrieved dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Zipprich, H.; Sándor, G.K.; Wolff, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technology in the assessment of retrieved dental implants. Cases are presented to illustrate the value of micro-CT imaging techniques in determining possible mechanical causes for dental implant

  18. Microcomputed Tomography-Based Assessment of Retrieved Dental Implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Zipprich, H.; Sandor, G.K.; Wolff, J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technology in the assessment of retrieved dental implants. Cases are presented to illustrate the value of micro-CT imaging techniques in determining possible mechanical causes for dental implant

  19. New dental implant selection criterion based on implant design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anwar, Mohamed I; El-Zawahry, Mohamed M; Ibraheem, Eman M; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; ElGabry, Hisham

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study between threaded and plain dental implant designs was performed to find out a new criterion for dental implant selection. Several dental implant designs with a systematic increase in diameter and length were positioned in a cylindrical-shaped bone section and analyzed using finite element method. Four loading types were tested on different dental implant designs; tension of 50 N, compression of 100 N, bending of 20 N, and torque of 2 Nm, to derive design curves. Better stress distribution on both spongy and cortical bone was noted with an increase in dental implant diameter and length. With the increase in dental implant side area, a stress reduction in the surrounding bones was observed, where threaded dental implants showed better behavior over the plain ones. Increasing value of ratio between dental implant side area and its cross-sectional area reduces stresses transferred to cortical and spongy bones. The use of implants with higher ratio of side area to cross-section area, especially with weak jaw bone, is recommended.

  20. Virtual Reality-Based Technologies in Dental Medicine: Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice among Students and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabalic, Maja; Schoener, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality-based technologies have been used in dentistry for almost two decades. Dental simulators, planning software and CAD/CAM (computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing) systems have significantly developed over the years and changed both dental education and clinical practice. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes…

  1. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  2. [Dental education for college students based on WeChat public platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Jun; Sun, Tan

    2016-06-01

    The authors proposed a model for dental education based on WeChat public platform. In this model, teachers send various kinds of digital teaching information such as PPT,word and video to the WeChat public platform and students share the information for preview before class and differentiate the key-point knowledge from those information for in-depth learning in class. Teachers also send reference materials for expansive learning after class. Questionaire through the WeChat public platform is used to evaluate teaching effect of teachers and improvement may be taken based on the feedback questionnaire. A discussion and interaction based on WeCchat between students and teacher can be aroused on a specific topic to reach a proper solution. With technique development of mobile terminal, mobile class will come true in near future.

  3. Determination of surface roughness and topography of dental resin-based nanocomposites using AFM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Lainović

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine surface roughness and topography of polished dental resin-based nanocomposites.Four representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were tested in the study: two nanohybrids (Filtek Z550 and Tetric EvoCeram and two nanofilled (Filtek Ultimate Body and Filtek Ultimate Translucent; and two reference materials: one microfilled (Gradia Direct and one microhybrid (Filtek Z250. Polymerized cylindrical specimens (4 mm x 2 mm were polished with multi-step polishing system-Super Snap. Immediately after the polishing, topography of each specimen was examined by Veeco di CP-II Atomic Force Microscope. Specimen’s surface has been scanned in 6 points in contact mode with CONT20A-CP tips. 1 Hz scan rate and 256 x 256 resolution were used to obtain topography on a 90 μm x 90 μm scanning area. Measured topography data were processed by Image Processing and Data Analysis V2.1.15 software. Following parameters were compared among specimens: average roughness and maximum peak-to-valley distance.All of the tested materials had similar average surface roughness after finishing and polishing procedure. The lowest values occurred in the material Filtek Ultimate Body, and the highest in the Filtek Z550. When interpreting maximum peak-to-valley distance the larger differences in values (up to 100% occurred in Filtek Z550, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Ultimate Body, which is a result of the deep polishing channels and tracks. Type, size, distribution of fillers and filler loading in tested materials, didn’t influence average roughness values, but had an impact on maximum peak-to-valley distance values.

  4. Effect of therapeutic dose X rays on mechanical and chemical properties of esthetic dental materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dibo da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of therapeutic dose X rays on the microhardness (MH and degree of conversion (DC of two different esthetic restorative dental materials. The materials were photo-activated with a LED light-curing unit using three cure-times: 5, 20 and 40 seconds. The photo-activation was carried out in two distinct periods: before and after irradiation with doses of 5, 35 and 70 Gy, from a 6 MV X rays beam. In accordance with the methodology used, it was conclude that a therapeutic dose does not have a detrimental effect on the photoinitiator molecules, because the photo-activation occurred after they were irradiated. When the irradiation was applied before photo-activation, the materials showed MH improvement, but when photo-activation was performed after irradiation, there was less improvement. However, there was no correlation between MH and DC. Thus, a therapeutic dose applied to cured material can promote linking and breaking of chain bonds in a non-linear way.

  5. The effect of a mouthrinse containing essential oils on dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Kelley, J I; DePaola, L G; Meiller, T F

    2006-01-01

    Mouthrinses that contain essential oils are effective for controlling plaque and periodontal disease. Recent studies have shown that such mouthrinses are effective at preventing the formation of biofilm in dental unit waterlines. However, there is no information in the literature regarding the effect of such mouthrinses on restorative materials used within the oral cavity. Specimens of three common restorative materials (a glass ionomer, a composite resin, and amalgam) were subjected to continuous exposure to Listerine and distilled water for 10 days; at that time, the strength, fluid sorption, and surface appearance of the specimens were compared. Specimens of the test materials also were placed in intraoral devices; volunteer patients wore these devices for 12 hours per day for a period of 10 days. During that time, the patients were instructed to rinse twice daily for 30 seconds with Listerine Cool Mint or a non-active mouthrinse. After 10 days, the specimens were salvaged from the devices and inspected by visible and SEM examination. This study indicates that routine use of mouthrinses containing essential oils (or even prolonged exposure to such mouthrinses) has no adverse effects on restorative materials that might be expected to react to such mixtures because of their chemical compositions. It was concluded that active mouthrinses do not appear to have any adverse effects on a variety of restorative biomaterials.

  6. A particle swarm-based algorithm for optimization of multi-layered and graded dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Ehsan; Flores, Paulo; Silva, Filipe

    2018-01-01

    The thermal residual stresses (TRSs) generated owing to the cooling down from the processing temperature in layered ceramic systems can lead to crack formation as well as influence the bending stress distribution and the strength of the structure. The purpose of this study is to minimize the thermal residual and bending stresses in dental ceramics to enhance their strength as well as to prevent the structure failure. Analytical parametric models are developed to evaluate thermal residual stresses in zirconia-porcelain multi-layered and graded discs and to simulate the piston-on-ring test. To identify optimal designs of zirconia-based dental restorations, a particle swarm optimizer is also developed. The thickness of each interlayer and compositional distribution are referred to as design variables. The effect of layers number constituting the interlayer between two based materials on the performance of graded prosthetic systems is also investigated. The developed methodology is validated against results available in literature and a finite element model constructed in the present study. Three different cases are considered to determine the optimal design of graded prosthesis based on minimizing (a) TRSs; (b) bending stresses; and (c) both TRS and bending stresses. It is demonstrated that each layer thickness and composition profile have important contributions into the resulting stress field and magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental materials. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M; Cohen, Michael J; MacRenaris, Keith W; Pasteris, Jill D; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-13

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg(2+), F(-), and CO3(2-). However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg(2+) is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of Corrosion Resistance of Some Dental Metallic Materials with an Adaptive Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelariu, Romeu; Suditu, Gabriel Dan; Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana; Cimpoesu, Nicanor; Leon, Florin; Curteanu, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the electrochemical behavior of some dental metallic materials in artificial saliva for different pH (5.6 and 3.4), NaF content (500 ppm, 1000 ppm, and 2000 ppm), and with albumin protein addition (0.6 wt.%) for pH 3.4. The corrosion resistance of the alloys was quantitatively evaluated by polarization resistance, estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. An adaptive k-nearest-neighbor regression method was applied for evaluating the corrosion resistance of the alloys by simulation, depending on the operation conditions. The predictions provided by the model are useful for experimental practice, as they can replace or, at least, help to plan the experiments. The accurate results obtained prove that the developed model is reliable and efficient.

  10. Shear bond strength of brackets on restorative materials: Comparison on various dental restorative materials using the universal primer Monobond® Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas; Elsner, Laura; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Hanke, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to analyze surfaces consisting of different restorative materials for shear bond strength (SBS) and failure patterns of metal and ceramic brackets. Bonding involved the use of a universal primer (Monobond® Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent). Six restorative materials were tested, including one composite resin (Clearfil Majesty™ Posterior, Kuraray Noritake Dental), one glass-ceramic material (IPS Empress® Esthetic, Ivoclar Vivadent), one oxide-ceramic material (CORiTEC Zr transpa Disc, imes-icore), two base-metal alloys (remanium® star, Dentaurum; Colado® CC, Ivoclar Vivadent), and one palladium-based alloy (Callisto® 75 Pd, Ivoclar Vivadent). Bovine incisors served as controls. Both metal and ceramic brackets (discovery®/discovery® pearl; Dentaurum) were bonded to the restorative surfaces after sandblasting and pretreatment with Monobond® Plus. A setup modified from DIN 13990-2 was used for SBS testing and adhesive remnant index (ARI)-based analysis of failure patterns. The metal brackets showed the highest mean SBS values on the glass-ceramic material (68.61 N/mm(2)) and the composite resin (67.58 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on one of the base-metal alloys (Colado® CC; 14.01 N/mm(2)). The ceramic brackets showed the highest mean SBS on the glass-ceramic material (63.36 N/mm(2)) and the lowest mean SBS on the palladium-based alloy (38.48 N/mm(2)). Significant differences between the metal and ceramic brackets were observed in terms of both SBS values and ARI scores (p restorative materials under metal brackets were found to involve undercuring of the adhesive. Monobond® Plus succeeded in generating high bond strengths of both bracket types on all restorative surfaces. Given our observations of cohesive fracture (including cases of surface avulsion) of the composite-resin and the glass-ceramic samples, we recommend against using these material combinations in clinical practice.

  11. The effect of disinfecting solutions on the dimensional stability of dental alginate impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Danish; Braden, Michael; Parker, Sandra; Patel, Mangala P

    2012-07-01

    Dimensional changes occur in set dental alginate impression materials when immersed in disinfecting solutions. In this contribution the dimensional changes of two alginates in two disinfecting solutions, and for two specimen thicknesses, have been studied. The results were analyzed theoretically. The dimensional changes of two commercial alginates (Blueprint Cremix and Hydrogum), have been measured, in distilled water and two disinfecting solutions (Perform ID/sodium hypochlorite), using a traveling microscope, at 5 min intervals over a period of 1h. Samples of simple geometry have been studied, namely rectangular strips with thicknesses of 1.5 and 3mm, respectively. In all cases, both alginates continuously shrank with time, in the three immersion liquids, over the hour of measurement, indicating transfer of water from the alginate into the external water or disinfecting solution. The t(1/2) shrinkage plots were generally linear, but with an intercept on the t(1/2) axis, indicating the possibility of an initial expansion at very short times. In most cases, the ratios of slopes for both thicknesses were 1.33-1.54, in contrast to the theoretical value of 2. Perform ID however gave anomalous results for the 1.5mm thick samples. At 10 min their shrinkage was 1.34-1.72%, compared with -0.42% to 0.67% in the other two media. The effects of thickness observed were not in accord with simple Fickian theory because of the various ions diffusing into and out of the alginate. Moreover, the water content of the alginate decreased consequent on the cross-linking process. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How does duration of curing affect the radiopacity of dental materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejeh Mir, Arash Poorsattar; Bejeh Mir, Morvarid Poorsattar

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians commonly encounter cases in which it is difficult to determine whether adjacent radiopacities are normal or pathologic. The ideal radiopacity of composite resin is equal to or higher than that of the same thickness of aluminum. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of different curing times on the post-24-hour radiopacity of composite resins on digital radiographs. One mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil resin composites were prepared and cured with three regimens of continuous 400 mW/cm 2 irradiance for 10, 20 and 30 seconds. Along with a 12-step aluminum step wedge, digital radiographs were captured and the radiopacities were transformed to the equivalent aluminum thicknesses. Data were compared by a general linear model and repeated-measures of ANOVA. Overall, the calculated equivalent aluminum thicknesses of composite resins were increased significantly by doubling and tripling the curing times (F(2,8)=8.94, p=0.002). Notably, Bonferroni post-hoc tests confirmed that the radiopacity of the cured Filtek P60 was significantly higher at 30 seconds compared with 10 seconds (p=0.04). Although the higher radiopacity was observed by increasing the time, other comparisons showed no statistical significance (p>0.05). These results supported the hypothesis that the radiopacity of resin composites might be related to the duration of light curing. In addition to the current standards for radiopacity of digital images, defining a standard protocol for curing of dental materials should be considered, and it is suggested that they should be added to the current requirements for dental material.

  13. Clinical and Community-Based Education in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Frank W; Evans, Caswell A

    2017-08-01

    This review of U.S. dental schools' clinical curricula suggests that the basic structure of clinical education has not changed significantly in the past 60 years, although important developments include the introduction of competency-based education and community-based clinical education. Most dental schools still have a two-year preclinical curriculum and a two-year clinical curriculum, and most schools still operate a large clinical facility where students receive the bulk of their clinical education and assessment for graduation. In those clinics, dental students are the main providers of patient treatment, with faculty serving in supervisory roles. In addition, a major portion of the entire dental curriculum continues to be dedicated to student education on the restoration of a single tooth or replacement of teeth. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  14. Moldable setting time evaluation between sodium alginate and bovine gelatine of glutinous rice mixture as dental putty materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarini, V.; Hasratiningsih, Z.; Karlina, E.; Febrida, R.; Asri, L. A. T. W.; Purwasasmita, BS

    2017-02-01

    Putty elastomeric material is a viscous, moldable material that can be used as a dental impression to record and duplicate the tooth structure. Commercially available putty materials are hardly found in the Indonesian market. The aim of this work is to develop an alternative putty dental material from glutinous rice with two different gelling agents; sodium alginate and bovine gelatine. A commercially putty material was used as a control. The length of time required for the putty materials to set (setting time) was evaluated with compression set test. The result showed that sodium alginate and bovine gelatine gelling agents resulted in moldable putty materials that comparable to the commercial product. Glutinous rice mixed with sodium alginate gelling agent demonstrated longer setting time (more than 1 hours) compared to bovine gelatine (6 minutes). These may occur due to heat treatment applied to the bovine gelatine, while sodium alginate mixture has a chemical reaction since CaCl2 crosslink agent had been added to the mixture. Glutinous rice with bovine gelatine mixture is a promising candidate to be used as a dental putty material.

  15. Nanoscale chemical surface characterization of four different types of dental pulp-capping materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Victor; França, Rodrigo

    2017-03-01

    The surface of any dental pulp-capping material has important implications for its clinical success because it is in direct contact with dental tissue, which influences its cytotoxicity. The aim was to determine the chemical composition of the first atomic layers of four pulp-protection agents because these atoms can initiate the pulp healing process. Biodentine (Septodont), ProRoot MTA (Dentsply), Dycal (Caulk) and TheraCal (Bisco) were prepared (n=5) according to manufacturer recommendations. The chemical surface composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the bulk composition was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Both survey and high resolution XPS spectra of the elements detected were obtained, with element-dependent probe depths of 4-5nm; the binding energy scale was normalized to the C1s adventitious carbon peak at 285eV. There was a significant difference between bulk and surface compositions for all the pulp-capping materials. The calcium surface concentrations at 0nm and 70nm were Dycal 7.9% and 15.1%; ProRoot MTA 14.1% and 17%; TheraCal 0% and 3.6%; and Biodentine 17.6% and 33.7%, respectively. Trace amounts of the following elements (<1%) were also found: Ti, S and Zr in Biodentine; Bi in ProRoot MTA and TheraCal; Na, P, Zn and N in Dycal. The XPS results showed that Ca in the surface layer could vary from 0 to 18%, depending on the material. Aliphatic carbons, from the polymerization reactions, especially in Dycal and TheraCal, were found to mask the other components. This study compares, for the first time, the chemical composition of the first atomic layers of four pulp-capping materials. This information is relevant because the interaction between pulpar cells and the material's outermost atomic layer is an important factor for leading the pulpal response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study on frequency of dental developmental alterations in a MEXICAN school-based population

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma Montes, Constantino; Garcés Ortíz, Maricela; Salcido García, Juan Francisco; Hernández Flores, Florentino

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to know the distribution of dental developmental alterations in the population requesting stomatological attention at the Admission and Diagnosis Clinic of our institution in Mexico City. Material and Methods We reviewed the archives and selected those files with developmental dental alterations. Analyzed data were diagnoses, age, gender, location and number of involved teeth. Results Of the 3.522 patients reviewed, 179 (5.1%) harbored 394 developmental de...

  17. Toxicity Testing of Restorative Dental Materials Using Brine Shrimp Larvae (Artemia salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar M. Milhem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GICs and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy, a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP, and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the composite groups by Tukey's pairwise multiple-comparison test (α =0.05 showed that the extract of Synergy was significantly less toxic than the extracts of all the other materials except that of Solitaire 2. The compomers showed 100% lethality, while the percentage of viable larvae for the extracts of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer were 32.3%, and 37.0%, respectively. One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the groups of materials (p<0.001. Follow-up comparison between the groups by Tukey's test (α = 0.05 showed that the toxic effect of the extracts of the compomers were significantly greater than that of Ketac-Fil, and Vitremer. The differences in the toxic effects of Vitremer and Ketac-Fil were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the toxicity of composite materials varied according to their chemical composition. Compomers were the most lethal materials to brine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites.

  18. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens : a co-culture study in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration

  19. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbial adherence on various intraoral suture materials in patients undergoing dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banche, Giuliana; Roana, Janira; Mandras, Narcisa; Amasio, Mario; Gallesio, Cesare; Allizond, Valeria; Angeretti, Alessandra; Tullio, Vivian; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2007-08-01

    Sutures used in oral surgery should avoid or limit bacterial adhesion and proliferation to those parts exposed to oral fluids. Hence, microbial colonization on various intraoral suture materials from patients undergoing dental surgery was compared. During dentoalveolar surgery, various suture materials were used in 60 patients, who were randomly divided into 5 groups of 12. In each group, silk was placed intraorally in association with a different type of suture (ie, Supramid, Synthofil, Ethibond Excel, Ti-cron, Monocryl) at the same site to compare microbial colonization intraindividually. Eight days postoperatively, the sutures were removed, and adhered micro-organisms were isolated, counted, and identified through enzymatic activities and fermentation of sugars. In all 60 patients, silk sutures exhibited the smallest affinity toward the adhesion of bacteria compared with considerable proliferation with nonresorbable multifilament sutures (Supramid, Synthofil, Ethibond Excel, Ti-cron). On the contrary, the microbial load was significantly lower when absorbable monofilament Monocryl was used. A greater quantity of bacteria was found on nonresorbable sutures than on absorbable ones, and nearly 2 times more facultative anaerobic bacteria were isolated in total. Our results show that bacteria adhere with different affinity to various types of suture materials. Absorbable silk and Monocryl exhibited the smallest number of adherent bacteria. Colonization by pathogens on sutures leads to the recommendation that sutures should be removed as early as possible after surgery is performed, to eliminate or to limit the reservoir for oral pathogens. This recommendation is dependent on whether the suture is absorbable.

  1. Biological Effects of Provisional Resin Materials on Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S-K; Mahapatra, C; Lee, H-H; Kim, H-W; Lee, J-H

    This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity as well as the proinflammatory cytokine expression of provisional resin materials on primary cultured human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Five commercially available provisional resin materials were chosen (SNAP [SN], Luxatemp [LT], Jet [JE], Revotek LC [RL], and Vipi block [VB]). Eluates that were either polymerizing or already set were added to hDPSCs under serially diluted conditions divided into three different setting times (25% set, 50% set, and 100% set) and incubated for 24 hours with 2× concentrated culture media. Cell cytotoxicity tests were performed by LDH assay and live and dead confocal microscope images. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in SN and VB was measured using cytokine antibody arrays. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) or ANOVA followed by the Tukey post hoc test at a significance level of pprovisional resin materials during polymerization (SN, LT, and JE) were cytotoxic to hDPSCs and may adversely affect pulp tissue.

  2. Graphene-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Sasha; Dikin, Dmitriy A; Dommett, Geoffrey H B; Kohlhaas, Kevin M; Zimney, Eric J; Stach, Eric A; Piner, Richard D; Nguyen, SonBinh T; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2006-07-20

    Graphene sheets--one-atom-thick two-dimensional layers of sp2-bonded carbon--are predicted to have a range of unusual properties. Their thermal conductivity and mechanical stiffness may rival the remarkable in-plane values for graphite (approximately 3,000 W m(-1) K(-1) and 1,060 GPa, respectively); their fracture strength should be comparable to that of carbon nanotubes for similar types of defects; and recent studies have shown that individual graphene sheets have extraordinary electronic transport properties. One possible route to harnessing these properties for applications would be to incorporate graphene sheets in a composite material. The manufacturing of such composites requires not only that graphene sheets be produced on a sufficient scale but that they also be incorporated, and homogeneously distributed, into various matrices. Graphite, inexpensive and available in large quantity, unfortunately does not readily exfoliate to yield individual graphene sheets. Here we present a general approach for the preparation of graphene-polymer composites via complete exfoliation of graphite and molecular-level dispersion of individual, chemically modified graphene sheets within polymer hosts. A polystyrene-graphene composite formed by this route exhibits a percolation threshold of approximately 0.1 volume per cent for room-temperature electrical conductivity, the lowest reported value for any carbon-based composite except for those involving carbon nanotubes; at only 1 volume per cent, this composite has a conductivity of approximately 0.1 S m(-1), sufficient for many electrical applications. Our bottom-up chemical approach of tuning the graphene sheet properties provides a path to a broad new class of graphene-based materials and their use in a variety of applications.

  3. Packaging based on polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Slobodan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past two years the consumption of common in the developed countries world wide (high tonnage polymers for packaging has approached a value of 50 wt.%. In the same period more than 50% of the packaging units on the world market were made of polymeric materials despite the fact that polymeric materials present 17 wt.% of all packaging materials. The basic properties of polymeric materials and their environmental and economical advantages, providing them such a position among packaging materials, are presented in this article. Recycling methods, as well as the development trends of polymeric packaging materials are also presented.

  4. Web-mediated database for internet-based dental radiology teaching files constructed by 5th-year undergraduate students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kito, Shinji; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Oda, Masafumi; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Fukai, Yasuhiro; Tokitsu, Takatoshi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    To provide oral healthcare for patients of all ages, dental welfare environments and technical aspects of dentistry have evolved and developed and dental education must also diversify. Student-centered voluntary education and establishment of a life-long self-learning environment are becoming increasingly important in the changing world of dental education. In this article, we introduce a new process for the construction of a web-mediated database containing internet-based teaching files on the normal radiological anatomy of panoramic radiographs and CT images of the oral and maxillofacial regions, as well as a system for the delivery of visual learning materials through an intra-faculty local network. This process was developed by our 5th-year undergraduate students. Animated CT scan images were produced using Macintosh Iphoto and Imovie animation software. Normal anatomical images of panoramic radiographs and CT scans were produced using Adobe Illustrator CS and Adobe Photoshop CS. The web database was constructed using Macromedia Dreamweaver MX and Microsoft Internet Explorer. This project was the basis of our participation in the Student Clinician Research Program (SCRP). At Kyushu Dental College, we developed a new series of teaching files on the web. Uploading these teaching files to the internet allowed many individuals to access the information. Viewers can easily select the area of study that they wish to examine. These processes suggest that our laboratory practice is a useful tool for promoting students' motivation and improving life-long self learning in dental radiology. We expect that many medical and dental students, practitioners and patients will be able to use our teaching files to learn about the normal radiological anatomy of the oral and maxillofacial regions.(author)

  5. A School-Based Dental Program Evaluation: Comparison to the Massachusetts Statewide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Corinna S; Kotelchuck, Milton; Declercq, Eugene; Kuhlthau, Karen; Jones, Kari; Yoder, Karen M

    2017-10-01

    School-based dental programs target high-risk communities and reduce barriers to obtaining dental services by delivering care to students in their schools. We describe the evaluation of a school-based dental program operating in Chelsea, a city north of Boston, with a low-income and largely minority population, by comparing participants' oral health to a Massachusetts oral health assessment. Standardized dental screenings were conducted for students in kindergarten, third, and sixth grades. Outcomes were compared in bivariate analysis, stratified by grade and income levels. A greater percentage of Chelsea students had untreated decay and severe treatment need than students statewide. Yet, fewer Chelsea third graders had severe treatment need, and more had dental sealants. There was no significant difference in the percentage of Chelsea students having severe treatment need or dental sealants by income level. Students participating in our program do not have lower decay levels than students statewide. However, they do have lower levels of severe treatment need, likely due to treatment referrals. Our results confirm that school-based prevention programs can lead to increased prevalence of dental sealants among high-risk populations. Results provide support for the establishment of full-service school-based programs in similar communities. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  6. A concise overview of dental implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju Abdurrazaq Taiwo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants has resulted in several applications in diverse clinical settings. Hence, has contributed to the suitable replacement of missing teeth and the realization of an optimal facial appearance. This paper describes the benefits, applications, contraindications, and complications of dental implants in contemporary dental practice. Materials and Methods: An electronic search was undertaken in PUBMED without time restriction for appropriate English papers on dental implants based on a series of keywords in different combinations. Results: Fifty-eight acceptable, relevant articles were selected for review. The review identified the various components of dental implants, classification, and brands. It also looked at osseointegration and factors promoting and inimical to it. It also explored primary and secondary stability; and patients' selection for a dental implant. Complications of dental implants were also highlighted. Conclusion: With over 95% success rate, dental implants remain the gold standard for achieving aesthetic and functional oral rehabilitation.

  7. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wananuruksawong, R; Jinawath, S; Wasanapiarnpong, T [Research Unit of Advanced Ceramic, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Padipatvuthikul, P, E-mail: raayaa_chula@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-10-29

    Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 deg. C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200 deg. C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100 deg. C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98x10{sup -6} deg. C{sup -1}, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  8. Biocompatibility effects of indirect exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Emma Louise; Moran, Gary P; Fleming, Garry J P

    2013-11-01

    The study employed a three-dimensional (3D) human-derived oral mucosal model to assess the biocompatibility of base-metal dental casting alloys ubiquitous in fixed prosthodontic and orthodontic dentistry. Oral mucosal models were generated using primary human oral keratinocyte and gingival fibroblast cells seeded onto human de-epidermidised dermal scaffolds. Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) base-metal alloy immersion solutions were exposed to oral mucosal models for increasing time periods (2-72h). Analysis methodologies (histology, viable cell counts, oxidative stress, cytokine expression and toxicity) were performed following exposure. Ni-based alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly decreased cell viability (Palloy immersion solutions did not elicit adverse oxidative stress (P>0.4755) or cellular toxicity (Pmetal alloy immersion solutions elicited significantly detrimental effects to the oral mucosal models, it was possible to distinguish between Ni-Cr alloys using the approach employed. The study employed a 3D human-derived full-thickness differentiated oral mucosal model suitable for biocompatibility assessment of base-metal dental casting alloys through discriminatory experimental parameters. Increasing incidences of Ni hypersensitivity in the general population warrants serious consideration from dental practitioners and patients alike where fixed prosthodontic/orthodontic dental treatments are the treatment modality involved. The novel and analytical oral mucosal model has the potential to significantly contribute to the advancement of reproducible dental medical device and dental material appraisals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Survey of attitudes, materials and methods preferred in root canal therapy by general dental practice in Turkey: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Gul Celik; Kaya, Bulem Ureyen; Tac, Ali Gurhan; Kececi, Ayse Diljin

    2012-10-01

    To gather information on the materials and methods employed in root canal treatment by dentists in Turkey. A questionnaire was distributed to 1,527 dentists who attended the Turkish Dental Association Congress. Respondents were asked to choose one or more suitable answers for the questions. Data was gathered for demographic and professional information regarding stages, materials, and methods commonly used in endodontic therapy. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical package SPSS. Descriptive statistics were given as frequencies (n) and percent (%). Chi-square (χ(2)) test was used to investigate the influence of gender and the years of professional activity for the materials and techniques employed. The response rate was 49%. A total of 97% of respondents were working in a general dental practice. Of respondents, 44% were using an agent containing arsenic or aldehyde. Only 5.1% of the respondents preferred the rubber dam isolation method. Sodium hypochlorite was the most popular choice (73%) as a root canal irrigation solution. Calcium hydroxide was the most commonly used medicament (53%). Most of the practitioners (77%) preferred radiographs for working-length determination. Root canal preparation done solely with K-Files or in combination with other instruments was preferred by 73.1% of the respondents. Ni-Ti hand or rotary files were used by 79.7% of the practitioners. Polymer based root canal sealers were the sealers most frequently chosen (48.4%). The majority of the respondents (66.2%) preferred cold lateral condensation as an obturation technique. Gender affected the preference of intracanal medicament, periapical radiographs for working-length determination, root canal instrument, root canal sealers, and root canal obturation technique (P<.05). Years of professional experience affected the preference of devitalizing agents, irrigation solutions, intracanal medicament, root canal instrument, root canal sealer, and root canal obturation

  10. [Evaluation of the dental pathology in archaeological skeletal material: prevalence of dental caries since prehistory to modern age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stránská, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of the dental health of past populations is an important part of the anthropological analysis of human skeletal remains uncovered during the archaeological excavations. The results provide the important information not only of the overall health of past populations, but also are reflective of the nutrition or the social status of our ancestors. We focused on the comparison of dental caries from prehistoric times to the present day. The aim was to evaluate the dental decay in several prehistoric, Early Medieval and modern populations and determine whether and to what extent the decay differ between the individual groups. METHODS AND RESULTS. We observed the permanent dentition in adult men and females, who were divided into three groups: the population of the younger Eneolithic to the Bronze Age, the population of the Early Middle Ages and the population of the modern times. We used the Index of Intensity of Caries I-CE and the Index of Caries Frequency F-CE to evaluate the incidence of caries and intra-vital losses. The comparison was carried out between groups, between both of jaws and between individual teeth. We took into account sex and age of the individuals studied. The highest value of F-CE was set in the population of the modern times (67.5). The difference in caries frequency among populations was not significant. The intensity of caries was the highest in modern population (I-CE: 13.2). Compared with the two older populations the difference was statistically highly significant (p 0.001).With regard to sex, the results differed between populations. It could be caused by a different frequency of men and females in individual groups.The correlation of intensity of caries with age was confirmed. Some partial results were affected by unequal frequency of age categories. CONCLUSION. The results showed the worst dental health in the population of the modern times. The null hypothesis,that tooth decay among the individual populations from different

  11. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  12. [Study on color matching of equal volume in dental ceramic prothesis materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Bei-yan; Zhang, Yan; Luo, Yun; Sun, Jun; Chao, Yong-lie

    2007-10-01

    To study the color changes on brightness and hue in dental ceramic prothesis materials. The different color mark of VINTAGE series was sintered on 15 pieces Ni-Cr alloy denture materials. The sample group and control group was given the sintering of color blending with equivalent volume. The order of color mark was of A1 and A2, A2 and A3, A3 and A4, B1 and B2, B2 and B3, B3 and B4 in sample group, and A1, A2, A3, A3.5, A4, B1, B2, B3 and B4 orderly in control group. The chromatic analysis on samples of VITA had been taken through applying PR 650 spectrum detector and adopted the statistic software of Photo Research and SPSS 12.0 for analysis. The statistical difference (P<0.05) of L*a*b* value was found in the different color mark of the same color serials. A non-linearity relation had been found in the chromatic parameters a*b*. It means the change of color was visible. Set A has a bigger grading change of brightness than Set B. The change of red-green is obviously in Set A, as well as yellow-blue in Set B.

  13. Occupational exposure to potentially infectious biological material in a dental teaching environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Carvalhais, Helenaura P; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L; Auad, Sheyla M; Martins, Laura H P M; Paiva, Saul M; Pordeus, Isabela A

    2008-10-01

    The aims of this cross-sectional study were to determine the prevalence of occupational accidents with exposure to biological material among undergraduate students of dentistry and to estimate potential risk factors associated with exposure to blood. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire (86.4 percent return rate), which was completed by a sample of 286 undergraduate dental students (mean age 22.4 +/-2.4 years). The students were enrolled in the clinical component of the curriculum, which corresponds to the final six semesters of study. Descriptive, bivariate, simple logistic regression and multiple logistic regression (Forward Stepwise Procedure) analyses were performed. The level of statistical significance was set at 5 percent. Percutaneous and mucous exposures to potentially infectious biological material were reported by 102 individuals (35.6 percent); 26.8 percent reported the occurrence of multiple episodes of exposure. The logistic regression analyses revealed that the incomplete use of individual protection equipment (OR=3.7; 95 percent CI 1.5-9.3), disciplines where surgical procedures are carried out (OR=16.3; 95 percent CI 7.1-37.2), and handling sharp instruments (OR=4.4; 95 percent CI 2.1-9.1), more specifically, hollow-bore needles (OR=6.8; 95 percent CI 2.1-19.0), were independently associated with exposure to blood. Policies of reviewing the procedures during clinical practice are recommended in order to reduce occupational exposure.

  14. Mechanical properties and three-body wear of dental restoratives and their comparative flowable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Sabine; Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Handel, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    To compare wear performance and resistance to crack propagation (K1C) of commercial restorative materials and their flowable variations. A potential correlation between three-body wear and fracture toughness, modulus of elasticity, fracture work, Vickers hardness, and filler content was investigated. Seven restoratives (five composites, one ormocer, and one compomer) and their corresponding flowable materials were used to determine and compare the three-body wear with a bolus of millet-seed shells and rice food (Willytec). The wear characteristics were measured by profilometry after 50,000, 100,000, 150,000, and 200,000 loading cycles. The fracture toughness value, K1C (MPam1/2), for each single-edged notched specimen was measured in a three-point bending test (universal testing machine 1446, Zwick). Fracture work and modulus of elasticity were calculated from the load curves. Vickers hardness was measured (HV hardness tester, Zwick) according to DIN 50133. The veneering composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was used as a reference material. Heavily filled composites experienced less wear than their flowable variations. The nanofiller composites revealed better wear results than hybrid composites, compomers, and ormocers. After 200,000 load cycles, the lowest wear rates were detected for Grandio (14 microm; Voco), and the highest mean values were found for Dyract AP (104 microm; Dentsply DeTrey). The values for fracture toughness (K1C) ranged from 0.82 to 3.64 MPam1/2. Highest K1C data was exhibited by the nanocomposite Nanopaq (Schutz Dental). All tested restorative materials exhibited higher fracture toughness than their low-viscosity variations. The wear resistance of the newer generation composites with incorporated nanofiller or microfiller particles increased to a high extent. Flowables show less resistance against wear and crack propagation because of their lower filler content. The reduced mechanical properties limit their use as a restorative to small noncontact

  15. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons.......The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  16. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    OpenAIRE

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne Dybdahl; Ulsund, Amanda Hembre; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based res...

  17. Process of Converting Military Training Materials to Competency-Based Modules for Civilian Use. A Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization and Human Resources Development Associates, Inc., Austin, TX.

    This document outlines the steps in the process of converting military training materials in physician and dental assistant education to competency-based learning modules for use in the civilian sector. Subsections discuss the activity and any problems or issues involved for 14 steps. The 14 steps are as follow: establish liaison to obtain…

  18. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Boldrin MESTIERI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus.Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs.Material and Methods The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP; MTA Fillapex (MTAF and FillCanal (FC. Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4. Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT. Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution. All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%.Results MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%. Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure.Conclusions The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materialsin vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments.

  19. Validity of Preoperative Clinical Findings to Identify Dental Pulp Status: A National Dental Practice-Based Research Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, Maria; Nixdorf, Donald R; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Law, Alan S

    2016-06-01

    Endodontic diagnostic tests are often used clinically to assess pulp status as a basis for the diagnosis and determination of whether root canal treatment (RCT) is indicated. Response to cold and pain on percussion are 2 common tests, yet their validity in identifying nonvital pulp in regular dental practice has not been reported. We assessed the validity of cold and percussion tests to identify nonvital pulp in teeth requiring RCT in a dental practice setting performed by 46 general dentists and 16 endodontists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. The influence of patient-, tooth-, and dentist-related characteristics was investigated. Observed bleeding from the pulp chamber was the clinical reference. Sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), overall test accuracy (TA), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values, and likelihood and diagnostic odds ratios (LR+, LR-, dORs) were calculated for each single test and the combined cold and percussion tests. Seven hundred eight patient teeth were included. Cold test showed high validity to identify a nonvital pulp status (SN = 89%, SP = 80%, TA = 84%, PPV = 81%, NPV = 88%, LR+ = 4.35, LR- = 0.14, dOR = 31.4), whereas pain on percussion had lower validity (SN = 72%, SP = 41%, TA = 56%, PPV = 54%, NPV = 60%, LR+ = 1.22, LR- = 0.69, dOR = 1.78). Combining the 2 tests did not increase validity, whereas preoperative pain, medication intake, patient age and sex, and dentist training level affected test validity significantly. In regular dental practice, the cold test exhibits higher validity to discriminate between vital and nonvital pulp than the tooth percussion test. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenstein, F.H.; Naumann, M.; Truong, B.; Thomas, A.; Schroeder, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: to measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Materials and methods: five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm 3 were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B O . Results: in gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B O and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B O . In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B O ) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B O ). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Conclusions: ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Surface Microhardness and Abrasion Resistance of Two Dental Glass Ionomer Cement Materials after Radiant Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a radiant heat treatment using a dental LED unit on the surface microhardness and abrasion resistance after toothbrushing simulation of two conventional GIC materials. Two conventional GIC materials were studied in this investigation: Ketac Fil Plus Aplicap and IonoStar Molar. Twenty disk-shaped specimens (n=10 were prepared of each GIC (7 mm × 2 mm using cylindrical Teflon molds. Group 1 specimens were left in the mold to set without any treatment, while in Group 2 after placement in the mold the specimens were irradiated for 60 sec at the top surface using a LED light-curing unit. Toothbrushing simulation was carried out using a commercial electric toothbrush which was fixed in a constructed device that allowed the heads of the brushes to be aligned parallel to the surface of the specimens and to control the pressure, with the following parameters: load of the toothbrush standardized at 250 g, medium hardness toothbrush head, and rotation sense changing every 30 sec. The toothbrush abrasion test mechanism, based on a 1.25-Hz frequency for 10,000 cycles, was equivalent to 800 days (~2 years of brushing. Surface hardness, surface roughness, and surface loss after abrasive procedure were evaluated using Vickers method and Vertical Scanning Interferometry. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (a=0.05. The radiant heat treatment increased the surface microhardness and decreased surface roughness and surface loss after abrasive procedures of both the tested GIC materials but to different extent. Between the tested GIC materials there were significant differences in their tested properties (p<0.05.

  2. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    the Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) completed a detailed questionnaire about how they diagnose and treat dental caries. Next, they received a customized report that compared their answers to those from all other practitioner-investigators. Then, 126 of them attended the DPBRN's first network......-wide meeting of practitioner-investigators from all five of its regions. During that meeting, certain questions were repeated and new ones were asked about the dentist's intention to change the way that he or she diagnosed or treated dental caries. Less than one-third of practitioner-investigators intended...

  3. Palladium-based dental alloys are associated with oral disease and palladium-induced immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Joris; Scheper, Rik J; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Rustemeyer, Thomas; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W; von Blomberg, Mary E; Feilzer, Albert J

    2014-08-01

    Palladium (Pd) and gold (Au) based dental alloys have been associated with oral disease. This study was designed to explore possible associations between the presence of Au-based and Pd-based dental alloys, and oral lesions, systemic complaints, and specific in vivo and in vitro immune responses. The investigated population consisted of three groups: 26 non-metal-allergic volunteers, 25 metal-allergic patients, and 20 oral disease patients. Medical histories were taken, oral examinations were carried out, and compositions of all dental alloys were determined. Then, Au and Pd patch tests and in vitro assays were performed, revealing cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells [T helper (Th)1, interferon-γ; Th2, interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13] and lymphocyte proliferation (LTT-MELISA(®) ). Non-plaque-related gingivitis was associated with the presence of Pd-based dental alloys, and Pd-positive patch tests and in vitro assays. Collectively, participants with Pd-based dental alloys showed increased Pd patch test reactivity (p alloys (p dental alloys. However, most oral disease patients did not show positive patch test results or in vitro signs of specific immunoreactivity, suggesting local toxic reactions or the involvement of innate immune responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of conventional and digital radiography capacities for distinguishing dental materials on radiograms depending on the present radiopacifying agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Đorđe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgroun/Aim. The radiopacity of an endodontic material can considerably vary as measured on film and a digital sensor. Digital radiography offers numerous advantages over convential film-based radiography in dental clinical practice regarding both diagnostic capabilities and postintervention procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of conventional and charge-conpled device (CCD based digital radiography to detect material on radiograph depending on the radio-pacifying agent present in the material. Methods. Experimental cements were formulated by mixing Portland cement with the following radiopacifying agents: zinc oxide (ZnO, zirconium oxide (ZrO2, titanium dioxide (TiO2, barium sulphate (BaSO4, iodoform (CHI3, bismuth oxide (Bi2O3 and ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3. In addition, 5 endodontic materials comprising Endomethasone®, Diaket®, N2®, Roth 801® and Acroseal® were investigated to serve as control. Per three specimens of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge on film (Eastman Kodak Company®, Rochester, NY and a CCD-based digital sensor (Trophy Radiologie®, Cedex, France. Radiopacity values were calculated by converting the radiographic densities of the specimens expressed as a mean optical densities or mean grey scale values into equivalent thickness of aluminum. Results. Twoway ANOVA detected no significant differences with respect to the imaging system (p > 0.05, but the differences were significant with respect to radiopacifier (p < 0.001 and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.05. Paired ttest revealed significant differences between the methods used for pure Portland cement, all concentrations of BaSO4 and CHI3, 10% and 20% additions of ZrO2 and Bi2O3 and 10% and 30% addition of YbF3 (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The materials which incorporate CHI3 or BaSO4 as radiopacifying agents are expected to be significantly more radiopaque on a digital sensor than on film. During clinical

  5. Teeth and bones: applications of surface science to dental materials and related biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. H.

    2001-05-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable upsurge in publications concerning the surface structure and chemistry of materials with biological or biomedical applications. Within the body, gas-solid interactions become relatively less significant and solid-liquid or solid-solid interfaces dominate, providing new challenges for the surface scientist. The current paper aims to provide a timely review of the use of surface analysis and modification techniques within the biomaterials field. A broad overview of applications in a number of related areas is given with particular attention focusing on those materials commonly encountered in dentistry and oral or maxillofacial implantology. Several specific issues of current interest are discussed. The interaction between synthetic and natural solids, both in the oral environment and elsewhere in the body is important in terms of adhesion, related stresses and strains and ultimately the longevity of a dental restoration, biomedical implant, or indeed the surrounding tissue. Exposure to body fluids, of course, can also affect stability, leading to the degradation or corrosion of materials within the body. Whilst this could potentially be harmful, e.g., if cytotoxic elements are released, it may alternatively provide a route to the preferential release of beneficial substances. Furthermore, in some cases, the controlled disintegration of a biomaterial is desirable, allowing the removal of an implant, e.g., without the need for further surgery. The presence of cells in the immediate bioenvironment additionally complicates the situation. A considerable amount of current research activity is targeted at the development of coatings or surface treatments to encourage tissue growth. If this is to be achieved by stimulating enhanced cell productivity, determination of the relationship between cell function and surface composition is essential.

  6. Measuring natrium alginate content of brown algae spesies Padina sp. as the basic matter for making dental impression material (Irreversible hydrocolloid impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlindah Hamrun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important procedure in denture fabrication and orthodontic treatment is molding the patient’s detail oral cavity to determine the treatment planning. This procedure does by using alginate impression material or irreversible hydrocolloid which is the basic material is natrium alginate which is imported from abroad because it is extracted from brown algae which habitat is not in Indonesia so it is causes the impression material is relative expensive which is impact to high cost of dental treatment. Indonesia as the archipelago country has availability of abundant brown algae Padina sp. especially in Puntondo-Punaga seashore, South Sulawesi, but it has not cultivate yet by the local society because it is never discover by alginate industry so it is just grow wild and it’s potency is useless. This experiment purposes to identified how much natrium alginate is producted from Padina Sp. extraction as the basic matter of irreversible hydrocolloid. The design of this study is conducted by experimental design with one shot case study method. Early stage research, extraction of alginate in form of natrium alginate. After that it is weighted by using analytical weight in milligram (mg unit. Then, it is compare with the standard natrium alginate to observe the similarity of molecule by using FTIR device. Data were analyzed using uji rerata. Based on extracted Padina sp, produced 12.86 g natrium alginate content or 28,4% from the alga dry weight total was used which is 45 g. Based on FTIR test, showed that extracted natrium alginate is similar with the standard natrium alginate with the found of hidroxyl, carboxylate, and eter group which is composer of natrium alginate. From both of infra red spectrum pattern, it was observed unsignificant difference. Extracted natrium alginate Padinasp is same with the standard natrium alginate and it has content 12.86 g.

  7. Osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells under the influence of three different materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajlan, S. A.; Ashri, N. Y.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regeneration of periodontal tissues is a major goal of periodontal therapy. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) show mesenchymal cell properties with the potential for dental tissue engineering. Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are examples...

  8. Anti-biofilm activity of zinc oxide and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles as dental implant coating materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkareem, Elham H; Memarzadeh, K; Allaker, R P; Huang, J; Pratten, J; Spratt, D

    2015-12-01

    Dental implants are prone to failure as a result of bacterial biofilm accumulation. Such biofilms are often resistant to traditional antimicrobials and the use of nanoparticles as implant coatings may offer a means to control infection over a prolonged period. The objective of this study was to determine the antibiofilm activity of nanoparticulate coated titanium (Ti) discs using a film fermenter based system. Metal oxide nanoparticles of zinc oxide (nZnO), hydroxyapatite (nHA) and a combination (nZnO+nHA) were coated using electrohydrodynamic deposition onto Ti discs. Using human saliva as an inoculum, biofilms were grown on coated discs for 96 h in a constant depth film fermenter under aerobic conditions with artificial saliva and peri-implant sulcular fluid. Viability assays and biofilm thickness measurements were used to assess antimicrobial activity. Following 96 h, reduced numbers of facultatively anaerobic and Streptococcus spp. on all three nano-coated surfaces were demonstrated. The proportion of non-viable microorganisms was shown to be higher on nZnO and composite (nZnO+nHA) coated surfaces at 96 h compared with nHA coated and uncoated titanium. Biofilm thickness comparison also demonstrated that nZnO and composite coatings to be the most effective. The findings support the use of coating Ti dental implant surfaces with nZnO to provide an antimicrobial function. Current forms of treatment for implant associated infection are often inadequate and may result in chronic infection requiring implant removal and resective/regenerative procedures to restore and reshape supporting tissue. The use of metal oxide nanoparticles to coat implants could provide osteoconductive and antimicrobial functionalities to prevent failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting the dental implant stability based on the antiresonance phase of a piezo-based impedance sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Banerjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The stability of dental implants (DIs in in vivo tests can be determined using noninvasive resonance frequency analysis technique. A low-cost piezo-based sensor has been developed for this purpose which uses a readily available two-terminal piezo element, to which a metal substrate is adhesively glued for attaching the implant. Aim: The attainment of implant stability in dynamic tests using this sensor must be standardized in terms of the major antiresonance (AR in the impedance phase responses using sensor-DI assembly. This will be used to predetermine the dimensions of the glued metal substrate in the sensor design. Materials and Methods: Multiple sensors with varying sensor dimensions were developed. Static and dynamic impedance studies were performed on these and corresponding sensor-implant assemblies. Static tests as well as in vitro tests with the sensor-implant assembly dipped in a standardized dental plaster mixture were performed in controlled laboratory conditions. Results: The probability of acceptance of the hypothesis has been checked using binomial distribution with a significance level of 5%. Statistically observed that for 95% of the cases where the DI becomes stable in dental plaster, both AR phase and AR frequency (ARF return to their corresponding static values. Furthermore, for a piezo element, whose ARF is within 6–6.6 kHz, the sensor yields maximal phase when the length of the metallic strip is 2 cm. Conclusions: Experimental validation supports both claims. Hence, this work can be extended to in vivo DI stability determination and design aspects of the corresponding sensor.

  10. Biocompatibility and bioactivity of calcium silicate-based endodontic sealers in human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Gomes-Cornélio, Ana Lívia; Rodrigues, Elisandra Márcia; Salles, Loise Pedrosa; Bosso-Martelo, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2015-10-01

    Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate-based material. New sealers have been developed based on calcium silicate as MTA Fillapex and MTA Plus. The aim of this study was to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity of these two calcium silicate-based sealers in culture of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). The cells were isolated from third molars extracted from a 16-year-old patient. Pulp tissue was sectioned into fragments with approximately 1 mm3 and kept in supplemented medium to obtain hDPCs adherent cultures. Cell characterization assays were performed to prove the osteogenic potential. The evaluated materials were: MTA Plus (MTAP); MTA Fillapex (MTAF) and FillCanal (FC). Biocompatibility was evaluated with MTT and Neutral Red (NR) assays, after hDPCs exposure for 24 h to different dilutions of each sealer extract (1:2, 1:3 and 1:4). Unexposed cells were the positive control (CT). Bioactivity was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic assay in cells exposed for one and three days to sealer extracts (1:4 dilution). All data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post-test (p≤0.05%). MTT and NR results showed suitable cell viability rates for MTAP at all dilutions (90-135%). Cells exposed to MTAF and FC (1:2 and 1:4 dilutions) showed significant low viability rate when compared to CT in MTT. The NR results demonstrated cell viability for all materials tested. In MTAP group, the cells ALP activity was similar to CT in one and three days of exposure to the material. MTAF and FC groups demonstrated a decrease in ALP activity when compared to CT at both periods of cell exposure. The hDPCs were suitable for the evaluation of new endodontic materialsin vitro. MTAP may be considered a promising material for endodontic treatments.

  11. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  12. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos; Fernandes, Marco A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  13. Cytotoxicity of Light-Cured Dental Materials according to Different Sample Preparation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Jin Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental light-cured resins can undergo different degrees of polymerization when applied in vivo. When polymerization is incomplete, toxic monomers may be released into the oral cavity. The present study assessed the cytotoxicity of different materials, using sample preparation methods that mirror clinical conditions. Composite and bonding resins were used and divided into four groups according to sample preparation method: uncured; directly cured samples, which were cured after being placed on solidified agar; post-cured samples were polymerized before being placed on agar; and “removed unreacted layer” samples had their oxygen-inhibition layer removed after polymerization. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using an agar diffusion test, MTT assay, and confocal microscopy. Uncured samples were the most cytotoxic, while removed unreacted layer samples were the least cytotoxic (p < 0.05. In the MTT assay, cell viability increased significantly in every group as the concentration of the extracts decreased (p < 0.05. Extracts from post-cured and removed unreacted layer samples of bonding resin were less toxic than post-cured and removed unreacted layer samples of composite resin. Removal of the oxygen-inhibition layer resulted in the lowest cytotoxicity. Clinicians should remove unreacted monomers on the resin surface immediately after restoring teeth with light-curing resin to improve the restoration biocompatibility.

  14. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.b, E-mail: asantos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marcosrf@salesiano-ata.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  15. In vitro photosensitization initiated by camphorquinone and phenyl propanedione in dental polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Terje; Morisbak, Else; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth; Bruzell, Ellen M

    2010-09-02

    Documentation is scarce on the photobiological effects of photoinitiators present in dental light curable materials. The aim of this study was to determine cellular effects of the photoinitiators camphorquinone (CQ) and phenyl propanedione (PPD) and to investigate whether these substances produced reactive oxygen species after low and high doses of optical radiation (between 0 and 17J/cm(2)). Rat salivary gland cells in vitro were exposed to visible blue light and/or UVA. Hematoporphyrin (HP), a photosensitizer used in medicine, and the UVA-filter 2-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzophenone (B-3) were used as reference substances. It was found that PPD produced hydrogen peroxide, but not singlet oxygen, upon light irradiation. CQ produced neither hydrogen peroxide nor singlet oxygen. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis was induced by irradiation in the presence of CQ, PPD and HP. Doses higher than 6J/cm(2) UVA and blue visible light from a source similar to clinically applied sources, induced apoptosis even in the absence of photosensitizers added. A reciprocity relationship was found between radiant exposure (at constant irradiance) and concentration of photoinitiators. In conclusion, the oral cells under investigation were light sensitive, and the sensitivity increased in presence of photoinitiators. PPD acted by mechanisms that included reactive oxygen species and CQ probably by formation of free radicals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ELECTROCHEMICAL AND MECHANICAL EVALUATION OF SOME DENTAL MATERIALS EMPLOYED FOR IMMOBILIZATION DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA FATU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of corrosion potential is a relatively simple concept, an unanimously accepted notion in industry for the monitorization of steel corrosion, in building industry and in other structures. Equally, in the last decades, this parameter has been intensively utilized for characterizing dental alloys in either natural oral environment or in simulated solutions. The corrosion potential may be measured directly versus a reference electrode, characterized by a highly stable semi-cell potential. In this respect, a reference electrode (or a separated sensor of the material to be monitorized is introduced in the corrosive medium together with the metal or alloy under study, and the potential is measured directly with a millivoltmeter with very high input impedance. Additional details on the processes occurring in the system may be acquired if analyzing the curves of cyclic polarization, for whose obtaining the potential of the electrode formed with the investigated alloy is increased, at constant rate, in positive direction, up to a pre-established value, followed by its scavenging in reverse direction (towards negative values until reaching the initial value or some other value. During scavenging of the potential, the electric power passing through the solution between the working electrode and an auxilliary (platinum-made electrode is measured.

  17. In vitro dentin barrier cytotoxicity testing of some dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, R D; Lin, H; Zheng, G; Zhang, X M; Du, Q; Yang, M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the cytotoxicity of four dental restorative materials in three-dimensional (3D) L929 cell cultures using a dentin barrier test. The cytotoxicities of light-cured glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond), total-etching adhesive (GLUMA Bond5), and two self-etching adhesives (GLUMA Self Etch and Single Bond Universal) were evaluated. The permeabilities of human dentin disks with thicknesses of 300, 500, and 1000μm were standardized using a hydraulic device. Test materials and controls were applied to the occlusal side of human dentin disks. The 3D-cell scaffolds were placed beneath the dentin disks. After a 24-h contact with the dentin barrier test device, cell viabilities were measured by performing MTT assays. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. The mean (SD) permeabilities of the 300-μm, 500-μm, and 1000-μm dentin disks were 0.626 (0.214), 0.219 (0.0387) and 0.089 (0.028) μlmin -1 cm -2 cm H 2 O -1 . Vitrebond was severely cytotoxic, reducing the cell viability to 10% (300-μm disk), 17% (500μm), and 18% (1000μm). GLUMA Bond5 reduced the cell viability to 40% (300μm), 83% (500μm), and 86% (1000μm), showing moderate cytotoxicity (300-μm) and non-cytotoxicity (500-μm and 1000-μm). Single Bond Universal and GLUMA Self Etch did not significantly reduce cell viability, regardless of the dentin thicknesses, which characterized them as non-cytotoxic. Cytotoxicity varied with the materials tested and the thicknesses of the dentin disks. The tested cytotoxicity of materials applied on 300-, 500-, and 1000-μm dentin disks indicates that the clinical use of the test materials (excepting self-etching adhesives) in deep cavities poses a potential risk of damage to the pulp tissues to an extent, depending on the thickness of the remaining dentin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. General dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of resin-based composite restorations and light curing unit technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A; Turner, S

    2011-09-23

    Clinical successful use of resin-based composite restorations (RBCs) depends on knowledge of material and light curing unit (LCU) related factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate general dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of RBCs and LCU technology. Members of the Active Research Group of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) in England, Scotland and Wales engaged in primary dental care were sent a letter introducing the study and asking for their cooperation, followed by an email containing a link to the online survey questionnaire, hosted on Surveymonkey.com. The questionnaire enquired about current LCUs, and asked a series of questions on material science. Sixty-six percent of the 274 members contacted responded. Fifty-seven percent used LED units, 25% quartz tungsten halogen (QTH), and 1% plasma arc (missing: 17%). Thirty percent reported having access to a radiometer. Appropriate responses regarding the degree of conversion of composite and adhesive materials were given by 32% and 23% respectively, and 22% agreed that LED and QTH LCUs had comparable efficiency in polymerising composites. Thirty-three percent were aware that RBCs eluted substances that may have adverse local or systemic consequences. Fifty-eight percent stated that if polymerisation of RBC is slowed down, polymerisation stress will be lower, and 43% said that polymerisation shrinkage will be reduced if the degree of conversion is reduced. Knowledge (measured by appropriate responses to these questions) was not related to years since qualification (r=-0.05, n=168, p=0.53). The study suggests that dentists' knowledge of curing RBC restorations and LCUs is poor. This indicates that there is a need for training and guidance in this aspect of primary dental care.

  19. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  20. Evaluation of conventional and digital radiography capacities for distinguishing dental materials on radiograms depending on the present radiopacifying agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijević, Djordje; Ilić, Dragan; Medić, Vesna; Dodić, Slobodan; Obradović-Djuriĉić, Kosovka; Rakoĉević, Zoran

    2014-11-01

    The radiopacity of an endodontic material can considerably vary as measured on film and a digital sensor. Digital radiography offers numerous advantages over conventional film-based radiography in dental clinical practice regarding both diagnostic capabilities and postintervention procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of conventional and charge-conpled device (CCD) based digital radiography to detect material on radiograph depending on the radio-pacifying agent present in the mate- rial. Experimental cements were formulated by mixing Portland cement with the following radiopacifying agents: zinc oxide (ZnO), zirconium oxide (ZrO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium sulphate (BaSO4), iodoform (CHI3), bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) and ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3). In addition, 5 endodontic materials comprising Endometh- asone, Diaket, N2, Roth 801 and Acroseal were investigated to serve as control. Per three specimens of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge on film (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) and a CCD-based digital sensor (Trophy Radiologie, Cedex, France). Radiopacity values were calculated by converting the radiographic densities of the specimens expressed as a mean optical densities or mean grey scale values into equivalent thickness of aluminum. Two-way ANOVA detected no significant differences with respect to the imaging system (p > 0.05), but the differences were significant with respect to radiopacifier (p < 0.001) and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.05). Paired t-test revealed significant differences between the methods used for pure Portland cement, all concentrations of BaSO4 and CHI3, 10% and 20% additions of ZrO2 and Bi2O3 and 10% and 30% additions of YbF3 (p < 0.05). The materials which incorporate CHI3 OR BaSO4 as radiopacifying agents are expected to be significantly more radiopaque on a digital sensor than on film. During clinical practice one should concern to the quality of contrast

  1. [Signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging caused by intraoral anchored dental magnetic materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenstein, F H; Truong, B; Thomas, A; Schröder, R J; Naumann, M

    2006-08-01

    To measure the maximum extent of the signal loss areas in the center of the susceptibility artifacts generated by ferromagnetic dental magnet attachments using three different sequences in the 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI. Five different pieces of standard dental magnet attachments with volumes of 6.5 to 31.4 mm(3) were used: a NdFeB magnet with an open magnetic field, a NdFeB magnet with a closed magnetic field, a SmCo magnet with an open magnetic field, a stainless steel keeper (AUM-20) and a PdCo piece. The attachments were placed between two cylindrical phantoms and examined in 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI using gradient echo and T1- and T2-weighted spin echoes. We measured the maximum extent of the generated signal loss areas parallel and perpendicular to the direction of B (O). In gradient echoes the artifacts were substantially larger and symmetrically adjusted around the object. The areas with total signal loss were mushroom-like with a maximum extent of 7.4 to 9.7 cm parallel to the direction of B (O) and 6.7 to 7.4 cm perpendicular to B (O). In spin echoes the signal loss areas were obviously smaller, but not centered. The maximum values ranged between 4.9 and 7.2 cm (parallel B (O)) and 3.6 and 7.0 cm (perpendicular B (O)). The different ferromagnetic attachments had no clinically relevant influence on the signal loss neither in 1.5 T nor 3.0 T MRI. Ferromagnetic materials used in dentistry are not intraorally standardized. To ensure, that the area of interest is not affected by the described artifacts, the maximum extent of the signal loss area should be assumed: a radius of up to 7 cm in 1.5 and 3.0 T MRI by T1 and T2 sequences, and a radius of up to 10 cm in T2* sequences. To decide whether magnet attachments have to be removed before MR imaging, physicians should consider both the intact retention of the keepers and the safety distance between the ferromagnetic objects and the area of interest.

  2. Effects of a novel light-curable material on odontoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B-N; Lee, B-G; Chang, H-S; Hwang, Y-C; Hwang, I-N; Oh, W-M

    2017-05-01

    To assess the biological effects, including odontoblastic differentiation of a novel light-curable material (TheraCal), on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs). The hDPCs were isolated from freshly extracted, caries-free third molars. Ten discs of TheraCal and MTA (8 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) were incubated in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) and the supernatant collected. Viability of hDPCs in response to TheraCal and MTA was measured using the WST-1 assay. RT-PCR and real-time PCR were used to detect the gene expression of dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentine matrix protein-1 (DMP-1). ALP staining and Alizarin red S staining were used to evaluate the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and mineralization behaviour. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test were used to determine the statistically significant differences as a result of the variation in test materials (P TheraCal and MTA on cell viability were similar except at the highest concentration. The mRNA level of DSPP increased significantly in the MTA group relative to the control at day 1 and 3 (P TheraCal group relative to the control at day 3 (P TheraCal groups relative to the control (P TheraCal groups compared to the control (P TheraCal and MTA had the ability to induce odontoblastic differentiation and mineralization of hDPCs. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Office-based preventive dental program and statewide trends in dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achembong, Leo N; Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a North Carolina Medicaid preventive dentistry program in primary care medical offices (Into the Mouths of Babes Program [IMBP]) on decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) of kindergarten students statewide and in schools with a large proportion of students from low-income families. An ecologic study using panel data of 920,505 kindergarten students with 11,694 school-year observations examined the effect of the IMBP on dmft scores from 1998 to 2009. Ordinary least squares regression with fixed effects determined the association between IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county and mean dmft scores per kindergarten student per school, controlling for school-level poverty and ethnicity, county-level Medicaid enrollment, and supply of dentists and physicians. Mean dmft per kindergarten student per school increased from 1.53 in 1998 to 1.84 in 2004, then decreased to 1.59 in 2009. The mean number of IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county increased from 0.01 in 2000 to 0.22 in 2009. A 1-unit increase in IMBP visits per county was associated with a 0.248 (95% confidence interval, -0.40 to -0.10) decrease in dmft per kindergarten student per school. For schools with more students at high risk for dental disease, a 1-unit increase in IMBP visits was associated with a 0.320 (95% confidence interval, -0.55 to -0.09) decrease in dmft. IMBP reduced dental caries among targeted vulnerable children, which helped reduce oral health disparities among preschool-aged children in North Carolina.

  5. The Biomineralization of a Bioactive Glass-Incorporated Light-Curable Pulp Capping Material Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of a newly introduced bioactive glass-incorporated light-curable pulp capping material using human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). The product (Bioactive? [BA]) was compared with a conventional calcium hydroxide-incorporated (Dycal [DC]) and a light-curable (Theracal? [TC]) counterpart. Eluates from set specimens were used for investigating the cytotoxicity and biomineralization ability, determined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) a...

  6. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu-Tzu; Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin; Lin, CHun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical ...

  7. Influence of shape and finishing on the corrosion of palladium-based dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Muris, J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the surface treatment and shape of the dental alloy on the composition of the prosthetic work and its metallic ion release in a corrosive medium after casting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Orion Argos (Pd-Ag) and Orion Vesta (Pd-Cu) were

  8. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia); Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  9. Knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among academic dental practitioners of Bhopal, India: a preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize the knowledge of evidence-based dentistry (EBD among dental faculty members in the city of Bhopal in central India. A cross-sectional questionnaire was administered at two dental colleges in Bhopal City. All dental faculty members who were present on the day of the study and who agreed to participate were included in the study. A total of 50 dental faculty members returned the questionnaire. Six Likert-type questions were asked, and the percentages of various responses were used for analysis. Sixteen faculty members (32.0% strongly agreed that EBD is a process of making decisions based on scientifically proven evidence. Fifteen faculty members (30.0% strongly disagreed or disagreed with the item stating that the best and quickest way to find evidence is by reading textbooks or asking experienced colleagues. Thirteen faculty members (26.0% strongly agreed that EBD allows dentists to improve their scientific knowledge and clinical skills. It is recommended that EBD be included in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and in intensive continuing dental education programs that are conducted for dental faculty members.

  10. Going Global: Toward Competency-Based Best Practices for Global Health in Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Shick, Elizabeth; Chaffee, Benjamin W; Benzian, Habib

    2017-06-01

    The Global Oral Health Interest Group of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (GOHIG-CUGH) published recommended competencies to support development of competency-based global health education in dental schools. However, there has been no comprehensive, systematically derived, or broadly accepted framework for creating and delivering competency-based global health education to dental students. This article describes the results of a collaborative workshop held at the 2016 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session & Exhibition designed to build on the GOHIG-CUGH competencies and start to develop systematic approaches for their practical application. Workshop organizers developed a preliminary theoretical framework for guiding the development of global health in dental education, grounded in published research. Collectively, workshop participants developed detailed outcomes for the theoretical framework with a focus on three educational practices: didactic, experiential, and research learning and how each can meet the competencies. Participants discussed learning objectives, keys to implementation, ethical considerations, challenges, and examples of success. Outcomes demonstrated that no educational practice on its own meets all 33 recommended competencies for dental students; however, the three educational practices combined may potentially cover all 33. Participants emphasized the significance of sustainable approaches to student learning for both students and communities, with identified partners in the communities to collaborate on the development, implementation, evaluation, and long-term maintenance of any student global health activity. These findings may represent early steps toward professional consensus and best practices for global health in dental education in the United States.

  11. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  12. Melanin-Based Functional Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Marco d’Ischia

    2018-01-01

    Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to inv...

  13. Lignin-based polyurethane materials

    OpenAIRE

    Cateto, C.A.; Barreiro, M.F.; Rodrigues, A.E.; Belgacem, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Four technical lignins (Alcell, Indulin AT, Sarkanda and Curan 27-11P) were used as macromonomers in the synthesis of polyurethane materials following two global approaches. In the first one Alcell and Indulin AT lignins were used directly as co-monomers in combination with a linear polycaprolactone (PCL) in order to produce polyurethane elastomers where lignin content varied between 10 and 25% (w/w) with respect to polyol mixture (PCL+lignin). The thermomechanical properties o...

  14. Paints based on renewable materials

    OpenAIRE

    Olive, Gilles; Richel, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    National audience; Paints, at the coating meaning, are known since a long time. Typically, paint is a dispersion of one or more powders (pigments and fillers) in a macromolecular substance ("resin"), called film-forming material, diluted in solvents. Pigments are solid particles, used to give opacity and/or color. Today almost all pigments have a synthetic origin. The fillers are often natural compounds. Unlike pigments, fillers have low opacity and are colorless. These very cheap products ac...

  15. Gender based comparison of impact of dental pain on the quality of life among out patients of a private dental college in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental pain is the most common reason for the patients to visit a dental office and anxious patients typically expect more pain than they experience. Dental pain has an impact on the patient's oral health and quality of life. Aims: To evaluate and compare the dental pain and anxiety levels in both male and female patients prior to dental treatment and to assess the influence of oral health on the quality of life. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at a Private Dental College in Tamil Nadu which included 201 patients consisting of 101 males and 100 females. The origin of dental pain was identified and the patients were asked to indicate the level of pain experienced by them at the moment with the help of a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS, numerical scale (NS, verbal pain rating scale (VRS, and faces pain scale. The Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS was used to evaluate dental anxiety before self-assessment questionnaire, Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14 was used to assess the impact of dental pain on the quality of life of the patients. GFNx01 Statistical software was used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of males was of 36.57 years and for females it was 35.50 years. The number of patients who had pulpal pain (68.66% was greater than those who had periodontal pain (29.35%. The mean score of VAS for males (55.41 ± 20.43 was significantly lower than the females (62.51 ± 1.73. The mean score of NS was 54.46 ± 20.71 for males and 62.50 ± 21.38 for females. Severe pain was reported by 27% females and 15.8% males in VRS. It was found using the MDAS that 5% of females and only 1.5% of males had dental phobia. The mean OHIP-14 score was 19.73 ± 9.43 for females and 16.67 ± 8.72 for males. The male patients reported a lower impact on oral health than the females. Conclusions: The level of pain and anxiety experienced by female patients are greater when compared to males. Dental pain

  16. Materiality in a practice-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. Common terms for materiality are 'artifact' and 'object'. The interaction between social and material realities is grasped as several processes: object-oriented...

  17. Development of starch-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habeych Narvaez, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Starch-based materials show potential as fully degradable plastics. However, the current
    applicability of these materials is limited due to their poor moisture tolerance and
    mechanical properties. Starch is therefore frequently blended with other polymers to make
    the material more

  18. Effect of the functionalization of silica nanoparticles as a reinforcing agent on dental composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Alberto Rodríguez-Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio evaluó el efecto del estado de agregación de nanopartículas de sílica en la reflectancia y cristalinidad de materiales compuestos de uso dental. Se emplearon dos tipos de sílica nanométrica (ca. 10 nm: Aerosil 200  no funcionalizado y Aerosil DT4  funcionalizado con 3-metacriloxipropiltrimetoxisilano. Las nanopartículas de sílica fueron dispersas en una mezcla de monómeros de Uretano Dimetilacrilato (UDMA y Etilenglicol Dimetacrilato (EGDMA en una relación 80:20 en masa. El tamaño de partícula de la silica y su estado de agregación fue determinado mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM y microscopía electrónica de transmisión (TEM, mostrando que el Aerosil DT4  presentó agregados densos de tamaño superior a 1 μm; en tanto el Aerosil 200  presentó una estructura agregada tipo gel de partículas. El grado de funcionalización del Aerosil DT4  fue determinado mediante análisis termogravimétrico (TGA, obteniendo un valor de 7.57% w/w. Los materiales compuestos fueron evaluados mediante calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC para determinar su cristalidad. El material compuesto reforzado con Aerosil DT4  presentó una menor cristalinidad que el sistema con Aerosil 200  , debido a la mayor interacción de la matriz polimérica con la superficie funcionalizada del Aerosil DT4  . El efecto de la agregación de las nanopartículas de silica en las propiedades ópticas del material compuesto fue determinado mediante análisis de reflectancia. La muestra de Aerosil 200  presentó un menor estado de agregación de las nanopartículas y mayor reflectancia que el sistema con Aerosil DT4  . La funcionalización de la superficie del Aerosil DT4  propició la aglomeración de las nanopartículas deteriorando las propiedades ópticas del material compuesto.

  19. Community-Based Dental Education Models: An Analysis of Current Practices at U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A

    2016-10-01

    Community-based dental education (CBDE) enhances students' clinical expertise, improves their cultural competence, increases access to care, and fosters community engagement. As emphasis on CBDE has increased over the last decades, the aim of this survey study was to determine how CBDE is currently being implemented in U.S. dental schools. The study used a 20-item, author-designed survey emailed in April to August 2015 to 60 of the 65 U.S. dental schools, excluding those that had been recently established. Of the 60 schools, representatives of 33 responded, resulting in a 55% response rate: 70% public and 30% private. These respondents reported that the extramural sites being used the most were community clinics (90.9%), Federally Qualified Health Clinics (66.7%), public health clinics (54.5%), and Indian Health Service clinics (42.4%). The majority of responding schools (63.6%) had ten or more sites available for rotations, and the rotation lengths were 1-2 weeks (29%), 2-4 weeks (25%), 4-6 weeks (29%), 6-8 weeks (3.2%), and 8-10 weeks (12.9%). Most of the respondents (78.8%) reported that their students were unable to be assessed for clinical competencies at external clinical sites, but roughly half allowed students to receive clinical credit. After students completed their rotations, the majority of the respondents (81.8%) reported that students were required to produce a reflection, and 87.9% reported that students completed a post-rotation survey. Considering the benefits of CBDE for students' education and for improving access to oral health care, it is encouraging that over 45% of the responding schools required their students to spend four weeks or longer on external rotations.

  20. Evaluating the Effect of Dental Filling Material and Filling Depth on the Strength and Deformation of Filled Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifollah Gholampour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ackground and aim: It is important to evaluate the effect of the type of filling material on deformation and strength of tooth after filling and also the effect of filling depth on quality of restoration of a decayed tooth. Material and Methods: The Orthopantomogram (OPG of the first and second molars of a 28-year-old man was made and the teeth were 3D modeled. The stress-deformation analysis was then performed on the models in the three states of normal tooth, tooth filled with amalgam and tooth filled with composite using finite element method under a distributed load of 400N equivalent to chewing force. Two values (1/2 and 1/3 of the tooth height were considered for filling depth in the analyses. Results: The results showed that the normal first molar was exposed to a 7.2% greater risk of dental injuries compared to the normal second molar and also a greater stress is created in it when it is filled with composite. The first molar filled with a composite material is 13.7% weaker than the normal tooth while it is almost as strong as a normal tooth when it is filled with amalgam. The effect of the type of filling material on the strength and deformation of the second molar was trivial. Conclusion: Amalgam is a more proper dental filling material for the first molar although a 16.7% change in drilling depth is needed for tooth preparation. Dental filling material and filling depth have a small effect on the strength and deformation of filled second molars.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in zirconia-based dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Mertens, Marianne E; Vizkelety, Josef; Gremse, Felix; Stadelmann, Vincent A; Sauerbier, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    X-ray-based planning and post-implantation assessment of titanium implants is the commonly accepted standard to date. However, new implant materials such as zirconia (ZrO2 ) have become available, and magnetic resonance imaging may be a valuable alternative with these implants. The present in vitro study investigated artifacts produced by titanium and zirconia implants in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and assessed the accuracy of pre-implant planning and post-implantation assessment comparing MRI to standard X-ray-based imaging modalities: Orthopantomogram (OPT), cone beam (CBCT), and computed tomography (CT). Twelve porcine mandibles were prepared and scanned (MRI, OPT, CBCT, μCT), and bone height above the nerve canal was measured. Specimens were implanted with either two titanium or zirconia implants and rescanned to investigate the influence of implant materials on post-implantation assessment. MRI and μCT artifacts were quantified with implants embedded in gelatin phantoms and porcine specimens. Compared with CBCT set as standard, μCT, OPT, and MRI showed similar accuracy in pre-op bone height measurements. Post-implantation, while titanium implants induced a strong B0 -field distortion resulting in extensive signal voids, zirconia implants were clearly depictable with only minor distortions. Excellent contrast, limited artifacts, radiation-free and accurate implant assessment may indicate that MRI is a valuable imaging alternative for zirconia-based implant dentistry. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Oral Implants Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Melanin-Based Functional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ischia, Marco

    2018-01-12

    Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to invest in melanin research for innovative and inspiring solutions.

  3. Melanin-Based Functional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco d’Ischia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to invest in melanin research for innovative and inspiring solutions.

  4. Effect of dental tool surface texture and material on static friction with a wet gloved fingertip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Charles; Barr, Alan; Dong, Hui; Rempel, David

    2007-01-01

    Hand injuries are an important cause of pain and disability among dentists and dental hygienists and may be due to the high pinch forces involved in periodontal work. The pinch forces required to perform scaling may be reduced by increasing the friction between the tool and fingers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether modifying the tool material, surface texture, or glove type altered the coefficient of static friction for a wet gloved finger. Seven tools with varying surface topography were machined from 13 mm diameter stainless steel and Delrin and mounted to a 6-component force plate. The textures tested were a fine, medium and coarse diamond knurled pattern and a medium and fine annular pattern (concentric rings). Thirteen subjects pulled their gloved, wet thumb pad along the long axis of the tool while maintaining a normal force of 40 N. Latex and nitrile gloves were tested. The coefficient of static friction was calculated from the shear force history. The mean coefficients of static friction ranged from 0.20 to 0.65. The coefficient of static friction was higher for a smooth tool of Delrin than one of stainless steel. Differences in the coefficient of static friction were observed between the coarse and medium knurled patterns and the fine knurled and annular patterns. Coefficients of static friction were higher for the nitrile glove than the latex glove for tools with texture. These findings may be applied to the design of hand tools that require fine motor control with a wet, gloved hand.

  5. Mg-containing hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloy for dental materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Min; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2018-02-01

    In this study, Mg-containing hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6A1-4 V alloy for dental materials were researched using various experimental instruments. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed in electrolytes containing Mg (symbols of specimens: CaP, 5M%, 10M%, and 20M%) at 280 V for 3 min. The electrolyte used for PEO was produced by mixing Ca(CH3COO)2·H2O, C3H7NaCaO6P, and MgCl2·6H2O. The phases and composition of the oxide films were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The irregularity of the surface, pore size, and number of pores decreased as the Mg concentration increased. The ratio of the areas occupied and not occupied by pores decreased as the Mg concentration increased, with the numbers of both large and small pores decreasing with increasing Mg concentration. The number of particles on the internal surfaces of pores was increased as the Mg content increased. Mg content of all samples containing Mg ions showed higher in the pore outside than that of pore inside, whereas the Ca content was higher inside the pores. The P content of samples with the addition of Mg ions showed higher values inside the pores than outside. The Ca/P and [Mg + Ca]/P molar ratios in the PEO films decreased with Mg content. The crystallite size of anatase was increased with increasing Mg concentration in the solution.

  6. Mimicking the Nanostructure for Perfect Dental Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-01-01

    Nanotechnology is set to alter clinical dental practice. In no distant future, dental restorative materials will become very accurate, the same as natural one and smart. Thus all efforts should be done to achieve dental restorative materials in nanoscale including dental medicament, resin composite, cements, sealers, ceramics, impression materials, remineralizing agent, dentures, bone replacement agent,root fillings and dental implant materials.

  7. Clinical and laboratory evaluation of microstructural changes in the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of dental filling materials under the influence of an electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Natalia S; Kunin, Anatoly A

    2018-03-01

    Restorative filling materials used for dental caries prevention and treatment consist of various components including monomers or oligomers, which play a significant role in forming the main structure of these materials, as well as in characterising their physical, mechanical and chemical properties. The necessity for the development and improvement of structural characteristics of polymeric dental filling materials intended for caries prevention and their life duration increase served as the initiating factor of our research. According to the research purpose and challenges, we studied the changes in the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of composite filling materials with and without electromagnetic field influence. The investigations in vivo include the study of microstructural features of polymeric filling materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the investigations in vitro include the study of sealed and extracted human teeth chips by using X-ray spectral analysis. We also evaluated the changes in the strength characteristics of dental filling materials with and without electromagnetic field influence. The analysis of the obtained data indicates the presence of structural changes in polymeric dental filling materials, including the material microstructure condensation confirmed by the SEM results, an increase in the strength and adhesion characteristics and certain regularities of the chemical elemental composition concentration change in the area of hard tooth tissue and dental filling material. These scientific data will provide tooth caries prevention and promote the increase of treatment quality.

  8. Effect of recasting on element release from base metal dental casting alloys in artificial saliva and saline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, K.; Kumar Shetty, K. Harish; Shetty, A. Nityananda; Nandish, Bantarahalli Thopegowda

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the concentration of ion release from recasted base metal alloys in various pH conditions using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Materials and Methods: Specimens of commercially available dental casting alloys (cobalt [Co]-chromium [Cr] and nickel [Ni]- chromium [Cr]) were prepared using lost-wax casting techniques and were stored in the test solution for 1 week and 4 weeks, and ions released during chemical corrosion were detected using AAS. Results: An increase in the quantity of ion release was observed with recasting. These changes were higher after twice recasting in Ni-Cr alloy. PMID:29279626

  9. Impact of Community-Based Clinical Training on Dental Students' Confidence in Treating Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Julie M; Brickhouse, Tegwyn H; Bhatti, Bushra A; Best, Al M

    2018-01-01

    With a significant need for more general dentists to provide care for pediatric patients, previous studies have found that community-based clinical training experience with children increased dental students' willingness to provide care to pediatric patients after graduation. The aim of our study was to determine the impact of community-based clinical training with pediatric patients on dental students' self-perceived confidence in treating pediatric patients, both overall and related to specific procedures. Of the total 105 fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school invited to participate in the study in academic year 2011-12, 76 completed the survey about their community-based dental education (CBDE), for a 72% response rate. Over half of the respondents (55%) reported feeling more confident in treating pediatric patients after their rotations. The increase in confidence was not associated with demographics. The placement of sealants (p=0.0022) and experience in giving local anesthesia (p=0.0008) were the two procedures most strongly associated with the increase in confidence. Also, these students received more experience in pulp therapy, extractions, and treating children up to three years of age during their community-based rotations than in the school-based clinic. In this study, greater exposure to pediatric dental clinical experiences during CBDE increased the students' confidence in treating pediatric patients. These results suggest that community-based experiences are useful in supplementing the school-based pediatric clinical experience, including increasing entry-level dentists' confidence in treating pediatric patients.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide bleaching induces changes in the physical properties of dental restorative materials: Effects of study protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Zhang, Chang-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Ning; Cheng, Hui

    2017-12-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, substance loss, flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), Weibull parameters, and color of 7 restorative materials. The test materials included 4 composite resins, 1 glass-ionomer cement, 1 dental ceramic, and 1 polyacid-modified composite. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20) according to different study protocols: a bleaching group at 25°C (group 25B), a bleaching group at 37°C (group 37B), a control group at 25°C (group 25C), and a control group at 37°C (group 37C). The specimens in the bleaching group were treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide for 80 min at the respective environmental temperatures. The surface roughness, substance loss, FS, FM, and color of the specimens were measured before and after treatment. FS data were also subjected to Weibull analysis, which was used to estimate of the Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic strength (σ 0 ). Surface roughness increased and significant color changes were observed for all tested specimens after bleaching treatment, except for the ceramic. After bleaching at 37°C, the polyacid-modified composite showed significantly reduced FS, FM, m, and σ 0 values in comparison to the control specimens stored at 37°C in whole saliva. Significant differences were also found between the 37B and 25B polyacid-modified composite groups in terms of surface roughness, FS, m, σ 0 , and color changes. Varying effects of bleaching on the physical properties of dental restorative materials were observed, and the influences of the study protocols on bleaching effects were found to be material-dependent. The influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, flexural properties, and color of dental restorative materials are material-dependent and should be considered when evaluating the effects of bleaching on dental restorative

  11. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine reasons for seeking dental care at late stages of oral diseases among dental patients attending the dental clinics at the School of Dentistry MUHAS. Materials and Methods: A total of 365 dental patients aged 15+ years who attended outpatient dental clinics of School of Dentistry MUHAS as first visit during ...

  12. Differences chronological age and dental age using Demirjian method based upon a study radiology using radiography panoramic at the Hasanuddin University Dental Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Choronological age is assessed by the date, month, and year of birth. Several researches suggested that chronological age may not be able to provide sufficient information regarding on human growth precisely. Chronological age, on the other hand, could not be used to assess  maturity development rate of a patient, so it is necessary to assess the dental age. Dental age is age assessment method by measuring human growth and development. Age estimation has important role in health field, particularly in dentistry as it will be beneficial in making appropriate diagnosis, treatment plan, and prognosis. Tooth eruption estimation according to Demirjian method conducted by assessing growth and development process of tooth using panoramic radiography. The purpose of this study is to determine the difference between chronological age and dental age using Demirjian method based on radiology analysis of panoramic radiography. This study was an observational analytic using cross-sectional study, all data are observed once at the time. In this study, the amount of sample reviewed were 30 samples, consisted of 4 – 9 years old children. Panoramic radiography were collected based on target population which fulfill sample criteria from reconciled patient of radiology department Hasanuddin University Dental Hospital. The results were obtained by estimating the score of  dental age using Demirjian method. After that, the dental age and chronological age were analayzed to obtain the mean difference. Based on wilcoxon test, mean value was obtain p:0.011 (p<0.05, this result shows that there is significant difference between chronological age and dental age. Chronological age and dental age can be assessed by reviewing the panoramic radiography using Demirjian method.

  13. Mathematical modeling of cross-linking monomer elution from resin-based dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, Dragica; Radisic, Marina; Lausevic, Mila; Zivkovic, Slavoljub; Miletic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Elution of potentially toxic substances, including monomers, from resin-based dental composites may affect the biocompatibility of these materials in clinical conditions. In addition to the amounts of eluted monomers, mathematical modeling of elution kinetics reveals composite restorations as potential chronic sources of leachable monomers. The aim of this work was to experimentally quantify elution of main cross-linking monomers from four commercial composites and offer a mathematical model of elution kinetics. Composite samples (n = 7 per group) of Filtek Supreme XT (3M ESPE), Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Admira (Voco), and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) were prepared in 2-mm thick Teflon moulds and cured with halogen or light-emitting diode light. Monomer elution in ethanol and water was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography up to 28 days postimmersion. The mathematical model was expressed as a sum of two exponential regression functions representing the first-order kinetics law. Elution kinetics in all cases followed the same mathematical model though differences in rate constants as well as the extent of monomer elution were material-, LCU-, medium-dependent. The proposed mechanisms of elution indicate fast elution from surface and subsurface layers and up to 100 times slower monomer extraction from the bulk polymer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Academy of Dental Materials guidance-Resin composites: Part II-Technique sensitivity (handling, polymerization, dimensional changes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, J L; Hilton, T J; Stansbury, J W; Watts, D C; Silikas, N; Ilie, N; Heintze, S; Cadenaro, M; Hickel, R

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this work, commissioned by the Academy of Dental Materials, was to review and critically appraise test methods to characterize properties related to critical issues for dental resin composites, including technique sensitivity and handling, polymerization, and dimensional stability, in order to provide specific guidance to investigators planning studies of these properties. The properties that relate to each of the main clinical issues identified were ranked in terms of their priority for testing, and the specific test methods within each property were ranked. An attempt was made to focus on the tests and methods likely to be the most useful, applicable, and supported by the literature, and where possible, those showing a correlation with clinical outcomes. Certain methods are only briefly mentioned to be all-inclusive. When a standard test method exists, whether from dentistry or another field, this test has been identified. Specific examples from the literature are included for each test method. The properties for evaluating resin composites were ranked in the priority of measurement as follows: (1) porosity, radiopacity, sensitivity to ambient light, degree of conversion, polymerization kinetics, depth of cure, polymerization shrinkage and rate, polymerization stress, and hygroscopic expansion; (2) stickiness, slump resistance, and viscosity; and (3) thermal expansion. The following guidance is meant to aid the researcher in choosing the most appropriate test methods when planning studies designed to assess certain key properties and characteristics of dental resin composites, specifically technique sensitivity and handling during placement, polymerization, and dimensional stability. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New Cork-Based Materials and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Luís

    2015-02-10

    This review work is an update of a previous work reporting the new cork based materials and new applications of cork based materials. Cork is a material which has been used for multiple applications. The most known uses of cork are in stoppers (natural and agglomerated cork) for alcoholic beverages, classic floor covering with composite cork tiles (made by the binding of cork particles with different binders), and thermal/acoustic/vibration insulation with expanded corkboard in buildings and some other industrial fields. Many recent developments have been made leading to new cork based materials. Most of these newly developed cork materials are not yet on the market, but they represent new possibilities for engineers, architects, designers and other professionals which must be known and considered, potentially leading to their industrialization. This paper is a review covering the last five years of innovative cork materials and applications also mentioning previous work not reported before.

  16. New Cork-Based Materials and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Gil

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review work is an update of a previous work reporting the new cork based materials and new applications of cork based materials. Cork is a material which has been used for multiple applications. The most known uses of cork are in stoppers (natural and agglomerated cork for alcoholic beverages, classic floor covering with composite cork tiles (made by the binding of cork particles with different binders, and thermal/acoustic/vibration insulation with expanded corkboard in buildings and some other industrial fields. Many recent developments have been made leading to new cork based materials. Most of these newly developed cork materials are not yet on the market, but they represent new possibilities for engineers, architects, designers and other professionals which must be known and considered, potentially leading to their industrialization. This paper is a review covering the last five years of innovative cork materials and applications also mentioning previous work not reported before.

  17. Costs of a school-based dental mobile service in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molete, M P; Chola, L; Hofman, K J

    2016-10-19

    The burden of untreated tooth decay remains high and oral healthcare utilisation is low for the majority of children in South Africa. There is need for alternative methods of improving access to low cost oral healthcare. The mobile dental unit of the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) has been operational for over 25 years, providing alternative oral healthcare to children and adults who otherwise would not have access. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-analysis of a school based oral healthcare program in the Wits mobile dental unit. The objectives were to estimate the general costs of the school based program, costs of oral healthcare per patient and the economic implications of providing services at scale. In 2012, the Wits mobile dental unit embarked on a 5 month project to provide oral healthcare in four schools located around Johannesburg. Cost and service use data were retrospectively collected from the program records for the cost analysis, which was undertaken from a provider perspective. The costs considered included both financial and economic costs. Capital costs were annualised and discounted at 6 %. One way sensitivity tests were conducted for uncertain parameters. The total economic costs were R813.701 (US$76,048). The cost of screening and treatment per patient were R331 (US$31) and R743 (US$69) respectively. Furthermore, fissure sealants cost the least out of the treatments provided. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the Wits mobile dental unit was cost efficient at 25 % allocation of staff time and that a Dental Therapy led service could save costs by 9.1 %. Expanding the services to a wider population of children and utilising Dental Therapists as key personnel could improve the efficiency of mobile dental healthcare provision.

  18. Knowledge and attitude of dental faculty members towards evidence-based dentistry in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabounchi, S S; Nouri, M; Erfani, N; Houshmand, B; Khoshnevisan, M H

    2013-08-01

    Educating dental practitioners is a major component in obtaining evidence-based approach to oral health care, but there is no evidence about knowledge and attitude of dental faculty members towards evidence-based dentistry (EBD) in Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administered questionnaires on dental school faculties in Iran to assess their knowledge and attitude towards basic principles and methods of EBD. A total of eight dental schools were randomly selected of 17 public and two existing private schools. Validated questionnaire with an appropriate reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.67 - 0.87) was conducted on (n = 505) available dental instructors. The covered dimensions were perceived knowledge on critical appraisal, actual knowledge of EBD concepts, evidence-accessing methods and attitudes about EBD. Correlations were assessed between background characteristics and four main parts of the questionnaire, and multiple linear regression analysis was also used. A total of 377 of 505 dental instructors returned completed questionnaires (response rate 74.65%). The mean perceived knowledge score was 15.32 ± 4.69 on a range of 6-36, and mean actual knowledge was 7.98 ± 2.0 on a range of 0-11 for all respondents with an overall positive attitude towards EBD. This study suggests that the level of actual knowledge of dental faculties about basic principles of EBD was moderate in Iran. However, faculties' overall interest and positive attitude towards learning EBD is encouraging. Therefore, it is highly recommended that degree/certificate continuing educational programmes be planned by the organising committees. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evidence-Based Dental Practice: Part II. Levels And Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For questions related to diagnosis, prognosis or causation, other study designs such as longitudinal studies, cohort studies or case-control studies are more appropriate. The present article discusses the levels and quality of evidence, and basic concepts of clinical research design in evidence-based dental practice based ...

  20. Concordance between patient satisfaction and the dentist's view: findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Joseph L; Gordan, Valeria V; Hudak-Boss, Susan E; Fellows, Jeffery L; Rindal, D Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the authors examined the dentist's view of the patient's experience and concordance with the patient's rating of satisfaction. Practitioners from 197 practices in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network recruited consecutively seen patients who had defective restorations that were replaced or repaired. At the end of the dental visit, the treating dentist and 5,315 patients completed and returned a survey that asked about the patient's satisfaction. Most dentists viewed their patients as having been satisfied with the treatment experience (n = 4,719 [89 percent]) and as having perceived them as friendly (n = 5,136 [97 percent]). Dentists had less strong feelings about whether patients had a preference for the restorative material (n = 2,271 [43 percent]) or an interest in obtaining information about the procedure (n = 1,757 [33 percent]). Overall, patients were satisfied, and most of the time dentists correctly predicted this outcome. Among patients who were less than satisfied, there was a substantial subset of cases in which dentists were not aware of this dissatisfaction. For improved patient-centered care, dentists should assess patients' desires, expectations and perceptions of the dental care experience and then manage or correct the expectations and perceptions as needed. By taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the services provided, thereby enabling them to focus on what each patient values most.

  1. How effective the problem-based learning (PBL) in dental education. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahlah, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this critical review is to explore the research supporting the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) as a teaching method in dental education. PBL was developed more than 40 years ago in reaction to the problems and limitations of traditional teaching approaches. Here, aspects of the PBL teaching approach are reviewed, and the reasons for the substantial effect of this approach on dental education are discussed. Evidence shows that students in PBL-based courses exhibit superior professional skills and effective learning compared with those instructed using traditional approaches.

  2. Material-based figure of merit for caloric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, L. D.; Mudryk, Y.; Slaughter, J.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    The efficient use of reversible thermal effects in magnetocaloric, electrocaloric, and elastocaloric materials is a promising avenue that can lead to a substantially increased efficiency of refrigeration and heat pumping devices, most importantly, those used in household and commercial cooling applications near ambient temperature. A proliferation in caloric material research has resulted in a wide array of materials where only the isothermal change in entropy in response to a handful of different field strengths over a limited range of temperatures has been evaluated and reported. Given the abundance of such data, there is a clear need for a simple and reliable figure of merit enabling fast screening and down-selection to justify further detailed characterization of those material systems that hold the greatest promise. Based on the analysis of several well-known materials that exhibit vastly different magnetocaloric effects, the Temperature averaged Entropy Change is introduced as a suitable early indicator of the material's utility for magnetocaloric cooling applications, and its adoption by the caloric community is recommended.

  3. Hemostatic properties of glucosamine-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas H; Bode, Arthur P; Demcheva, Marina; Vournakis, John N

    2007-01-01

    Glucosamine- and N-acetyl glucosamine-containing polymers are being used in an increasing number of biomedical applications, including in products for surface (topical) hemostasis. The studies presented here investigate the relationship between the structure (conformation) and function (activation of hemostasis) of glucosamine-based materials. Several polymer systems were studied, including fibers isolated from a microalgal source containing poly-N-acetyl glucosamine polymers that are organized in a parallel, hydrogen-bonded tertiary structure and can be chemically modified to an antiparallel orientation; and gel formulation derivatives of the microalgal fibers consisting of partially deacetylated (F2 gel) and fully deacetylated (F3 gel) polymers. Comparison of the properties of the poly-N-acetyl glucosamine fiber-derived materials with chitin, chitosan, and commercial chitosan-based products are presented. Several studies were performed with the glucosamine-based materials, including (1) an analysis of the ability of materials to activate platelets and turnover of the intrinsic coagulation cascade, (2) an examination of the viscoelastic properties of mixtures of platelet-rich plasma and the glucosamine-based materials via thromboelastography, and (3) scanning electron microscopic studies to examine the morphology of the glucosamine-based materials. The results presented demonstrate that hemostatic responses to the glucosamine-based materials studied are highly dependent on their chemical nature and tertiary/quaternary structure. The unique natural microalgal fibers were found to have strongly prohemostatic activity compared to the other materials studied. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Impact of prosthetic material on mid- and long-term outcome of dental implants supporting single crowns and fixed partial dentures: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Ayash, Samir; Strasding, Malin; Rücker, Gerta; Att, Wael

    The impact of prosthetic material selection on implant survival is not clear. The current criteria for choosing a prosthetic material seem to be based on clinician preferences. This systematic review aims to evaluate the impact of restorative materials on the mid- and long-term survival of implants supporting single crowns and fixed partial dentures. Hand and MEDLINE searches were performed to identify relevant literature for single crowns (SC) and fixed partial dentures (FPD). Further inclusion criteria were a mean follow-up period of at least 3 years, the inclusion of at least 10 patients in a relevant study cohort, and a clear description of prosthesis type and prosthetic material. A total of 63 studies for the SC group and 11 studies for the FPD group were included. Full arch restorations were not included. The materials utilised in the SC group were metal-ceramic (precious and non-precious), lithium-disilicate, veneered zirconia, veneered alumina, and nanoceramics. The materials used in the FPD group were metal-ceramic (precious), veneered titanium, metal-resin (precious), and veneered zirconia. No significant impact on the prosthetic material relating to mid- or long-term implant survival was identified. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant differences between the survival rates of the dental prostheses made from different materials (SC and FPD group). Single crowns made of nanoceramics showed a higher risk for decementation relative to other materials (0.80, 95% CI [0.67; 0.89]; P prosthetic material selection has no influence on mid- and long-term survival of implants restored with single crowns and fixed partial dentures. Similarly, the prosthetic material seems to have no significant impact on prosthetic survival rates. Further research is required to provide more evidence regarding the impact of the prosthetic material on long-term outcome. Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

  5. A hyaluronan-based scaffold for the in vitro construction of dental pulp-like tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Berengo, Mario; Piattelli, Adriano; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-03-02

    Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D) hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF) staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue.

  6. A Hyaluronan-Based Scaffold for the in Vitro Construction of Dental Pulp-Like Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Ferroni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue.

  7. Measuring sodium alginate content of brown algae species Padina sp. as the basic matter for making dental impression material (Irreversible hydrocolloid impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlindah Hamrun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important procedures in denture fabrication and orthodontic treatment is molding the patient’s detail oral cavity to determine the treatment planning. This procedure was done by using alginate impression material or irreversible hydrocolloid in which the basic material is sodium alginate imported from abroad because it is extracted from brown algae which its habitat is not in Indonesia so that it is causes the impression material is relatively expensive roomates is impact to high cost of dental treatment. Indonesia as the archipelago country has availability of abundant brown algae Padina sp. Especially in Puntondo-Punaga seashore, South Sulawesi, but it has not Cultivate yet by the local society because it is never discovered by alginate industry so it is just grow wild and its potency is useless. This experiment identified the purposes of how much sodium alginate is produced from Padina Sp. Extraction as the basic matter of irreversible hydrocolloid. The design of this study is experimental design with one shot case study method. In early stage research, extraction of alginate in the form of sodium alginate. After that, they are weighted by using analytical weight in milligrams (mg unit. Then, it is compare with the standard sodium alginate to observe the similarity of molecules by using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red device. Data were Analyzed using mean differences. Based on Padina extracted, produced 12.86 g of sodium alginate content or 28.4% from the cleaning algae was used roomates total weight is 45 g. Based on FTIR test, showed that sodium alginate is extracted similar to the standard sodium alginate with the found of hydroxyl, carboxylic acid, ether group and the which is the composer of sodium alginate. In conclusion, from both of infra red spectrum pattern, it was observed unsignificant difference. Extracted sodium alginate Padina is same with the standard sodium alginate and it has 12.86 g content.

  8. Safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Greenwall, L

    2013-07-01

    In-office tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been practised in dentistry without significant safety concerns for more than a century. While few disputes exist regarding the efficacy of peroxide-based at-home whitening since its first introduction in 1989, its safety has been the cause of controversy and concern. This article reviews and discusses safety issues of tooth whitening using peroxide-based materials, including biological properties and toxicology of H₂O₂, use of chlorine dioxide, safety studies on tooth whitening, and clinical considerations of its use. Data accumulated during the last two decades demonstrate that, when used properly, peroxide-based tooth whitening is safe and effective. The most commonly seen side effects are tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation, which are usually mild to moderate and transient. So far there is no evidence of significant health risks associated with tooth whitening; however, potential adverse effects can occur with inappropriate application, abuse, or the use of inappropriate whitening products. With the knowledge on peroxide-based whitening materials and the recognition of potential adverse effects associated with the procedure, dental professionals are able to formulate an effective and safe tooth whitening regimen for individual patients to achieve maximal benefits while minimising potential risks.

  9. The use of prophylactic antibiotics prior to dental procedures in patients with prosthetic joints: Evidence-based clinical practice guideline for dental practitioners--a report of the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollecito, Thomas P; Abt, Elliot; Lockhart, Peter B; Truelove, Edmond; Paumier, Thomas M; Tracy, Sharon L; Tampi, Malavika; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie

    2015-01-01

    A panel of experts (the 2014 Panel) convened by the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline (CPG) on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in patients with prosthetic joints who are undergoing dental procedures. This CPG is intended to clarify the "Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures: Evidence-based Guideline and Evidence Report," which was developed and published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association (the 2012 Panel). The 2014 Panel based the current CPG on literature search results and direct evidence contained in the comprehensive systematic review published by the 2012 Panel, as well as the results from an updated literature search. The 2014 Panel identified 4 case-control studies. The 2014 Panel judged that the current best evidence failed to demonstrate an association between dental procedures and prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The 2014 Panel also presented information about antibiotic resistance, adverse drug reactions, and costs associated with prescribing antibiotics for PJI prophylaxis. The 2014 Panel made the following clinical recommendation: In general, for patients with prosthetic joint implants, prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended prior to dental procedures to prevent prosthetic joint infection. The practitioner and patient should consider possible clinical circumstances that may suggest the presence of a significant medical risk in providing dental care without antibiotic prophylaxis, as well as the known risks of frequent or widespread antibiotic use. As part of the evidence-based approach to care, this clinical recommendation should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Competency in managing cardiac arrest: A scenario-based evaluation of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Georg; Knipfer, Christian; Huber, Tobias; Huettl, Stephan; Shams, Nima; Knipfer, Kristin; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schuettler, Juergen; Stelzle, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) in life-threatening situations is perceived as a basic skill for dental professionals. However, medical emergency training in dental schools is often not standardized. The dental students' knowledge transfer to an ACLS setting thus remains questionable. The aim of the study was to evaluate dental pre-doctorate students' practical competence in ACLS in a standardized manner to enable the curriculum to be adapted to meet their particular needs. Thirty dental students (age 25.47 ± 1.81; 16 male/14 female) in their last year of dental studies were randomly assigned to 15 teams. Students' ability to successfully manage ACLS was assessed by a scenario-based approach (training module: Laerdal® ALS Skillmaster). Competence was assessed by means of (a) an observation chart, (b) video analysis and (c) training module analysis (Laerdal HeartSim®4000; Version 1.4). The evaluation was conducted by a trained anesthesiologist with regard to the 2010 guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC). Only five teams (33.3%) checked for all three vital functions (response, breathing and circulation). All teams initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Only 54.12% of the compressions performed during CPR were sufficient. Four teams stopped the CPR after initiation. In total, 93% of the teams used the equipment for bag-valve-mask ventilation and 53.3% used the AED (Automated external defibrillator). ACLS training on a regular basis is necessary and, consistent with a close link between dentistry and medicine, should be a standardized part of the medical emergency curriculum for dental students with a specific focus on the deficiencies revealed in this study.

  11. Awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants - A questionnaire-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Shanti, Tenneti; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kashyap, Rajesh Shankar; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya

    2017-01-01

    In developing nations like India awareness and education about dental implants as a treatment modality is still scanty. The study was conducted to determine the awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants as a treatment modality among the general population and to assess the influence of personality characteristics on accepting dental implants as a treatment modality in general and as well as treatment group. A structured questionnaire-based survey was conducted on 500 randomly selected participants attending the outpatient department. The study was conducted in 2 parts. In the first part of the study, level of awareness, knowledge, and attitude was assessed. In the second part of the study, interactive educational sessions using audiovisual aids were conducted following which a retest was conducted. The participants who agreed to undergo implant treatment were followed up to assess their change in attitude towards dental implants posttreatment. Thus pain, anxiety, functional, and esthetic benefits were measured using visual analog scale. They were further followed up for 1 year to reassess awareness, knowledge, and attitude towards dental implants. A total of 450 individuals completed the questionnaires. Only 106 individuals agreed to participate in the educational sessions and 83 individuals took the retest. Out of these, only 39 individuals chose implants as a treatment option. A significant improvement in the level of information, subjective and objective need for information, was noted after 1 year. In this study, a severe deficit in level of information, subjective and objective need for information towards, dental implants as a treatment modality was noted. In the treatment group, a significant improvement in perception of dental implant as a treatment modality suggests that professionally imparted knowledge can bring about a change in the attitude.

  12. The effects of a commercial aluminum airpolishing powder on dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William W; Barnes, Caren M; Covey, David A; Walker, Mary P; Ross, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    JET-Fresh (Dentsply International, York, PA), a new airpolishing powder that contains aluminum trihydroxide as the abrasive agent, has been introduced for use with Prophy-Jet trade mark (Dentsply International). The aim of this study was to investigate the surface effects of aluminum trihydroxide airpolishing powder on a series of restorative materials. A total of 6 Class V preparations with enamel margins were created on the buccal surface of extracted human molars. The preparations were restored with Type III gold, a high copper spherical alloy amalgam, porcelain, a light-activated hybrid composite material, a light-activated microfilled composite material, and a light-activated, resin-modified glass ionomer material. The distal half of each restoration was covered with fiberglass tape and the mesial half subjected to treatment with the aluminum trihydroxide powder via the Prophy-Jet for 5 seconds. After removal of the protective tape, the buccal surface of each treated tooth was replicated with impression material. Replicas were generated using epoxy resin and prepared for evaluation with scanning electron microscopy. The aluminum trihydroxide produced surface alterations that were apparent visually and when viewed by a scanning microscope of the hybrid and microfilled composites and the glass ionomer restorations. The surfaces of the amalgam and gold restorations were altered, but not to the extent that the resin-based materials were. No disruption of the surface characterization of the porcelain was detected; however, with gold and porcelain materials, the aluminum trihydroxide removed notable amounts of the luting cements (the results are consistent with the data gathered with sodium bicarbonate powder). Aluminum trihydroxide as the abrasive agent in an airpolishing system should be avoided on resin composites, resin-modified composites, and around the margins of cemented restorations.

  13. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region: implications for Dixon-based attenuation correction in PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Hansen, Adam E; Keller, Sune H; Fischer, Barbara M [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Rasmussen, Jacob H [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Law, Ian; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Lauze, Francois [Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Beyer, Thomas [Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20/4L, Vienna, A-1090 (Austria); Andersen, Flemming L [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark)

    2015-03-11

    In the absence of CT or traditional transmission sources in combined clinical positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems, MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The susceptibility effects due to metal implants challenge MR-AC in the neck region of patients with dental implants. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and magnitude of subsequent PET image distortions following MR-AC. A total of 148 PET/MR patients with clear visual signal voids on the attenuation map in the dental region were included in this study. Patients were injected with [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-PiB, [{sup 18}F]-FET, or [{sup 64}Cu]-DOTATATE. The PET/MR data were acquired over a single-bed position of 25.8 cm covering the head and neck. MR-AC was based on either standard MR-AC{sub DIXON} or MR-AC{sub INPAINTED} where the susceptibility-induced signal voids were substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. The MR-based volume of the susceptibility-induced signal voids on the MR-AC attenuation maps was between 1.6 and 520.8 mL. The corresponding/resulting bias of the reconstructed tracer distribution was localized mainly in the area of the signal void. The mean and maximum SUVs averaged across all patients increased after inpainting by 52% (± 11%) and 28% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility

  14. Soft tissue integration versus early biofilm formation on different dental implant materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henderina; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; de Vries, Joop; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J.; Qu-Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: Dental implants anchor in bone through a tight fit and osseo-integratable properties of the implant surfaces, while a protective soft tissue seal around the implants neck is needed to prevent bacterial destruction of the bone-implant interface. This tissue seal needs to form in the

  15. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  16. Characterization of asphalt treated base course material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Asphalt-treated bases are often used in new pavements; the materials are available and low-cost, but there is little data on how these materials perform in cold regions. : This study investigated four ATB types (hot asphalt, emulsion, foamed asphalt,...

  17. Material Recognition for Content Based Image Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusebroek, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    One of the open problems in content-based Image Retrieval is the recognition of material present in an image. Knowledge about the set of materials present gives important semantic information about the scene under consideration. For example, detecting sand, sky, and water certainly classifies the

  18. Bridging the gap in 1(st) year dental material curriculum: A 3 year randomized cross over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Sivaranjani; Shetty, Vibha; Murthy, N S; Marimuthu, P

    2015-01-01

    Case-oriented small group discussions (COSGDs) can help students to correlate and integrate the basic science of dental materials into clinical application. We used COSGDs along with didactic lectures in dental material curriculum and hypothesized that case-oriented group discussions would be more effective than traditional lecture alone in terms of performance of students, student perception on the above two teaching methodologies and the feasibility in classes of 2010, 2011 and 2012. A total of 170 students were taught using both COSGD and didactic lecture in a randomized controlled crossover trial design. Their performance was assessed through multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as part of the formative assessment, and their perception was assessed through Likert scale questionnaire. The mean difference in the scores between case-oriented group discussions with lecture and didactic lecture showed significant difference only in few topics. Around 94-96% of students perceived COSGD with didactic lecture help them understand theory better; 76-92% of students feel more comfortable asking questions in a group discussion; 89-98% of students feel such discussions motivate them and 91-100% of students agree that discussions make the subject interesting in the respective years of 2010, 2011 and 2012. Effectiveness of COSGD in terms of scores through MCQs is comparable to traditional lecture. However, most of the students perceive COSGD help them understand the theory better; co-relate clinically; more motivating and interesting than a traditional lecture. Feasibility in institution needs more time and resources to conduct COSGD within the dental material curriculum.

  19. Urinary levels of nickel and chromium associated with dental restoration by nickel-chromium based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Xia, Gang; Cao, Xin-Ming; Wang, Jue; Xu, Bi-Yao; Huang, Pu; Chen, Yue; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate if the dental restoration of nickel-chromium based alloy (Ni-Cr) leads to the enhanced excretions of Ni and Cr in urine. Seven hundred and ninety-five patients in a dental hospital had single or multiple Ni-Cr alloy restoration recently and 198 controls were recruited to collect information on dental restoration by questionnaire and clinical examination. Urinary concentrations of Ni and Cr from each subject were measure by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Compared to the control group, the urinary level of Ni was significantly higher in the patient group of dental alloys or a higher index of metal crown not covered with the porcelain. Urinary levels of Cr were significantly higher in the three patient groups of metal crown exposure index. Linear curve estimations showed better relationships between urinary Ni and Cr in patients within 6-month groups. Our data suggested significant increased excretions of urinary Ni and Cr after dental restoration. Potential short- and long-term effects of Ni-Cr alloy restoration need to be investigated.

  20. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, D; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Harrison, A; Alemzadeh, K; Burgess, S; Ireland, A; Sandy, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  1. Effect of an Experimental Direct Pulp-capping Material on the Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fan; Dong, Yan; Yang, Yan-Wei; Lin, Ping-Ting; Yu, Hao-Han; Sun, Xiang; Sun, Xue-Fei; Zhou, Huan; Huang, Li; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Effective pulp-capping materials must have antibacterial properties and induce dentin bridge formation; however, many current materials do not satisfy clinical requirements. Accordingly, the effects of an experiment pulp-capping material (Exp) composed of an antibacterial resin monomer (MAE-DB) and Portland cement (PC) on the viability, adhesion, migration, and differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined. Based on a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, hDPSCs exposed to Exp extracts showed limited viability at 24 and 48 h, but displayed comparable viability to the control at 72 h. hDPSC treatment with Exp extracts enhanced cellular adhesion and migration according to in vitro scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. Exp significantly upregulated the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. The hDPSCs cultured with Exp exhibited higher ALP activity and calcium deposition in vitro compared with the control group. The novel material showed comparable cytocompatibility to control cells and promoted the adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs, indicating excellent biocompatibility. This new direct pulp-capping material containing MAE-DB and PC shows promise as a potential alternative to conventional materials for direct pulp capping.

  2. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, prestoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, prestoration (OR=12.2, prestorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  3. Differences chronological age and dental age using Demirjian method based upon a study radiology using radiography panoramic at the Dental Hospital Hasanuddin University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background.Choronological age is assessed by the date, month, and year of birth. Several researches suggested that Chronological age may not be able to provide sufficient information regarding on human growth precisely. Chronological age, on the other hand, could not be used to assess  Maturity development rate of a patient, so it is necessary to assess the dental age. Dental age is age assessment method  by measuring human growth and development. Age estimation has important role in health field, Particularly  in dentistry as it will be beneficial in making appropriate diagnosis, Treatment plan, and prognosis. Tooth eruption estimation according to Demirjian Method conducted by assessing growth and development process of tooth using panoramic  radiography. Purpose. Determine the difference between Chronological Age and Dental Age Using Demirjian Method Based on Radiology Analysis of Panoramic Radiography. Method. This study was an observational analytic using Cross-sectional study, all data are observed once at the time. In this study,  the amount of sample reviewed were 30 samples, consisted of 4 – 9 years old children. Panoramic radiography were collected based on target population which fulfill Sample Criteria from reconciled patient of radiology department RSGM Unhas. The results were obtained by estimating the score of  dental age using Demirjian Method. After that, the Dental age and chronological age were analayzed to obtain the mean difference. Result. Based on wilcoxon test, mean value was obtain p:0.011 (p<0.05, this result shows that there is significant difference between chronological age and dental age. Conclusion.Chronological age and dental age can be assessed by reviewing the panoramic radiography using Demirjian Method

  4. Dual-energy-based metal segmentation for metal artifact reduction in dental computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Mohamed A A; Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hernandez, Daniel; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2018-02-01

    In a dental CT scan, the presence of dental fillings or dental implants generates severe metal artifacts that often compromise readability of the CT images. Many metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques have been introduced, but dental CT scans still suffer from severe metal artifacts particularly when multiple dental fillings or implants exist around the region of interest. The high attenuation coefficient of teeth often causes erroneous metal segmentation, compromising the MAR performance. We propose a metal segmentation method for a dental CT that is based on dual-energy imaging with a narrow energy gap. Unlike a conventional dual-energy CT, we acquire two projection data sets at two close tube voltages (80 and 90 kV p ), and then, we compute the difference image between the two projection images with an optimized weighting factor so as to maximize the contrast of the metal regions. We reconstruct CT images from the weighted difference image to identify the metal region with global thresholding. We forward project the identified metal region to designate metal trace on the projection image. We substitute the pixel values on the metal trace with the ones computed by the region filling method. The region filling in the metal trace removes high-intensity data made by the metallic objects from the projection image. We reconstruct final CT images from the region-filled projection image with the fusion-based approach. We have done imaging experiments on a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using a lab-built micro-CT and a commercial dental CT system. We have corrected the projection images of a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using the single-energy and dual-energy-based metal segmentation methods. The single-energy-based method often failed in correcting the metal artifacts on the slices on which tooth enamel exists. The dual-energy-based method showed better MAR performances in all cases regardless of the presence of tooth enamel on the slice of

  5. Encapsulation of grape seed extract in polylactide microcapsules for sustained bioactivity and time-dependent release in dental material applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourdkhani, Mostafa; Leme-Kraus, Ariene Arcas; Aydin, Berdan; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; White, Scott R

    2017-06-01

    To sustain the bioactivity of proanthocyanidins-rich plant-derived extracts via encapsulation within biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Polylactide microcapsules containing grape seed extract (GSE) were manufactured using a combination of double emulsion and solvent evaporation techniques. Microcapsule morphology, size distribution, and cross-section were examined via scanning electron microscopy. UV-vis measurements were carried out to evaluate the core loading and encapsulation efficiency of microcapsules. The bioactivity of extracts was evaluated after extraction from capsules via solvent partitioning one week or one year post-encapsulation process. Fifteen human molars were cut into 7mm×1.7mm×0.5mm thick mid-coronal dentin beams, demineralized, and treated with either encapsulated GSE, pristine GSE, or left untreated. The elastic modulus of dentin specimens was measured based on three-point bending experiments as an indirect assessment of the bioactivity of grape seed extracts. The effects of the encapsulation process and storage time on the bioactivity of extracts were analyzed. Polynuclear microcapsules with average diameter of 1.38μm and core loading of up to 38wt% were successfully manufactured. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean fold increase of elastic modulus values among the samples treated with encapsulated or pristine GSE (p=0.333), or the storage time (one week versus one year storage at room temperature, p=0.967). Polynuclear microcapsules containing proanthocyanidins-rich plant-derived extracts were prepared. The bioactivity of extracts was preserved after microencapsulation. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of three strains of oral bacteria on the surface and mechanical properties of a dental resin material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Karen S; Shih, Han; Gregory, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if three strains of bacteria could impact the mechanical or surface properties of a dental resin material. Resin material specimens were incubated at 37°C in sterile saline, tryptic soy broth supplemented with sucrose (TSBS), or TSBS inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus gordonii, or Streptococcus sanguis. The specimens were subjected to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after incubation. The flexural strength test was performed once a week for 6 weeks. Microhardness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on specimens at 1 and 6 weeks. Differences in the area under the carbonyl peak were statistically significant for the specimens incubated in the media inoculated with either S. mutans or S. gordonii. To determine why S. sanguis did not produce changes as the other bacteria did, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, methacrylic acid, and triethylene glycol were added to bacterial cultures at increasing concentrations. Both methacrylic acid and triethylene glycol reduced the number of colony-forming units of S. sanguis. Specimens incubated in TSBS, saline or in culture with S. sanguis demonstrated a decrease in peak stress in week 1 of the flexure strength test. SEM demonstrated that surface topology changed for those specimens incubated in culture with S. mutans or S. gordonii. The changes in surface topology demonstrated here could contribute to the secondary caries and changes in esthetic properties seen clinically with the use of resin materials in dental restorations.

  7. CONTACT ANGLE MEASUREMENT OF DENTAL RESTORATIVE MATERIALS BY DROP PROFILE IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. K. Yulianto dan M. Rinastiti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The capability of initial microbial adhesion to dental restorative composites surface is influenced by the surface wettability of the materials. The common method to evaluate surface wettability of materials is contact angle measurement. The existing conventional method to measure contact angle is by means of a contact angle (CA-Goniometer device, which is less practically applicable in clinical circumstances. Therefore, a more practical and applicable method is needed to measure contact angle in clinical circumstances. This research was performed to compare between contact angles measured by means of a CA-Goniometer device and a new practical method of drop profile image analysis. In addition, since there were two different formulas that can be used to calculate contact angle value from a drop profile image, then we also need to evaluate which formula is more reliable to be used. Tests were carried out using three composite discs (Clearfill-Kuraray Medical, Inc. sample and deionised water for different measurement procedures. One drop of 3µl liquid was dropped onto the surface of the composite discs, and the drop profile image was captured by means of a customized home-made device connected to a digital camera. Two different formulas were used to calculate the contact angle value from the drop profile image, namely the “linier gradient equation” and the “tangential line”. The contact angle values obtained from the two different formulas were compared with the value obtained from the conventional method descriptively. Tests were carried out using three composite discs (Clearfill-Kuraray Medical, Inc. sample and deionised water for different measurement procedures. One drop of 3µl liquid was dropped onto the surface of the composite discs, and the drop profile image was captured by means of a customized home-made device connected to a digital camera. Two different formulas were used to calculate the contact angle value from the drop

  8. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Pu Chang

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation.Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls.In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001. After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47. This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26.Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a

  9. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tzu-Pu; Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Chung, Hsien-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27-2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39-2.26). Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should consider dental procedures to be a risk factor

  10. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo after Dental Procedures: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yueh-Wen; Sung, Pi-Yu; Chuang, Hsun-Yang; Liao, Wen-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common type of vertigo in the general population, is thought to be caused by dislodgement of otoliths from otolithic organs into the semicircular canals. In most cases, however, the cause behind the otolith dislodgement is unknown. Dental procedures, one of the most common medical treatments, are considered to be a possible cause of BPPV, although this has yet to be proven. This study is the first nationwide population-based case-control study conducted to investigate the correlation between BPPV and dental manipulation. Methods Patients diagnosed with BPPV between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 were recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We further identified those who had undergone dental procedures within 1 month and within 3 months before the first diagnosis date of BPPV. We also identified the comorbidities of the patients with BPPV, including head trauma, osteoporosis, migraine, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and stroke. These variables were then compared to those in age- and gender-matched controls. Results In total, 768 patients with BPPV and 1536 age- and gender-matched controls were recruited. In the BPPV group, 9.2% of the patients had undergone dental procedures within 1 month before the diagnosis of BPPV. In contrast, only 5.5% of the controls had undergone dental treatment within 1 month before the date at which they were identified (P = 0.001). After adjustments for demographic factors and comorbidities, recent exposure to dental procedures was positively associated with BPPV (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.27–2.47). This association was still significant if we expanded the time period from 1 month to 3 months (adjusted odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval 1.39–2.26). Conclusions Our results demonstrated a correlation between dental procedures and BPPV. The specialists who treat patients with BPPV should

  11. Dental fluorosis in the primary dentition and intake of manufactured soy-based foods with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Cristiane Alves Paz; Zanlorenzi Nicodemo, César Augusto; Ferreira Mercadante, Daniela Cristiane; de Carvalho, Fábio Silva; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; de Carvalho Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena

    2013-06-01

    To identify manufactured soy-based products more recommended by pediatricians and nutritionists; to determine fluoride concentrations in these products; to evaluate children concerning fluorosis in primary teeth and its association with the consumption of soy-based products. Pediatricians and Nutritionists answered a questionnaire about soy-based products they most recommended to children. Fluoride concentrations of the 10 products more cited were analyzed with the ion-specific electrode. Dental fluorosis exams were performed in 315 4-6-year-old children. Dean's Index was used to assess fluorosis. Among the children examined, 26 had lactose intolerance. Their parents answered a questionnaire about children's and family's profile, besides permitting the identification of soy-based products use. Chi-squared and Multivariable Logistic Regression tests were used (p Dental fluorosis was detected in 11% of the children, with very mild and mild degrees. Dental fluorosis in primary teeth was associated with lactose intolerance (p children do not offer risk of dental fluorosis in primary teeth, which had a low prevalence and severity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants placed in a general dental practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hevinga, M.A.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term performance of resin based fissure sealants applied in a general dental practice. METHODS: Regularly attending patients visiting the practice between July 2006 until November 2007 and who had received sealants

  13. Dental Faculty Members' Pedagogic Beliefs and Curriculum Aims in Problem-Based Learning: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, HsingChi; Walker, Judith; Dalrymple, Kirsten R; Shuler, Charles F

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this exploratory study were to explore dental faculty members' views and beliefs regarding knowledge, the dental profession, and teaching and learning and to determine how these views related to their problem-based learning (PBL) instructional practices. Prior to a PBL in dental education conference held in 2011, all attendees were invited to complete a survey focused on their pedagogical beliefs and practices in PBL. Out of a possible 55 participants, 28 responded. Additionally, during the conference, a forum was held in which preliminary survey findings were shared and participants contributed to focus group data collection. The forum results served to validate and bring deeper understanding to the survey findings. The conference participants who joined the forum (N=32) likely included some or many of the anonymous respondents to the survey, along with additional participants interested in dental educators' beliefs. The findings of the survey and follow-up forum indicated a disconnect between dental educators' reported views of knowledge and their pedagogical practices in a PBL environment. The results suggested that the degree of participants' tolerance of uncertainty in knowledge and the discrepancy between their epistemological and ontological beliefs about PBL pedagogy influenced their pedagogical choices. These findings support the idea that learner-centered, inquiry-based pedagogical approaches such as PBL may create dissonance between beliefs about knowledge and pedagogical practice that require the building of a shared understanding of and commitment to curricular goals prior to implementation to ensure success. The methods used in this study can be useful tools for faculty development in PBL programs in dental education.

  14. Nanocellulose based polymer composite for acoustical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mohammad; Purniawan, Agung; Susanti, Diah; Priyono, Slamet; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Rahmasita, Mutia E.

    2018-04-01

    Natural fibers are biodegradable materials that are innovatively and widely used for composite reinforcement in automotive components. Nanocellulose derived from natural fibers oil palm empty bunches have properties that are remarkable for use as a composite reinforcement. However, there have not been many investigations related to the use of nanocellulose-based composites for wideband sound absorption materials. The specimens of nanocellulose-based polyester composite were prepared using a spray method. An impedance tube method was used to measure the sound absorption coefficient of this composite material. To reveal the characteristics of the nanocellulose-based polyester composite material, SEM (scanning electron microscope), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red), TGA (Thermogravimetric Analysis), and density tests were performed. Sound absorption test results showed the average value of sound absorption coefficient of 0.36 to 0,46 for frequency between 500 and 4000 Hz indicating that this nanocellulose-based polyester composite materials had a tendency to wideband sound absorption materials and potentially used as automotive interior materials.

  15. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  16. Inconsistency in the strength testing of dental resin-based composites among researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this paper were to review the current strength testing methods of the dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to explore the inconsistencies with regard to strength testing among researchers. Data selection/extraction: An outline of the most relevant aspects of RBCs was created, and a subsequent literature search for articles published during last four decades (1970-2010) was conducted using the databases, namely PubMed, Science Direct and ISI Web of Knowledge. The literature review highlighted a lack of consensus among researchers regarding the reliability of ISO recommended three-point flexure strength testing method. Several investigators have used Weibull statistics for the analysis of RBCs strength data, however their applicability might be questioned as many RBCs contain greater resin content and may exhibit sufficient viscous deformation prior to brittle failure. In addition, variability in the selection of cross-head speed and mould material for strength testing was evident which may lead to variation in the strength data and render the interpretation difficult among researchers.

  17. A practice-based evaluation of the handling of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor; Crisp, Russell J; Richter, B

    2006-06-01

    Ease of handling of materials may be considered helpful to achieving good results. The handling properties of a new self-adhesive universal resin luting material were tested in clinical use. Thirteen practitioners were selected at random from the Product Research and Evaluation by Practitioners (PREP) Panel, a United Kingdom-based group of dental practitioners prepared to complete evaluations of new materials and techniques in the practice environment. Explanatory letters, questionnaires and packs of the luting material were sent to the evaluators. The practitioners were asked to use the material and return the questionnaire. 144 restorations were placed using the new self-adhesive resin luting material, which was rated higher by the evaluators for ease of use (4.7 on a visual analogue scale where 5 represented easy to use and 1 represented difficult to use) than both the pre-trial resin-based and 'conventional' luting materials (rated 3.7 and 4.4 respectively on the same scale). The presentation, instructions, convenience of dispensing and handling and viscosity also received high ratings. The new material achieved ratings for ease of use superior to the pre-study resin-based and conventional luting materials in the dental practices of 13 UK dental practitioners.

  18. Cellular transcriptional response to zirconia-based implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Brigitte; Rabel, Kerstin; Kohal, Ralf J; Proksch, Susanne; Tomakidi, Pascal; Adolfsson, Erik; Bernsmann, Falk; Palmero, Paola; Fürderer, Tobias; Steinberg, Thorsten

    2017-02-01

    To adequately address clinically important issues such as osseointegration and soft tissue integration, we screened for the direct biological cell response by culturing human osteoblasts and gingival fibroblasts on novel zirconia-based dental implant biomaterials and subjecting them to transcriptional analysis. Biomaterials used for osteoblasts involved micro-roughened surfaces made of a new type of ceria-stabilized zirconia composite with two different topographies, zirconium dioxide, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (control). For fibroblasts smooth ceria- and yttria-stabilized zirconia surface were used. The expression of 90 issue-relevant genes was determined on mRNA transcription level by real-time PCR Array technology after growth periods of 1 and 7 days. Generally, modulation of gene transcription exhibited a dual dependence, first by time and second by the biomaterial, whereas biomaterial-triggered changes were predominantly caused by the biomaterials' chemistry rather than surface topography. Per se, modulated genes assigned to regenerative tissue processes such as fracture healing and wound healing and in detail included colony stimulating factors (CSF2 and CSF3), growth factors, which regulate bone matrix properties (e.g. BMP3 and TGFB1), osteogenic BMPs (BMP2/4/6/7) and transcription factors (RUNX2 and SP7), matrix collagens and osteocalcin, laminins as well as integrin ß1 and MMP-2. With respect to the biomaterials under study, the screening showed that a new zirconia-based composite stabilized with ceria may be promising to provide clinically desired periodontal tissue integration. Moreover, by detecting biomarkers modulated in a time- and/or biomaterial-dependent manner, we identified candidate genes for the targeted analysis of cell-implant bioresponse during biomaterial research and development. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation time and material stiffness of sequential removable orthodontic appliances. Part 2: Dental improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Karen Michelle; Bollen, Anne-Marie; Huang, Greg; King, Greg; Hujoel, Philippe; Ma, Tsun

    2003-11-01

    Fifty-one patients were enrolled in this study to explore the treatment effects of material stiffness and frequency of appliance change when using clear, sequential, removable appliances (aligners). Patients were stratified based on pretreatment peer assessment rating (PAR) scores and need for extractions. They were randomized into 4 treatment protocols: 1-week activation with soft material, 1-week activation with hard material, 2-week activation with soft material, and 2-week activation with hard material. Patients continued with their protocols until either the series of aligners was completed, or until it was determined that the aligner was not fitting well (study end point). Weighted PAR score and average incisor irregularity (AII) indexes were used to measure pretreatment and end-point study models, and average improvement was compared among the 4 groups. In addition to the evaluation of the 4 treatment groups, comparisons were made of the individual components of the PAR score to determine which occlusal components experienced the most correction with the aligners. The percentages and absolute extraction space closures were evaluated, and papillary bleeding scores before and during treatment were compared. Although no statistical difference was observed between the 4 treatment groups, a trend was noted with the 2-week frequency having a larger percentage of reduction in weighted PAR and AII scores, and greater extraction space closure. Anterior alignment was the most improved component, and buccal occlusion was the least improved. When analyzed by type of extraction, incisor extraction sites had a significantly greater percentage of closure than either maxillary or mandibular premolar extraction sites. A statistically significant decrease in mean average papillary bleeding score was found during treatment when compared with pretreatment scores, although this difference was not clinically significant.

  20. Information retrieval, critical appraisal and knowledge of evidence-based dentistry among Finnish dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, P; Virtanen, J I

    2017-11-01

    One of the core skills of competent dentist is the ability to search and analyse high-quality evidence. Problems in understanding the basic aspects of knowledge-based information may impede its implementation into clinical practice. We examined how Finnish dental students acquire scientific information and how familiar they are with methods for evaluating scientific evidence related to clinical questions. All fifth-year dental students (n = 120) at the three universities in Finland received a self-administered questionnaire. The three most commonly used sources of information were colleagues, the commercial Health Gate Portal for dental practitioners and personal lecture notes. Although students rarely read scientific journals, they did find that they possess at least passable or even good skills in literature retrieval. Three questions related to the appraisal of evidence in dentistry revealed that students' knowledge of evidence-based dentistry was inadequate to critically evaluate clinical research findings. Most students seem to lack knowledge of key methodological evidence-based terms. The present curricula in dental schools fail to encourage the students to search and acquire knowledge wider than their patients themselves do. Universities have the responsibility to teach dentists various methods of critical appraisal to cope with scientific information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. IDIOS: An innovative index for evaluating dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barngkgei, Imad; Al Haffar, Iyad; Khattab, Razan [Faculty of Dentistry, Damascus University, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Halboub, Esam; Almashraqi, Abeer Abdulkareem [Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-15

    The goal of this study was to develop a new index as an objective reference for evaluating current and newly developed indices used for osteoporosis screening based on dental images. Its name; IDIOS, stands for Index of Dental-imaging Indices of Osteoporosis Screening. A comprehensive PubMed search was conducted to retrieve studies on dental imaging-based indices for osteoporosis screening. The results of the eligible studies, along with other relevant criteria, were used to develop IDIOS, which has scores ranging from 0 (0%) to 15 (100%). The indices presented in the studies we included were then evaluated using IDIOS. The 104 studies that were included utilized 24, 4, and 9 indices derived from panoramic, periapical, and computed tomographic/cone-beam computed tomographic techniques, respectively. The IDIOS scores for these indices ranged from 0 (0%) to 11.75 (78.32%). IDIOS is a valuable reference index that facilitates the evaluation of other dental imaging-based osteoporosis screening indices. Furthermore, IDIOS can be utilized to evaluate the accuracy of newly developed indices.

  2. [The effects of topical fluoridation of Ketac Molar Aplicap glass-ionomer material on the growth of cariogenic bacteria contained in the dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuciennik-Stronias, Małgorzata; Zarzycka, Beata; Bołtacz-Rzepkowska, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is a bacterial disease. The most important element used in caries prevention is fluoride, which is derived from the air, diet or fluoride-containing preparations and materials, e.g. glass-ionomer restorations. Modern fluoride-containing restorative materials are capable of releasing fluoride to the environment. Fluoride can be also accumulated in glass-ionomer cements, thus an attempt was made to saturate these materials with fluoride. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of topical fluoridation of Ketac Molar Aplicap glass-ionomer cement on the growth of Lactobacillus spp. in the dental plaque. The study was carried out in 15 patients with good oral hygiene, in whom 35 fillings with conventional glass-ionomer material, Ketac Molar Aplicap, were performed. After 6 months, three-day dental plaque from these fillings was examined. Next, fluoride was rubbed on the glass-ionomer surface and the examination of three-day dental plaque was repeated. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.143) in the amounts of Lactobacillus spp. in the plaque collected prior to and after topical fluoridation were revealed. Fluoride rubbed in the conventional glass-ionomer cement, Ketac Molar Aplicap, did not affect the amount of Lactobacillus spp. in the dental plaque growing on this material.

  3. Influence of connector design and material composition and veneering on the stress distribution of all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möllers, Kristina; Pätzold, Wiebke; Parkot, Daniel; Kirsten, Armin; Güth, Jan-Frederik; Edelhoff, Daniel; Fischer, Horst

    2011-08-01

    Finite element analysis is a standard method to simulate the stress distribution in all-ceramic dental restorations in order to estimate the loading capacity of the brittle components. The hypothesis of this study was that stresses in the connector area of a veneered FDP are strongly influenced by the framework dimensions and the veneering material. Finite element analyzes of bilayered fixed dental prostheses with three different framework-designs and three different veneering materials were conducted, applying the loads onto the veneering as well as directly onto the framework. The outer shape of the veneering ceramic remained constant for all cases. The maximum first principal stresses in the framework of the fixed dental prostheses (FDP) decreased with smaller framework dimensions when the load was applied on the veneering. By applying the load directly onto the framework of the FDP without veneering a converse tendency was found. The variation of the veneering material lead to the conclusion that stresses in the framework became higher with decreasing Young's modulus of the veneer, while the stresses in the veneer increased at the same time. The veneering material plays a significant role for the failure of a FDP and cannot be neglected neither in testing nor in simulation. Thus the loading capacity of dental restorations can only be reasonably evaluated when the whole restoration is taken into account, including framework and veneering. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microleakage of Er:YAG laser and dental bur prepared cavities in primary teeth restored with different adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghalian, Ali; Nakhjavani, Yahya B; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Motahhary, Pouria; Bahramian, Hoda

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation and conventional dental bur cavity preparation on in vitro microleakage of class V cavities restored with different adhesive restorative materials and two types of self-etching adhesives in primary teeth. Standard class V cavities were prepared on 80 extracted primary, and the teeth were randomly divided into eight subgroups prepared either by dental bur or Er:YAG laser irradiation and then restored with self-cured glass ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), resin composite and Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etching adhesive), and resin composite and Clearfil S3 Bond (one-step self-etching adhesive). Restorations were finished and stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and then subjected to thermocycling. All the teeth were sealed with nail varnish, placed in a silver nitrate solution, and then vertically cut in a buccolingually direction. Subsequently, the specimens were evaluated for gingival and occlusal microleakage using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney test. Wilcoxon test was used for comparing occlusal microleakage with gingival microleakage at p laser irradiation resulted in a significantly higher degree of microleakage only at the gingival margins for teeth restored with GI or RMGI, or composite and Clearfil S3 Bond compared with the bur preparation. The Er:YAG laser-prepared teeth restored with composite and Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated a better marginal seal on occlusal and gingival margins compared with that of bur-prepared cavities. The degree of microleakage in class V cavities was affected by the type of adhesive restorative materials, type of self-etching adhesive, cavity margin location, and tooth preparation method either by Er:YAG laser or dental bur.

  5. Association between dental erosion and possible risk factors: A hospital-based study in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition, with a prevalence of up to 10–20% in the general population. GERD may involve damage to the oral cavity, and dental erosion may occur with a higher frequency. Aim: To estimate the prevalence of dental erosion in GERD patients and to evaluate the association between dental erosion and possible risk factors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow among patients attending outpatient department between June and August 2014. The study group comprised 91 subjects with GERD and 114 subjects without GERD. Information regarding symptoms of GERD, medicines, any chronic disease, and dietary habits were recorded. Dental examination was done to assess the presence or absence of dental erosions and its severity was measured using O'Sullivan Index (2000. Statistical analysis was done using Mann–Whitney U-test and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: Of 91 GERD patients, 87 (95.6% patients had dental erosion. In both groups, association between frequent intake of fruit juice, carbonated drinks, milk, yoghurt, fruits, and tea/coffee with occurrence of dental erosion were statistically significant (P < 0.05. In GERD patients, association between intake of milk and occurrence of dental erosion were statistically significant (P < 0.05. Association of medication with dental erosion was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05. Chronic diseases like diabetes and asthma were also found to be statistically significant with dental erosion (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that GERD patients were at increased risk of developing dental erosion compared to controls.

  6. Evaluation of accuracy of complete-arch multiple-unit abutment-level dental implant impressions using different impression and splinting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed; Baig, Mirza Rustum; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the accuracy of multiple-unit dental implant casts obtained from splinted or nonsplinted direct impression techniques using various splinting materials by comparing the casts to the reference models. The effect of two different impression materials on the accuracy of the implant casts was also evaluated for abutment-level impressions. A reference model with six internal-connection implant replicas placed in the completely edentulous mandibular arch and connected to multi-base abutments was fabricated from heat-curing acrylic resin. Forty impressions of the reference model were made, 20 each with polyether (PE) and polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) impression materials using the open tray technique. The PE and PVS groups were further subdivided into four subgroups of five each on the bases of splinting type: no splinting, bite registration PE, bite registration addition silicone, or autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The positional accuracy of the implant replica heads was measured on the poured casts using a coordinate measuring machine to assess linear differences in interimplant distances in all three axes. The collected data (linear and three-dimensional [3D] displacement values) were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference resin model and analyzed with nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney). No significant differences were found between the various splinting groups for both PE and PVS impression materials in terms of linear and 3D distortions. However, small but significant differences were found between the two impression materials (PVS, 91 μm; PE, 103 μm) in terms of 3D discrepancies, irrespective of the splinting technique employed. Casts obtained from both impression materials exhibited differences from the reference model. The impression material influenced impression inaccuracy more than the splinting material for multiple-unit abutment-level impressions.

  7. Users' dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério dos; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira e

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users' dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users' dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units.

  8. Users’ dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima Martins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users’ dissatisfaction with such are.METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users’ dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable, demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables. Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals.RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms.CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units.

  9. Users’ dissatisfaction with dental care: a population-based household study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; dos Santos, Pedro Eleutério; Carreiro, Danilo Lima; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine whether demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care are associated with users’ dissatisfaction with such are. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 781 people who required dental care in Montes Claros, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2012, a city with of medium-sized population situated in the North of Minas Gerais. Household interviews were conducted to assess the users’ dissatisfaction with dental care (dependent variable), demographic, socioeconomic conditions, oral health subjectivity and characterization of dental care (independent variables). Sample calculation was used for the finite population, with estimates made for proportions of dissatisfaction in 50.0% of the population, a 5.0% error margin, a non-response rate of 5.0% and a 2.0% design effect. Logistic regression was used, and the odds ratio was calculated with a 5% significance level and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS Of the interviewed individuals, 9.0% (7.9%, with correction for design effect) were dissatisfied with the care provided. These were associated with lower educational level; negative self-assessment of oral health; perception that the care provider was unable to give dental care; negative evaluation of the way the patient was treated, the cleanliness of the rooms, based on the examination rooms and the toilets, and the size of the waiting and examination rooms. CONCLUSIONS The rate of dissatisfaction with dental care was low. This dissatisfaction was associated with socioeconomic conditions, subjectivity of oral health, skill of the health professionals relating to the professional-patient relationship and facility infrastructure. Educational interventions are suggested that aim at improving the quality of care among professionals by responsible agencies as is improving the infrastructure of the care units. PMID:26270017

  10. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  11. Selection of dental implants based on masticatory load of the patient: A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sudhakar Kumararama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Masticatory load and efficiency vary from one individual to other. Maximum load of one person may be the least load of another. Hence, optimization of dental implants based on the load dissipation of an individual is essential for a better prognosis of implant-supported prosthesis. The aim of the study was to find the appropriate implant dimensions for the particular region based on the masticatory efficiency of the individual. Materials and Methods: A two-dimensional-threaded implant model was designed, which was duplicated in total 28 models with varying dimensions starting from 3 mm × 8 mm till 6 mm × 14 mm, with an incremental increase of 2 mm in length and 0.5 mm in diameter. All these implant models were surrounded in cancellous bone. Each implant model was loaded from 50 Newtons (N to 700 N with an incremental increase of 50 N in load in vertical direction to the static model complex. Results: Von Mises stresses were calculated for all the models with different amount of load. The analysis showed that, with an increase in applied masticatory load the smaller dimensional implants showed more stress in the bone, with more stress concentration toward the crest of the implants, and in the apical bone, with respect to the ultimate stress capacity of bone. Conclusion: Thus, based on the numerical analysis results, a classification was designed, which will indicate that for a particular amount of masticatory load, a particular dimension of implant has to be selected, rather than just selecting the implant based on the available bone and its dimensions without knowing the load the implant is going to take once it is loaded.

  12. Physicochemical characterization of porcine bone-derived grafting material and comparison with bovine xenografts for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Heon; Yi, Gyu Sung; Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Deug Joong

    2017-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of a xenograft are very important because they strongly influence the bone regeneration capabilities of the graft material. Even though porcine xenografts have many advantages, only a few porcine xenografts are commercially available, and most of their physicochemical characteristics have yet to be reported. Thus, in this work we aimed to investigate the physicochemical characteristics of a porcine bone grafting material and compare them with those of 2 commercially available bovine xenografts to assess the potential of xenogenic porcine bone graft materials for dental applications. We used various characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption method, atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and others, to compare the physicochemical properties of xenografts of different origins. The porcine bone grafting material had relatively high porosity (78.4%) and a large average specific surface area (SSA; 69.9 m 2 /g), with high surface roughness (10-point average roughness, 4.47 µm) and sub-100-nm hydroxyapatite crystals on the surface. Moreover, this material presented a significant fraction of sub-100-nm pores, with negligible amounts of residual organic substances. Apart from some minor differences, the overall characteristics of the porcine bone grafting material were very similar to those of one of the bovine bone grafting material. However, many of these morphostructural properties were significantly different from the other bovine bone grafting material, which exhibited relatively smooth surface morphology with a porosity of 62.0% and an average SSA of 0.5 m 2 /g. Considering that both bovine bone grafting materials have been successfully used in oral surgery applications in the last few decades, this work shows that the porcine-derived grafting material possesses most of the key physiochemical characteristics required for its

  13. Effect of a desensitizing paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the surface roughness of dental materials and human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Garcia-Godoy, Alexander; Garcia-Godoy, Cristina

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of an 8% arginine-calcium carbonate fluoride-free desensitizing paste on the surface roughness of resin composite, porcelain, amalgam, gold, and human dental enamel both prior to and following simulated toothbrushing. A resin composite (Filtek Supreme), a commercial porcelain (IPS Empress), an amalgam (Dispersalloy), gold (JIF-PF) and human dental enamel were used, as well as commercial finishing and polishing instruments. Eight two-sided samples were fabricated for each group. The composite and amalgam samples were stored at 100% relative humidity and 37 degrees C for 48 hours prior to measuring the surface roughness and completing the subsequent finishing and polishing procedures. Enamel blocks were cut from human lesion-free teeth and embedded in acrylic. The blocks were then polished flat with high polishing pastes. For gold and porcelain, the same size was used and the materials processed by a professional dental laboratory. Following storage, each surface was polished using the Super-Snap (Shofu) system. The amalgam was polished with conventional polishing techniques. Roughness (Ra and Ry) was evaluated with both a 3D non-contact profilometer and a stylus profilometer. With the two-sided samples only one side was polished with the desensitizing paste and the other side was left unpolished without paste. The 8% arginine-calcium carbonate desensitizing paste was applied to a surface for 15 seconds using a single disposable prophy cup. Each polished surface was measured by the profilometers and three roughness values per surface were recorded as the "initial prophy" surface. Following initial surface analysis, each side of every sample was treated with a simulated toothbrushing technique using a toothbrushing device (V-8). A 50:50 (w/w) slurry of toothpaste (Colgate Cavity Protection) and deionized water was used. Each surface was brushed 10,000 times. Then, the samples were rinsed with tap water and stored in 100% humidity until roughness

  14. Mechanical properties of provisional dental materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astudillo-Rubio, Daniela; Delgado-Gaete, Andrés; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Montiel-Company, José María; Pascual-Moscardó, Agustín; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Provisional restorations represent an important phase during the rehabilitation process, knowledge of the mechanical properties of the available materials allows us to predict their clinical performance. At present, there is no systematic review, which supports the clinicians' criteria, in the selection of a specific material over another for a particular clinical situation. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess and compare the mechanical properties of dimethacrylates and monomethacrylates used in fabricating direct provisional restorations, in terms of flexural strength, fracture toughness and hardness. This review followed the PRISMA guidelines. The searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, the New York Academy of Medicine Grey Literature Report and were complemented by hand-searching, with no limitation of time or language up to January 10, 2017. Studies that assess and compare the mechanical properties of dimethacrylate- and monomethacrylate-based provisional restoration materials were selected. A quality assessment of full-text articles were performed according to modified ARRIVE and CONSORT criteria and modified Cochrane Collaboration's tool for in vitro studies. Initially, 256 articles were identified. After removing the duplicates and applying the selection criteria, 24 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis and 7 were included in the quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). It may be concluded that dimethacrylate-based provisional restorations presented better mechanical behavior than monomethacrylate-based ones in terms of flexural strength and hardness. Fracture toughness showed no significant differences. Within the monomethacrylate group, polymethylmethacrylate showed greater flexural strength than polyethylmethacrylate.

  15. Mechanical properties of provisional dental materials: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Astudillo-Rubio

    Full Text Available Provisional restorations represent an important phase during the rehabilitation process, knowledge of the mechanical properties of the available materials allows us to predict their clinical performance. At present, there is no systematic review, which supports the clinicians' criteria, in the selection of a specific material over another for a particular clinical situation. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess and compare the mechanical properties of dimethacrylates and monomethacrylates used in fabricating direct provisional restorations, in terms of flexural strength, fracture toughness and hardness. This review followed the PRISMA guidelines. The