WorldWideScience

Sample records for based clinical microscopy

  1. Clinical specular microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, L.W.; Laing, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides the general ophthalmologist with a guide to the clinical applications of specular microscopy. Important material is included on laser injury, cataract surgery, corneal transplants, glaucoma, uveitis, and trauma.

  2. Clinical multiphoton and CARS microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, H. G.; Weinigel, M.; Darvin, M. E.; Lademann, J.; König, K.

    2012-03-01

    We report on clinical CARS imaging of human skin in vivo with the certified hybrid multiphoton tomograph CARSDermaInspect. The CARS-DermaInspect provides simultaneous imaging of non-fluorescent intradermal lipid and water as well as imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence from intrinsic molecules. Two different excitation schemes for CARS imaging have been realized: In the first setup, a combination of fs oscillator and optical parametric oscillator provided fs-CARS pump and Stokes pulses, respectively. In the second setup a fs oscillator was combined with a photonic crystal fiber which provided a broadband spectrum. A spectral range out of the broadband-spectrum was selected and used for CARS excitation in combination with the residual fs-oscillator output. In both setups, in addition to CARS, single-beam excitation was used for imaging of two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. Both CARS-excitation systems were successfully used for imaging of lipids inside the skin in vivo.

  3. A semi-automated, field-portable microscopy platform for clinical diagnostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Srinivasan, Rajesh; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2015-08-01

    Clinical microscopy is a versatile diagnostic platform used for diagnosis of a multitude of diseases. In the recent past, many microfluidics based point-of-care diagnostic devices have been developed, which serve as alternatives to microscopy. However, these point-of-care devices are not as multi-functional and versatile as clinical microscopy. With the use of custom designed optics and microfluidics, we have developed a versatile microscopy-based cellular diagnostic platform, which can be used at the point of care. The microscopy platform presented here is capable of detecting infections of very low parasitemia level (in a very small quantity of sample), without the use of any additional computational hardware. Such a cost-effective and portable diagnostic device, would greatly impact the quality of health care available to people living in rural locations of the world. Apart from clinical diagnostics, it's applicability to field research in environmental microbiology has also been outlined.

  4. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinica...

  5. Photorejuvenation observation based on two photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-lian; Li, Hui; Xiao, Zheng-ying; Xie, Shu-sen

    2008-12-01

    With low risk of complications and little down-time, the non-ablative photo-rejuvenation is playing an increasing role in the therapy of the photo-damaged skin, but the appraisal standard is different. This paper mainly observed the effect of the mouse skin irradiated by intense pulse light source through two photo microscopy in sub-micrometer. The spectrum and morphological imaging between pre- and post-irradiated by Intense Pulse Light (IPL) were obtained from two photon microscopy respectively. The outcome showed that non-ablative IPL irradiated the aging mouse skin got the better effect, and then have gained the changes of spectrum intensity and corresponding photon numbers in a rectangular area, these probable achieve the mechanism of light irradiated skin. The intention of this was offer the theory basis in clinic.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  7. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  8. Magnetic resonance microscopy of prostate tissue: How basic science can inform clinical imaging development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This commentary outlines how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy studies of prostate tissue samples and whole organs have shed light on a number of clinical imaging mysteries and may enable more effective development of new clinical imaging methods

  9. Camera array based light field microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  10. All fiber based supercontinuum light source utilized for IR microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Sune; Petersen, Christian; Thøgersen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    An all fiber based supercontinuum light source is demonstrated for infrared microscopy. The high brightness and spatial coherence of the source facilitate fast high resolution measurements.......An all fiber based supercontinuum light source is demonstrated for infrared microscopy. The high brightness and spatial coherence of the source facilitate fast high resolution measurements....

  11. Hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy based on compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Vincent; Bobin, Jérome; Chahid, Makhlad; Mousavi, Hamed; Candes, Emmanuel; Dahan, Maxime

    2012-03-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, one can distinguish two kinds of imaging approaches, wide field and raster scan microscopy, differing by their excitation and detection scheme. In both imaging modalities the acquisition is independent of the information content of the image. Rather, the number of acquisitions N, is imposed by the Nyquist-Shannon theorem. However, in practice, many biological images are compressible (or, equivalently here, sparse), meaning that they depend on a number of degrees of freedom K that is smaller that their size N. Recently, the mathematical theory of compressed sensing (CS) has shown how the sensing modality could take advantage of the image sparsity to reconstruct images with no loss of information while largely reducing the number M of acquisition. Here we present a novel fluorescence microscope designed along the principles of CS. It uses a spatial light modulator (DMD) to create structured wide field excitation patterns and a sensitive point detector to measure the emitted fluorescence. On sparse fluorescent samples, we could achieve compression ratio N/M of up to 64, meaning that an image can be reconstructed with a number of measurements of only 1.5 % of its pixel number. Furthemore, we extend our CS acquisition scheme to an hyperspectral imaging system.

  12. Digital differential confocal microscopy based on spatial shift transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wilson, T; Wang, H; Tan, J

    2014-11-01

    Differential confocal microscopy is a particularly powerful surface profilometry technique in industrial metrology due to its high axial sensitivity and insensitivity to noise. However, the practical implementation of the technique requires the accurate positioning of point detectors in three-dimensions. We describe a simple alternative based on spatial transformation of a through-focus series of images obtained from a homemade beam scanning confocal microscope. This digital differential confocal microscopy approach is described and compared with the traditional Differential confocal microscopy approach. The ease of use of the digital differential confocal microscopy system is illustrated by performing measurements on a 3D standard specimen. PMID:25303106

  13. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, Thomas; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    We describe a diffraction microscopy technique based on refractive optics to study structural variations in crystals. The X-ray beam diffracted by a crystal was magnified by beryllium parabolic refractive lenses on a 2D X-ray camera. The microscopy setup was integrated into the 6-circle Huber diffractometer at the ESRF beamline ID06. Our setup allowed to visualize structural imperfections with a resolution of approximately 1 micrometer. The configuration, however, can easily be adapted for sub-micrometer resolution.

  14. A microscopy technique based on bio-impedance sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Yúfera, A.; Huertas, Gloria; Olmo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    It is proposed a microscopy for cell culture applications based on impedance sensors. The imagined signals are measured with the Electrical Cell-Substrate Spectroscopy (ECIS) technique, by identifying the cell area. The proposed microscopy allows real-time monitoring inside the incubator, reducing the contamination risk by human manipulation. It requires specific circuits for impedance measurements, a two-dimensional sensor array (pixels), and employing electrical models to decode efficiently...

  15. Clinical applications of in vivo fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Kim, Junhyung; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Chun, Byungseon; Gweon, Daegab

    2008-02-01

    Living skin for basic and clinical research can be evaluated by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) non-invasively. CLSM imaging system can achieve skin image its native state either "in vivo" or "fresh biopsy (ex vivo)" without fixation, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. This study examines the potential fluorescent CLSM with a various exogenous fluorescent contrast agent, to provide with more resolution images in skin. In addition, in vivo fluorescent CLSM researchers will be extended a range of potential clinical application. The prototype of our CLSM system has been developed by Prof. Gweon's group. The operating parameters are composed of some units, such as illuminated wavelength 488 nm, argon illumination power up to 20mW on the skin, objective lens, 0.9NA oil immersion, axial resolution 1.0μm, field of view 200μm x 100μm (lateral resolution , 0.3μm). In human volunteer, fluorescein sodium was administrated topically and intradermally. Animal studies were done in GFP transgenic mouse, IRC mouse and pig skin. For imaging of animal skin, fluorescein sodium, acridine orange, and curcumine were used for fluorescein contrast agent. We also used the GFP transgenic mouse for fluorescein CLSM imaging. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. Curcumin is a yellow food dye that has similar fluorescent properties to fluorescein sodium. Acridin Orange can be highlight nuclei in viable keratinocyte. In vivo CLSM of transgenic GFP mouse enable on in vivo, high resolution view of GFP expressing skin tissue. GFP signals are brightest in corneocyte, kertinocyte, hair and eccrine gland. In intact skin, absorption of fluorescein sodium by individual corneocyte and hair. Intradermal administrated the fluorescein sodium, distinct outline of keratinocyte cell border could be seen. In

  16. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...... evidence in clinical practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice....

  17. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  18. STED super-resolution microscopy of clinical paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ilgen

    Full Text Available Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories.

  19. CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy has emerged as a high resolution, non-contact imaging technique for thermal profiling and performance and reliability analysis of numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices at the micro-scale. This thermography technique, which is based on measuring the relative change in reflectivity of the device surface as a function of change in temperature, provides high-resolution thermal images that are useful for hot spot detection and failure analysis, mapping of temperature distribution, measurement of thermal transient, optical characterization of photonic devices and measurement of thermal conductivity in thin films. In this paper we review the basic physical principle behind thermoreflectance as a thermography tool, discuss the experimental setup, resolutions achieved, signal processing procedures and calibration techniques, and review the current applications of CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy in various devices. (topical review)

  20. Mechanisms of Electromechanical Coupling in Strain Based Scanning Probe Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ou, Yun; Ma, Feiyue; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical coupling is ubiquitous in nature and underpins the functionality of materials and systems as diverse as ferroelectric and multiferroic materials, electrochemical devices, and biological systems, and strain-based scanning probe microscopy (s-SPM) techniques have emerged as a powerful tool in characterizing and manipulating electromechanical coupling at the nanoscale. Uncovering underlying mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in these diverse materials and systems, however...

  1. Entanglement-assisted electron microscopy based on a flux qubit

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nagatani, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    A notorious problem in high-resolution biological electron microscopy is radiation damage to the specimen caused by probe electrons. Hence, acquisition of data with minimal number of electrons is of critical importance. Quantum approaches may represent the only way to improve the resolution in this context, but all proposed schemes to date demand delicate control of the electron beam in highly unconventional electron optics. Here we propose a scheme that involves a flux qubit based on a radio...

  2. Operational implementation of LED fluorescence microscopy in screening tuberculosis suspects in an urban HIV clinic in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Albert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Light emitting diode (LED fluorescence microscopy (FM is an affordable, technology targeted for use in resource-limited settings and recommended for widespread roll-out by the World Health Organization (WHO. We sought to compare the operational performance of three LED FM methods compared to light microscopy in a cohort of HIV-positive tuberculosis (TB suspects at an urban clinic in a high TB burden country. METHODS: Two spot specimens collected from TB suspects were included in the study. Smears were stained using auramine O method and read after blinding by three LED-based FM methods by trained laboratory technicians in the Infectious Diseases Institutelaboratory. Leftover portions of the refrigerated sputum specimens were transported to the FIND Tuberculosis Research Laboratory for Ziehl Neelsen (ZN smear preparation and reading by experienced technologist as well as liquid and solid culture. RESULTS: 174 of 627 (27.8% specimens collected yielded one or more positive mycobacterial cultures. 94.3% (164/174 were M. tuberculosis complex. LED FM was between 7.3-11.0% more sensitive compared to ZN microscopy. Of the 592 specimens examined by all microscopy methods, there was no significant difference in sensitivity between the three LED FM methods. The specificity of the LED FM methods was between 6.1% and 7.7% lower than ZN microscopy (P<0.001, although exclusion of the single poor reader resulted in over 98% specificity for all FM methods. CONCLUSIONS: Laboratory technicians in routine settings can be trained to use FM which is more sensitive than ZN microscopy. Despite rigorous proficiency testing, there were operator-dependent accuracy issues which highlight the critical need for intensive quality assurance procedures during LED FM implementation. The low sensitivity of FM for HIV-positive individuals particularly those with low CD4 T cell counts, will limit the number of additional patients found by LED FM in countries with high

  3. Stokes vector formalism based second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Mazumder, Nirmal; Tsai, Han-Ruei; Hu, Chih-Wei; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we have developed a four-channel Stokes vector formalism based second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to map and analyze SHG signal. A four-channel Stokesmeter setup is calibrated and integrated into a laser scanning microscope to measure and characterize the SH's corresponding Stokes parameters. We are demonstrating the use of SH and its Stokes parameters to visualize the birefringence and crystalline orientation of KDP and collagen. We believe the developed method can reveal unprecedented information for biomedical and biomaterial studies.

  4. STED microscopy based on axially symmetric polarized vortex beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhehai, Zhou; Lianqing, Zhu

    2016-03-01

    A stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy scheme using axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is proposed based on unique focusing properties of such kinds of beams. The concept of axially symmetric polarized vortex beams is first introduced, and the basic principle about the scheme is described. Simulation results for several typical beams are then shown, including radially polarized vortex beams, azimuthally polarized vortex beams, and high-order axially symmetric polarized vortex beams. The results indicate that sharper doughnut spots and thus higher resolutions can be achieved, showing more flexibility than previous schemes based on flexible modulation of both phase and polarization for incident beams. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61108047 and 61475021), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant No. 4152015), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Universities of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0667), and the Top Young Talents Support Program of Beijing, China (Grant No. CIT&TCD201404113).

  5. Ultramicrosensors based on transition metal hexacyanoferrates for scanning electrochemical microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Komkova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here a way for improving the stability of ultramicroelectrodes (UME based on hexacyanoferrate-modified metals for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. The most stable sensors were obtained by electrochemical deposition of six layers of hexacyanoferrates (HCF, more specifically, an alternating pattern of three layers of Prussian Blue and three layers of Ni–HCF. The microelectrodes modified with mixed layers were continuously monitored in 1 mM hydrogen peroxide and proved to be stable for more than 5 h under these conditions. The mixed layer microelectrodes exhibited a stability which is five times as high as the stability of conventional Prussian Blue-modified UMEs. The sensitivity of the mixed layer sensor was 0.32 A·M−1·cm−2, and the detection limit was 10 µM. The mixed layer-based UMEs were used as sensors in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM experiments for imaging of hydrogen peroxide evolution.

  6. Scanning near field microwave microscopy based on an active resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Naser; Kolokoltsev, Oleg; Ordonez-Romero, Cesar Leonardo

    2014-03-01

    A large number of recent implementations of near field scanning microwave microscopy (NFSMM) have been based on the perturbation of a resonant cavity connected to a sharp scanning probe. In this work we present results from an alternative approach: the perturbation of a microwave source connected to a scanning tip. Based on a yittrium iron garnet (YIG) cavity ring resonator this scanning probe system has a quality factor greater than 106, which allows us to detect very small frequency shifts, which translates to a very high sensitivity in sample impedance measurements. Using a selection of representative semiconductor, metal and biological samples we show how this approach leads to unusually high sensitivity and spatial resolution. Work supported by a grant from PAPIIT, UNAM 104513.

  7. Two-photon microscopy using fiber-based nanosecond excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Hüttmann, Gereon; Huber, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful technique for sensitive tissue imaging at depths of up to 1000 micrometers. However, due to the shallow penetration, for in vivo imaging of internal organs in patients beam delivery by an endoscope is crucial. Until today, this is hindered by linear and non-linear pulse broadening of the femtosecond pulses in the optical fibers of the endoscopes. Here we present an endoscope-ready, fiber-based TPEF microscope, using nanosecond pulses at low repetition rates instead of femtosecond pulses. These nanosecond pulses lack most of the problems connected with femtosecond pulses but are equally suited for TPEF imaging. We derive and demonstrate that at given cw-power the TPEF signal only depends on the duty cycle of the laser source. Due to the higher pulse energy at the same peak power we can also demonstrate single shot two-photon fluorescence lifetime measurements. PMID:27446680

  8. Digital super-resolution microscopy using example-based algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinji; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    We propose a super-resolution microscopy with a confocal optical setup and an example-based algorithm. The example-based super-resolution algorithm was performed by an example database which is constructed by learning a lot of sets of a high-resolution patch and a low-resolution patch. The high-resolution patch is a part of the high-resolution image of an object model expressed in a computer, and the low-resolution patch is calculated from the high-resolution patch in consideration with a spatial property of an optical microscope. In the reconstruction process, a low-resolution image observed by the confocal optical setup with an image sensor is converted to the super-resolved high-resolution image selected by a pattern matching method from the example database. We demonstrate the adequate selection of the patch size and the weighting superposition method performs the super resolution with a low signal-to noise ratio.

  9. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25634291

  10. An Evaluation of Web-Based Case Studies in Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Merkel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to provide students in introductory science courses with opportunities that mimic the investigative learning experience of doing research. This is particularly true in microbiology courses where advanced microscopy techniques are expensive and difficult to do. To that end, we developed three computer-based case studies around real-life scenarios. Our goals were to: (i improve students’ understanding of advanced microscopic techniques, (ii give students practice analyzing and interpreting data, and (iii model a scientific approach to how these techniques are applied to current issues in microbiology. Each case requires students to use references and interpret actual microscopic images, thus giving them a more realistic experience than we could previously provide. We analyzed student learning and perceptions to these case studies. After doing the case studies, students were more able to apply microscopic methods to a realistic problem, thus demonstrating an understanding of how the methods are used. Students appreciated the intellectual challenges presented by having to interpret and analyze actual microscopic images. This approach has allowed us to introduce new areas of content to our course and to stimulate critical thinking skills, a difficult task in a large introductory microbiology course.

  11. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy based on multianode photomultiplier tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki Hean; Buehler, Christof; Bahlmann, Karsten; Ragan, Timothy; Lee, Wei-Chung A.; Nedivi, Elly; Heffer, Erica L.; Fantini, Sergio; So, Peter T. C.

    2007-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) enhances imaging speed by parallelization. It is not well understood why the imaging depth of MMM is significantly shorter than conventional single-focus multiphoton microscopy (SMM). In this report, we show that the need for spatially resolved detectors in MMM results in a system that is more sensitive to the scattering of emission photons with reduced imaging depth. For imaging depths down to twice the scattering mean free path length of emission phot...

  12. Stereological characterization of the γ' particles in a nickel base superalloy: Comparison between transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical comparison of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques was provided concerning size measurements of γ' precipitates in a nickel-base superalloy. The divergence between results is explained in terms of the resolution limit for atomic force microscopy, linked both to the tip dimension and the diameter of the investigated particles

  13. Inquiry-Based Instruction of Compound Microscopy Using Simulated Paleobiogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jay Y. S.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    The compound microscope is an important tool in biology, and mastering it requires repetition. Unfortunately, introductory activities for students can be formulaic, and consequently, students are often unengaged and fail to develop the required experience to become proficient in microscopy. To engage students, increase repetition, and develop…

  14. Fourier ptychographic microscopy for filtration-based circulating tumor cell enumeration and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anthony; Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Datar, Ram; Yang, Changhuei; Cote, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as a candidate biomarker with strong prognostic and predictive potential in metastatic disease. Filtration-based enrichment technologies have been used for CTC characterization, and our group has previously developed a membrane microfilter device that demonstrates efficacy in model systems and clinical blood samples. However, uneven filtration surfaces make the use of standard microscopic techniques a difficult task, limiting the performance of automated imaging using commercially available technologies. Here, we report the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to tackle this challenge. Employing this method, we were able to obtain high-resolution color images, including amplitude and phase, of the microfilter samples over large areas. FPM's ability to perform digital refocusing on complex images is particularly useful in this setting as, in contrast to other imaging platforms, we can focus samples on multiple focal planes within the same frame despite surface unevenness. In model systems, FPM demonstrates high image quality, efficiency, and consistency in detection of tumor cells when comparing corresponding microfilter samples to standard microscopy with high correlation (R2=0.99932). Based on these results, we believe that FPM will have important implications for improved, high throughput, filtration-based CTC analysis, and, more generally, image analysis of uneven surfaces.

  15. SLM-based Fourier Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorizadeh, Sahand

    Optical phase microscopy provides a view of objects that have minimal to no effect on the detected intensity of light that are unobservable by standard microscopy techniques. Since its inception just over 60 years ago that gave us a vision to an unseen world and earned Frits Zernike the Nobel prize in physics in 1953, phase microscopy has evolved to find various applications in biological cell imaging, crystallography, semiconductor failure analysis, and more. Two common and commercially available techniques are phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC). In phase contrast method, a large portion of the unscattered light that accounts for the majority of the light passing unaffected through a transparent medium is blocked to allow the scattered light due to the object to be observed with higher contrast. DIC is a self-referenced interferometer that transduces phase variation to intensity variation. While being established as fundamental tools in many scientific and engineering disciplines, the traditional implementation of these techniques lacks the ability to provide the means for quantitative and repeatable measurement without an extensive and cumbersome calibration. The rapidly growing fields in modern biology meteorology and nano-technology have emphasized the demand for a more robust and convenient quantitative phase microscopy. The recent emergence of modern optical devices such as high resolution programmable spatial light modulators (SLM) has enabled a multitude of research activities over the past decade to reinvent phase microscopy in unconventional ways. This work is concerned with an implementation of a DIC microscope containing a 4-f system at its core with a programmable SLM placed at the frequency plane of the imaging system that allows for employing Fourier pair transforms for wavefront manipulation. This configuration of microscope provides a convenient way to perform both wavefront shearing with quantifiable arbitrary shear amount

  16. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    Using the best quality of clinical research evidence is essential for choosing the right treatment for patients. How to identify the best research evidence is, however, difficult. In this narrative review we summarise these threats and describe how to minimise them. Pertinent literature was consi...

  17. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP by using Magnifying Loupes (ML and dental operating microscope (DOM. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided, Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001 difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ≅ Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05, also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

  18. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones. PMID:26872004

  19. SEROLOGY VERSUS SPUTUM MICROSCOPY AFTER THE INTENSIVE PHASE OF DOTS THERAPY: EVALUATION OF A MPT64 BASED ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamonud Modak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast, sensitive, specific yet inexpensive methods for detection of tuberculosis remain elusive. In spite of its limitations sputum smear microscopy remains the most widely used method for it’s detection. Various commercial antigen based serological tests are being promoted as an alternative to sputum microscopy. These tests offer an economically viable pragmatic alternative to smear microscopy. Few studies exist evaluating the performance of serological tests after the intensive phase of DOTS. We believe to be an effective alternative to sputum microscopy; serology must perform reasonably well in all the stages of therapy. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of a single serological test after two months of intensive phase drug therapy in previously seropositive and smear positive patients attending the DOTS clinic of a tertiary care hospital. Our results showed a sensitivity of 0.5 (0.17-0.82 95% CI and a specificity of 0.25 (0.11-0.46 95% CI taking sputum smear microscopy as the gold standard. We concluded that the present formats of serological tests are not useful in differentiating an active infection from a recently cured infection. Further research must be done on detecting antibodies which reflect the true infection load.

  20. Interaction force microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yexian

    The ability to sense small changes in the interaction force between a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and a substrate requires cantilevers with a sharp mechanical resonance. A typical commercially available cantilever in air is characterized by a resonance with a Q factor of 100 ˜ 300. The low Q factor can be attributed to imperfections in the cantilever itself as well as damping effects of the surrounding air. To substantially increase the Q factor, novel concepts are required. For this reason, we have performed a systematic study of quartz tuning fork resonators for possible use with SPMs. We find that tuning fork resonators operating in air are characterized by Q factors in the order of 104, thereby greatly improving the SPM's ability to measure small shifts in the interaction force. By carefully attaching commercially available SPM tips to the tuning fork, it is possible to obtain SPM images using non-contact imaging techniques and analyze the tip-sample interactions. The assembly of uniform molecular monolayers on atomically flat substrates for molecular electronics applications has received widespread attention during the past ten years. Scanning probe techniques are often used to assess substrate topography, molecular ordering and electronic properties, yet little is known about the fundamental tip-molecule interaction. To address this issue we have built an Interaction Force Microscope using a quartz tuning fork to probe tip-molecular monolayer interactions using scanning probe microscopy. The high quality factor and stable resonant frequency of a quartz tuning fork allows accurate measurement of small shifts in the resonant frequency as the tip interacts with the substrate. To permit an accurate measure of surface interaction forces, the electrical and piezomechanical properties of a tuning fork have been calibrated using a fiber optical interferometer. In prior work [1], we have studied molecular layers formed from either 4-Trifluoro

  1. Optical coherence tomography-based freeze-drying microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mujat, Mircea; Greco, Kristyn; Galbally-Kinney, Kristin L.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Mulhall, Phillip; Sharma, Puneet; Pikal, Michael J.; Kessler, William J.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of freeze-drying microscope based upon time-domain optical coherence tomography is presented here (OCT-FDM). The microscope allows for real-time, in situ 3D imaging of pharmaceutical formulations in vials relevant for manufacturing processes with a lateral resolution of

  2. School-Based Clinics to the Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, M. Joycelyn

    1992-01-01

    Although Lakeview (Arkansas) School District's health services originally targeted teenage pregnancies, its school-based clinic now offers varied health improvement services and contributes to decreased substance abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, dropping out, injuries, homicides, and suicides. Tips for forming clinics are provided, along with…

  3. A PDMS-Based 2-Axis Waterproof Scanner for Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Young Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM is an imaging tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. To achieve a small size, fast imaging speed, wide scan range, and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs in a water environment, we introduce a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-based 2-axis scanner for a flexible and waterproof structure. The design, theoretical background, fabrication process and performance of the scanner are explained in details. The designed and fabricated scanner has dimensions of 15 × 15 × 15 mm along the X, Y and Z axes, respectively. The characteristics of the scanner are tested under DC and AC conditions. By pairing with electromagnetic forces, the maximum scanning angles in air and water are 18° and 13° along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured resonance frequencies in air and water are 60 and 45 Hz along the X axis and 45 and 30 Hz along the Y axis, respectively. Finally, OR-PAM with high SNRs is demonstrated using the fabricated scanner, and the PA images of micro-patterned samples and microvasculatures of a mouse ear are successfully obtained with high-resolution and wide-field of view. OR-PAM equipped with the 2-axis PDMS based waterproof scanner has lateral and axial resolutions of 3.6 μm and 26 μm, respectively. This compact OR-PAM system could potentially and widely be used in preclinical and clinical applications.

  4. Recent developments in fluorescence-based microscopy applied in biomedical sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present short review aims to give an overview of the most recent de velopments in fluorescence microscopy and its applications in biomedical science s. Apart from improvements in well-established methods based on conventional fl u orescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (fluorescence in situ hybridisa tion (FISH), tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in immunocytochemistry, new fluorop hores), more recently introduced techniques like fluorescence resonance energy t ransfer (FRET), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), multiphoton m icroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) will be discussed.

  5. Initial clinical experience of MRI microscopy coil to triangular fibrocartilage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the efficacy of high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil at 1.5 T for diagnosing triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury, compared with arthroscopy and arthrography. All subjects were imaged in the prone position with the arm over the head. The wrist was kept in the pronation position and a microscopy coil was placed on the center of ulnar head. All MR images were obtained at 1.5 T. Two-dimensional gradient-echo (GRE), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fast spin echo (FSE) images of the wrist were acquired using a microscopy coil (47 mm in diameter). Eight patients with injured TFCC were studied with both arthrography and MRI, and three patients were studied with both arthroscopy and MRI. The structures of TFCC were classified into 6 regions (radius attachment, disc proper, triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment, volar side radio-ulnar ligament, and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament), and were evaluated by one orthopedics surgeon and two radiologists. It was possible to distinguish each structure of the TFCC using high-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil. The injuries were pointed out at radius attachment in 3 patients, disc proper in 4, triangular ligament in 4, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament in 3, volar side radioulnar ligament in 7, and lunate-triquetral attachment in 7 on MRI. Using arthroscopy, injuries at lunate-triquetral attachment in 1, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, and triangular ligament in 3 were not observed possibly because of dorsal approach. Another TFCC injuries on MRI in 3 patients were consistent with those with arthroscopy. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil allowed to describe most of TFCC injuries, and to evaluate triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, which could not be observed by arthroscopy and arthrography. (author)

  6. Clinical Epidemiology, Evidence Based Medicine and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines vs. Clinical Method?

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Alberto Corona Martínez; Mercedes Fonseca Hernández

    2009-01-01

    Evidence Based Medicine, as a trend or approach to the medical practice nowadays, and the use of Good Clinical Practice Guidelines in the assistance activities are core elements that contribute to improve the professional practice and the decision making process in diagnosis and therapy; but they do not substitute the professional method for patients assistance: the clinical method. The purpose of this article is to analyze the role of clinical epidemiology, evidence based medicine and good c...

  7. The Influence of Physical and Physiological Cues on Atomic Force Microscopy-Based Cell Stiffness Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chiou; Hsiu-Kuan Lin; Ming-Jer Tang; Hsi-Hui Lin; Ming-Long Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All...

  8. Sub-100 nm resolution microscopy based on proximity projection grating scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Hu; Somekh, Michael G.; Albutt, Darren J.; Kevin Webb; Emilia Moradi; See, Chung W.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) has been widely used in life science imaging applications. The maximum resolution improvement of SIM, compared to conventional bright field system is a factor of 2. Here we present an approach to structured illumination microscopy using the proximity projection grating scheme (PPGS), which has the ability to further enhance the SIM resolution without invoking any nonlinearity response from the sample. With the PPGS-based SIM, sub-100 nm resolution has ...

  9. Atomic magnetometer-based ultra-sensitive magnetic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Savukov, Igor

    2016-03-01

    An atomic magnetometer (AM) based on lasers and alkali-metal vapor cells is currently the most sensitive non-cryogenic magnetic-field sensor. Many applications in neuroscience and other fields require high resolution, high sensitivity magnetic microscopic measurements. In order to meet this need we combined a cm-size spin-exchange relaxation-free AM with a flux guide (FG) to produce an ultra-sensitive FG-AM magnetic microscope. The FG serves to transmit the target magnetic flux to the AM thus enhancing both the sensitivity and resolution for tiny magnetic objects. In this talk, we will describe a prototype FG-AM device and present experimental and numerical tests of its sensitivity and resolution. We also demonstrate that an optimized FG-AM achieves high resolution and high sensitivity sufficient to detect a magnetic field of a single neuron in a few seconds, which would be an important milestone in neuroscience. We anticipate that this unique device can be applied to the detection of a single neuron, the detection of magnetic nano-particles, which in turn are very important for detection of target molecules in national security and medical diagnostics, and non-destructive testing.

  10. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references

  11. High precision deflection measurement of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Heon [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong 760-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents the methodology to measure the precise deflection of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy. In this paper, three types of calibration methods have been proposed: full linearization, sectioned linearization, and the method based on astigmatism. In addition, the probe heads for easy calibration of optical pickup head and fast replacement of optical pickup head have been developed. The performances of each method have been compared through a set of experiments and constant height mode operation which was not possible in the optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy has been carried out successfully.

  12. Fluorescent Nanoparticle-Based Indirect Immunofluorescence Microscopy for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyun Chen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A method of fluorescent nanoparticle-based indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (FNP-IIFM was developed for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis antibody was used as primary antibody to recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and then an antibody binding protein (Protein A labeled with Tris(2,2-bipyridyldichlororuthenium(II hexahydrate (RuBpy-doped silica nanoparticles was used to generate fluorescent signal for microscopic examination. Prior to the detection, Protein A was immobilized on RuBpy-doped silica nanoparticles with a coverage of ∼5.1×102 molecules/nanoparticle. With this method, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bacterial mixture as well as in spiked sputum was detected. The use of the fluorescent nanoparticles reveals amplified signal intensity and higher photostability than the direct use of conventional fluorescent dye as label. Our preliminary studies have demonstrated the potential application of the FNP-IIFM method for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples.

  13. Context based support for Clinical Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup Pedersen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Intelligence, Knowledge Management Systems and Business Intelligence to make context sensitive, patient case specific analysis and knowledge management. The knowledge base consists of patient health records, reasoning process information and clinical guidelines. Patient specific information and knowledge is...... paper a framework for a Clinical Reasoning Knowledge Warehouse (CRKW) is presented, intended to support the reasoning process, by providing the decision participants with an analysis platform that captures and enhances information and knowledge. The CRKW mixes theories and models from Artificial...... continually enhanced by adding results of analysis. Context sensitive analysis is done by retrieving similar patient cases and guidelines from the knowledge base in a case based fashion....

  14. Oral leukoplakia: Transmission electron microscopic correlation with clinical types and light microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Avinash Tamgadge

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Thus, it is finally concluded that nodular leukoplakia seems to be the most severe clinical type of leukoplakia showing highest risk of malignant transformation. Homogenous leukoplakia might show break in basement membrane under TEM.

  15. Relationship between Histological and Clinical Course of Psoriasis: A Pilot Investigation by Reflectance Confocal Microscopy during Goeckerman Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archid, Rami; Duerr, Hans Peter; Patzelt, Alexa; Philipp, Sandra; Röwert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Ulrich, Martina; Meinke, Martina Claudia; Knorr, Fanny; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the skin microvasculature are known to play an important role in the development and maintenance of psoriatic skin lesions. In this study, we investigated lesional skin in 11 psoriatic patients during a modified Goeckerman treatment using reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) to study the relationship between clinical clearance and histological normalization of psoriatic skin and the significance of histological abnormalities on the course of disease. The treatment regimen resulted in a significant reduction of the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) as well as capillary and papillary diameters (p RCM findings as successor of the PASI in the monitoring of psoriasis. PMID:26841099

  16. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E; Kroghsbo, S; Wang, Mikala; Sondergaard, T E

    2015-01-01

    CelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96 % overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates...... short time-to-result, enabling same-day targeted antimicrobial therapy, facilitating antibiotic stewardship and better patient management. A full-scale validation of the oCelloScope system including more isolates is necessary to assess the impact of using it for AST....

  17. Atomic force microscopy imaging to measure precipitate volume fraction in nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nickel-based superalloys, quantitative analysis of scanning electron microscopy images fails in providing accurate microstructural data, whereas more efficient techniques are very time-consuming. As an alternative approach, the authors propose to perform quantitative analysis of atomic force microscopy images of polished/etched surfaces (quantitative microprofilometry). This permits the measurement of microstructural parameters and the depth of etching, which is the main source of measurement bias. Thus, nonbiased estimations can be obtained by extrapolation of the measurements up to zero etching depth. In this article, the authors used this approach to estimate the volume fraction of γ' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy single crystal. Atomic force microscopy images of samples etched for different times show definition, homogeneity, and contrast high enough to perform image analysis. The result after extrapolation is in very good agreement with volume fraction values available from published reports

  18. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed

  19. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forslind, B.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is frequently applied to dermatological problems, as is evident from a review of the recent literature. In this paper, preparation methods and new techniques allowing experimental studies on the integumentary system are emphasized. Quantitative analysis in the electron microscope by use of energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) has become an important accessory technique. EDX can, for instance, be used to study problems involving physiological changes induced in skin by agents causing contact reactions. Recently, it has been shown that treatment with DNCB, chromate and nickel causes changes in elemental distribution in guinea-pig skin. In addition, elemental uptake in the integumentary system and in pathological inclusions in skin can be analyzed.

  20. Investigation of Amyloid Structures at Nanoscale via AFM based Dynamic Nanomechncial Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    material research. Among kinds of techniques, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the advantages in amyloid study, due to the real-space nano-resolution, the possibilities to characterize in physiological condition, and easy operation without staining requirement. The recent developed AFM based dynamic...

  1. Use of atomic force microscopy to quantify slip irreversibility in a nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risbet, M.; Feaugas, X.; Guillemer-Neel, C.; Clavel, M

    2003-09-15

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the evolution of surface deformation during cyclic loading in a nickel-base superalloy. Cyclic slip irreversibility has been investigated using quantitative evaluation of extrusion heights and inter-band spacing. This approach is applied to formulate a microscopic crack initiation law, compared to a classical Manson-Coffin relationship.

  2. Use of atomic force microscopy to quantify slip irreversibility in a nickel-base superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the evolution of surface deformation during cyclic loading in a nickel-base superalloy. Cyclic slip irreversibility has been investigated using quantitative evaluation of extrusion heights and inter-band spacing. This approach is applied to formulate a microscopic crack initiation law, compared to a classical Manson-Coffin relationship

  3. Diagnosis of human fascioliasis in Arusha region, northern Tanzania by microscopy and clinical manifestations in patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lukambagire, Abdul-Hamid Settenda; Mchaile, Deborah N.; Nyindo, Mramba

    2015-01-01

    Background Human fascioliasis (HF) is a zoonotic disease that has been identified in many countries worldwide. This report concerns the identification and clinical management of cases of human fascioliasis in the suburbs of Arusha city, northern Tanzania in 2013. Fascioliasis is included among the WHO’s Neglected Tropical Diseases as a plant transmitted trematode infection. Human fascioliasis has not been described before in the East Africa region, including Tanzania. Methods Patients present...

  4. Live Cell Microscopy-Based RNAi Screening in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Tomohiro; Nakaoka, Yuki; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful technique enabling the identification of the genes involved in a certain cellular process. Here, we discuss protocols for microscopy-based RNAi screening in protonemal cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens, an emerging model system for plant cell biology. Our method is characterized by the use of conditional (inducible) RNAi vectors, transgenic moss lines in which the RNAi vector is integrated, and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. This method allows for effective and efficient screening of >100 genes involved in various cellular processes such as mitotic cell division, organelle distribution, or cell growth. PMID:27581297

  5. Birefringence and transmission electron microscopy of maghemite-based biocompatible magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static magnetic birefringence (SMB) and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate maghemite-based magnetic fluids surface coated with citrate and dispersed in physiologic solution. The model used to investigate the birefringence signal considers the monomer and dimer contributions and dimer magnetic permeability dependence to the applied field. The particle size distribution obtained from the fit of the SMB data is compared to the data obtained from the microscopy. Zero-field birefringence, present in the birefringence data, was also taken into account, and analyzed by the dimer model

  6. Noncontact scanning force microscopy based on a modified tuning fork sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttlich, Hagen; Stark, Robert W.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2000-08-01

    Distance control using a tuning fork setup for the detection of shear forces is a standard configuration in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Based on this concept, a modified sensor was developed, where a standard silicon tip for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is attached to the front end of one prong of a 100 kHz quartz tuning fork oscillator. Comparison of force curves of a standard tapping-mode AFM cantilever, a conventional fiber tip SNOM sensor and the novel AFM tip shear force sensor demonstrate an enhanced stability and sensitivity of the new sensor. Due to the rigid sensor design the force curves of the AFM tip shear force sensor indicate a perfect noncontact behavior under normal conditions in air. Noncontact images show a comparable resolution to conventional force microscopy.

  7. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of clinical isolates by digital time-lapse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, M; Rosenvinge, F S; Spillum, E; Kroghsbo, S; Wang, M; Sondergaard, T E

    2015-12-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is essential for early and appropriate therapy. Methods with short detection time enabling same-day treatment optimisation are highly favourable. In this study, we evaluated the potential of a digital time-lapse microscope system, the oCelloScope system, to perform rapid AST. The oCelloScope system demonstrated a very high accuracy (96% overall agreement) when determining the resistance profiles of four reference strains, nine clinical isolates, including multi-drug-resistant isolates, and three positive blood cultures. AST of clinical isolates (168 antimicrobial agent-organism combinations) demonstrated 3.6% minor, no major and 1.2% very major errors of the oCelloScope system compared to conventional susceptibility testing, as well as a rapid and correct phenotypic detection of strains with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) profiles. The net average time-to-result was 108 min, with 95% of the results being available within 180 min. In conclusion, this study strongly indicates that the oCelloScope system holds considerable potential as an accurate and sensitive AST method with short time-to-result, enabling same-day targeted antimicrobial therapy, facilitating antibiotic stewardship and better patient management. A full-scale validation of the oCelloScope system including more isolates is necessary to assess the impact of using it for AST. PMID:26407621

  8. Service-based Systems in Clinical Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    In this report we present an architectural approach to add quality-of-service (QoS) assurance and location awareness to service-based systems within existing clinical infrastructures. To address typical design requirements of such systems (e.g., cooperating services, performance and availability) the work proposes a service-oriented architecture (SOA) as architectural concept and architectural translucency to provide stable QoS. We evaluate position sensing systems, QoS assurance approaches a...

  9. 3D resolution enhancement of deep-tissue imaging based on virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, I-Cheng; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-07-25

    During the last decades, several resolution enhancement methods for optical microscopy beyond diffraction limit have been developed. Nevertheless, those hardware-based techniques typically require strong illumination, and fail to improve resolution in deep tissue. Here we develop a high-speed computational approach, three-dimensional virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy (3D-vSPOM), which immediately solves the strong-illumination issue. By amplifying only the spatial frequency component corresponding to the un-scattered point-spread-function at focus, plus 3D nonlinear value selection, 3D-vSPOM shows significant resolution enhancement in deep tissue. Since no iteration is required, 3D-vSPOM is much faster than iterative deconvolution. Compared to non-iterative deconvolution, 3D-vSPOM does not need a priori information of point-spread-function at deep tissue, and provides much better resolution enhancement plus greatly improved noise-immune response. This method is ready to be amalgamated with two-photon microscopy or other laser scanning microscopy to enhance deep-tissue resolution. PMID:27464077

  10. Fluorescent Nanoparticle-Based Indirect Immunofluorescence Microscopy for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiyun Chen; Weihong Tan; Xiaojun Julia Zhao; Kemin Wang; Xiaoxiao He; Dilan Qin

    2007-01-01

    A method of fluorescent nanoparticle-based indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (FNP-IIFM) was developed for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis antibody was used as primary antibody to recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and then an antibody binding protein (Protein A) labeled with Tris(2,2-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (RuBpy)-doped silica nanoparticles was used to generate fluorescent signal for microscopic examination. P...

  11. Solid-state nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a nuclear-spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two-qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1 K. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  12. Solid-State Nuclear Spin Quantum Computer Based on Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Hammel, P C; Tsifrinovich, V I

    1999-01-01

    We propose a nuclear spin quantum computer based on magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). It is shown that an MRFM single-electron spin measurement provides three essential requirements for quantum computation in solids: (a) preparation of the ground state, (b) one- and two- qubit quantum logic gates, and (c) a measurement of the final state. The proposed quantum computer can operate at temperatures up to 1K.

  13. Detecting degradation in Ni-based superalloy Udimet520 with scanning SQUID microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isawa, K.; Igarashi, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Sato, F.; Ogota, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Miyaguchi, K.

    2010-11-01

    In order to develop a new method for detecting degradation nondestructively in Udimet520 (U520), which is used for blades of aircraft jet-engine components and land-based gas turbines, fractured and interrupted samples in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep tests were studied using scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM). High temperature LCF and creep experiments on U520 were conducted to obtain various samples with different damage level. Simultaneously, we also examined the artificially degraded samples by optical microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction, and hardness measurements to ensure the damage level. On the basis of the magnetic permeability data, the virgin sample is nonmagnetic. However, for the artificially damaged samples, the observation of magnetic signals on the field maps indicates the potential of SSM to evaluate the degradation in U520 superalloy nondestructively.

  14. New directions in point-contact spectroscopy based on scanning tunneling microscopy techniques (Review Article)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Yanson showed 38 years ago for the first time a point-contact measurement where he probed the energy resolved spectroscopy of the electronic scattering inside the metal. Since this first measurement, the pointcontact spectroscopy (PCS) technique improved enormously. The application of the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques in the late 1980s allowed achieving contacts with a diameter of a single atom. With the introduction of the mechanically controlled break junction technique, even spectroscopy on freely suspended chains of atoms could be performed. In this paper, we briefly review the current developments of PCS and show recent experiments in advanced scanning PCS based on SPM techniques. We describe some results obtained with both needle-anvil type of point contacts and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We also show our first attempt to lift up with a STM a chain of single gold atoms from a Au(110) surface.

  15. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics Modelling, Simulation, Setup Building and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hui; Régnier, Stéphane; Sitti, Metin

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully used to perform nanorobotic manipulation operations on nanoscale entities such as particles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanocrystals, and DNA since 1990s. There have been many progress on modeling, imaging, teleoperated or automated control, human-machine interfacing, instrumentation, and applications of AFM based nanorobotic manipulation systems in literature. This book aims to include all of such state-of-the-art progress in an organized, structured, and detailed manner as a reference book and also potentially a textbook in nanorobotics and any other nanoscale dynamics, systems and controls related research and education. Clearly written and well-organized, this text introduces designs and prototypes of the nanorobotic systems in detail with innovative principles of three-dimensional manipulation force microscopy and parallel imaging/manipulation force microscopy.

  16. Chip-based optical microscopy for imaging membrane sieve plates of liver scavenger cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Øystein I.; Øie, Cristina I.; McCourt, Peter; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

    2015-08-01

    The evanescent field on top of optical waveguides is used to image membrane network and sieve-plates of liver endothelial cells. In waveguide excitation, the evanescent field is dominant only near the surface (~100-150 nm) providing a default optical sectioning by illuminating fluorophores in close proximity to the surface and thus benefiting higher signal-to-noise ratio. The sieve plates of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are present on the cell membrane, thus near-field waveguide chip-based microscopy configuration is preferred over epi-fluorescence. The waveguide chip is compatible with optical fiber components allowing easy multiplexing to different wavelengths. In this paper, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities provided by integrated optical microscopy for imaging cell membranes.

  17. Atomic force microscopy-based repeated machining theory for nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.Q., E-mail: wangzhiqian@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jiao, N.D. [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tung, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Dong, Z.L. [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, CAS, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based repeated nanomachining of nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The relationships of the initial nanochannel depth vs. final nanochannel depth at a normal force are systematically studied. Using the derived theory and simulation results, the final nanochannel depth can be predicted easily. Meanwhile, if a nanochannel with an expected depth needs to be machined, a right normal force can be selected simply and easily in order to decrease the wear of the AFM tip. The theoretical analysis and simulation results can be effectively used for AFM-based fabrication of nanochannels.

  18. Atomic force microscopy-based repeated machining theory for nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based repeated nanomachining of nanochannels on silicon oxide surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The relationships of the initial nanochannel depth vs. final nanochannel depth at a normal force are systematically studied. Using the derived theory and simulation results, the final nanochannel depth can be predicted easily. Meanwhile, if a nanochannel with an expected depth needs to be machined, a right normal force can be selected simply and easily in order to decrease the wear of the AFM tip. The theoretical analysis and simulation results can be effectively used for AFM-based fabrication of nanochannels.

  19. Large-field-of-view Chip-scale Talbot-grid-based Fluorescence Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Shuo; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W; Yang, Changhuei

    2012-01-01

    The fluorescence microscope is one of the most important tools in modern clinical diagnosis and biological science. However, its expense, size and limited field-of-view (FOV) are becoming bottlenecks in key applications such as large-scale phenotyping and low-resource-setting diagnostics. Here we report a low-cost, compact chip-scale fluorescence-imaging platform, termed the Fluorescence Talbot Microscopy (FTM), which utilizes the Talbot self-imaging effect to enable efficient fluorescence imaging over a large and directly-scalable FOV. The FTM prototype has a resolution of 1.2 microns and an FOV of 3.9 mm x 3.5 mm. We demonstrate the imaging capability of FTM on fluorescently labeled breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and HEK cells expressing green fluorescent protein.

  20. Screening photoswitching properties of synthesized BODIPY-based fluorophores for multispectral superresolution microscopy (MSSRM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittel, Amy M.; Saldivar, Isaac S.; Nan, Xiaolin; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-02-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) utilizes photoswitchable fluorophores to detect biological entities with 10-20 nm resolution. Multispectral superresolution microscopy (MSSRM) extends SMLM functionality by improving its spectral resolution up to 5 fold facilitating imaging of multicomponent cellular structures or signaling pathways. Current commercial fluorophores are not ideal for MSSRM as they are not designed to photoswitch and do not adequately cover the visible and far-red spectral regions required for MSSRM imaging. To obtain optimal MSSRM spatial and spectral resolution, fluorophores with narrow emission spectra and controllable photoswitching properties are necessary. Herein, a library of BODIPY-based fluorophores was synthesized and characterized to create optimal photoswitchable fluorophores for MSSRM. BODIPY was chosen as the core structure as it is photostable, has high quantum yield, and controllable photoswitching. The BODIPY core was modified through the addition of various aromatic moieties, resulting in a spectrally diverse library. Photoswitching properties were characterized using a novel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based film methodology to isolate single molecules. The PVA film methodology enabled photoswitching assessment without the need for protein conjugation, greatly improving screening efficiency of the BODIPY library. Additionally, image buffer conditions were optimized for the BODIPY-based fluorophores through systematic testing of oxygen scavenger systems, redox components, and additives. Through screening the photoswitching properties of BODIPY-based compounds in PVA films with optimized imaging buffer we identified novel fluorophores well suited for SMLM and MSSRM.

  1. Deformable mirror based remote focusing for fast three-dimensional microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Frade, Maria; Booth, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We present a deformable mirror based remote focusing method for three-dimensional imaging in high-resolution microscopy systems. The method relies on predefined mirror mode arrays that are obtained during initial mirror training step with a low complexity wavefront-sensing module. The imaging plane can be refocused over distances over a hundred times greater than the original depth of field of the objective lens along the optical axis at millisecond rates. We will demonstrate the combination of the remote focusing method with spatiotemporally focused two-photon excitation applied to three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

  2. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Kim, Seong H.; Tittmann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  3. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing

  4. Atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation study of onion abaxial epidermis walls in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoning; Tittmann, Bernhard [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Kim, Seong H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    An atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation method was employed to study how the structure of cellulose microfibril packing and matrix polymers affect elastic modulus of fully hydrated primary plant cell walls. The isolated, single-layered abaxial epidermis cell wall of an onion bulb was used as a test system since the cellulose microfibril packing in this cell wall is known to vary systematically from inside to outside scales and the most abundant matrix polymer, pectin, can easily be altered through simple chemical treatments such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and calcium ions. Experimental results showed that the pectin network variation has significant impacts on the cell wall modulus, and not the cellulose microfibril packing.

  5. Korean Clinic Based Outcome Measure Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongbae Park

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence based medicine has become main tools for medical practice. However, conducting a highly ranked in the evidence hierarchy pyramid is not easy or feasible at all times and places. There remains a room for descriptive clinical outcome measure studies with admitting the limit of the intepretation. Aims: Presents three Korean clinic based outcome measure studies with a view to encouraging Korean clinicians to conduct similar studies. Methods: Three studies are presented briefly here including 1 Quality of Life of liver cancer patients after 8 Constitutional acupuncture; 2 Developing a Korean version of Measuring yourself Medical Outcome profile (MYMOP; and 3 Survey on 5 Shu points: a pilot In the first study, we have included 4 primary or secondary liver cancer patients collecting their diagnostic X-ray film and clinical data f개m their hospital, and asked them to fill in the European Organization Research and Treatment of Cancer, Quality of Life Questionnaire before the commencement of the treatment. The acupuncture treatment is set up format but not disclosed yet. The translation and developing a Korean version of outcome measures that is Korean clinician friendly has been sought for MYMOP is one of the most appropriate one. The permission was granted, the translation into Korean was done, then back translated into English only based on the Korean translation by the researcher who is bilingual in both languages. The back translation was compared by the original developer of MYMOP and confirmed usable. In order to test the existence of acupoints and meridians through popular forms of Korean acupuncture regimes, we aim at collecting opinions from 101 Korean clinicians that have used those forms. The questions asked include most effective symptoms, 5 Shu points, points those are least likely to use due to either adverse events or the lack of effectiveness, theoretical reasons for the above proposals, proposing outcome measures

  6. Theoretical study of carbon-based tips for scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, C.; Abad, E.; Dappe, Y. J.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here a detailed theoretical analysis of the use of carbon-based conductive tips in scanning tunnelling microscopy. In particular, we employ ab initio methods based on density functional theory to explore a graphitic, an amorphous carbon and two diamond-like tips for imaging with a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM), and we compare them with standard metallic tips made of gold and tungsten. We investigate the performance of these tips in terms of the corrugation of the STM images acquired when scanning a single graphene sheet. Moreover, we analyse the impact of the tip-sample distance and show that it plays a fundamental role in the resolution and symmetry of the STM images. We also explore in depth how the adsorption of single atoms and molecules in the tip apexes modifies the STM images and demonstrate that, in general, it leads to an improved image resolution. The ensemble of our results provides strong evidence that carbon-based tips can significantly improve the resolution of STM images, as compared to more standard metallic tips, which may open a new line of research in scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  7. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  8. HIV detection by in-situ hybridization based on confocal reflected light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis C.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Cuellar, Roland; Paddock, Stephen W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    1991-05-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of AIDS is confounded by the finding that few actively infected CD4+ cells (1 in 104-105) can be detected in the peripheral blood, even though there is dramatic depletion (often >90%) of CD4+ cells as the disease progresses. A sensitive, 35S-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNA in situ hybridization technique was coupled with a new detection method, confocal laser scanning microscopy, to examine transcriptionally active HIV-infected cells from individuals at different disease stages. An algorithm for image segmentation and analysis has been developed to determine the proportion of HIV-positive cells. Data obtained using this improved detection method suggest that there are more HIV mRNA-producing cells in HIV-infected individuals than previously thought, based on other detection methods.

  9. Research on key technique of microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction based on piezoelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Xiao, Zexin

    2011-11-01

    Due to the limited depth of focus of microscope objective, a series of images taken from different sections and directions are needed to reconstruct 3D microscopy image. In this paper, we present a novel method which utilizes piezoelectric actuator, high magnification microscopy system without mirror and single CCD to observe micro-objects and reconstruct its three-dimensional image. Inverse piezoelectric effect of piezoelectric ceramics have some superior characteristics, such as high positioning resolution, high positioning accuracy, etc. And piezoelectric actuator possess the advantage of small-size, strong-power and easy- to-integrated as well. Based on these points, we designed a 360° rotation and tilt positioning platform. In this platform, Piezoelectric actuator is employed to ensure the positioning accuracy at axis-Z direction. At the same time, Motion of 360° rotation and tilt can be controlled precisely using stepping motor controlling technology. Furthermore, finite element methods (FEM) analyze software--ANSYS is used to analyze the rigidity, stress and structure optimization of the platform. This rotation and tilt mechanical positioning platform can help the single CCD to get clear, complete-view two dimensional images. This method paves the way for three-dimensional reconstruction of micro objects. Experiments demonstrate that this 360° rotation and tilt positioning stage is structure-simple and high-accurate. It can be widely used in micro-structure observing and three-dimensional image reconstruction among mechanics, materials and biology, etc.

  10. [Comparison of cell elasticity analysis methods based on atomic force microscopy indentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Hao, Fengtao; Chen, Xiaohu; Yang, Zhouqi; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2014-10-01

    In order to investigate in greater detail the two methods based on Hertz model for analyzing force-distance curve obtained by atomic force microscopy, we acquired the force-distance curves of Hela and MCF-7 cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation in this study. After the determination of contact point, Young's modulus in different indentation depth were calculated with two analysis methods of "two point" and "slope fitting". The results showed that the Young's modulus of Hela cell was higher than that of MCF-7 cell,which is in accordance with the F-actin distribution of the two types of cell. We found that the Young's modulus of the cells was decreased with increasing indentation depth and the curve trends by "slope fitting". This indicated that the "slope fitting" method could reduce the error caused by the miscalculation of contact point. The purpose of this study was to provide a guidance for researcher to choose an appropriate method for analyzing AFM indentation force-distance curve. PMID:25764725

  11. Phytoplankton taxonomy based on CHEMTAX and microscopy in the northwestern Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker-Develi, Elif; Berthon, Jean-François; Canuti, Elisabetta; Slabakova, Natalya; Moncheva, Snejana; Shtereva, Galina; Dzhurova, Boryana

    2012-06-01

    Abundance and carbon biomass of different phytoplankton groups obtained by microscopy were compared with taxonomy derived from pigment measurements and CHEMTAX analysis of samples collected in June 2006 in the NW Black Sea. The diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus was dominant in terms of carbon biomass based on cell volume at inshore stations, while the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was prevalent at offshore. Emiliania huxleyi reached bloom abundance of 3.3 × 106 cells L- 1. The chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration within phytoplankton groups as allocated by CHEMTAX was in agreement with microscopy derived carbon biomasses of the taxonomic groups diatoms, dinoflagellates and cryptophytes only. Carbon biomass of less abundant phytoplankton taxa (cyanophytes, euglenophytes and chlorophytes) did not correlate with group-specific chl a. It was not possible to detect E. huxleyi bloom by CHEMTAX analysis probably due to much higher biomass of other species containing 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin. Nutrient concentrations were generally high in the waters where diatom and dinoflagellates dominated the community but low in the area of E. huxleyi bloom. A good correlation between total carbon biomass of phytoplankton and chl a was found and the estimated C:chl a ratio of phytoplankton varied between 36 and 256 (in average 124 ± 50).

  12. Total variation based image deconvolution for extended depth-of-field microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausser, F.; Beckers, I.; Gierlak, M.; Kahraman, O.

    2015-03-01

    One approach for a detailed understanding of dynamical cellular processes during drug delivery is the use of functionalized biocompatible nanoparticles and fluorescent markers. An appropriate imaging system has to detect these moving particles so as whole cell volumes in real time with high lateral resolution in a range of a few 100 nm. In a previous study Extended depth-of-field microscopy (EDF-microscopy) has been applied to fluorescent beads and tradiscantia stamen hair cells and the concept of real-time imaging has been proved in different microscopic modes. In principle a phase retardation system like a programmable space light modulator or a static waveplate is incorporated in the light path and modulates the wavefront of light. Hence the focal ellipsoid is smeared out and images seem to be blurred in a first step. An image restoration by deconvolution using the known point-spread-function (PSF) of the optical system is necessary to achieve sharp microscopic images of an extended depth-of-field. This work is focused on the investigation and optimization of deconvolution algorithms to solve this restoration problem satisfactorily. This inverse problem is challenging due to presence of Poisson distributed noise and Gaussian noise, and since the PSF used for deconvolution exactly fits in just one plane within the object. We use non-linear Total Variation based image restoration techniques, where different types of noise can be treated properly. Various algorithms are evaluated for artificially generated 3D images as well as for fluorescence measurements of BPAE cells.

  13. Highly versatile confocal microscopy system based on a tunable femtosecond Er:fiber source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träutlein, D; Adler, F; Moutzouris, K; Jeromin, A; Leitenstorfer, A; Ferrando-May, E

    2008-03-01

    The performance of a confocal microscopy setup based on a single femtosecond fiber system is explored over a broad range of pump wavelengths for both linear and nonlinear imaging techniques. First, the benefits of a laser source in linear fluorescence excitation that is continuously tunable over most of the visible spectrum are demonstrated. The influences of subpicosecond pulse durations on the bleaching behavior of typical fluorophores are discussed. We then utilize the tunable near-infrared output of the femtosecond system in connection with a specially designed prism compressor for dispersion control. Pulses as short as 33 fs are measured in the confocal region. As a consequence, 2 mW of average power are sufficient for two-photon microscopy in an organotypic sample from the mouse brain. This result shows great prospect for deep-tissue imaging in the optimum transparency window around 1100 nm. In a third experiment, we prove that our compact setup is powerful enough to exploit even higher-order nonlinearities such as three-photon absorption that we use to induce spatially localized photodamage in DNA. PMID:19343635

  14. The application of Fresnel zone plate based projection in optofluidic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jigang; Cui, Xiquan; Lee, Lap Man; Yang, Changhuei

    2008-09-29

    Optofluidic microscopy (OFM) is a novel technique for low-cost, high-resolution on-chip microscopy imaging. In this paper we report the use of the Fresnel zone plate (FZP) based projection in OFM as a cost-effective and compact means for projecting the transmission through an OFM's aperture array onto a sensor grid. We demonstrate this approach by employing a FZP (diameter = 255 microm, focal length = 800 microm) that has been patterned onto a glass slide to project the transmission from an array of apertures (diameter = 1 microm, separation = 10 microm) onto a CMOS sensor. We are able to resolve the contributions from 44 apertures on the sensor under the illumination from a HeNe laser (wavelength = 633 nm). The imaging quality of the FZP determines the effective field-of-view (related to the number of resolvable transmissions from apertures) but not the image resolution of such an OFM system--a key distinction from conventional microscope systems. We demonstrate the capability of the integrated system by flowing the protist Euglena gracilis across the aperture array microfluidically and performing OFM imaging of the samples. PMID:18825198

  15. Context based mixture model for cell phase identification in automated fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated identification of cell cycle phases of individual live cells in a large population captured via automated fluorescence microscopy technique is important for cancer drug discovery and cell cycle studies. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images provide an important method to study the cell cycle process under different conditions of perturbation. Existing methods are limited in dealing with such time-lapse data sets while manual analysis is not feasible. This paper presents statistical data analysis and statistical pattern recognition to perform this task. Results The data is generated from Hela H2B GFP cells imaged during a 2-day period with images acquired 15 minutes apart using an automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The patterns are described with four kinds of features, including twelve general features, Haralick texture features, Zernike moment features, and wavelet features. To generate a new set of features with more discriminate power, the commonly used feature reduction techniques are used, which include Principle Component Analysis (PCA, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA, Maximum Margin Criterion (MMC, Stepwise Discriminate Analysis based Feature Selection (SDAFS, and Genetic Algorithm based Feature Selection (GAFS. Then, we propose a Context Based Mixture Model (CBMM for dealing with the time-series cell sequence information and compare it to other traditional classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM, Neural Network (NN, and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN. Being a standard practice in machine learning, we systematically compare the performance of a number of common feature reduction techniques and classifiers to select an optimal combination of a feature reduction technique and a classifier. A cellular database containing 100 manually labelled subsequence is built for evaluating the performance of the classifiers. The generalization error is estimated using the cross validation technique. The

  16. Influence of the phase effect on gradient-based and statistics-based focus measures in bright field microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, S; Mualla, F; Sommerfeldt, B; Steidl, S; Maier, A; Buchholz, R; Hornegger, J

    2014-05-01

    Autofocusing is essential to high throughput microscopy and live cell imaging and requires reliable focus measures. Phase objects such as separated single Chinese hamster ovary cells are almost invisible at the optical focus position in bright field microscopy images. Because of the phase effect, defocused images of phase objects have more contrast. In this paper, we show that widely used focus measures exhibit an untypical behaviour for such images. In the case of homogeneous cells, that is, when most cells tend to lie in the same focal plane, both gradient-based and statistics-based focus measures tend to have a local minimum instead of a global maximum at the optical focus position. On the other hand, if images show inhomogeneous cells, gradient-based focus measures tend to yield typical focus curves, whereas statistics-based focus measures deliver curves similar to the case of homogeneous cells. These results were interpreted using the equation describing the phase effect and patch-wise analysis of the focus curves. Bioprocess engineering experts are also influenced by the phase effect. Forty-four focus positions selected by them led to the conclusion that they prefer to look at defocused images instead of those at the optical focus. PMID:24611652

  17. Analysis of acute brain slices by electron microscopy: a correlative light-electron microscopy workflow based on Tokuyasu cryo-sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Celine; Leis, Andrew; Mathisen, Cliff; Bouvier, David S; Blanchard, Willy; Volterra, Andrea; Lich, Ben; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain slices are slices of brain tissue that are kept vital in vitro for further recordings and analyses. This tool is of major importance in neurobiology and allows the study of brain cells such as microglia, astrocytes, neurons and their inter/intracellular communications via ion channels or transporters. In combination with light/fluorescence microscopies, acute brain slices enable the ex vivo analysis of specific cells or groups of cells inside the slice, e.g. astrocytes. To bridge ex vivo knowledge of a cell with its ultrastructure, we developed a correlative microscopy approach for acute brain slices. The workflow begins with sampling of the tissue and precise trimming of a region of interest, which contains GFP-tagged astrocytes that can be visualised by fluorescence microscopy of ultrathin sections. The astrocytes and their surroundings are then analysed by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). An important aspect of this workflow is the modification of a commercial cryo-ultramicrotome to observe the fluorescent GFP signal during the trimming process. It ensured that sections contained at least one GFP astrocyte. After cryo-sectioning, a map of the GFP-expressing astrocytes is established and transferred to correlation software installed on a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope equipped with a STEM detector. Next, the areas displaying fluorescence are selected for high resolution STEM imaging. An overview area (e.g. a whole mesh of the grid) is imaged with an automated tiling and stitching process. In the final stitched image, the local organisation of the brain tissue can be surveyed or areas of interest can be magnified to observe fine details, e.g. vesicles or gold labels on specific proteins. The robustness of this workflow is contingent on the quality of sample preparation, based on Tokuyasu's protocol. This method results in a reasonable compromise between preservation of morphology and maintenance of

  18. Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Hai

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based edu...

  19. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Torres, C.; Streppa, L. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F. [CNRS, UMR5672, Laboratoire de Physique, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, Université de Lyon, 69007 Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR5798, Laboratoire Ondes et Matière d' Aquitaine, Université de Bordeaux, 351 Cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France); Argoul, P. [Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, SDOA, MAST, IFSTTAR, 14-20 Bd Newton, Cité Descartes, 77420 Champs sur Marne (France)

    2016-01-18

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved.

  20. SMILE Microscopy : fast and single-plane based super-resolution volume imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2016-01-01

    Fast 3D super-resolution imaging is essential for decoding rapidly occurring biological processes. Encoding single molecules to their respective planes enable simultaneous multi-plane super-resolution volume imaging. This saves the data-acquisition time and as a consequence reduce radiation-dose that lead to photobleaching and other undesirable photochemical reactions. Detection and subsequent identification of the locus of individual molecule (both on the focal plane and off-focal planes) holds the key. Experimentally, this is achieved by accurate calibration of system PSF size and its natural spread in off-focal planes using sub-diffraction fluorescent beads. Subsequently the identification and sorting of single molecules that belong to different axial planes is carried out (by setting multiple cut-offs to respective PSFs). Simultaneous Multiplane Imaging based Localization Encoded (SMILE) microscopy technique eliminates the need for multiple z-plane scanning and thereby provides a truly simultaneous multip...

  1. Delay-multiply-and-sum-based synthetic aperture focusing in photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongin; Jeon, Seungwan; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Lee, Jin S.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We propose an improved version of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on a delay-multiply-and-sum algorithm for acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). In this method, the photoacoustic (PA) signals from multiple scan-lines are combinatorially coupled, multiplied, and then summed. This process can be considered a correlation operation of the PA signals in each scan-line, so the spatial coherent information between the PA signals can be efficiently extracted. By applying this method in conventional AR-PAM, lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in out-of-focus regions are much improved compared with those estimated from the previously developed SAFT, respectively, thereby achieving the extension of the imaging focal region. Our phantom and in vivo imaging experiments prove the validity of our proposed method.

  2. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  3. Passive microrheology of soft materials with atomic force microscopy: A wavelet-based spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to active microrheology where a known force or modulation is periodically imposed to a soft material, passive microrheology relies on the spectral analysis of the spontaneous motion of tracers inherent or external to the material. Passive microrheology studies of soft or living materials with atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever tips are rather rare because, in the spectral densities, the rheological response of the materials is hardly distinguishable from other sources of random or periodic perturbations. To circumvent this difficulty, we propose here a wavelet-based decomposition of AFM cantilever tip fluctuations and we show that when applying this multi-scale method to soft polymer layers and to living myoblasts, the structural damping exponents of these soft materials can be retrieved

  4. Delay-multiply-and-sum-based synthetic aperture focusing in photoacoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongin; Jeon, Seungwan; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Lee, Jin S; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We propose an improved version of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on a delay-multiply-and-sum algorithm for acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM). In this method, the photoacoustic (PA) signals from multiple scan-lines are combinatorially coupled, multiplied, and then summed. This process can be considered a correlation operation of the PA signals in each scan-line, so the spatial coherent information between the PA signals can be efficiently extracted. By applying this method in conventional AR-PAM, lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in out-of-focus regions are much improved compared with those estimated from the previously developed SAFT, respectively, thereby achieving the extension of the imaging focal region. Our phantom and in vivo imaging experiments prove the validity of our proposed method. PMID:27020602

  5. Label-free monitoring of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence based on multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. X.; Li, H. S.; Chen, Z. F.; Feng, C. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. Z.; Guan, G. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Xu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring and evaluation of colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy are important for endoscopic resection of precursor lesions to disrupt the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and halt progression to invasive neoplastic disease. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to identify different stages during the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma including adenoma with low-grade and high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma invading the submucosa. It was found that by combining two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, MPM can reveal the morphological changes of the epithelial cells and glands, identify the invasive position and depth of atypical glands and quantitatively describe the change of the cellular nucleus and the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio during the stepwise progression of colorectal adenocarcinoma. These are important pathological findings for pathologists when diagnosing colorectal lesions. With the advancement of a compact and flexible multiphoton endoscope for in vivo imaging and clinical applications, MPM has the potential to provide immediate histological diagnosis for the monitoring and evaluation of the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence during endoscopy.

  6. Atom location using scanning transmission electron microscopy based on electron energy loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The technique of atom location by channelling enhanced microanalysis (ALCHEMI) using cross section data, measured as a function of electron beam orientation, has been widely implemented by many researchers. The accurate application of ALCHEMI, usually based on energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), requires knowledge, from first principles, of the relative delocalization of the inner-shell ionization interaction (see for example Oxley and Allen, 1998; Oxley et al., 1999). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) also provides information about the location of atoms of different types within the crystal lattice. Unlike high angle annular dark field (HAADF), EELS provides a unique signal for each atom type. In conjunction with highly focused probes, allowing near atomic resolution, this makes possible, in principle, the application of ALCHEMI like techniques to STEM images to determine the distribution of impurities within the unit cell. The accurate interpretation of STEM results requires that both the inner-shell ionization interaction and resulting ionization cross section or image be correctly modelled. We present model calculations demonstrating the in principle application of ALCHEMI type techniques to STEM images pertinent to EELS. The inner-shell ionisation interaction is modelled using Hartree-Fock wave functions to describe the atomic bound states and Hartree-Slater wave functions to describe the continuum states. The wave function within the crystal is calculated using boundary conditions appropriate for a highly focussed probe (Rossouw and Allen, 2001) and STEM images or ionisation cross sections are simulated using an inelastic cross section formulation that correctly accounts for the contribution from both dynamical electrons and those dechannelled by absorptive scattering processes such as thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy

  7. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R.; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tool...

  8. Thermodynamic Prediction of Compositional Phases Confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy on Tantalum-Based Alloy Weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum alloys have been used by the U.S. Department of Energy as structural alloys for radioisotope based thermal to electrical power systems since the 1960s. Tantalum alloys are attractive for high temperature structural applications due to their high melting point, excellent formability, good thermal conductivity, good ductility (even at low temperatures), corrosion resistance, and weldability. Tantalum alloys have demonstrated sufficient high-temperature toughness to survive prolonged exposure to the radioisotope power-system working environment. Typically, the fabrication of power systems requires the welding of various components including the structural members made of tantalum alloys. Issues such as thermodynamics, lattice structure, weld pool dynamics, material purity and contamination, and welding atmosphere purity all potentially confound the understanding of the differences between the weldment properties of the different tantalum-based alloys. The objective of this paper is to outline the thermodynamically favorable material phases in tantalum alloys, with and without small amounts of hafnium, during and following solidification, based on the results derived from the FactSage(c) Integrated Thermodynamic Databank. In addition, Transition Electron Microscopy (TEM) data will show for the first time, the changes occurring in the HfC before and after welding, and the data will elucidate the role HfC plays in pinning grain boundaries

  9. The influence of physical and physiological cues on atomic force microscopy-based cell stiffness assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chiou

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy provides a novel technique for differentiating the mechanical properties of various cell types. Cell elasticity is abundantly used to represent the structural strength of cells in different conditions. In this study, we are interested in whether physical or physiological cues affect cell elasticity in Atomic force microscopy (AFM-based assessments. The physical cues include the geometry of the AFM tips, the indenting force and the operating temperature of the AFM. All of these cues show a significant influence on the cell elasticity assessment. Sharp AFM tips create a two-fold increase in the value of the effective Young's modulus (E(eff relative to that of the blunt tips. Higher indenting force at the same loading rate generates higher estimated cell elasticity. Increasing the operation temperature of the AFM leads to decreases in the cell stiffness because the structure of actin filaments becomes disorganized. The physiological cues include the presence of fetal bovine serum or extracellular matrix-coated surfaces, the culture passage number, and the culture density. Both fetal bovine serum and the extracellular matrix are critical for cells to maintain the integrity of actin filaments and consequently exhibit higher elasticity. Unlike primary cells, mouse kidney progenitor cells can be passaged and maintain their morphology and elasticity for a very long period without a senescence phenotype. Finally, cell elasticity increases with increasing culture density only in MDCK epithelial cells. In summary, for researchers who use AFM to assess cell elasticity, our results provide basic and significant information about the suitable selection of physical and physiological cues.

  10. Spectral demixing avoids registration errors and reduces noise in multicolor localization-based super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, André; Tadeus, Georgi; Schmoranzer, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Multicolor single molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SMLM) approaches are challenged by channel crosstalk and errors in multi-channel registration. We recently introduced a spectral demixing-based variant of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SD-dSTORM) to perform multicolor SMLM with minimal color crosstalk. Here, we demonstrate that the spectral demixing procedure is inherently free of errors in multicolor registration and therefore does not require multicolor channel alignment. Furthermore, spectral demixing significantly reduces single molecule noise and is applicable to astigmatism-based 3D multicolor imaging achieving 25 nm lateral and 66 nm axial resolution on cellular nanostructures.

  11. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratiti...

  12. New imaging-based biomarkers for melanoma diagnosis using coherent Raman Scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, pheomelanin has been found to play a critical role in melanoma progression given its pro-oxidant chemical properties as well as its marked presence in pre-cancerous and malignant melanoma lesions, even in the absence of ultraviolet radiation. In addition, epidemiological evidence indicates a strong correlation between melanoma incidence and skin type, with the highest incidence occurring in individuals of the red-haired/fair-skinned phenotype. Interestingly, nevus count correlates well with melanoma incidence and skin type, except in the population most prone to developing melanoma, where nevus count strikingly drops. As such, a current hypothesis proposes that fair-skinned red-haired individuals, who are unable to stimulate production of eumelanin due to a mutation in MC1R in melanocytes, may actually harbor numerous "invisible", pheomelanin-rich nevi that evade clinical detection, supporting the high incidence of melanoma in that population. Here, we show for the very first time that melanocytes extracted from genetically modified MC1R-mutant, red-haired mice displayed bright perinuclear distributions of signal within the cells under coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Changes in pheomelanin production in siRNA knockdowns of cultured human melanoma cells were also sensed. We then successfully imaged pheomelanin distributions in both ex vivo and in vivo mouse ear skin. Finally, melanosomes within amelanotic melanoma patient tissue sections were found to show bright pheomelanin signals. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that pheomelanin has been found spatially localized in a human amelanotic melanoma sample. These pheomelanotic CARS features may be used as potential biomarkers for melanoma detection, especially for amelanotic melanomas.

  13. Evidence-based practice: a trainee clinical psychologist perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is now the dominant model in health care; its aim is to increase the use of research evidence to inform clinical decision making. Clinical practice guidelines are the predominant method by which research is distilled into practice recommendations. Clinical psychology has its own model which promotes the integration of research evidence with clinical expertise, the scientist practitioner model (SPM). Recent developments within the United Kingdom health service, su...

  14. Dynamic Clinical Data Mining: Search Engine-Based Decision Support

    OpenAIRE

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine t...

  15. Utility of nested polymerase chain reaction over the microscopy and immuno-chromatographic test in the detection of Plasmodium species and their clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, P; Ghoshal, U

    2016-09-01

    Though demonstration of Plasmodium parasite in peripheral blood on microscopy remains gold standard, it may miss some patients resulting in delay in instituting life-saving therapy. Studies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a highly sensitive and specific technique that also discriminates among different species of malaria parasite, are scanty. Hence, we aimed to evaluate the role of PCR in diagnosis and species identification of Plasmodium. Of 2186 febrile patients with clinical suspicion of malaria screened between July 2013 to February 2015, 561 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. Microscopy, rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and PCR were performed to identify the parasite. Plasmodium was detected in 64/561 (11.40 %), 92/561 (16.40 %) and 78/561 (13.90 %) cases using microscopy, RDT and PCR, respectively. Of 78 positive cases by PCR, 47 (60.25 %) were confirmed as Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum), 28 (35.89 %) were Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) and 3 (3.84 %) had mixed infections. Sensitivity and specificity of microscopy and RDT were 82.10 %, 100 % and 98.70 %, 96.90 %, respectively (p = 0.139). Of total 93 patients, 67 (72.04 %) were classified as complicated and 26 (27.96 %) were as uncomplicated. Creatinine (p = Plasmodium species. PMID:27147091

  16. Annotating Evidence Based Clinical Guidelines: A Lightweight Ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Hoekstra; A. de Waard; R. Vdovjak

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a lightweight ontology for representing annotations of declarative evidence based clinical guidelines. We present the motivation and requirements for this representation, based on an analysis of several guidelines. The ontology provides the means to connect clinical questions an

  17. Free Form Deformation–Based Image Registration Improves Accuracy of Traction Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Izquierdo-Alvarez, Alicia; Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Garcia-Aznar, José Manuel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans; de-Juan-Pardo, Elena M.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2015-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a widespread method used to recover cellular tractions from the deformation that they cause in their surrounding substrate. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is commonly used to quantify the substrate’s deformations, due to its simplicity and efficiency. However, PIV relies on a block-matching scheme that easily underestimates the deformations. This is especially relevant in the case of large, locally non-uniform deformations as those usually found in the vicinity of a cell’s adhesions to the substrate. To overcome these limitations, we formulate the calculation of the deformation of the substrate in TFM as a non-rigid image registration process that warps the image of the unstressed material to match the image of the stressed one. In particular, we propose to use a B-spline -based Free Form Deformation (FFD) algorithm that uses a connected deformable mesh to model a wide range of flexible deformations caused by cellular tractions. Our FFD approach is validated in 3D fields using synthetic (simulated) data as well as with experimental data obtained using isolated endothelial cells lying on a deformable, polyacrylamide substrate. Our results show that FFD outperforms PIV providing a deformation field that allows a better recovery of the magnitude and orientation of tractions. Together, these results demonstrate the added value of the FFD algorithm for improving the accuracy of traction recovery. PMID:26641883

  18. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy based on determination of thermal probe dynamic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzenta, J; Juszczyk, J; Chirtoc, M

    2013-09-01

    Resistive thermal probes used in scanning thermal microscopy provide high spatial resolution of measurement accompanied with high sensitivity to temperature changes. At the same time their sensitivity to variations of thermal conductivity of a sample is relatively low. In typical dc operation mode the static resistance of the thermal probe is measured. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the sensitivity of measurement can be improved by a factor of three by measuring the dynamic resistance of a dc biased probe superimposed with small ac current. The dynamic resistance can be treated as a complex value. Its amplitude represents the slope of the static voltage-current U-I characteristic for a given I while its phase describes the delay between the measured ac voltage and applied ac current component in the probe. The phase signal also reveals dependence on the sample thermal conductivity. Signal changes are relatively small but very repeatable. In contrast, the difference between dynamic and static resistance has higher sensitivity (the same maximum value as that of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics), and also much higher amplitude than higher harmonics. The proposed dc + ac excitation scheme combines the benefits of dc excitation (mechanical stability of probe-sample contact, average temperature control) with those of ac excitation (base-line stability, rejection of ambient temperature influence, high sensitivity, lock-in signal processing), when the experimental conditions prohibit large ac excitation. PMID:24089831

  19. Structural changes in a Schiff base molecular assembly initiated by scanning tunneling microscopy tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomak, A.; Bacaksiz, C.; Mendirek, G.; Sahin, H.; Hur, D.; Görgün, K.; Senger, R. T.; Birer, Ö.; Peeters, F. M.; Zareie, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the controlled self-organization and switching of newly designed Schiff base (E)-4-((4-(phenylethynyl) benzylidene) amino) benzenethiol (EPBB) molecules on a Au (111) surface at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) were used to image and analyze the conformational changes of the EPBB molecules. The conformational change of the molecules was induced by using the STM tip while increasing the tunneling current. The switching of a domain or island of molecules was shown to be induced by the STM tip during scanning. Unambiguous fingerprints of the switching mechanism were observed via STM/STS measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering was employed, to control and identify quantitatively the switching mechanism of molecules in a monolayer. Density functional theory calculations were also performed in order to understand the microscopic details of the switching mechanism. These calculations revealed that the molecular switching behavior stemmed from the strong interaction of the EPBB molecules with the STM tip. Our approach to controlling intermolecular mechanics provides a path towards the bottom-up assembly of more sophisticated molecular machines.

  20. Pattern of glomerular diseases in oman: A study based on light microscopy and immunofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Yousuf Alwahaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy and immunofluorescence play an important part in the final diagnosis of renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of various glomerular diseases in Oman. A total of 424 renal biopsies were retrospectively analyzed at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2010. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, minimal change disease (MCD, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN and IgA nephropathy were the most common primary glomerular diseases encountered, accounting for 21.2%, 17%, 12.3% and 8.3%, respectively, of all cases. Lupus nephritis was the most common secondary glomerular disease and was the most prevalent among all biopsies, accounting for 30.4% of all biopsies. Amyloidosis was seen in only two cases. The presence of fluorescein isothiocyanatefibrin in all renal cases was low when compared with IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C1q markers. In conclusion, based on the findings of this study, lupus nephritis was the most common of all glomerular diseases and FSGS was the most common primary glomerular disease. The importance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-fibrin in the diagnosis of renal biopsy needs to be further investigated.

  1. The bacterial rhizobiome of hyperaccumulators: future perspectives based on omics analysis and advanced microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eVisioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperaccumulators are plants that can extract heavy metal ions from the soil and translocate those ions to the shoots, where they are sequestered and detoxified. Hyperaccumulation depends not only on the availability of mobilized metal ions in the soil, but also on the enhanced activity of metal transporters and metal chelators which may be provided by the plant or its associated microbes. The rhizobiome is captured by plant root exudates from the complex microbial community in the soil, and may colonize the root surface or infiltrate the root cortex. This community can increase the root surface area by inducing hairy root proliferation. It may also increase the solubility of metals in the rhizosphere and promote the uptake of soluble metals by the plant. The bacterial rhizobiome, a subset of specialized microorganisms that colonize the plant rhizosphere and endosphere, makes an important contribution to the hyperaccumulator phenotype. In this review, we discuss classic and more recent tools that are used to study the interactions between hyperaccumulators and the bacterial rhizobiome, and consider future perspectives based on the use of omics analysis and microscopy to study plant metabolism in the context of metal accumulation. Recent data suggest that metal-resistant bacteria isolated from the hyperaccumulator rhizosphere and endosphere could be useful in applications such as phytoextraction and phytoremediation, although more research is required to determine whether such properties can be transferred successfully to non-accumulator species.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of GaN based, doped semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretorius, A.

    2006-07-01

    This thesis addresses the analysis of GaN based heterostructures with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Basic properties of the material of interest are introduced in chapter 2. These include the structural and optical properties as well as an introduction to the growth methods used for the samples analysed in this work. In chapter 3 a brief theoretical treatment of TEM is given. As one main topic of this work is the determination of the In concentration in InGaN islands using strain state analysis, a detailed description of the method is given. Chapter 4 describes the results obtained for pyramidal defects present in metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy grown GaN:Mg with high dopant concentration. Based on the experimental results and the well established knowledge that GaN of inverted polarity is present inside the pyramidal defects, a variety of basal plane inversion domain boundary models was set up. From these models, HRTEM images were simulated using the multislice approach, followed by a quantitative comparison to experimentally obtained HRTEM images. Another focus of this work is the analysis of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N islands grown on GaN presented in chapter 5. Following a literature survey which describes different methods used to obtain In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N islands, the first topic is the distinction of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N islands and metal droplets, which can form during growth. This is followed by the experimental results of molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy grown In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N island and quantum dot samples. (orig.)

  3. Field-portable reflection and transmission microscopy based on lensless holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungjun; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate a lensfree dual-mode holographic microscope that can image specimens in both transmission and reflection geometries using in-line transmission and off-axis reflection holography, respectively. This field-portable dual-mode holographic microscope has a weight of ~200 g with dimensions of 15 x 5.5 x 5cm, where a laser source is powered by two batteries. Based on digital in-line holography, our transmission microscope achieves a sub-pixel lateral resolution of ≤2 µm over a wide field-of-view (FOV) of ~24 mm(2) due to its unit fringe magnification geometry. Despite its simplicity and ease of operation, in-line transmission geometry is not suitable to image dense or connected objects such as tissue slides since the reference beam gets distorted causing severe aberrations in reconstruction of such objects. To mitigate this challenge, on the same cost-effective and field-portable assembly we built a lensless reflection mode microscope based on digital off-axis holography where a beam-splitter is used to interfere a tilted reference wave with the reflected light from the object surface, creating an off-axis hologram of the specimens on a CMOS sensor-chip. As a result of the reduced space-bandwidth product of the off-axis geometry compared to its in-line counterpart, the imaging FOV of our reflection mode is reduced to ~9 mm(2), while still achieving a similar sub-pixel resolution of ≤2 µm. We tested the performance of this compact dual-mode microscopy unit by imaging a US-air force resolution test target, various micro-particles as well as a histopathology slide corresponding to skin tissue. Due to its compact, cost-effective, and lightweight design, this dual-mode lensless holographic microscope might especially be useful for field-use or for conducting microscopic analysis in resource-poor settings. PMID:21991559

  4. Short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of tryptophan with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Palero (Jonathan); V.O. Boer (Vincent); J.C. Vijverberg (Jacob); H.C. Gerritsen (Hans); H.J.C.M. Sterenborg (Dick)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe report on a novel and simple light source for short-wavelength two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy based on the visible nonsolitonic radiation from a photonic crystal fiber. We demonstrate tunability of the light source by varying the wavelength and intensity of the Ti:Sapph

  5. Microgalvanic activity of an Mg-Al-Ca-based alloy studied by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Mg-Al-Ca based alloy was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy following extrusion. The investigations revealed two main intermetallics, i.e. Al-Ca(Sn,Sr) and Al-Mn-Fe, both distributed along the extrusion direction and having distinctive morphology. The microgalvanic couples, i.e. Al-Ca(Sn,Sr)/α-Mg and Al-Mn-Fe/α-Mg showed positive Volta potential differences with the Al-Mn-Fe intermetallic being the noblest (i.e. 262 ± 18 mV vs 62 ± 7 mV)

  6. Developing an empirical base for clinical nurse specialist education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Arleen M; Nardi, Deena; Lewandowski, Margaret A

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the design of a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) education program using National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) CNS competencies to guide CNS program clinical competency expectations and curriculum outcomes. The purpose is to contribute to the development of an empirical base for education and credentialing of CNSs. The NACNS CNS core competencies and practice competencies in all 3 spheres of influence guided the creation of clinical competency grids for this university's practicum courses. This project describes the development, testing, and application of these clinical competency grids that link the program's CNS clinical courses with the NACNS CNS competencies. These documents guide identification, tracking, measurement, and evaluation of the competencies throughout the clinical practice portion of the CNS program. This ongoing project will continue to provide data necessary to the benchmarking of CNS practice competencies, which is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of direct practice performance and the currency of graduate nursing education. PMID:18438164

  7. A new direct microscopy based method for evaluating in-situ bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupathiraju, V K; Hernandez, M; Krauter, P; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1999-06-30

    A new epifluorescent microscopy based method using 5-cyano-2, 3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) and 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluoroscein (DTAF) was developed for quantifying total microbial biomass and evaluating levels of microbial activity. CTC is a tetrazolium dye that forms fluorescent intracellular formazan when biologically reduced by components of the electron transport system and/or dehydrogenases of metabolically active bacteria. DTAF is a fluorescein-based fluorochrome that selectively stains bacterial cell walls thereby enabling quantification of total bacterial biomass. CTC can be used in conjunction with DTAF to provide the optical resolution necessary to differentiate metabolically active cells from inactive cells in microbial populations associated with subsurface soils. The CTC/DTAF staining method has been shown to be effective for quantifying the metabolic activity of not only aerobic bacteria, but also diverse groups of anaerobic bacteria. This method allows for the rapid quantification of total and active bacterial numbers in complex soil samples without enrichment or cell elution. In this study, CTC/DTAF staining was applied to evaluate in-situ microbial activity in petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated subsurface soils from Sites 3 and 13 at Alameda Point, CA. At each site, subsurface microbial activity at two locations within contaminated plumes were examined and compared to activity at two geologically similar but uncontaminated background locations. Significant bacterial populations were detected in all soils examined, and the biomass estimates were several orders of magnitude higher than those obtained by conventional culture-based techniques. Both the total bacterial concentrations and the numbers of active bacteria in soils from contaminated areas were substantially higher than those observed in soils from background locations. Additionally, the percentages of metabolically active bacteria in the contaminated areas were

  8. Structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates based on transmission electron microscopy: relationship to particle mobility analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Weon Gyu; Wang Jing [University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States); Mertler, Michael; Sachweh, Bernd [Fine Particle Technology and Particle Characterization, BASF SE (Germany); Fissan, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology e. V. (IUTA) (Germany); Pui, David Y. H., E-mail: dyhpui@umn.ed [The University of Minnesota, Department of Mechanical Engineering (United States)

    2009-01-15

    In this work, the structural properties of silver nanoparticle agglomerates generated using condensation and evaporation method in an electric tube furnace followed by a coagulation process are analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Agglomerates with mobility diameters of 80, 120, and 150 nm are sampled using the electrostatic method and then imaged by TEM. The primary particle diameter of silver agglomerates was 13.8 nm with a standard deviation of 2.5 nm. We obtained the relationship between the projected area equivalent diameter (d{sub pa}) and the mobility diameter (d{sub m}), i.e., d{sub pa} = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 d{sub m} for particles from 80 to 150 nm. We obtained fractal dimensions of silver agglomerates using three different methods: (1) D{sub f} = 1.84 {+-} 0.03, 1.75 {+-} 0.06, and 1.74 {+-} 0.03 for d{sub m} = 80, 120, and 150 nm, respectively from projected TEM images using a box counting algorithm; (2) fractal dimension (D{sub fL}) = 1.47 based on maximum projected length from projected TEM images using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633; and (3) mass fractal-like dimension (D{sub fm}) = 1.71 theoretically derived from the mobility analysis proposed by Lall and Friedlander (2006) J Aerosol Sci 37:260-271. We also compared the number of primary particles in agglomerate and found that the number of primary particles obtained from the projected surface area using an empirical equation proposed by Koylu et al. (1995) Combust Flame 100:621-633 is larger than that from using the relationship, d{sub pa} = 0.92 {+-} 0.03 d{sub m} or from using the mobility analysis.

  9. All-optical optoacoustic microscopy system based on probe beam deflection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswadi, Saher M.; Tsyboulskic, Dmitri; Roth, Caleb C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to achieve sub-micron resolution in backward mode OA microscopy using conventional piezoelectric detectors, because of wavefront distortions caused by components placed in the optical path, between the sample and the objective lens, that are required to separate the acoustic wave from the optical beam. As an alternate approach, an optoacoustic microscope (OAM) was constructed using the probe beam deflection technique (PBDT) to detect laserinduced acoustic signals. The all-optical OAM detects laser-generated pressure waves using a probe beam passing through a coupling medium, such as water, filling the space between the microscope objective lens and sample. The acoustic waves generated in the sample propagate through the coupling medium, causing transient changes in the refractive index that deflect the probe beam. These deflections are measured with a high-speed, balanced photodiode position detector. The deflection amplitude is directly proportional to the magnitude of the acoustic pressure wave, and provides the data required for image reconstruction. The sensitivity of the PBDT detector expressed as noise equivalent pressure was 12 Pa, comparable to that of existing high-performance ultrasound detectors. Because of the unimpeded working distance, a high numerical aperture objective lens, i.e. NA = 1, was employed in the OAM to achieve near diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 0.5 μm at 532nm. The all-optical OAM provides several benefits over current piezoelectric detector-based systems, such as increased lateral and axial resolution, higher sensitivity, robustness, and potentially more compatibility with multimodal instruments.

  10. Estimation of age based on tooth cementum annulations: A comparative study using light, polarized, and phase contrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhpreet; Astekar, Madhusudan; Singh, Jappreet; Arora, Karandeep Singh; Bhalla, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Context: The identification of living or deceased persons using unique traits and characteristics of the teeth and jaws is a cornerstone of forensic science. Teeth have been used to estimate age both in the young and old, as well as in the living and dead. Gradual structural changes in teeth throughout life are the basis for age estimation. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a microscopic method for the determination of an individual's age based on the analysis of incremental lines of cementum. Aim: To compare ages estimated using incremental lines of cementum as visualized by bright field microscopy, polarized microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy with the actual age of subject and to determine accuracy and feasibility of the method used. Materials and Methods: Cementum annulations of 60 permanent teeth were analyzed after longitudinal ground sections were made in the mesiodistal plane. The incremental lines were counted manually using a light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy. Ages were estimated and then compared with the actual age of individual. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, the Pearson product-moment corre (PPMCC) and regression analysis were performed. Results: PPMCC value r = 0.347, 0.542 and 0.989 were obtained using light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy methods respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that incremental lines of cementum were most clearly visible under a phase contrast microscope, followed by a polarized microscope, and then a light microscope when used for age estimation. PMID:26816462

  11. DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA BY MAGNETIC DEPOSITION MICROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Thomson, Jodi M.; Fujioka, Hisashi; Collins, William E.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Although malaria contributes to a significant public health burden, malaria diagnosis relies heavily on either non-specific clinical symptoms or blood smear microscopy methods developed in the 1930s. These approaches severely misrepresent the number of infected individuals and the reservoir of parasites in malaria-endemic communities and undermine efforts to control disease. Limitations of conventional microscopy-based diagnosis center on time required to examine slides, time required to atta...

  12. High-Throughput Nonlinear Optical Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yew, Elijah Y.S.; So, Peter T. C.; Rowlands, Christopher James; Yew, Elijah Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy methods based on different nonlinear optical (NLO) contrast mechanisms are finding numerous applications in biology and medicine. While the basic implementations of these microscopy methods are relatively mature, an important direction of continuing technological innovation lies in improving the throughput of these systems. Throughput improvement is expected to be important for studying fast kinetic processes, for enabling clinical diagnosis and treatment, and for e...

  13. Hierarchical Networks of Casein Proteins: An Elasticity Study Based on Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uricanu, V.I.; Duits, M.H.G.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    2D- and 3D-atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed on single casein micelles (CM) in native state, submerged in liquid, using a home-built AFM instrument. The micelles were immobilized via carbodiimide chemistry to a self-assembled monolayer supported on gold-coated slides. Off-line

  14. A data grid for imaging-based clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Chao, Sander S.; Lee, Jasper; Liu, Brent; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.

    2007-03-01

    Clinical trials play a crucial role in testing new drugs or devices in modern medicine. Medical imaging has also become an important tool in clinical trials because images provide a unique and fast diagnosis with visual observation and quantitative assessment. A typical imaging-based clinical trial consists of: 1) A well-defined rigorous clinical trial protocol, 2) a radiology core that has a quality control mechanism, a biostatistics component, and a server for storing and distributing data and analysis results; and 3) many field sites that generate and send image studies to the radiology core. As the number of clinical trials increases, it becomes a challenge for a radiology core servicing multiple trials to have a server robust enough to administrate and quickly distribute information to participating radiologists/clinicians worldwide. The Data Grid can satisfy the aforementioned requirements of imaging based clinical trials. In this paper, we present a Data Grid architecture for imaging-based clinical trials. A Data Grid prototype has been implemented in the Image Processing and Informatics (IPI) Laboratory at the University of Southern California to test and evaluate performance in storing trial images and analysis results for a clinical trial. The implementation methodology and evaluation protocol of the Data Grid are presented.

  15. Combined microscopies study of the C-contamination induced by extreme-ultraviolet radiation: A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiO2 and Al2O3 surfaces exposed to periodically modulated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light (λ = 46.9 nm) have been investigated at the μm scale by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The formation of a carbon contamination layer preserving the same periodical modulation of the EUV dose has been observed. The mechanisms of hydrocarbon molecules deposition have been studied with the help of correlation plots between the modulated Auger signal and the corresponding EUV dose. A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model has been proposed.

  16. Combined microscopies study of the C-contamination induced by extreme-ultraviolet radiation: A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezioso, S.; Donarelli, M.; Bisti, F.; Palladino, L.; Santucci, S.; Ottaviano, L. [Dip. di Fisica, Universita dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Spadoni, S.; Avaro, L. [Micron, Process R and D, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Liscio, A.; Palermo, V. [CNR-ISOF, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-14

    SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces exposed to periodically modulated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light ({lambda} = 46.9 nm) have been investigated at the {mu}m scale by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The formation of a carbon contamination layer preserving the same periodical modulation of the EUV dose has been observed. The mechanisms of hydrocarbon molecules deposition have been studied with the help of correlation plots between the modulated Auger signal and the corresponding EUV dose. A surface-dependent secondary-electron-based model has been proposed.

  17. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed, E-mail: samasoumia@hotmail.fr [Science and Technology Faculty, El Bachir El Ibrahimi University, BordjBouArreridj (Algeria); Messali, Zoubeida, E-mail: messalizoubeida@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Electrical Engineering(LGE), University of M' sila (Algeria); Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil, E-mail: abdeldjalil.ouahabi@univ-tours.fr [Polytechnic School, University of Tours (EPU - PolytechTours), EPU - Energy and Electronics Department (France); Trepout, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Messaoudi, Cedric, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr; Marco, Sergio, E-mail: sylvain.trepout@curie.fr, E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr, E-mail: sergio.marco@curie.fr [INSERMU759, University Campus Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  18. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  19. Semantically based clinical TCM telemedicine systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Allan K Y; Lin, Wilfred W K; Dillon, Tharam S; Chang, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen the development of two significant trends namely: the adoption of some Traditional Chinese Medicine Practices into mainstream Allopathic Western Medicine and the advent of the internet and broad band networks leading to an increased interest in the use of Telemedicine to deliver medical services. In this book, we see the convergence of these two trends leading to a semantically-based TCM Telemedicine system that utilizes an ontology to provide sharable knowledge in the TCM realm to achieve this. The underpinning research required the development of a three-layer architecture and an Ontology of the TCM knowledge. As TCM knowledge like all medical knowledge is not frozen in time it was important to develop an approach that would allow evolution of the Ontology when new evidence became available. In order for the system to be practically grounded it was important to work with an industry partner PuraPharm Group/HerbMiners Informatics Limited. This partnership was initiated through Professo...

  20. Detection of intestinal parasites by use of the cuvette-based automated microscopy analyser sediMAX(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, J; Taverna, E; Sala, M R; Falbo, R; Cappellini, F; Brambilla, P

    2016-03-01

    Microscopy is the reference method for intestinal parasite identification. The cuvette-based automated microscopy analyser, sediMAX 1, provides 15 digital images of each sediment sample. In this study, we have evaluated this fully automated instrument for detection of enteric parasites, helminths and protozoa. A total of 700 consecutively preserved samples consisting of 60 positive samples (50 protozoa, ten helminths) and 640 negative samples were analysed. Operators were blinded to each others' results. Samples were randomized and were tested both by manual microscopy and sediMAX 1 for parasite recognition. The sediMAX 1 analysis was conducted using a dilution of faecal samples, allowing determination of morphology. The data obtained using sediMAX 1 showed a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 100%. Some species of helminths, such as Enterobius vermicularis, Strongyloides stercolaris, the Ancylostoma duodenale/Necator americanus complex, and schistosomes were not considered in this work, because they are rare in stool specimens, are not easily detectable with microscopy analysis, and require specific recovery techniques. This study demonstrated for the first time that sediMAX 1 can be an aid in enteric parasite identification. PMID:26679923

  1. Fabrication of metal oxide nanostructures based on Atomic Force Microscopy lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) mechanical lithography is a simple but significant method for nanofabrication. In this work, we used this method to construct nanos- tructures on Pt/Cu bilayer metal electrodes under ambient conditions in air. The influence of various scratch parameters, such as the applied force, scan velocity and circle times, on the lithography patterns was investigated. The Pt-Cu-CuxO-Cu-Pt nanostructure was constructed by choosing suitable scratch parameters and oxidation at room temperature. The properties of the scratched regions were also investigated by friction force microscopy and conductive AFM (C-AFM). The I-V curves show symmetric and linear properties, and Ohmic contacts were formed. These results indicate that AFM mechanical lithography is a powerful tool for fabricating novel metal-semiconductor nanoelectronic devices.

  2. Model-based traction force microscopy reveals differential tension in cellular actin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiné, Jérôme R D; Brand, Christoph A; Stricker, Jonathan; Oakes, Patrick W; Gardel, Margaret L; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-03-01

    Adherent cells use forces at the cell-substrate interface to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment. These cell forces can be measured with traction force microscopy which inverts the equations of elasticity theory to calculate them from the deformations of soft polymer substrates. We introduce a new type of traction force microscopy that in contrast to traditional methods uses additional image data for cytoskeleton and adhesion structures and a biophysical model to improve the robustness of the inverse procedure and abolishes the need for regularization. We use this method to demonstrate that ventral stress fibers of U2OS-cells are typically under higher mechanical tension than dorsal stress fibers or transverse arcs. PMID:25748431

  3. Issues for application of virtual microscopy to cytoscreening, perspectives based on questionnaire to Japanese cytotechnologists

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi Emiko; Ozaki Takashi; Nunobiki Osamu; Mori Ichiro; Kakudo Kennichi

    2008-01-01

    Abstract To clarify the issues associated with the applications of virtual microscopy to the daily cytology slide screening, we conducted a survey at a slide conference of cytology. The survey was conducted specifically to the Japanese cytology technologists who use microscopes on a routine basis. Virtual slides (VS) were prepared from cytology slides using NanoZoomer (Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan), which is capable of adjusting focus on any part of the slide. A total of ten layers were scanned...

  4. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Microscopy-Based Point of Care Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, John A.; Nakasi, Rose; Mugagga, Pius K. B.; Byanyima, Patrick; Lubega, William; Andama, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Point of care diagnostics using microscopy and computer vision methods have been applied to a number of practical problems, and are particularly relevant to low-income, high disease burden areas. However, this is subject to the limitations in sensitivity and specificity of the computer vision methods used. In general, deep learning has recently revolutionised the field of computer vision, in some cases surpassing human performance for other object recognition tasks. In this paper, we evaluate...

  5. Large-volume en-bloc staining for electron microscopy-based connectomics

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Yunfeng; Laserstein, Philip; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale connectomics requires dense staining of neuronal tissue blocks for electron microscopy (EM). Here we report a large-volume dense en-bloc EM staining protocol that overcomes the staining gradients, which so far substantially limited the reconstructable volumes in three-dimensional (3D) EM. Our protocol provides densely reconstructable tissue blocks from mouse neocortex sized at least 1 mm in diameter. By relaxing the constraints on precise topographic sample targeting, it makes the...

  6. Characterization of semiconductor materials using synchrotron radiation-based near-field infrared microscopy and nano-FTIR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, Peter; Hoehl, Arne; Ulrich, Georg; Fleischmann, Claudia; Hermelink, Antje; Kästner, Bernd; Patoka, Piotr; Hornemann, Andrea; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Rühl, Eckart; Ulm, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the application of scattering-type near-field optical microscopy to characterize various semiconducting materials using the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) as a broadband synchrotron radiation source. For verifying high-resolution imaging and nano-FTIR spectroscopy we performed scans across nanoscale Si-based surface structures. The obtained results demonstrate that a spatial resolution below 40 nm can be achieved, despite the use of a radiation source with an e...

  7. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  8. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig;

    2015-01-01

    EVs are considered the active drug components or primarily serve as drug delivery vehicles. For an effective and particularly safe translation of EV-based therapies into clinical practice, a high level of cooperation between researchers, clinicians and competent authorities is essential....... The translation of EVs into clinical therapies requires the categorization of EV-based therapeutics in compliance with existing regulatory frameworks. As the classification defines subsequent requirements for manufacturing, quality control and clinical investigation, it is of major importance to define whether....... In this position statement, basic and clinical scientists, as members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program of the European Union, namely European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME...

  9. Contextual cloud-based service oriented architecture for clinical workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Núñez-Benjumea, Francisco J; Parra-Calderón, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Given that acceptance of systems within the healthcare domain multiple papers highlighted the importance of integrating tools with the clinical workflow. This paper analyse how clinical context management could be deployed in order to promote the adoption of cloud advanced services and within the clinical workflow. This deployment will be able to be integrated with the eHealth European Interoperability Framework promoted specifications. Throughout this paper, it is proposed a cloud-based service-oriented architecture. This architecture will implement a context management system aligned with the HL7 standard known as CCOW. PMID:25991217

  10. Recent advancements in the "water-window" microscopy with laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas-puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of our recent developments, regarding "water-window" soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy based on a laser-plasma double stream gas puff target sources is presented. The work, presented herein, describes two approaches to SXR microscopy. The first one is a low spatial resolution, achromatic SXR microscopy, employing Wolter type-I objective. The second one is a nanometer spatial resolution SXR microscopy, with the use of a Fresnel zone plate objective, for imaging various objects with quasimonochromatic light, emitted from a double stream gas puff target based short wavelength source. The developments regarding both systems are presented, as well as the possible applications, for which the SXR microscope was already employed. Such compact, table-top size, laboratory type microscopy setups may be employed in the near future for complementary-like studies to other, often used, microscopy techniques.

  11. Developing methods based on light sheet fluorescence microscopy for biophysical investigations of larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Michael J.

    Adapting the tools of optical microscopy to the large-scale dynamic systems encountered in the development of multicellular organisms provides a path toward understanding the physical processes necessary for complex life to form and function. Obtaining quantitatively meaningful results from such systems has been challenging due to difficulty spanning the spatial and temporal scales representative of the whole, while also observing the many individual members from which complex and collective behavior emerges. A three-dimensional imaging technique known as light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides a number of significant benefits for surmounting these challenges and studying developmental systems. A thin plane of fluorescence excitation light is produced such that it coincides with the focal plane of an imaging system, providing rapid acquisition of optically sectioned images that can be used to construct a three-dimensional rendition of a sample. I discuss the implementation of this technique for use in larva of the model vertebrate Danio rerio (zebrafish). The nature of light sheet imaging makes it especially well suited to the study of large systems while maintaining good spatial resolution and minimizing damage to the specimen from excessive exposure to excitation light. I show the results from a comparative study that demonstrates the ability to image certain developmental processes non-destructively, while in contrast confocal microscopy results in abnormal growth due to phototoxicity. I develop the application of light sheet microscopy to the study of a previously inaccessible system: the bacterial colonization of a host organism. Using the technique, we are able to obtain a survey of the intestinal tract of a larval zebrafish and observe the location of microbes as they grow and establish a stable population in an initially germ free fish. Finally, I describe a new technique to measure the fluid viscosity of this intestinal environment in vivo using

  12. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  13. Application of transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam tomography for microstructure characterization of tungsten based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten and its alloys are considered as structural materials for plasma-facing applications. The divertor design requires a material with a low ductile-brittle transition temperature and a recrystallization temperature (TR) of about 1570 K. One of the materials under consideration is W-1.7%TiC. The aim of this work was to perform a detailed microstructural characterization of the two materials, pure W and W-1.7%TiC alloy, by electron microscopy and a new technique, electron tomography. Thin foil preparation for transmission electron microscopy investigation of W-based materials is extremely difficult. After many trials by various techniques, a method for thin foil preparation was successfully elaborated and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation was carried out. A pure tungsten specimen was investigated as a reference material. The application of TEM and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy techniques enables the identification of some creep-induced features in pure tungsten and the determination of the size and morphology of three-dimensional pores and particles in W-TiC-based alloy.

  14. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-11-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  15. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun Woo Nho; Yogesh Kalegowda; Hyun-Joon Shin; Tae Hyun Yoon

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC ...

  17. Dynamic clinical data mining: search engine-based decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  18. Experimental validation of atomic force microscopy-based cell elasticity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew R.; Charras, G. T.

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for measuring the elasticity of living cells yielding values ranging from 100 Pa to 100 kPa, much larger than those obtained using bead-tracking microrheology or micropipette aspiration (100-500 Pa). AFM elasticity measurements appear dependent on tip geometry with pyramidal tips yielding elasticities 2-3 fold larger than spherical tips, an effect generally attributed to the larger contact area of spherical tips. In AFM elasticity measurements, experimental force-indentation curves are analyzed using contact mechanics models that infer the tip-cell contact area from the tip geometry and indentation depth. The validity of these assumptions has never been verified. Here we utilize combined AFM-confocal microscopy of epithelial cells expressing a GFP-tagged membrane marker to directly characterize the indentation geometry and measure the indentation depth. Comparison with data derived from AFM force-indentation curves showed that the experimentally measured contact area for spherical tips agrees well with predicted values, whereas for pyramidal tips, the contact area can be grossly underestimated at forces larger than ~ 0.2 nN leading to a greater than two-fold overestimation of elasticity. These data suggest that a re-examination of absolute cellular elasticities reported in the literature may be necessary and we suggest guidelines for avoiding elasticity measurement artefacts introduced by extraneous cantilever-cell contact.

  19. Experimental validation of atomic force microscopy-based cell elasticity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Andrew R; Charras, G T, E-mail: g.charras@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for measuring the elasticity of living cells yielding values ranging from 100 Pa to 100 kPa, much larger than those obtained using bead-tracking microrheology or micropipette aspiration (100-500 Pa). AFM elasticity measurements appear dependent on tip geometry with pyramidal tips yielding elasticities 2-3 fold larger than spherical tips, an effect generally attributed to the larger contact area of spherical tips. In AFM elasticity measurements, experimental force-indentation curves are analyzed using contact mechanics models that infer the tip-cell contact area from the tip geometry and indentation depth. The validity of these assumptions has never been verified. Here we utilize combined AFM-confocal microscopy of epithelial cells expressing a GFP-tagged membrane marker to directly characterize the indentation geometry and measure the indentation depth. Comparison with data derived from AFM force-indentation curves showed that the experimentally measured contact area for spherical tips agrees well with predicted values, whereas for pyramidal tips, the contact area can be grossly underestimated at forces larger than {approx} 0.2 nN leading to a greater than two-fold overestimation of elasticity. These data suggest that a re-examination of absolute cellular elasticities reported in the literature may be necessary and we suggest guidelines for avoiding elasticity measurement artefacts introduced by extraneous cantilever-cell contact.

  20. DMD-based random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinyang; Zhou, Yong; Winkler, Amy W.; Wang, Lidai; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The scanning mechanism is a major technical focus in optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy. Flexible scanning access with fast scanning speed is desired to monitor biological and physiological dynamics with high temporal resolution. We developed random-access optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (RA-OR-PAM) using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Each micromirror on the DMD can be independently controlled, allowing imaging of regions of interest with arbitrary user-selected shapes without extraneous information. A global structural image is first acquired, and the regions of interest are selected. The laser beam then scans these regions exclusively, resulting in a faster frame rate than in a conventional raster scan. This system can rapidly scan arbitrarily shaped regions of interest with a lateral resolution of 3.6 μm within a 40×40 μm2 imaging area, a size comparable to the focal spot size of a 50 MHz ultrasound transducer. We demonstrated the random-access ability of RA-OR-PAM by imaging a monolayer of red blood cells. This system was then used to monitor blood flow in vivo within user-selected capillaries in a mouse ear. By imaging only the capillary of interest, the frame rate was increased by up to 13.3 times.

  1. Epitaxial Graphene and Graphene–Based Devices Studied by Electrical Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim L. Burnett

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present local electrical characterization of epitaxial graphene grown on both Si- and C-faces of 4H-SiC using Electrostatic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in ambient conditions and at elevated temperatures. These techniques provide a straightforward identification of graphene domains with various thicknesses on the substrate where topographical determination is hindered by adsorbates and SiC terraces. We also use Electrostatic Force Spectroscopy which allows quantitative surface potential measurements with high spatial resolution. Using these techniques, we study evolution of a layer of atmospheric water as a function of temperature, which is accompanied by a significant change of the absolute surface potential difference. We show that the nanoscale wettability of the material is strongly dependent on the number of graphene layers, where hydrophobicity increases with graphene thickness. We also use micron-sized graphene Hall bars with gold electrodes to calibrate work function of the electrically conductive probe and precisely and quantitatively define the work functions for single- and double-layer graphene.

  2. A novel Kalman filter based video image processing scheme for two-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqing; Huang, Xia; Li, Chunqiang; Xiao, Chuan; Qian, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) is a perfect optical imaging equipment to monitor the interaction between fast moving viruses and hosts. However, due to strong unavoidable background noises from the culture, videos obtained by this technique are too noisy to elaborate this fast infection process without video image processing. In this study, we developed a novel scheme to eliminate background noises, recover background bacteria images and improve video qualities. In our scheme, we modified and implemented the following methods for both host and virus videos: correlation method, round identification method, tree-structured nonlinear filters, Kalman filters, and cell tracking method. After these procedures, most of noises were eliminated and host images were recovered with their moving directions and speed highlighted in the videos. From the analysis of the processed videos, 93% bacteria and 98% viruses were correctly detected in each frame on average.

  3. Friedel oscillations in graphene-based systems probed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Pierre; Brihuega, Iván; Cherkez, Vladimir; Gómez-Rodríguez, Jose Marìa; Veuillen, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    For the last 25 years, scientists have demonstrated the capabilities of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) to visualize in real space the response of a two-dimensional electron gas to atomic-scale impurities. The analysis of the Friedel oscillations surrounding the impurities yields valuable information regarding the elastic scattering properties, the band structure, the doping level and the symmetry of the electronic states in the two-dimensional host system. We will address in this article the use of this technique for probing the electronic properties of graphene, the star two-dimensional compound of the last decade. In particular, we will emphasize how this technique can be pushed up to unravel the electronic pseudospin, a distinctive degree of freedom of graphene's Dirac fermions. xml:lang="fr"

  4. A model for the ultrastructure of bone based on electron microscopy of ion-milled sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A McNally

    Full Text Available The relationship between the mineral component of bone and associated collagen has been a matter of continued dispute. We use transmission electron microscopy (TEM of cryogenically ion milled sections of fully-mineralized cortical bone to study the spatial and topological relationship between mineral and collagen. We observe that hydroxyapatite (HA occurs largely as elongated plate-like structures which are external to and oriented parallel to the collagen fibrils. Dark field images suggest that the structures ("mineral structures" are polycrystalline. They are approximately 5 nm thick, 70 nm wide and several hundred nm long. Using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis we show that approximately 70% of the HA occurs as mineral structures external to the fibrils. The remainder is found constrained to the gap zones. Comparative studies of other species suggest that this structural motif is ubiquitous in all vertebrates.

  5. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.;

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential as...... study of this element through STEM-EDX. Moreover, nickel sintering was observed in the KCl poisoned sample and was ascribed once again to the formation of mobile Ni-Cl species upon reaction of HCl with surface oxides [4]. Furthermore, environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) has been used...... high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...

  6. Measuring the loss tangent of polymer materials with atomic force microscopy based methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) quantitatively maps viscoelastic parameters of polymers on the nanoscale by several methods. The loss tangent, the ratio between dissipated and stored energy, was measured on a blend of thermoplastic polymer materials by a dynamic contact method, contact resonance, and by a recently developed loss tangent measurement by amplitude modulation AFM. Contact resonance measurements were performed both with dual AC resonance tracking and band excitation (BE), allowing for a reference-free measurement of the loss tangent. Amplitude modulation AFM was performed where a recent interpretation of the phase signal under certain operating conditions allows for the loss tangent to be calculated. The loss tangent measurements were compared with values expected from time–temperature superposed frequency-dependent dynamical mechanical curves of materials and reveal that the loss tangents determined from the BE contact resonance method provide the most accurate values. (paper)

  7. Near-field optical microscopy with a nanodiamond-based single photon tip

    CERN Document Server

    Cuche, A; Sonnefraud, Y; Faklaris, O; Treussart, F; Roch, J -F; Huant, S

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a point-like scanning single-photon source that operates at room temperature and offers an exceptional photostability (no blinking, no bleaching). This is obtained by grafting in a controlled way a diamond nanocrystal (size around 20 nm) with single nitrogen-vacancy color-center occupancy at the apex of an optical probe. As an application, we image metallic nanostructures in the near-field, thereby achieving a near-field scanning single-photon microscopy working at room temperature on the long term. Our work may be of importance to various emerging fields of nanoscience where an accurate positioning of a quantum emitter is required such as for example quantum plasmonics.

  8. Distinction of heterogeneity on Au nanostructured surface based on phase contrast imaging of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discrimination of the heterogeneity of different materials on nanostructured surfaces has attracted a great deal of interest in biotechnology as well as nanotechnology. Phase imaging through tapping mode of atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) can be used to distinguish the heterogeneity on a nanostructured surface. Nanostructures were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO). An 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) layer adsorbed onto the Au nanodots through self-assembly to improve the bio-compatibility. The Au nanostructures that were modified with 11-MUA and the concave surfaces were investigated using the TMAFM phase images to compare the heterogeneous and homogeneous nanostructured surfaces. Although the topography and phase images were taken simultaneously, the images were different. Therefore, the contrast in the TMAFM phase images revealed the different compositional materials on the heterogeneous nanostructure surface.

  9. Comment on ``MEMS-based high speed scanning probe microscopy'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 043702 (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degertekin, F. Levent; Torun, Hamdi

    2010-11-01

    In a recent article, Disseldorp et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 043702 (2010)] present a micromachined z-scanner for scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The scanner comprises a micromachined electrostatically actuated membrane anchored to its substrate with crab-leg flexures. This structure is used as a fast actuator specifically for atomic force microscope and scanning tunneling microscope. The authors present topographic images acquired using the scanner in this paper and elsewhere [F. C. Tabak et al., Ultramicroscopy 110, 599 (2010)]. Although the work is clearly described, it does not appear to be placed in proper context. For example, the authors claim that previous work on microelectromechanical systems SPM has not been focused on high-speed imaging with feedback, which is not supported by the existing literature. In addition, similar actuator structures, albeit slightly larger scale, have been designed and used for SPM applications. Here, we would like comment briefly on the existing literature to clarify the significance of the work.

  10. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results

  11. All-optical photoacoustic microscopy based on plasmonic detection of broadband ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianxiong; Cao, Rui; Ning, Bo; Dixon, Adam J.; Hossack, John A.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Anbo; Hu, Song

    2015-10-01

    We report on an implementation of all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), which capitalizes on the effect of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for optical detection of ultrasound. The SPR sensor in our all-optical PAM shows, experimentally, a linear response to the acoustic pressure from 5.2 kPa to 2.1 MPa, an ultra-flat frequency response (±0.7 dB) from 680 kHz to 126 MHz, and a noise-equivalent pressure sensitivity of 3.3 kPa. With the broadband ultrasonic detection, our SPR-PAM has achieved high spatial resolution with relatively low anisotropy (i.e., 2.0 μm laterally and 8.4 μm axially). Three-dimensional high-resolution imaging of a single melanoma cell is demonstrated.

  12. Observer Performance in the Use of Digital and Optical Microscopy for the Interpretation of Tissue-Based Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios A. Gavrielides

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We conducted a validation study of digital pathology for the quantitative assessment of tissue-based biomarkers with immunohistochemistry. Objective.\tTo examine observer agreement as a function of viewing modality (digital versus optical microscopy, whole slide versus tissue microarray (TMA review, biomarker type (HER2 incorporating membranous staining and Ki-67 with nuclear staining, and data type (continuous and categorical. Methods.\tEight pathologists reviewed 50 breast cancer whole slides (25 stained with HER2 and 25 with Ki-67 and 2 TMAs (1 stained with HER2, 1 with Ki-67, each containing 97 cores, using digital and optical microscopy. Results. Results showed relatively high overall interobserver and intermodality agreement, with different patterns specific to biomarker type. For HER2, there was better interobserver agreement for optical compared to digital microscopy for whole slides as well as better interobserver and intermodality agreement for TMAs. For Ki-67, those patterns were not observed. Conclusions. The differences in agreement patterns when examining different biomarkers and different scoring methods and reviewing whole slides compared to TMA stress the need for validation studies focused on specific pathology tasks to eliminate sources of variability that might dilute findings. The statistical uncertainty observed in our analyses calls for adequate sampling for each individual task rather than pooling cases.

  13. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  14. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  15. Characterization of printed pigment-based inks on ink-jet media using cross-sectional electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the microscopic assessment of representative specimen cross-sections prepared by microtomy and ultramicrotomy with emphasis in structure-property information using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, namely, the absolute optical density δ, the measured effective printing coverage C-tilde, the averaged pigment-based ink layer thickness t-bar, and the morphology at 100% nominal printing coverage. This work shows that for different test patches printed at the same nominal printing coverage a number of different printing schemes yield a pre-defined absolute optical density δ which basically depends on the measured effective printing coverage C-tilde and the type of pigment-based inks used (spectral absorptivity m≠∞) and therefore on the averaged pigment-based ink layer thickness t-bar. A method for estimating the spectral absorptivity m is presented which combines the absolute optical density δ of the test patch and the averaged pigment-based ink layer thickness t-bar as measured from cross-sectional electron microscopy

  16. Filtering, reconstruction, and measurement of the geometry of nuclei from hippocampal neurons based on confocal microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wittmann, Malte; Bading, Hilmar; Wittum, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    The cell nucleus is often considered a spherical structure. However, the visualization of proteins associated with the nuclear envelope in rat hippocampal neurons indicates that the geometry of nuclei is far more complex. The shape of cell nuclei is likely to influence the nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules and ions, in particular calcium, a key regulator of neuronal gene expression. We developed a tool to retrieve the 3-D view of cell nuclei from laser scanning confocal microscopy data. By applying an inertia-based filter, based on a special structure detection mechanism, the signal-to-noise ratio of the image is enhanced, the signal is smoothed, gaps in the membrane are closed, while at the same time the geometric properties, such as diameters of the membrane, are preserved. After segmentation of the image data, the microscopy data are sufficiently processed to extract surface information of the membrane by creating an isosurface with a marching tetrahedra algorithm combined with a modified Dijkstra graph-search algorithm. All methods are tested on artificial data, as well as on real data, which are recorded with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Significant advantages of the inertia-based filter can be observed when comparing it to other state of the art nonlinear diffusion filters. An additional program is written to calculate surface and volume of cell nuclei. These results represent the first step toward establishing a geometry-based model of the-dynamics of cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium. PMID:18315367

  17. Event detection using population-based health care databases in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Leif; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted, Hans Henrik; Mæng, Michael; Terkelsen, Christian; Thayssen, Per; Ravkilde, Jan; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Madsen, Morten; Lassen, Jens F

    2013-01-01

    To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials.......To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials....

  18. From Paper Based Clinical Practice Guidelines to Declarative Workflow Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2009-01-01

    We present a field study of oncology workflow, involving doctors, nurses and pharmacists at Danish hospitals and discuss the obstacles, enablers and challenges for the use of computer based clinical practice guidelines. Related to the CIGDec approach of Pesic and van der Aalst we then describe how...

  19. Cytokeratin-based CTC counting unrelated to clinical follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Machado; Rocha, Bruna Maria Malagoli; Aguiar, Caroline Motta; Abdallah, Emne Ali; Campanha, Daniel; Mingues, Natália Breve; de Oliveira, Thiago Bueno; Maciel, Macello Sampaio; Cervantes, Gustavo Marchioro; Dettino, Aldo L.A.; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been reported to be a relevant prognostic biomarker in metastatic patients. However, their clinical use and impact is still under debate. We have thus comparatively and kinetically assessed two CTC detection methods according to the patient’s clinical follow up. Methods CTC counting and characterization were repeatedly performed during follow up in a patient with metastatic undifferentiated non-small cell lung cancer by using cytokeratin (CK)-dependent immunomagnetic separation (Miltenyi) and CK-independent, size-based isolation [isolation by size of tumor cells (ISET)] (Rarecells). Results Comparison between the two methods showed a parallel increase of CTC detected by ISET and worsening of the clinical status, while CK-dependent CTC numbers were decreasing, misleadingly suggesting a response to treatment. ISET results were in agreement with the clinical follow up showing Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) and CTC expressing a mesenchymal marker with absence of epithelial markers. Conclusions This case report study shows the interest of a comparative and kinetic analysis of different methods for CTCs detection combined with their evaluation according to the clinical follow up. Our results should open up an area for future research and validation in larger clinical cohorts. PMID:24255771

  20. Inverse dynamical photon scattering (IDPS): an artificial neural network based algorithm for three-dimensional quantitative imaging in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Van den Broek, Wouter; Koch, Christoph T

    2016-04-01

    Inverse dynamical photon scattering (IDPS), an artificial neural network based algorithm for three-dimensional quantitative imaging in optical microscopy, is introduced. Because the inverse problem entails numerical minimization of an explicit error metric, it becomes possible to freely choose a more robust metric, to introduce regularization of the solution, and to retrieve unknown experimental settings or microscope values, while the starting guess is simply set to zero. The regularization is accomplished through an alternate directions augmented Lagrangian approach, implemented on a graphics processing unit. These improvements are demonstrated on open source experimental data, retrieving three-dimensional amplitude and phase for a thick specimen. PMID:27136994

  1. Professionally applied topical fluoride: evidence-based clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    With the dramatic increase in the amount of scientific information available about oral health, an evidence-based approach to oral health care and the practice of dentistry is necessary. There is a need to summarize, critique, and disseminate scientific evidence and to translate the evidence into a practical format that is used easily by dentists. The evidence-based clinical recommendations in this report were developed by an expert panel established by the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs that evaluated the collective body of scientific evidence on the effectiveness of professionally applied topical fluoride for caries prevention. The recommendations are intended to assist dentists in clinical decision making. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched for systematic reviews and clinical studies of professionally applied topical fluoride-including gel, foam, and varnish-through October 2005. Panelists were selected on the basis of their expertise in the relevant subject matter. The recommendations are stratified by age groups and caries risk and indicate that periodic fluoride treatments should be considered for both children and adults who are at moderate or high risk of developing caries. Included in the clinical recommendations is a summary table that can be used as a chairside resource. The dentist, knowing the patient's health history and vulnerability to oral disease, is in the best position to make treatment decisions in the interest of each patient. These clinical recommendations must be balanced with the practitioner's professional expertise and the individual patient's preferences. PMID:17389574

  2. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties. PMID:27087141

  3. Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Hyun Woo; Kalegowda, Yogesh; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2016-04-01

    For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

  4. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-01

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale. PMID:27404764

  5. Micromorphology of cactus-pear (Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill) cladodes based on scanning microscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem-Fnayou, Asma; Zemni, Hassène; Nefzaoui, Ali; Ghorbel, Abdelwahed

    2014-01-01

    Cladode ultrastructural features of two prickly and two spineless Opuntia ficus-indica cultivars were examined using environmental scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. Observations focused on cladode as well as spine and glochid surface micromorphologies. Prickly cultivars were characterized by abundant cracked epicuticular wax deposits covering the cladode surface, with an amorphous structure as observed by AFM, while less abundant waxy plates were observed by ESEM on spineless cultivar cladodes. Further AFM observations allowed a rough granular and crystalloid epicuticular wax structure to be distinguished in spineless cultivars. Regarding spine micromorphology, prickly cultivars had strong persistent spines, observed by ESEM as a compact arrangement of oblong epidermal cells with a rough granular structure. However, deciduous spines in spineless cultivars had a broken transversely fissured epidermis covering a parallel arrangement of fibres. Through AFM, the deciduous spine surface presented an irregular hilly and smooth microrelief while persistent spines exhibited rough helical filamentous prints. ESEM and AFM studies of cladode surfaces from prickly and spineless cactus pear cultivars revealed valuable micro-morphological details that ought to be extended to a large number of O. ficus-indica cultivars. PMID:24210248

  6. Time-lapse contact microscopy of cell cultures based on non-coherent illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Marion; Balle, Dorothée; Bigault, Stéphanie; Pornin, Cyrille; Gétin, Stéphane; Perraut, François; Block, Marc R.; Chatelain, François; Picollet-D'Hahan, Nathalie; Gidrol, Xavier; Haguet, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Video microscopy offers outstanding capabilities to investigate the dynamics of biological and pathological mechanisms in optimal culture conditions. Contact imaging is one of the simplest imaging architectures to digitally record images of cells due to the absence of any objective between the sample and the image sensor. However, in the framework of in-line holography, other optical components, e.g., an optical filter or a pinhole, are placed underneath the light source in order to illuminate the cells with a coherent or quasi-coherent incident light. In this study, we demonstrate that contact imaging with an incident light of both limited temporal and spatial coherences can be achieved with sufficiently high quality for most applications in cell biology, including monitoring of cell sedimentation, rolling, adhesion, spreading, proliferation, motility, death and detachment. Patterns of cells were recorded at various distances between 0 and 1000 μm from the pixel array of the image sensors. Cells in suspension, just deposited or at mitosis focalise light into photonic nanojets which can be visualised by contact imaging. Light refraction by cells significantly varies during the adhesion process, the cell cycle and among the cell population in connection with every modification in the tridimensional morphology of a cell.

  7. Time-lapse contact microscopy of cell cultures based on non-coherent illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Marion; Balle, Dorothée; Bigault, Stéphanie; Pornin, Cyrille; Gétin, Stéphane; Perraut, François; Block, Marc R; Chatelain, François; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Gidrol, Xavier; Haguet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Video microscopy offers outstanding capabilities to investigate the dynamics of biological and pathological mechanisms in optimal culture conditions. Contact imaging is one of the simplest imaging architectures to digitally record images of cells due to the absence of any objective between the sample and the image sensor. However, in the framework of in-line holography, other optical components, e.g., an optical filter or a pinhole, are placed underneath the light source in order to illuminate the cells with a coherent or quasi-coherent incident light. In this study, we demonstrate that contact imaging with an incident light of both limited temporal and spatial coherences can be achieved with sufficiently high quality for most applications in cell biology, including monitoring of cell sedimentation, rolling, adhesion, spreading, proliferation, motility, death and detachment. Patterns of cells were recorded at various distances between 0 and 1000 μm from the pixel array of the image sensors. Cells in suspension, just deposited or at mitosis focalise light into photonic nanojets which can be visualised by contact imaging. Light refraction by cells significantly varies during the adhesion process, the cell cycle and among the cell population in connection with every modification in the tridimensional morphology of a cell. PMID:26459014

  8. Intra-vital microscopy of lung tissue: A simulation based analysis of the image formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Schirrmann, Kerstin; Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Kirsten, Lars; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    In the course of pulmonary research, understanding alveolar tissue dynamics plays a critical role in the treatment of patients suffering from acute lung diseases. As a gold standard technique for monitoring micro scale changes of lung tissue, real-time intra-vital microscopy (IVM) has been established to evaluate the behavior of the alveolar tissue. To allow profound qualitative and quantitative conclusions, characteristic features of the obtained images have to be thoroughly understood. These factors are strongly influenced by the imaging setup and physiological condition of the lung. To circumvent misinterpretations, a ray-tracing approach has been applied in this study using an idealized geometry of the mouse lung parenchyma deduced from optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a complementary imaging technique. Basic features of IVM images are double ring structures and disappearing of alveoli related to liquid infiltration. Ray propagation analysis reveals the formation of these features by two major reflection processes: partial reflection and total internal reflection. The results give rise to quantification errors of the alveolar area related to reflexes misinterpreted as alveolar borders and should further be used to yield a correction factor for future IVM lung tissue studies.

  9. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. PMID:25174902

  10. Advanced defect characterization via electron microscopy and its application to cyclically deformed nickel-based superalloy R104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.

    Ni-based superalloys continue to be used in the hot sections of turbine engines due to their superior high temperature properties and retained strength. The present document will focus specifically on the polycrystalline alloy R104, and the deformation substructure observed during and following cyclic mechanical testing. Both low cycle fatigue (LCF) and sustained peak low cycle fatigue (SPLCF) tests are considered. Two chapters on electron microscopy technique development follow a brief introduction on general properties of Nickel superalloys. Almost exclusively, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was performed for defect characterization. Furthermore, through a systematic study of STEM-based diffraction contrast methods, including experimental and computational results, STEM is presented as a valid means of defect analysis. The second chapter in this set also uses STEM, but in a non-traditional setting: the microscope is configured for high resolution imaging, i.e., the sample is aligned along a low index zone axis and a large convergence angle is used. In this low angle annular dark field (LAADF) mode, an annular detector accepts low-angle scattering, which allows one to obtain atomic resolution images while retaining defect contrast. Both techniques described in these two chapters were used extensively throughout this research. The remaining chapters discuss the application of the microscopy techniques developed in the proceeding chapters to cyclically deformed specimens of R104. Both interrupted and failed samples were deformed in LCF at 427°C and 704°C, and interrupted SPLCF samples were tested at 704 and 760°C. The deformation mechanisms observed will be discussed at length in this document. In general, dislocation activity dominates under LCF conditions while stacking faults and stacking fault ribbons are most prominent under SPLCF conditions. Time and temperature components will be discussed in regards to the operative mechanisms. A point

  11. Concurrent clinical review: using microcomputer-based DRG-software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Portocarrero, D; Ruiz, P P; Marmol, J P

    1988-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Prospective Payment System based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) in the U.S.A., important information technologies are arising. We discuss how Professional Review Organizations, (PROS) are forcing a better control of appropriateness and quality of medical care. Hospitals should have the internal capabilities to perform, at least, the same reviews as performed by the PROs. Concurrent Clinical Review Systems based on DRGs are a special type of information technology that take place during and even before patient hospitalization, therefore allowing an 'on line' monitoring information. Low-cost microcomputers are playing a major role in the popularization of this technology. 'Clinical Review System' is a microcomputer-based software that renders easy and feasible and otherwise complex task. An effort should be made in order to adapt the philosophy underlying this or other similar software to the European needs. PMID:10312511

  12. Review of rank-based procedures for multicenter clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M Mushfiqur; McKean, Joseph W; Kloke, John D

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews nonparametric alternatives to the mixed model normal theory analysis for the analyses of multicenter clinical trials. Under a mixed model, the traditional analysis is based on maximum likelihood theory under normal errors. This analysis, though, is not robust to outliers. Robust, rank-based, Wilcoxon-type procedures are reviewed for a multicenter clinical trial for the mixed model but without the assumption of normality. These procedures retain the high efficiency of Wilcoxon methods for simple location problems and are based on a fitting criterion which is robust to outliers in response space. A simple weighting scheme can be employed so that the procedures are robust to outliers in factor (design) space as well as response space. These rank-based analyses offer a complete analysis, including estimation of fixed effects and their standard errors, and tests of linear hypotheses. Both rank-based estimates of contrasts and individual treatment effects are reviewed. We illustrate the analyses using real data from a clinical trial. PMID:24138428

  13. Prospects for a clinical science of mindfulness-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidjian, Sona; Segal, Zindel V

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are at a pivotal point in their future development. Spurred on by an ever-increasing number of studies and breadth of clinical application, the value of such approaches may appear self-evident. We contend, however, that the public health impact of MBIs can be enhanced significantly by situating this work in a broader framework of clinical psychological science. Utilizing the National Institutes of Health stage model (Onken, Carroll, Shoham, Cuthbert, & Riddle, 2014), we map the evidence base for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and mindfulness-based stress reduction as exemplars of MBIs. From this perspective, we suggest that important gaps in the current evidence base become apparent and, furthermore, that generating more of the same types of studies without addressing such gaps will limit the relevance and reach of these interventions. We offer a set of 7 recommendations that promote an integrated approach to core research questions, enhanced methodological quality of individual studies, and increased logical links among stages of clinical translation in order to increase the potential of MBIs to impact positively the mental health needs of individuals and communities. PMID:26436311

  14. Transmission electron microscopy investigations of the CdSe based quantum structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roventa, E.

    2006-09-22

    In this work, the structural morphology of the active region of the ZnSe laser diode: quaternary CdZnSSe quantum well or CdSe quantum dots embedded in CdSe/ZnSSe superlattices is investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy. The conventional as well as high resolution imaging studies indicated that the degradation of the ZnSe laser diodes is connected with the formation of extended defects in the optical active region leading to a local strain relaxation of the quantum well. Furthermore the outdiffusion of Cd from the quantum well occurs predominantly where the defects are located. The chemical composition and ordering phenomena in CdSe/ZnSSe supperlattices were also investigated, employing a series of five-fold structures with different spacer layer thickness and a ten-fold structure. The composition in the CdSe/ZnSSe superlattice was determined to a certain extent using different techniques. Generally, the encountered difficulties regarding the accuracy of the obtained values are correlated with the complexity of the investigated system and with the available experimental methods used. Regarding the alignment of the dots, experimental results support a strain driven ordering process, in which the strain fields from buried dots lead to heterogeneous nucleation conditions for the dots in the subsequently deposited layers. An increased ordering with subsequent stacking of the dot layers is was also found. An anisotropy of the lateral alignment of the CdSe dots was also observed in two different left angle 110 right angle zone axes. The similar plan-view images shows that the preferential alignment of the dots does not follow low-index crystallographic directions. However, it is assumed that this is attributed to the anisotropic elastic strain distribution combined with surface diffusion. (orig.)

  15. Chitosan nanoparticles as non-viral gene delivery vehicles based on atomic force microscopy study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujing Yuan; Jieyi Tan; Yifei Wang; Chuiwen Qian; Meiying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan (CS), a biocompatible and biodegradable material, can act as a non-viral delivery vehicle with low toxicity. In this study, plasmid DNA (pDNA) and siRNA were encapsulated in CS nanoparticles (NPs) to prepare CS-DNA and CS-siRNA NPs using a complex coacervation process. The CS-DNA particle size was within the range of 180-370 nm with a surface charge ranging from 0 to 18 mV at pH 5.5. The stability of pDNA in CS-DNA was investigated by pDNA release study and DNase I protection assay. The release of pDNA from NPs was studied in pH 7.4 phosphatebuffered saline at 37℃ and the CS-DNA NPs could delay the DNA release. Results of DNase I protection assay showed that CS-DNA NPs could protect the encapsulated pDNA from nuclease degradation. In the transfection study, it was found that the transfection efficiency in vitro was dependent on the molecular weight, charge ratio, and DNA concentration of the CS-DNA NP as well as the type of cell transfected. Moreover, the morphology of HeLa cells transfected with CS-siRNA complexes was studied using atomic force microscopy. The results suggest that CS may be more capable than liposome in delivering siRNA to target cells. In summary,our analysis suggests that pDNA and siRNA can be encapsulated in CS NPs without being damaged.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy investigations of the CdSe based quantum structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the structural morphology of the active region of the ZnSe laser diode: quaternary CdZnSSe quantum well or CdSe quantum dots embedded in CdSe/ZnSSe superlattices is investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy. The conventional as well as high resolution imaging studies indicated that the degradation of the ZnSe laser diodes is connected with the formation of extended defects in the optical active region leading to a local strain relaxation of the quantum well. Furthermore the outdiffusion of Cd from the quantum well occurs predominantly where the defects are located. The chemical composition and ordering phenomena in CdSe/ZnSSe supperlattices were also investigated, employing a series of five-fold structures with different spacer layer thickness and a ten-fold structure. The composition in the CdSe/ZnSSe superlattice was determined to a certain extent using different techniques. Generally, the encountered difficulties regarding the accuracy of the obtained values are correlated with the complexity of the investigated system and with the available experimental methods used. Regarding the alignment of the dots, experimental results support a strain driven ordering process, in which the strain fields from buried dots lead to heterogeneous nucleation conditions for the dots in the subsequently deposited layers. An increased ordering with subsequent stacking of the dot layers is was also found. An anisotropy of the lateral alignment of the CdSe dots was also observed in two different left angle 110 right angle zone axes. The similar plan-view images shows that the preferential alignment of the dots does not follow low-index crystallographic directions. However, it is assumed that this is attributed to the anisotropic elastic strain distribution combined with surface diffusion. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt. PMID:27115043

  18. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy. (paper)

  19. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  20. Scanning Probe Microscopy Study of Electronic Properties in Alkyl-substituted Oligothiopene-based Field-Effect Transitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharimani, N.; Nysten, B.

    It appeared in the past decades that semi-conducting organic liquid crystals could easily replace the inorganic semi-conductors to manufacture field-effect transistors (FET). They can be easily processed by simple methods such as inkjet printing. These simple and cheap manufacturing methods pave the way to new applications for plastic electronics: electronic tags, biosensors, flexible screens, … The performance of these liquid crystal nanomaterials is due to their specific nanoscale structure. However, one limitation to the improvement of organic electronic devices is an incomplete understanding of their optoelectronic properties at the nanoscale. The organic semiconductor films often contain a combination of many ordered and disordered regions, grain boundaries and localized traps. These features impact charge transport and trapping at the sub-100 nm length scales [1]. Electrical SPM techniques such as STM, KPFM, EFM and CS-AFM have the potential to provide the correlation between the electronic properties directly and local film structure and have already made important contributions to the field of organic electronics. Here we report on the investigation of the structural and electronic properties of p-conductive organic field-effect transistors based on alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes with bottom-contact structure. For this purpose we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KPFM) in dual frequency mode under ambient conditions. This study helps to determine the local potential in the channel of active OFETs. On the other hand the molecular arrangements of these molecules on the HOPG surface have been studied using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) at the liquid-solid interface.

  1. Dual-soliton Stokes-based background-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-06-01

    We propose an all-fiber-generated, dual-soliton, Stokes-based scheme for background-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) under the spectral focusing mechanism. Owing to the strong birefringence and high nonlinearity of a polarization-maintaining PCF (PM-PCF), two soliton pulses can be simultaneously emitted along different eigenpolarization axes and both serve as Stokes pulses, while allowing feasible tunability of frequency distance and temporal interval between them. This proposed scheme, based on an all-fiber light source, exploits a unique combination of slight frequency-shift temporal walk-off of these two solitons to achieve efficient suppression of the nonresonant background and beat the inaccessibility and complexity of the excitation source. Capability is experimentally demonstrated by background-free CARS spectroscopy and unambiguous CARS microscopy in the fingerprint region. PMID:27244431

  2. A total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy study of mass diffusion enhancement in water-based alumina nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Jocelyn; Coulombe, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    Mass diffusion of rhodamine 6G (R6G) in water-based alumina nanofluids is studied by means of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We report a mass diffusivity enhancement that reaches an order of magnitude in a 2 vol % nanofluid when compared to the value in deionized water. Since experiments were performed with positively charged R6G, interfacial complexation between the dye and the nanoparticles was not observed. The effect of local density variations on mass diffusivity measurements is also addressed. An explanation for the enhancement of mass diffusion is presented using arguments based on dispersion, and it is shown that it correctly describes the order of magnitude differences between the thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity enhancements reported in the literature.

  3. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de, E-mail: ricardomcfreitas@gmail.com; Andrade, Celi Santos, E-mail: celis.andrade@hotmail.com; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira, E-mail: jgmpcaldas@uol.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit of the Instituto de Radiologia (Brazil); Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi, E-mail: miharumi@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Department of Biostatistics, Biosciences Institute (Brazil); Ferreira, Lorraine Braga, E-mail: lorraine.braga@gmail.com; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias, E-mail: vearana@usp.br [Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Oral Pathology (Brazil); Cury, Patrícia Maluf, E-mail: pmcury@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  4. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO2) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO2 epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers

  5. The ePetri dish, an on-chip cell imaging platform based on subpixel perspective sweeping microscopy (SPSM)

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Guoan; Lee, Seung Ah; Antebi, Yaron; Elowitz, Michael B.; Yang, Changhuei

    2011-01-01

    We report a chip-scale lensless wide-field-of-view microscopy imaging technique, subpixel perspective sweeping microscopy, which can render microscopy images of growing or confluent cell cultures autonomously. We demonstrate that this technology can be used to build smart Petri dish platforms, termed ePetri, for cell culture experiments. This technique leverages the recent broad and cheap availability of high performance image sensor chips to provide a low-cost and automated microscopy soluti...

  6. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-env...

  7. Design and Implementation of a Video-based Clinical Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Valdez, Connie A.; Paulsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To (1) describe the development of a Video-based Clinical Examination (VCE) as a formal testing format to evaluate student ability to make an accurate pharmaceutical assessment and recommendation, and (2) determine student perception of the VCE testing format. Methods: Descriptive study of first-year pharmacy students. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine students were included in the study. Students perceived that the VCE testing format provided a real life/interactive environmen...

  8. Intravital microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Milberg, Oleg; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Sramkova, Monika; Wigand, Tim; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is an extremely powerful tool that enables imaging several biological processes in live animals. Recently, the ability to image subcellular structures in several organs combined with the development of sophisticated genetic tools has made possible extending this approach to investigate several aspects of cell biology. Here we provide a general overview of intravital microscopy with the goal of highlighting its potential and challenges. Specifically, this review is geared...

  9. DLA based compressed sensing for high resolution MR microscopy of neuronal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khieu-Van; Li, Jing-Rebecca; Radecki, Guillaume; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present the implementation of compressed sensing (CS) on a high field preclinical scanner (17.2 T) using an undersampling trajectory based on the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) random growth model. When applied to a library of images this approach performs better than the traditional undersampling based on the polynomial probability density function. In addition, we show that the method is applicable to imaging live neuronal tissues, allowing significantly shorter acquisition times while maintaining the image quality necessary for identifying the majority of neurons via an automatic cell segmentation algorithm.

  10. Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates: evidence-based clinical nutrition education using the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, A D

    2005-08-01

    The Arbor Clinical Nutrition Updates (ACNU) is a weekly electronic nutrition journal for health professionals. Each issue summarises several recent clinical research papers appearing in the general medical and nutrition literature and which deal with a common nutrition topic. A commentary is added on how this research fits in with previous work, and what it all means for the practising clinician. ACNU is the world's most widely read electronic nutrition publication, with over 100,000 largely health-professional readers in 186 countries. It is published in nine languages and distributed by email without charge in both plain text and Acrobat formats. ACNU utilises a number of the Internet's unique characteristics to facilitate broad reach, currency and active reader feedback. This, together with its brevity and summarising format, helps to maintain its relevance to the nutrition education needs of health professionals, particularly those in clinical practice, and to overcome the factors most commonly reported by health professionals as obstacles to their greater adoption of evidence-based medicine. ACNU is intended to be a collaboration with the primary research journals to extend the reach of new nutrition research findings to a wider community of researchers, academics and clinicians than each journal might otherwise reach individually. As such, ACNU utilises the Internet to promote the goals of open-access publishing and evidence-based medicine. PMID:16052179

  11. Thermal and topographical characterization of polyester- and styrene/acrylate-based composite powders by scanning probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal properties of two conventional polyester-based toners and a chemically prepared styrene/acrylate toner with different thermal histories were studied by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal transition temperatures detected by SPM agreed with the results of the DSC measurements. The validity of SPM for detecting thermal transitions was further confirmed by studying two amorphous reference polymers with different glass transition points (Tg) and three crystalline reference polymers with different melting points (Tm). When the toner sample was heated by the SPM probe above the glass transition temperature of the toner powder (Tprobe > Tg), changes occurred in the surface topography and roughness causing different levels of local sintering of the particles. A set of roughness parameters calculated from the SPM image data were used to quantify the most essential features of toner surfaces. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to study the penetration depth of heat dissipated by the SPM probe. The probe-annealing was compared with oven-annealing in order to establish the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of the materials

  12. Thermal and topographical characterization of polyester- and styrene/acrylate-based composite powders by scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfolk, Kaj [Stora Enso Oyj, Imatra Research Centre, FI-55 800 Imatra (Finland)], E-mail: Kaj.Backfolk@storaenso.com; Sirvioe, Petri [Stora Enso Oyj, Imatra Research Centre, FI-55 800 Imatra (Finland); Department of Physical Chemistry, Abo Akademi University, Porthaninkatu 3-5, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Ihalainen, Petri [Department of Physical Chemistry, Abo Akademi University, Porthaninkatu 3-5, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Peltonen, Jouko [Laboratory of Paper Coating and Converting, Abo Akademi University, Porthaninkatu 3-5, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)

    2008-04-10

    The thermal properties of two conventional polyester-based toners and a chemically prepared styrene/acrylate toner with different thermal histories were studied by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal transition temperatures detected by SPM agreed with the results of the DSC measurements. The validity of SPM for detecting thermal transitions was further confirmed by studying two amorphous reference polymers with different glass transition points (T{sub g}) and three crystalline reference polymers with different melting points (T{sub m}). When the toner sample was heated by the SPM probe above the glass transition temperature of the toner powder (T{sub probe} > T{sub g}), changes occurred in the surface topography and roughness causing different levels of local sintering of the particles. A set of roughness parameters calculated from the SPM image data were used to quantify the most essential features of toner surfaces. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used to study the penetration depth of heat dissipated by the SPM probe. The probe-annealing was compared with oven-annealing in order to establish the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of the materials.

  13. Rapid on-site detection of airborne asbestos fibers and potentially hazardous nanomaterials using fluorescence microscopy-based biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Akio; Alexandrov, Maxym; Nishimura, Tomoki; Ishida, Takenori

    2016-06-01

    A large number of peptides with binding affinity to various inorganic materials have been identified and used as linkers, catalysts, and building blocks in nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. However, there have been few applications of material-binding peptides in the fluorescence microscopy-based biosensing (FM method) of environmental pollutants. A notable exception is the application of the FM method for the detection of asbestos, a dangerous industrial toxin that is still widely used in many developing countries. This review details the selection and isolation of asbestos-binding proteins and peptides with sufficient specificity to distinguish asbestos from a large variety of safer fibrous materials used as asbestos substitutes. High sensitivity to nanoscale asbestos fibers (30-35 nm in diameter) invisible under conventional phase contrast microscopy can be achieved. The FM method is the basis for developing an automated system for asbestos biosensing that can be used for on-site testing with a portable fluorescence microscope. In the future, the FM method could also become a useful tool for detecting other potentially hazardous nanomaterials in the environment. PMID:27220109

  14. Correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array

  15. High-speed real-time single-pixel microscopy based on Fourier sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Qiang; Wang, Yuxi; Guo, Yong; Liu, Peng; Zhu, Xiurui; Cheng, Zheng; Yu, Zhenming; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Single-pixel cameras based on the concepts of compressed sensing (CS) leverage the inherent structure of images to retrieve them with far fewer measurements and operate efficiently over a significantly broader spectral range than conventional silicon-based cameras. Recently, photonic time-stretch (PTS) technique facilitates the emergence of high-speed single-pixel cameras. A significant breakthrough in imaging speed of single-pixel cameras enables observation of fast dynamic phenomena. However, according to CS theory, image reconstruction is an iterative process that consumes enormous amounts of computational time and cannot be performed in real time. To address this challenge, we propose a novel single-pixel imaging technique that can produce high-quality images through rapid acquisition of their effective spatial Fourier spectrum. We employ phase-shifting sinusoidal structured illumination instead of random illumination for spectrum acquisition and apply inverse Fourier transform to the obtained spectrum fo...

  16. Web-based volume slicer for 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavert-Torres, José; Iudin, Andrii; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Patwardhan, Ardan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the functionality and design of the Volume slicer - a web-based slice viewer for EMDB entries. This tool uniquely provides the facility to view slices from 3D EM reconstructions along the three orthogonal axes and to rapidly switch between them and navigate through the volume. We have employed multiple rounds of user-experience testing with members of the EM community to ensure that the interface is easy and intuitive to use and the information provided is relevant. The impetus to develop the Volume slicer has been calls from the EM community to provide web-based interactive visualisation of 2D slice data. This would be useful for quick initial checks of the quality of a reconstruction. Again in response to calls from the community, we plan to further develop the Volume slicer into a fully-fledged Volume browser that provides integrated visualisation of EMDB and PDB entries from the molecular to the cellular scale. PMID:26876163

  17. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R.; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms ...

  18. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-05-01

    This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional community, and features of clinical practice such as private versus public practice as well as local management policies. This review brings together the different strands of knowledge concerning non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making. This aspect of decision-making may be the biggest obstacle to the reality of practising evidence-based medicine. It needs to be understood in order to develop clinical strategies that will facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20436026

  19. Influence of force-based crosstalk on the 'wedge method' in lateral force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lateral force mode of an atomic force microscope is a contact-based measurement where the cantilever moves laterally in order to contribute to the lateral component of the tip–surface interaction. An accurate quantitative measure is difficult to achieve and is subject to the calibration of a model of the machine such that the output signal is related to the contact forces. Currently available models and calibration methods do not consider the existence of crosstalk. The influence of the latter on the measurement is not clearly identified and raises the question of the result's accuracy. In this paper a definition of the crosstalk is given and the diversity of the crosstalk briefly presented. A first-order, two-dimensional model of the system that includes the force-based crosstalk is presented. The model is used to simulate a calibration method known as the 'wedge method'. A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the calibration errors that can be made by the 'wedge method'. Results show that force-based crosstalk can have a noticeable influence on the calibration as well as on the estimated friction coefficient

  20. Self-healing of lime based mortars: Microscopy observations on case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lubelli, B.; Nijland, T.G.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Lime mortars have, up to a certain extent, a self-healing capacity which may contribute to their durability. Self-healing in lime mortars consists of a process of dissolution, transport and re-precipitation of calcium compounds to heal cracks and fissures. The spontaneous occurrence of self-healing in lime-based mortars is a well known phenomenon; to date, however, little research has been done on its occurrence in the practice. This study aims at gaining a better understanding of the self-he...

  1. Arduino Due based tool to facilitate in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artoni, Pietro; Landi, Silvia; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; Luin, Stefano; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon excitation spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the characterization of the optical properties of genetically encoded and synthetic fluorescent molecules. Excitation spectroscopy requires tuning the wavelength of the Ti:sapphire laser while carefully monitoring the delivered power. To assist laser tuning and the control of delivered power, we developed an Arduino Due based tool for the automatic acquisition of high quality spectra. This tool is portable, fast, affordable and precise. It allowed studying the impact of scattering and of blood absorption on two-photon excitation light. In this way, we determined the wavelength-dependent deformation of excitation spectra occurring in deep tissues in vivo. PMID:27446677

  2. Imaging molecular structure with Stokes-polarimeter based second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Hu, Chih-Wei; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-02-01

    We analyzed the polarization states of second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from starch granules and type I collagen through a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. The 2D SHG images of samples are reconstructed using various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), as well as the anisotropy from the acquired Stokes parameters. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the polarization parameters are changes at different input polarizations and focusing depths.

  3. Model-Based Estimation of Three-Dimensional Stiffness Parameters in Photonic-Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, P; Singh, A.S.G.; Bertseva, E.; Lekki, J.; Kulik, A. J.; Unser, M

    2010-01-01

    We propose a system to characterize the 3-D diffusion properties of the probing bead trapped by a photonic-force microscope. We follow a model-based approach, where the model of the dynamics of the bead is given by the Langevin equation. Our procedure combines software and analog hardware to measure the corresponding stiffness matrix. We are able to estimate all its elements in real time, including off-diagonal terms. To achieve our goal, we have built a simple analog computer that performs a...

  4. Model-Based Estimation of 3-D Stiffness Parameters in Photonic-Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, P; Singh, A.S.G.; Bertseva, E.; Lekki, J.; Kulik, A. J.; Unser, M

    2010-01-01

    We propose a system to characterize the 3-D diffusion properties of the probing bead trapped by a photonic-force microscope. We follow a model-based approach, where the model of the dynamics of the bead is given by the Langevin equation. Our procedure combines software and analog hardware to measure the corresponding stiffness matrix. We are able to estimate all its elements in real time, including off-diagonal terms. To achieve our goal, we have built a simple analog computer that performs a...

  5. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11-Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Lanping Yue; Yunlong Jin; Wenyong Zhang; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. The effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox (x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. The coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5)....

  6. Repeatability and reproducibility of intracellular molar concentration assessed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolle, L., E-mail: lucia.merolle@elettra.eu; Gianoncelli, A. [Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Malucelli, E., E-mail: emil.malucelli@unibo.it; Cappadone, C.; Farruggia, G.; Sargenti, A.; Procopio, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Fratini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma Italy (Italy); Department of Science, Roma Tre University, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Notargiacomo, A. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnology, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, 00156 Rome (Italy); Lombardo, M. [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Lagomarsino, S. [Institute of Chemical-Physical Processes, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Rome (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, 00136 Rome (Italy); Iotti, S. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna 40127 (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, 00136 Rome (Italy)

    2016-01-28

    Elemental analysis of biological sample can give information about content and distribution of elements essential for human life or trace elements whose absence is the cause of abnormal biological function or development. However, biological systems contain an ensemble of cells with heterogeneous chemistry and elemental content; therefore, accurate characterization of samples with high cellular heterogeneity may only be achieved by analyzing single cells. Powerful methods in molecular biology are abundant, among them X-Ray microscopy based on synchrotron light source has gaining increasing attention thanks to its extremely sensitivity. However, reproducibility and repeatability of these measurements is one of the major obstacles in achieving a statistical significance in single cells population analysis. In this study, we compared the elemental content of human colon adenocarcinoma cells obtained by three distinct accesses to synchrotron radiation light.

  7. Material and doping transitions in single GaAs-based nanowires probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the potential of Kelvin probe force microscopy for simultaneously probing the topography and the work function of individual nanowires. Our technique allows us to visualize both the material and the doping contrast in single GaAs-based nanowires without the need to electrically contact the nanowires. In a GaAs/GaP heterostructure nanowire, a core-shell structure is found. This is attributed to a thermally activated radial overgrowth of GaAs, while in the GaP region the vertical nanowire growth dominates. In partially p-doped GaAs nanowires the doping transitions can be localized and the width of the depletion layer is estimated.

  8. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, A.; Grabarek, A.; Moroń, L.; Wałecki, M.; Kryla, P.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before.

  9. Characterization of semiconductor materials using synchrotron radiation-based near-field infrared microscopy and nano-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Peter; Hoehl, Arne; Ulrich, Georg; Fleischmann, Claudia; Hermelink, Antje; Kästner, Bernd; Patoka, Piotr; Hornemann, Andrea; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Rühl, Eckart; Ulm, Gerhard

    2014-07-28

    We describe the application of scattering-type near-field optical microscopy to characterize various semiconducting materials using the electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) as a broadband synchrotron radiation source. For verifying high-resolution imaging and nano-FTIR spectroscopy we performed scans across nanoscale Si-based surface structures. The obtained results demonstrate that a spatial resolution below 40 nm can be achieved, despite the use of a radiation source with an extremely broad emission spectrum. This approach allows not only for the collection of optical information but also enables the acquisition of near-field spectral data in the mid-infrared range. The high sensitivity for spectroscopic material discrimination using synchrotron radiation is presented by recording near-field spectra from thin films composed of different materials used in semiconductor technology, such as SiO2, SiC, SixNy, and TiO2. PMID:25089414

  10. Impact of thermal frequency drift on highest precision force microscopy using quartz-based force sensors at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Pielmeier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM the stability of the eigenfrequency of the force sensor is of key importance for highest precision force measurements. Here, we study the influence of temperature changes on the resonance frequency of force sensors made of quartz, in a temperature range from 4.8–48 K. The sensors are based on the qPlus and length extensional principle. The frequency variation with temperature T for all sensors is negative up to 30 K and on the order of 1 ppm/K, up to 13 K, where a distinct kink appears, it is linear. Furthermore, we characterize a new type of miniaturized qPlus sensor and confirm the theoretically predicted reduction in detector noise.

  11. Repeatability and reproducibility of intracellular molar concentration assessed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental analysis of biological sample can give information about content and distribution of elements essential for human life or trace elements whose absence is the cause of abnormal biological function or development. However, biological systems contain an ensemble of cells with heterogeneous chemistry and elemental content; therefore, accurate characterization of samples with high cellular heterogeneity may only be achieved by analyzing single cells. Powerful methods in molecular biology are abundant, among them X-Ray microscopy based on synchrotron light source has gaining increasing attention thanks to its extremely sensitivity. However, reproducibility and repeatability of these measurements is one of the major obstacles in achieving a statistical significance in single cells population analysis. In this study, we compared the elemental content of human colon adenocarcinoma cells obtained by three distinct accesses to synchrotron radiation light

  12. Surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes and silicon based on lateral force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the surface adhesion between hexagonal boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and silicon based on lateral manipulation in an atomic force microscope (AFM). The BNNT was mechanically manipulated by the lateral force of an AFM pyramidal silicon probe using the scan mechanism in the imaging mode. With a controlled normal force of the AFM probe and the lateral motion, the lateral force applied to the BNNT could overcome the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface. The individual BNNT is forced to slide and rotate on the silicon surface. Based on the recorded force curve, the calculated shear stress due to surface adhesion is 0.5 GPa. And the specific sliding energy loss is 0.2 J/m2. Comparing BNNTs and carbon nanotube (CNT), the shear stress and specific sliding energy loss of BNNT are an order of magnitude larger than that of CNT. Therefore, the results show that the surface adhesion between BNNT and silicon surface is higher than that of CNT.

  13. Web-based volume slicer for 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavert-Torres, José; Iudin, Andrii; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Patwardhan, Ardan

    2016-01-01

    We describe the functionality and design of the Volume slicer – a web-based slice viewer for EMDB entries. This tool uniquely provides the facility to view slices from 3D EM reconstructions along the three orthogonal axes and to rapidly switch between them and navigate through the volume. We have employed multiple rounds of user-experience testing with members of the EM community to ensure that the interface is easy and intuitive to use and the information provided is relevant. The impetus to develop the Volume slicer has been calls from the EM community to provide web-based interactive visualisation of 2D slice data. This would be useful for quick initial checks of the quality of a reconstruction. Again in response to calls from the community, we plan to further develop the Volume slicer into a fully-fledged Volume browser that provides integrated visualisation of EMDB and PDB entries from the molecular to the cellular scale. PMID:26876163

  14. Clinical TVA-based studies: a general review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eHabekost

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In combination with whole report and partial report tasks, the Theory of Visual Attention (TVA can be used to estimate individual differences in five basic attentional parameters: The visual processing speed, the storage capacity of visual short-term memory, the perceptual threshold, the efficiency of top-down selectivity, and the spatial bias of attentional weighting. TVA-based assessment has been used in about 30 studies to investigate attentional deficits in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions: (a neglect and simultanagnosia, (b reading disturbances, (c aging and neurodegenerative diseases, and most recently (d neurodevelopmental disorders. The article introduces TVA based assessment, discusses its methodology and psychometric properties, and reviews the progress made in each of the four research fields. The empirical results demonstrate the general usefulness of TVA-based assessment for many types of clinical neuropsychological research. The method’s most important qualities are cognitive specificity and theoretical grounding, but it is also characterized by good reliability and sensitivity to minor deficits. The review concludes by pointing to promising new areas for clinical TVA-based research.

  15. FDA perspectives on potential microarray-based clinical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Težak Živana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA encourages the development of new technologies such as microarrays which may improve and streamline assessments of safety and the effectiveness of medical products for the benefit of public health. The FDA anticipates that these new technologies may offer the potential for more effective approaches to medical treatment and disease prevention and management. This paper discusses issues associated with the translation of nucleic acid microarray-based devices from basic research and target discovery to in vitro clinical diagnostic use, which the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health foresees will be important for assurance of safety and effectiveness of these types of devices. General technological points, assessment of potential concerns for transitioning microarrays into clinical diagnostic use and approaches for evaluating the performance of these types of devices will be discussed.

  16. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-04-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms a natural photonic crystal structure. By integration over all the solid angle, it will allow very similar SHG quantum efficiency regardless of the angle or the states of incident polarization. Given type I phase matching and the concentric shell structure of a starch granule, one can easily infer the polarization states of the input beam from the resulting SH micrograph. PMID:23577289

  17. Nanovid tracking: a new automatic method for the study of mobility in living cells based on colloidal gold and video microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, H; De Brabander, M.; Nuydens, R; Geuens, S; Moeremans, M.; De Mey, J.; Hollenbeck, P

    1987-01-01

    We describe a new automatic technique for the study of intracellular mobility. It is based on the visualization of colloidal gold particles by video-enhanced contrast light microscopy (nanometer video microscopy) combined with modern tracking algorithms and image processing hardware. The approach can be used for determining the complete statistics of saltatory motility of a large number of individual moving markers. Complete distributions of jump time, jump velocity, stop time, and orientatio...

  18. Clinical applications of MS-based protein quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Bassel; Mindt, Sonani; Neumaier, Michael; Findeisen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry-based assays are increasingly important in clinical laboratory medicine and nowadays are already commonly used in several areas of routine diagnostics. These include therapeutic drug monitoring, toxicology, endocrinology, pediatrics, and microbiology. Accordingly, some of the most common analyses are therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressants, vitamin D, steroids, newborn screening, and bacterial identification. However, MS-based quantification of peptides and proteins for routine diagnostic use is rather rare up to now despite excellent analytical specificity and good sensitivity. Here, we want to give an overview over current fit-for-purpose assays for MS-based protein quantification. Advantages as well as challenges of this approach will be discussed with focus on feasibility for routine diagnostic use. PMID:27061318

  19. Ag/ZnO hybrid systems studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy-based luminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Leandro; Stavale, Fernando; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Coupled metal/oxide systems are prepared by depositing and embedding Ag nanoparticles into crystalline ZnO films grown on Au(111) supports. The morphology and optical properties of the compounds are investigated by topographic imaging and luminescence spectroscopy performed in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The luminescence of bare ZnO is governed by the band-recombination and a Zn-vacancy related peak. After Ag deposition, two additional maxima are detected that are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane plasmon in Ag nanoparticles and have energies below and slightly above the oxide band-gap, respectively. Upon coating the particles with additional ZnO, the out-of-plane plasmon redshifts and loses intensity, indicating strong coupling to the oxide electronic system, while the in-plane mode broadens but remains detectable. The original situation can be restored by gently heating the sample, which drives the silver back to the surface. However, the optical response of pristine ZnO is not recovered even after silver evaporation at high temperature. Small discrepancies are explained with changes in the ZnO defect landscape, e.g., due to silver incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate how energy-transfer processes can be investigated in well-defined metal/oxide systems by means of STM-based spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Identification of novel pro-migratory, cancer-associated genes using quantitative, microscopy-based screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suha Naffar-Abu-Amara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell migration is a highly complex process, regulated by multiple genes, signaling pathways and external stimuli. To discover genes or pharmacological agents that can modulate the migratory activity of cells, screening strategies that enable the monitoring of diverse migratory parameters in a large number of samples are necessary. METHODOLOGY: In the present study, we describe the development of a quantitative, high-throughput cell migration assay, based on a modified phagokinetic tracks (PKT procedure, and apply it for identifying novel pro-migratory genes in a cancer-related gene library. In brief, cells are seeded on fibronectin-coated 96-well plates, covered with a monolayer of carboxylated latex beads. Motile cells clear the beads, located along their migratory paths, forming tracks that are visualized using an automated, transmitted-light screening microscope. The tracks are then segmented and characterized by multi-parametric, morphometric analysis, resolving a variety of morphological and kinetic features. CONCLUSIONS: In this screen we identified 4 novel genes derived from breast carcinoma related cDNA library, whose over-expression induces major alteration in the migration of the stationary MCF7 cells. This approach can serve for high throughput screening for novel ways to modulate cellular migration in pathological states such as tumor metastasis and invasion.

  1. Fast and compact optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a water-proofing two-axis MEMS scanner, and a step forward to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Lim, Geunbae; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel microscopic tool to provide in vivo optically sensitive images in biomedical research. Conventional OR-PAM systems are typically slow and bulky because of the linear scanning stages with stepping motors. For practical purposes, however, fast imaging speed and small footprint are crucial. To address these issues, we have developed a real-time compact OR-PAM system equipped with a waterproof two-axis MEMS scanner. The OR-PAM system consists of key components such as an ultrasonic transducer with a bandwidth of 50 MHz, an opto-acoustic beam combiner (BC), and an MEMS scanner. These are all installed inside a small water tank, with dimensions of 30 mm × 90 mm × 30 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. A pulsed laser with a repetition rate of 50 kHz is confocally aligned with the photoacoustic (PA) waves in the BC to maximize the SNRs. The fast scanning ability of the MEMS scanner fully utilizes the A-scan speed of 50 kHz. For instance, the B- and C-scan imaging speeds are 125 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively, when the acquired PA maximum amplitude projection image has 200 × 200 pixels along the x- and y-axes, respectively. The measured lateral resolution of 3.6 μm and axial resolution of 27 μm are sufficient to resolve the small capillaries. Finally, we have successfully obtained in vivo PA images of iris microvasculatures in mice. This real-time and compact OR-PAM system is optimized to examine small animals in clinical studies.

  2. An internet-based teaching file on clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The goal of this project was to develop an internet-based interactive digital teaching file on nuclide imaging in clinical nuclear medicine, with the capability of access to internet. Methods: On the basis of academic teaching contents in nuclear medicine textbook for undergraduates who major in nuclear medicine, Frontpage 2000, HTML language, and JavaScript language in some parts of the contents, were utilized in the internet-based teaching file developed in this study. Results: A practical and comprehensive teaching file was accomplished and may get access with acceptable speed to internet. Besides basic teaching contents of nuclide imagings, a large number of typical and rare clinical cases, questionnaire with answers and update data in the field of nuclear medicine were included in the file. Conclusion: This teaching file meets its goal of providing an easy-to-use and internet-based digital teaching file, characteristically with the contents instant and enriched, and with the modes diversified and colorful

  3. Synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy for improved extraction in shale during hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Andrew M.; Jew, Adam D.; Joe-Wong, Claresta; Maher, Kate M.; Liu, Yijin; Brown, Gordon E.; Bargar, John

    2015-09-01

    Engineering topics which span a range of length and time scales present a unique challenge to researchers. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) of oil shales is one of these challenges and provides an opportunity to use multiple research tools to thoroughly investigate a topic. Currently, the extraction efficiency from the shale is low but can be improved by carefully studying the processes at the micro- and nano-scale. Fracking fluid induces chemical changes in the shale which can have significant effects on the microstructure morphology, permeability, and chemical composition. These phenomena occur at different length and time scales which require different instrumentation to properly study. Using synchrotron-based techniques such as fluorescence tomography provide high sensitivity elemental mapping and an in situ micro-tomography system records morphological changes with time. In addition, the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) beamline 6-2 is utilized to collect a nano-scale three-dimensional representation of the sample morphology with elemental and chemical sensitivity. We present the study of a simplified model system, in which pyrite and quartz particles are mixed and exposed to oxidizing solution, to establish the basic understanding of the more complex geology-relevant oxidation reaction. The spatial distribution of the production of the oxidation reaction, ferrihydrite, is retrieved via full-field XANES tomography showing the reaction pathway. Further correlation between the high resolution TXM data and the high sensitivity micro-probe data provides insight into potential morphology changes which can decrease permeability and limit hydrocarbon recovery.

  4. Regulations and guidelines governing stem cell based products: Clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells as medicines is a promising and upcoming area of research as they may be able to help the body to regenerate damaged or lost tissue in a host of diseases like Parkinson′s, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, liver disease, spinal cord damage, cancer and many more. Translating basic stem cell research into routine therapies is a complex multi-step process which entails the challenge related to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks while complying with the existing regulations and guidelines. While in the United States (US and European Union (EU regulations are in place, in India, we do not have a well-defined regulatory framework for "stem cell based products (SCBP". There are several areas that need to be addressed as it is quite different from that of pharmaceuticals. These range from establishing batch consistency, product stability to product safety and efficacy through pre-clinical, clinical studies and marketing authorization. This review summarizes the existing regulations/guidelines in US, EU, India, and the associated challenges in developing SCBP with emphasis on clinical aspects.

  5. Multiplex component-based allergen microarray in recent clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelis, A; Borres, M P; Kober, A; Berthold, M

    2016-08-01

    During the last decades component-resolved diagnostics either as singleplex or multiplex measurements has been introduced into the field of clinical allergology, providing important information that cannot be obtained from extract-based tests. Here we review recent studies that demonstrate clinical applications of the multiplex microarray technique in the diagnosis and risk assessment of allergic patients, and its usefulness in studies of allergic diseases. The usefulness of ImmunoCAP ISAC has been validated in a wide spectrum of allergic diseases like asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy and anaphylaxis. ISAC provides a broad picture of a patient's sensitization profile from a single test, and provides information on specific and cross-reactive sensitizations that facilitate diagnosis, risk assessment, and disease management. Furthermore, it can reveal unexpected sensitizations which may explain anaphylaxis previously categorized as idiopathic and also display for the moment clinically non-relevant sensitizations. ISAC can facilitate a better selection of relevant allergens for immunotherapy compared with extract testing. Microarray technique can visualize the allergic march and molecular spreading in the preclinical stages of allergic diseases, and may indicate that the likelihood of developing symptomatic allergy is associated with specific profiles of sensitization to allergen components. ISAC is shown to be a useful tool in routine allergy diagnostics due to its ability to improve risk assessment, to better select relevant allergens for immunotherapy as well as detecting unknown sensitization. Multiplex component testing is especially suitable for patients with complex symptomatology. PMID:27196983

  6. QA programme based on clinical dosimeter with diamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The devices with ionizing chambers as the primary converters are traditionally used for dosimetry of the ionizing radiation in medicine and beam therapy. The application of the semiconductor detectors based on silicon is limited due to the high energy dependence of detection sensitivity, small radiation resource, dependence of the sensitivity on ambient temperature. Among the solid detectors, the diamond detectors are the most similar to the ionizing chambers as the carbon atomic number is close to the effective atomic number of air and biological tissue. The clinical dosimeter DKDa-01-'IPTP' based on the natural diamond detector was developed at the Institute in Physical and Technical Problems with the purpose of absolute and relative measurements in radiotherapy beams. The known properties of natural diamond detector provide high registration sensitivity, high radiation resistance and independence of the sensitivity on temperature, pressure. The small sensitive volume of the detector (1-6 mm3) allows measuring relative dose distributions with high spatial resolution. If calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam, the clinical dosimeter DKDa-01-'IPTP' provides determination of the absorbed dose to water of photon and electron beams in the radiotherapy dose rate and energy ranges without any additive corrections usually required during the ionizing chamber measurement. The relative error of these dose determinations is within ±2% that includes inherent features of the natural diamond detector (small energy dependence and dose rate dependence). The clinical dosimeter DKDa-01-'IPTP' was tested for the absolute measurements of proton radiation dose rate in the medical phasotron beam at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). At the beginning, the dosimeter was calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water against the secondary standard of gamma radiation absorbed dose to water (Co-60). The measurements were carried out at different

  7. Bioinspired Protein Channel-Based Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (Bio-SICM) for Simultaneous Conductance and Specific Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macazo, Florika C; White, Ryan J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of stochastic single-molecule detection using protein nanopores has found widespread application in bioanalytical sensing as a result of the inherent signal amplification of the resistive pulse method. Integration of protein nanopores with high-resolution scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) extends the utility of SICM by enabling selective chemical imaging of specific target molecules, while simultaneously providing topographical information about the net ion flux through a pore under a concentration gradient. In this study, we describe the development of a bioinspired scanning ion conductance microscopy (bio-SICM) approach that couples the imaging ability of SICM with the sensitivity and chemical selectivity of protein channels to perform simultaneous pore imaging and specific molecule mapping. To establish the framework of the bio-SICM platform, we utilize the well-studied protein channel α-hemolysin (αHL) to map the presence of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) at a substrate pore opening. We demonstrate concurrent pore and specific molecule imaging by raster scanning an αHL-based probe over a glass membrane containing a single 25-μm-diameter glass pore while recording the lateral positions of the probe and channel activity via ionic current. We use the average channel current to create a conductance image and the raw current-time traces to determine spatial localization of βCD. With further optimization, we believe that the bio-SICM platform will provide a powerful analytical methodology that is generalizable, and thus offers significant utility in a myriad of bioanalytical applications. PMID:26848947

  8. The measurement of red blood cell volume change induced by Ca2+ based on full field quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Ji Yong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Young

    2009-02-01

    We present the measurement of red blood cell (RBC) volume change induced by Ca2+ for a live cell imaging with full field quantitative phase microscopy (FFQPM). FFQPM is based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer combined with an inverted microscopy system. We present the effective method to obtain a clear image and an accurate volume of the cells. An edge detection technique is used to accurately resolve the boundary between the cell line and the suspension medium. The measurement of the polystyrene bead diameter and volume has been demonstrated the validity of our proposed method. The measured phase profile can be easily converted into thickness profile. The measured polystyrene bead volume and the simulated result are about 14.74 μm3 and 14.14 μm3, respectively. The experimental results of our proposed method agree well with the simulated results within less than 4 %. We have also measured the volume variation of a single RBC on a millisecond time scale. Its mean volume is 54.02 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.52 μm3. With the proposed system, the shape and volume changes of RBC induced by the increased intracellular Ca2+ are measured after adding ionophore A23187. A discocyte RBC is deformed to a spherocyte due to the increased intracellular Ca2+ in RBC. The volume of the spherocyte is 47.88 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.19 μm3. We have demonstrated that the volume measurement technique is easy, accurate, and robust method with high volume sensitivity (<0.0000452 μm3) and this provides the ability to study a biological phenomenon in Hematology.

  9. Electronic properties of dioctylterthiophene-based organic thin-film transistors: A Kelvin probe force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared in the past decades that semi-conducting organic liquid crystals could be used as the active layer in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). They can be processed by simple methods such as inkjet printing, which paves the way to applications for cheap plastic electronics such as electronic tags, biosensors, and flexible screens. However, the measured field-effect mobility in these OTFTs is relatively low compared to inorganic devices. Generally, such low field-effect mobility values result from extrinsic effects such as grain boundaries or imperfect interfaces with source and drain electrodes. It has been shown that reducing the number of grain boundaries between the source and drain electrodes improves the field effect mobility. Therefore, it is important to understand the transport mechanisms by studying the local structure and electronic properties of organic thin films within the channel and at the interfaces with source and drain electrodes in order to improve the field-effect mobility in OTFTs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is an ideal tool for that purpose since it allows to simultaneously investigate the local structure and the electrical potential distribution in electronic devices. In this work, the structure and the electrical properties of OTFTs based on dioctylterthiophene (DOTT) were studied. The transistors were fabricated by spin-coating DOTT on the transistor structures with untreated and treated (silanized) channel silicon oxide. The potential profiles across the channel and at the metal-electrode interfaces were measured by KPFM. The effect of surface treatment on the electrical properties, charge trapping phenomenon and hysteresis effects is demonstrated and analyzed. - Highlights: • Kelvin probe force microscopy study of organic thin film transistors. • Cost and time savings by using solution processable molecules as active layers. • Smaller crystals and less charge trapping effects in silanized devices. • Decrement

  10. A phase-contrast microscopy-based method for modeling the mechanical behavior of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mayssam; Sharabani-Yosef, Orna; Weihs, Daphne; Gefen, Amit

    2016-10-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of single, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), generated from images obtained by optical phase-contrast microscopy and used to quantify the structural responses of the studied cells to externally applied mechanical loads. Mechanical loading has been shown to affect cell morphology and structure, phenotype, motility and other biological functions. Cells experience mechanical loads naturally, yet under prolonged or sizable loading, damage and cell death may occur, which motivates research regarding the structural behavior of loaded cells. For example, near the weight-bearing boney prominences of the buttocks of immobile persons, tissues may become highly loaded, eventually leading to massive cell death that manifests as pressure ulcers. Cell-specific computational models have previously been developed by our group, allowing simulations of cell deformations under compressive or stretching loads. These models were obtained by reconstructing specific cell structures from series of 2D fluorescence, confocal image-slices, requiring cell-specific fluorescent-staining protocols and costly (confocal) microscopy equipment. Alternative modeling approaches represent cells simply as half-spheres or half-ellipsoids (i.e. idealized geometries), which neglects the curvature details of the cell surfaces associated with changes in concentrations of strains and stresses. Thus, we introduce here for the first time an optical image-based FE modeling, where loads are simulated on reconstructed 3D geometrical cell models from a single 2D, phase-contrast image. Our novel modeling method eliminates the need for confocal imaging and fluorescent staining preparations (both expensive), and makes cell-specific FE modeling affordable and accessible to the biomechanics community. We demonstrate the utility of this cost-effective modeling method by performing simulations of compression of MSCs embedded in a gel. PMID:26856632

  11. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  12. PROBLEM BASED LEARNING IN MANAGEMENT AND CLINICAL ENGINEERING COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Azah Hamzaid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed student perceptions and opinion of the problem based learning method, as well as the empirically collected data on students' learning outcomes on a Biomedical Engineering course, i.e. Management and Clinical Engineering. Pure lecture delivery with absence of practical intervention was deemed insufficient to provide appropriate means to achieve the course objectives. Therefore, a Mock Company assignment was introduced in this course as a problem based learning application aimed to aid the achievement of the program outcome while improving the attainment of the course objectives. The students were divided into groups to form individual mock company. Each mock company formed their organization post for each member, and came up with a business plan for a new project to be presented for fund approval by the panels, made up of the course instructors and invited lecturers from the clinical engineering industry and hospital practitioners. The company discussion progress and performance were monitored by the instructors through the formal university e- learning platform throughout the semester with occasional response and suggestions. The panels identified the expected lack of business and management knowledge but this was counteracted by the reasonably successful business plan produced independently by all companies’ At the end of the semester, through questionnaires, 69.6% of the 56 students agreed that this mock company assignment was useful in achieving the course objectives and should be conducted in the following years. Students who performed weakly in this assignment also demonstrated lower performance in all evaluations including by traditional means (p = 0.01, although there were no direct associations amongst the problem-based and the traditional evaluations (r <0.66. The students’ responses also reflected their readiness to perform more independent learning approaches, despite them expressing the lack of clear scope

  13. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live...

  14. Atomic force microscopy-based antibody recognition imaging of proteins in the pathological deposits in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of protein aggregation is of considerable interest to various disciplines, including the field of medicine. A range of disease pathologies are associated with this phenomenon. One of the ocular diseases hallmarked by protein aggregation is the Pseudoexfoliation (PEX) Syndrome. This condition is characterized by the deposition of insoluble proteinaceous material on the anterior human lens capsule. Genomic and proteomic analyses have revealed an association of specific genetic markers and various proteins, respectively, with PEX syndrome. However, the ultrastructure of the protein aggregates is poorly characterized. This study seeks to build capacity to determine the molecular nature of PEX aggregates on human lens capsules in their native state by AFM-based antibody recognition imaging. Lysyl oxidase-Like 1 (LOXL1), a protein identified as a component of PEX aggregates, is detected by an antibody-modified AFM probe. Topographical AFM images and antibody recognition images are obtained using three AFM-based techniques: TREC, phase and force-volume imaging. LOXL1 is found to be present on the lens capsule surface, and is localized around fibrous protein aggregates. Our evaluation shows that TREC imaging is best suited for human tissue imaging and holds significant potential for imaging of human disease tissues in their native state. -- Highlights: → Atomic force microscopy techniques were applied to diseased human tissues. → LOXL1 protein was detected on the small fibers of Pseudoexfoliation deposits. → PicoTREC was the optimum technique for investigating protein aggregates.

  15. Resonance-type bimorph-based high-speed atomic force microscopy: real-time imaging and distortion correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance-type bimorph-based high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) capable of operating in the sample-scan and tip-scan modes is presented in this paper. The working principle of the high-speed scanner, the experimental setup, and the data collection system are described in detail. The main characteristic of the high-speed scanner is the use of a piezoelectric bimorph, where one of the piezoelectric layers is used to drive the bimorph beam to scan at a high speed and the other monitors the bimorph vibration. Image distortions due to the phase-lag and sinusoidal scanning are analyzed and simulated. The correction methods for the compensation of the phase-lag and nonlinear movement are proposed based on data shift and nonlinear mapping relations, respectively. The HSAFM imaging at the maximum rate of ∼30 frames per second is demonstrated with our data collection and correction program. The image distortions caused by the phase-lag and sinusoidal scanning are effectively eliminated in real-time. This work would provide useful methods for the development of HSAFM and applications in the observation of dynamic processes at nanoscale. (paper)

  16. Giant Electric-Field-Induced Strain in PVDF-Based Battery Separator Membranes Probed by Electrochemical Strain Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, Konstantin; Costa, Carlos M; Luchkin, Sergey Yu; Kholkin, Andrei L; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2016-05-31

    Efficiency of lithium-ion batteries largely relies on the performance of battery separator membrane as it controls the mobility and concentration of Li-ions between the anode and cathode electrodes. Recent advances in electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) prompted the study of Li diffusion and transport at the nanoscale via electromechanical strain developed under an application of inhomogeneous electric field applied via the sharp ESM tip. In this work, we observed unexpectedly high electromechanical strain developed in polymer membranes based on porous poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) and, using it, could study a dynamics of electroosmotic flow of electrolyte inside the pores. We show that, independently of the separator membrane, electric field-induced deformation observed by ESM on wetted membrane surfaces can reach up to 10 nm under a moderate bias of 1 V (i.e., more than an order of magnitude higher than that in best piezoceramics). Such a high strain is explained by the electroosmotic flow in a porous media composed of PVDF. It is shown that the strain-based ESM method can be used to extract valuable information such as average pore size, porosity, elasticity of membrane in electrolyte solvent, and membrane-electrolyte affinity expressed in terms of zeta potential. Besides, such systems can, in principle, serve as actuators even in the absence of apparent piezoelectricity in amorphous PVDF. PMID:27142946

  17. Workshop on the coupling of synchrotron radiation IR and X-rays with tip based scanning probe microscopies X-TIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, F.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Mundboth, K.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Purans, J.; Sammelselg, V. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia); Chevrier, J.; Huant, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, LEPES, 38 (France); Hamilton, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Saito, A. [Osaka Univ., RIKEN/SPring8 (Japan); Dhez, O. [OGG, INFM/CNR, 38 - Grenoble (France); Brocklesby, W.S. [Southampton Univ., Optoelectronics Research Centre (United Kingdom); Alvarez-Prado, L.M. [Ovieado, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Kuzmin, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Riga (Latvia); Pailharey, D. [CRMC-N - CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Tonneau, D. [CRMCN - Faculte des sciences de Luminy, 13 - Marseille (France); Chretien, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Cricenti, A. [ISM-CNR, Rome (Italy); DeWilde, Y. [ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coupling of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with synchrotron radiation is attracting increasing attention from nano-science community. By combining these 2 tools one can visualize, for example, the sample nano-structure prior to any X-ray characterization. Coupled with focusing devices or independently, SPM can provide spatial resolution below the optical limits. Furthermore, the possibility of employing SPM to manipulate nano-objects under X-ray beams is another exciting perspective. This document gathers the transparencies of 6 of the presentations made at the workshop: 1) the combination of atomic force microscopy and X-ray beam - experimental set-up and objectives; 2) the combination of scanning probe microscope and X-rays for detection of electrons; 3) towards soft X-ray scanning microscopy using tapered capillaries and laser-based high harmonic sources; 4) near-field magneto-optical microscopy; 5) near-field scanning optical microscopy - a brief overview -; and 6) from aperture-less near-field optical microscopy to infra-red near-field night vision. 4 posters entitled: 1) development of laboratory setup for X-ray/AFM experiments, 2) towards X-ray diffraction on single islands, 3) nano-XEOL using near-field detection, and 4) local collection with a STM tip of photoelectrons emitted by a surface irradiated by visible of UV laser beam, are included in the document.

  18. Fatigue crack initiation in nickel-based superalloys studied by microstructure-based FE modeling and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fried M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work stage I crack initiation in polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys is investigated by analyzing anisotropic mechanical properties, local stress concentrations and plastic deformation on the microstructural length scale. The grain structure in the gauge section of fatigue specimens was characterized by EBSD. Based on the measured data, a microstructure-based FE model could be established to simulate the strain and stress distribution in the specimens during the first loading cycle of a fatigue test. The results were in fairly good agreement with experimentally measured local strains. Furthermore, the onset of plastic deformation was predicted by identifying shear stress maxima in the microstructure, presumably leading to activation of slip systems. Measurement of plastic deformation and observation of slip traces in the respective regions of the microstructure confirmed the predicted slip activity. The close relation between micro-plasticity, formation of slip traces and stage I crack initiation was demonstrated by SEM surface analyses of fatigued specimens and an in-situ fatigue test in a large chamber SEM.

  19. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Immunosensors for Clinically Significant Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has played a crucial role in the development of biosensors over the past decade. The development, testing, optimization, and validation of new biosensors has become a highly interdisciplinary effort involving experts in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and medicine. The sensitivity, the specificity and the reproducibility of biosensors have improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their design. In general, nanomaterials-based electrochemical immunosensors amplify the sensitivity by facilitating greater loading of the larger sensing surface with biorecognition molecules as well as improving the electrochemical properties of the transducer. The most common types of nanomaterials and their properties will be described. In addition, the utilization of nanomaterials in immunosensors for biomarker detection will be discussed since these biosensors have enormous potential for a myriad of clinical uses. Electrochemical immunosensors provide a specific and simple analytical alternative as evidenced by their brief analysis times, inexpensive instrumentation, lower assay cost as well as good portability and amenability to miniaturization. The role nanomaterials play in biosensors, their ability to improve detection capabilities in low concentration analytes yielding clinically useful data and their impact on other biosensor performance properties will be discussed. Finally, the most common types of electroanalytical detection methods will be briefly touched upon.

  20. Model Comparison for Breast Cancer Prognosis Based on Clinical Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Boughorbel

    Full Text Available We compared the performance of several prediction techniques for breast cancer prognosis, based on AU-ROC performance (Area Under ROC for different prognosis periods. The analyzed dataset contained 1,981 patients and from an initial 25 variables, the 11 most common clinical predictors were retained. We compared eight models from a wide spectrum of predictive models, namely; Generalized Linear Model (GLM, GLM-Net, Partial Least Square (PLS, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Random Forests (RF, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN and Boosted Trees. In order to compare these models, paired t-test was applied on the model performance differences obtained from data resampling. Random Forests, Boosted Trees, Partial Least Square and GLMNet have superior overall performance, however they are only slightly higher than the other models. The comparative analysis also allowed us to define a relative variable importance as the average of variable importance from the different models. Two sets of variables are identified from this analysis. The first includes number of positive lymph nodes, tumor size, cancer grade and estrogen receptor, all has an important influence on model predictability. The second set incudes variables related to histological parameters and treatment types. The short term vs long term contribution of the clinical variables are also analyzed from the comparative models. From the various cancer treatment plans, the combination of Chemo/Radio therapy leads to the largest impact on cancer prognosis.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  2. Nonparametric Denoising Methods Based on Contourlet Transform with Sharp Frequency Localization: Application to Low Exposure Time Electron Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Sid Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Image denoising is a very important step in cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM and the energy filtering TEM images before the 3D tomography reconstruction, as it addresses the problem of high noise in these images, that leads to a loss of the contained information. High noise levels contribute in particular to difficulties in the alignment required for 3D tomography reconstruction. This paper investigates the denoising of TEM images that are acquired with a very low exposure time, with the primary objectives of enhancing the quality of these low-exposure time TEM images and improving the alignment process. We propose denoising structures to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structures are based on Bayesian estimation in the transform domains instead of the spatial domain to build a novel feature preserving image denoising structures; namely: wavelet domain, the contourlet transform domain and the contourlet transform with sharp frequency localization. Numerical image denoising experiments demonstrate the performance of the Bayesian approach in the contourlet transform domain in terms of improving the signal to noise ratio (SNR and recovering fine details that may be hidden in the data. The SNR and the visual quality of the denoised images are considerably enhanced using these denoising structures that combine multiple noisy copies. The proposed methods also enable a reduction in the exposure time.

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy-based in situ measurement of fast tool servo-assisted diamond turning micro-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Bing-Feng; Zhu, Wu-Le; Yang, Shunyao; Yang, Keji

    2014-05-01

    We propose a new in situ measurement system based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to realize spiral scanning of a micro-structure without removing it after fast tool servo (FTS) cutting. To avoid distortion of the machined and measured surface, the center alignment of the FTS tool and the STM tip was first implemented by an STM in situ raster scan of two circular grooves cut by the machine tool. To originally observe the machined surface, the trace of the STM tip is put in accord with that of the FTS by setting the same start and end points of cutting and scanning and the same feed rate, and both are triggered by the subdivided rotary encoder of the spindle of the diamond turning machine. The profile data of the in situ spiral scanning of the machined micro-lens array can be fed back to compensate the depth of the cut to guarantee sub-micron form accuracy after second machining. The efficient spiral scanning, proper matching and accurate evaluation results demonstrate that the proposed STM in situ measurement approach is of great significance to the fabrication process.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy-based in situ measurement of fast tool servo-assisted diamond turning micro-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new in situ measurement system based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to realize spiral scanning of a micro-structure without removing it after fast tool servo (FTS) cutting. To avoid distortion of the machined and measured surface, the center alignment of the FTS tool and the STM tip was first implemented by an STM in situ raster scan of two circular grooves cut by the machine tool. To originally observe the machined surface, the trace of the STM tip is put in accord with that of the FTS by setting the same start and end points of cutting and scanning and the same feed rate, and both are triggered by the subdivided rotary encoder of the spindle of the diamond turning machine. The profile data of the in situ spiral scanning of the machined micro-lens array can be fed back to compensate the depth of the cut to guarantee sub-micron form accuracy after second machining. The efficient spiral scanning, proper matching and accurate evaluation results demonstrate that the proposed STM in situ measurement approach is of great significance to the fabrication process. (paper)

  5. Microscopy system of atomic force based on a digital optical reading unit and a buzzer-scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An astigmatic detection system (Ads) based on a compact disk/digital-versatile-disk (Cd-DVD) astigmatic optical pickup unit is presented. It can achieve a resolution better than 0.3 nm in detection of the vertical displacement and is able to detect the two-dimensional angular tilt of the object surface. Furthermore, a novel scanner design actuated by piezoelectric disk buzzers is presented. The scanner is composed of a quad-rod actuation structure and several piezoelectric disks. It can be driven directly with low-voltage and low-current sources, such as analogue outputs of a data acquisition card and enables a sufficient scanning range of up to μm. In addition, an economic, high-performance streamlined atomic force microscopy (AFM) was constructed, using the buzzer-scanner to move the sample relative to the probe, and using a Cd/DVD optical pickup unit to detect the mechanical resonance of a micro fabricated cantilever. The performance of the AFM is evaluated. The high sensitivity and high bandwidth of the detection system makes the equipment suitable for characterizing nano scale elements. An AFM using our detection system for detecting the deflection of micro fabricated cantilevers can resolve individual atomic steps on graphite surfaces. (Author)

  6. Immobilization of zebrafish larvae on a chip-based device for environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    Small vertebrate model organisms have recently gained popularity as attractive experimental models that enhance our understanding of human tissue and organ development. Laser microsurgery on zebrafish larvae combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging can in particular provide accelerated insights into the tissue regeneration phenomena. Conventional SEM exposes, however, specimens to high vacuum environments, and often requires laborintensive and time-consuming pretreatments and manual positioning. Moreover, there are virtually no technologies available that can quickly immobilize the zebrafish larvae for high definition SEM imaging. This work describes the proof-of-concept design and validation of a microfluidic chip-based system for immobilizing zebrafish larvae and it's interfacing with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) imaging. The Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) device was fabricated using a high-speed infrared laser micromachining and consists of a reservoir with multiple semispherical microwells, which hold the yolk of zebrafish larvae, and drain channels that allow removing excess of medium during SEM imaging. Paper filter is used to actuate the chip and immobilization of the larvae by gentle suction that occurs during water drainage. The trapping region allows multiple specimens to be positioned on the chip. The device is then inserted directly inside the ESEM and imaged in a near 100% humidity atmosphere. This facilitates ESEM imaging of untreated biological samples.

  7. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  8. Atomic force microscopy study of stacking modes of martensitic transformation in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensitic transformation in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr shape memory alloys have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has been found that thermally induced martensite plates appear with the self-accommodated stacking form, in which all the three possible variants with different left angle 112 right angle shear directions in a {111} plane are activated and formed in parallel but at separate places; i.e. each plate corresponds to one variant. In addition, a plastic deformation band is always induced in austenite between two different variants. On the other hand, stress-induced martensite plates appear with the mono-partial stacking form, i.e. only single variant is activated in a {111} plane in a grain. The difference between stacking modes of thermally induced and stress-induced martensites makes them play a different role in contributing to shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si based shape memory alloys. (orig.)

  9. A novel method for identifying a graph-based representation of 3-D microvascular networks from fluorescence microscopy image stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Sepideh; Xu, Xiaoyin; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Gu, Chenghua; Miller, Eric L

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach to determine the global topological structure of a microvasculature network from noisy and low-resolution fluorescence microscopy data that does not require the detailed segmentation of the vessel structure is proposed here. The method is most appropriate for problems where the tortuosity of the network is relatively low and proceeds by directly computing a piecewise linear approximation to the vasculature skeleton through the construction of a graph in three dimensions whose edges represent the skeletal approximation and vertices are located at Critical Points (CPs) on the microvasculature. The CPs are defined as vessel junctions or locations of relatively large curvature along the centerline of a vessel. Our method consists of two phases. First, we provide a CP detection technique that, for junctions in particular, does not require any a priori geometric information such as direction or degree. Second, connectivity between detected nodes is determined via the solution of a Binary Integer Program (BIP) whose variables determine whether a potential edge between nodes is or is not included in the final graph. The utility function in this problem reflects both intensity-based and structural information along the path connecting the two nodes. Qualitative and quantitative results confirm the usefulness and accuracy of this method. This approach provides a mean of correctly capturing the connectivity patterns in vessels that are missed by more traditional segmentation and binarization schemes because of imperfections in the images which manifest as dim or broken vessels. PMID:25515433

  10. Fuzzy-Logic Based Detection and Characterization of Junctions and Terminations in Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojević, Miroslav; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Digital reconstruction of neuronal cell morphology is an important step toward understanding the functionality of neuronal networks. Neurons are tree-like structures whose description depends critically on the junctions and terminations, collectively called critical points, making the correct localization and identification of these points a crucial task in the reconstruction process. Here we present a fully automatic method for the integrated detection and characterization of both types of critical points in fluorescence microscopy images of neurons. In view of the majority of our current studies, which are based on cultured neurons, we describe and evaluate the method for application to two-dimensional (2D) images. The method relies on directional filtering and angular profile analysis to extract essential features about the main streamlines at any location in an image, and employs fuzzy logic with carefully designed rules to reason about the feature values in order to make well-informed decisions about the presence of a critical point and its type. Experiments on simulated as well as real images of neurons demonstrate the detection performance of our method. A comparison with the output of two existing neuron reconstruction methods reveals that our method achieves substantially higher detection rates and could provide beneficial information to the reconstruction process. PMID:26701809

  11. Differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography microscopy based on a single-optical-element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; Xie, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Both digital in-line holography (DIH) and zone plate-based microscopy have received considerable interest as powerful imaging tools. However, the former suffers from a twin-image noise problem. The latter suffers from low efficiency and difficulty in fabrication. Here, we present an effective and efficient phase-contrast imaging approach, named differential-interference-contrast digital in-line holography (DIC-DIH), by using a single optical element to split the incident light into a plane wave and a converging spherical wave and generate a two-dimensional (2D) DIC effect simultaneously. Specifically, to improve image contrast, we present a new single optical element, termed 2D DIC compound photon sieves, by combining two overlaid binary gratings and a compound photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can eliminate the twin-image noise problem and improve image contrast with high efficiency. Additionally, we present an example of the phase-contrast imaging nonuniform thick photoresist development process. PMID:26512507

  12. GPU-based rapid reconstruction of cellular 3D refractive index maps from tomographic phase microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardikman, Gili; Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    We present highly parallel and efficient algorithms for real-time reconstruction of the quantitative three-dimensional (3-D) refractive-index maps of biological cells without labeling, as obtained from the interferometric projections acquired by tomographic phase microscopy (TPM). The new algorithms are implemented on the graphic processing unit (GPU) of the computer using CUDA programming environment. The reconstruction process includes two main parts. First, we used parallel complex wave-front reconstruction of the TPM-based interferometric projections acquired at various angles. The complex wave front reconstructions are done on the GPU in parallel, while minimizing the calculation time of the Fourier transforms and phase unwrapping needed. Next, we implemented on the GPU in parallel the 3-D refractive index map retrieval using the TPM filtered-back projection algorithm. The incorporation of algorithms that are inherently parallel with a programming environment such as Nvidia's CUDA makes it possible to obtain real-time processing rate, and enables high-throughput platform for label-free, 3-D cell visualization and diagnosis.

  13. Compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional image acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional (2D) image acquisition is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A section of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is used to perform wavelength-to-time conversion and then ultrafast spectral shaping of broadband optical pulses can be achieved via high-speed intensity modulation. A 2D spatial disperser comprising a pair of orthogonally oriented dispersers is employed to produce spatially structured illumination for 2D image acquisition and a section of single mode fiber (SMF) is utilized for pulse compression in the optical domain. In our scheme, a 1.2-GHz photodetector and a 50-MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) are used to acquire the energy of the compressed pulses. Image reconstructions are demonstrated at a frame rate of 500 kHz and a sixteen-fold image compression is achieved in our proof-of-concept demonstration. PMID:26698446

  14. Selection of higher eigenmode amplitude based on dissipated power and virial contrast in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Alfredo J.; Eslami, Babak; López-Guerra, Enrique A.; Solares, Santiago D., E-mail: ssolares@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    This paper explores the effect of the amplitude ratio of the higher to the fundamental eigenmode in bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the phase contrast and the dissipated power contrast of the higher eigenmode. We explore the optimization of the amplitude ratio in order to maximize the type of contrast that is most relevant to the particular study. Specifically, we show that the trends in the contrast range behave differently for different quantities, especially the dissipated power and the phase, with the former being more meaningful than the latter (a similar analysis can be carried out using the virial, for which we also provide a brief example). Our work is based on numerical simulations using two different conservative-dissipative tip-sample models, including the standard linear solid and the combination of a dissipation coefficient with a conservative model, as well as experimental images of thin film Nafion{sup ®} proton exchange polymers. We focus on the original bimodal AFM method, where the higher eigenmode is driven with constant amplitude and frequency (i.e., in “open loop”).

  15. [Clinical pathway management of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on state machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jian; Hao, Liwei; Cheng, Yuanxiong; Xu, Tongliang; Song, Yingnuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a clinical pathway of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) based on state machine. Clinical event-driven response was utilized to control workflow execution of the AECOPD clinical pathway. By comparison with the traditional clinical pathway management, clinical numerical results showed that the proposed method was better in hospitalization days, average hospitalization expense and aberration rate, and better handled the variability in the AECOPD clinical pathway execution. PMID:24752111

  16. Microcomputer-based recording system for clinical electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, B

    1990-09-01

    We developed a personal computer-based system for clinical electrophysiologic measurements. The computer interfaced with a commercially available A/D converter, a low-noise isolation preamplifier, filter circuits, pattern and Ganzfeld stimulators, and a hardcopy unit. Separate programs were developed for electroretinography (ERG), pattern ERG and simultaneous visual evoked potential (VEP), flash and pattern-shift VEP, and electro-oculographic measurements. The complete control of the applied hardware (eg, stimulus control, automatic gain, and filter selection) is a common feature of the computer programs. These programs provide oscilloscopic functions, overload protection, artifact elimination, averaging, automatic peak latency and amplitude determination, baseline correction, smoothing, and digital filtering. The results can be presented on matrix, laser printers, or digital plotters. The hardware components and the features of the driver software are demonstrated on normal and pathologic signals. PMID:2276319

  17. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  18. Personal Computer Based Clinical Programming Software for Auditory Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rajakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory Prostheses (AP are widely used electronic devices for patients suffering with severe to profound senosorineural deafness by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve using an electrode array surgically placed in the inner ear. AP mainly contains external Body Worn Speech Processor (BWSP and internal Implantable Receiver Stimulator (IRS. BWSP receives an external sound or speech and generates encoded speech data bits for transmission to IRS via radio frequency transcutaneous link for excitation of electrode array. After surgical placement electrode array in the inner ear, BWSP should be fine tuned to achieve the 80-100% speech reception abilities of patient by an audiologist. Problem statement: Basic objective of this research was to develop a simple personal computer based user friendly hardware and software interface to fine tune the BWSP to achieve the best possible speech reception abilities of each individual patient. Approach: Tuning process involved several tasks such as identifying the active electrode contacts, determination of detection and pain thresholds of each active electrode and loads these values into BWSP by reprogramming the BWSP. This study contracted with development of easy and simple user friendly hardware and software interface for audiologist to perform post operation tuning procedures. A microcontroller based impedance telemetry with bidirectional RF transceiver was developed as a hardware interface between PC and IRS. The clinical programming software was developed using VB.NET 2008 to perform the post-operative tuning procedures such as (i impedance measurement, (ii fitting to determine the threshold and comfort levels for each active electrodes and (iii reprogramming the speech processor. Results: Simple hardware and software interfaces for audiologist were constructed and tested with laboratory model BWSP and IRS using simulated resistance electrode array. All the functional aspects were tested and results

  19. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  20. Building a web-based CAD server for clinical use, evaluation, and incremental learning. Implementation of analysis function based on execution result and clinical feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of clinical image analysis software such as computer-assisted detection/diagnosis (CAD) involves a cycle of algorithm development, software implementation, clinical use, refinement of algorithm and software based on feedback. This cycle is expected to accelerate development of CAD software. We have been building a web-based CAD server that enables radiologists to use CAD software and to give feedback in clinical environment. The platform has been utilized in our hospital for 16 months, and more than 2,000 cases of feedback data have been accumulated. In this report, we introduce additional functions for performance evaluation based on executed results of CAD software and clinical feedback. (author)

  1. Impact of crosslingking and remelting on UHMWPE structure, investigated by electron microscopy with image analysis based on fourier transform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Baldrian, Josef; Synková, Hana

    Slovene Society for Microscopy, 2005 - (Čeh, M.; Dražič, G.; Fidler, S.), s. 393-394 ISBN 961-6303-69-4. [Multinational Congress on Microscopy /7./. Portorož (SI), 26.06.2005-30.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/04/1118 Keywords : crosslinking * Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  2. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.; Nichols, R.; Wengel, Jesper; Ulstrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer unde...

  3. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  4. Specific visualization of nitric oxide in the vasculature with two-photon microscopy using a copper based fluorescent probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrajit Ghosh

    Full Text Available To study the role and (sub cellular nitric oxide (NO constitution in various disease processes, its direct and specific detection in living cells and tissues is a major requirement. Several methods are available to measure the oxidation products of NO, but the detection of NO itself has proved challenging. We visualized NO production using a NO-sensitive copper-based fluorescent probe (Cu 2FL2E and two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM. Cu 2FL2E demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for NO synthesis, combined with low cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Cu 2FL2E showed superior sensitivity over the conventionally used Griess assay. NO specificity of Cu 2FL2E was confirmed in vitro in human coronary arterial endothelial cells and porcine aortic endothelial cells using various triggers for NO production. Using TPLSM on ex vivo mounted murine carotid artery and aorta, the applicability of the probe to image NO production in both endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells was shown. NO-production and time course was detected for multiple stimuli such as flow, acetylcholine and hydrogen peroxide and its correlation with vasodilation was demonstrated. NO-specific fluorescence and vasodilation was abrogated in the presence of NO-synthesis blocker L-NAME. Finally, the influence of carotid precontraction and vasorelaxation validated the functional properties of vessels. Specific visualization of NO production in vessels with Cu 2FL2E-TPLSM provides a valid method for studying spatial-temporal synthesis of NO in vascular biology at an unprecedented level. This approach enables investigation of the pathways involved in the complex interplay between NO and vascular (dys function.

  5. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26666911

  6. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  7. EPID based in vivo dosimetry system: clinical experience and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Sofia; Costa, Emilie; Wessels, Claas; Mazal, Alejandro; Fourquet, Alain; Francois, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mandatory in several countries, in vivo dosimetry has been recognized as one of the next milestones in radiation oncology. Our department has implemented clinically an EPID based in vivo dosimetry system, EPIgray, by DOSISOFT S.A., since 2006. An analysis of the measurements per linac and energy over a two-year period was performed, which included a more detailed examination per technique and treat-ment site over a six-month period. A comparison of the treatment planning system doses and the doses estimated by EPIgray shows a mean of the differences of 1.9% (± 5.2%) for the two-year period. The 3D conformal treatment plans had a mean dose difference of 2.0% (± 4.9%), while for intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy treatments the mean dose difference was -3.0 (± 5.3%) and -2.5 (± 5.2%), respectively. In addition, root cause analyses were conducted on the in vivo dosimetry measurements of two breast cancer treatment techniques, as well as prostate treatments with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. During the breast study, the dose differences of breast treatments in supine position were correlated to patient setup and EPID positioning errors. Based on these observations, an automatic image shift correc-tion algorithm is developed by DOSIsoft S.A. The prostate study revealed that beams and arcs with out-of-tolerance in vivo dosimetry results tend to have more complex modulation and a lower exposure of the points of interest. The statistical studies indicate that in vivo dosimetry with EPIgray has been successfully imple-mented for classical and complex techniques in clinical routine at our institution. The additional breast and prostate studies exhibit the prospects of EPIgray as an easy supplementary quality assurance tool. The validation, the automatization, and the reduction of false-positive results represent an important step toward adaptive radiotherapy with EPIgray. PMID:27167283

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  9. Rule based Part of speech Tagger for Homoeopathy Clinical realm

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Kumar Dwivedi; Pramod P Sukhadeve

    2011-01-01

    A tagger is a mandatory segment of most text scrutiny systems, as it consigned a syntax class (e.g., noun, verb, adjective, and adverb) to every word in a sentence. In this paper, we present a simple part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. This paper reports about the anticipated part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. It exploit standard pattern for evaluating sentences, untagged clinical corpus of 20085 words is used, from which we had selected 125 sentence...

  10. Metadata-based analysis to improve clinical trial exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Luzi, Daniela; Ricci, Fabrizio L. (CNR-IRPPS); Serbanati, Luca D.; GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2006-01-01

    There are various, important information sources devoted to the diffusion of clinical trials, but they fail to achieve a complete coverage of clinical research. The demand for a mandatory public registration of clinical trials is emerging from different institutions, which are making efforts to develop common metadata schemas to both increase information exchange and make this information publicly available. The paper describes a metadata analysis of the various solutions of CT data represent...

  11. Revealing the Molecular Structure and the Transport Mechanism at the Base of Primary Cilia Using Superresolution STED Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tung-Lin

    The primary cilium is an organelle that serves as a signaling center of the cell and is involved in the hedgehog signaling, cAMP pathway, Wnt pathways, etc. Ciliary function relies on the transportation of molecules between the primary cilium and the cell, which is facilitated by intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT88, one of the important IFT proteins in complex B, is known to play a role in the formation and maintenance of cilia in various types of organisms. The ciliary transition zone (TZ), which is part of the gating apparatus at the ciliary base, is home to a large number of ciliopathy molecules. Recent studies have identified important regulating elements for TZ gating in cilia. However, the architecture of the TZ region and its arrangement relative to intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins remain largely unknown, hindering the mechanistic understanding of the regulation processes. One of the major challenges comes from the tiny volume at the ciliary base packed with numerous proteins, with the diameter of the TZ close to the diffraction limit of conventional microscopes. Using a series of stimulated emission depletion (STED) superresolution images mapped to electron microscopy images, we analyzed the structural organization of the ciliary base. Subdiffraction imaging of TZ components defines novel geometric distributions of RPGRIP1L, MKS1, CEP290, TCTN2 and TMEM67, shedding light on their roles in TZ structure, assembly, and function. We found TCTN2 at the outmost periphery of the TZ close to the ciliary membrane, with a 227+/-18 nm diameter. TMEM67 was adjacent to TCTN2, with a 205+/-20 nm diameter. RPGRIP1L was localized toward the axoneme at the same axial level as TCTN2 and TMEM67, with a 165+/-8 nm diameter. MKS1 was situated between TMEM67 and RPGRIP1L, with an 186+/-21 nm diameter. Surprisingly, CEP290 was localized at the proximal side of the TZ close to the distal end of the centrin-labeled basal body. The lateral width was unexpectedly close to

  12. Clinical dosimetry in photon radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo based investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical clinical dosimetry is a fundamental step within the radiation therapy process and aims at quantifying the absorbed radiation dose within a 1-2% uncertainty. To achieve this level of accuracy, corrections are needed for calibrated and air-filled ionization chambers, which are used for dose measurement. The procedures of correction are based on cavity theory of Spencer-Attix and are defined in current dosimetry protocols. Energy dependent corrections for deviations from calibration beams account for changed ionization chamber response in the treatment beam. The corrections applied are usually based on semi-analytical models or measurements and are generally hard to determine due to their magnitude of only a few percents or even less. Furthermore the corrections are defined for fixed geometrical reference-conditions and do not apply to non-reference conditions in modern radiotherapy applications. The stochastic Monte Carlo method for the simulation of radiation transport is becoming a valuable tool in the field of Medical Physics. As a suitable tool for calculation of these corrections with high accuracy the simulations enable the investigation of ionization chambers under various conditions. The aim of this work is the consistent investigation of ionization chamber dosimetry in photon radiation therapy with the use of Monte Carlo methods. Nowadays Monte Carlo systems exist, which enable the accurate calculation of ionization chamber response in principle. Still, their bare use for studies of this type is limited due to the long calculation times needed for a meaningful result with a small statistical uncertainty, inherent to every result of a Monte Carlo simulation. Besides heavy use of computer hardware, techniques methods of variance reduction to reduce the needed calculation time can be applied. Methods for increasing the efficiency in the results of simulation were developed and incorporated in a modern and established Monte Carlo simulation environment

  13. Bases for time-resolved probing of transient carrier dynamics by optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Munenori; Yoshida, Shoji; Mera, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2013-09-01

    The tangled mechanism that produces optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy spectra from semiconductors was analyzed by comparing model simulation data with experimental data. The nonlinearities reflected in the spectra, namely, the excitations generated by paired laser pulses with a delay time, the logarithmic relationship between carrier density and surface photovoltage (SPV), and the effect of the change in tunneling barrier height depending on SPV, were examined along with the delay-time-dependent integration process used in measurement. The optimum conditions required to realize reliable measurement, as well as the validity of the microscopy technique, were demonstrated for the first time.

  14. WebCIS: large scale deployment of a Web-based clinical information system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hripcsak, G.; Cimino, J. J.; Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    WebCIS is a Web-based clinical information system. It sits atop the existing Columbia University clinical information system architecture, which includes a clinical repository, the Medical Entities Dictionary, an HL7 interface engine, and an Arden Syntax based clinical event monitor. WebCIS security features include authentication with secure tokens, authorization maintained in an LDAP server, SSL encryption, permanent audit logs, and application time outs. WebCIS is currently used by 810 phy...

  15. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  16. Clinical use of Skype: a review of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Nigel R; Gray, Leonard C; Smith, Anthony C

    2012-04-01

    Skype is a popular and free software application that allows PCs and mobile devices to be used for video communication over the Internet. We reviewed the literature to determine whether the clinical use of Skype is supported by evidence. One small (n = 7) controlled clinical trial had assessed the effect of nursing communication using Skype on elderly patients with dementia and their carers. However, we were unable to identify any large, well-designed studies which had formally evaluated the safety, clinical effectiveness, security and privacy of Skype for the routine delivery of patient care. While there were many case reports and small studies, no firm evidence either in favour of, or against the use of Skype for clinical telehealth was found. The risks and benefits of using Skype for clinical purposes are not known. PMID:22362829

  17. Are the outcomes of clinical pathways evidence-based? A critical appraisal of clinical pathway evaluation research

    OpenAIRE

    El Baz, N.; Middel, B.; van Dijk, J. P.; Oosterhof, A.; Boonstra, P.W.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim and objective To evaluate the validity of study outcomes of published papers that report the effects of clinical pathways (CP). Method Systematic review based on two search strategies, including searching Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Psychinfo and Picarta from 1995 till 2005 and ISI Web of Knowledge (SM). We included randomized controlled or quasi-experimental studies evaluating the efficacy of clinical pathway application. Assessment of the methodological quality of the studies included rand...

  18. Clinical diagnosis support system based on case based fuzzy cognitive maps and semantic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douali, Nassim; De Roo, Jos; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Incorrect or improper diagnostic tests uses have important implications for health outcomes and costs. Clinical Decision Support Systems purports to optimize the use of diagnostic tests in clinical practice. The computerized medical reasoning should not only focus on existing medical knowledge but also on physician's previous experiences and new knowledge. Such medical knowledge is vague and defines uncertain relationships between facts and diagnosis, in this paper, Case Based Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (CBFCM) are proposed as an evolution of Fuzzy Cognitive Maps. They allow more complete representation of knowledge since case-based fuzzy rules are introduced to improve diagnosis decision. We have developed a framework for interacting with patient's data and formalizing knowledge from Guidelines in the domain of Urinary Tract Infection. The conducted study allowed us to test cognitive approaches for implementing Guidelines with Semantic Web tools. The advantage of this approach is to enable the sharing and reuse of knowledge from Guidelines, physicians experiences and simplify maintenance. PMID:22874199

  19. An observation on the bias in clinic-based estimates of malnutrition rates

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret E. Grosh; Fox, Kristin; Jackson, Maria

    1991-01-01

    Clinic-based data on malnutrition are the most readily available for following malnutrition levels and trends in most countries, but there is a bias inherent in clinic-based estimates of malnutrition rates. The authors compare annual clinic-based malnutrition data and those from four household surveys in Jamaica. The clinic data give lower estimates of malnutrition than the survey data in all four cases - significantly so in three. The size of the bias was variable over time, so the clinic da...

  20. Analysis of quality data based on national clinical databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzon, Jan; Petri, A.L.; Christophersen, S.

    2009-01-01

    There is little agreement on the philosophy of measuring clinical quality in health care. How data should be analyzed and transformed to healthcare information is an ongoing discussion. To accept a difference in quality between health departments as a real difference, one should consider to which...... extent the selection of patients, random variation, confounding and inconsistency may have influenced results. The aim of this article is to summarize aspects of clinical healthcare data analyses provided from the national clinical quality databases and to show how data may be presented in a way which...

  1. Evidence-based clinical use of insulin premixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambascia, Marcos Antônio; Nery, Márcia; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Ermetice, Mariana Narbot; de Oliveira, Carolina Piras

    2013-01-01

    Brazil is expected to have 19.6 million patients with diabetes by the year 2030. A key concept in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is establishing individualized glycemic goals based on each patient's clinical characteristics, which impact the choice of antihyperglycemic therapy. Targets for glycemic control, including fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (A1C), are often not reached solely with antihyperglycemic therapy, and insulin therapy is often required. Basal insulin is considered an initial strategy; however, premixed insulins are convenient and are equally or more effective, especially for patients who require both basal and prandial control but desire a more simplified strategy involving fewer daily injections than a basal-bolus regimen. Most physicians are reluctant to transition patients to insulin treatment due to inappropriate assumptions and insufficient information. We conducted a nonsystematic review in PubMed and identified the most relevant and recently published articles that compared the use of premixed insulin versus basal insulin analogues used alone or in combination with rapid-acting insulin analogues before meals in patients with T2DM. These studies suggest that premixed insulin analogues are equally or more effective in reducing A1C compared to basal insulin analogues alone in spite of the small increase in the risk of nonsevere hypoglycemic events and nonclinically significant weight gain. Premixed insulin analogues can be used in insulin-naïve patients, in patients already on basal insulin therapy, and those using basal-bolus therapy who are noncompliant with blood glucose self-monitoring and titration of multiple insulin doses. We additionally provide practical aspects related to titration for the specific premixed insulin analogue formulations commercially available in Brazil. PMID:24011173

  2. Rule based Part of speech Tagger for Homoeopathy Clinical realm

    CERN Document Server

    Dwivedi, Sanjay K

    2011-01-01

    A tagger is a mandatory segment of most text scrutiny systems, as it consigned a s yntax class (e.g., noun, verb, adjective, and adverb) to every word in a sentence. In this paper, we present a simple part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. This paper reports about the anticipated part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. It exploit standard pattern for evaluating sentences, untagged clinical corpus of 20085 words is used, from which we had selected 125 sentences (2322 tokens). The problem of tagging in natural language processing is to find a way to tag every word in a text as a meticulous part of speech. The basic idea is to apply a set of rules on clinical sentences and on each word, Accuracy is the leading factor in evaluating any POS tagger so the accuracy of proposed tagger is also conversed.

  3. Rule based Part of speech Tagger for Homoeopathy Clinical realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar Dwivedi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A tagger is a mandatory segment of most text scrutiny systems, as it consigned a syntax class (e.g., noun, verb, adjective, and adverb to every word in a sentence. In this paper, we present a simple part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. This paper reports about the anticipated part of speech tagger for homoeopathy clinical language. It exploit standard pattern for evaluating sentences, untagged clinical corpus of 20085 words is used, from which we had selected 125 sentences (2322 tokens. The problem of tagging in natural language processing is to find a way to tag every word in a text as a meticulous part of speech. The basic idea is to apply a set of rules on clinical sentences and on each word, Accuracy is the leading factor in evaluating any POS tagger so the accuracy of proposed tagger is also conversed.

  4. Temporal abstraction-based clinical phenotyping with Eureka!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Willard, Richie; Rathod, Himanshu; Mansour, Michel; Pai, Akshatha Kalsanka; Torian, William M; Agravat, Sanjay; Sturm, Suzanne; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Temporal abstraction, a method for specifying and detecting temporal patterns in clinical databases, is very expressive and performs well, but it is difficult for clinical investigators and data analysts to understand. Such patterns are critical in phenotyping patients using their medical records in research and quality improvement. We have previously developed the Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW), which computes such phenotypes using temporal abstraction but requires software engineers to use. We have extended the AIW's web user interface, Eureka! Clinical Analytics, to support specifying phenotypes using an alternative model that we developed with clinical stakeholders. The software converts phenotypes from this model to that of temporal abstraction prior to data processing. The model can represent all phenotypes in a quality improvement project and a growing set of phenotypes in a multi-site research study. Phenotyping that is accessible to investigators and IT personnel may enable its broader adoption. PMID:24551400

  5. Fickian-Based Empirical Approach for Diffusivity Determination in Hollow Alginate-Based Microfibers Using 2D Fluorescence Microscopy and Comparison with Theoretical Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mobed-Miremadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hollow alginate microfibers (od = 1.3 mm, id = 0.9 mm, th = 400 µm, L = 3.5 cm comprised of 2% (w/v medium molecular weight alginate cross-linked with 0.9 M CaCl2 were fabricated to model outward diffusion capture by 2D fluorescent microscopy. A two-fold comparison of diffusivity determination based on real-time diffusion of Fluorescein isothiocyanate molecular weight (FITC MW markers was conducted using a proposed Fickian-based approach in conjunction with a previously established numerical model developed based on spectrophotometric data. Computed empirical/numerical (Dempiricial/Dnumerical diffusivities characterized by small standard deviations for the 4-, 70- and 500-kDa markers expressed in m2/s are (1.06 × 10−9 ± 1.96 × 10−10/(2.03 × 10−11, (5.89 × 10−11 ± 2.83 × 10−12/(4.6 × 10−12 and (4.89 × 10−12 ± 3.94 × 10−13/(1.27 × 10−12, respectively, with the discrimination between the computation techniques narrowing down as a function of MW. The use of the numerical approach is recommended for fluorescence-based measurements as the standard computational method for effective diffusivity determination until capture rates (minimum 12 fps for the 4-kDa marker and the use of linear instead of polynomial interpolating functions to model temporal intensity gradients have been proven to minimize the extent of systematic errors associated with the proposed empirical method.

  6. The Emerging Microbe Project: Developing Clinical Care Plans Based on Pathogen Identification and Clinical Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. O'Donnell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For many students in the health sciences, including doctor of pharmacy (PharmD students, basic and clinical sciences often appear detached from each other. In the infectious disease field, PharmD students additionally struggle with mastering the diversity of microorganisms and the corresponding therapies. The objective of this study was to design an interdisciplinary project that integrates fundamental microbiology with clinical research and decision-making skills. The Emerging Microbe Project guided students through the identification of a microorganism via genetic sequence analysis. The unknown microbe provided the basis for a patient case that asked the student to design a therapeutic treatment strategy for an infected patient. Outside of lecture, students had two weeks to identify the pathogen using nucleotide sequences, compose a microbiology report on the pathogen, and recommend an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan for the corresponding clinical case. We hypothesized that the students would develop a better understanding of the interplay between basic microbiology and infectious disease clinical practice, and that they would gain confidence and skill in independently selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapies for a new disease state. The exercise was conducted with PharmD students in their second professional year of pharmacy school in a required infectious disease course. Here, we demonstrate that the Emerging Microbe Project significantly improved student learning through two assessment strategies (assignment grades and exam questions, and increased student confidence in clinical infectious disease practice. This exercise could be modified for other health sciences students or undergraduates depending upon the level of clinical focus required of the course.

  7. The Emerging Microbe Project: Developing Clinical Care Plans Based on Pathogen Identification and Clinical Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lauren A; Perry, Michael W; Doup, Dane't R

    2015-12-01

    For many students in the health sciences, including doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, basic and clinical sciences often appear detached from each other. In the infectious disease field, PharmD students additionally struggle with mastering the diversity of microorganisms and the corresponding therapies. The objective of this study was to design an interdisciplinary project that integrates fundamental microbiology with clinical research and decision-making skills. The Emerging Microbe Project guided students through the identification of a microorganism via genetic sequence analysis. The unknown microbe provided the basis for a patient case that asked the student to design a therapeutic treatment strategy for an infected patient. Outside of lecture, students had two weeks to identify the pathogen using nucleotide sequences, compose a microbiology report on the pathogen, and recommend an appropriate therapeutic treatment plan for the corresponding clinical case. We hypothesized that the students would develop a better understanding of the interplay between basic microbiology and infectious disease clinical practice, and that they would gain confidence and skill in independently selecting appropriate antimicrobial therapies for a new disease state. The exercise was conducted with PharmD students in their second professional year of pharmacy school in a required infectious disease course. Here, we demonstrate that the Emerging Microbe Project significantly improved student learning through two assessment strategies (assignment grades and exam questions), and increased student confidence in clinical infectious disease practice. This exercise could be modified for other health sciences students or undergraduates depending upon the level of clinical focus required of the course. PMID:26753029

  8. Effect of Humidity on Dielectric Charging Process in Electrostatic Capacitive RF MEMS Switches Based on Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Surface Potential Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zaghloul, Heiba; Papaioannou, G.; Coccetti, Fabio; Pons, Patrick; Plana, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of relative humidity on dielectric charging/discharging processes in electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. The assessment procedure is based on surface potential measurements using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) and it targets in this specific work PECVD silicon nitride films in view of application in electrostatic capacitive RF MEMS switches. Charges have been injected through the AFM tip and the induced surface potential has been measured u...

  9. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.;

    2013-01-01

    We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer under...... correlated with theoretical frames for condensed matter conductivity of redox molecules. Together the data suggest that Ru-units are bound to both terpy and the UNA–DNA backbone....

  10. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS). PMID:25160142

  11. Examining differences in culturally based stress among clinical and non-clinical Hispanic adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Cervantes, Richard C.; Cardoso, Jodi Berger; Goldbach, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if, and how, Hispanic adolescents receiving clinical treatment differ from their peers who are not in treatment on the 8 domains (family economic stress, cultural or educational stress, acculturation-gap stress, immigration stress, discrimination stress, family immigration stress, community or gang related stress) of cultural stress (HSI-A), and if the relation between cultural stress domains and depressive symptomology differed by group membe...

  12. Toward carbon nanotube-based imaging agents for the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Zaibaq, Nicholas G; Wilson, Lon J

    2016-09-01

    Among the many applications for carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their use in medicine has drawn special attention due to their potential for a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. As progress toward clinical applications continues, monitoring CNTs in vivo will be essential to evaluate their biodistribution, potential toxicity, therapeutic activity, and any physiological changes that the material may induce in specific tissues. There are many different imaging modalities to visualize and track CNTs in vivo, yet only a few are full-body penetrating, a central characteristic that widens their clinical utility. In order to visualize CNTs, chemical modification is often required for the material to be used as a platform to carry imaging agents compatible with one or more of the clinical imaging techniques. Here, we focus on the most recent work involving the use of CNTs as imaging agents for the non-invasive, full-body penetrating clinical modalities of MRI, PET, SPECT, and X-ray CT. The synthesis and modification of the CNT materials are discussed, as well as relevant preclinical studies. PMID:27294540

  13. Shoulder instability : A clinical and MRI-based analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Salomonsson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Shoulder instability is a common but complex and challenging area of shoulder pathology, and new diagnostic methods and treatments are continuously developed. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of shoulder instability with respect to different diagnostic possibilities and surgical treatments. We have studied the patient material from our department, consisting of atraumatic instability, posttraumatic recurrent anterior instability, and primary shoul...

  14. Sustained effect of simulation-based ultrasound training on clinical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, M G; Ringsted, C; Dreisler, E;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the effect of initial simulation-based transvaginal ultrasound training compared to only clinical training on the clinical performances of residents in Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB-GYN) measured at two months into the residency. METHODS: In a randomized study......, new residents in OB-GYN (N = 33) without prior ultrasound experience were included from three teaching hospitals. Participants were allocated to simulation-based training and subsequent clinical training (n = 18) or only clinical training (n = 15). The simulation-based training was performed on a...

  15. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of crystal structures, defects, surface and interfaces in bismuth-based superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of high Tc superconductors many investigations have been performed to clarify the origin of the superconductivity. The High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy is one of the most effective instruments to obtain more information and understanding of the superconducting mechanism of oxide superconductors. This paper reviews and discusses the result of studies on Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors which have been performed at the Japanese National Institute for Research in Inorganic Materials. Special attention has been paid to crystal structures, defects, surfaces and interfaces of examined samples. (author). 19 refs, 9 figs

  16. Description of spermatheca and eggs of Eurygaster austriaca (Schrank, 1778) (Heteroptera: Scutelleridae),based on optical and scanning electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    CANDAN, Selami; Suludere, Zekiye; GÜLLÜ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Spermatheca and egg morphology of Eurygaster austriaca (Schrank, 1778) were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The spermatheca of E. austriaca is characterized by a spermathecal bulb, a pumping region, distal and proximal flanges and ducts, and a genital chamber. Each female was shown to deposit 14 green eggs on average in mass. The spherical eggs averaged 1.05 ± 0.05 mm in diameter. The first external evidence of embryonic development was the appearance of 2 red eye s...

  17. Use of colloidal quantum dots as a digitally switched swept light source for gold nanoparticle based hyperspectral microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Kazunori; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Bhave, Gauri.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to utilize colloidal quantum dots (QDs) as a swept light source for hyperspectral microscopy. The use of QD allows for uniform multicolor emission which covers visible-NIR wavelengths. We used 8 colors of CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots with the peak emission wavelengths from 520 nm to 800 nm. The QDs are packed in a compact enclosure, composing a low-cost, solid-state swept light source that can be easily used in most microscopes. Multicolor emission from the...

  18. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Min, Yul Ha; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed ...

  19. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  20. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  1. A Comparison of Urban School- and Community-Based Dental Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Charles D.; Larsen, Michael D.; Handwerker, Lisa B.; Kim, Maile S.; Rosenthal, Murray

    2009-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to quantitatively compare school- and community-based dental clinics in New York City that provide dental services to children in need. It was hypothesized that the school-based clinics would perform better in terms of several measures. Methods: We reviewed billing and visit data derived from encounter…

  2. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application. PMID:25464952

  3. Signal-Characteristic analysis with respect to backing material of PVDF-based high-frequency ultrasound for photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Su; Chang, Jin Ho [Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Photoacoustic microscopy is capable of providing high-resolution molecular images, and its spatial resolution is typically determined by ultrasonic transducers used to receive the photoacoustic signals. Therefore, ultrasonic transducers for photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) should have a high operating frequency, broad bandwidth, and high signal-reception efficiency. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is a suitable material. To take full advantage of this material, the selection of the backing material is crucial, as it influences the center frequency and bandwidth of the transducer. Therefore, we experimentally determined the most suitable backing material among EPO-TEK 301, E-Solder 3022, and RTV. For this, three PVDF high-frequency single-element transducers were fabricated with each backing material. The center frequency and -6 dB bandwidth of each transducer were ascertained by a pulse-echo test. The spatial resolution of each transducer was examined using wire-target images. The experimental results indicated that EPO-TEK 301 is the most suitable backing material for a PAM transducer. This material provides the highest signal magnitude and a reasonable bandwidth because a large portion of the energy propagates toward the front medium, and the PVDF resonates in the half-wave mode.

  4. Spirulina in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Human Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Karkos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina or Arthrospira is a blue-green alga that became famous after it was successfully used by NASA as a dietary supplement for astronauts on space missions. It has the ability to modulate immune functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the release of histamine by mast cells. Multiple studies investigating the efficacy and the potential clinical applications of Spirulina in treating several diseases have been performed and a few randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews suggest that this alga may improve several symptoms and may even have an anticancer, antiviral and antiallergic effects. Current and potential clinical applications, issues of safety, indications, side-effects and levels of evidence are addressed in this review. Areas of ongoing and future research are also discussed.

  5. Implementation outcomes of evidence-based quality improvement for depression in VA community based outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortney John

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborative-care management is an evidence-based practice for improving depression outcomes in primary care. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has mandated the implementation of collaborative-care management in its satellite clinics, known as Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs. However, the organizational characteristics of CBOCs present added challenges to implementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI as a strategy to facilitate the adoption of collaborative-care management in CBOCs. Methods This nonrandomized, small-scale, multisite evaluation of EBQI was conducted at three VA Medical Centers and 11 of their affiliated CBOCs. The Plan phase of the EBQI process involved the localized tailoring of the collaborative-care management program to each CBOC. Researchers ensured that the adaptations were evidence based. Clinical and administrative staff were responsible for adapting the collaborative-care management program for local needs, priorities, preferences and resources. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were used to refine the program over time. The evaluation was based on the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance Framework and used data from multiple sources: administrative records, web-based decision-support systems, surveys, and key-informant interviews. Results Adoption: 69.0% (58/84 of primary care providers referred patients to the program. Reach: 9.0% (298/3,296 of primary care patients diagnosed with depression who were not already receiving specialty care were enrolled in the program. Fidelity: During baseline care manager encounters, education/activation was provided to 100% (298/298 of patients, barriers were assessed and addressed for 100% (298/298 of patients, and depression severity was monitored for 100% (298/298 of patients. Less than half (42.5%, 681/1603 of follow-up encounters during the acute

  6. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care. PMID:26829522

  7. Clinical Microbiology in Pharmacy Education: A Practice-based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Olla Wasfi; Mary Power; Slavcev, Roderick A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of multi-drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, alongside viral and fungal human pathogens, supports the argument that skills in microbiology and infectious disease diagnosis, treatment and prevention are of growing global importance to be held among primary care clinicians.In Canada, inevitable future astronomical health care costs largely due to an aging population, have forced eyes upon pharmacists as one of (if not) the primary clinical professions to accommodate the...

  8. Clinical applications of calixarene based sodium-selective electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Suzanne

    1997-01-01

    Since their beginnings in the late 1960's ion-selective electrodes have rapidly become one of the most important types of chemical sensor. They are commercially available for a large variety of ions, are widely used and have been characterised thoroughly by many investigators. Having attained this level of sophistication, research in this area today is often directed towards novel applications of such sensors. This thesis represents a study of certain clinical applications of sodium-selective...

  9. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    OpenAIRE

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an im...

  10. Exploring clinical associations using '-omics' based enrichment analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Hanauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vast amounts of clinical data collected in electronic health records (EHR is analogous to the data explosion from the "-omics" revolution. In the EHR clinicians often maintain patient-specific problem summary lists which are used to provide a concise overview of significant medical diagnoses. We hypothesized that by tapping into the collective wisdom generated by hundreds of physicians entering problems into the EHR we could detect significant associations among diagnoses that are not described in the literature. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed an analytic approach original developed for detecting associations between sets of gene expression data, called Molecular Concept Map (MCM, to find significant associations among the 1.5 million clinical problem summary list entries in 327,000 patients from our institution's EHR. An odds ratio (OR and p-value was calculated for each association. A subset of the 750,000 associations found were explored using the MCM tool. Expected associations were confirmed and recently reported but poorly known associations were uncovered. Novel associations which may warrant further exploration were also found. Examples of expected associations included non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and various diagnoses such as retinopathy, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. A recently reported association included irritable bowel and vulvodynia (OR 2.9, p = 5.6x10(-4. Associations that are currently unknown or very poorly known included those between granuloma annulare and osteoarthritis (OR 4.3, p = 1.1x10(-4 and pyloric stenosis and ventricular septal defect (OR 12.1, p = 2.0x10(-3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Computer programs developed for analyses of "-omic" data can be successfully applied to the area of clinical medicine. The results of the analysis may be useful for hypothesis generation as well as supporting clinical care by reminding clinicians of likely problems associated with a

  11. An ontology-based hierarchical semantic modeling approach to clinical pathway workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Jiang, Zhibin; Diao, Xiaodi; Yang, Dong; Du, Gang

    2009-08-01

    This paper proposes an ontology-based approach of modeling clinical pathway workflows at the semantic level for facilitating computerized clinical pathway implementation and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare services. A clinical pathway ontology (CPO) is formally defined in OWL web ontology language (OWL) to provide common semantic foundation for meaningful representation and exchange of pathway-related knowledge. A CPO-based semantic modeling method is then presented to describe clinical pathways as interconnected hierarchical models including the top-level outcome flow and intervention workflow level along a care timeline. Furthermore, relevant temporal knowledge can be fully represented by combing temporal entities in CPO and temporal rules based on semantic web rule language (SWRL). An illustrative example about a clinical pathway for cesarean section shows the applicability of the proposed methodology in enabling structured semantic descriptions of any real clinical pathway. PMID:19539278

  12. [Insist on the nature of evidence-based medicine for the development of glaucoma clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has markedly promoted the development of ophthalmology.Glaucoma clinical trials have been developed rapidly. Clinical trial papers have been tremendously increasing in the decade, but unhealthy tendency deviating from the nature of EBM---"conscientious, explicit and judicious" has come into notice by the medical society. It is the time to develop patient based medicine, combining with experience-based, experiment-based, ethics-based, economy-based medicine. Only face up to the fundamental problems can we avoid misleading clinicians and provide better health care of affordable, accessible, accountable medical service for patients. This is the intrinsic value of evidence-based medicine. PMID:25907996

  13. Simulated non-contact atomic force microscopy for GaAs surfaces based on real-space pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a GaAs(1 1 0) surface using a real-space ab initio pseudopotential method. While most ab initio simulations include an explicit model for the AFM tip, our method does not introduce the tip modeling step. This approach results in a considerable reduction of computational work, and also provides complete AFM images, which can be directly compared to experiment. By analyzing tip-surface interaction forces in both our results and previous ab initio simulations, we find that our method provides very similar force profile to the pure Si tip results. We conclude that our method works well for systems in which the tip is not chemically active.

  14. Quantitative Method to Measure Thermal Conductivity of One-Dimensional Nanostructures Based on Scanning Thermal Wave Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method to quantitatively measure the thermal conductivity of one-dimensional nanostructures by utilizing scanning thermal wave microscopy (STWM) at a nanoscale spatial resolution. In this paper, we explain the principle for measuring the thermal diffusivity of one-dimensional nanostructures using STWM and the theoretical analysis procedure for quantifying the thermal diffusivity. The SWTM measurement method obtains the thermal conductivity by measuring the thermal diffusivity, which has only a phase lag relative to the distance corresponding to the transferred thermal wave. It is not affected by the thermal contact resistances between the heat source and nanostructure and between the nanostructure and probe. Thus, the heat flux applied to the nanostructure is accurately obtained. The proposed method provides a very simple and quantitative measurement relative to conventional measurement techniques

  15. Post-embedding Mammalian Tissue for Immunoelectron Microscopy: A Standardized Procedure Based on Heat-Induced Antigen Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We describe a standardized method of fixation, antigen retrieval, and image contrasting for post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Tissues are fixed with formaldehyde solutions containing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions at pH 7.4 and then at pH 8.5. After dehydration with dimethylformamide, the specimens are embedded in LR-White resin. For antigen retrieval, ultrathin sections are heated in 0.5 M Tris-HCl, pH 9.0, for 1-2 h at 95 °C. After immunogold labeling, the sections are treated with a mixture of tannic acid and glutaraldehyde, with OsO4 solution, and then double-stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The standardized method yields strong and reproducible immunoreactions for many antigens showing excellent image contrast without destruction of fine structures. PMID:27515088

  16. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO3 based lead-free piezoceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na0.52K0.48−x)(Nb0.95−xTa0.05)-xLiSbO3, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x = 0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  17. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO{sub 3} based lead-free piezoceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shengbo, E-mail: shengbo.lu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xu, Zhengkui [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Kwok, K. W.; Chan, Helen L. W. [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-28

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.48−x})(Nb{sub 0.95−x}Ta{sub 0.05})-xLiSbO{sub 3}, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x = 0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  18. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO3 based lead-free piezoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengbo; Xu, Zhengkui; Kwok, K. W.; Chan, Helen L. W.

    2014-07-01

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na0.52K0.48-x)(Nb0.95-xTa0.05)-xLiSbO3, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x = 0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  19. Quantitative Method to Measure Thermal Conductivity of One-Dimensional Nanostructures Based on Scanning Thermal Wave Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Chung, Jae Hun; Hwang, Gwang Seok; Jung, Eui Han; Kwon, Oh Myoung [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We present a method to quantitatively measure the thermal conductivity of one-dimensional nanostructures by utilizing scanning thermal wave microscopy (STWM) at a nanoscale spatial resolution. In this paper, we explain the principle for measuring the thermal diffusivity of one-dimensional nanostructures using STWM and the theoretical analysis procedure for quantifying the thermal diffusivity. The SWTM measurement method obtains the thermal conductivity by measuring the thermal diffusivity, which has only a phase lag relative to the distance corresponding to the transferred thermal wave. It is not affected by the thermal contact resistances between the heat source and nanostructure and between the nanostructure and probe. Thus, the heat flux applied to the nanostructure is accurately obtained. The proposed method provides a very simple and quantitative measurement relative to conventional measurement techniques.

  20. Finite-difference time-domain-based optical microscopy simulation of dispersive media facilitates the development of optical imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Capoglu, Ilker; Li, Yue; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Chandler, John; Spicer, Graham; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-06-01

    Combining finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods and modeling of optical microscopy modalities, we previously developed an open-source software package called Angora, which is essentially a "microscope in a computer." However, the samples being simulated were limited to nondispersive media. Since media dispersions are common in biological samples (such as cells with staining and metallic biomarkers), we have further developed a module in Angora to simulate samples having complicated dispersion properties, thereby allowing the synthesis of microscope images of most biological samples. We first describe a method to integrate media dispersion into FDTD, and we validate the corresponding Angora dispersion module by applying Mie theory, as well as by experimentally imaging gold microspheres. Then, we demonstrate how Angora can facilitate the development of optical imaging techniques with a case study.

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  2. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an important factor in achieving better results for this problem is to determine how much information to extract from the patient reports in the time interval between the patient admission time and the current prediction time. PMID:24551325

  3. PERFORMANCE COMPARISON OF ECG COMPRESSIONALGORITHMS BASED ON CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李顺山; 李高平; 乐园; 庄天戈

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviewed the recent progress in the field of electrocardiogram (ECG) compression and compared the efficiency of some compression algorithms. By experimenting on the 500 cases of ECG signals from the ECG database of China, it obtained the numeral indexes for each algorithm. Then by using the automatic diagnostic program developed by Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital, it also got the parameters of the reconstructed signals from linear approximation distance threshold (LADT), wavelet transform (WT), differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) and discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm. The results show that when the index of percent of root-mean-square difference(PRD) is less than 2.5%, the diagnostic agreement ratio is more than 90%; the index of PRD cannot completely show the damage of significant clinical information; the performance of wavelet algorithm exceeds other methods in the same compression ratio (CR). For the statistical result of the parameters of various methods and the clinical diagnostic results, it is of certain value and originality in the field of ECG compression research.

  4. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  5. Knowledge-based Systems and Interestingness Measures: Analysis with Clinical Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, Jabez J.; Khanna H. Nehemiah; Kannan Arputharaj

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge mined from clinical data can be used for medical diagnosis and prognosis. By improving the quality of knowledge base, the efficiency of prediction of a knowledge-based system can be enhanced. Designing accurate and precise clinical decision support systems, which use the mined knowledge, is still a broad area of research. This work analyses the variation in classification accuracy for such knowledge-based systems using different rule lists. The purpose of this work is not to improve...

  6. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huser V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vojtech Huser,1 Murat Sincan,2,3 James J Cimino1,4 1Laboratory for Informatics Development, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Undiagnosed Diseases Program, 3Office of the Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA; 4National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA Abstract: Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward. Keywords: personalized medicine, knowledge bases, databases, clinical decision support, clinical informatics

  7. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  8. The use of atomic force microscopy as an important technique to analyze the dispersion of nanometric fillers and morphology in nanocomposites and polymer blends based on elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Fabiula Danielli Bastos de; Scuracchio, Carlos Henrique, E-mail: fabiuladesousa@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2014-11-15

    AFM has been recognized as one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of surface morphologies because it creates three-dimensional images at angstrom and nano scale. This technique has been exhaustively used in the analyses of dispersion of nanometric components in nanocomposites and in polymer blends, because of the easiness of sample preparation and lower equipment maintenance costs compared to electron microscopy. In this review, contributions using AFM are described, with emphasis on the dispersion of nanofillers in polymeric matrices. It is aimed to show the importance of technical analysis for nanocomposites and polymer blends based on elastomers. (author)

  9. Recommendations for improving the quality of reporting clinical electrochemotherapy studies based on qualitative systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Campana Luca G.; Clover A. James P.; Valpione Sara; Quaglino Pietro; Gehl Julie; Kunte Christian; Snoj Marko; Cemazar Maja; Rossi Carlo R; Miklavcic Damijan; Sersa Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy is becoming a well-established treatment for malignancies of skin and non-skin origin and its use is widening across Europe. The technique was developed and optimized from solid experimental and clinical evidence. A consensus document is now warranted to formalize reporting results, which should strengthen evidence-based practice recommendations. This consensus should be derived from high quality clinical data collection, clinical expertise and summarizing patie...

  10. Technology-based strategies for promoting clinical reasoning skills in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty face the demand of preparing nursing students for the constantly changing health care environment. Effective use of online, classroom, and clinical conferencing opportunities helps to enhance nursing students' clinical reasoning capabilities needed for practice. The growth of technology creates an avenue for faculty to develop engaging learning opportunities. This article presents technology-based strategies such as electronic concept mapping, electronic case histories, and digital storytelling that can be used to facilitate clinical reasoning skills. PMID:25402714

  11. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mekonnen AB; Yesuf EA; Odegard PS; Wega SS

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods:...

  12. Validation of clinical problems using a UMLS-based semantic parser.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, H. S.; Hsu, C.; Law, V; Safran, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capture and symbolization of data from the clinical problem list facilitates the creation of high-fidelity patient resumes for use in aggregate analysis and decision support. We report on the development of a UMLS-based semantic parser and present a preliminary evaluation of the parser in the recognition and validation of disease-related clinical problems. We randomly sampled 20% of the 26,858 unique non-dictionary clinical problems entered into OMR (Online Medical Record) between 1989 an...

  13. Impact of clinical severity on outcomes of mentalisation-based treatment for borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, A; Fonagy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective – Evidence of remission without specialized treatment for BPD is accumulating. The authors investigated whether specialized treatments are particularly indicated for patients at high levels of clinical severity. They examined the impact of clinical severity on outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of mentalization-based treatment (MBT) contrasted with supportive clinical management (SCM). Method – 134 patients were randomly allocated to MBT or SCM. The primary outcome was the ab...

  14. Genome-based versus gene-based theory of cancer: Possible implications for clinical practice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nataša Todorović-Raković

    2011-09-01

    The current state in oncology research indicates that the attempts to explain such complex process as cancerogenesis by a single or several genetic mutations were not successful enough. On the other hand, chromosomal/genomic instability – almost universal features of malignant tumours which influence a global pattern of gene expression and, subsequently, many oncogenic pathways – were often disregarded and considered nonessential to clinical application. However, a new arising field of system biology including ‘new forms’ of genome diversity such as copy number variations (CNV) and high-throughput oncogene mutation profiling now reveal all the complexity of cancer and provide the final explanation of the oncogenic pathways, based on stochastic (onco)genomic variation rather than on (onco)genic concepts.

  15. A Semantic Web-based System for Mining Genetic Mutations in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Sambhawa; Jiang, Guoqian; Dasari, Surendra; Zimmermann, Michael T; Wang, Chen; Heflin, Jeff; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Textual eligibility criteria in clinical trial protocols contain important information about potential clinically relevant pharmacogenomic events. Manual curation for harvesting this evidence is intractable as it is error prone and time consuming. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based system that captures and manages mutation evidences and related contextual information from cancer clinical trials. The system has 2 main components: an NLP-based annotator and a Semantic Web ontology-based annotation manager. We evaluated the performance of the annotator in terms of precision and recall. We demonstrated the usefulness of the system by conducting case studies in retrieving relevant clinical trials using a collection of mutations identified from TCGA Leukemia patients and Atlas of Genetics and Cytogenetics in Oncology and Haematology. In conclusion, our system using Semantic Web technologies provides an effective framework for extraction, annotation, standardization and management of genetic mutations in cancer clinical trials. PMID:26306257

  16. The binding of cellulase variants to dislocations: a semi-quantitative analysis based on CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Budi J; Weisskopf, Carmen; Felby, Claus; Johansen, Katja S; Thygesen, Lisbeth G

    2015-12-01

    Binding of enzymes to the substrate is the first step in enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose, a key process within biorefining. During this process elongated plant cells such as fibers and tracheids have been found to break into segments at irregular cell wall regions known as dislocations or slip planes. Here we study whether cellulases bind to dislocations to a higher extent than to the surrounding cell wall. The binding of fluorescently labelled cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases to filter paper fibers was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and a ratiometric method was developed to assess and quantify the abundance of the binding of cellulases to dislocations as compared to the surrounding cell wall. Only Humicola insolens EGV was found to have stronger binding preference to dislocations than to the surrounding cell wall, while no difference in binding affinity was seen for any of the other cellulose variants included in the study (H. insolens EGV variants, Trichoderma reesei CBHI, CBHII and EGII). This result favours the hypothesis that fibers break at dislocations during the initial phase of hydrolysis mostly due to mechanical failure rather than as a result of faster degradation at these locations. PMID:26626331

  17. A suggestion of the graphene/Ge(111) structure based on ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the 5.5√3x5.5√3- R300 overlayers superstructure observed by the scanning tunneling microscopy on the Ge(111) surface. It shows pronounced effects of the local density of states leading to the strong dependence of STM images on the bias voltage and some dynamic changes of images at 300 K. This overlayer is tentatively interpreted as graphene formed in small submonolayer amounts due to the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon constituents of the residual atmosphere of the vacuum chamber during the annealing of a Ge(111) sample at 900 K. We suggest a model of the graphene/Ge(111)- 5.5 √3x5.5√3-R300. Heteroepitaxial interface, featuring the reconstructed Ge(111) substrate with no long-range order under the graphene layer, the latter being corrugated due to spatial variations of the interatomic geometry of the Ge(111) and graphene(0001) atomic lattices with extremely large mismatch

  18. A simple calibration approach based on film-casting for confocal Raman microscopy to support the development of a hot-melt extrusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netchacovitch, L; Thiry, J; De Bleye, C; Dumont, E; Dispas, A; Hubert, C; Krier, F; Sacré, P-Y; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph; Ziemons, E

    2016-07-01

    When developing a new formulation, the development, calibration and validation steps of analytical methods based on vibrational spectroscopy are time-consuming. For each new formulation, real samples must be produced and a "reference method" must be used in order to determine the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) content of each sample. To circumvent this issue, the paper presents a simple approach based on the film-casting technique used as a calibration tool in the framework of hot-melt extrusion process. Confocal Raman microscopic method was successfully validated for the determination of itraconazole content in film-casting samples. Then, hot-melt extrusion was carried out to produce real samples in order to confront the results obtained with confocal Raman microscopy and Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC). The agreement between both methods was demonstrated using a comparison study based on the Bland and Altman's plot. PMID:27154691

  19. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  20. The Varied Circumstances Prompting Requests for Emergency Contraception at School-Based Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, Abbey; Harrison, Patricia A.; Amidon, Donna; Finnegan, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the circumstances that prompt teenagers to request emergency contraception (EC). This evaluation was designed to refine the EC clinical protocol and improve pregnancy prevention efforts in high school-based clinics by analyzing information on EC use and subsequent contraception use of EC patients. Methods: Sites…

  1. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  2. How evidence based is the management of two common sports injuries in a sports injury clinic?

    OpenAIRE

    MURRAY, I; S. Murray; MacKenzie, K.; Coleman, S.; Cullen, M

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the diagnosis and management of adults attending a sports injury clinic, to establish to what extent the management of the two most common injuries treated at this clinic is evidence based, and to explore factors that affect management.

  3. Students' Experiences of Clinic-Based Learning during a Final Year Veterinary Internship Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Susan M.; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Ellis, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated veterinary students' experiences of clinic-based learning (CBL) during a comprehensive final year internship programme. Open-ended surveys (n = 93) were used to gather qualitative data about students' conceptions of what is learned during CBL and their approaches to learning in clinics. Phenomenography was used for detailed…

  4. Jaws based IMRT: quality assurance and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment is delivered by modulating the radiation beam with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) or compensator or micro Multi-leaf collimator. An alternate for beam modulation is using the standard conventional Jaws developed by Prowess, Inc. In conventional jaw only intensity modulated radiation therapy (JIMRT), the beam is modulated by varying the dimensions of the collimator jaws based upon the shape of the target and organ at risk constraints. During the optimization process, the aperture shapes and weights are optimized simultaneously based on Direct Aperture Optimization (DAO) method

  5. Quality and safety based management of radiological and clinical equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TQM (Total quality management) is the 'buzz' acronym expected in almost every aspect of industrial manufacturing, product development and services solicited by the outside agencies. The correct management of the many technological resources in health institutions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness and safety is a necessity in view of the criteria on which modern medicine is based. Almost all activities -be they diagnostic, therapeutic and rehabilitative - carried out within a modern hospital are based on widespread application of equipment and technology, the efficiency of which can directly influence the quality of service offered to the patient

  6. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU. PMID:17952657

  7. High-throughput and label-free single nanoparticle sizing based on time-resolved on-chip microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Euan; Dincer, T Umut; Veli, Muhammed; Ertas, Yavuz N; Nguyen, Chau; Luo, Wei; Greenbaum, Alon; Feizi, Alborz; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-24

    Sizing individual nanoparticles and dispersions of nanoparticles provides invaluable information in applications such as nanomaterial synthesis, air and water quality monitoring, virology, and medical diagnostics. Several conventional nanoparticle sizing approaches exist; however, there remains a lack of high-throughput approaches that are suitable for low-resource and field settings, i.e., methods that are cost-effective, portable, and can measure widely varying particle sizes and concentrations. Here we fill this gap using an unconventional approach that combines holographic on-chip microscopy with vapor-condensed nanolens self-assembly inside a cost-effective hand-held device. By using this approach and capturing time-resolved in situ images of the particles, we optimize the nanolens formation process, resulting in significant signal enhancement for the label-free detection and sizing of individual deeply subwavelength particles (smaller than λ/10) over a 30 mm(2) sample field-of-view, with an accuracy of ±11 nm. These time-resolved measurements are significantly more reliable than a single measurement at a given time, which was previously used only for nanoparticle detection without sizing. We experimentally demonstrate the sizing of individual nanoparticles as well as viruses, monodisperse samples, and complex polydisperse mixtures, where the sample concentrations can span ∼5 orders-of-magnitude and particle sizes can range from 40 nm to millimeter-scale. We believe that this high-throughput and label-free nanoparticle sizing platform, together with its cost-effective and hand-held interface, will make highly advanced nanoscopic measurements readily accessible to researchers in developing countries and even to citizen-scientists, and might especially be valuable for environmental and biomedical applications as well as for higher education and training programs. PMID:25688665

  8. Recommendations for improving the quality of reporting clinical electrochemotherapy studies based on qualitative systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campana Luca G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemotherapy is becoming a well-established treatment for malignancies of skin and non-skin origin and its use is widening across Europe. The technique was developed and optimized from solid experimental and clinical evidence. A consensus document is now warranted to formalize reporting results, which should strengthen evidence-based practice recommendations. This consensus should be derived from high quality clinical data collection, clinical expertise and summarizing patient feedback. The first step, which is addressed in this paper, aims to critically analyze the quality of published studies and to provide the recommendations for reporting clinical trials on electrochemotherapy.

  9. Model for a university-based clinical research development infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermahl, Tamara; LaPensee, Elizabeth; Williams, David; Clauw, Daniel; Parker, Robert A; Downey, Brad; Liu, Jing; Myles, James

    2015-01-01

    The Research Development Core (RDC) is housed within the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR) at the University of Michigan (U-M). Established in 2006, RDC provides no-cost, in-person consultations to help U-M investigators strengthen their grant proposals. RDC offers investigators feedback and critique on all aspects of their study design, plus partnerships, funding mechanisms, and future directions. This article describes RDC's model and provides data describing the success of its services.RDC is composed of a multidisciplinary team of professionals in grant development. It comprises two senior faculty codirectors from the U-M Medical School, two senior biostatisticians, outside faculty content experts, and RDC administrative staff. Investigators contact RDC to request a consultation and submit advance grant materials for review by the RDC team. During the consultation, investigators explain their project and identify challenges. The RDC team and additional experts offer feedback that is captured in meeting notes and provided to investigators. RDC commitments beyond the meetings are implemented and carefully tracked. Investigators may also request grant editing, budgeting, or proposal submission assistance. Investigators using RDC have been awarded $44.5 million since 2011.The demand for RDC consultations doubled from 2010 to 2011 and reached a high of 131 consultations in 2012. Investigator feedback has been positive: 80% reported that RDC had a strong impact on their proposal, and over 90% indicated that they would recommend RDC to colleagues. MICHR is committed to providing investigators with RDC services to better ensure strong grant applications and successful research careers. PMID:25340362

  10. Effects of conventional and problem-based learning on clinical and general competencies and career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Geertsma, Jelle; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test hypotheses regarding the longitudinal effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and conventional learning relating to students' appreciation of the curriculum, self-assessment of general competencies, summative assessment of clinical competence and indicators of career development.

  11. Towards a computer aided diagnosis system dedicated to virtual microscopy based on stereology sampling and diffusion maps

    OpenAIRE

    Plancoulaine Benoit; Michels Jean-Jaques; Oger Myriam; Belhomme Philippe; Herlin Paulette

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An original strategy is presented, combining stereological sampling methods based on test grids and data reduction methods based on diffusion maps, in order to build a knowledge image database with no bias introduced by a subjective choice of exploration areas. The practical application of the exposed methodology concerns virtual slides of breast tumors.

  12. Technology for nanoelectronic devices based on ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy on the Si(100) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; Ilge, B; Rogge, S; Geerlings, LJ

    1999-01-01

    We describe two process steps in an STM-based fabrication technology for nanoelectronic devices. First, we have fabricated Co/Si metal lines on Si(100) surfaces by UHV-STM based nanolithography on a monohydride passivation layer. The STM tip was used to define depassivated lines (

  13. Fractographic features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based dental restorations fractured during clinical function

    OpenAIRE

    Øilo, Marit; Hardang, Anne Dybdahl; Ulsund, Amanda Hembre; Gjerdet, Nils Roar

    2014-01-01

    Fractures during clinical function have been reported as the major concern associated with all-ceramic dental restorations. The aim of this study was to analyze the fracture features of glass-ceramic and zirconia-based restorations fractured during clinical use. Twenty-seven crowns and onlays were supplied by dentists and dental technicians with information about type of cement and time in function, if available. Fourteen lithium disilicate glass-ceramic restorations and 13 zirconia-based res...

  14. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    OpenAIRE

    Scicluna Helen A; Grimm Michael C; O’Sullivan Anthony J; Harris Peter; Pilotto Louis S; Jones Philip D; McNeil H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW) Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a r...

  15. A Population-Based Clinical Trial of Irinotecan and Carboplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derick Lau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Phase I trials of anticancer drugs are commonly conducted using the method of modified Fibonacci. We have developed a population-based design for phase I trials of combining anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and carboplatin. Patients and Methods. Intrapatient dose escalation of irinotecan and carboplatin was performed according to a predetermined schema to reach individual dose-limiting toxicity (DLT in 50 patients with solid tumors refractory to previous chemotherapy. The individual toxicity-limiting dose levels were analyzed for normal distribution using the method of Ryan-Joiner and subsequently used to determine a population-based maximum tolerated dose (pMTD. For comparison, a simulation study was performed using the method of modified Fibonacci. Results. The most common dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs included neutropenia (58%, thrombocytopenia (16%, and diarrhea (8%. The frequency of individual toxicity-limiting dose levels of 50 patients approximated a normal distribution. The dose levels associated with individual limiting toxicities ranged from level 1 (irinotecan 100 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC = 4 mg/mL x min to level 8 (irinotecan 350 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC = 6. The pMTD was determined to be dose level 3 (150 mg/m2 for irinotecan and AUC = 5 for carboplatin. In contrast, the MTD was determined to be dose level 4 (200 mg/m2 for irinotecan and AUC 5 for carboplatin by modified-Fibonacci simulation. Conclusions. The population-based design of phase I trial allows optimization of dose intensity and derivation of a pMTD. The pMTD has been applied in phase II trial of irinotecan and carboplatin in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

  16. Fluorescence-based optical biosensors for clinical and environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Psoma, Sotiria D.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous utilisation of pH and oxygen-dependent fluorescent indicators for the development of a novel fibre-optical fluorescence-based bio sensor. This approach would be used to measure simultaneously changes in the two indicator species generated by a single enzyme-catalysed reaction in response to one analyte where both the indicators and the enzyme are immobilised in the same sol-gel matrix, and to offer more a...

  17. Identifying influenza-like illness presentation from unstructured general practice clinical narrative using a text classifier rule-based expert system versus a clinical expert

    OpenAIRE

    MacRae, Jayden; Love, Tom; Michael G Baker; Dowell, Anthony; Carnachan, Matthew; Stubbe, Maria; McBain, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background We designed and validated a rule-based expert system to identify influenza like illness (ILI) from routinely recorded general practice clinical narrative to aid a larger retrospective research study into the impact of the 2009 influenza pandemic in New Zealand. Methods Rules were assessed using pattern matching heuristics on routine clinical narrative. The system was trained using data from 623 clinical encounters and validated using a clinical expert as a gold standard against a m...

  18. Evidence-based early clinical detection of emerging diseases in food animals and zoonoses: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegerman, Claude; Humblet, Marie-France; Porter, Sarah Rebecca; Zanella, Gina; Martinelle, Ludovic

    2012-03-01

    If diseases of food-producing animals or zoonoses (re-)emerge, early clinical decision making is of major importance. In this particular condition, it is difficult to apply a classic evidence-based veterinary medicine process, because of a lack of available published data. A method based on the partition of field clinical observations (evidences) could be developed as an interesting alternative approach. The classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to improve the early clinical detection in two cases of emerging diseases: bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) and bluetongue due to the serotype 8-virus in cattle. PMID:22374122

  19. CLINICAL DATABASE ANALYSIS USING DMDT BASED PREDICTIVE MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srilakshmi Indrasenan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, predictive data mining techniques play a vital role in the field of medical informatics. These techniques help the medical practitioners in predicting various classes which is useful in prediction treatment. One of such major difficulty is prediction of survival rate in breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is a common disease these days and fighting against it is a tough battle for both the surgeons and the patients. To predict the survivability rate in breast cancer patients which helps the medical practitioner to select the type of treatment a predictive data mining technique called Diversified Multiple Decision Tree (DMDT classification is used. Additionally, to avoid difficulties from the outlier and skewed data, it is also proposed to perform the improvement of training space by outlier filtering and over sampling. As a result, this novel approach gives the survivability rate of the cancer patients based on which the medical practitioners can choose the type of treatment.

  20. Pityriasis amiantacea: clinical-dermatoscopic features and microscopy of hair tufts Pitiríase amiantácea: aspectos clínicos e dermatoscópicos e microscopia dos tufos capilares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Costa Verardino

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis Amiantacea, also known as pseudotinea amiantacea, is a clinical syndrome which affects the scalp, having a reaction pattern reported to occur in several inflammatory dermatoses. The authors seek to establish the correlation between its clinical, dermoscopic and light microscopy features through the analysis of scale- encrusted hair tufts submitted to histological processing.A pitiríase amiantácea, também chamada de pseudotínea amiantácea, é compreendida como uma síndrome clínica que acomete o couro cabeludo. Representa um padrão de reação a diversas dermatoses inflamatórias. Os autores procuram estabelecer a correlação entre características clínicas, dermatoscópicas e de microscopia ótica, através da análise do tufo de cabelos agregados pelas escamocrostas, submetido a processamento histológico.

  1. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Helen A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a range of clinical tasks and assessment of medical education as preparation for hospital practice were evaluated in recent graduates after 3 months working as junior doctors. Responses of the 2009 graduates of the UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated medical education program were compared to those of the 2007 graduates of UNSW’s previous content-based program, to published data from other Australian medical schools, and to hospital-based supervisor evaluations of their clinical competence. Results Three months into internship, graduates from UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated program rated themselves to have good clinical and procedural skills, with ratings that indicated significantly greater capability than graduates of the previous UNSW content-based program. New program graduates rated themselves significantly more prepared for hospital practice in the confidence (reflective practice, prevention (social aspects of health, interpersonal skills (communication, and collaboration (teamwork subscales than old program students, and significantly better or equivalent to published benchmarks of graduates from other Australian medical schools. Clinical supervisors rated new program graduates highly capable for teamwork, reflective practice and communication. Conclusions Medical students from an outcomes-based integrated program graduate with excellent self-rated and supervisor-evaluated capabilities in a range of clinically-relevant outcomes. The program

  2. BASED TO CLINICAL CASE. VON HIPLEA-LINDAU SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzeziński Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL is a rare, genetic multi-system disorder characterized by the abnormal growth of tumors in certain parts of the body (angiomatosis. The tumors of the central nervous system (CNS are benign and are comprised of a nest of blood vessels and are called hemangioblastomas. Hemangioblastomas may develop in the brain, the retina of the eyes, and other areas of the nervous system. Other types of tumors develop in the adrenal glands, the kidneys, or the pancreas. Symptoms of VHL vary among patients and depend on the size and location of the tumors. Symptoms may include headaches, problems with balance and walking, dizziness, weakness of the limbs, vision problems, and high blood pressure. Cysts (fluid-filled sacs and/or tumors (benign or cancerous may develop around the hemangioblastomas and cause the symptoms listed above. Individuals with VHL are also at a higher risk than normal for certain types of cancer, especially kidney cancer. Based on the case of 30-year old patient with characteristics of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome as phakomatosis.

  3. Spatiotemporal Ultrafast-Plasmon Control Based on Response Functions of Nanostructures Measured by Interferometric Cross-Correlation Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusaba Miyuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an electrical-field cross-correlation imaging technique to obtain a response function of localized plasmon generated by femtosecond laser pulses on gold nanostructures. Based on the measured response functions, we spatiotemporally control the plasmon by shaping the femtosecond excitation laser pulses.

  4. Imaging of Pseudo Oil Base Mud in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Imagerie des boues de forage à base d'huile de substitution par microscopie électronique à balayage ambiant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricart J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing pseudo oil base muds (POBM amounts to determining the relationships between the size distribution of droplets and stability of emulsions. Conventional scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM have been used to investigate these problems. However, hydrated samples are difficult to handle using such techniques. The Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM or Electroscan and the cryogenic techniques have opened the door to the study of wet and non-conductive specimens, and of various liquids or emulsions. ESEM with the cold stage allows us to directly visualize emulsions :- without any preparation or coating;- at different temperatures, by controlling the specimen temperature (between -180°C and -8O°C and pressure (between 400 and 1400 Pa. La caractérisation des boues de forage à base d'huile de substitution (POBM équivaut à définir la relation entre la répartition dimensionnelle des gouttelettes et la stabilité des émulsions. Les microscopes électroniques à balayage (SEM et à transmission (TEM classiques ont été utilisés pour étudier ces problèmes. Toutefois, les échantillons hydratés sont d'un traitement difficile à l'aide de ces techniques. Le microscope environnemental électronique à balayage (ESEM ou electroscan et les techniques cryogéniques ont ouvert la voie à l'étude de spécimens humides et non conducteurs, de liquides et d'émulsions divers. A froid, l'ESEM nous permet de visualiser des émulsions : - sans aucune préparation ou enrobage, - à différentes températures, en régulant la température (entre - 180°C et - 80°C et la pression (entre 400 et 1400 kPa du spécimen. Le présent document se propose de caractériser les boues à base d'huile de substitution et d'étudier : - l'homogénéité de la formulation et la procédure de préparation, - l'influence de la répartition dimensionnelle des gouttelettes sur la stabilité des émulsions.

  5. Medical Students’ Attitudes about Team-Based Learning in a Pre-Clinical Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Parmelee, Dean X.; DeStephen, Dan; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Team-Based Learning is relatively new in medical education. Team-Based Learning was integrated into one medical school's pre-clinical curriculum in 2002. Purpose: This study compared how medical students’ attitudes about the Team-Based Learning process changed between the first and second year of medical school. Method: 180 students responded to 19 statements regarding their attitudes about Team-Based Learning during their first and second year of medical school. Data were analyze...

  6. Direct Image-Based Correlative Microscopy Technique for Coupling Identification and Structural Investigation of Bacterial Symbionts Associated with Metazoans

    OpenAIRE

    Halary, S.; Duperron, S.; Boudier, T

    2011-01-01

    Coupling prokaryote identification with ultrastructural investigation of bacterial communities has proven difficult in environmental samples. Prokaryotes can be identified by using specific probes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), but resolution achieved by light microscopes does not allow ultrastructural investigation. In the case of symbioses involving bacteria associated with metazoan tissues, FISH-based studies often indicate the co-occurrence of several bacterial types withi...

  7. Damage in nickel base superalloy: Influence of local parameters measured by electron backscattered diffraction and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risbet, M. [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6253 UTC-CNRS, Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, BP 20529-60205 Compiegne cedex (France)], E-mail: marion.risbet@utc.fr; Feaugas, X. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Materiaux en Milieux Agressifs, EA 3127, Universite de La Rochelle, 17000 La Rochelle cedex (France); Guillemer-Neel, C. [Laboratoire de Technologies Innovantes, EA 3899, IUT Genie Mecanique d' Amiens, 80025 Amiens Cedex (France); Clavel, M. [Laboratoire Mecanique des Sols, Structures et Materiaux, UMR 8579 CNRS, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    The low-cycle fatigue behaviour of a nickel-based superalloy has been investigated with regard to its surface damage features. This alloy endures localized plastic deformation confined in slip bands emerging as extrusions. The correlations between damage, grain orientation, the Schmid factor of slip systems and the height of extrusions have been questioned. It is proved here that reaching a critical height value is not a sufficient condition for an extrusion to induce the apparition of a transgranular crack.

  8. Damage in nickel base superalloy: Influence of local parameters measured by electron backscattered diffraction and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-cycle fatigue behaviour of a nickel-based superalloy has been investigated with regard to its surface damage features. This alloy endures localized plastic deformation confined in slip bands emerging as extrusions. The correlations between damage, grain orientation, the Schmid factor of slip systems and the height of extrusions have been questioned. It is proved here that reaching a critical height value is not a sufficient condition for an extrusion to induce the apparition of a transgranular crack

  9. Interferometer-based structured-illumination microscopy utilizing complementary phase relationship through constructive and destructive image detection by two cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, L; Winoto, L; Agard, D A; Gustafsson, M G L; Sedat, J W

    2012-06-01

    In an interferometer-based fluorescence microscope, a beam splitter is often used to combine two emission wavefronts interferometrically. There are two perpendicular paths along which the interference fringes can propagate and normally only one is used for imaging. However, the other path also contains useful information. Here we introduced a second camera to our interferometer-based three-dimensional structured-illumination microscope (I(5)S) to capture the fringes along the normally unused path, which are out of phase by π relative to the fringes along the other path. Based on this complementary phase relationship and the well-defined phase interrelationships among the I(5)S data components, we can deduce and then computationally eliminate the path length errors within the interferometer loop using the simultaneously recorded fringes along the two imaging paths. This self-correction capability can greatly relax the requirement for eliminating the path length differences before and maintaining that status during each imaging session, which are practically challenging tasks. Experimental data is shown to support the theory. PMID:22472010

  10. Structured Illumination Microscopy and a Quantitative Image Analysis for the Detection of Positive Margins in a Pre-Clinical Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Henry L; Mueller, Jenna L; Whitley, Melodi J; Cardona, Diana M; Willett, Rebecca M; Kirsch, David G; Brown, J Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative assessment of surgical margins is critical to ensuring residual tumor does not remain in a patient. Previously, we developed a fluorescence structured illumination microscope (SIM) system with a single-shot field of view (FOV) of 2.1 × 1.6 mm (3.4 mm2) and sub-cellular resolution (4.4 μm). The goal of this study was to test the utility of this technology for the detection of residual disease in a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma. Primary soft tissue sarcomas were generated in the hindlimb and after the tumor was surgically removed, the relevant margin was stained with acridine orange (AO), a vital stain that brightly stains cell nuclei and fibrous tissues. The tissues were imaged with the SIM system with the primary goal of visualizing fluorescent features from tumor nuclei. Given the heterogeneity of the background tissue (presence of adipose tissue and muscle), an algorithm known as maximally stable extremal regions (MSER) was optimized and applied to the images to specifically segment nuclear features. A logistic regression model was used to classify a tissue site as positive or negative by calculating area fraction and shape of the segmented features that were present and the resulting receiver operator curve (ROC) was generated by varying the probability threshold. Based on the ROC curves, the model was able to classify tumor and normal tissue with 77% sensitivity and 81% specificity (Youden's index). For an unbiased measure of the model performance, it was applied to a separate validation dataset that resulted in 73% sensitivity and 80% specificity. When this approach was applied to representative whole margins, for a tumor probability threshold of 50%, only 1.2% of all regions from the negative margin exceeded this threshold, while over 14.8% of all regions from the positive margin exceeded this threshold. PMID:26799613

  11. Structured Illumination Microscopy and a Quantitative Image Analysis for the Detection of Positive Margins in a Pre-Clinical Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L Fu

    Full Text Available Intraoperative assessment of surgical margins is critical to ensuring residual tumor does not remain in a patient. Previously, we developed a fluorescence structured illumination microscope (SIM system with a single-shot field of view (FOV of 2.1 × 1.6 mm (3.4 mm2 and sub-cellular resolution (4.4 μm. The goal of this study was to test the utility of this technology for the detection of residual disease in a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma. Primary soft tissue sarcomas were generated in the hindlimb and after the tumor was surgically removed, the relevant margin was stained with acridine orange (AO, a vital stain that brightly stains cell nuclei and fibrous tissues. The tissues were imaged with the SIM system with the primary goal of visualizing fluorescent features from tumor nuclei. Given the heterogeneity of the background tissue (presence of adipose tissue and muscle, an algorithm known as maximally stable extremal regions (MSER was optimized and applied to the images to specifically segment nuclear features. A logistic regression model was used to classify a tissue site as positive or negative by calculating area fraction and shape of the segmented features that were present and the resulting receiver operator curve (ROC was generated by varying the probability threshold. Based on the ROC curves, the model was able to classify tumor and normal tissue with 77% sensitivity and 81% specificity (Youden's index. For an unbiased measure of the model performance, it was applied to a separate validation dataset that resulted in 73% sensitivity and 80% specificity. When this approach was applied to representative whole margins, for a tumor probability threshold of 50%, only 1.2% of all regions from the negative margin exceeded this threshold, while over 14.8% of all regions from the positive margin exceeded this threshold.

  12. Defining Emergency Department Necessary Policies Based on Clinical Governance Accreditation Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Esmailian

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of accreditation scheme in quality improvement of emergency departments (ED has not been thoroughly evaluated in studies. Therefore, this study was designed to appraise the effects of policies defined based on clinical governance accreditation scores, on improvement of the procedures in ED. Methods: The present cohort study was carried out in the ED of Alzahra University Hospital, Isfahan, Iran in 2012-2013. In 2012 the deficiencies in ED of this hospital was determined based on clinical governance indicators. Then the deficiencies were classified based on their importance and changes were made in the ED. Finally, the effects of the changes were evaluated in August 2013. Results: The evaluation made in 2012 showed that 23 clinical and non-clinical procedures were carried out with deficiencies. Over the mentioned period, 6 (26.1% procedures were not done at all, while 17 (73.9% were done without a policy and irregularly. The overall score for clinical and non-clinical procedures in the ED before carrying out the accreditation scheme was 43 / 230 (18.7% of the maximum possible score. The score was raised to 222 equal to 96.5% of the maximum possible score after carrying out the scheme. This increase was statistically significant (p < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that defining policies for improving the procedures carried out in ED based on accreditation scheme leads to improvement of medical services in ED.

  13. Dermatophytosis: fluorostaining enhances speed and sensitivity in direct microscopy of skin, nail and hair specimens from dermatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovrén, Ellen; Berglund, Lars; Nordlind, Klas; Rollman, Ola

    2016-07-01

    Direct microscopy of keratinised specimens is a standard screening procedure that assists clinicians to differentiate true superficial mycoses from non-fungal disorders of the skin, nail and hair. Most clinical dermatologists use bright-field microscopy when searching for dermatophyte fungi in clinical samples while laboratory-based mycologists increasingly favour fluorescence microscopy in order to optimise visualisation of fungal elements. This study compared the validity and speediness of fluorescence microscopy vs. conventional light microscopy when screening for fungi in 206 dermatological samples from dermatology outpatients. Both senior dermatologist and a less experienced investigator (medical student) attained high and comparable levels of specificity (91.7-93.8%), positive predictive value (77.1-81.4%) and negative predictive value (83.7-89.9%) using either method. Fluorostaining with Blankophor prior to fluorescence microscopy increased the sensitivity by 22 ± 1% as compared to light microscopy of unstained samples. For both investigators, the time required to identify fungal elements by the fluorescence-based technique was reduced by at least 50%, thus improving the performance of direct microscopy in the clinical setting. PMID:26931645

  14. Scale Development of a Measure to Assess Community-Based and Clinical Intervention Group Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A.; Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Neufeld, Sharon; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2008-01-01

    Though group interventions are widely used in community-based and clinical settings, there are few brief instruments for assessing the group environment. Two studies on the development of a brief measure to assess intervention group environments are described, and psychometric properties of the new scale are presented. The new measure is based on…

  15. Correlation between self-reported and clinically based diagnoses of bruxism in temporomandibular disorders patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Paesani; F. Lobbezoo; C. Gelos; L. Guarda-Nardini; J. Ahlberg; D. Manfredini

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation was performed in a population of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and it was designed to assess the correlation between self-reported questionnaire-based bruxism diagnosis and a diagnosis based on history taking plus clinical examination. One-hundred-fifty-n

  16. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome. PMID:23920851

  17. Shearforce-based constant-distance scanning electrochemical microscopy as fabrication tool for needle-type carbon-fiber nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Emad Mohamed; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Schulte, Albert

    2010-07-01

    Carbon fiber nanoelectrodes with nanometer radii tip curvatures were fabricated using a shearforce-based constant-distance scanning electrochemical microscope and electrochemically induced polymer deposition. A simple DC etching procedure in alkaline solution provided conically sharpened single carbon fibers with well-formed nanocones at their bottom. Coating the stems but not the end of the tips of the tapered structures with anodic electrodeposition paint was the strategy for limiting the bare carbon to the foremost end and restricting a feasible voltammetry current response to exactly this section. The electrodeposition of the polymer was prevented at the foremost end of the tip using a shearforce-based tip-to-sample distance control that allowed approaching the etched tips carefully in just touching distance to a film of a silicone elastomer. Analysis of the steady-state cyclic voltammograms in presence of a reversible redox compound revealed effective radii for the obtained needle-type carbon-fiber nanoelectrodes down to as small as 46 nm. The method offers an alternative pathway toward the fabrication of highly miniaturized carbon electrodes. PMID:20533837

  18. Highly reliable and efficient atomic force microscopy based bending test for assessing Young's modulus of one-dimensional nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yao; Sun, Yi-Jing; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-03-01

    A highly reliable and efficient mechanical characterization technique for one-dimensional nanomaterials was developed based on multi-position bending tests by atomic force microscope (AFM) on top-down fabricated suspended nanowires with double-clamped ends and appropriate theoretical analysis considering residual stress and substrate deformation. The reliability and efficiency of the technique were improved through the avoidance of sample manipulation, high sample comparability, precise experimental control, and more data for mechanics analysis. The AFM-based multi-position bending tests were conducted on gold nanowires with thicknesses of ˜90 nm, widths ranged from 180 nm to 340 nm, and suspension lengths ranged from 3.6 μm to 5.1 μm, showing good testing repeatability and data reliability. The evaluated Young's modulus for gold nanowires was 75.35 ± 6.60 GPa, which had a much smaller deviation compared to that of 72.06 ± 16.21 GPa reported in the literature.

  19. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen AB

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods: The study was carried out in the internal medicine ward from March to April, 2011 at Jimma University Specialized Hospital. The study design was a prospective observational study where pharmaceutical care services provided by clinical pharmacists for inpatients were documented over a period of two months. Interventions like optimization of rational drug use and physician acceptance of these recommendations were documented. Clinical significance of interventions was evaluated by an independent team (1 internist, 1 clinical pharmacologist using a standardized method for categorizing drug related problems (DRPs. Results: A total of 149 drug related interventions conducted for 48 patients were documented; among which 133(89.3% were clinical pharmacists initiated interventions and 16(10.7% interventions were initiated by other health care professionals. The most frequent DRPs underlying interventions were unnecessary drug therapy, 36(24.2%; needs additional drug therapy, 34(22.8% and noncompliance, 29(19.5%. The most frequent intervention type was change of dosage/instruction for use, 23(15.4%. Acceptance rate by physicians was 68.4%. Among the interventions that were rated as clinically significant, 46(48.9% and 25(26.6% had major and moderate clinical importance respectively. Conclusion: Involving trained clinical pharmacists in the healthcare team leads to clinically relevant and well accepted optimization of medicine use in a resource limited settings. This

  20. Semi-automatic Generation of a Patient Preoperative Knowledge-Base from a Legacy Clinical Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Rector, Alan; Hurrell, Martin

    We discuss our practical experience of automating the process of migrating a clinical database with a weak underlying information model towards a high level representation of a patient medical history information in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). The purpose of this migration is to enable sophisticated clinical decision support functionalities based on semantic-web technologies, i.e. reasoning on a clinical ontology. We discuss the research and practical motivation behind this process, including improved interoperability and additional classification functionalities. We propose a methodology to optimise the efficiency of this process and provide practical implementation examples.

  1. Fuzzy-Arden-Syntax-based, Vendor-agnostic, Scalable Clinical Decision Support and Monitoring Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective is to develop and use a scalable genuine technology platform for clinical decision support based on Arden Syntax, which was extended by fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. Arden Syntax is a widely recognized formal language for representing clinical and scientific knowledge in an executable format, and is maintained by Health Level Seven (HL7) International and approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Fuzzy set theory and logic permit the representation of knowledge and automated reasoning under linguistic and propositional uncertainty. These forms of uncertainty are a common feature of patients' medical data, the body of medical knowledge, and deductive clinical reasoning. PMID:26262410

  2. A system for building clinical research applications using semantic web-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurupur, Varadraj P; Tanik, Murat M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we present a system using Semantic Web by which applications can be effectively constructed for clinical research purposes. We are aware of the immense difficulties and variations involved in clinical research applications. With a purpose of mitigating some of these difficulties in the process of developing clinical research applications we are presenting an approach for building information systems based on Semantic Web. We have developed a working prototype using C-Map tools leveraging the underlying principles of Abstract Software Design Framework to convert domain knowledge into machine-actable information. PMID:20703749

  3. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification, based on clinical and morphometric disease features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Tereshchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In ag- gressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early clinical appearances stage, manifesta- tion stage, developed, advanced and terminal stages. the peculiarity of early clinical appearances stage and manifestation stage is thepresence of types: favourable and unfavourable.

  4. Development of a Smartphone Application for Clinical-Guideline-Based Obesity Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to develop and evaluate a clinical-guideline-based smartphone application ('app') for obesity management. Methods Obesity-related knowledge and functional requirements were extracted from clinical practice guidelines, a literature review, and consultations with experts. The extracted knowledge was used to design obesity-management algorithms, and the functions of the developed app are presented through a use case diagram and activity diagrams. The datab...

  5. Incorporating equity into developing and implementing for evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Sandoval-Vargas, Gisella; Mosquera, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are useful tools for clinical decision making, processes standardization and quality of care improvements. The current General Social Security and Health System (GSSHS) in Colombia is promoting the initiative of developing and implementing CPG based on evidence in order to improve efficiency and quality of care. The reduction of inequalities in health should be an objective of the GSSHS. The main propose of this analysis is to argue why it is necessary to co...

  6. General practice-based clinical trials in Germany - a problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, clinical trials and comparative effectiveness studies in primary care are still very rare, while their usefulness has been recognised in many other countries. A network of researchers from German academic general practice has explored the reasons for this discrepancy. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review and expert group discussions, problem analyses as well as structural and procedural prerequisites for a better implementation of clinical trials in German primary care are presented. Results In Germany, basic biomedical science and technology is more reputed than clinical or health services research. Clinical trials are funded by industry or a single national programme, which is highly competitive, specialist-dominated, exclusive of pilot studies, and usually favours innovation rather than comparative effectiveness studies. Academic general practice is still not fully implemented, and existing departments are small. Most general practitioners (GPs work in a market-based, competitive setting of small private practices, with a high case load. They have no protected time or funding for research, and mostly no research training or experience. Good Clinical Practice (GCP training is compulsory for participation in clinical trials. The group defined three work packages to be addressed regarding clinical trials in German general practice: (1 problem analysis, and definition of (2 structural prerequisites and (3 procedural prerequisites. Structural prerequisites comprise specific support facilities for general practice-based research networks that could provide practices with a point of contact. Procedural prerequisites consist, for example, of a summary of specific relevant key measures, for example on a web platform. The platform should contain standard operating procedures (SOPs, templates, checklists and other supporting materials for researchers. Conclusion All in all, our problem analyses revealed that

  7. How are clinical therapy students prepared to become evidence based practitioners?

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, Mary-Marcella

    2014-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background: There is increasing imputes for evidence based practice (EBP) to be utilised within medical and allied healthcare. To integrate this clinical evidence into everyday practice, students must be equipped with the skills and knowledge required to access this information adequately and interpret and implement this evidence when shaping their practice. Objectives: Exploration of University of Limerick???s final year clinical therapy student???s experiences of acq...

  8. Diffusion-based tractography by neurological diseases: concepts, clinical application and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion-based tractography enables the graphical reconstruction of the white matter pathways in the brain and spinal cord of living humans. This technique has many potential clinical applications, including the investigation of stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, and spinal cord disorder and it enables hypotheses to be tested that could not previously be considered in living humans. This review will outline the limitations of tractography, describe its current clinical applications in the most common neurological diseases, and highlight future opportunities. (authors)

  9. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity classification, based on clinical and morphometric disease features

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Tereshchenko; Yu. A. Belyy; I. G. Trifanenkova; M. S. Tereshchenkova

    2014-01-01

    Based on dynamic monitoring of 133 premature infants (266 eyes) with aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), digital retinoscopy and computer morphometry the disease clinical and morphometric features were revealed and systematized, and their consecutive replacement was fixed. As a result the separate classification of aggressive posterior disease was worked up. In ag- gressive posterior ROP course the next consecutive stages were marked out: subclinical, early clinical appeara...

  10. Clinical concept mapping: Does it improve discipline-based critical thinking of nursing students?

    OpenAIRE

    Moattari, Marzieh; Soleimani, Sara; Moghaddam, Neda Jamali; Mehbodi, Farkhondeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhancing nursing students’ critical thinking is a challenge faced by nurse educators. This study aimed at determining the effect of clinical concept mapping on discipline-based critical thinking of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental post-test only design, a convenient sample of 4th year nursing students (N = 32) participated. They were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group participated in a 1-day workshop on clinical concept map...

  11. Hypermobility associated with osteoarthritis of the thumb base: a clinical and radiological subset of hand osteoarthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jónsson, H; Valtýsdóttir, S T; Kjartansson, O.; Brekkan, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of articular hypermobility on the clinical and radiological features of hand osteoarthritis (OA) and to investigate whether hand osteoarthritis associated with hypermobility should be considered a separate subset of hand OA. METHODS: Fifty consecutive female patients with clinical hand OA and thumb base symptoms were examined for hypermobility according to the Beighton criteria. RESULTS: Thirty one of the 50 patients had hypermobility features (Beighton score >...

  12. Perceived Benefits of Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Training on Clinical Learning Outcomes among Omani Undergraduate Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija Madhavanprabhakaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to explore the benefits perceived by Omani undergraduate maternity nursing students regarding the effect of pre-clinical simulation-based training (PSBT on clinical learning outcomes. Methods: This non-experimental quantitative survey was conducted between August and December 2012 among third-year baccalaureate nursing students at Sultan Qaboos University in Muscat, Oman. Voluntary participants were exposed to faculty-guided PSBT sessions using low- and medium-fidelity manikins, standardised scenarios and skill checklists on antenatal, intranatal, postnatal and newborn care and assessment. Participants answered a purposely designed self-administered questionnaire on the benefits of PSBT in enhancing learning outcomes. Items were categorised into six subscales: knowledge, skills, patient safety, academic safety, confidence and satisfaction. Scores were rated on a four-point Likert scale. Results: Of the 57 participants, the majority (95.2% agreed that PSBT enhanced their knowledge. Most students (94.3% felt that their patient safety practices improved and 86.5% rated PSBT as beneficial for enhancing skill competencies. All male students and 97% of the female students agreed that PSBT enhanced their confidence in the safe holding of newborns. Moreover, 93% of participants were satisfied with PSBT. Conclusion: Omani undergraduate nursing students perceived that PSBT enhanced their knowledge, skills, patient safety practices and confidence levels in providing maternity care. These findings support the use of simulation training as a strategy to facilitate clinical learning outcomes in future nursing courses in Oman, although further research is needed to explore the objective impact of PSBT on learning outcomes.

  13. HRP2 and pLDH-Based Rapid Diagnostic Tests, Expert Microscopy, and PCR for Detection of Malaria Infection during Pregnancy and at Delivery in Areas of Varied Transmission: A Prospective Cohort Study in Burkina Faso and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jane; Angutoko, Patrick; Ategeka, John; Compaoré, Yves-Daniel; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Somé, Fabrice A.; Ouattara, Aminata; Rouamba, Noél; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Hopkins, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent screening and treatment (IST) of malaria during pregnancy has been proposed as an alternative to intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp), where IPTp is failing due to drug resistance. However, the antenatal parasitaemias are frequently very low, and the most appropriate screening test for IST has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a multi-center prospective study of 990 HIV-uninfected women attending ANC in two different malaria transmission settings at Tororo District Hospital, eastern Uganda and Colsama Health Center in western Burkina Faso. Women were enrolled in the study in the second or third trimester of pregnancy and followed to delivery, generating 2,597 blood samples for analysis. Screening tests included rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) targeting histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) and microscopy, compared to nPCR as a reference standard. At enrolment, the proportion of pregnant women who were positive for P. falciparum by HRP2/pan pLDH RDT, Pf pLDH/pan pLDH RDT, microscopy and PCR was 38%, 29%, 36% and 44% in Uganda and 21%, 16%, 15% and 35% in Burkina Faso, respectively. All test positivity rates declined during follow-up. In comparison to PCR, the sensitivity of the HRP2/pan pLDH RDT, Pf pLDH/pan pLDH RDT and microscopy was 75.7%, 60.1% and 69.7% in Uganda, 55.8%, 42.6% and 55.8% in Burkina Faso respectively for all antenatal visits. Specificity was greater than 96% for all three tests. Comparison of accuracy using generalized estimating equation revealed that the HRP2- detecting RDT was the most accurate test in both settings. Conclusions/Significance The study suggests that HRP2-based RDTs are the most appropriate point-of-care test currently available for use during pregnancy especially for symptomatic women, but will still miss some PCR-positive women. The clinical significance of these very low density infections needs to be better defined. PMID

  14. Outcomes assessment of case-based writing exercises in a veterinary clinical pathology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Leslie; Michael, Helen; LeBeau, Brandon; Center, Bruce; Wingert, Deb

    2012-01-01

    Our second-year core clinical pathology course uses free-response case-based learning exercises in an otherwise traditional lecture or laboratory course format to augment the development of skills in application of knowledge and critical thinking and clinical reasoning. We previously reported increased learner confidence accompanied by perceived improvements in understanding and ability to apply information, along with enhanced feelings of preparedness for examinations that students attributed to the case-based exercises. The current study prospectively follows a cohort of students to determine the ability of traditional multiple-choice versus free-response case-based assessments to predict future academic performance and to determine if the perceived value of the case-based exercises persists through the curriculum. Our data show that after holding multiple-choice scores constant, better performance on case-based free-response exercises led to higher GPA and better class rank in the second and third years and better class rank in the fourth year. Students in clinical rotations reported that the case-based approach was superior to traditional lecture or multiple-choice exam format for learning clinical reasoning, retaining factual information, organizing information, communicating medical information clearly to colleagues in clinical situations, and preparing high quality medical records. In summary, this longitudinal study shows that case-based free-response writing assignments are efficacious above and beyond standard measures in determining students' GPAs and class rank and in students' acquisition of knowledge, skills, and clinical reasoning. Students value these assignments and overwhelmingly find them an efficient use of their time, and these opinions are maintained even two years following the course. PMID:23187033

  15. Optimal design of a flexure hinge-based XYZ atomic force microscopy scanner for minimizing Abbe errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish of standard technique of nanolength measurement in a two-dimensional plane, a new (AFM) system has been designed. In this system, measurement uncertainty is dominantly affected by the Abbe error of the XYZ scanning stage. No linear stage is perfectly straight; in other words, every scanning stage is subject to tilting, pitch, and yaw motion. In this article, an AFM system with minimum offset of XYZ sensing is designed. And, the XYZ scanning stage is designed to minimize the rotation angle because Abbe errors occur through the multiply of offset and rotation angle. For XY stage, optimal design is performed to minimize the rotation angle by maximizing the stiffness ratio of motion direction to the parasitic motion direction of each stage. For the Z stage, the optimal design of maximizing the first-resonant frequency is performed. When the resonant frequency increases, the scan speed is improved, thereby reducing errors caused by sensor drift. This article describes the procedures of selecting parameters for the optimal design. The full range of the XYZ scanner is 100 μmx100 μmx10 μm. Based on the solution of the optimization problem, the XYZ scanner is fabricated. And tilting, pitch, and yaw motion are measured by autocollimator to evaluate the performance of XY stage

  16. Multi-modal Image Registration for Correlative Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Tian; Zach, Christopher; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is a methodology combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy and other microscopy technologies. Image registration for correlative microscopy is quite challenging because it is a multi-modal, multi-scale and multi-dimensional registration problem. In this report, I introduce two methods of image registration for correlative microscopy. The first method is based on fiducials (beads). I generate landmarks from the fiduci...

  17. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families. PMID:17694890

  18. Medical imaging in clinical applications algorithmic and computer-based approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Bhateja, Vikrant; Hassanien, Aboul

    2016-01-01

    This volume comprises of 21 selected chapters, including two overview chapters devoted to abdominal imaging in clinical applications supported computer aided diagnosis approaches as well as different techniques for solving the pectoral muscle extraction problem in the preprocessing part of the CAD systems for detecting breast cancer in its early stage using digital mammograms. The aim of this book is to stimulate further research in medical imaging applications based algorithmic and computer based approaches and utilize them in real-world clinical applications. The book is divided into four parts, Part-I: Clinical Applications of Medical Imaging, Part-II: Classification and clustering, Part-III: Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) Tools and Case Studies and Part-IV: Bio-inspiring based Computer Aided diagnosis techniques. .

  19. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of a Resin-Based Root Canal Sealer: 10-Year Recall Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Zmener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This retrospective clinical and radiographical study evaluated the 10-year outcome of one-visit endodontic treatment with gutta-percha and a methacrylate resin-based sealer. Methods. From an initial sample size of 180 patients, 89 patients with 175 root canals responded to a recall. Treatment outcome was based on predetermined clinical and radiographic criteria. Results. Root canals had been adequately filled to the working length in 80 teeth (89.88%, short in 6 instances (6.74%, while 3 (3.37% with extrusion immediate postoperatively, showed no sealer in periradicular tissues. The difference in the outcomes of treatments with respect to age, gender, preoperative pulp or periapical status, the size of periapical lesions and the type of permanent restorations were not statistically significantly different (>0.05. Overall, 7 (7.86% cases were considered clinically and radiographically a failure. A life table analysis showed a cumulative probability of success of 92.13% after 10 years with a 95% confidence interval of 83.0 to 94.0. Conclusions. The results of this retrospective clinical and radiographical study suggest that the tested methacrylate-resin based sealer used with gutta-percha performed similarly to other root canal sealers over a period 10 years. Clinical Implications. Considering the success rate after 10 years of this methacrylate resin-based sealer can be recommended as an alternative to other commonly used root canal sealers.

  20. Distributed microscopy: toward a 3D computer-graphic-based multiuser microscopic manipulation, imaging, and measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzmann, Armin; Carlier, Jerome; Jacot, Jacques

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this project is to telecontrol the movements in 3D-space of a microscope in order to manipulate and measure microsystems or micro parts aided by multi-user virtual reality (VR) environments. Presently microsystems are gaining in interest. Microsystems are small, independent modules, incorporating various functions, such as electronic, micro mechanical, data processing, optical, chemical, medical and biological functions. Though improving the manufacturing technologies, the measurement of the small structures to insure the quality of the process is a key information for the development. So far to measure the micro structures strong microscopes are needed. The use of highly magnifying computerized microscopes is expensive. To insure high quality measurements and distribute the acquired information to multi-user our proposed system is divided into three parts: the virtual reality microscopic environment (VRME)-based user-interface on a SGI workstation to prepare the manipulations and measurements. Secondly the computerized light microscope with the vision system inspecting the scene and getting the images of the specimen. Newly developed vision algorithms are used to analyze micro structures in the scene corresponding to the known a priori model. This vision is extracting position and shape of the objects and then transmitted as feedback to the user of the VRME-system to update his virtual environment. The internet demon is the third part of the system and distributes the information about the position of the micro structures, their shape and the images to the connected users who themselves may interact with the microscope (turn and displace the specimen on the back of a moving platform, or adding their structures to the scene and compare). The key idea behind our project VRME is to use the intuitiveness and the 3D visualization of VR environments coupled with a vision system to perform measurements of micro structures at a high accuracy. The direct

  1. Rapid imaging, detection and quantification of Giardia lamblia cysts using mobile-phone based fluorescent microscopy and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Hatice Ceylan; Gorocs, Zoltan; Tseng, Derek; Cortazar, Bingen; Feng, Steve; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Burbano, Jordi; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    efficiency of ~79% on our filter membrane along with a machine learning based cyst counting sensitivity of ~84%, yielding a limit-of-detection of ~12 cysts per 10 mL. Providing rapid detection and quantification of microorganisms, this field-portable imaging and sensing platform running on a mobile-phone could be useful for water quality monitoring in field and resource-limited settings. PMID:25537426

  2. Three-dimensional block-based restoration integrated with wide-field fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of thick specimens with spatially variant refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sreya; Preza, Chrysanthe

    2016-04-01

    Development of a block-based restoration (BBR) method that addresses spatially variant (SV) imaging in wide-field fluorescence microscopy of thick samples is presented. The BBR method is based on a block-based imaging model, which approximates SV imaging using an efficient orthonormal basis decomposition of multiple SV point-spread functions computed at block vertices. The effect of reducing the number of blocks needed to account for SV imaging on the restoration accuracy was investigated with simulations using a numerical lung tissue phantom relevant to biological studies. Results show that reducing the number of blocks by 82% and 98% resulted in a 19% and 27% reduction in restoration accuracy, respectively, thereby establishing a reasonable tradeoff between computational resources and accuracy. Comparison of the BBR method to existing methods (deconvolution) that do not account for SV imaging demonstrates a 90% improvement in restoration accuracy. BBR results from synthetic and experimental images of a controlled test sample with SV refractive index (RI) show consistency, providing a validation of the BBR approach. In this study, information from DIC and fluorescence images was combined to identify regions with changing RI within the imaging volume. The BBR method provides a first step toward computationally tractable reconstruction of images from thick samples.

  3. In situ and operando atomic force microscopy of high-capacity nano-silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitung, Ben; Baumann, Peter; Sommer, Heino; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle size as well as electrode structure and height are visualized with high resolution. Furthermore, the formation and evolution of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) can be followed and its thickness determined by phase imaging and nano-indentation, respectively. Major changes occur in the first lithiation cycle at potentials below 0.6 V with respect to Li/Li+ due to increased SEI formation - which is a dynamic process - and alloying reactions. Overall, these results provide insight into the function of silicon-based composite electrodes and further show that AFM is a powerful technique that can be applied to important battery materials, without restriction to thin film geometries.Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle

  4. An analytical electron microscopy study of the role of La and Y during high-temperature oxidation of selected Ni-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor but critical additions of active elements such as Y to Al2O3-forming alloys and La to Cr2O3-forming alloys are known to have beneficial effects on their high-temperature oxidation resistance. Several mechanisms, sometimes opposing, particularly in the case of Al2O3-forming alloys have been proposed to explain the active element-effect. A number of extensive reviews have dealt with these mechanisms. In the case of Cr2O3-forming alloys, however, it is generally agreed that the role of active elements is to promote selective oxidation of Cr, reduce the scale growth rate, and improve its mechanical strength. For a better understanding of the active element-effect, it is essential to determine its atomic-scale distribution within the oxide scale. Using thin-foil analytical electron microscopy techniques, it has been shown that in some Al2O3-forming alloys and Cr2O3-forming alloys, Y tends to segregate at grain boundaries of the oxide scale resulting in modification of its transport properties and mechanical strength. Also, it has been suggested that other elements such as Ce and La may segregate to grain boundaries of oxide scale in Cr2O3-forming alloys. It was the objective of this study to determine the atomic-scale distribution of active elements in wrought Ni-base alloys of commercial grade using the techniques of analytical electron microscopy. Two alloys representing Al2O3-forming and Cr2O3-forming alloys were selected for the study. Haynes alloy no. 214 is a Y-containing alloy capable of developing Al2O3 scale upon exposure at temperature exceeding 1,000C and Haynes alloy no. 230 is a La-containing alloy protected by Cr2O3 scale

  5. Evidence based dentistry – between the science and the clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Georgiev, Zlatko

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the more experience a physician or a dentist possess better the quality of health care delivery. However, recent studies had shown that there is in fact an inverse relationship between the number of years of practice and the quality of care provided. Evidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) is a process that restructures the way in which we think about clinical problems. It is an approach to clinical problem solving that has evolved from a self-directed and problem based a...

  6. Clinical Study on the Visceral Differentiation-Based Acupuncture Therapy for Insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Li; JIANG Xin-mei; XUE Jin-wei; WANG Miao; KE Rui

    2008-01-01

    objective;To investigate the clinical effects of acupuncture for insomnia on the basis of visceral differentiation.Methods;Seventy cases of insomnia were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group,The former was treated by acupuncture based on visceral differentiation and the latter by the routine acupuncture therapy.Results;The clinical effcts were significantly better in the treatment group than that of the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion;The visceral difrerentiation-based acupuncture therapy may enhance the therapeutic effects for insomnia patients.

  7. Simulation-Based Dysphagia Training: Teaching Interprofessional Clinical Reasoning in a Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna; Friary, Philippa; Jackson, Bianca; Sekula, Julia; Braakhuis, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated hospital readiness and interprofessional clinical reasoning in speech-language pathology and dietetics students following a simulation-based teaching package. Thirty-one students participated in two half-day simulation workshops. The training included orientation to the hospital setting, part-task skill learning and immersive simulated cases. Students completed workshop evaluation forms. They filled in a 10-question survey regarding confidence, knowledge and preparedness for working in a hospital environment before and immediately after the workshops. Students completed written 15-min clinical vignettes at 1 month prior to training, immediately prior to training and immediately after training. A marking rubric was devised to evaluate the responses to the clinical vignettes within a framework of interprofessional education. The simulation workshops were well received by all students. There was a significant increase in students' self-ratings of confidence, preparedness and knowledge following the study day (p < .001). There was a significant increase in student overall scores in clinical vignettes after training with the greatest increase in clinical reasoning (p < .001). Interprofessional simulation-based training has benefits in developing hospital readiness and clinical reasoning in allied health students. PMID:26803776

  8. Navigating the Rapids : The Development of NGS-based Clinical Trial Assays and Companion Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MatthewJohnMarton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, next generation sequencing (NGS technology has experienced meteoric growth in the aspects of platform, technology and supporting bioinformatics development allowing its widespread and rapid uptake in research settings. More recently, NGS-based genomic data has been exploited to better understand disease development and patient characteristics that influence response to a given therapeutic intervention. Cancer, as a disease characterized by and driven by the tumor genetic landscape, is particularly amenable to NGS-based diagnostic approaches. NGS based technologies are particularly well suited to studying cancer disease development, progression and emergence of resistance, all key factors in the development of next generation cancer diagnostics. Yet, to achieve the promise of NGS based patient treatment, drug developers will need to overcome a number of operational, technical, regulatory and strategic challenges. Here we provide a succinct overview of the state of the clinical NGS field in terms of the available clinically targeted platforms and sequencing technologies. We discuss the various operational and practical aspects of clinical NGS testing that will facilitate or limit the uptake of such assays in routine clinical care. We examine the current strategies for analytical validation of NGS-based assays and ongoing efforts to standardize clinical NGS and build quality control standards for the same. The rapidly evolving CDx landscape for NGS-based assays will be reviewed, highlighting the key areas of concern and suggesting strategies to mitigate risk. The review will conclude with a series of strategic questions that face drug developers and a discussion of the likely future course of NGS-based Dx development efforts.

  9. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventolini G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gary Ventolini, Ravi Patel, Robert Vasquez Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Permian Basin, Odessa, TX, USA Objective: Lichen sclerosus (LS is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods: Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results: We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion: Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. Keywords: vulvovaginal, vulvar, atypical, lichen sclerosus, asymptomatic

  10. Training-Based Interventions in Motor Rehabilitation after Stroke: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Sterr

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic neuroscience research on brain plasticity, motor learning and recovery has stimulated new concepts in neurological rehabilitation. Combined with the development of set methodological standards in clinical outcome research, these findings have led to a double-paradigm shift in motor rehabilitation: (a the move towards evidence-based procedures for the assessment of clinical outcome & the employment of disablement models to anchor outcome parameters, and (b the introduction of practice-based concepts that are derived from testable models that specify treatment mechanisms. In this context, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIT has played a catalytic role in taking motor rehabilitation forward into the scientific arena. As a theoretically founded and hypothesis-driven intervention, CIT research focuses on two main issues. The first issue is the assessment of long-term clinical benefits in an increasing range of patient groups, and the second issue is the investigation of neuronal and behavioural treatment mechanisms and their interactive contribution to treatment success. These studies are mainly conducted in the research environment and will eventually lead to increased treatment benefits for patients in standard health care. However, gradual but presumably more immediate benefits for patients may be achieved by introducing and testing derivates of the CIT concept that are more compatible with current clinical practice. Here, we summarize the theoretical and empirical issues related to the translation of research-based CIT work into the clinical context of standard health care.

  11. Changing of an anesthesiology clinical base year to create an integrated 48-month curriculum: experience of one program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, John; Dorotta, Ihab; Steckner, Karen; Mossad, Emad; Estafanous, F George; Tetzlaff, John E

    2005-05-01

    To allow for growth in our anesthesiology residency, we assumed control of the clinical base year (postgraduate year 1[PGY-1]) and adjusted the curriculum to accommodate the expanded size. With this opportunity to change the curriculum, we created a clinical base year to prepare PGY-1 for clinical anesthesia training in PGY-2 to PGY-4 using, for this purpose, the best resources of our clinical site. We describe the process and preliminary results of the change. PMID:15896594

  12. Laboratory-based real and reciprocal space imaging of the electronic structure of few layer graphene on SiC(0001¯) using photoelectron emission microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present real and reciprocal space photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) results on few layer graphene using laboratory based He I and II radiation. The combination of a focused high-intensity source and high transmission PEEM electron optics provides good signal to noise ratios for the different modes of acquisition. We demonstrate work function mapping and secondary electron analysis, related to the graphene layer thickness, band structure imaging from micron scale regions by wave vector resolved PEEM (k-PEEM) and local secondary electron spectroscopy, giving information on the valence and conduction band states and the dispersion relations of the π bands. Dark field PEEM is done by selecting the Dirac cone corresponding to the specific rotation of each graphene layer and allows spatial mapping of the commensurate rotation angles. The use of He II radiation increases the volume of reciprocal space accessible to k-PEEM and improves signal to background. The preferential linear polarization of the light source is used to investigate aspects of the electronic chirality near the Dirac cone. Recent developments in sample manipulation and cooling are presented. - Highlights: ► Laboratory-based, energy-filtered PEEM using a focused VUV source. ► Dark field imaging of commensurate rotations in Graphene. ► Full 2D band structure using He II radiation. ► Light polarization to study aspects of electronic chirality

  13. In vivo imaging flow cytometry based on laser scanning two-photon microscopy at kHz cross-sectional frame rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingjie; Tang, Jianyong; Cui, Meng

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry has found numerous applications in biology and pharmacology. However, conventional cytometry does not provide the detailed morphological information that is needed to fully determine the phenotype of individual circulating cells. Imaging cytometry, capable of visualizing the morphology and dynamics of the circulating cells at high spatiotemporal resolution, is highly desired. Current wide-field based image cytometers are limited in the imaging depth and provide only two-dimensional resolution. For deep tissue imaging, laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) is widely adopted. However, for applications in flow cytometry, the axial scanning speed of current TPMs is inadequate to provide high-speed cross-sectional imaging of vasculature. We have integrated an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens into a standard TPM and achieved microsecond-scale axial scanning. With a galvo scanner for transverse scanning, we achieved kHz cross-sectional frame rate. Here we report its applications for in vivo deformability cytometry and in vivo imaging flow cytometry, and demonstrate the capability of imaging dynamical morphologies of flowing cells, distinguishing cells and cellular clusters, and simultaneously quantifying different cell populations based on their fluorescent labels.

  14. Synchrotron-based X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy in Conjunction with Nanoindentation to Study Molecular-Scale Interactions of Phenol-Formaldehyde in Wood Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakes, Joseph E.; Hunt, Chris G.; Yelle, Daniel J.; Lorenz, Linda; Hirth, Kolby; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Grigsby, Warren; Frihart, Charles R.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding and controlling molecular-scale interactions between adhesives and wood polymers are critical to accelerate the development of improved adhesives for advanced wood-based materials. The submicrometer resolution of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) was found capable of mapping and quantifying infiltration of Br-labeled phenolformaldehyde (BrPF) into wood cell walls. Cell wall infiltration of five BrPF adhesives with different average molecular weights (MWs) was mapped. Nanoindentation on the same cell walls was performed to assess the effects of BrPF infiltration on cell wall hygromechanical properties. For the same amount of weight uptake, lower MW BrPF adhesives were found to be more effective at decreasing moisture-induced mechanical softening. This greater effectiveness of lower MW phenolic adhesives likely resulted from their ability to more intimately associate with water sorption sites in the wood polymers. Evidence also suggests that a BrPF interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) formed within the wood polymers, which might also decrease moisture sorption by mechanically restraining wood polymers during swelling.

  15. In situ and operando atomic force microscopy of high-capacity nano-silicon based electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitung, Ben; Baumann, Peter; Sommer, Heino; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Silicon is a promising next-generation anode material for high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. While the alloying of nano- and micron size silicon with lithium is relatively well understood, the knowledge of mechanical degradation and structural rearrangements in practical silicon-based electrodes during operation is limited. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, in situ and operando atomic force microscopy (AFM) of nano-silicon anodes containing polymer binder and carbon black additive. With the help of this technique, the surface topography is analyzed while electrochemical reactions are occurring. In particular, changes in particle size as well as electrode structure and height are visualized with high resolution. Furthermore, the formation and evolution of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) can be followed and its thickness determined by phase imaging and nano-indentation, respectively. Major changes occur in the first lithiation cycle at potentials below 0.6 V with respect to Li/Li(+) due to increased SEI formation - which is a dynamic process - and alloying reactions. Overall, these results provide insight into the function of silicon-based composite electrodes and further show that AFM is a powerful technique that can be applied to important battery materials, without restriction to thin film geometries. PMID:27222212

  16. Enhanced Optoelectronic Performance of a Passivated Nanowire-Based Device: Key Information from Real-Space Imaging Using 4D Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jafar I; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Sun, Jingya; Priante, Davide; Bose, Riya; Shaheen, Basamat S; Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Bakr, Osman M; Ooi, Boon S; Mohammed, Omar F

    2016-05-01

    Managing trap states and understanding their role in ultrafast charge-carrier dynamics, particularly at surface and interfaces, remains a major bottleneck preventing further advancements and commercial exploitation of nanowire (NW)-based devices. A key challenge is to selectively map such ultrafast dynamical processes on the surfaces of NWs, a capability so far out of reach of time-resolved laser techniques. Selective mapping of surface dynamics in real space and time can only be achieved by applying four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (4D S-UEM). Charge carrier dynamics are spatially and temporally visualized on the surface of InGaN NW arrays before and after surface passivation with octadecylthiol (ODT). The time-resolved secondary electron images clearly demonstrate that carrier recombination on the NW surface is significantly slowed down after ODT treatment. This observation is fully supported by enhancement of the performance of the light emitting device. Direct observation of surface dynamics provides a profound understanding of the photophysical mechanisms on materials' surfaces and enables the formulation of effective surface trap state management strategies for the next generation of high-performance NW-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26938476

  17. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke;

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the...... Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) completed a detailed questionnaire about how they diagnose and treat dental caries. Next, they received a customized report that compared their answers to those from all other practitioner-investigators. Then, 126 of them attended the DPBRN's first network...... with the idea that a highly interactive meeting with fellow practitioner-investigators may be an effective means to translate scientific findings into clinical practice. Practitioner-investigators are open to changing how they treat patients as a result of engaging fellow practitioner-investigators in...

  18. Clarification of Safe Delivery by Iranian Experts Based on Clinical Governance: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forozun Olfati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To clarify the principles of a safe delivery based on Clinical Governance Criteria, as recommended by the pertinent experts.Materials and methods:The current study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method in 2013 and purposive sampling, performing 24 in-depth interviews based on semi-structured questions and analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research included midwives, obstetricians, managers, and hospital doctors. The data were under continuous consideration and comparative analysis in order to achieve data saturation.Results:The main concepts derived from interpretations of the pertinent experts include: Patient & Public involvement; Risk Management; Education; Clinical efficiency; Clinical audit; Personnel & Management.Conclusion:In a safe delivery, there is a vicious cycle of causes the elimination of which is only possible through benchmarking patterns that attend to most aspects of a safe delivery.Changes to services require utilization of appropriate change management strategies.

  19. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  20. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  1. 3D -Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Schmidt, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte;

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscopy is a fast and non-destructive structural characterization technique aimed at the study of individual crystalline elements (grains or subgrains) within mm-sized polycrystalline specimens. It is based on two principles: the use of highly penetr...

  2. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Assess Problem-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Salinitri, Francine D.; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Garwood, Candice L.; Lehr, Victoria Tutag; Abdallah, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare pharmacy students’ performance on an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to their performance on a written examination for the assessment of problem-based learning (PBL); and to determine students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of OSCEs for PBL evaluations.

  3. Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans Served by Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C.; Carmody, Timothy; Erickson, Lauren; Jin, Ling; Leader, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multiple trials have found telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) to be effective for the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-CBT for the treatment of depression among veterans served by community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) outside of major urban areas. Method: Eighty-five veterans…

  4. Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Part 2 Application to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elise; McLeod, Sharynne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides both a tutorial and a clinical example of how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can conduct evidence-based practice (EBP) when working with children with speech sound disorders (SSDs). It is a companion paper to the narrative review of 134 intervention studies for children who have an SSD (Baker & McLeod, 2011).…

  5. Automatic Domain Adaptation of Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Sublanguage Semantic Schemata Applied to Clinical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Domain adaptation of natural language processing systems is challenging because it requires human expertise. While manual effort is effective in creating a high quality knowledge base, it is expensive and time consuming. Clinical text adds another layer of complexity to the task due to privacy and confidentiality restrictions that hinder the…

  6. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  7. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  8. A Measure for the Reliability of a Rating Scale Based on Longitudinal Clinical Trial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Annouschka; Alonso, Ariel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A new measure for reliability of a rating scale is introduced, based on the classical definition of reliability, as the ratio of the true score variance and the total variance. Clinical trial data can be employed to estimate the reliability of the scale in use, whenever repeated measurements are taken. The reliability is estimated from the…

  9. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E;

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  10. Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2012). Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples. Instructional Science, 40(5), 813-827. doi:10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

  11. Conveying Clinical Reasoning Based on Visual Observation via Eye-Movement Modelling Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nystrom, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Complex perceptual tasks, like clinical reasoning based on visual observations of patients, require not only conceptual knowledge about diagnostic classes but also the skills to visually search for symptoms and interpret these observations. However, medical education so far has focused very little on how visual observation skills can be…

  12. An Antipodean Evaluation of Problem-Based Learning by Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of problem-based learning in an Australian nursing education program was evaluated through interviews with 14 clinical teachers. They saw improvement in students' self-direction and holistic views of patients, but felt students lacked psychomotor skills and fundamental knowledge of anatomy and physiology. (SK)

  13. Medical Students’ Attitudes about Team-Based Learning in a Pre-Clinical Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Parmelee, Dean X.; DeStephen, Dan; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Team-Based Learning is relatively new in medical education. Team-Based Learning was integrated into one medical school’s pre-clinical curriculum in 2002. Purpose: This study com­pared how medical students’ attitudes about the Team-Based Learning process changed between the first and second year of medical school. Method: 180 students responded to 19 statements regarding their attitudes about Team-Based Learning during their first and second year of medical school. Data were analy...

  14. Incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian patients: Analysis of clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Melva Louisa; Madoka Takeuchi; Masahiro Takeuchi; Nafrialdi Nafrialdi; Rianto Setiabudy

    2010-01-01

    Aim To review the effi cacy and safety data on incretin-based therapies currently available (exenatide, liraglutide, sitagliptin, vildagliptin) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population.Methods We conducted Medline search of all relevant randomized clinical trials of incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian populations. Data pertinent to the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-4 inhibitors were extracted and used.Results We found 14 rand...

  15. Overview of the second workshop on medical content–based retrieval for clinical decision support

    OpenAIRE

    Depeursinge A.; Greenspan H.; Syeda T.; Muller H.

    2013-01-01

    The second workshop on Medical Content–Based Retrieval for Clinical Decision Support took place at the MICCAI conference in Toronto, Canada on September 22, 2011. The workshop brought together more than 40 registered researchers interested in the field of medical content–based retrieval. Eleven papers were accepted and presented at the workshop. Two invited speakers gave overviews on state–of–the–art academic research and industrial perspectives. The program was completed with a panel discuss...

  16. Help-seeking behavior for erectile dysfunction: A clinic-based survey in China

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Zhang; Wei Yu; Zhan-Ju He; Jie Jin

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of Chinese patients seeking help for erectile dysfunction (ED) has not been described in detail. This was an observational study conducted using an outpatient clinic-based questionnaire survey of ED patients. From 2008 to 2009, physicians in 10 medical centers in China enrolled 2693 men (aged 25-70 years) diagnosed with ED. The diagnosis was based on the International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5) Questionnaire. The men completed a survey that asked questions about demogr...

  17. Clinic-based surveillance for bacterial- and rotavirus-associated diarrhea in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzba, Thomas F; Abdel-Messih, Ibrahim Adib; Abu-Elyazeed, Remon; Putnam, Shannon D; Kamal, Karim A; Rozmajzl, Patrick; Ahmed, Salwa F; Fatah, Abdel; Zabedy, Khaled; Shaheen, Hind I; Sanders, John; Frenck, Robert

    2006-01-01

    To identify enteropathogens for vaccine development, we implemented clinic-based surveillance for severe pediatric diarrhea in Egypt's Nile River Delta. Over 2 years, a physician clinically evaluated and obtained stool samples for microbiology from patients with diarrhea and less than 6 years of age. In the first (N = 714) and second clinic (N = 561), respectively, 36% (N = 254) and 46% (N = 260) of children were infected with rotavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), Campylobacter, or Shigella. When excluding mixed rotavirus-bacterial infections, for the first and second clinic, 23% and 10% had rotavirus-associated diarrhea, and 14% and 17% had ETEC-associated diarrhea, respectively. Campylobacter-associated diarrhea was 1% and 3%, and Shigella-associated diarrhea was 2% and 1%, respectively, for the two clinics. Rotavirus-associated diarrhea peaked in late summer to early winter, while bacterial agents were prevalent during summer. Rotavirus-associated cases presented with dehydration, vomiting, and were often hospitalized. Children with Shigella- or Campylobacter-associated diarrhea reported as watery diarrhea and rarely dysentery. ETEC did not have any clinically distinct characteristics. For vaccine development and/or deployment, our study suggests that rotavirus is of principle concern, followed by ETEC, Shigella, and Campylobacter. PMID:16407360

  18. Examining differences in culturally based stress among clinical and nonclinical Hispanic adolescents: Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Reports an error in "Examining differences in culturally based stress among clinical and nonclinical Hispanic adolescents" by Richard C. Cervantes, Jodi Berger Cardoso and Jeremy T. Goldbach (Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 2015[Jul], Vol 21[3], 458-467). In the article the copyright attribution was incorrect. The copyright is "© 2014 American Psychological Association" All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2014-45077-001.) The purpose of the current study was to determine if, and how, Hispanic adolescents receiving clinical treatment differ from their peers who are not in treatment on the 8 domains (family economic stress, cultural or educational stress, acculturation-gap stress, immigration stress, discrimination stress, family immigration stress, community or gang-related stress) of cultural stress (HSI-A), and if the relation between cultural stress domains and depressive symptomology differed by group membership (clinical vs. nonclinical). The sample included 1,254 Hispanic adolescents. The clinical sample had significantly higher scores of cultural stress (p discrimination, and family drug stress had a unique effect on depression and effect varied by group. Acculturation gap stress was associated with depression for the nonclinical group but not the clinical group (p < .001) and community gang stress was more strongly related to depression for the clinical group (p < .05). PMID:26460668

  19. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for whic...

  20. CARS microscopy for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical microscopy grows in its importance with the development of modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, methods of diagnostics and treatment of most dangerous diseases for mankind. There are several important goals of optical microscopy for biomedical studies among which the next three may be distinguished: fast imaging with high lateral spatial resolution, 3-D sectioning capability and high contrast for chemical selectivity. To meet these specific requirements, various types of both linear and nonlinear optical microscopy were elaborated. (authors)

  1. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  2. Evaluation of clinical teaching and professional development in a problem and community-based nursing module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C de Villiers

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa the main focus is on primary health care. This affects the education and training of nurses, and training schools must respond by developing appropriate teaching modules. A school of nursing developed, implemented and revised a problem- and community- based learning module over a period of three years (1996-1998. This student-centered module focuses on students’ needs, active participation, collaboration, accountability, self-assessment, self-study, life-long learning and appropriate skills. In the formal clinical teaching environment PBL was the main approach. However, this approach was also supported by a variety of strategies, for example group discussions and scenarios. The knowledge, attitudes and professional development skills acquired in the PBL approach were then applied informally in the community setting (CBE. The purpose of the study was to evaluate a first year clinical teaching module as part of an extensive programme. A quantitative research method, a descriptive design, and a variety of data collection techniques were used. Conclusions were that clinical teaching was effective within the problem- (PBL and community-based (CBE approaches; 78% of respondents were positive about the clinical learning environment; 61 % stated that expectations were met; 81% preferred group activities, and 67% indicated that they had developed professional skills. Facilitators agreed that clinical teaching met the requirements of PBL & CBE. The pass rate also improved.

  3. Developing clinical competency in crisis event management: an integrated simulation problem-based learning activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S Y; Chen, F G; Klainin, P; Brammer, J; O'Brien, A; Samarasekera, D D

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session would be superior to those who completed the conventional problem-based session. The students were allocated into either simulation with problem-based discussion (SPBD) or problem-based discussion (PBD) for scenarios on respiratory and cardiac distress. Following completion of each scenario, students from both groups were invited to sit an optional individual test involving a systematic assessment and immediate management of a simulated patient facing a crisis event. A total of thirty students participated in the first post test related to a respiratory scenario and thirty-three participated in the second post test related to a cardiac scenario. Their clinical performances were scored using a checklist. Mean test scores for students completing the SPBD were significantly higher than those who completing the PBD for both the first post test (SPBD 20.08, PBD 18.19) and second post test (SPBD 27.56, PBD 23.07). Incorporation of simulation learning activities into problem-based discussion appeared to be an effective educational strategy for teaching nursing students to assess and manage crisis events. PMID:19916052

  4. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  5. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  6. Comparison of Clinical Effects of Au-Pt Based and Ni-Cr Based Porcelain Crowns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-chun Wu; Ye Shi; Teng Ma

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term clinical effects of two kinds of crowns and bridges made of porcelain fused to Au-Pt alloy and Ni-Cr alloy.Methods A total of 131 teeth (64 patients) were rehabilitated using porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns,among which 59 were rehabilitated with Au-Pt alloy metal ceramic crown and 72 with Ni-Cr alloy metal ceramic crown.The porcelain fracture,shade,marginal adaptation,gingival discoloration,and gingival status after finishing restoration and 36 months of follow-up were evaluated.Results After 36 months of restoration,porcelain fused to Au-Pt alloy crown showed better clinical effects than porcelain fused to Ni-Cr alloy crown in shade,marginal adaptation,gingival discoloration,as well as gingival status (all P<0.05).Conclusion The Au-Pt alloy ceramic crown is superior to Ni-Cr alloy ceramic crown in long-term clinical effects.

  7. Implementation of a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT with MCNP code

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongming Tony

    In IMRT inverse planning, inaccurate dose calculations and limitations in optimization algorithms introduce both systematic and convergence errors to treatment plans. The goal of this work is to practically implement a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT. The intention is to minimize both types of error in inverse planning and obtain treatment plans with better clinical accuracy than non-Monte Carlo based systems. The strategy is to calculate the dose matrices of small beamlets by using a Monte Carlo based method. Optimization of beamlet intensities is followed based on the calculated dose data using an optimization algorithm that is capable of escape from local minima and prevents possible pre-mature convergence. The MCNP 4B Monte Carlo code is improved to perform fast particle transport and dose tallying in lattice cells by adopting a selective transport and tallying algorithm. Efficient dose matrix calculation for small beamlets is made possible by adopting a scheme that allows concurrent calculation of multiple beamlets of single port. A finite-sized point source (FSPS) beam model is introduced for easy and accurate beam modeling. A DVH based objective function and a parallel platform based algorithm are developed for the optimization of intensities. The calculation accuracy of improved MCNP code and FSPS beam model is validated by dose measurements in phantoms. Agreements better than 1.5% or 0.2 cm have been achieved. Applications of the implemented model to clinical cases of brain, head/neck, lung, spine, pancreas and prostate have demonstrated the feasibility and capability of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for clinical IMRT. Dose distributions of selected treatment plans from a commercial non-Monte Carlo based system are evaluated in comparison with Monte Carlo based calculations. Systematic errors of up to 12% in tumor doses and up to 17% in critical structure doses have been observed. The clinical importance of Monte Carlo based

  8. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials – an ISEV position paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig; Börger, Verena; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Chaput, Nathalie; Chatterjee, Devasis; Court, Felipe A.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Fraile, Lorenzo; Gho, Yong Song; Görgens, André; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Hendrix, An; Hermann, Dirk M.; Hill, Andrew F.; Hochberg, Fred; Horn, Peter A.; de Kleijn, Dominique; Kordelas, Lambros; Kramer, Boris W.; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Laitinen, Saara; Leonardi, Tommaso; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J.; Lim, Sai Kiang; Lötvall, Jan; Maguire, Casey A.; Marcilla, Antonio; Nazarenko, Irina; Ochiya, Takahiro; Patel, Tushar; Pedersen, Shona; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Pluchino, Stefano; Quesenberry, Peter; Reischl, Ilona G.; Rivera, Francisco J.; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schallmoser, Katharina; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Strunk, Dirk; Tonn, Torsten; Vader, Pieter; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Wauben, Marca; Andaloussi, Samir El; Théry, Clotilde; Rohde, Eva; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information from their cell of origin to their target cells. As a result of these properties, EVs of defined cell types may serve as novel tools for various therapeutic approaches, including (a) anti-tumour therapy, (b) pathogen vaccination, (c) immune-modulatory and regenerative therapies and (d) drug delivery. The translation of EVs into clinical therapies requires the categorization of EV-based therapeutics in compliance with existing regulatory frameworks. As the classification defines subsequent requirements for manufacturing, quality control and clinical investigation, it is of major importance to define whether EVs are considered the active drug components or primarily serve as drug delivery vehicles. For an effective and particularly safe translation of EV-based therapies into clinical practice, a high level of cooperation between researchers, clinicians and competent authorities is essential. In this position statement, basic and clinical scientists, as members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program of the European Union, namely European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME-HaD), summarize recent developments and the current knowledge of EV-based therapies. Aspects of safety and regulatory requirements that must be considered for pharmaceutical manufacturing and clinical application are highlighted. Production and quality control processes are discussed. Strategies to promote the therapeutic application of EVs in future clinical studies are addressed. PMID:26725829

  9. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials - an ISEV position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig; Börger, Verena; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Chaput, Nathalie; Chatterjee, Devasis; Court, Felipe A; Del Portillo, Hernando A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Fraile, Lorenzo; Gho, Yong Song; Görgens, André; Gupta, Ramesh C; Hendrix, An; Hermann, Dirk M; Hill, Andrew F; Hochberg, Fred; Horn, Peter A; de Kleijn, Dominique; Kordelas, Lambros; Kramer, Boris W; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Laitinen, Saara; Leonardi, Tommaso; Lorenowicz, Magdalena J; Lim, Sai Kiang; Lötvall, Jan; Maguire, Casey A; Marcilla, Antonio; Nazarenko, Irina; Ochiya, Takahiro; Patel, Tushar; Pedersen, Shona; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Pluchino, Stefano; Quesenberry, Peter; Reischl, Ilona G; Rivera, Francisco J; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schallmoser, Katharina; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Strunk, Dirk; Tonn, Torsten; Vader, Pieter; van Balkom, Bas W M; Wauben, Marca; Andaloussi, Samir El; Théry, Clotilde; Rohde, Eva; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information from their cell of origin to their target cells. As a result of these properties, EVs of defined cell types may serve as novel tools for various therapeutic approaches, including (a) anti-tumour therapy, (b) pathogen vaccination, (c) immune-modulatory and regenerative therapies and (d) drug delivery. The translation of EVs into clinical therapies requires the categorization of EV-based therapeutics in compliance with existing regulatory frameworks. As the classification defines subsequent requirements for manufacturing, quality control and clinical investigation, it is of major importance to define whether EVs are considered the active drug components or primarily serve as drug delivery vehicles. For an effective and particularly safe translation of EV-based therapies into clinical practice, a high level of cooperation between researchers, clinicians and competent authorities is essential. In this position statement, basic and clinical scientists, as members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) and of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program of the European Union, namely European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME-HaD), summarize recent developments and the current knowledge of EV-based therapies. Aspects of safety and regulatory requirements that must be considered for pharmaceutical manufacturing and clinical application are highlighted. Production and quality control processes are discussed. Strategies to promote the therapeutic application of EVs in future clinical studies are addressed. PMID:26725829

  10. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials – an ISEV position paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lener

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information from their cell of origin to their target cells. As a result of these properties, EVs of defined cell types may serve as novel tools for various therapeutic approaches, including (a anti-tumour therapy, (b pathogen vaccination, (c immune-modulatory and regenerative therapies and (d drug delivery. The translation of EVs into clinical therapies requires the categorization of EV-based therapeutics in compliance with existing regulatory frameworks. As the classification defines subsequent requirements for manufacturing, quality control and clinical investigation, it is of major importance to define whether EVs are considered the active drug components or primarily serve as drug delivery vehicles. For an effective and particularly safe translation of EV-based therapies into clinical practice, a high level of cooperation between researchers, clinicians and competent authorities is essential. In this position statement, basic and clinical scientists, as members of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV and of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST program of the European Union, namely European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME-HaD, summarize recent developments and the current knowledge of EV-based therapies. Aspects of safety and regulatory requirements that must be considered for pharmaceutical manufacturing and clinical application are highlighted. Production and quality control processes are discussed. Strategies to promote the therapeutic application of EVs in future clinical studies are addressed.

  11. Design and Effectiveness of a Required Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Curriculum for Fundamental Clinical Skills and Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Daryl P. Lofaso; Peter M. DeBlieux; DiCarlo, Richard P.; Hilton, Charles; Yang, Tong; Sheila W. Chauvin

    2011-01-01

    Background: For more than 20 years, medical literature has increasingly documented the need for students to learn, practice and demonstrate competence in basic clinical knowledge and skills. In 2001, the Louisiana State University Health Science Centers (LSUHSC) School of Medicine New Orleans replaced its traditional Introduction in to Clinical Medicine (ICM) course with the Science and Practice of Medicine (SPM) course. The main component within the SPM course is the Clinical Skills Lab (CS...

  12. A history of urine microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-11-01

    The naked-eye appearance of the urine must have been studied by shamans and healers since the Stone Age, and an elaborate interpretation of so-called Uroscopy began around 600 AD as a form of divination. A 1000 years later, the first primitive monocular and compound microscopes appeared in the Netherlands, and along with many other objects and liquids, urine was studied from around 1680 onwards as the enlightenment evolved. However, the crude early instruments did not permit fine study because of chromatic and linear/spherical blurring. Only after complex multi-glass lenses which avoided these problems had been made and used in the 1820s in London by Lister, and in Paris by Chevalier and Amici, could urinary microscopy become a practical, clinically useful tool in the 1830s. Clinical urinary microscopy was pioneered by Rayer and his pupils in Paris (especially Vigla), in the late 1830s, and spread to UK and Germany in the 1840s, with detailed descriptions and interpretations of cells and formed elements of the urinary sediment by Nasse, Henle, Robinson and Golding Bird. Classes were held, most notably by Donné in Paris. After another 50 years, optical microscopy had reached its apogee, with magnifications of over 1000 times obtainable free of aberration, using immersion techniques. Atlases of the urinary sediment were published in all major European countries and in the US. Polarised light and phase contrast was used also after 1900 to study urine, and by the early 20th century, photomicroscopy (pioneered by Donné and Daguerre 50 years previously, but then ignored) became usual for teaching and recording. In the 1940s electron microscopy began, followed by detection of specific proteins and cells using immunofluorescent antibodies. All this had been using handheld methodology. Around 1980, machine-assisted observations began, and have dominated progress since. PMID:26079823

  13. Optically-guided frameless linac-based radiosurgery for brain metastases: clinical experience

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Sameer K; Lawson, Joshua D.; Wang, Jia-Zhu; Simpson, Daniel R.; Newman, C. Benjamin; Alksne, John F.; Mundt, Arno J.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe our clinical experience using optically-guided linear accelerator (linac)-based frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of brain metastases. Sixty-five patients (204 lesions) were treated between 2005 and 2008 with frameless SRS using an optically-guided bite-block system. Patients had a median of 2 lesions (range, 1–13). Prescription dose ranged from 14 to 22 Gy (median, 18 Gy) and was given in a single fraction. Clinical and radi...

  14. Psychiatric hospital nursing staff's experiences of participating in group-based clinical supervision:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Group-based clinical supervision is commonly offered as a stress-reducing intervention in psychiatric settings, but nurses often feel ambivalent about participating. This study aimed at exploring psychiatric nurses' experiences of participating in groupbased supervision and identifying psychosocial...... reasons for their ambivalence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 psychiatric nurses at a Danish university hospital. The results indicated that participation in clinical supervision was difficult for the nurses because of an uncomfortable exposure to the professional community. The sense...... of exposure was caused by the particular interactional organisation during the sessions, which brought to light pre-existing but covert conflicts among the nurses....

  15. CLINICAL SURFACES -- Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh;

    2009-01-01

    A multi-display environment (MDE) is made up of co-located and networked personal and public devices that form an integrated workspace enabling co-located group work. Traditionally, MDEs have, however, mainly been designed to support a single “smart room”, and have had little sense of the tasks and...... activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval...

  16. Using Mobile Technologies to Access Evidence-Based Resources: A Rural Health Clinic Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Templeton, Heather D; Wu, Lin

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the feasibility and usability of a mobile device and selected electronic evidence-based information programs used to support clinical decision making in a rural health clinic. The study focused on nurses' perceptions on when they needed more information, where they sought information, what made them feel comfortable about the information they found, and rules and guidelines they used to determine if the information should be used in patient care. ATLAS.ti, the qualitative analysis software, was used to assist with qualitative data analysis and management. PMID:26333613

  17. Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method to determine the penetration ability of petrolatum oil into in vivo human skin using confocal Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin pre-treated with petrolatum was analyzed in vivo using confocal Raman microscopy in order to determine the penetration depth of the oil into the skin. The broad Raman peak (2820–3030 cm−1) measured in vivo on human skin in the high wavenumber region exhibits two prominent main Raman peaks at 2880 cm−1 and 2935 cm−1 that originated from cutaneous lipids and keratin and two main peak shoulders at 2850 cm−1 and 2980 cm−1 that originated from lipids and keratin, respectively. Topical application of petrolatum oil onto the skin gives rise to an increase of the intensity of the broad lipid–keratin Raman peak (2820–3030 cm−1). Herewith, not only the intensity of the lipid part but also of the keratin part is increased, making the normalization to keratin and the determination of the petrolatum penetration profile erroneous. To solve this problem, the Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method is introduced in analyzing the Raman spectrum of the lipid–keratin peak and the least square method is applied for analyzing the petrolatum penetration profile. Results obtained in vivo show that the petrolatum oil does not penetrate deeper than 10 µm into intact human skin. (paper)

  18. Level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for EIT lung images: first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show the first clinical results using the level-set-based reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data. The level-set-based reconstruction method (LSRM) allows the reconstruction of non-smooth interfaces between image regions, which are typically smoothed by traditional voxel-based reconstruction methods (VBRMs). We develop a time difference formulation of the LSRM for 2D images. The proposed reconstruction method is applied to reconstruct clinical EIT data of a slow flow inflation pressure–volume manoeuvre in lung-healthy and adult lung-injury patients. Images from the LSRM and the VBRM are compared. The results show comparable reconstructed images, but with an improved ability to reconstruct sharp conductivity changes in the distribution of lung ventilation using the LSRM. (paper)

  19. Validation of a computer based objective structured clinical examination in the assessment of undergraduate dermatology courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feroze Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many teaching centers have now adopted objective structured clinical examination (OSCE as an assessment method for undergraduate dermatology courses. A modification of the standard OSCE in dermatology is computer based or electronic OSCE (eOSCE. We attempted to validate the use of a computer-based OSCE in dermatology in a group of fifth year medical students. The scores of the students in the computer-based OSCE showed a strong positive correlation with the scores on the clinical presentation (Pearson′s co-efficient - 0.923, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level and a good correlation with overall scores of the student (Pearson′s co-efficient - 0.728, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level, indicating that this is a reliable method for assessment in dermatology. Generally, the students′ feedback regarding the methods was positive.

  20. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity. We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  1. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  2. An Exploration of Dental Students' Assumptions About Community-Based Clinical Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Nicole; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which assumptions dental students recalled feeling prior to beginning community-based clinical experiences and whether those assumptions were fulfilled or challenged. All fourth-year students at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics participate in community-based clinical experiences. At the completion of their rotations, they write a guided reflection paper detailing the assumptions they had prior to beginning their rotations and assessing the accuracy of their assumptions. For this qualitative descriptive study, the 218 papers from three classes (2011-13) were analyzed for common themes. The results showed that the students had a variety of assumptions about their rotations. They were apprehensive about working with challenging patients, performing procedures for which they had minimal experience, and working too slowly. In contrast, they looked forward to improving their clinical and patient management skills and knowledge. Other assumptions involved the site (e.g., the equipment/facility would be outdated; protocols/procedures would be similar to the dental school's). Upon reflection, students reported experiences that both fulfilled and challenged their assumptions. Some continued to feel apprehensive about treating certain patient populations, while others found it easier than anticipated. Students were able to treat multiple patients per day, which led to increased speed and patient management skills. However, some reported challenges with time management. Similarly, students were surprised to discover some clinics were new/updated although some had limited instruments and materials. Based on this study's findings about students' recalled assumptions and reflective experiences, educators should consider assessing and addressing their students' assumptions prior to beginning community-based dental education experiences. PMID:26933101

  3. Clinic-based intervention projects: STD and family planning programs get involved. Intervention model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W R

    1991-06-01

    The sexually transmitted disease (STD) program in Udorn, a popular Thai tourist city, has worked closely with 750 prostitutes for 15 years, incorporating the concerns of brothel managers and prostitutes into service delivery. The program in Udorn is part of a nationwide network of STD clinics. The level of person-to-person interaction was increased once it was determined by 1989 that HIV had infected 6% of prostitutes in the city's brothels. Outreach educators were recruited and trained to ensure that all prostitutes in Udorn had the basic facts about HIV and AIDS. Over the last 2 years, the STD program has trained outreach educators to work in 8 brothels, started a local AIDS prevention foundation supported by local businessmen, and taken other steps to incorporate AIDS prevention into its clinic structure. Such clinic-based programs are an important way of targeting groups at high risk of HIV transmission. PMID:12316886

  4. Compact MEMS-based Adaptive Optics Optical Coherence Tomography for Clinical Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D; Olivier, S; Jones, S; Zawadzki, R; Evans, J; Choi, S; Werner, J

    2008-02-04

    We describe a compact MEMS-based adaptive optics (AO) optical coherence tomography system with improved AO performance and ease of clinical use. A typical AO system consists of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror that measures and corrects the ocular and system aberrations. Because of the limitation on the current deformable mirror technologies, the amount of real-time ocular-aberration compensation is restricted and small in the previous AO-OCT instruments. In this instrument, we proposed to add an optical apparatus to correct the spectacle aberrations of the patients such as myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. This eliminated the tedious process of the trial lenses in clinical imaging. Different amount of spectacle aberration compensation was achieved by motorized stages and automated with the AO computer for ease of clinical use. In addition, the compact AO-OCT was optimized to have minimum system aberrations to reduce AO registration errors and improve AO performance.

  5. 3D restoration microscopy improves quantification of enzyme-labeled fluorescence-based single-cell phosphatase activity in plankton. Cytometry Part A, 85A: 841–853

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diaz-de-Quijano, D.; Palacios, P.; Horňák, Karel; Felip, M.

    85A, č. 10 (2014), s. 841-853. ISSN 1552-4922 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : 3D fluorescence microscopy * deconvolution * ELF phosphate * phosphatase activity * phytoplankton Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.928, year: 2014

  6. Transformation of amyloid-like fibers, formed from an elastin-based biopolymer, into a hydrogel: an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamia, R; Salvi, A M; D'Alessio, L; Castle, J E; Tamburro, A M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the propensity of elastin-based biopolymers to form amyloid-like fibers when dissolved in water. These are of interest when considered as "ancestral units" of elastin in which they represent the simplest sequences in the hydrophobic regions of the general type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu). We normally refer to these biopolymers based on elastin or related to elastin units as "elastin-like polypeptides". The requirement of water for the formation of amyloids seems quite interesting and deserves investigation, the water representing the natural transport medium in human cells. As a matter of fact, the "natural" supramolecular organization of elastin is in the form of beaded-string-like filaments and not in the form of amyloids whose "in vivo" deposition is associated with some important human diseases. Our work is directed, therefore, to understanding the mechanism by which such hydrophobic sequences form amyloids and any conditions by which they might regress to a non-amyloid filament. The elastin-like sequence here under investigation is the ValGlyGlyValGly pentapeptide that has been previously analyzed both in its monomer and polymer form. In particular, we have focused our investigation on the apparent stability of amyloids formed from poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), and we have observed these fibers evolving to a hydrogel after prolonged aging in water. We will show how atomic force microscopy can be combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to gain an insight into the spontaneous organization of an elastin-like polypeptide driven by interfacial interactions. The results are discussed also in light of fractal-like assembly and their implications from a biomedical point of view. PMID:17206798

  7. A preliminary study of the effectiveness of an otolaryngology-based multidisciplinary falls prevention clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvord, Lynn S; Benninger, Michael S; Stach, Brad A

    2008-09-01

    Because the cause of falls is often multifactorial, efforts to identify risk factors and promote prevention would benefit from a multidisciplinary approach in which the contributions of a broad range of body systems are considered. We describe the practices and procedures followed at the otolaryngology-based multidisciplinary Falls Prevention Clinic at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Our team is made up of an otolaryngologist, an audiologist, an internist, and a physical therapist. Our multidisciplinary approach involves evaluations of vestibular and balance function, cardiovascular function, and visual function; lower-extremity strength and sensation; cognition and mood; and medication use. We also assess a number of nonmedical risk factors. Evaluations are made over the course of two clinic visits. To assess the effectiveness of our approach, we conducted a preliminary study based on chart reviews and telephone interviews of 52 patients who had been referred to our clinic for evaluation and counseling. The basis of our study was a comparison of the number of falls that patients had experienced during the 6 months prior to their first visit to our clinic and the number of falls they experienced during the 6 months after their second visit. We found that among "true fallers" (i.e., those who had actually experienced a fall at some point during the study), 64.7% reported that they had experienced fewer falls after their clinic visits than before (p or=3 falls during the previous 6 mo) reported that they had not fallen at all during the 6 months following their last visit. Finally, our evaluations identified a substantial number of risk factors in individual patients that had been missed previously, including many nonvestibular factors that might not have been detected without a multidisciplinary approach. We conclude that the results of this preliminary study demonstrate the potential that a comprehensive falls prevention clinic can have in reducing the number of

  8. Design and Effectiveness of a Required Pre-Clinical Simulation-based Curriculum for Fundamental Clinical Skills and Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl P. Lofaso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than 20 years, medical literature has increasingly documented the need for students to learn, practice and demonstrate competence in basic clinical knowledge and skills. In 2001, the Louisiana State University Health Science Centers (LSUHSC School of Medicine – New Orleans replaced its traditional Introduction in to Clinical Medicine (ICM course with the Science and Practice of Medicine (SPM course. The main component within the SPM course is the Clinical Skills Lab (CSL. The CSL teaches 30 plus skills to all pre-clinical medical students (Years 1 and 2. Since 2002, an annual longitudinal evaluation questionnaire was distributed to all medical students targeting the skills taught in the CSL. Students were asked to rate their self- confidence (Dreyfus and Likert-type and estimate the number of times each clinical skill was performed (clinically/non-clinically. Of the 30 plus skills taught, 8 were selected for further evaluation. An analysis was performed on the eight skills selected to determine the effectiveness of the CSL. All students that participated in the CSL reported a significant improvement in self-confidence and in number performed in the clinically/non-clinically setting when compared to students that did not experience the CSL. For example, without CSL training, the percentage of students reported at the end of their second year self-perceived expertise as “novice” ranged from 21.4% (CPR to 84.7% (GU catheterization. Students who completed the two-years CSL, only 7.8% rated their self-perceived expertise at the end of the second year as “novice” and 18.8% for GU catheterization. The CSL design is not to replace real clinical patient experiences. It's to provide early exposure, medial knowledge, professionalism and opportunity to practice skills in a patient free environment.

  9. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proteomic based identification of clinical bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pathogenic bacteria often cause life threatening infections especially in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, rapid and reliable species identification is essential for a successful treatment and disease management. We evaluated a rapid, proteomic based technique for identification of clinical bacterial isolates by protein profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time - of - flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Methods: Freshly grown bacterial isolates were selected from culture plates. Ethanol/formic acid extraction procedure was carried out, followed by charging of MALDI target plate with the extract and overlaying with α-cyano-4 hydroxy-cinnamic acid matrix solution. Identification was performed using the MALDI BioTyper 1.1, software for microbial identification (Bruker Daltonik GmbH, Bremen, Germany. Results: A comparative analysis of 82 clinical bacterial isolates using MALDI -TOF MS and conventional techniques was carried out. Amongst the clinical isolates, the accuracy at the species level for clinical isolates was 98.78%. One out of 82 isolates was not in accordance with the conventional assays because MALDI-TOF MS established it as Streptococcus pneumoniae and conventional methods as Streptococcus viridans. Interpretation & conclusions: MALDI - TOF MS was found to be an accurate, rapid, cost-effective and robust system for identification of clinical bacterial isolates. This innovative approach holds promise for earlier therapeutic intervention leading to better patient care.

  10. Towards an evidence-based process for the clinical interpretation of copy number variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, ER; Church, DM; Hanson, K; Horner, VL; Kaminsky, EB; Kuhn, RM; Wain, KE; Williams, ES; Aradhya, S; Kearney, HM; Ledbetter, DH; South, ST; Thorland, EC; Martin, CL

    2016-01-01

    The evidence-based review (EBR) process has been widely used to develop standards for medical decision-making and to explore complex clinical questions. This approach can be applied to genetic tests, such as chromosomal microarrays, in order to assist in the clinical interpretation of certain copy number variants (CNVs), particularly those that are rare, and guide array design for optimal clinical utility. To address these issues, the International Standards for Cytogenomic Arrays Consortium has established an EBR Work Group charged with building a framework to systematically assess the potential clinical relevance of CNVs throughout the genome. This group has developed a rating system enumerating the evidence supporting or refuting dosage sensitivity for individual genes and regions that considers the following criteria: number of causative mutations reported; patterns of inheritance; consistency of phenotype; evidence from large-scale case-control studies; mutational mechanisms; data from public genome variation databases; and expert consensus opinion. The system is designed to be dynamic in nature, with regions being reevaluated periodically to incorporate emerging evidence. The evidence collected will be displayed within a publically available database, and can be used in part to inform clinical laboratory CNV interpretations as well as to guide array design. PMID:22097934

  11. Impacts of Clinic-based Informed Choice Program on Quality of Individualized Counseling Service in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-qing WU; Xi-kuan CHEN; Er-sheng GAO

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impacts of clinic-based informed choice program on quality of individualized service in family planning clinics in ChinaMethods During the program, family planning service staff in intervention clinics were trained on counseling skills and key points of individualized counseling service. Questionnaire surveys were conducted pre- and post-informed choice program to evaluate the impacts of the program.Results Informed choice program had significantly improved the quality of individualized counseling service. The multivariate regression analysis showed that clients of the clinic were more likely to give the better evaluation of the service, the OR of evaluation score of individualized service is 1.712 (95% CI is 1.146 to 2.564) in Experiment Group of post-program in contrast with pre-program. The program also could satisfy individual needs of clients and increase the satisfaction degree of the service.Conclusions Informed choice program is helpful for the improvement of the quality of individualized counseling service. It is necessary and imperative to improve the skills of counseling service provided in family planning clinics.

  12. Botulinum Toxin Clinic-Based Epidemiologic Survey of Adults with Primary Dystonia in East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Primary focal or segmental dystonia is a rare clinical condition. The clinical features of dystonia have not been evaluated in China. We performed a study to investigate the epidemiology of primary dystonia and its clinical variants in an adult population. Methods: A Botulinum Toxin Clinic-based study was conducted in the period 18 May through 8 October 2010 in East China. We identified 523 dystonia patients from the Movement disorders and Botulinum Toxin clinic Cases. Results: The most common focal dystonia were blepharospasm (59%, cervical dystonia (35%, limb dystonia (3%, oromandibular dystonia (2% and laryngeal dystonia (1%. Males with primary dystonia were noted to have earlier age of onset. A female predominance was noted for most of the primary dystonias with a male to female ratio (M : F ranging from 1 : 1.48 to 1 : 3. Conclusions: The epidemiological features of dystonia in East China we collected were similar to the report in Japan which contrasts partly with that reported in Europe.

  13. Video- or text-based e-learning when teaching clinical procedures? A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buch SV

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Steen Vigh Buch,1 Frederik Philip Treschow,2 Jesper Brink Svendsen,3 Bjarne Skjødt Worm4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark Background and aims: This study investigated the effectiveness of two different levels of e-learning when teaching clinical skills to medical students. Materials and methods: Sixty medical students were included and randomized into two comparable groups. The groups were given either a video- or text/picture-based e-learning module and subsequently underwent both theoretical and practical examination. A follow-up test was performed 1 month later. Results: The students in the video group performed better than the illustrated text-based group in the practical examination, both in the primary test (P<0.001 and in the follow-up test (P<0.01. Regarding theoretical knowledge, no differences were found between the groups on the primary test, though the video group performed better on the follow-up test (P=0.04. Conclusion: Video-based e-learning is superior to illustrated text-based e-learning when teaching certain practical clinical skills. Keywords: e-learning, video versus text, medicine, clinical skills

  14. Developments of mass spectrometry-based technologies for effective drug development linked with clinical proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Noboru; Bando, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Haruhiko; Marko-Varga, György; Nishimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    A strong demand in drug discovery and development today is to overcome "Big Gaps" encountered by differences in species and races, to accelerate effective developments in cost and time, and to meet medical needs. Moreover, drugs of various types have emerged which cover middle-size molecules and polymers rather than conventional small molecules. Upon those challenges, mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, which will be described in this paper, will play an increasingly important role, among which the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) platform will be powerful as rapid and molecule-based analysis more than ever. nanoPore Optical Interferometry (nPOI) newly introduced can detect even weak interactions in protein-protein and protein-compound, and can be connected directly to LC/MS/MS for identification of binding molecular species, which will be quite useful for affinity ranking and high-throughput interaction screening. Imaging MS provides the molecular information and spatial distribution of targeted molecules within a tissue specimen. MS-based clinical proteomics utilizing clinical specimens and empowered by advanced bioinformatics can attain both key protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with major protein players responsible for functional mechanisms of a disease subtype. An integration of those MS-based technologies will deliver a seamless platform of drug development from molecules identified in human clinical specimens. PMID:26782309

  15. Using the core curriculum on childhood trauma to strengthen clinical knowledge in evidence-based practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Christopher M; Strand, Virginia; Popescu, Marciana; Kaplow, Julie B; Abramovitz, Robert; Stuber, Margaret; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa; Ross, Leslie; Pynoos, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The high prevalence of trauma exposure in mental health service-seeking populations, combined with advances in evidence-based practice, competency-based training, common-elements research, and adult learning make this an opportune time to train the mental health workforce in trauma competencies. The Core Curriculum on Childhood Trauma (CCCT) utilizes a five-tiered conceptual framework (comprising Empirical Evidence, Core Trauma Concepts, Intervention Objectives, Practice Elements, and Skills), coupled with problem-based learning, to build foundational trauma knowledge and clinical reasoning skills. We present findings from three studies: Study 1 found that social work graduate students' participation in a CCCT course (N = 1,031) was linked to significant pre-post increases in self-reported confidence in applying core trauma concepts to their clinical work. Study 2 found significant pre-post increases in self-reported conceptual readiness (N = 576) and field readiness (N = 303) among social work graduate students participating in a "Gold Standard Plus" educational model that integrated classroom instruction in core trauma concepts, training in evidence-based trauma treatment (EBTT), and implementation of that EBTT in a supervised field placement. Students ranked the core concepts course as an equivalent or greater contributor to field readiness compared to standard EBTT training. Study 3 used qualitative methods to "distill" common elements (35 intervention objectives, 59 practice elements) from 26 manualized trauma interventions. The CCCT is a promising tool for educating "next-generation" evidence-based practitioners who possess competencies needed to implement modularized, individually tailored trauma interventions by strengthening clinical knowledge, clinical reasoning, and familiarity with common elements. PMID:24484506

  16. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is common and costly. Development of accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment has been identified as a research priority. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based means to apply the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with LBP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of LBP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 264 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 2.7%. Centralization signs were found in 41%, lumbar and sacroiliac segmental signs in 23% and 27%, respectively and radicular signs were found in 24%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were diagnosed in 10%. Dynamic instability was diagnosed in 63%, fear beliefs in 40%, central pain hypersensitivity in 5%, passive coping in 3% and depression in 3%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG.

  17. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Donald R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain (NP is a common cause of disability. Accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment have been elusive. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based guide in applying the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with NP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of NP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 95 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 1%. Centralization signs were found in 27%, segmental pain provocation signs were found in 69% and radicular signs were found in 19%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were found in 22%. Dynamic instability was found in 40%, oculomotor dysfunction in 11.6%, fear beliefs in 31.6%, central pain hypersensitivity in 4%, passive coping in 5% and depression in 2%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, oculomotor dysfunction, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability, validity and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG.

  18. Association rule mining based study for identification of clinical parameters akin to occurrence of brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dipankar; Sood, Meemansa; Vijayvargia, Poorvika; Hota, Sunil; Naik, Pradeep K

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare sector is generating a large amount of information corresponding to diagnosis, disease identification and treatment of an individual. Mining knowledge and providing scientific decision-making for the diagnosis & treatment of disease from the clinical dataset is therefore increasingly becoming necessary. Aim of this study was to assess the applicability of knowledge discovery in brain tumor data warehouse, applying data mining techniques for investigation of clinical parameters that can be associated with occurrence of brain tumor. In this study, a brain tumor warehouse was developed comprising of clinical data for 550 patients. Apriori association rule algorithm was applied to discover associative rules among the clinical parameters. The rules discovered in the study suggests - high values of Creatinine, Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), SGOT & SGPT to be directly associated with tumor occurrence for patients in the primary stage with atleast 85% confidence and more than 50% support. A normalized regression model is proposed based on these parameters along with Haemoglobin content, Alkaline Phosphatase and Serum Bilirubin for prediction of occurrence of STATE (brain tumor) as 0 (absent) or 1 (present). The results indicate that the methodology followed will be of good value for the diagnostic procedure of brain tumor, especially when large data volumes are involved and screening based on discovered parameters would allow clinicians to detect tumors at an early stage of development. PMID:23888095

  19. FORM: An Australian method for formulating and grading recommendations in evidence-based clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salisbury Janet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical practice guidelines are an important element of evidence-based practice. Considering an often complicated body of evidence can be problematic for guideline developers, who in the past may have resorted to using levels of evidence of individual studies as a quasi-indicator for the strength of a recommendation. This paper reports on the production and trial of a methodology and associated processes to assist Australian guideline developers in considering a body of evidence and grading the resulting guideline recommendations. Methods In recognition of the complexities of clinical guidelines and the multiple factors that influence choice in health care, a working group of experienced guideline consultants was formed under the auspices of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC to produce and pilot a framework to formulate and grade guideline recommendations. Consultation with national and international experts and extensive piloting informed the process. Results The FORM framework consists of five components (evidence base, consistency, clinical impact, generalisability and applicability which are used by guideline developers to structure their decisions on how to convey the strength of a recommendation through wording and grading via a considered judgement form. In parallel (but separate from the grading process guideline developers are asked to consider implementation implications for each recommendation. Conclusions The framework has now been widely adopted by Australian guideline developers who find it to be a logical and intuitive way to formulate and grade recommendations in clinical practice guidelines.

  20. Comparison of reflectance confocal microscopy and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy in fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J; Park, Jin Hyoung; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea by fungal pathogens. Diagnosis methods based on optical microscopy could be beneficial over the conventional microbiology method by allowing rapid and non-invasive examination. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and two-photon second harmonic generation microscopy (TPSHGM) have been applied to pre-clinical or clinical studies of fungal keratitis. In this report, RCM and TPSHGM were characterized and compared in the imaging of a fungal keratitis rabbit model ex vivo. Fungal infection was induced by using two strains of fungi: aspergillus fumigatus and candida albicans. The infected corneas were imaged in fresh condition by both modalities sequentially and their images were analyzed. Both RCM and TPSHGM could detect both fungal strains within the cornea based on morphology: aspergillus fumigatus had distinctive filamentous structures, and candida albicans had round structures superficially and elongated structures in the corneal stroma. These imaging results were confirmed by histology. Comparison between RCM and TPSHGM showed several characteristics. Although RCM and TPSHGM images had good correlation each other, their images were slightly different due to difference in contrast mechanism. RCM had relatively low image contrast with the infected turbid corneas due to high background signal. TPSHGM visualized cells and collagen in the cornea clearly compared to RCM, but used higher laser power to compensate low autofluorescence. Since these two modalities provide complementary information, combination of RCM and TPSHGM would be useful for fungal keratitis detection by compensating their weaknesses each other. PMID:26977371