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Sample records for based cardiac rehabilitation

  1. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2010-01-20

    The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.11 (95% CI -0.35 to 0.13), as well as in modifiable risk factors (systolic blood pressure; diastolic blood pressure; total cholesterol

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  3. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Sharp, Georgina A; Norton, Rebecca J; Dalal, Hasnain; Dean, Sarah G; Jolly, Kate; Cowie, Aynsley; Zawada, Anna; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-06-30

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death globally. Traditionally, centre-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. This is an update of a review previously published in 2009 and 2015. To compare the effect of home-based and supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, exercise-capacity, health-related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with heart disease. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane Review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid) and CINAHL (EBSCO) on 21 September 2016. We also searched two clinical trials registers as well as previous systematic reviews and reference lists of included studies. No language restrictions were applied. We included randomised controlled trials, including parallel group, cross-over or quasi-randomised designs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on pre-defined inclusion criteria. Disagreements were resolved through discussion or by involving a third review author. Two authors independently extracted outcome data and study characteristics and assessed risk of bias. Quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE principles and a Summary of findings table was created. We included six new studies (624 participants) for this update, which now includes a total of 23 trials that randomised a total of 2890 participants undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Participants had an acute myocardial

  4. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also do muscle-strengthening exercises, such as lifting weights or other resistance training exercises, two or three ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and healthy weight ... the most benefits from cardiac rehabilitation, make sure your exercise and ...

  5. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Doherty, Patrick; Gale, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS...

  6. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille Palm; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian; Taylor, Rod S; Svendsen, Jesper H; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria.OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, o...

  7. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Norten, RJ; Dean, SG

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for heart failure compared to either usual medical care (i.e. no CR) or centre-based CR on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, drop out, adherence rates, and costs. METHODS: Randomised...

  8. Dealing with existential anxiety in exercice-based cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Pedersen, Birthe D.; Dreyer, Pia

    2015-01-01

    is important because it requires specific care. Recognising this anxiety also highlights how participating in the programme can be very demanding, which can help us understand aspects of adherence problems. Of greatest importance is that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation enables patients to find a new...

  9. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T B; Zwisler, A D; Berg, S K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to a lack of evidence, patients undergoing heart valve surgery have been offered exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) since 2009 based on recommendations for patients with ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of CR...... expensive outpatient visits. Further studies should investigate the benefits of CR to heart valve surgery patients as part of a formal cost-utility analysis....

  10. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise...

  11. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane ...... and improvements in quality of life. These benefits appear to be consistent across patients and intervention types and were independent of study quality, setting, and publication date....

  12. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  13. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in twelve European countries results of the European cardiac rehabilitation registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzer, Werner; Rauch, Bernhard; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Results from EuroCaReD study should serve as a benchmark to improve guideline adherence and treatment quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Europe. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from 2.054 CR patients in 12 European countries were derived from 69 centres. 76% were male. Indication for CR...... were under medication according to current guidelines for the treatment of CV risk factors. A wide range of CR programme designs was found (duration 3 to 24weeks; total number of sessions 30 to 196). Patient programme adherence after admission was high (85%). With reservations that eCRF follow-up data...

  14. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S.; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille P.

    2017-01-01

    heterogeneity by visual inspection of the forest plots, and by using standard Chi2 and I2 statistics. We performed meta-analyses using fixed-effect and random-effects models; we used standardised mean differences where different scales were used for the same outcome. We assessed the risk of random errors...... moderate to very-low. Authors' conclusions: Due to few randomised patients and outcomes, we could not evaluate the real impact of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality or serious adverse events. The evidence showed no clinically relevant effect on health-related quality of life. Pooled data...... and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, PsycINFO Ovid, Web of Science Core Collection Thomson Reuters, CINAHL EBSCO, LILACS Bireme, and three clinical trial registers on 14 July 2016. We also checked the bibliographies of relevant...

  15. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  16. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Chung

    Full Text Available We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR with the target heart rate zone (THZ. The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  17. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Nguyen, Tricia T; Dall, Christian H; Burgess, Laura; Bridges, Charlene; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-04-04

    Heart transplantation is considered to be the gold standard treatment for selected patients with end-stage heart disease when medical therapy has been unable to halt progression of the underlying pathology. Evidence suggests that aerobic exercise training may be effective in reversing the pathophysiological consequences associated with cardiac denervation and prevent immunosuppression-induced adverse effects in heart transplant recipients. To determine the effectiveness and safety of exercise-based rehabilitation on the mortality, hospital admissions, adverse events, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, return to work and costs for people after heart transplantation. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Web of Science Core Collection (Thomson Reuters) to June 2016. We also searched two clinical trials registers and handsearched the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of parallel group, cross-over or cluster design, which compared exercise-based interventions with (i) no exercise control (ii) a different dose of exercise training (e.g. low- versus high-intensity exercise training); or (iii) an active intervention (i.e. education, psychological intervention). The study population comprised adults aged 18 years or over who had received a heart transplant. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on pre-specified inclusion criteria. Disagreements were resolved by consensus or by involving a third person. Two review authors extracted outcome data from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias. One review author extracted study characteristics from included studies and a second author checked them against the trial report for accuracy. We included 10 RCTs that involved a total of 300 participants whose mean age was 54.4 years. Women accounted

  18. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery:review

    OpenAIRE

    Sibilitz, Kirstine L; Berg, Selina K; Tang, Lars H; Risom, Signe S; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Kober, Lars; Hassager, Christian; Taylor, Rod S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit heart valve surgery patients. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for the use of exercise-based intervention programmes following heart valve surgery.OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation compared with no exercise training intervention, or treatment as usual, in adults following heart valve surgery. We considered programmes including exercise training with or witho...

  19. Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Hasnain M; Zawada, Anna; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Taylor, Rod S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of home based and supervised centre based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Design Systematic review. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, without language restriction, searched from 2001 to January 2008. Review methods Reference lists checke...

  20. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  1. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Johansen, Pernille P; Sibilitz, Kirstine L; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian; Taylor, Rod S; Svendsen, Jesper H; Berg, Selina K

    2017-02-09

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria. To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF. We searched the following electronic databases; CENTRAL and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, PsycINFO Ovid, Web of Science Core Collection Thomson Reuters, CINAHL EBSCO, LILACS Bireme, and three clinical trial registers on 14 July 2016. We also checked the bibliographies of relevant systematic reviews identified by the searches. We imposed no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCT) that investigated exercise-based interventions compared with any type of no-exercise control. We included trials that included adults aged 18 years or older with atrial fibrillation, or post-treatment for atrial fibrillation. Two authors independently extracted data. We assessed the risk of bias using the domains outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We assessed clinical and statistical heterogeneity by visual inspection of the forest plots, and by using standard Chi² and I² statistics. We performed meta-analyses using fixed-effect and random-effects models; we used standardised mean differences where different scales were used for the same outcome. We assessed the risk of random errors with trial sequential analysis (TSA) and used the GRADE methodology to rate the quality of evidence, reporting it in the 'Summary of findings' table. We included six RCTs with a total of 421 patients with various types of atrial fibrillation. All trials were

  2. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with stable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Linda; Anderson, Lindsey; Dewhirst, Alice M; He, Jingzhou; Bridges, Charlene; Gandhi, Manish; Taylor, Rod S

    2018-02-02

    A previous Cochrane review has shown that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can benefit myocardial infarction and post-revascularisation patients. However, the impact on stable angina remains unclear and guidance is inconsistent. Whilst recommended in the guidelines of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, in the UK the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) states that there is "no evidence to suggest that CR is clinically or cost-effective for managing stable angina". To assess the effects of exercise-based CR compared to usual care for adults with stable angina. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review 'Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary heart disease' by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, DARE, CINAHL and Web of Science on 2 October 2017. We searched two trials registers, and performed reference checking and forward-citation searching of all primary studies and review articles, to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a follow-up period of at least six months, which compared structured exercise-based CR with usual care for people with stable angina. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Two review authors also independently assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE principles and we presented this information in a 'Summary of findings' table. Seven studies (581 participants) met our inclusion criteria. Trials had an intervention length of 6 weeks to 12 months and follow-up length of 6 to 12 months. The comparison group in all trials was usual care (without any form of structured exercise training or advice) or a no-exercise comparator. The mean age of participants within the trials ranged from 50 to 66 years, the

  3. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in heart transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Dall, Christian H.; Nguyen, Tricia T.

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the effectiveness and safety of exercise-based rehabilitation on the mortality, hospital admissions, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and return to work of people a...... after heart transplantation.......This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the effectiveness and safety of exercise-based rehabilitation on the mortality, hospital admissions, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, and return to work of people...

  4. Information and communication technology-based cardiac rehabilitation homecare programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varnfield M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marlien Varnfield, Mohanraj KarunanithiAustralian eHealth Research Centre, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, AustraliaAbstract: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR has, for many years, been a highly recommended approach to secondary prevention for patients recovering after a heart attack or heart surgery. These programs are traditionally delivered from a hospital outpatient center. Despite demonstrated benefits and guideline recommendations, CR utilization has been poor, particularly in women, older patients, and ethnic minority groups. To overcome some of the barriers to the traditional delivery of CR, different delivery platforms and approaches have been developed in recent years. In general, Telehealth solutions which have been used to address the delivery of CR services remotely include: 1 patient–provider contact delivered by telephone systems; 2 the Internet, with the majority of patient–provider contact for risk factor management taking place online; and 3 interventions using Smartphones as tools to deliver CR through (independently or in combination with short message service messaging, journaling applications, connected measurement devices, and remote coaching. These solutions have been shown to overcome some of the barriers in CR participation and show potential as alternative or complementary options for individuals that find traditional center-based CR programs difficult to commit to. The major benefits of remote platforms for CR delivery are the ability to deliver these interventions without ongoing face-to-face contact, which provides an opportunity to reach large numbers of people, and the convenience of selecting the timing of cardiovascular disease management sessions. Furthermore, technologies have the potential to deliver long-term follow-up, which programs delivered by health professionals cannot afford to do due to staff shortages and budget restrictions

  5. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-05

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) compared with usual care on mortality, morbidity and HRQL in patients with CHD.To explore the potential study level predictors of the effectiveness of exercise-based CR in patients with CHD. We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review, by searching Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2014) from December 2009 to July 2014. We also searched MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Science Citation Index Expanded (December 2009 to July 2014). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise-based interventions with at least six months' follow-up, compared with a no exercise control. The study population comprised men and women of all ages who have had a myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or who have angina pectoris, or coronary artery disease. We included RCTs that reported at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, MI, revascularisations, hospitalisations, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or costs. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on the above inclusion and exclusion criteria. One author extracted data from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias; a second review author checked data. We stratified meta-analysis by the duration of follow up of trials, i.e. short-term: 6

  6. Effect of Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation on Ejection Fraction in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Haddadzadeh, Mohammad H.; Maiya, Arun G.; Padmakumar, R.; Shad, Bijan; Mirbolouk, Fardin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Exercise training as a part of cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patient with heart disease to health. However, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is clinically used as a predictor of long-term prognosis in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, there is a scarcity of data on the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on LVEF. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on LVEF in early post-event CAD patien...

  7. The remote exercise monitoring trial for exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (REMOTE-CR): a randomised controlled trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Maddison, Ralph; Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Rolleston, Anna; Whittaker, Robyn; Stewart, Ralph; Benatar, Jocelyne; Warren, Ian; Jiang, Yannan; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is an essential component of contemporary cardiac rehabilitation programs for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Despite the benefits associated with regular exercise, adherence with supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation remains low. Increasingly powerful mobile technologies, such as smartphones and wireless physiological sensors, may extend the capability of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation by enabling real-time exercise monitoring for tho...

  8. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVE THROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    into that the heart endures physical activity. In addition to serving as physical guidance, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation offers valuable mental support. The patients find help to overcome an initial anxiety and move forward towards a physically active life featuring a feeling of improved health and new......, and it seems to be crucial to further emphasise the individuals lived experiences when exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is followed. Hence this study aims to investigate how patients experience exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in a hospital setting. Methods. This study, which included nine men...... interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally...

  9. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVETHROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2015-01-01

    into that the heart endures physical activity. In addition to serving as physical guidance, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation offers valuable mental support. The patients find help to overcome an initial anxiety and move forward towards a physically active life featuring a feeling of improved health and new......, and it seems to be crucial to further emphasise the individuals lived experiences when exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is followed. Hence this study aims to investigate how patients experience exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in a hospital setting. Methods. This study, which included nine men...... interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally...

  10. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... for the situation at hand. Due to challenging circumstances, the cost assessment turned out to be ex-post and top-down. RESULTS: Cost per treatment sequence is estimated to be approximately euro 976, whereas the incremental cost (compared with usual care) is approximately euro 682. The cost estimate is uncertain...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  11. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil

    2016-01-01

    the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) compared...... follow-up of studies using univariate meta-regression. Results show that benefits in outcomes were independent of participants' CHD case mix (proportion of patients with MI), type of CR (exercise only vs comprehensive rehabilitation) dose of exercise, length of follow-up, trial publication date, setting...

  12. Service and business model for technology enabled and home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarela, Antti; Whittaker, Frank; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs are comprehensive life-style programs aimed at preventing recurrence of a cardiac event. However, the current programs have globally significantly low levels of uptake. Home-based model can be a viable alternative to hospital-based programs. We developed and analysed a service and business model for home based cardiac rehabilitation based on personal mentoring using mobile phones and web services. We analysed the different organizational and economical aspects of setting up and running the home based program and propose a potential business model for a sustainable and viable service. The model can be extended to management of other chronic conditions to enable transition from hospital and care centre based treatments to sustainable home-based care.

  13. ICF-based approach to evaluating functionality in cardiac rehabilitation patients after heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, V; Di Rienzo, M; Mazzini, P; Ripamonti, V; Gasti, G; Spezzaferri, R; Modica, M; Ferratini, M

    2015-08-01

    Heart surgery is a frequent reason for admission to in-patient cardiac rehabilitation programmes. ICF approach has never been used to evaluate cardiac patients after major heart surgery. The aim was to evaluate and measure functionality in cardiac patients who have undergone heart surgery, using for the first time the ICF-based approach and to assess whether such approach can be feasible and useful in cardiac rehabilitation. Observational study. In-patients cardiac Rehabilitation Unit in Milan. Fifty consecutively admitted patients who had undergone heart surgery (34 males, 16 females; mean age 65.7±12.5 years). We prepared a ICF-core set short enough to be feasible and practical. Patients were individually interviewed by different healthcare professionals (randomly selected from a group of two physicians, two physiotherapists and two psychologists) at the beginning (T1) and end of cardiac rehabilitation (T2) RESULTS: The sum of the scores of each ICF body function, body structure, activity and participation code significantly decreased between T1 and T2 (PICF body function scores and Barthel's index (ρ=0.381; P=0.006), NYHA class (ρ=0.404; P=0.004) and plasma Cr-P levels (r=0.31; P=0.03), between the ICF body structure codes and the Conley scale (ρ=0.306; P=0.02), and between the activity/participation codes and SpO2 (ρ=0.319; P=0.04). There were no correlations between the ICF environmental codes and clinical parameters. The ICF-based data provided functional information that was consistent with the patients' clinical course. The core set used allowed to quantify important body functions and activities, including some areas that are generally insufficiently considered by healthcare professionals during cardiac rehabilitation, and document their improvement.

  14. Effect of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on mobility and self-esteem of persons after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J Y; Tam, S F

    2000-08-01

    This study adopted an experimental design with using a nonequivalent, posttest only control group to study the rehabilitation outcomes of 152 persons who received cardiac surgery. 37 subjects in a rehabilitation group participated in a 2-mo. exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme, and another 115 subjects who did not attend the programme formed the control group. The subjects' self-esteem was measured on the Adult Source of Self-esteem Inventory by Elvoson and Fleming, and their mobility skill was measured by a simple mobility test based on New York Heart Association Classification. Analysis of covariance (with covariance analysis of the subjects' age, years of education, occupational skill, and mobility skill) indicated that the experimental group scored higher on positive self esteem and showed significantly better improvement in mobility skill. The exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme positively affected physical and psychological outcomes. Also, subjects' self-esteem was significantly correlated with their mobility skills (r=.21, p<.05) among those aged under 60 years (n=96) but not among those aged 60 or above (n=53).

  15. Patient and practitioner perspectives on reducing sedentary behavior at an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aviroop; Faulkner, Guy E; Oh, Paul I; Alter, David A

    2017-06-06

    To understand the awareness of sedentary behavior, as well as the perceived facilitators and barriers to reducing sedentary behaviors from the perspectives of patients undertaking an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program, and from staff involved in supporting patient self-management. A qualitative study was conducted at a large cardiac rehabilitation program in a metropolitan city in Canada. Guided by an ecological framework, semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with 15 patients, and in two focus groups with six staff. Transcribed interviews were analyzed by thematic analysis. Patients placed little importance on reducing sedentary behavior as they were unconvinced of the health benefits, did not perceive themselves to be sedentary, or associated such behaviors with enjoyment and relaxation. While staff were aware of the risks, they saw them as less critical than other health behaviors. Intrapersonal factors (physical and psychosocial health) and environment factors (the information environment, socio-cultural factors) within leisure time, the home, and work, influenced sedentary behavior. While these findings require further testing, future interventions may be effective if aimed at increasing awareness of the health benefits of reducing sedentary behavior, utilizing existing behavior change strategies, and using a participatory approach to tailor strategies to patients. Implications for rehabilitation Cardiac rehabilitation programs effectively use exercise promotion to improve the health of people with established cardiovascular disease. As sedentary lifestyles become more prevalent, recommendations to reduce the health risks of prolonged sedentary behavior that are specific to the characteristics and prognostic profiles of cardiac rehabilitation patients are needed. Cardiac rehabilitation programs must consider extending existing behavior change strategies utilized for exercise promotion towards addressing sedentary behaviors in order

  16. Home- and Hospital-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise: The Important Role of Physician Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Susan L; Dunn, L Maureen; Buursma, Madison P; Clark, Jacob A; Vander Berg, Lucas; DeVon, Holli A; Tintle, Nathan L

    2016-09-02

    Exercise reduces morbidity and mortality for patients with heart disease. Despite clear guidelines and known benefits, most cardiac patients do not meet current exercise recommendations. Physician endorsement positively affects patient participation in hospital-based Phase II cardiac rehabilitation programs, yet the importance of physician recommendation for home-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise is unknown. A prospective observational design was used to examine predictors of both home-based and Phase II rehabilitation exercise in a sample of 251 patients with coronary heart disease. Regression analyses were done to examine demographic and clinical characteristics, physical functioning, and patient's report of physician recommendation for exercise. Patients with a strong physician referral, who were married and older, were more likely to participate in Phase II exercise. Increased strength of physician recommendation was the unique predictor of home-based exercise. Further research is needed to examine how health professionals can motivate cardiac patients to exercise in home and outpatient settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is as effective as centre-based cardiac rehabilitation among elderly with coronary heart disease: results from a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oerkild, Bodil; Frederiksen, Marianne; Hansen, Jorgen Fischer

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: participation in centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is known to reduce morbidity and mortality but participation rates among the elderly are low. Establishing alternative programmes is important, and home-based CR is the predominant alternative. However, no studies have investig......BACKGROUND: participation in centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is known to reduce morbidity and mortality but participation rates among the elderly are low. Establishing alternative programmes is important, and home-based CR is the predominant alternative. However, no studies have...... participated. There were no significant differences in exercise capacity after the intervention between home and centre-based CR. Adjusted mean differences of peak VO2 = 0.9 ml/kg/min (95% CI -0.7, 2.4) and of 6 min walk test = -18.7 m (95% CI -56.4, 18.9). In addition, no differences were found...... in the secondary outcomes of systolic blood pressure (-0.6 mmHg, 95% CI -11.3, 10.0), LDL cholesterol (0.3 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.04, 0.7), HDL cholesterol (0.2 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.01, 0.3), body composition, proportion of smokers and health-related quality of life. A group of patients who did not have an effect...

  18. Behaviour change techniques in home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes offering secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) advise healthy lifestyle behaviours, with the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and social support recommended. More information is needed about BCT use in home-based CR to support these programmes in practice.AIM: To identify and describe the use of BCTs in home-based CR programmes.DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomised controlled trials o...

  19. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit heart valve surgery patients. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for the use of exercise-based intervention programmes following heart valve surgery. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise......-based cardiac rehabilitation compared with no exercise training intervention, or treatment as usual, in adults following heart valve surgery. We considered programmes including exercise training with or without another intervention (such as a psycho-educational component). SEARCH METHODS: We searched...... handsearched Web of Science, bibliographies of systematic reviews and trial registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Controlled-trials.com, and The World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised clinical trials that investigated exercise...

  20. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Anne Dorthe; Palm Johansen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The aim of this review is to assess the benefits and harms of rehabilitation programmes consisting of a physical exercise component that focuses on increasing exercise capacity, and may include...... a psychoeducational intervention that focuses on improving mental h ealth and the patient’s se lf management skills, compared with no intervention or treatment as usual in adults who currently have AF or have been treated for A F. Version 1...

  1. PATIENTS OVERCOME ANXIETY AND ARE ENCOURAGED TO BE PHYSICAL ACTIVETHROUGH EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    2015-01-01

    into that the heart endures physical activity. In addition to serving as physical guidance, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation offers valuable mental support. The patients find help to overcome an initial anxiety and move forward towards a physically active life featuring a feeling of improved health and new...... interviews were performed 1-2 months later. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was conducted, comprising three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis and comprehensive interpretation. Results. The preliminary findings are that although physically and especially mentally...... other to begin exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients overcome anxiety and dare to be physically active. Conclusions. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation provides a comfort-giving setting that offers peer support and a positive physical perception leading to confidence...

  2. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in cardiac resynchronization therapy recipients: A primer for practicing clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Sarzi Braga, Simona; Giada, Franco; Pedretti, Roberto F E

    2017-11-30

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a therapeutic option of increasing importance for chronic heart failure (CHF) and criteria for implantation now concern a large amount of patient populations. As a consequence, subjects with ongoing CRT (or immediately after CRT implantation) are more often referred to Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programmes, and it has been recently estimated that about one third of CHF patients attending CR in Italy currently have this kind of device. The presence of CRT represents a modulating factor for exercise prescription and monitoring, since CRT patients may be considered per se as a target group for CR. Exercise therapy (ET) increases benefits from CRT on functional capacity, and recent evidence suggests an adjuvant role of ET in improving cardiovascular prognosis also. Both aerobic endurance and resistance training activities may involve CHF patients with CRT, while the potential role of aerobic interval training needs more studies and evidence. Prescription of an ET program should be associated with information regarding device programming and possible limiting factors associated with pacing therapy, tailoring of the basic principles of ET (in terms of type of exercise, intensity and program duration) in this patient group is mandatory.

  3. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention.

  4. [Cardiac rehabilitation: current status and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahmann, H W

    2012-02-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to support heart patients using a multidisciplinary team in order to obtain the best possible physical and mental health and achieve long-term social reintegration. In addition to improving physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation restores self-confidence, thus better equipping patients to deal with mental illness and improving their social reintegration ("participation"). Once the causes of disease have been identified and treated as effectively as possible, drug and lifestyle changes form the focus of cardiac rehabilitation measures. In particular diseases, rehabilitation offers the opportunity for targeted educational courses for diabetics or drug dose escalation, as well as special training for heart failure patients. A nationwide network of outpatient heart groups is available for targeted follow-up. Cardiac patients predominantly rehabilitated in follow-up rehabilitation are older and have greater morbidity than in the past; moreover, they generally come out of acute clinical care earlier and are discharged from hospital more quickly. The proportion of severely ill and multimorbid patients presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in cardiac rehabilitation, although cardiac rehabilitation was not initially conceived for this patient group. The benefit of cardiac rehabilitation has been a well documented reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, hurdles remain, partly due to the patients themselves, partly due to the health insurers. Some insurance providers still refuse rehabilitation for non-ST-segment elevation infarction. In principle rehabilitation can be carried out in an inpatient or an outpatient setting. Specific allocation criteria have not yet been established, but the structure and process quality of outpatient rehabilitation should correspond to that of the inpatient setting. The choice between the two settings should be based on pragmatic criteria. Both settings should be possible for an individual

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  6. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutane...

  7. Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lars H.; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Christensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency...... and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed....

  8. Real-Time Monitoring in Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Using Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Medina Quero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rehabilitation is a key program which significantly reduces the mortality in at-risk patients with ischemic heart disease; however, there is a lack of accessibility to these programs in health centers. To resolve this issue, home-based programs for cardiac rehabilitation have arisen as a potential solution. In this work, we present an approach based on a new generation of wrist-worn devices which have improved the quality of heart rate sensors and applications. Real-time monitoring of rehabilitation sessions based on high-quality clinical guidelines is embedded in a wearable application. For this, a fuzzy temporal linguistic approach models the clinical protocol. An evaluation based on cases is developed by a cardiac rehabilitation team.

  9. The remote exercise monitoring trial for exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (REMOTE-CR): a randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, Ralph; Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Rolleston, Anna; Whittaker, Robyn; Stewart, Ralph; Benatar, Jocelyne; Warren, Ian; Jiang, Yannan; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-11-28

    Exercise is an essential component of contemporary cardiac rehabilitation programs for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Despite the benefits associated with regular exercise, adherence with supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation remains low. Increasingly powerful mobile technologies, such as smartphones and wireless physiological sensors, may extend the capability of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation by enabling real-time exercise monitoring for those with coronary heart disease. This study compares the effectiveness of technology-assisted, home-based, remote monitored exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (REMOTE) to standard supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in New Zealand adults with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease. A two-arm, parallel, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial will be conducted at two sites in New Zealand. One hundred and sixty two participants will be randomised at a 1:1 ratio to receive a 12-week program of technology-assisted, home-based, remote monitored exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (intervention), or an 8-12 program of standard supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (control).The primary outcome is post-treatment maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max). Secondary outcomes include cardiovascular risk factors (blood lipid and glucose concentrations, blood pressure, anthropometry), self-efficacy, intentions and motivation to be active, objectively measured physical activity, self-reported leisure time exercise and health-related quality of life. Cost information will also be collected to compare the two modes of delivery. All outcomes are assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 6 months, except for V̇O2max, blood lipid and glucose concentrations, which are assessed at baseline and post-treatment only. This novel study will compare the effectiveness of technology-supported exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation to a traditional supervised approach. If the REMOTE program

  10. Dealing with existential anxiety in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study of patients' lived experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Pedersen, Birthe D; Dreyer, Pia; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-09-01

    To investigate patients' lived experiences of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is used to enable patients with cardiac problems to move forward to lead satisfying lives. However, knowledge of patients' concerns while they follow the current programmes is sparse. This study, which included nine men and two women with unstable angina pectoris and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, used a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. The patients were followed by field observations during exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Focus group interviews were conducted at the programme end, and individual interviews were performed one to two months later. The interpretation comprised three methodological steps: naïve reading, structural analysis, and comprehensive interpretation and discussion. Although both physically and psychologically challenged, the patients were encouraged to maintain an active lifestyle. Three themes were identified: anxiety regarding exercise, whereby the patients are initially insecure about how to behave with their diseased hearts; encouragement from training together, whereby the patients support each other in exercising; and growing confidence in the heart, whereby the patients enjoy being physically active. In exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, patients' insecurity with respect to their heart disease is revealed as an existential anxiety. Through peer support and a positive physical perception, the patients gain renewed self-efficacy, helping them to continue their lives in an active and satisfying way. Knowing that patients are confronted with an existential anxiety during exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is important because it requires specific care. Recognising this anxiety also highlights how participating in the programme can be very demanding, which can help us understand aspects of adherence problems. Of greatest importance is that exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation enables

  11. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine L; Berg, Selina K; Tang, Lars H; Risom, Signe S; Gluud, Christian; Lindschou, Jane; Kober, Lars; Hassager, Christian; Taylor, Rod S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2016-03-21

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit heart valve surgery patients. We conducted a systematic review to assess the evidence for the use of exercise-based intervention programmes following heart valve surgery. To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation compared with no exercise training intervention, or treatment as usual, in adults following heart valve surgery. We considered programmes including exercise training with or without another intervention (such as a psycho-educational component). We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); MEDLINE (Ovid); EMBASE (Ovid); CINAHL (EBSCO); PsycINFO (Ovid); LILACS (Bireme); and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-S (CPCI-S) on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) on 23 March 2015. We handsearched Web of Science, bibliographies of systematic reviews and trial registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Controlled-trials.com, and The World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform). We included randomised clinical trials that investigated exercise-based interventions compared with no exercise intervention control. The trial participants comprised adults aged 18 years or older who had undergone heart valve surgery for heart valve disease (from any cause) and received either heart valve replacement, or heart valve repair. Two authors independently extracted data. We assessed the risk of systematic errors ('bias') by evaluation of bias risk domains. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity were assessed. Meta-analyses were undertaken using both fixed-effect and random-effects models. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. We sought to assess the risk of random errors with trial sequential analysis. We included two trials from 1987 and 2004 with a total 148 participants who have had heart valve surgery. Both trials had a high risk of bias.There was insufficient evidence

  12. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions.

  13. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients.

  14. Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM: a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN72884263

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Deirdre

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an out-patient setting. Patients We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity. In-depth interviews with non-attendees and non-adherers will ascertain patient views and the acceptability of the programmes and provide insights about non-attendance and aims to generate a theory of attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The economic analysis will measure National Health Service costs using resource inputs. Patient costs will be established from the qualitative research, in particular how they affect adherence. Discussion More data are needed on the role of home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients following myocardial infarction and revascularisation, which would be provided by the

  15. Availability of, referral to and participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As with ischaemic heart disease, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended for patients undergoing heart valve surgery; recommendations are based on limited evidence. The organization of CR programmes and factors associated with uptake among patients undergoing heart valve surgery have......, with patients in the capital region less likely to be referred (0.22 (0.08-0.57)). Patients with TAVI were less likely to participate (0.29 (0.12-0.70)). CONCLUSIONS: Despite high national programme coverage, only half the patients post heart valve surgery received CR. Both factors identified at provider......- and patient-level influenced uptake and included significant regional variation in referral pattern. Further research into the effect and organization of CR post heart valve surgery is needed....

  16. Development and feasibility of a smartphone, ECG and GPS based system for remotely monitoring exercise in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Worringham

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite its efficacy and cost-effectiveness, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is undertaken by less than one-third of clinically eligible cardiac patients in every country for which data is available. Reasons for non-participation include the unavailability of hospital-based rehabilitation programs, or excessive travel time and distance. For this reason, there have been calls for the development of more flexible alternatives. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a system to enable walking-based cardiac rehabilitation in which the patient's single-lead ECG, heart rate, GPS-based speed and location are transmitted by a programmed smartphone to a secure server for real-time monitoring by a qualified exercise scientist. The feasibility of this approach was evaluated in 134 remotely-monitored exercise assessment and exercise sessions in cardiac patients unable to undertake hospital-based rehabilitation. Completion rates, rates of technical problems, detection of ECG changes, pre- and post-intervention six minute walk test (6 MWT, cardiac depression and Quality of Life (QOL were key measures. The system was rated as easy and quick to use. It allowed participants to complete six weeks of exercise-based rehabilitation near their homes, worksites, or when travelling. The majority of sessions were completed without any technical problems, although periodic signal loss in areas of poor coverage was an occasional limitation. Several exercise and post-exercise ECG changes were detected. Participants showed improvements comparable to those reported for hospital-based programs, walking significantly further on the post-intervention 6 MWT, 637 m (95% CI: 565-726, than on the pre-test, 524 m (95% CI: 420-655, and reporting significantly reduced levels of cardiac depression and significantly improved physical health-related QOL. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The system provided a feasible and very flexible alternative form of

  17. Perceptions of cardiac rehabilitation patients, specialists and rehabilitation programs regarding cardiac rehabilitation wait times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sherry L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS Access to Care Working Group recommended a 30-day wait time benchmark for cardiac rehabilitation (CR. The objectives of the current study were to: (1 describe cardiac patient perceptions of actual and ideal CR wait times, (2 describe and compare cardiac specialist and CR program perceptions of wait times, as well as whether the recommendations are appropriate and feasible, and (3 investigate actual wait times and factors that CR programs perceive to affect these wait times. Methods Postal and online surveys to assess perceptions of CR wait times were administered to CR enrollees at intake into 1 of 8 programs, all CCS member cardiac specialists treating patients indicated for CR, and all CR programs listed in Canadian directories. Actual wait times were ascertained from the Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Registry. The design was cross-sectional. Responses were described and compared. Results Responses were received from 163 CR enrollees, 71 cardiac specialists (9.3% response rate, and 92 CR programs (61.7% response rate. Patients reported that their wait time from hospital discharge to CR initiation was 65.6 ± 88.4 days (median, 42 days, while their ideal median wait time was 28 days. Most patients (91.5% considered their wait to be acceptable, but ideal wait times varied significantly by the type of cardiac indication for CR. There were significant differences between specialist and program perceptions of the appropriate number of days to wait by most indications, with CR programs perceiving shorter waits as appropriate (p  Conclusions Wait times following access to cardiac rehabilitation are prolonged compared with consensus recommendations, and yet are generally acceptable to most patients. Wait times following percutaneous coronary intervention in particular may need to be shortened. Future research is required to provide an evidence base for wait time

  18. Evaluation of exercise tolerance patients in cardiac rehabilitation D model based on 6 Minute Walk Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielawa Lukasz.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the results of 6-minute walk test depending on gender, age, left ventricular ejection fraction, the primary disease and BMI. Patients underwent assessment of Cardiac Rehabilitation Department in Szymbark in 2012 (80 people. Duration of rehabilitation for all patients was 21 days. The test was performed at the beginning and end of the cycle. Following the 3-week cardiac rehabilitation in the model D in a group of 80 patients with a mean age of 72 years achieved a statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity, expressed in the increase in test 6MWT distance by an average of 52 meters. In the study, men received final results statistically superior to women. The largest increase in the distance gained to patients after aortic valve prosthesis. People who are obese with a body mass index BMI over 30 have an average trip distance underperform both at baseline, final, and in the resulting increase of the distance than those with a BMI under 30. Prevention of obesity, one of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be the goal of training during cardiac rehabilitation patient education.

  19. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwisler AD

    2016-10-01

    The Regional Research Unit, Region Zealand, Roskilde, 19Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Research Unit, Regional Hospital Herning, Herning, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD.Study population: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward.Main variables: Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year.Descriptive data: Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations.Conclusion: The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients. Keywords: secondary prevention, coronary heart disease, cardiovascular prevention, clinical quality registry

  20. Telehealth exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstorn, Jonathan C; Gant, Nicholas; Direito, Artur; Beckmann, Christina; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Despite proven effectiveness, participation in traditional supervised exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exCR) remains low. Telehealth interventions that use information and communication technologies to enable remote exCR programme delivery can overcome common access barriers while preserving clinical supervision and individualised exercise prescription. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the benefits of telehealth exCR on exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors compared with traditional exCR and usual care, among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed and PsycINFO were searched from inception through 31 May 2015 for randomised controlled trials comparing telehealth exCR with centre-based exCR or usual care among patients with CHD. Outcomes included maximal aerobic exercise capacity, modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and exercise adherence. 11 trials (n=1189) met eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Physical activity level was higher following telehealth exCR than after usual care. Compared with centre-based exCR, telehealth exCR was more effective for enhancing physical activity level, exercise adherence, diastolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Telehealth and centre-based exCR were comparably effective for improving maximal aerobic exercise capacity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Telehealth exCR appears to be at least as effective as centre-based exCR for improving modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and functional capacity, and could enhance exCR utilisation by providing additional options for patients who cannot attend centre-based exCR. Telehealth exCR must now capitalise on technological advances to provide more comprehensive, responsive and interactive interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Yoga based cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery: One-year results on LVEF, lipid profile and psychological states – A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarathna Raghuram

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Addition of yoga based relaxation to conventional post-CABG cardiac rehabilitation helps in better management of risk factors in those with abnormal baseline values and may help in preventing recurrence.

  2. Effect of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on ejection fraction in coronary artery disease patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadzadeh, Mohammad H; Maiya, Arun G; Padmakumar, R; Shad, Bijan; Mirbolouk, Fardin

    2011-04-01

    Exercise training as a part of cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patient with heart disease to health. However, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is clinically used as a predictor of long-term prognosis in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, there is a scarcity of data on the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on LVEF. To investigate the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation on LVEF in early post-event CAD patients. In a single blinded, randomized controlled trial, post-coronary event CAD patients from the age group of 35-75 years, surgically (Coronary artery bypass graft or percutaneous coronary angioplasty) or conservatively treated, were recruited from Golsar Hospital, Iran. Exclusion criteria were high-risk group (AACVPR-99) patients and contraindications to exercise testing and training. Forty-two patients were randomized either into Study or Control. The study group underwent a 12-week structured individually tailored exercise program either in the form of Center-based (CExs) or Home-based (HExs) according to the ACSM-2005 guidelines. The control group only received the usual cardiac care without any exercise training. LVEF was measured before and after 12 weeks of exercise training for all three groups. Differences between and within groups were analyzed using the general linear model, two-way repeated measures at alfa=0.05. Mean age of the subjects was 60.5 ± 8.9 years. There was a significant increase in LVEF in the study (46.9 ± 5.9 to 61.5 ± 5.3) group compared with the control (47.9 ± 7.0 to 47.6 ± 6.9) group (P=0.001). There was no significant difference in changes in LVEF between the HExs and CExs groups (P=1.0). A 12-week early (within 1 month post-discharge) structured individually tailored exercise training could significantly improve LVEF in post-event CAD patients.

  3. Examining motivations and barriers for attending maintenance community-based cardiac rehabilitation using the health-belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, Hayley; Williams, Michael J A; Mandic, Sandra

    2015-10-01

    Reasons for low attendance at maintenance cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs remain largely unknown. Using the Health Belief Model as a theoretical framework, this study compared the motivations and barriers for attending a community-based CR maintenance program in high attenders (HA), low attenders (LA) and non-attenders (NA) with coronary artery disease (CAD). Forty-four older adults with CAD (70.5% males; age: 72.7±6.9 years; 11 HA, 16 LA and 17 NA) completed questionnaires examining reasons for attending CR: perceived threat (symptoms of CAD; the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire), perceived benefits (Multi-dimensional Outcomes Expectations for Exercise Scale), perceived barriers (Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale) and cues to action questionnaire. Sociodemographic characteristics and perceived threat were not different between the groups. Compared to LA and NA, HA perceived greater social and physical (vs NA only) benefits of participation in maintenance CR and had fewer barriers to attending (all phealth concerns and others having heart problems were stronger cues to action for HA versus NA (all p<0.05). Participants perceived greater benefits from attending CR, had fewer barriers and perceived stronger cues to action compared to non-attenders. Promoting CR maintenance programs should emphasise physical and social benefits and provide encouragement. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    OpenAIRE

    Dolansky, Mary A.; Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity wal...

  5. Barriers to Outpatient Hospital-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation in Korean Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyo Won; Baek, Sora; Jee, Sungju; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Myung Woo; Kim, Won-Seok

    2018-02-01

    To investigate factors associated with enrollment and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Korea. Patients admitted to four university hospitals with acute coronary syndrome between June 2014 and May 2016 were enrolled. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS) made of 21-item questionnaire and divided in four subdomains was administered during admission. CRBS items used a 5-point Likert scale and ≥2.5 was considered as a barrier. Differences between CR non-attender and CR attender, or CR non-enroller and CR enroller in subscale and each items of CRBS were examined using the chi-square test. The CR participation rate in four hospitals was 31% (170 of the 552). Logistical factors (odds ratio [OR]=7.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.62-12.55) and comorbidities/functional status (OR=6.60; 95% CI, 3.95-11.01) were identified as a barrier to CR enrollment in the subdomain analysis. Among patients who were enrolled (agreed to participate in CR during admission), only work/time conflict was a significant barrier to CR participation (OR=2.17; 95% CI, 1.29-3.66). Diverse barriers to CR participation were identified in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Providing the tailored model for CR according to the individual patient's barrier could improve the CR utilization. Further multicenter study with large sample size including other CR indication is required.

  6. Home-based aerobic interval training improves peak oxygen uptake equal to residential cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Moholdt

    Full Text Available Aerobic capacity, measured as the peak oxygen uptake, is a strong predictor of survival in cardiac patients. Aerobic interval training (AIT, walking/running four times four minutes at 85-95% of peak heart rate, has proven to be effective in increasing peak oxygen uptake in coronary heart disease patients. As some patients do not attend organized rehabilitation programs, home-based exercise should be an alternative. We investigated whether AIT could be performed effectively at home, and compared the effects on peak oxygen uptake with that observed after a standard care, four-week residential rehabilitation. Thirty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized to residential rehabilitation or home-based AIT. At six months follow-up, peak oxygen uptake increased 4.6 (±2.7 and 3.9 (±3.6 mL·kg(-1 min(-1 (both p<0.005, non-significant between-group difference after residential rehabilitation and AIT, respectively. Quality of life increased significantly in both groups, with no statistical significant difference between groups. We found no evidence for a different treatment effect between patients randomized to home-based AIT compared to patients attending organized rehabilitation (95% confidence interval -1.8, 3.5. AIT patients reported good adherence to exercise training. Even though these first data indicate positive effects of home-based AIT in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, more studies are needed to provide supporting evidence for the application of this rehabilitation strategy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00363922.

  7. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  8. Patients' preference for exercise setting and its influence on the health benefits gained from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lars H; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Christensen, Jan; Lawaetz, Jannik; Doherty, Patrick; Taylor, Rod S; Langberg, Henning; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-04-01

    To assess patient preference for exercise setting and examine if choice of setting influences the long-term health benefit of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation. Patients participating in a randomised controlled trial following either heart valve surgery, or radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation were given the choice to perform a 12-week exercise programme in either a supervised centre-based, or a self-management home-based setting. Exercise capacity and physical and mental health outcomes were assessed for up to 24months after hospital discharge. Outcomes between settings were compared using a time×setting interaction using a mixed effects regression model. Across the 158 included patients, an equivalent proportion preferred to undertake exercise rehabilitation in a centre-based setting (55%, 95% CI: 45% to 63%) compared to a home-based setting (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 53%, p=0.233). At baseline, those who preferred a home-based setting reported better physical health (mean difference in physical component score: 5.0, 95% CI 2.3 to 7.4; p=0.001) and higher exercise capacity (mean between group difference 15.9watts, 95% CI 3.7 to 28.1; p=0.011). With the exception of the depression score in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (F(3.65), p=0.004), there was no evidence of a significant difference in outcomes between settings. The preference of patients to participate in home-based and centre-based exercise programmes appears to be equivalent and provides similar health benefits. Whilst these findings support that patients should be given the choice between exercise-settings when initiating cardiac rehabilitation, further confirmatory evidence is needed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Mid-1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, John D.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes a state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program consisting of training and supervision in exercise, nutrition, and stress management. Inpatient, postdischarge, and late postdischarge regimens are presented. (MT)

  10. Goal conflict and goal facilitation in community-based cardiac rehabilitation: a theory-based interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presseau, Justin; Boyd, Emily; Francis, Jill J; Sniehotta, Falko F

    2015-01-01

    Theories often consider behaviors in isolation of conflicting and facilitating personal goals. We conducted interviews with 13 people in cardiac rehabilitation, investigating whether eliciting physical activity (PA) control beliefs sufficiently captures goal conflict and goal facilitation. We assessed PA, intention, and control beliefs using standard elicitation methods and then assessed goal conflict and goal facilitation. Twelve participants described conflicting, and all described facilitating, personal goals. Most goal facilitation (94%) and conflict (82%) beliefs were identified beyond the control belief elicitation. Goal facilitation and conflict are not captured in a standard control belief elicitation and may supplement single-behavior models to understand PA.

  11. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases daily physical activity of patients following myocardial infarction: subanalysis of two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, N L; Silva, G; Campos, L; Miranda, F; Teixeira, M; Alves, A J; Oliveira, J

    2017-03-01

    To assess the effects of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme on daily physical activity levels of patients following myocardial infarction. Subanalysis of two randomised, prospective controlled trials. Outpatient clinic of a secondary hospital. Fifty consecutive patients randomised to the exercise group {n=25; 23 males; mean age 54 [standard deviation (SD) 9] years} or the control group [n=25; 20 males; mean age 58 (SD 9) years]. The exercise group participated in an 8-week aerobic exercise programme plus usual medical care and follow-up. The control group received usual medical care and follow-up. The primary outcome measure was change in time spent undertaking moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day, assessed by accelerometer over 7 consecutive days. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, body mass, and resting blood pressure and heart rate. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels increased significantly in the exercise group [43.2 (SD 36.3) to 53.5 (SD 31.9) minutes/day, P=0.030], and remained unchanged in the control group [40.8 (SD 26.2) to 36.8 (SD 26.5) minutes/day, P=0.241] from baseline to the end of the programme. Cardiorespiratory fitness increased significantly in the exercise group (mean difference 2.8; 95% of the difference 1.3 to 4.4ml/kg/minute, P=0.001) after the 8-week programme. In patients under optimal medication following myocardial infarction, participation in an 8-week exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme was found to improve physical activity levels consistent with health-related benefits. Future studies are needed to determine whether the increase in physical activity is maintained in the long term. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of a web-based audit and feedback intervention with outreach visits on the clinical performance of multidisciplinary teams: a cluster-randomized trial in cardiac rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gude, Wouter T.; van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M.; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Kemps, Hareld M. C.; Jaspers, Monique W. M.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Peek, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a web-based audit and feedback (A&F) intervention with outreach visits to support decision-making by multidisciplinary teams. We performed a multicentre cluster-randomized trial within the field of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in

  13. The Effect of Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation on Functional Capacity, Behavior, and Risk Factors in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjing Ding

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the effect of home-based cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity, health behavior, and risk factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome in China. Methods: Eighty patients with acute coronary syndrome were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled study. Patients in the cardiac rehabilitation group (n=52 received home-based cardiac rehabilitation with a heart manual and a home exercise video for 3 months and patients in the control group (n=28 received only routine secondary prevention. The 6-min walk distance, laboratory test results, healthy behavior (questionnaire, quality of life (12-item Short Form Health Survey, anxiety (7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire, and depression (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire were evaluated at the beginning and after treatment for 3 months. Results: Compared with baseline data, 52 patients who participated in cardiac rehabilitation had longer 6-min walk distance (515.26±113.74 m vs 0.445.30±97.92 m, P<0.0002, higher proportions of “always exercise” (78.26% vs. 28%, P<0.05, “always limit food with sugar” (65.22% vs 12%, P<0.05, “always eat fruits 200–400 g every day” (82.61% vs. 4%, P<0.05. and “always eat vegetables 300–500 g every day” (21.74% vs. 12%, P<0.06 after treatment for 3 months. The low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control rate (52.17% vs. 28%, P<0.05 and the systolic blood pressure control rate (100% vs. 68%, P<0.05 were also significantly increased after treatment for 3 months in the cardiac rehabilitation group. No significant increase was found in the control group after treatment for 3 months. No cardiac-event related to home exercise was reported in both groups. Conclusion: Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is a feasible and available cardiac rehabilitation mode in China.

  14. Beneficial effects of home-based cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic profiles in coronary heart-disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Ting Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with increased risk of CHD. Cardiac rehabilitation is considered an effective intervention and a Class I indication in patients with CHD. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of home-based, integrated cardiac rehabilitation (HBICR of patients with CHD in modifiable risk-factor control and exercise capacity. Sixty-four patients with CHD were investigated and randomized into intervention and control groups. The intervention group received a HBICR containing medication use, exercise program, smoking-cessation counseling, and education regarding risk factors, nutrition, and the necessity of continuing the program, whereas the control group received traditional care. Baseline and follow-up assessments at 3 months and 12 months, including body composition, metabolic syndrome risk score, and biochemical tests were performed in all patients. Additionally, cardiopulmonary function tests were also performed at baseline and 3-month follow-up assessments. There was a significant between-group, within-group, and interaction effect found in the MetS Z scores. Significant within-group effects were also observed in modified Adult Treatment Panel III score, waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein. However, several cardiopulmonary parameters did not differ significantly at 3-month follow-up between the two groups, including peak V̇O2, peak heart rate, peak respiratory exchange ratio, anaerobic threshold V̇O2, heart-rate reserve, and heart-rate recovery after 1 min and after 2 min. Our results showed that HBICR exhibited significant positive effects on modifiable risk-factor control in CHD patients.

  15. Beneficial effects of home-based cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic profiles in coronary heart-disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Ting; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Chen, Chun-Kai

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of CHD. Cardiac rehabilitation is considered an effective intervention and a Class I indication in patients with CHD. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of home-based, integrated cardiac rehabilitation (HBICR) of patients with CHD in modifiable risk-factor control and exercise capacity. Sixty-four patients with CHD were investigated and randomized into intervention and control groups. The intervention group received a HBICR containing medication use, exercise program, smoking-cessation counseling, and education regarding risk factors, nutrition, and the necessity of continuing the program, whereas the control group received traditional care. Baseline and follow-up assessments at 3 months and 12 months, including body composition, metabolic syndrome risk score, and biochemical tests were performed in all patients. Additionally, cardiopulmonary function tests were also performed at baseline and 3-month follow-up assessments. There was a significant between-group, within-group, and interaction effect found in the MetS Z scores. Significant within-group effects were also observed in modified Adult Treatment Panel III score, waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein. However, several cardiopulmonary parameters did not differ significantly at 3-month follow-up between the two groups, including peak V̇O2, peak heart rate, peak respiratory exchange ratio, anaerobic threshold V̇O2, heart-rate reserve, and heart-rate recovery after 1 min and after 2 min. Our results showed that HBICR exhibited significant positive effects on modifiable risk-factor control in CHD patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  17. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Norton, Rebecca J; Dean, Sarah G; Dalal, Hayes; Tang, Lars H; Wingham, Jenny; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-10-15

    To assess the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for heart failure compared to either usual medical care (i.e. no CR) or centre-based CR on mortality, morbidity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, drop out, adherence rates, and costs. Randomised controlled trials were initially identified from previous systematic reviews of CR. We undertook updated literature searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library to December 2015. A total of 19 trials with median follow up of 3months were included - 17 comparisons of home-based CR to usual care (995 patients) and four comparing home and centre-based CR (295 patients). Compared to usual care, home-based CR improved VO2max (mean difference: 1.6ml/kg/min, 0.8 to 2.4) and total Minnesota Living with Quality of Life score (-3.3, -7.5 to 1.0), with no difference in mortality, hospitalisation or study drop out. Outcomes and costs were similar between home-based and centre-based CR with the exception of higher levels of trial completion in the home-based group (relative risk: 1.2, 1.0 to 1.3). Home-based CR results in short-term improvements in exercise capacity and health-related quality of life of heart failure patients compared to usual care. The magnitude of outcome improvement is similar to centre-based CR. Home-based CR appears to be safe with no evidence of increased risk of hospitalisation or death. These findings support the provision of home-based CR for heart failure as an evidence-based alternative to the traditional centre-based model of provision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in patients with cardiovascular disease entering exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernando M F; Almodhy, Meshal; Pepera, Garyfalia; Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios M; Sandercock, Gavin R H

    2017-01-01

    The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is used to assess functional capacity of patients entering cardiac rehabilitation. Factors such as age and sex account for a proportion of the variance in test performance in healthy individuals but there are no reference values for patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to produce reference values for the ISWT. Participants were n = 548 patients referred to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation who underwent a clinical examination and performed the ISWT. We used regression to identify predictors of performance and produced centile values using the generalised additive model for location, scale and shape model. Men walked significantly further than women (395 ± 165 vs. 269 ± 118 m; t = 9.5, P < 0.001) so data were analysed separately by sex. Age (years) was the strongest predictor of performance in men (β = -5.9; 95% CI: -7.1 to -4.6 m) and women (β = -4.8; 95% CI: -6.3 to 3.3). Centile curves demonstrated a broadly linear decrease in expected ISWT values in males (25-85 years) and a more curvilinear trend in females. Patients entering cardiac rehabilitation present with highly heterogeneous ISWT values. Much of the variance in performance can be explained by patients' age and sex. Comparing absolute values with age-and sex-specific reference values may aid interpretation of ISWT performance during initial patient assessment at entry to cardiac rehabilitation.

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  20. Legal Aspects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, William; Herbert, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A medical model is used to examine liability issues related to cardiac rehabilitation programs. Obtaining effective informed consent from patients, standardizing policies and procedures, and exercise prescription and monitoring are among the proposed elements of a risk management model for developing safe and legally defensible programs. (IAH)

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation in Europe: results from the European Cardiac Rehabilitation Inventory Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; McGee, Hannah; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes support patients to achieve professionally recommended cardiovascular prevention targets and thus good clinical status and improved quality of life and prognosis. Information on CR service delivery in Europe is sketchy.......Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes support patients to achieve professionally recommended cardiovascular prevention targets and thus good clinical status and improved quality of life and prognosis. Information on CR service delivery in Europe is sketchy....

  2. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. Objective We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. Methods An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. Results The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients’ exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. Conclusions The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial. PMID:27342791

  3. The Johannesburg cardiac rehabilitation programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-16

    Feb 16, 1991 ... rehabilitation programme for sufferers from coronary artery disease, beginning 8 ... artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) or percutaneous trans- ..... rD. 0. "ll' co lower social classes having a poorer prognosis.23. Z. The most common medical condition for which patients. 0. ~. 0 were referred was MI. A large ...

  4. Kinesiophobia mediates the influences on attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Maria; Cider, Åsa; Herlitz, Johan; Lundberg, Mari; Jansson, Bengt

    2016-11-01

    To identify predictors of attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and to test the hypothesis that kinesiophobia mediates the influence on attendance at CR in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In total, 332 patients (75 women; mean age 65 ± 9.1 years) with a diagnosis of CAD were recruited at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were tested in terms of objective measurements, self-rated psychological measurements, and level of physical activity. A path model with direct and indirect effects via kinesiophobia was used to predict participation in CR. An exploratory selection of significant predictors was made. A current incidence of coronary bypass grafting (p < 0.001) and a diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (p = 0.004) increased the probability of attendance at CR, while kinesiophobia (p = 0.001) reduced attendance. As a mediator, kinesiophobia was influenced by four predictors and the following indirect effects were found. General health and muscle endurance increased the probability of attendance at CR, while self-rated anxiety and current incidence of heart failure had the opposite effect. This study suggests that kinesiophobia has an influence on and a mediating role in attendance at CR. The results need to be further investigated in relation to clinical practice.

  5. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.49 Cardiac rehabilitation program... and self-reported measures of exertion and behavior. Physician means a doctor of medicine or... basic life support or advanced cardiac life support. (3) Be licensed to practice medicine in the State...

  6. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation reduces cardiac events over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In people with coronary artery disease, does an expanded cardiac rehabilitation program reduce cardiac deaths, myocardial infarctions, and hospital admissions due to cardiovascular disease? Randomised, controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. A University hospital in Sweden. People aged less than 75 years who had had a recent myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafts were eligible to participate. Severe co-morbidities were exclusion criteria. Randomisation of 224 participants allocated 111 to undergo expanded cardiac rehabilitation and 113 to a control group. Both groups received standard cardiac rehabilitation, including physical training, education, group and individual counselling, and support to cease smoking. All participants received appropriate preventive medications. In addition, the intervention group received 20 group sessions of stress management, 3 sessions of cooking and diet counselling by a dietician, and a 5-day stay at a 'patient hotel' with several activities including physical training and information. Although other outcomes were reported at the conclusion of 1-year follow-up, the outcomes at the 5-year follow-up were rates of cardiac events: cardiovascular death, acute myocardial infarction, and readmission to a hospital due to other cardiovascular causes. All participants were followed up via national registers of health and mortality. During the 5-year follow-up, 53 (48%) participants in the expanded cardiac rehabilitation group and 68 (60%) participants in the control group had a cardiac event (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99). This difference was mainly due to only 12 (11%) participants having non-fatal myocardial infarctions in the treatment group versus 23 (20%) in the control group (hazard ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.97). The number of hospitalisations and the number of days of hospitalisation were both significantly fewer in the treatment group than in the control group. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation

  7. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after Heart valve surgery (protocol)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lærum Sibilitz, Kristine; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2013-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based intervention programmes (exercise-based interventions alone or in combination with psycho-educational components), compared to no intervention, or treatment...

  8. An Internet- and mobile-based tailored intervention to enhance maintenance of physical activity after cardiac rehabilitation: short-term results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, Konstantinos; Wangberg, Silje C

    2014-03-11

    An increase in physical activity for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation has multiple therapeutic benefits, including decreased mortality. Internet- and mobile-based interventions for physical activity have shown promising results in helping users increase or maintain their level of physical activity in general and specifically in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cardiac rehabilitation. One component related to the efficacy of these interventions is tailoring of the content to the individual. Our trial assessed the effect of a longitudinally tailored Internet- and mobile-based intervention for physical activity as an extension of a face-to-face cardiac rehabilitation stay. We hypothesized that users of the tailored intervention would maintain their physical activity level better than users of the nontailored version. The study population included adult participants of a cardiac rehabilitation program in Norway with home Internet access and a mobile phone. The participants were randomized in monthly clusters to a tailored or nontailored (control) intervention group. All participants had access to a website with information regarding cardiac rehabilitation, an online discussion forum, and an online activity calendar. Those using the tailored intervention received tailored content based on models of health behavior via the website and mobile fully automated text messages. The main outcome was self-reported level of physical activity, which was obtained using an online international physical activity questionnaire at baseline, at discharge, and at 1 month and 3 months after discharge from the cardiac rehabilitation program. Included in the study were 69 participants. One month after discharge, the tailored intervention group (n=10) had a higher median level of overall physical activity (median 2737.5, IQR 4200.2) than the control group (n=14, median 1650.0, IQR 2443.5), but the difference was not significant

  9. Hospital-based comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care among patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease: 12-month results of a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Rasmussen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), although evidence for this is still limited. We investigated the 12-month effect of hospital-based CCR versus usual care (UC) for a broadly defined group of cardiac patients within the modern therapeutic ...

  10. Social inequality in phase II cardiac rehabilitation attendance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria; Egerod, Ingrid; Overgaard, Dorthe

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac rehabilitation participation is an essential component of the contemporary management of coronary heart disease. However, patients with low socioeconomic position are less likely to attend the rehabilitation programme. Aim: We aimed to explore the effect of potential mediators...

  11. Combining users' needs with health behavior models in designing an internet- and mobile-based intervention for physical activity in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, Konstantinos; Wangberg, Silje C

    2014-01-10

    Internet-based physical activity interventions have great potential in supporting patients in cardiac rehabilitation. Health behavior change theories and user input are identified as important contributors in the effectiveness of the interventions, but they are rarely combined in a systematic way in the design of the interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the appropriate theoretical framework, along with the needs of the users of a physical activity intervention for cardiac rehabilitation, and to combine them into an effective Internet- and mobile-based intervention. We explain the theoretical framework of the intervention in a narrative overview of the existing health behavior change literature as it applies to physical activity. We also conducted a focus group with 11 participants of a cardiac rehabilitation program and used thematic analysis to identify and analyze patterns of meaning in the transcribed data. We chose stage-based approaches, specifically the transtheoretical model and the health action process approach as our main framework for tailoring, supplemented with other theoretical concepts such as regulatory focus within the appropriate stages. From the thematic analysis of the focus group data, we identified seven themes: (1) social, (2) motivation, (3) integration into everyday life, (4) information, (5) planning, (6) monitoring and feedback, and (7) concerns and potential problems. The final design of the intervention was based on both the theoretical review and the user input, and it is explained in detail. We applied a combination of health behavioral theory and user input in designing our intervention. We think this is a promising design approach with the potential to combine the high efficacy of theory-based interventions with the higher perceived usefulness of interventions designed according to user input. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01223170; http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01223170 (Archived by WebCite at http

  12. Learning and coping strategies versus standard education in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayyari Dehbarez, Nasrin; Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Learning and coping education strategies (LC) was implemented to enhance patient attendance in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. This study assessed the cost-utility of LC compared to standard education (standard) as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with ischemic heart...... to estimate the net benefit of the LC and to illustrate cost effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped standard errors. Results An additional cost of DKK 6,043 (95 % CI −5,697; 17,783) and a QALY gain of 0.005 (95 % CI −0.001; 0.012) was estimated for LC...

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation services in Denmark: still room for expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O; Traeden, Ulla I; Videbaek, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    support, dietary counselling, smoking cessation, and pharmaceutical risk factor management) were available during each of three phases: (I) in hospital; (II) outpatient; and (II) community-based services. RESULTS: Many hospitals offered one or more of the CR components during phases I and II: physical...... services, as do most other European countries. CR activities need to be registered at Danish hospitals.......AIM: European cardiologists agree that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) should be offered as an integrated part of cardiac care, and CR guidelines have been published. The authors aimed to ascertain the potential for expanding CR coverage at hospitals in Denmark. METHOD: A cross-sectional questionnaire...

  14. Structures, processes and outcomes of the Aussie Heart Guide Program: A nurse mentor supported, home based cardiac rehabilitation program for rural patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohmader, Terence J; Lin, Frances; Chaboyer, Wendy P

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation has a number of benefits for patients, yet participation in it is sub-optimal, especially in regional Australia. Innovative models of cardiac rehabilitation are needed to improve participation. Providing nurse mentors to support patients transitioning from hospital to home represents a new model of service delivery in Australia. To explore the impact of a home-based cardiac rehabilitation program in assisting patients to recover from Acute Coronary Syndrome and meeting the expectations of nurse mentors delivering the program. This case study was underpinned by the structure, process and outcomes model and occurred in three Australian hospitals 2008-2011. Thirteen patients recovering from acute coronary syndrome were interviewed by telephone and seven nurse mentors completed a survey after completing the program. Mentor perceptions concerning the structures of the home-based CR program included the timely recruitment of patients, mentor training to operationalise the program, commitment to development of the mentor role, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills about cognitive behavioural therapy and patient centred care. Processes included the therapeutic relationship between mentors and patients, suitability of the program and the promotion of healthier lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes identified that patients were satisfied with the program's audiovisual resources, and the level of support and guidance provided by their nurse mentors. Mentors believed that the program was easy to use in terms of its delivery. Patients believed the program assisted their recovery and were satisfied with the information, guidance and support received from mentors. There were positive signs that the program influenced patients' decisions to change unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Outcomes highlighted both rewards and barriers associated with mentoring patients in their homes by telephone. Experience gained from developing a therapeutic relationship with

  15. Yoga-based postoperative cardiac rehabilitation program for improving quality of life and stress levels: Fifth-year follow-up through a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraballi Amaravathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the efficacy of yoga-based lifestyle program (YLSP in improving quality of life (QOL and stress levels in patients after 5 years of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: Three hundred patients posted for elective CABG in Narayana Hrudayalaya Super Speciality Hospital, Bengaluru, were randomized into two groups: YLSP and conventional lifestyle program (CLSP, and follow-up was done for 5 years. Intervention: In YLSP group, all practices of integrative approach of yoga therapy such as yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, and meditation were used as an add-on to conventional cardiac rehabilitation. The control group (CLSP continued conventional cardiac rehabilitation only. Outcome Measures: World Health Organization (WHO-QOL BREF Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed before surgery and at the end of the 5th year after CABG. As data were not normally distributed, Mann–Whitney U-test was used for between-group comparisons and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was used for within-group comparisons. Results: At the end of 5 years, mental health (P = 0.05, perceived stress (P = 0.01, and negative affect (NA (P = 0.05 have shown significant improvements. WHO-QOL BREF score has shown improvements in physical health (P = 0.046, environmental health (P = 0.04, perceived stress (P = 0.001, and NA (P = 0.02 in YLSP than CLSP. Positive affect has significantly improved in CLSP than YLSP. Other domains of WHO-QOL-BREF, PANAS, and HADS did not reveal any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: Addition of long-term YLSP to conventional cardiac rehabilitation brings better improvements in QOL and reduction in stress levels at the end of 5 years after CABG.

  16. Quality service delivery in cardiac rehabilitation: cross-cultural challenges in an Australian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Abbas; Davidson, Patricia M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is an evidence-based health service model for providing secondary prevention strategies following an acute cardiac event. In spite of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation, there are striking cultural and ethnic disparities with regard to access to and usage of these programmes. To investigate the challenges in providing cardiac rehabilitation to culturally diverse populations in Australia to inform culturally competent care. This was a qualitative study using interviews with 25 health professionals from diverse professional and language backgrounds working in cardiac rehabilitation and participant observation of educational and counselling sessions in four cardiac rehabilitation programmes in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Providing cardiac rehabilitation to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds presented greater challenges than did provision to the mainstream population. These challenges resulted from the interaction of multiple and complex factors such as patients, providers, structural and organisational characteristics within the treatment setting. Communication issues, reconciling health messages with culturally specific issues such as diet, social and family structure and implementation of self-management strategies are significant challenges. Strategies are needed to overcome cross-cultural challenges and ensure effective and equitable cardiac rehabilitation service delivery.

  17. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The COPE-ICD (Copenhagen Outpatient ProgrammE-implantable cardioverter defibrillator) trial studied comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation for patients with ICDs. The purpose of this paper was to explore: (1) gender differences in self-rated health and quality of life (QoL) at hospital...... discharge after ICD implantation, (2) gender differences in effect of cardiac rehabilitation, and (3) predictors of effect of cardiac rehabilitation. METHODS: Patients with first-time ICD implantation were randomized to comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care. Gender differences in self......-rated health and QoL and effect of rehabilitation were tested using t-tests. Predictors of effect of rehabilitation were tested using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 196 patients (mean age 58 ± 13 years; 155 men, 41 women) were included. At hospital discharge, significant differences were found...

  18. Investigating patients' preferences for cardiac rehabilitation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trine; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to analyze preferences for activities comprised in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programs among former cardiac patients from three different hospitals in Copenhagen County, Denmark. METHODS: A discrete choice experiment was applied to elicit...... cardiac patients. We had a response rate of 69 percent. RESULTS: We found that preferences differed with respect to gender and age and that the offer of participation in cardiac rehabilitation activities was not highly valued by older patients, in particular among older men. CONCLUSIONS: The discrete...... choice experiment proved a valuable instrument for the measurement of preferences for cardiac rehabilitation. The study provides important information on patients' preferences for cardiac rehabilitation for healthcare professionals and decision makers....

  19. Psychometric validation of the cardiac rehabilitation barriers scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Gagliese, Lucia; Oh, Paul; Stewart, Donna E; Brister, Stephanie J; Chan, Victoria; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS). In total, 2636 cardiac inpatients from 11 hospitals completed a survey. One year later, participants completed a follow-up survey, which included the CRBS. A subsample of patients also completed a third survey which included the CRBS, the Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrolment Obstacles scale, and the Beliefs About Cardiac Rehabilitation scale three weeks later. The CRBS asked participants to rate 21 cardiac rehabilitation barriers on a five-point Likert scale regardless of cardiac rehabilitation referral or enrolment. Maximum likelihood factor analysis with oblique rotation resulted in a four-factor solution: perceived need/healthcare factors (eigenvalue = 6.13, Cronbach's α = .89), logistical factors (eigenvalue = 5.83, Cronbach's α = .88), work/time conflicts (eigenvalue = 3.78, Cronbach's α = .71), and comorbidities/functional status (eigenvalue = 4.85, Cronbach's α = .83). Mean total perceived barriers were significantly greater among non-enrollees than cardiac rehabilitation enrollees (P scales was also demonstrated. Test-retest reliability of the CRBS was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient = .64). The CRBS consists of four subscales and has sound psychometric properties. The extent to which identified barriers can be addressed to facilitate greater cardiac rehabilitation utilization warrants future study.

  20. Evaluation of a newly designed shirt-based ECG and breathing sensor for home-based training as part of cardiac rehabilitation for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skobel, Erik; Martinez-Romero, Alvaro; Scheibe, Britta; Schauerte, Patrick; Marx, Nikolaus; Luprano, Jean; Knackstedt, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Participation in phase-III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains low but adherence could potentially be improved with supervised home-based CR. New technological approaches are needed to provide sufficient supervision with respect to safety and performance of individual exercise programmes. The newly designed closed-loop tool, HeartCycle's guided exercise (GEX) system, will support professionals and patients during exercise-based CR. Patients wear a dedicated shirt with incorporated wireless sensors, and ECG, heart rate (HR), breathing frequency (BF), and activity are monitored during exercise. This information is streamed live to a mobile device (PDA) that processes these parameters. A phase-I study was performed to evaluate feasibility, function, and reliability of this GEX device and compare it to conventional cardiac exercise testing (CPX, spiroergometry) in 50 patients (seven women, mean ± SD age 69 ± 9 years, body mass index 26 ± 3 kg/m(2), ejection fraction 58 ± 10%). ECG, HR, and BF were monitored using standard equipment and the GEX device simultaneously. Furthermore, HR recorded on the PDA was compared with CPX measurements. The fit of the shirt and the sensor was good. No technical problems were encountered. All occurring arrhythmia were reliably detected. There was an acceptable comparability between HR on the GEX device vs. CPX, a good comparability between HR on the PDA vs. CPX, and a moderate comparability between BF on the GEX device vs. Comparability between CPX and the GEX device was acceptable for HR measurement and moderate for BF; arrhythmias were reliably detected. HR processing and display on the PDA was even better comparable. The whole system seems suitable for monitoring home-based CR. Further studies are now needed to implement training prescription to facilitate individual exercise. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation After Heart Valve Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollmann, Agathe Gerwina Elena; Frederiksen, Marianne; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence of the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart valve surgery is scarce, but nevertheless CR is recommended for this group of patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of CR on exercise capacity, cardiovascular risk factors, and long-term mortality and morbidity......, as well as predictors for enrolment in or failing to complete CR. METHODS: A review of medical records identified 250 patients who underwent heart valve surgery between January 2009 and August 2013. Of these, 211 patients eligible for CR were identified. Effect of CR was assessed by peak oxygen uptake...... ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak) or 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A composite endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital admission due to myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, endocarditis, revascularization, or reoperation was used to assess the hazard ratio between CR attenders...

  2. Important aspects in relation to patients' attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation - facilitators, barriers and physiotherapist's role: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Maria; Öberg, Birgitta; Krevers, Barbro

    2017-03-14

    In order to improve attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR), a greater insight into patients' perspectives is necessary. The aim of the study was to explore aspects that influence patients' attendance at exercise-based CR after acute coronary artery disease (CAD) and the role of the physiotherapist in patients' attendance at exercise-based CR. A total of 16 informants, (5 women; median age 64.5, range 47-79 years), diagnosed with CAD, were included in the study at the Cardiology Department, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. Qualitative interviews were conducted and analysed according to inductive content analysis. Four main categories were identified: (i) previous experience of exercise, (ii) needs in the acute phase, (iii) important prerequisites for attending exercise-based CR and (iv) future ambitions. The categories demonstrate that there are connections between the past, the present and the future, in terms of attitudes to facilitators, barriers and the use of strategies for managing exercise. An overall theme, defined as existential thoughts, had a major impact on the patients' attitudes to attending exercise-based CR. The interaction and meetings with the physiotherapists in the acute phase were described as important factors for attending exercise-based CR. Moreover, informants could feel that the physiotherapists supported them in learning the right level of effort during exercise and reducing the fear of exercise. This study adds to previous knowledge of barriers and facilitators for exercise-based CR that patients with CAD get existential thoughts both related to exercise during the rehabilitation process and for future attitudes to exercise. This knowledge might necessitate greater attention to the physiotherapist-patient interaction. To be able to tailor exercise-based CR for patients, physiotherapists need to be aware of patients' past experiences of exercise and previous phases of the rehabilitation process as these are

  3. A systematic review of economic evaluations of cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Wai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR, a multidisciplinary program consisting of exercise, risk factor modification and psychosocial intervention, forms an integral part of managing patients after myocardial infarction (MI, revascularization surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions, as well as patients with heart failure (HF. This systematic review seeks to examine the cost-effectiveness of CR for patients with MI or HF and inform policy makers in Singapore on published cost-effectiveness studies on CR. Methods Electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, PEDro, CINAHL were searched from inception to May 2010 for published economic studies. Additional references were identified through searching bibliographies of included studies. Two independent reviewers selected eligible publications based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Quality assessment of economic evaluations was undertaken using Drummond’s checklist. Results A total of 22 articles were selected for review. However five articles were further excluded because they were cost-minimization analyses, whilst one included patients with stroke. Of the final 16 articles, one article addressed both centre-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation, as well as home-based cardiac rehabilitation versus no rehabilitation. Therefore, nine studies compared cost-effectiveness between centre-based supervised CR and no CR; three studies examined that between centre- and home based CR; one between inpatient and outpatient CR; and four between home-based CR and no CR. These studies were characterized by differences in the study perspectives, economic study designs and time frames, as well as variability in clinical data and assumptions made on costs. Overall, the studies suggested that: (1 supervised centre-based CR was highly cost-effective and the dominant strategy when compared to no CR; (2 home-based CR was no different from centre-based CR; (3 no difference existed

  4. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally......, or readmissions due to heart disease based on linkage to public registries. The CR was an individually tailored, multidisciplinary program (6 weeks of intensive CR and 12 months of follow-up) including patient education, exercise training, dietary counseling, smoking cessation, psychosocial support, risk factor...

  5. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. STUDY DESIGN: The DANish Cardiac ReHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally......, or readmissions due to heart disease based on linkage to public registries. The CR was an individually tailored, multidisciplinary program (6 weeks of intensive CR and 12 months of follow-up) including patient education, exercise training, dietary counseling, smoking cessation, psychosocial support, risk factor...

  6. Yoga based cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery: one-year results on LVEF, lipid profile and psychological states--a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuram, Nagarathna; Parachuri, Venkateshwara Rao; Swarnagowri, M V; Babu, Suresh; Chaku, Ritu; Kulkarni, Ravi; Bhuyan, Bhagavan; Bhargav, Hemant; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    To compare the long term effects of yoga based cardiac rehabilitation program with only physiotherapy based program as an add-on to conventional rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on risk factors. In this single blind prospective randomized parallel two armed active control study, 1026 patients posted for CABG at Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Bengaluru (India) were screened. Of these, 250 male participants (35-65 years) who satisfied the selection criteria and consented were randomized into two groups. Within and between group comparisons were done at three points of follow up (i.e. 6th week, 6th month, and 12th month) by using Wilcoxon's signed ranks test and Mann Whitney U test respectively. Yoga group had significantly (p = 0.001, Mann Whitney) better improvement in LVEF than control group in those with abnormal baseline EF (<53%) after 1 year. There was a better reduction in BMI in the yoga group (p = 0.038, between groups) in those with high baseline BMI (≥23) after 12 months. Yoga group showed significant (p = 0.008, Wilcoxon's) reduction in blood glucose at one year in those with high baseline FBS ≥110 mg/dl. There was significantly better improvement in yoga than the control group in HDL (p = 0.003), LDL (p = 0.01) and VLDL (p = 0.03) in those with abnormal baseline values. There was significantly better improvement (p = 0.02, between groups) in positive affect in yoga group. Within Yoga group, there was significant decrease in perceived stress (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.001), and negative affect (p = 0.03) while in the control group there was reduction (p = 0.003) only in scores on anxiety. Addition of yoga based relaxation to conventional post-CABG cardiac rehabilitation helps in better management of risk factors in those with abnormal baseline values and may help in preventing recurrence. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation increases physical capacity but not mental health after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Klikkenborg; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    -educational consultations (intervention) versus usual care without structured physical exercise or psycho-educational consultations (control). Primary outcome was physical capacity measured by VO2 peak and secondary outcome was self-reported mental health measured by Short Form-36. Results: 76% were men, mean age 62 years.......40) or the exploratory physical and mental outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation increased the occurrence of self-reported non-serious adverse events (11/72 vs 3/75, p=0.02). Conclusions: Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery significantly improves VO2 peak at 4 months but has no effect on mental health and other......Objective: The evidence for cardiac rehabilitation after valve surgery remains sparse. Current recommendations are therefore based on patients with ischaemic heart disease. The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effects of cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care after heart...

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease is a New Target of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kohzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The Cochrane review demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation (CR resulted in improvements in QOL and a reduction in long-term mortality. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is another worldwide public health problem. This review focuses on the importance and efficacy of rehabilitation for CKD patients as a new target of CR. Patients with CKD on hemodialysis (HD have a high mortality rate, with cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic heart failure. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials reported that exercise-based renal rehabilitation improved aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and QOL in CKD patients with HD. Moreover, exercise training may have renal protective effects, not only in some animal models of pre-HD CKD, but also in pre-HD CKD patients. Exercise therapy could be an effective clinical strategy in improving renal function, lowering the need for renal replacement therapy, such as HD, and reducing renal transplant risk in pre-HD CKD patients. This led the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan to extend renal rehabilitation partial coverage to stage 4 pre-HD CKD patients for the first time in the world in 2016.

  9. Directly Measured Physical Function in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengo, Jason L; Savage, Patrick D; Shaw, Joan C; Ades, Philip A

    2017-05-01

    The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) is a strong predictor for risk of physical disability in older adults. Roughly half of individuals participating in phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) are 65 years or older, many presenting with low aerobic capacities and may be at increased risk for physical disability. The cohort consisted of 196 consecutive patients (136 men), aged 65 years or older, entering CR who were prospectively evaluated by the SPPB. Data were also obtained for age, self-reported physical function (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 questionnaire), and peak aerobic capacity. Measures were repeated upon completion of CR for those individuals who completed the program. The average age of patients was 74 ± 0.5 years. At baseline, total SPPB score was 9.7 ± 0.2 (out of 12). Followup data were obtained on 133 (68%) patients, with a mean improvement of 0.8 ± 0.1 (P speed (0.5 ± 0.1, P vs 17.5 ± 0.4 mL/kg/min, P speed and leg strength (chair-stand).

  10. Patients' and nurses' views on providing psychological support within cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katrina M; Winder, Rachel; Campbell, John L; Richards, David A; Gandhi, Manish; Dickens, Chris M; Richards, Suzanne

    2017-09-01

    To explore patients' and nurses' views on the feasibility and acceptability of providing psychological care within cardiac rehabilitation services. In-depth interviews analysed thematically. 18 patients and 7 cardiac nurses taking part in a pilot trial (CADENCE) of an enhanced psychological care intervention delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes by nurses to patients with symptoms of depression. Cardiac services based in the South West of England and the East Midlands, UK. Patients and nurses viewed psychological support as central to good cardiac rehabilitation. Patients' accounts highlighted the significant and immediate adverse effect a cardiac event can have on an individual's mental well-being. They also showed that patients valued nurses attending to both their mental and physical health, and felt this was essential to their overall recovery. Nurses were committed to providing psychological support, believed it benefited patients, and advocated for this support to be delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes rather than within a parallel healthcare service. However, nurses were time-constrained and found it challenging to provide psychological care within their existing workloads. Both patients and nurses highly value psychological support being delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes but resource constraints raise barriers to implementation. Consideration, therefore, should be given to alternative forms of delivery which do not rely solely on nurses to enable patients to receive psychological support during cardiac rehabilitation. ISCTRN34701576. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Graded Cycling Test Combined With the Talk Test Is Responsive in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Grøn; Vinther, Anders

    2016-01-01

    changes in watts (W) were compared with the standard error of measurement (SEM95) for groups and the smallest real difference (SRD) for individuals. Minimal clinically important difference was assessed by comparing patient perceived changes in physical fitness with the test changes. RESULTS......PURPOSE: To evaluate clinical assessment outcome of cardiac rehabilitation, a simple and reliable submaximal exercise test, not based on heart rate, is warranted. The Talk Test (TT) has been found to correlate well with the ventilatory threshold, and excellent reliability was observed for TT...... combined with the Graded Cycling Test (GCT-TT) in cardiac patients. The purpose was to investigate responsiveness of GCT-TT in cardiac rehabilitation patients. METHODS: Patients (n = 93) referred to 8 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation were included. Pre- and posttests were performed using GCT-TT. Mean test...

  12. Adapted cardiac rehabilitation programme to improve uptake in patients of Moroccan and Turkish origin in The Netherlands : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloots, Maurits; Bartels, Edien A. C.; Angenot, Edmond L. D.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Dekker, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To explore the treatment experiences in patients of Moroccan and Turkish origin and their rehabilitation therapists regarding an adapted outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programme. Background. Non-native patients who participated in a cardiac rehabilitation programme at a Dutch rehabilitation

  13. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally ran...

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation uptake and its determinants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte; de Vries, Han; Kemps, Hareld; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik; de Keizer, Nicolette; Peek, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Despite its documented efficacy, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is still not well implemented in current clinical practice. The aims of the present study were to assess CR uptake rates in the Netherlands, and to identify factors that determine uptake.Methods: The cohort consisted of persons

  15. Multidisciplinary VA Cardiac Rehabilitation: Preliminary Results and Treatment Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Susan S.; And Others

    Initial studies have suggested that a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) may improve the physical and psychological functioning of participants. However, these studies have generally addressed a relatively young group of employed adult males. Three studies were designed to target an older, generally retired Veterans Administration population for…

  16. [Cardiac rehabilitation for children and adults with congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedro, Pascal; Gavotto, Arthur; Bredy, Charlène; Guillaumont, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Advances in heart surgery over the past 30 years have significantly improved the prognosis of congenital heart diseases (CHD). Therefore, the epidemiology of CHD has changed dramatically with a shift of mortality from pediatrics to adulthood and an increased prevalence of complex CHD. Today, caregivers and patients focus their interests to new perspectives: improving the quality of life, practicing sports, improving psychosocial care. Cardiac rehabilitation is completely integrated in these new therapeutic strategies. The starting point is the cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), with the measurement of oxygen uptake, or "VO2". CPET is now recommended in the follow-up of the adults with CHD. Maximum oxygen uptake correlates to the quality of life of children and adults with CHD. The principles of the rehabilitation in patients with heart failure may usually be applied to CHD patients. Some studies in complex CHD showed improvement of VO2 and quality of life after rehabilitation, without any adverse events. However few physicians have the experience in rehabilitation among CHD patients, especially children. Randomized trials on cardiac rehabilitation in adult and pediatric CHD patients are essential to increase the level of evidence and lead to specific guidelines in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The cost-effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review of the characteristics and methodological quality of published literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Edwards

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim This descriptive review aimed to assess the characteristics and methodological quality of economic evaluations of cardiac rehabilitation (CR programs according to updated economic guidelines for healthcare interventions. Recommendations will be made to inform future research addressing the impact of a physical exercise component on cost-effectiveness. Methods Electronic databases were searched for economic evaluations of exercise-based CR programs published in English between 2000 and 2014. The Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS statement was used to review the methodological quality of included economic evaluations. Results Fifteen economic evaluations met the review inclusion criteria. Assessed study characteristics exhibited wide variability, particularly in their economic perspective, time horizon, setting, comparators and included costs, with significant heterogeneity in exercise dose across interventions. Ten evaluations were based on randomised controlled trials (RCTs spanning 6–24 months but often with weak or inconclusive results; two were modelling studies; and the final three utilised longer time horizons of 3.5–5 years from which findings suggest that long-term exercise-based CR results in lower costs, reduced hospitalisations and a longer cumulative patient lifetime. None of the 15 articles met all the CHEERS quality criteria, with the majority either fully or partially meeting a selection of the assessed variables. Conclusion Evidence exists supporting the cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR for cardiovascular disease patients. However, variability in CR program delivery and weak consistency between study perspective and design limits study comparability and therefore the accumulation of evidence in support of a particular exercise regime. The generalisability of study findings was limited due to the exclusion of patients with comorbidities as would typically be found in a

  18. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on health related quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Riaz, A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are recognized as integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with cardiovascular disease and are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association (AHA). In this study we used serial administration of the short form 36 (SF36) to evaluate patient\\'s response to CR in terms of improvement in Health related Quality of Life. A total of 49 patients were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement observed after CR in the Physical Capacity Score (42.3 vs 49.9 p = 0.0005). There was no significant improvement in the Mental Capacity Score (54.8 vs 54.9 p = 0.96). We conclude that Cardiac Rehabilitation Program causes a significant improvement in the health related quality of life of patients by improving their physical health and well being but does not improve the mental capacity which is already at a healthy level before CR.

  19. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.054T. Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation4T. Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life4T.

  20. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Strength and Balance in Patients after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nazari

    Full Text Available Background: The most common method for improving the quality of life especially in chronic heart disease is rehabilitation. For increasing the level of knowledge about effect of rehabilitation and its' impression on improving the quality of life in patients. This study evaluates effect of one month cardiac rehabilitation on lower limb strength and the static and dynamic balance of CABG patients. Materials and Methods: This study is based on clinical trial before and after rehabilitation. the exercise protocol lasted for one month, three times per week, each session lasting 1 hour, on 30 male patients in two groups in control (N=15 and experimental group (N=15 after CABG in the centre of rehabilitation in Javad-Alaeme Heart Hospital, Mashhad. The strength of lower limb by chair standing test, the static balance by standing on one leg and dynamic balance by time up and go (TUG test, was evaluated before and after 1 month rehabilitation in training group and detraining in control group. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 and used t-test analysis (p≤0.05.Results: The strength of lower limb (p=0.001, static balance (p=0.023 and dynamic balance (p=0.037 increased significantly after one month of cardiac rehabilitation.Conclusion: The result of this study indicates that cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery causes significant increase in strength of lower limb and balance in patients, the more muscle strength is associated with an increase in ability of performing daily activities and so it causes improved quality of life.

  1. Virtual reality exercise on a home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation program, effect on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ágata; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the effect of a six-month home-based phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) specific exercise program, performed in a virtual reality (Kinect) or conventional (booklet) environment, on executive function, quality of life and depression, anxiety and stress of subjects with coronary artery disease. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with subjects, who had completed phase II, randomly assigned to intervention group 1 (IG1), whose program encompassed the use of Kinect (n = 11); or intervention group 2 (IG2), a paper booklet (n = 11); or a control group (CG), only subjected to the usual care (n = 11). The three groups received education on cardiovascular risk factors. The assessed parameters, at baseline (M0), 3 (M1) and 6 months (M2), were executive function, control and integration in the implementation of an adequate behaviour in relation to a certain objective, specifically the ability to switch information (Trail Making Test), working memory (Verbal Digit Span test), and selective attention and conflict resolution ability (Stroop test), quality of life (MacNew questionnaire) and depression, anxiety and stress (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21). Descriptive and inferential statistical measures were used, significance level was set at .05. The IG1 revealed significant improvements, in the selective attention and conflict resolution ability, in comparison with the CG in the variable difference M0 - M2 (p = .021) and in comparison with the IG2 in the variable difference M1 - M2 and M0 - M2 (p = .001 and p = .002, respectively). No significant differences were found in the quality of life, and depression, anxiety and stress. The virtual reality format had improved selective attention and conflict resolution ability, revealing the potential of CR, specifically with virtual reality exercise, on executive function. Implications for Rehabilitation In cardiac rehabilitation, especially in phase III, it is

  2. Physician-Related Factors Affecting Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahieh Moradi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the positive impact of cardiac rehabilitation (CR on quality of life and mortality, the majority of people who could benefit from this program fail to participate in it. The lack of referral from the physician is a common reason that patients give for not seeking CR. The objective of this study was to compare factors affecting CR referral by cardiologists. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 122 cardiologists, including 89 general cardiac specialists and 33 fellows in cardiology from 11 major cardiology training centers in Iran, was done in 2010. They responded to the 14- item investigator-generated survey, examining the physician’s attitudinal and knowledge factors affecting CR referral. Results: 47.9% of the subjects reported having available CR centers but only 6.6% reported continuous medical education on the topic. 90.7% of the physicians reported that less than 15% of patients are referred to CR centers. The main factor affecting the low referral rate was limited general knowledge about CR programs (79.5% such as program attributes and benefits, methods of reimbursement. Lack of insurance coverage, unavailability of CR centers in the community and low physicians’ fee were other factors reported by the physicians. Conclusion: Cardiologists’ inadequate general knowledge of and attitude toward CR programs seem to be a potential threat for cardiac prevention and rehabilitation in some societies.

  3. An audit of phase II cardiac rehabilitation at Auckland hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, D; Allison, M; Doughty, R; Cunningham, L; Ellis, C J

    2000-05-12

    To audit Phase II cardiac rehabilitation services available to patients admitted to Auckland Hospital in order to assess patient uptake and to identify problems with patient recruitment to the service. We performed a retrospective review from 1/8/ 97 to 30/9/97 of all patients admitted to the coronary care/ cardiology departments in Auckland Hospital. There were 289 patient admissions in this two month period, of which 22 (8%) were readmissions. 154 (54%) were admissions with provisional diagnoses of chest pain, of whom eight were readmissions. A total of 113 (39%) patients were felt to be suitable for the rehabilitation programme, of whom 50 (44%) attended one or more sessions and 22 (19%) completed the six week programme. 63 (56%) of the eligible patients did not attend any session. Reasons for non-attendance included the distance to be travelled, availability of transport and problems associated with taking time off work. A major finding of the audit was that the systems currently in place to follow patients are inadequate to allow formal audit and evaluation of the rehabilitation service. Although a reasonable rehabilitation service exists for Auckland Hospital patients, less than half of suitable patients attend a single session. There is a need for better collection and recording of patient data in order to facilitate the development of evaluation and audit tools.

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: can its failure be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzmański, Robert; Kapusta, Joanna; Obrębska-Stefaniak, Agnieszka; Urzędowicz, Beata; Kowalski, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The prognosis in patients after acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is significantly burdened by coexisting anaemia, leukocytosis and low glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Hyperglycaemia in the early stages of ACS is a strong predictor of death and heart failure in non-diabetic subjects. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hyperglycaemia, anaemia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopaenia and decreased GFR on the risk of the failure of cardiac rehabilitation (phase II at the hospital) in post-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. The study included 136 post-STEMI patients, 96 men and 40 women, aged 60.1 ± 11.8 years, admitted for cardiac rehabilitation (phase II) to the Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiac Rehabilitation, WAM University Hospital in Lodz, Poland. On admission fasting blood cell count was performed and serum glucose and creatinine level was determined (GFR assessment). The following results were considered abnormal: glucose ⩾ 100 mg/dl, GFR 10 × 103/μl; platelets (PLTs) failure of cardiac rehabilitation. This risk has been defined on the basis of the patient's inability to tolerate workload increment >5 Watt in spite of the applied program of cardiac rehabilitation. As a result of building a logistic regression model, the most statistically significant risk factors were selected, on the basis of which cardiac rehabilitation failure index was determined. leukocytosis and reduced GFR determined most significantly the risk of failure of cardiac rehabilitation (respectively OR = 6.42 and OR = 3.29, p = 0.007). These parameters were subsequently utilized to construct a rehabilitation failure index. Peripheral blood cell count and GFR are important in assessing the prognosis of cardiac rehabilitation effects. leukocytosis and decreased GFR determine to the highest degree the risk of cardiac rehabilitation failure. Cardiac rehabilitation failure index may be useful in classifying patients into an appropriate model of

  5. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Blood Pressure and Functional Capacity in Patients after Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Mandana Parvand; Babak Goosheh; Alireza Sarmadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Before the year 1950 treatment of myocardial Infarction patients was complete bed rest for several weeks and reduces physical activity for several months. Cardiac rehabilitation based on exercise training reduces the effects of deconditioning of bed rest. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the methods and means of prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.Materials and Methods: This study was designed clinical trial and cross sectional study before and af...

  6. "I'm No Superman": Understanding Diabetic Men, Masculinity, and Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Craig M; Angus, Jan E; Seto Nielsen, Lisa; Kramer-Kile, Marnie; Pritlove, Cheryl; Lapum, Jennifer; Price, Jennifer; Marzolini, Susan; Abramson, Beth; Oh, Paul; Clark, Alex

    2015-12-01

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs help patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) reduce their risk of recurrent cardiac illness, disability, and death. However, men with CHD and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) demonstrate lower attendance and completion of CR despite having a poor prognosis. Drawing on gender and masculinity theory, we report on a qualitative study of 16 Canadian diabetic men recently enrolled in CR. Major findings reflect two discursive positions men assumed to regain a sense of competency lost in illness: (a) working with the experts, or (b) rejection of biomedical knowledge. These positions underscore the varied and sometimes contradictory responses of seriously ill men to health guidance. Findings emphasize the priority given to the rehabilitation of a positive masculine identity. The analysis argues that gender, age, and employment status are powerful mechanisms of variable CR participation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Experience of exclusion: A framework analysis of socioeconomic factors affecting cardiac rehabilitation participation among patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria; Overgaard, Dorthe; Andersen, Ingelise; Baastrup, Marie; Egerod, Ingrid

    2017-12-01

    The Danish public healthcare system provides comprehensive care based on the principle of equal access. However, it is well documented that patients with low socioeconomic position are less likely to participate in cardiac rehabilitation. More knowledge is needed to understand this phenomenon. The aim of the study was to explore the patient experience of barriers to completion of phase II cardiac rehabilitation, and to investigate the impact of socioeconomic factors on completion of cardiac rehabilitation. The study had a qualitative explorative design using semi-structured individual or dyadic interviews with patients ( n = 24) and close relatives ( n = 12). Informants were sampled from a quantitative prospective study of 302 patients with acute coronary syndrome and data were analyzed using the framework method. Patients in different socioeconomic groups were challenged by a rigid and non-individualized rehabilitation program. A total of five themes were identified that might explain non-participation in cardiac rehabilitation: exclusion by time and place, exclusion by health beliefs, exclusion from counseling, exclusion by alienation, and exclusion of relatives. The themes were described in a matrix of socioeconomic factors of age, sex, education and employment. Patients in various socioeconomic subgroups felt excluded from cardiac rehabilitation for different reasons. This study supports earlier findings and provides examples of real-life issues that need to be addressed to prevent attrition and encourage participation. Equal access to cardiac rehabilitation can only be reached if the physical and psychological needs of patient and family are met by tailoring therapy to consider age, sex, education and employment groups.

  8. Extended cardiac rehabilitation for socially vulnerable patients improves attendance and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2013-01-01

    Patients living alone or having a low socioeconomic status are likely to quit cardiac rehabilitation. We aimed to compare patients being offered extended rehabilitation (ERP) with those being offered standard rehabilitation (SRP) as concerns 1) attendance rates and 2) achievement of treatment goals...

  9. A secondary meta-synthesis of qualitative studies of gender and access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Jan E; King-Shier, Kathryn M; Spaling, Melisa A; Duncan, Amanda S; Jaglal, Susan B; Stone, James A; Clark, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    To discuss issues in the theorization and study of gender observed during a qualitative meta-synthesis of influences on uptake of secondary prevention and cardiac rehabilitation services. Women and men can equally benefit from secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation and there is a need to understand gender barriers to uptake. Meta-method analysis secondary to meta-synthesis. For the meta-synthesis, a systematic search was performed to identify and retrieve studies published as full papers during or after 1995 and contained: a qualitative research component wholly or in a mixed method design, extractable population specific data or themes for referral to secondary prevention programmes and adults ≥18 years. Databases searched between January 1995-31 October 2011 included: CSA Sociological Abstracts, EBSCOhost CINAHL, EBSCOhost Gender Studies, EBSCOhost Health Source Nursing: Academic Edition, EBSCOhost SPORTDiscus, EBSCOhost SocINDEX. Studies were reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were subject to quality appraisal and standardized data extraction. Of 2264 screened articles, 69 were included in the meta-method analysis. Only four studies defined gender or used gender theories. Findings were mostly presented as inherently the characteristic of gendered worldviews of participants. The major themes suggest a mismatch between secondary prevention/cardiac rehabilitation services and consumers' needs, which are usually portrayed as differing according to gender but may also be subject to intersecting influences such as age or socioeconomic status. There is a persistent lack of theoretically informed gender analysis in qualitative literature in this field. Theory-driven gender analysis will improve the conceptual clarity of the evidence base for gender-sensitive cardiac rehabilitation programme development. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Reporting of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Cardiac Misconceptions Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Porras, Linda; Joekes, Katherine; Bhalla, Nitin; Sutherland, Caroline; Pollard, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 15% of cardiac patients experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), double the incidence seen in the general community. Posttraumatic stress disorder can seriously affect psychological and physical recovery. This study assessed how many patients reported symptoms of PTSD following a cardiac event and examined whether there was any change after completing a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program. Associations between PTSD and anxiety, depression, and cardiac misconceptions were also explored. This was a prospective cohort study using repeated measures. All patients eligible for the hospital CR program were invited to complete questionnaires assessing psychological distress and beliefs about heart disease before (T1) and after (T2) completing the CR program. Questionnaires at T1 were returned by 105 patients. Of these, 24% reported symptoms of PTSD, 18% high anxiety, and 9% high levels of depression. At T2, 67 patients returned questionnaires, showing that 9% of patients continued to experience PTSD. These patients experienced significantly higher levels of anxiety (t = -4.77; P misconceptions were associated with higher levels of anxiety and depression; however, the number of cardiac misconceptions remained similar throughout. Caucasians reported significantly fewer misconceptions than non-Caucasian patients, except for beliefs about myocardial infarction. Patients had fewer misconceptions about their own specific condition. These findings suggest that screening for symptoms of PTSD after completion of a CR program would be helpful in identifying patients who would benefit from specialist psychological support.

  11. The impact of professional status on the effects of and adherence to the outpatient followed by home-based telemonitored cardiac rehabilitation in patients referred by a social insurance institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Szalewska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Legislators and policymakers have expressed strong interest in intervention programs to reduce dependence on social disability benefits. Hybrid: ambulatory followed by home-based cardiac telerehabilitation – hybrid cardiac rehabilitation (HCR seems to be a novel alternative for standard cardiac rehabilitation for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD as a form of pension prevention paid by the Social Insurance Institution (SII. The kind of professional status may bias the motivation to return to work after HCR. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether the professional status can affect the effects of HCR. Material and Methods: One hundred fifty-two patients with CVD referred by the SII for a 5-week HCR were qualified for the study. Patients (87.7% males, aged 57.31±5.61 years, were divided into 2 subgroups: W white-collar employees (N = 22 and B blue-collar employees (N = 130. To evaluate functional capacity, an exercise test on a treadmill was used. Results: The number of days of absence in the cardiac rehabilitation program did not differ between the groups (mean ± standard deviation – B: 1.09±3.10 days, W: 1.95±3.64 days. There were significant improvements (p < 0.05 in measured variables after HCR in both (W and B groups (max workload: 8.21±2.88 METs (measured in metabolic equivalents vs. 9.6±2.49 METs, 7.76±2.51 METs vs. 8.73±2.7 METs, resting heart rate (RHR: 77±16.22 bpm vs. 69.94±12.93 bpm, 79.59±14 bpm vs. 75.24±11.87 bpm; double product, i.e., product of heart rate and systolic BP (DP rest 10 815.22±2968.24 vs. 9242.94±1923.08, 10 927.62±2508.47 vs. 9929.7±2304.94. In group B, a decrease in systolic blood pressure (BP syst. – 137.03±17.14 mm Hg vs. 131.82±21.13 mm Hg, heart rate recovery in the 1st minute after the end of peak exercise (HRR1 (99.38±19.25 vs. 93.9±19.48 and New York Heart Association (NYHA class (1.22±0.53 vs. 1.11±0.36 was observed. In group W, a decrease in diastolic

  12. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation in socially vulnerable patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2018-01-01

    ). The patients were defined as socially vulnerable or non-socially vulnerable according to their educational level and their social network. A complete follow-up was achieved. INTERVENTION: A socially differentiated CR intervention. The intervention consisted of standard CR and additionally a longer phase II......OBJECTIVE: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk. A research project performed at a university hospital in Denmark offered an expanded CR intervention to socially vulnerable patients. One-year follow-up showed significant improvements concerning medicine...... compliance, lipid profile, blood pressure and body mass index when compared with socially vulnerable patients receiving standard CR. The aim of the study was to perform a long-term follow-up on the socially differentiated CR intervention and examine the impact of the intervention on all-cause mortality...

  13. Effects of cardiac rehabilitation in diabetic patients: both cardiac and noncardiac factors determine improvement in exercise capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Mitchell; Mehta, Hardik; Sacrinty, Matthew; Johnson, Dominic; Robinson, Killian

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic patients have a worse prognosis than nondiabetic patients after myocardial infarction. Although exercise improves risk factors, exercise capacity, and mortality, it is still unclear if these benefits are the same as in nondiabetics. Furthermore, although exercise tolerance is predicted by systolic and diastolic dysfunction in nondiabetics, its role as a predictor of exercise capacity in diabetics remains unclear. Diabetics and nondiabetics see a similar improvement in their cardiac risk factors and exercise parameters from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A series of 370 diabetics and 942 nondiabetics entered a 36-session outpatient CR program after interventions for coronary heart disease or after bypass or cardiac valve surgery. The program consisted of physical exercise, lifestyle modification, and pharmacotherapy. Quality of life, weight, blood pressure, and lipid profiles improved significantly in both groups during the 12-week program. Baseline metabolic equivalents (METs) were lower in diabetics vs nondiabetics at the start of CR (2.4 vs 2.7, P diabetics had less improvement (change in METs 1.7 vs 2.6, P diabetes remained a significant predictor of reduced improvement in exercise capacity. Diabetics saw a significant benefit in quality of life, weight, exercise tolerance, and cardiac risk factors, but to a lesser extent when compared with nondiabetics. The mechanisms for poorer improvement in diabetics following CR also include noncardiac factors and require further study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Fácila, Lorenzo; Mazón, Pilar; Alegría, Eduardo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; García-Porrero, Esteban; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    As in other fields, understanding of vascular risk and rehabilitation is constantly improving. The present review of recent epidemiological update shows how far we are from achieving good risk factor control: in diet and nutrition, where unhealthy and excessive societal consumption is clearly increasing the prevalence of obesity; in exercise, where it is difficult to find a balance between benefit and risk, despite systemization efforts; in smoking, where developments center on programs and policies, with the electronic cigarette seeming more like a problem than a solution; in lipids, where the transatlantic debate between guidelines is becoming a paradigm of the divergence of views in this extensively studied area; in hypertension, where a nonpharmacological alternative (renal denervation) has been undermined by the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 setback, forcing a deep reassessment; in diabetes mellitus, where the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors and glucagon like peptide 1 analogues have contributed much new information and a glimpse of the future of diabetes treatment, and in cardiac rehabilitation, which continues to benefit from new information and communication technologies and where clinical benefit is not hindered by advanced diseases, such as heart failure. Our summary concludes with the update in elderly patients, whose treatment criteria are extrapolated from those of younger patients, with the present review clearly indicating that should not be the case. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Registry: Inaugural Report on the Status of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Grace

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are over 200 Cardiovascular Rehabilitation (CR programs in Canada, providing services to more than 50,000 new patients annually. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of CR in Canada. Methods. A retrospective analysis of Canadian CR Registry data is presented. There were 12 programs participating, with 4546 CR participants. Results. The average wait time between patient referral and CR admission was 68 ± 64 days. Participants were 66.3 ± 11.5 years old, 71% male, and 82% White. The three leading referral events were coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention, and acute coronary syndrome. At discharge, data were available for ~90% of participants. Significant improvements in blood pressure (systolic pre-CR 123.5 ± 17.0, post-CR 121.5 ± 15.8 mmHg; p<.001, lipids, adiposity, and exercise capacity (peak METs pre-CR 6.5 ± 2.8, post-CR 7.2 ± 3.1; p<.001 were observed. However, target attainment for some risk factors was suboptimal. Conclusions. This report provides the first snapshot of the beneficial effects of CR in Canada. Not all patients are equally represented in these programs, however, leaving room for more referral of diverse patients. Greater attainment of risk reduction targets should be pursued.

  16. LC-REHAB: randomised trial assessing the effect of a new patient education method--learning and coping strategies--in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole; Beauchamp, Alison; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Wittrup, Inge

    2014-12-13

    Due to improved treatments and ageing population, many countries now report increasing prevalence in rates of ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Cardiac rehabilitation has potential to reduce morbidity and mortality, but not all patients complete. In light of favourable effects of cardiac rehabilitation it is important to develop patient education methods which can enhance adherence to this effective program. The LC-REHAB study aims to compare the effect of a new patient education strategy in cardiac rehabilitation called 'learning and coping' to that of standard care. Further, this paper aims to describe the theoretical basis and details of this intervention. Open parallel randomised controlled trial conducted in three hospital units in Denmark among patients recently discharged with ischemic heart disease or heart failure. Patients are allocated to either the intervention group with learning and coping strategies incorporated into standard care in cardiac rehabilitation or the control group who receive the usual cardiac rehabilitation program. Learning and coping consists of two individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced patients as educators together with health professionals and theory based, situated and inductive teaching. Usual care in cardiac rehabilitation is characterised by a structured deductive teaching style with use of identical pre-written slides in all hospital units. In both groups, cardiac rehabilitation consists of training three times a week and education once a week over eight weeks. The primary outcomes are adherence to cardiac rehabilitation, morbidity and mortality, while secondary outcomes are quality of life (SF-12, Health education impact questionnaire and Major Depression Inventory) and lifestyle and risk factors (Body Mass Index, waist circumference, blood pressure, exercise work capacity, lipid profile and DXA-scan). Data collection occurs four times; at baseline, at immediate completion of cardiac

  17. Heart shaking transitions - A phenomenological-hermeneutic study of patients´ experiences in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.

    -patient cardiac rehabilitation during 1-2 months is offered after the acute treatment. Knowledge of the patients’ experiences of cardiac problems when receiving the current standards of treatment is needed in order to develop sufficient care. Hence the aim was to investigate how patients with new onset unstable...... a chronical severe disease which brings sweeping changes in their lives. Hereby the patients are challenged during the trajectory of cardiac rehabilitation. Care towards the integrity, which becomes vulnerable in these processes, is essential in order to support the cardiac patients to gain healthy...

  18. Gender matters in cardiac rehabilitation and diabetes: Using Bourdieu's concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Jan E; Dale, Craig M; Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Kramer-Kile, Marnie; Lapum, Jennifer; Pritlove, Cheryl; Abramson, Beth; Price, Jennifer A; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul; Clark, Alex

    2018-03-01

    Habitual practices are challenged by chronic illness. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) involves changes to habits of diet, activity and tobacco use, and although it is effective for people with diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), some participants are reportedly less likely to complete programs and adopt new health related practices. Within the first three months of enrolling in CR, attrition rates are highest for women and for people with diabetes. Previous studies and reviews indicate that altering habits is very difficult, and the social significance of such change requires further study. The purpose of the study was to use Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, capital and field to analyse the complexities of adopting new health practices within the first three months after enrolling in a CR program. We were particularly interested in gender issues. Thirty-two men and women with diabetes and CVD were each interviewed twice within the first three months of their enrolment in one of three CR programs in Toronto, Canada. Attention to CR goals was not always the primary consideration for study participants. Instead, a central concern was to restore social dignity within other fields of activity, including family, friendships, and employment. Thus, study participants evolved improvised tactical approaches that combined both physical and social rehabilitation. These improvised tactics were socially embedded and blended new cultural capital with existing (often gendered) cultural capital and included: concealment, mobilizing cooperation, re-positioning, and push-back. Our findings suggest that success in CR requires certain baseline levels of capital - including embodied, often gendered, cultural capital - and that efforts to follow CR recommendations may alter social positioning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient perceptions of experience with cardiac rehabilitation after isolated heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina B; Berg, Selina K; Sibilitz, Kirstine L

    2018-01-01

    to take active personal responsibility for their health. Despite these benefits, participants experienced existential and psychological challenges and musculoskeletal problems. Participants also sought additional advice from healthcare professionals both inside and outside the healthcare system....... CONCLUSIONS: Even though the cardiac rehabilitation programme reduced insecurity and helped participants take active personal responsibility for their health, they experienced existential, psychological and physical challenges during recovery. The cardiac rehabilitation programme had several limitations...

  20. Significance of Comorbid Psychological Stress and Depression on Outcomes After Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachur, Sergey; Menezes, Arthur R; De Schutter, Alban; Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-12-01

    Depression is associated with increased mortality in stable coronary heart disease. Cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training has been shown to decrease depression, psychological stress, and mortality after a coronary heart disease event. The presence of depression at completion of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training is associated with increased mortality. However, it is unknown if depression with comorbid psychological risk factors such as anxiety or hostility confers an additional mortality disadvantage. We evaluated the mortality effect of anxiety and hostility on depression after cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training. We studied 1150 patients with coronary heart disease following major coronary heart disease events who had completed formal cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training. Using Kellner questionnaires, stress levels were measured in 1 of 3 domains: anxiety, hostility, and depression (with an aggregated overall psychological stress score) and divided into 3 groups: nondepressed (n = 1072), depression alone (n = 18), and depression with anxiety or hostility (n = 60). Subjects were analyzed for all-cause mortality over 161 months of follow-up (mean 6.4 years) by National Death Index. Depression after cardiac rehabilitation was not common (6.8%; mortality 20.8%) but when present, frequently associated with either anxiety or hostility (77% of depressed patients; mortality 22.0%). After adjustment for age, sex, ejection fraction, and baseline peak oxygen consumption, depression alone (hazard ratio [HR] 1.73, P = .04), as well as depression with comorbid psychological stress, was associated with higher mortality (HR 1.98, P = .03). Furthermore, our data showed an increased mortality when both anxiety and hostility were present in addition to depression after cardiac rehabilitation (HR 2.41, P = .04). After cardiac rehabilitation, depression, when present, is usually associated with other forms of psychological stress, which confers

  1. Case Report: Cardiac Rehabilitation in a Patient with MVR & AVR & Tricuspid Valve Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Gousheh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient is a 24 year .old male with valvular heart disease, severe mitral & aortic & tricuspid valve stenosis and regurgitation. After MVR & AVR & tricuspid surgical repair, he has undergone cardiac rehabilitation for 8 weeks (24 sittings. After completion of a cardiac rehabilitation, review of cardiovascular tests showed obvious improvement in the functional capacity, blood pressure and heart rate. Physically and mentally patient feels very comfortable and hopeful of a good healthy life.

  2. Unhealthy behaviour modification, psychological distress, and 1-year survival in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostoli, Sara; Roncuzzi, Renzo; Urbinati, Stefano; Morisky, Donald E; Rafanelli, Chiara

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is considered the recommended secondary prevention treatment for cardiovascular diseases (CVD), in terms of health behaviours and, secondarily, better cardiac outcomes promotion. However, the role of psychiatric and psychosomatic distress on the efficacy of CR is unclear. This research aimed to evaluate the impact of CR on unhealthy behaviour modification and cardiac course, considering the moderating role of depression, anxiety, and psychosomatic syndromes. A longitudinal design between and within groups was employed. The assessment was repeated four times: at admission to CR (T1), at discharge (T2), 6 (T3) and 12 months following CR completion (T4). One hundred and eight patients undergoing CR versus 85 patients with CVD not referred to CR, underwent psychiatric, psychosomatic, and health behaviour assessment. The assessment included the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (depression and anxiety), the interview based on Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research, GOSPEL Study questionnaire (health behaviours), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Cardiac rehabilitation was associated with maintenance of physical activity, improvement of behavioural aspects related to food consumption, stress management, and sleep quality. On the contrary, CR was not associated with weight loss, healthy diet, and medication adherence. Depression and psychosomatic syndromes seem to moderate the modification of specific health-related behaviours (physical activity, behavioural aspects of food consumption, stress management, and pharmacological adherence). In CR settings, an integrated assessment including both psychiatric and psychosomatic syndromes is needed to address psychological factors associated with unhealthy behaviour modification. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is considered a class 1A treatment recommendation and the most cost

  3. Atrioventricular node reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) after mitral valvuloplasty during cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Santillo, Elpidio; Marini, Luciano; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2012-12-01

    We descrive a patient who presents palpitations during cardiac rehabilitation after mitral valvuloplasty. ECG showed regular narrow QRS tachycardia compatible with Atrioventricular Node Reentrant Tachycardia. After slow pathway radiofrequency catheter ablation, the patient completed the rehabilitation program remained tachycardia and palpitations-free.

  4. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Alegría, Eduardo; Cordero, Alberto; Fácila, Lorenzo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Mazón, Pilar; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease develops in a slow and subclinical manner over decades, only to manifest suddenly and unexpectedly. The role of prevention is crucial, both before and after clinical appearance, and there is ample evidence of the effectiveness and usefulness of the early detection of at-risk individuals and lifestyle modifications or pharmacological approaches. However, these approaches require time, perseverance, and continuous development. The present article reviews the developments in 2013 in epidemiological aspects related to prevention, includes relevant contributions in areas such as diet, weight control methods (obesity is now considered a disease), and physical activity recommendations (with warnings about the risk of strenuous exercise), deals with habit-related psychosocial factors such as smoking, provides an update on emerging issues such as genetics, addresses the links between cardiovascular disease and other pathologies such as kidney disease, summarizes the contributions of new, updated guidelines (3 of which have recently been released on topics of considerable clinical importance: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease), analyzes the pharmacological advances (largely mediocre except for promising lipid-related results), and finishes by outlining developments in the oft-neglected field of cardiac rehabilitation. This article provides a briefing on controversial issues, presents interesting and somewhat surprising developments, updates established knowledge with undoubted application in clinical practice, and sheds light on potential future contributions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Embodied masculinities in the context of cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Steve; Sheikh, Kay; Moore, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Interest continues to gather in relation to the sociology of the body, gendered embodiment and the theoretical links between these in both health and ill-health contexts. However, the available empirical work that links embodiment, masculinities and health remains sparse. This paper presents secondary data analysis from an original study that aimed to consider the similarities and differences in the experience of a continuing (phase four) cardiac rehabilitation programme for individuals choosing to participate in either an exercise or yoga component. The data presented are derived from two in-depth interviews, carried out a year apart, with each of the 34 men who completed the original study. Watson's (2000)'male body schema' was used to guide initial data coding and the subsequent analysis generated four overarching themes: 'embodied emotionality'; 'renegotiated embodiment'; 'embodiment and fitness' and 'knowing the hidden body'. An approach that theorises from, rather than about, men's bodies is fostered, and questions are raised about previous work that suggests men are emotionally 'disconnected' from their bodies and/or that they have a wholly mechanistic view of bodily function.

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    ) versus 20.7mL kg(-1) min(-1), p of main effect=0.003, p of interaction between time and intervention=0.020). No significant difference between groups on Short Form-36 was found (53.8 versus 51.9 points, P=.20). Two serious adverse events (atrial fibrillation in relation to physical exercise and death...... unrelated to rehabilitation) occurred in the cardiac rehabilitation group versus one in the usual care group (death unrelated to intervention) (P=.56). In the cardiac rehabilitation group 16 patients versus 7 in the usual care group reported non-serious adverse events (P=.047). CONCLUSION: Comprehensive...

  7. Efecto de un programa de rehabilitación cardiaca basado en ejercicio sobre la capacidad física, la función cardiaca y la calidad de vida, en pacientes con falla cardiaca Effect of a cardiac rehabilitation program based on exercise on physical capacity, cardiac function and quality of life in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Atehortúa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: la rehabilitación cardiaca basada en ejercicio es una estrategia de tratamiento para los pacientes con falla cardiaca. En la actualidad hay controversia sobre su efecto en parámetros centrales y hemodinámicos de la función ventricular. Objetivo: evaluar el efecto de un programa de rehabilitación cardiaca basada en ejercicio sobre la capacidad física, la función cardiaca y la calidad de vida en pacientes con falla cardiaca. Diseño y métodos: estudio de intervención en pacientes con falla cardiaca estadio C, clase funcional NYHA II-III, a quienes se les hicieron pruebas funcionales, ecocardiografía y concentración sérica de la porción NT-proPNC y, además, se les aplicó un cuestionario de calidad de vida, antes de un programa de rehabilitación cardiaca basada en ejercicio y doce semanas después de éste. Resultados: se incluyeron 22 pacientes con una edad promedio de 59 ± 9 años. De ellos, 17 (77,3% fueron hombres y 20 (90,9% tenían enfermedad coronaria. El consumo de oxígeno máximo indirecto (VO2 aumentó de 26,4 ± 6,4 mL.kg-1.min-1 a 34,5 ± 7,7 mL.kg-1.min-1 en promedio (pBackground: exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is a strategy treatment in patients with heart failure. Currently there is controversy about its effect on central and hemodynamic parameters of ventricular function. Objective: to evaluate the effect of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program on physical capacity, cardiac function and quality of life in patients with heart failure. Design and Methods: intervention study in patients with heart failure stage C, NYHA functional classes II-III that were submitted to functional tests, echocardiography and plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP, and also answered a questionnaire on quality of life before and twelve weeks after a cardiac rehabilitation program based on exercise. Results: 22 patients with mean age 59 ± 9 years old were included. 17 (77,3% were men and 20 (90,9% had coronary heart

  8. Relationship Between Cardiac Rehabilitation Participation and Health Service Expenditures Within a Universal Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David A; Yu, Bing; Bajaj, Ravi R; Oh, Paul I

    2017-03-13

    To examine the relationship between cardiac rehabilitation participation and health service expenditures in Ontario, Canada. A total of 6284 patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation between April 1, 2003, and December 31, 2010, were linked to 6284 matched cardiac rehabilitation eligible nonreferred controls and followed over a 3-year period across multiple linked administrative databases to identify health service utilization expenditures and mortality. All patients had previous cardiac hospitalizations within the preceding year. Four cardiac rehabilitation eligible groups of patients were balanced using propensity score weights: (1) no referral; (2) no participation; (3) low participation levels (ie, attending service expenditures (from all sources including hospitalizations, physician visits, diagnostic tests, and drugs for those older than 65 years) per "eligible day alive" over the 3-year period. Compared with the nonreferred population, health service expenditures followed a dose-response relationship and were lowest in patients who had the highest cardiac rehabilitation programmatic participation levels (Pservice utilization expenditures within a publicly funded health care system. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term Exercise Adherence After High-intensity Interval Training in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamot, Inger-Lise; Karlsen, Trine; Dalen, Håvard; Støylen, Asbjørn

    2016-03-01

    Exercise adherence in general is reported to be problematic after cardiac rehabilitation. Additionally, vigorous exercise is associated with impaired exercise adherence. As high-intensity interval training (HIT) is frequently used as a therapy to patients with coronary artery disease in cardiac rehabilitation, the objective was to assess long-term exercise adherence following an HIT cardiac rehabilitation programme. A multicentre randomized study was carried out. Eligible participants were adults who had previously attended a 12-week HIT cardiac rehabilitation programme, as either a home-based or hospital-based HIT (treadmill exercise or group exercise). The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake; secondary outcomes were self-reported and objectively measured physical activity. Out of 83 eligible participants, 76 were available for assessment (68 men/8 women, mean age 59 (8) years) at a one-year follow-up. Peak oxygen uptake was significantly elevated above baseline values, (treadmill exercise: 35.8 (6.4) vs. 37.4 (7.4) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) , group exercise: 32.7 (6.5) vs. 34.1 (5.8) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) and home-based exercise: 34.5 (4.9) vs. 36.7 (5.8) ml kg(-1)  min(-1) at baseline and follow-up, respectively), with no significant differences between groups. The majority of the participants (>90%) met the recommended daily level of 30 minutes of moderate physical activity. The home-based group showed a strong trend towards increased physical activity compared with the hospital-based groups. The results from this study have shown that both home-based and hospital-based HIT in cardiac rehabilitation induce promising long-term exercise adherence, with maintenance of peak oxygen uptake significantly above baseline values at a one-year follow-up. The implication for physiotherapy practice is that HIT in cardiac rehabilitation induces satisfactory long-term exercise adherence. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Characteristics of diabetic patients and diabetes care in cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacco, Maud; Vergès-Patois, Bénédicte; Blonde, Marie-Cécile; Crevisy, Elodie; Habchi, Marana; Bouillet, Benjamin; Buffier, Perrine; Petit, Jean-Michel; Vergès, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Although diabetes is associated with a high cardiovascular risk, very little information is available about diabetic patients enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). To analyse the characteristics of diabetic patients and diabetes care in CR. From the database of 700 patients enrolled in CR during a 29-month period, we analysed data from all patients with glucose metabolism disorders (n=105) and 210 matched normoglycaemic patients. A total of 105 patients with glucose metabolism disorders (type 1 diabetes, n=5; type 2 diabetes, n=84; impaired fasting glucose, n=16) were enrolled in a CR programme (15% of whole population). Fifteen per cent of patients with type 2 diabetes and all patients with impaired fasting glucose were diagnosed during CR. These 105 patients were older and had a higher body mass index, a larger waist circumference, higher fasting blood glucose and triglyceride concentrations and lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations than non-diabetic patients; they also had higher rates of hypertension (P=0.001) and dyslipidaemia (P=0.02). They were more frequently referred to CR for peripheral artery disease (P=0.001), coronary heart disease+peripheral artery disease (P=0.007) and primary prevention (P=0.009). The intervention of a diabetologist was needed for 42.6% of patients because of uncontrolled or newly diagnosed diabetes. In the present study, we showed that (1) the proportion of patients with diabetes in CR is lower than expected, (2) many glucose metabolism disorders are diagnosed during CR, (3) patients with glucose metabolism disorders show a more severe cardiovascular risk profile than normoglycemic patients, and (4) the intervention of a diabetologist is needed during CR for many patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Does Cardiac Rehabilitation After an Acute Cardiac Syndrome Lead to Changes in Physical Activity Habits? Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeve, Nienke; Huisstede, Bionka M. A.; Stam, Henk J.; van Domburg, Ron T.; Sunamura, Madoka; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J. G.

    Background. Optimal physical activity levels have health benefits for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and are an important goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Purpose. The purpose of this study was to systematically review literature regarding short-term effects (= 6 months after

  12. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention......, exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise...

  13. Poor preoperative nutritional status is an important predictor of the retardation of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery in elderly cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masato; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Kitamura, Aki; Ono, Rei; Sakai, Yoshitada; Okita, Yutaka

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative nutritional status and physical function are important predictors of mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery. However, the influence of nutritional status before cardiac surgery on physical function and the progress of postoperative rehabilitation requires clarification. To determine the effect of preoperative nutritional status on preoperative physical function and progress of rehabilitation after elective cardiac surgery. We enrolled 131 elderly patients with mean age of 73.7 ± 5.8 years undergoing cardiac surgery. We divided them into two groups by nutritional status as measured by the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI): high GNRI group (GNRI ≥ 92, n = 106) and low GNRI group (GNRI hospital stay. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, preoperative handgrip strength (P = 0.034), KEMS (P = 0.009), SPPB (P nutritional status as assessed by the GNRI could reflect perioperative physical function. Preoperative poor nutritional status may be an independent predictor of the retardation of postoperative rehabilitation in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery.

  14. Basic life support training into cardiac rehabilitation programs: A chance to give back. A community intervention controlled manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Salvado, Violeta; Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Peña-Gil, Carlos; Neiro-Rey, Carmen; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2018-03-12

    Early basic life support is crucial to enhance survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest but rates remain low, especially in households. High-risk groups' training has been advocated, but the optimal method is unclear. The CArdiac REhabilitation and BAsic life Support (CAREBAS) project aims to compare the effectiveness of two basic life support educational strategies implemented in a cardiac rehabilitation program. A community intervention study including consecutive patients enrolled on an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program after acute coronary syndrome or revascularization was conducted. A standard basic life support training (G-Stan) and a novel approach integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation hands-on rolling refreshers (G-CPR) were randomly assigned to each group and compared. Basic life support performance was assessed by means of simulation at baseline, following brief instruction and after the 2-month program. 114 participants were included and 108 completed the final evaluation (G-Stan:58, G-CPR:50). Basic life support performance was equally poor at baseline and significantly improved following a brief instruction. A better skill retention was found after the 2-month program in G-CPR, significantly superior for safety and sending for an automated external defibrillator. Confidence and self-perceived preparation were also significantly greater in G-CPR after the program. Integrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation hands-on rolling refreshers in the training of an exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program is feasible and improves patients' skill retention and confidence to perform a basic life support sequence, compared to conventional training. Exporting this formula to other programs may result in increased numbers of trained citizens, enhanced social awareness and bystander resuscitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impacts of Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Echocardiographic Parameters in Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The accurate impact of exercise on coronary artery disease (CAD patients with left ventricular dysfunction is still debatable. We studied the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR on echocardiography parameters in CAD patients with ventricular dysfunction. Methods. Patients with CAD who had ventricular dysfunction were included into an exercise-based rehabilitation program and received rehabilitation for eight weeks. All subjects underwent echocardiography before and at the end of the rehabilitation program. The echocardiography parameters, including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, LV end-diastolic (LVEDD and end-systolic diameters (LVESD, and peak exercise capacity measured in metabolic equivalents (METs, were assessed. Results. Seventy patients (mean age = 57.5 ± 10.2 years, 77.1% males were included into the study. At the end of rehabilitation period, the LVEF increased from 45.14 ± 5.77% to 50.44 ± 8.70% (P<0.001, and the peak exercise capacity increased from 8.00 ± 2.56 to 10.08 ± 3.00 METs (P<0.001. There was no significant change in LVEDD (54.63 ± 12.96 to 53.86 ± 8.95 mm, P=0.529 or in LVESD (38.91 ± 10.83 to 38.09 ± 9.04 mm, P=0.378 after rehabilitation. Conclusion. Exercise training in postmyocardial infarction patients with ventricular dysfunction could have beneficial effects on cardiac function without adversely affecting LV remodeling or causing serious cardiac complications.

  16. [Cardiac rehabilitation--expectations and appraisals of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubmann, R M; Vogel, H; Placzek, T; Faller, H

    2005-06-01

    Patients' expectancies are widely hypothesized to influence the course of rehabilitation. Therefore, an exploratory cross-sectional survey was performed in cardiological rehabilitation patients to analyse the relationships of patients' expectations and rehabilitation outcomes. Patients were recruited from ambulatory heart groups (phase III rehabilitation). All participants judged both their expectations and experiences regarding their inpatient rehabilitation (phase II) in retrospect. Of 300 eligible heart group members, 238 (79 %) consented to participate (81 % male; mean age 65.5 years). Discussions with their physician, in-depth clinical examination, and information regarding treatment and healthy life-style were rated as most important by the patients. Nutritional counselling, gymnastics, massage, walking and the pleasant surroundings of the clinic were also frequently mentioned. One third stated that they had changed their attitudes regarding life-style, stress management, and nutrition as a result of rehabilitation. However, according to their self-reports, changes in body weight were not substantial whereas the proportion of smokers declined. 70 % reported to be interested in attending a future rehabilitation treatment. Patients with high expectations regarding physical training, health counselling, behaviour modification and physician care had better rehabilitation outcomes. When interpreting the results, both the selective nature of the sample and possible recall bias due to the retrospective assessments have to be considered. Our findings may thus be seen as hints as to patients overall judging their rehabilitation in a positive way. However, critical aspects were also mentioned. While these did not touch the general concepts of the interventions, they highlighted specific aspects of its performance and implementation, issues that should be taken into account by the individual rehabilitation clinic.

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation adapted to transient ischaemic attack and stroke (CRAFTS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Catherine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease share many predisposing, modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy are recognised as the cornerstones of secondary prevention. Cochrane review has proven the benefits of programmes incorporating exercise and lifestyle counselling in the cardiac disease population. A Cochrane review highlighted as priority, the need to establish feasibility and efficacy of exercise based interventions for Cerebrovascular Disease. Methods A single blind randomised controlled trial is proposed to examine a primary care cardiac rehabilitation programme for adults post transient ischemic attack (TIA and stroke in effecting a positive change in the primary outcome measures of cardiac risk scores derived from Blood Pressure, lipid profile, smoking and diabetic status and lifestyle factors of habitual smoking, exercise and healthy eating participation. Secondary outcomes of interest include health related quality of life as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Stroke Specific Quality of Life scale and WONCA COOP Functional Health Status charts and cardiovascular fitness as measured by a sub-maximal fitness test. A total of 144 patients, over 18 years of age with confirmed diagnosis of ischaemic stroke or TIA, will be recruited from Dublin community stroke services and two tertiary T.I.A clinics. Exclusion criteria will include oxygen dependence, unstable cardiac conditions, uncontrolled diabetes, major medical conditions, claudication, febrile illness, pregnancy or cognitive impairment. Participants will be block-statified, randomly allocated to one of two groups using a pre-prepared computer generated randomisation schedule. Both groups will receive a two hour education class on risk reduction post stroke. The

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation Increases the Reliability of the 6-Minute Walk Test in Patients After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayta, Emrulah; Korkmaz, Özge

    2017-12-07

    Few data are available on the capacity for functional exercise after cardiac rehabilitation in patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and biochemical factors that affect the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) results in patients who have undergone CABG. Data were prospectively collected from 56 patients consecutively admitted at our hospital between January 2013 and May 2015 for a 3-month cardiac rehabilitation program. Data were analysed retrospectively up to 90 days after cardiac surgery. In addition to clinical and biochemical parameters, the functional capacity of patients was evaluated by an exercise 6-minute walking test and echocardiography. Functional capacity was evaluated at baseline and after three months of cardiac rehabilitation. Results: Before cardiac rehabilitation, the 6MWT values were negatively correlated with Body Mass Index (BMI) and abdominal and buttock diameters (r = -0.375, -0.386, and -0.370, respectively; P < .05), and were positively correlated with metabolic equivalent (MET) values (r = 0.493, P < .05). After cardiac rehabilitation, the 6MWT values were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) and abdominal and buttock diameters (r = -0.382, -0.274, and -0.405, respectively; P < .05) and were positively correlated with MET and VO2 max values (r = 0.456 and 0.573, respectively; P < 0.05). Before cardiac rehabilitation, VO2 max and FEV1/FEVC values were found as factors that significantly increased 6MWT values (P < .05). After cardiac rehabilitation, VO2 max values were found as factors that significantly increased 6MWT values (P < .05). Overall, in current clinical settings, cardiac rehabilitation increases the reliability of the 6MWT. Improvement in pulmonary function after cardiac rehabilitation reduces the impact of pulmonary function on 6MWT values. The functional capacity of patients may be more reliably determined by 6MWT after cardiac

  19. Type D patients report poorer health status prior to and after cardiac rehabilitation compared to non-type D patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Erdman, Ruud A M; van Domburg, Ron T

    2008-01-01

    Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients.......Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients....

  20. Walking tests during the exercise training: Specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Casillas, J.-M.; Hannequin, A.; Besson, D.; Benaïm, S.; Krawcow, C.; Laurent, Y.; Gremeaux, V.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability ...

  1. Systematic review: effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW OBJECTIVE/QUESTION: The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Specifically, the review question is: What is the effectiveness of expanded CR compared to standard CR in adult...... patients diagnosed with CHD? Effectiveness will be assessed by the effect on mortality and readmissions due to all causes or any cardiac event, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol levels and adherence to recommendations in secondary prevention guidelines....

  2. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention......, exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise...... training as central components in all rehabilitation and preventive interventions. Many of the risk factor improvements occurring in CR can be mediated through exercise training programmes. This call-for-action paper presents the key components of a CR programme: physical activity counselling and exercise...

  3. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François

    2010-01-01

    , exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise...... and Rehabilitation) has recently completed a Position Paper, entitled 'Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: A condition-oriented approach'. Components of multidisciplinary CR for seven clinical presentations have been addressed. Components include patient assessment, physical activity counselling...... training as central components in all rehabilitation and preventive interventions. Many of the risk factor improvements occurring in CR can be mediated through exercise training programmes. This call-for-action paper presents the key components of a CR programme: physical activity counselling and exercise...

  4. Feasibility of a Facebook Intervention for Exercise Motivation and Cardiac Rehabilitation Adherence: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Lee Anne; Ahmed, Haitham M; Crawford, Michael Todd; Bena, James Frank

    2017-08-18

    While cardiac rehabilitation has been shown to be effective at improving coronary heart disease (CHD), participation is generally poor. Attempts to increase uptake and adherence often fail. Use of a Facebook intervention for this population may be a unique opportunity to support self-determined motivation and affect adherence. To evaluate the impact of a Facebook intervention on motivation for exercise and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation in patients with CHD during a 12-week, Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. A prospective, randomized controlled pilot study, grounded in Self-Determination Theory, will be conducted. Participants will be recruited from inpatient, or the intake visit to outpatient, cardiac rehabilitation, and then randomly assigned to the intervention or comparison group. Participants in the intervention group will take part in a private Facebook group. Weekly posts will be designed to support self-determined motivation, measured at baseline and postcardiac rehabilitation by the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-3 (BREQ-3). The Psychological Need Satisfaction for Exercise (PNSE) scale will measure fulfillment of needs that affect motivation. Participants in the comparison group will be given the same materials, but these will be supplied via handouts and email. The number of sessions attended will be tallied and analyzed using t tests. Overall motivation will be evaluated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models. Multivariate analysis of variance models will be used to evaluate differences in the change across motivation subtypes. If significant, ANCOVA models for each subtype will be fit. ANCOVA models will be used to compare changes in needs satisfaction, overall and separately among the three subscales, between groups. Engagement in the Facebook group will be measured by number of "likes" and self-report of weekly visits to the group. This project was funded in July 2017 and recruitment is currently underway. The

  5. Oxygen saturation and heart rate monitoring during a single session of early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Vittorio; Petrucci, Lucia; Monteleone, Serena; Dall'Angelo, Anna; Miracca, Stefania; Conte, Teresa; Carlisi, Ettore; Ricotti, Susanna; D'Armini, Andrea M; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2016-02-01

    Early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery aims to prevent immobilization, to reduce the effects of surgery on the respiratory function and to facilitate the recovery of autonomy in the activities of daily living (ADL), after discharge. Nevertheless the optimal perioperative physical therapy care for patients undergoing cardiac surgery is not well established. Moreover, most of the studies monitored peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) during surgery or focused only on their recovery after rehabilitation and not on their pathways during a session of exercises. To monitor peripheral oxygen saturation and HR before, during and at the end of a single session of early rehabilitation after cardiac surgery, so testing our protocol's safety. A case series. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, inpatients. Forty-eight consecutive inpatients (35 M), mean age 61 years, with cardiovascular disease (CVD), who underwent cardiac surgery. We monitored SpO2%, HR, systemic blood pressure (BP), pain in the thoracic wound (VAS) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during the rehabilitation session after weaning from oxygen therapy. During all phases mean SpO2 was 94% (±1.8) and mean HR was 85 bpm (±13.3). Number of desaturation events were 14 in total and mean of % of time with SpO2<90% was 3 (±6.5) during all the rehabilitative session. Moreover, mean BP after reaching the sitting position was 124.7 (±11.9)/78.6 (±8.4) and after ambulation was 131.5 (±11.5)/82.9 (±7.3). The monitoring peripheral oxygen saturation and HR during and not only before and at the end of a standardized early rehabilitation session helped us to ensure the safety of our protocol. Because of its feasibility, safety and reproducibility our rehabilitation treatment has been applied to different types of surgical inpatients in order to limit the negative consequences of immobilization.

  6. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shane N; Fortier, Michelle S; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Blanchard, Chris M; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-13

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.'s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, Pmodel retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible.

  7. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shane N.; Fortier, Michelle S.; Strachan, Shaelyn M.; Blanchard, Chris M.; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.’s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, Pphysical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible. PMID:26973926

  8. Walking tests during the exercise training: specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, J-M; Hannequin, A; Besson, D; Benaïm, S; Krawcow, C; Laurent, Y; Gremeaux, V

    2013-10-01

    Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability are still subject to debate - probably because of the ambiguity in terms of the target speed (either comfortable or brisk walking). Of the other time-based walk tests, the 2-minute-walk test is the only one applicable during CR, reserved for patients with severe disabilities by its psychometric properties. Fixed-distance tests (principally the 200m fast walk test) and incremental shuttle walking, tests explore higher levels of effort and may represent a safe and inexpensive alternative to laboratory-based tests during CR. These walking tests may be useful for personalizing prescription of training programs. However, the minimum clinically significant difference has not yet been determined. Lastly, walking tests appear to be potential useful tools in promoting physical activity and behavioural changes at home. Thus, validation of other walk tests with better psychometric properties will be necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of a 6-month cardiac rehabilitation programme on serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and forty-two cardiac rehabilitation patients were followed up over a p.eriod of 6 months and the percentage change over time was recorded for various lipid fractions including apoprotein AI (apo AI), apoprotein B (apo B) and lipoprotein a (Lp(a)). Data were analysed to see if improvement in peak oxygen ...

  10. The effect of referral for cardiac rehabilitation on survival following acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Bland, John M; Crouch, Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International guidelines recommend referral for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, the impact on long-term survival after CR referral has not been adjusted by time-variance. We compared the effects of CR referral after hospitalization for AMI...

  11. Effects of a self-regulation lifestyle program for post-cardiac rehabilitation patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Veronica Regina

    2012-01-01

    Background As maintenance of lifestyle change and risk factor modification following completion of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to be notoriously difficult, we developed a brief self-regulation lifestyle program for post-CR patients. Design Randomized-controlled trial. Method Following

  12. Do illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation and quality of life following myocardial infarction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, David P; Lewin, Robert J P; Watson, Nina; Thompson, David R

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation and quality of life following myocardial infarction (MI). The illness perceptions of 194 MI patients were assessed whilst the patients were still in hospital following an MI. The mean age was 63.3 years (S.D. = 10.6), and 142 of the patients were men. Cardiac rehabilitation attendance and quality of life were assessed via a postal questionnaire 6 months later. In contrast to previous work reported in this area, illness perceptions were not significantly associated with attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. Illness perceptions measured within 24 h of an acute MI were predictive of quality of life 6 months later. Previous reports may have overestimated the extent to which illness perceptions predict attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The relationship between illness perceptions and quality of life at 6 months suggests that interventions to alter illness perceptions, especially perceptions of consequences, may be useful in improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following an MI.

  13. Effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW OBJECTIVE/QUESTION: The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Specifically, the review question is: What is the effectiveness of expanded CR compared to standard CR in adult...

  14. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Cardiac Rehabilitation WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PROGRAM SATISFACTION? A REVIEW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taherzadeh, Golnoush; Filippo, Deandra E.; Kelly, Shannon; van Engen-Verheul, Mariette; Peek, Niels; Oh, Paul; Grace, Sherry L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of quality and may be related to greater adherence to cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objectives of this narrative review were to investigate (1) patient satisfaction with CR and its relationship to adherence or health outcomes, and

  15. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. METHODS: 825 patients with ischaemic heart...

  16. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  17. Randomized controlled trial of tailored nursing interventions to improve cardiac rehabilitation enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Sylvie; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Juneau, Martin; Guertin, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Short hospital stays for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) reduce the opportunity for risk factor intervention during admission. After discharge, cardiac rehabilitation can decrease the recurrence of coronary events by up to 25%. However, it remains underused. The aim of this study was to determine whether a nursing intervention focused on individual ACS patients' perceptions of their disease and treatment would increase rehabilitation enrollment after discharge. A total of 242 ACS patients admitted to a specialized tertiary cardiac center were randomized to either the intervention or usual care (n = 121 in both groups). The intervention included one nurse-patient meeting before discharge with 2 additional contacts over the 10 days after discharge (mean duration = 40 minutes per contact). The primary outcome was enrollment in a free rehabilitation program offered to all participants 6 weeks after discharge. Secondary outcomes included illness perceptions; family support; anxiety level; medication adherence; and cardiac risk factors including lack of exercise, smoking, body mass index, and diet. The sample was composed of a majority of male, married workers who experienced a myocardial infarction or unstable angina without severe complications. The mean hospital stay in both groups was 3.6 days. There was a significantly higher rate of rehabilitation enrollment in the intervention group (45%) than in the control group (24%; p = .001). For the secondary outcomes, only the personal control dimension of illness perceptions was improved significantly with the intervention. Progressive, individualized interventions by nurses resulted in greater rehabilitation enrollment, thereby potentially improving long-term outcome.

  18. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Blood Pressure and Functional Capacity in Patients after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Parvand

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Before the year 1950 treatment of myocardial Infarction patients was complete bed rest for several weeks and reduces physical activity for several months. Cardiac rehabilitation based on exercise training reduces the effects of deconditioning of bed rest. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the methods and means of prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease.Materials and Methods: This study was designed clinical trial and cross sectional study before and after intervention, the effect of our new protocol was assessed according to method of Bruce stress test. Measurement consisted of Blood Pressure and Functional Capacity, which were recorded and compared before and after intervention.Results: There was a significant increase in functional capacity according to method of Bruce stress test after ten session of training. The criterion deviation at functional capacity variable was 13.19±2.242 METS and 24.42±6.00 METS before and after 10 sessions. Respectively, this obtained METS (body oxygen survey at rest state equal to 3/5 milliliter oxygen to each kg person weight at minute rise amount from secondary posttest to primary test (P<0.05. There was also a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure after ten session of training. The criterion deviation and average was 121.5±8.83 and 112.00±9.18 for systolic blood pressure. This decline amounts has a meaningful variable amount given P value <0.05.Conclusion: Cardiac rehabilitation can increase the performance of blood circulation and uptake of oxygen in body. These changes showed a significant increase in functional capacity it can also reduce resistance of blood circulation and showed a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure.

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary syndrome: Trends in referral, predictors and mortality outcome in a multicenter national registry between years 2006-2013: Report from the Working Group on Cardiac Rehabilitation, the Israeli Heart Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Fernando; Sabbag, Avi; Tzur, Boaz; Kopel, Eran; Goldkorn, Ronen; Matetzky, Shlomi; Goldenberg, Ilan; Shlomo, Nir; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background Utilization of cardiac rehabilitation is suboptimal. The aim of the study was to assess referral trends over the past decade, to identify predictors for referral to a cardiac rehabilitation program, and to evaluate the association with one-year mortality in a large national registry of acute coronary syndrome patients. Design and methods Data were extracted from the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey national surveys between 2006-2013. A total of 6551 patients discharged with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome were included. Results Referral to cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary syndrome increased from 38% in 2006 to 57% in 2013 ( p for trend following independent predictors for non-referral: 2006 survey, older age, female sex, past stroke, heart or renal failure, prior myocardial infarction, minority group, and lack of in-hospital cardiac rehabilitation center (all p follow-up ( p = 0.03). Consistently, a 32% lower one-year mortality risk was evident in a propensity score matched group of 3340 patients (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.95, p = 0.02). Conclusions Over the past decade there was a significant increase in cardiac rehabilitation referral following an acute coronary syndrome. However, cardiac rehabilitation is still under-utilized in important high-risk subsets of this population. Patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation have a lower adjusted mortality risk.

  20. [Consideration of early rehabilitation in the treatment of post-cardiac arrest syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaki; Ogasawara, Sadanobu; Kadowaki, Aya; Onizuka, Shouzaburou; Samejima, Mituhiro

    2011-04-01

    Resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest is an unnatural pathophysiological state. In 2008, ILCOR has proposed "post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS)". Clinicians must focus on treating to reverse the pathophysiological manifestations of PCAS in bed. Immobility, deconditioning, and weakness are common problems in patients with critical illness. Therapeutic strategies have to be identified to give patients after ROSC the best chance for survival with good neurological function. Concerning the beneficial effects of early mobilization after stroke, and the efficacy of a strategy for whole-body rehabilitation in the earliest days of critical illness on functional outcomes, the intervention of early rehabilitation care by an interdisciplinary team seems to contribute to good long-time outcome of post-cardiac arrest patients.

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation patient's perspectives on the recovery following heart valve surgery: a narrative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe Olsen; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To explore the structure and content of narratives about the recovery process among patients undergoing heart valve surgery participating in cardiac rehabilitation. BACKGROUND: Several studies with short-term follow-up have shown that recovering from cardiac surgery can be challenging......, but evidence on the long-term recovery process is very limited, especially following heart valve surgery. Furthermore, few studies have explored the recovery process among cardiac rehabilitation participants. DESIGN: A qualitative study with serial interviews analysed using narrative methods. METHODS: We......, the participants expected to return to normality. The analysis identified four courses of recovery, with three non-linear complex pathways deviating from the classic restitution narrative: the frustrated struggle to resume normality, the challenged expectation of normality - being in a limbo and becoming a heart...

  2. National Registry of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in Mexico II (RENAPREC II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; García-Saldivia, Marianna; Rojano-Castillo, Jessica; Justiniano, Samuel; Cerón, Norma; Aranda-Ayala, Zulema-L; Rodríguez, Azucena; Hernández, Alejandro; Cassaigne, María-Elena; Cantero, Raúl; Gasca, Pablo; Hinojosa, Tania; Alonso, Jesús; Romo, Ricardo; Lara, Jorge; Pimentel, Elizabeth; Zavala, Juana; Rius-Suárez, María-Dolores; Cherebetiu, Gabriel; Cortés, Othniel; Almaraz, Alejandro; Mendoza, Pedro; Silva, Jesús; Tirado, Enrique; Martínez, Leonel

    The aim of this paper is to compare the state of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) in 2009 with 2015. Focus is directed on health care, training of health-providers, research, and the barriers to their implementation. All authors of RENAPREC-2009, and other cardiac rehabilitation leaders in Mexico were requested to participate. These centres were distributed into two groups: RENAPREC-2009 centres that participated in 2015, and the new CRP units. In 2009 there were 14 centres, two of which disappeared and another two did not respond. CRP-units increased by 71% (n=24), and their geographic distribution shows a centripetal pattern. The coverage of CRP-units was 0.02 centres per 100,000 inhabitants. Only 4.4% of eligible patients were referred to CRP, with a rate of 10.4 patients/100,000 inhabitants in 2015. The ratio of Clinical Cardiologists to Cardiac Rehabilitation Specialists was 94:1, and the ratio of Intervention Specialists to cardiac rehabilitation experts was 16:1. Cardiac rehabilitation activities and costs varied widely. Patient dropout rate in phase II was 12%. Several barriers were identified: financial crisis (83%), lack of skilled personnel (67%), deficient equipment (46%), inadequate areas (42%), and a reduced number of operating centres (38%). CRPs in Mexico are still in the process of maturing. Mexican CRP-centres have several strengths, like the quality of the education of the professionals and the multidisciplinary programs. However, the lack of referral of patients and the heterogeneity of procedures are still their main weaknesses. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the effect of a web-based quality improvement system with feedback and outreach visits on guideline concordance in the field of cardiac rehabilitation: rationale and study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M; de Keizer, Nicolette F; van der Veer, Sabine N; Kemps, Hareld M C; Scholte op Reimer, Wilma J M; Jaspers, Monique W M; Peek, Niels

    2014-12-31

    Implementation of clinical practice guidelines into daily care is hampered by a variety of barriers related to professional knowledge and collaboration in teams and organizations. To improve guideline concordance by changing the clinical decision-making behavior of professionals, computerized decision support (CDS) has been shown to be one of the most effective instruments. However, to address barriers at the organizational level, additional interventions are needed. Continuous monitoring and systematic improvement of quality are increasingly used to achieve change at this level in complex health care systems. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of a web-based quality improvement (QI) system with indicator-based performance feedback and educational outreach visits to overcome organizational barriers for guideline concordance in multidisciplinary teams in the field of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A multicenter cluster-randomized trial with a balanced incomplete block design will be conducted in 18 Dutch CR clinics using an electronic patient record with CDS at the point of care. The intervention consists of (i) periodic performance feedback on quality indicators for CR and (ii) educational outreach visits to support local multidisciplinary QI teams focussing on systematically improving the care they provide. The intervention is supported by a web-based system which provides an overview of the feedback and facilitates development and monitoring of local QI plans. The primary outcome will be concordance to national CR guidelines with respect to the CR needs assessment and therapy indication procedure. Secondary outcomes are changes in performance of CR clinics as measured by structure, process and outcome indicators, and changes in practice variation on these indicators. We will also conduct a qualitative process evaluation (concept-mapping methodology) to assess experiences from participating CR clinics and to gain insight into factors which influence the

  4. A qualitative study exploring why people do not participate in cardiac rehabilitation and coronary heart disease self-help groups, and their rehabilitation experience without these resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Angela Mary; McKinstry, Brian; Gregory, Susan; Amos, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention and self-management of coronary heart disease (CHD) are of major importance to people who survive myocardial infarction (MI). This can be facilitated by cardiac rehabilitation (CR; the formal health service programme) and informal CHD self-help groups. Non-participation is an important issue, yet it is poorly understood. Rehabilitation difficulties and prevention challenges have been identified among people following MI, but the particular experience and perspective of CR and CHD group non-participants are largely unknown. The study aimed to understand non-participation in CR and CHD self-help groups from the perspectives of the non-participants and to provide insight into their experience and that of their 'significant others' in rehabilitating in the absence of these resources. In-depth interviews were conducted with 27 people who had not participated in either hospital-based CR or a CHD group, 6-14 months post-MI, and 17 'significant others' in Lothian, Scotland. Factors influencing non-participation fell into three broad themes 'No need/no point', 'Not worth it', and 'Not possible'. In the latter two categories, non-participation in these resources was often considered a 'missed opportunity' and needs had remained unmet. Shifts between categories could occur over time. Non-participation was linked to rehabilitation difficulties for some people and family members. Recommendations to enhance post-MI support are made.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation and the therapeutic environment: the importance of physical, social, and symbolic safety for programme participation among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Erica J; Rolfe, Danielle E; Landry, Mireille; Sternberg, Leonard; Price, Jennifer A D

    2012-08-01

    To report an exploration of the multidimensionality of safety in cardiac rehabilitation programmes as perceived by women who were enrolled in the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative in Toronto, Canada. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women. Although cardiac rehabilitation is clinically effective, significantly fewer women than men participate in available programmes. The literature identifies factors affecting women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, and provides possible explanations for this gender disparity. Although safety is mentioned among the barriers to women's cardiac rehabilitation participation, the extent to which safety contributes to programme participation, completion, and maintenance remains under-explored in the cardiac rehabilitation literature. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to examine the role safety and place play for women engaged in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Methods.  From 2005-2006, 14 participants engaged in semi-structured, qualitative interviews lasting 30-90 minutes. Discussions addressed women's experiences at the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were developed: 'Safety', which was sub-categorized according to physical, social, and symbolic interpretations of safety, 'searching for a sense of place', and 'confidence and empowerment'. Feeling physically, socially, and symbolically safe in one's cardiac rehabilitation environment may contribute to programme adherence and exercise maintenance for women. Focusing on comprehensive notions of safety in future cardiac rehabilitation research could offer insight into why many women do not maintain an exercise regimen in currently structured cardiac rehabilitation and community programmes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Older Adults' Music Listening Preferences to Support Physical Activity Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Imogen N; Baker, Felicity A; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2016-01-01

    Music listening during exercise is thought to increase physiological arousal and enhance subjective experience, and may support physical activity participation among older adults with cardiac disease. However, little is known about how music preferences, or perceptions of music during exercise, inform clinical practice with this population. Identify predominant musical characteristics of preferred music selected by older adults, and explore participants' music listening experiences during walking-based exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. Twenty-seven participants aged 60 years and older (21 men, 6 women; mean age = 67.3 years) selected music to support walking over a 6-month intervention period, and participated in post-intervention interviews. In this two-phase study, we first identified predominant characteristics of participant-selected music using the Structural Model of Music Analysis. Second, we used inductive thematic analysis to explore participant experiences. Predominant characteristics of participant-selected music included duple meter, consistent rhythm, major key, rounded melodic shape, legato articulation, predictable harmonies, variable volume, and episodes of tension with delayed resolution. There was no predominant tempo, with music selections ranging from slow through to medium and fast. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis of participant interviews: psycho-emotional responses, physical responses, influence on exercise behavior, and negative experiences. Findings are consistent with theory and research explaining influences from music listening on physiological arousal and subjective experience during exercise. Additionally, for older adults with cardiac disease, a holistic approach to music selection considering general well-being and adjustment issues, rather than just exercise performance, may improve long-term lifestyle changes and compliance with physical activity guidelines. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All

  7. Exercise-based rehabilitation for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Sagar, Viral A; Davies, Ed J; Briscoe, Simon; Coats, Andrew J S; Dalal, Hayes; Lough, Fiona; Rees, Karen; Singh, Sally

    2014-04-27

    of bias of included trials was moderate. There was no difference in pooled mortality between exercise-based rehabilitation versus no exercise control in trials with up to one-year follow-up (25 trials, 1871 participants: risk ratio (RR) 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69 to 1.27, fixed-effect analysis). However, there was trend towards a reduction in mortality with exercise in trials with more than one year of follow-up (6 trials, 2845 participants: RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.75 to 1.02, fixed-effect analysis). Compared with control, exercise training reduced the rate of overall (15 trials, 1328 participants: RR 0.75; 95% CI 0.62 to 0.92, fixed-effect analysis) and HF specific hospitalisation (12 trials, 1036 participants: RR 0.61; 95% CI 0.46 to 0.80, fixed-effect analysis). Exercise also resulted in a clinically important improvement superior in the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire (13 trials, 1270 participants: mean difference: -5.8 points; 95% CI -9.2 to -2.4, random-effects analysis) - a disease specific health-related quality of life measure. However, levels of statistical heterogeneity across studies in this outcome were substantial. Univariate meta-regression analysis showed that these benefits were independent of the participant's age, gender, degree of left ventricular dysfunction, type of cardiac rehabilitation (exercise only vs. comprehensive rehabilitation), mean dose of exercise intervention, length of follow-up, overall risk of bias and trial publication date. Within these included studies, a small body of evidence supported exercise-based rehabilitation for HFPEF (three trials, undefined participant number) and when exclusively delivered in a home-based setting (5 trials, 521 participants). One study reported an additional mean healthcare cost in the training group compared with control of USD3227/person. Two studies indicated exercise-based rehabilitation to be a potentially cost-effective use of resources in terms of gain in quality

  8. Changes in the Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise after Cardiac Transplantation in Patients Enrolled in an Early Rehabilitation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Lizanne M Bussières; Peter W Pflugfelder; Albert W Taylor; Dildar Ahmad; Corinne Weernink; William J Kostuk

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the changes in the cardiopulmonary response to exercise in the first year after cardiac transplantation in patients enrolled in a rehabilitation program in the first three months post-transplantation.METHODS: A graded cycle exercise test with mixed expired gas analysis was performed on patients with end-stage cardiac failure before and serially after cardiac transplantation at one, three and 12 months.RESULTS: Before cardiac transplantation, seven patients were fit enou...

  9. Evidence to service gap: cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention in rural and remote Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sandra; Mills, Belynda; McRae, Shelley; Thompson, Sandra

    2018-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, has similar incidence in metropolitan and rural areas but poorer cardiovascular outcomes for residents living in rural and remote Australia. Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) is an evidence-based intervention that helps reduce subsequent cardiovascular events and rehospitalisation. Unfortunately CR attendance rates are as low as 10-30% with rural/remote populations under-represented. This in-depth assessment investigated the provision of CR and secondary prevention services in Western Australia (WA) with a focus on rural and remote populations. CR and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services were identified through the Directory of Western Australian Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Services 2012. Structured interviews with CR coordinators included questions specific to program delivery, content, referral and attendance. Of the 38 CR services identified, 23 (61%) were located in rural (n = 11, 29%) and remote (n = 12, 32%) regions. Interviews with coordinators from 34 CR services (10 rural, 12 remote, 12 metropolitan) found 77% of rural/remote services were hospital-based, with no service providing a comprehensive home-based or alternative method of program delivery. The majority of rural (60%) and remote (80%) services provided CR through chronic condition exercise programs compared with 17% of metropolitan services; only 27% of rural/remote programs provided education classes. Rural/remote coordinators were overwhelmingly physiotherapists, and only 50% of rural and 33% of remote programs had face-to-face access to multidisciplinary support. Patient referral and attendance rates differed greatly across WA and referrals to rural/remote services generally numbered less than 5 per month. Program evaluation was reported by 33% of rural/remote coordinators. Geography, population density and service availability limits patient access to CR services in rural/remote WA. Current

  10. HAEMODYNAMIC RESPONSE DURING EXERCISE TESTING IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE UNDERGOING A CARDIAC REHABILITATION PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Siebert

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Haemodynamic monitoring during exercise testing is seldom used during cardiac rehabilitation. The aim was to evaluate haemodynamic changes using the cardiac impedance method during exercise testing in patients after percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass grafting during cardiac rehabilitation. Thirty (25 M; 5 F patients were included in the programme. The group was divided according to ejection fraction (EF: low – below 50% normal – equal to or above 50%. The exercise test was performed simultaneously with a four-electrode impedance cardiogram before and after rehabilitation. ECG, blood pressure, thoracic impedance, first derivative dz/dt, stroke volume (SV and cardiac output were recorded. Contractility index (Heather index – HI and vascular peripheral resistance were calculated. The pattern of haemodynamic changes was normal in 24 patients. The deflection points for HI and SV trend patterns were observed among patients with low EF. The contractility index decreased 90 s before maximal exercise and after the next 30-60 s a deflection point was observed in SV curve trends. In 24 patients with normal EF the contractility index trends did not decrease and SV trends increased until the end of exercise or a deflection point was not noted. The deflection points of the contractility index and SV curves were observed before the clinical indications for exercise test termination appeared in patients with a low ejection fraction. Impedance cardiography may indicate the threshold of the workload during real-time exercise testing.

  11. Factors that influence obesity, functional capacity, anxiety and depression outcomes following a Phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Gabrielle; Kerins, Mary; Fitzgerald, Geraldine; Spain, Marie; Morrison, Karen

    2013-10-01

    To examine changes in functional capacity, anxiety, depression and BMI in patients who completed a cardiac rehabilitation programme and to determine the influencing factors. While the effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation is long established, more studies are needed to examine the combined effectiveness of this multicomponent intervention and the factors that influence this in the changed profile of patients currently attending cardiac rehabilitation. The study was a longitudinal retrospective study of patients following a six- or eight-week Phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme. The study recruited 154 patients. Functional capacity, anxiety, depression, weight, waist circumference and BMI were assessed at the beginning and end of cardiac rehabilitation. t-tests were used to assess changes over time, and multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the influence of factors on these changes. Significant improvements were seen in functional capacity, waist circumference, weight and BMI, but not in depression and anxiety. Multivariate analysis revealed that being younger and less fit was associated with greater improvements in functional capacity while reason for referral, gender, depression or BMI did not influence improvements in functional capacity. Models testing the influence of the factors on BMI, anxiety and depression were not significant. Cardiac rehabilitation is still an effective method to instigate changes in cardiac risk factors despite the changes in patients profile attending programmes. Continued encouragement of the historically less typical patients to participate in cardiac rehabilitation is needed as reason for referral, gender, depression or BMI did not influence improvements in functional capacity. Despite psychosocial components within the programme, no significant improvements were observed over cardiac rehabilitation in depression or anxiety. While effectiveness was observed, there is room for further optimisation of practice

  12. Using a Combined Platform of Swarm Intelligence Algorithms and GIS to Provide Land Suitability Maps for Locating Cardiac Rehabilitation Defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffash-Charandabi, Neda; Sadeghi-Niaraki, Abolghasem; Park, Dong-Kyun

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a condition in which the heart is completely stopped and is not pumping any blood. Although most cardiac arrest cases are reported from homes or hospitals, about 20% occur in public areas. Therefore, these areas need to be investigated in terms of cardiac arrest incidence so that places of high incidence can be identified and cardiac rehabilitation defibrillators installed there. In order to investigate a study area in Petersburg, Pennsylvania State, and to determine appropriate places for installing defibrillators with 5-year period data, swarm intelligence algorithms were used. Moreover, the location of the defibrillators was determined based on the following five evaluation criteria: land use, altitude of the area, economic conditions, distance from hospitals and approximate areas of reported cases of cardiac arrest for public places that were created in geospatial information system (GIS). The A-P HADEL algorithm results were more precise about 27.36%. The validation results indicated a wider coverage of real values and the verification results confirmed the faster and more exact optimization of the cost function in the PSO method. The study findings emphasize the necessity of applying optimal optimization methods along with GIS and precise selection of criteria in the selection of optimal locations for installing medical facilities because the selected algorithm and criteria dramatically affect the final responses. Meanwhile, providing land suitability maps for installing facilities across hot and risky spots has the potential to save many lives.

  13. Duckneglect: video-games based neglect rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainetti, R; Sedda, A; Ronchetti, M; Bottini, G; Borghese, N A

    2013-01-01

    Video-games are becoming a common tool to guide patients through rehabilitation because of their power of motivating and engaging their users. Video-games may also be integrated into an infrastructure that allows patients, discharged from the hospital, to continue intensive rehabilitation at home under remote monitoring by the hospital itself, as suggested by the recently funded Rewire project. Goal of this work is to describe a novel low cost platform, based on video-games, targeted to neglect rehabilitation. The patient is guided to explore his neglected hemispace by a set of specifically designed games that ask him to reach targets, with an increasing level of difficulties. Visual and auditory cues helped the patient in the task and are progressively removed. A controlled randomization of scenarios, targets and distractors, a balanced reward system and music played in the background, all contribute to make rehabilitation more attractive, thus enabling intensive prolonged treatment. Results from our first patient, who underwent rehabilitation for half an hour, for five days a week for one month, showed on one side a very positive attitude of the patient towards the platform for the whole period, on the other side a significant improvement was obtained. Importantly, this amelioration was confirmed at a follow up evaluation five months after the last rehabilitation session and generalized to everyday life activities. Such a system could well be integrated into a home based rehabilitation system.

  14. Participation in society in patients with coronary artery disease before and after cardiac rehabilitation frequency, experienced restrictions and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeve, Nienke; Van Geffen, M.E.; Post, MWM; Stam, H.J.; Sunamura, M.; van Domburg, R.T.; Van Den Berg-Emons, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess changes in participation in society (frequency, restrictions, satisfaction) during and after cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and to assess associations between participation and heath-related quality of life (HRQOL). Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Outpatient CR center.

  15. Phase II intensive monitored cardiac rehabilitation for coronary artery disease and coronary risk factors--a six-session protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, B J; Thiel, J; Fletcher, G F

    1986-04-01

    To evaluate phase II intensive monitored cardiac rehabilitation using a 6-level, 6-session protocol, 31 patients were placed in a progressive 6-level exercise protocol with careful supervision and assessment of heart rate, rhythm, blood pressure and perceived exertion. Duration after the cardiac event ranged from 12 days to 8 years (median 10 months). Each exercise prescription was based on exercise testing with oxygen consumption determinations. Exercise activities were individually prescribed according to percentages of maximal MET level achieved on the exercise test. Each exercise session incorporated calisthenics, treadmill exercise, and bicycle and arm ergometry with progressively greater workloads on the various stations. All patients completed the 6 levels within 6 sessions of approximately 1 hour each, and achieved their designated 50 to 75% target heart rate with perceived exertion level 13 or less. There were no critical cardiac events, i.e., high-grade ventricular arrhythmias or myocardial infarction. All completed the 6-level protocol and progressed to a nonmonitored exercise program with no difficulty. The results of this short-term method of telemetry-monitored rehabilitation suggest benefits of proper exercise instruction, successful achievement of the 50 to 75% exercise target heart rate, detection of minor new arrhythmias and alterations of blood pressure response, adequate use of the perceived exertion scale, and a safe and effective transition to subsequent exercise programs.

  16. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: from knowledge to implementation. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo Francesco; Corrà, Ugo; Benzer, Werner

    2010-01-01

    ) to cardiovascular health outcomes. Secondary prevention through exercise-based CR is the intervention with the best scientific evidence to contribute to decrease morbidity and mortality in coronary artery disease, in particular after myocardial infarction but also incorporating cardiac interventions and chronic...... makers and consumers in the recognition of the comprehensive nature of CR. Those charged with responsibility for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, whether at European, national or individual centre level, need to consider where and how structured programmes of CR can be delivered to all...... patients eligible. Thus a novel, disease-oriented document has been generated, where all components of CR for cardiovascular conditions have been revised, presenting both well-established and controversial aspects. A general table applicable to all cardiovascular conditions and specific tables for each...

  17. Analysis of agreement between cardiac risk stratification protocols applied to participants of a center for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana A S; Silva, Anne K F; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Christofaro, Diego G D; Gonçalves, Aline F L; Vanderlei, Luiz C M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac risk stratification is related to the risk of the occurrence of events induced by exercise. Despite the existence of several protocols to calculate risk stratification, studies indicating that there is similarity between these protocols are still unknown. To evaluate the agreement between the existing protocols on cardiac risk rating in cardiac patients. The records of 50 patients from a cardiac rehabilitation program were analyzed, from which the following information was extracted: age, sex, weight, height, clinical diagnosis, medical history, risk factors, associated diseases, and the results from the most recent laboratory and complementary tests performed. This information was used for risk stratification of the patients in the protocols of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the protocol designed by Frederic J. Pashkow, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Société Française de Cardiologie, and the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the analysis of agreement between the protocols was calculated using the Kappa coefficient. Differences were considered with a significance level of 5%. Of the 21 analyses of agreement, 12 were considered significant between the protocols used for risk classification, with nine classified as moderate and three as low. No agreements were classified as excellent. Different proportions were observed in each risk category, with significant differences between the protocols for all risk categories. The agreements between the protocols were considered low and moderate and the risk proportions differed between protocols.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation: health characteristics and socio-economic status among those who do not attend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M; Faergeman, Ole; Foldspang, Anders

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is well documented, in randomised trials, to reduce mortality risk after myocardial infarction (MI). Selection of healthy patients for CR is a relatively unexplored problem. Our aims were to identify predictors of CR-attendance and to describe the prognosis......-attendees are older and more likely to have atypical symptoms at admission, a low socioeconomic status and to live alone. Special attention is needed to improve CR attendance among such patients....

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Different Tempos of Music During Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

    OpenAIRE

    MILLER, JARAD S.; TERBIZAN, DONNA J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of stimulating and sedative music on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and feeling status during exercise in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients. Twenty-two male and female older adults age 64 ± 8.0 y currently enrolled in phase III CR completed the study. Repeated measures crossover designs guided data collection. The manipulated independent variable was music condition (sedative, stimulating, and non-music control). T...

  20. Cardiac rehabilitation in a pediatric patient with heart retransplantation. A single case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K-V; Chiu, H-H; Wang, S-S; Lan, C; Chen, S-Y; Chou, N-K; Wu, M-H; Lai, J-S

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart transplantation is known to benefit physical capacity in adults, but the advantages of CR on pediatric patients with heart retransplantation remain undetermined. The purpose of the present study was to report the effect of structured CR for a boy receiving heart transplantations twice. Single case study. Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation department. A pediatric patient underwent heart transplantation due to dilated cardiomyopathy at 13.6 year-old and retransplantation owing to severe cardiac allograft vasculopathy at 16.2 year-old. CR was arranged after both transplantations. Bicycle or treadmill exercises were conducted three times weekly with the intensity adjusted to the ventilatory threshold. Serial cardiopulmonary exercise tests were performed to evaluate the sequential cardiorespiratory function changes using the peak oxygen uptake (VO₂peak) as the primary outcome. The patient had undergone 10 times of exercise tests during rehabilitation. The VO₂peak increased from 12.27 to 15.63 mL·kg-1·min-1 within 6 months after the primary transplantation. However, the VO₂peak dropped intensively after a rejection episode and failed to improve since the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Following retransplantation, the VO₂peak appeared worse initially but increased gradually with rehabilitation. One year subsequent to retransplantation, the VO₂peak reached 17.7 mL·kg-1·min-1 with a 7.22 mL·kg-1·min-1 improvement compared with his baseline value. Structured CR improves aerobic capacity of a pediatric patient with heart retransplantation. CR is safe and beneficial for pediatrics with heart retransplantation. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing can be considered as an adjuvant tool for detecting rejection or cardiac allograft vasculopathy in pediatric heart transplantation recipients.

  1. Examining the challenges of recruiting women into a cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Theresa M; Mendonca, Mary Ann; Fletcher, Gerald F; Schocken, Douglas D; Evans, Mary E; Banks, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    To examine the challenges of recruiting women for a 5-year cardiac rehabilitation randomized clinical trial; the aims of the study were to describe the range of recruitment sources, examine the myriad of factors contributing to ineligibility and nonparticipation of women during protocol screening, and discuss the challenges of enrolling women in the trial. The Women's-Only Phase II Cardiac Rehabilitation program used an experimental design with 2 treatment groups. Eligible participants included women who were (1) diagnosed with a myocardial infarction or stable angina or had undergone coronary revascularization within the last 12 months; (2) able to read, write, and speak English; and (3) older than 21 years. Responses to multiple recruitment strategies including automatic hospital referrals, physician office referrals, mass mailings, media advertisements, and community outreach are described. Reasons for ineligibility and nonparticipation in the trial are explored. Automatic hospital order was the largest source of referral (n = 1,367, 81%) accounting for the highest enrollment rate of women (n = 184, 73%). The barriers to enrollment into the cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial included patient-oriented, provider-oriented, and programmatic factors. Of the referral sources, 52% were screened ineligible for provider-oriented reasons, 31% were ineligible due to patient-oriented factors, and 17.4% were linked to the study protocol. Study nonparticipation of those eligible (73.8%) was largely associated with patient-oriented factors (65.2%), with far less due to provider-related factors (4%) or study-related factors (3.4%). Standing hospital orders facilitated enrollment to the cardiac rehabilitation clinical trial, yet women failed to participate predominantly due to significant patient-oriented biopsychosocial barriers.

  2. Contribution of Occupational Therapy in cardiac rehabilitation: intervention, challenges and reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Vila Paz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease increases the prevalence of disability and mortality in Western countries. In Spain, it is the main health problem of the adult population. Objective: To understand the professional role of Occupational Therapy in cardiac rehabilitation, in the different stages of intervention, as well as the standardized instruments currently available for evaluation. Method: Review and narrative analysis of the literature on Occupational Therapy and cardiac rehabilitation. The search in the Medline database did not locate any article; in the IME database, a study was identified. In addition, a manual search of articles, books and other academic works of relevance in this intervention area was conducted. Results: Regaining independence and autonomy in occupations and significant roles is the main goal of Occupational Therapy. The intervention follows a holistic paradigm, focused on achieving an active, healthy, social and productive life, according to the needs of each person. Individualized counselling and training actions include incorporating the principles of energy conservation, ergonomic analysis, simplification of tasks and the use of technology and environmental adaptations. In the evaluation of occupational performance, the therapist can use the generic scales FIM, Barthel and COPM in the absence of specific tools for this population; SF-36 is an important instrument to analyze quality of life. Conclusion: The relevance of OT in the promotion of autonomy argues the need to involve this professional in cardiac rehabilitation strategies, in order to promote educational and practical approaches focused on human occupation.

  3. [Strength training with elastic bands: measure of its effects in cardiac rehabilitation after coronary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbiervliet, W; Pélissier, J; Lédermann, B; Kotzki, N; Benaïm, C; Hérisson, C

    2003-11-01

    To compare high intensity strength training with weightlifting exercises or with elastic bands. Outpatient unit of cardiac rehabilitation. TYPE: Prospective randomised clinical trial. Inclusion of coronary patients in phase II after medical or surgical treatment of a myocardiac infarction, without cardiac insufficiency; beta-blockers were accepted. Evaluation of coronary patients at beginning and at the end of a 4 week cardiac rehabilitation program. It included progressive aerobic training according to Karvonen method for all the patients, associated with weightlifting exercises (Koch press) in the control group, or use of elastic bands in the experimental group. Cardiac rate, oxygen consumption at rest and at maximum power were the main criteria with also muscle strength of quadriceps, hamstrings, biceps brachii, latissimus dorsi and triceps brachii, body mass indexes, quality of life with SF-36, anxiety (stay T test) and perceived exertion with the Borg 10-point category-ratio scale, myotendinous injuries (Shaw scale). Twenty-six coronary patients, all male from 45 to 65 years old, all receiving beta-blockers, were included, 13 in each group. Control and experimental groups were initially similar. At the end of the 4 week program, all the two groups improved significantly their strength and power and there were no differences between the two groups. Perceived exertion was lower in the group using elastic bands and there were no myotendinous lesions. Strength training with elastic bands is a low-cost, attractive, playful technique, proposed to a group of coronary patients, which appears as effective in cardiac rehabilitation as individual weightlifting training.

  4. Outcome of Cardiac Rehabilitation Following Off-Pump Versus On-Pump Coronary Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefizadeh, Reza; Hariri, Seyed Yaser; Moghadam, Adel Johari

    2017-06-15

    A few studies have compared the cardiac rehabilitation (CR) outcome between those who undergo conventional on-pump bypass surgery and off-pump surgery. We compared this outcome among the patients differentiated by the On-pump and off-pump surgical procedures about cardiovascular variables and psychological status. This longitudinal study recruited 318 and 102 consecutive patients who had undergone CABG (on-pump surgery, n = 318 and off-pump surgery, n = 102) and been referred to the CR clinic. The off-pump surgery patients had more improvement in their metabolic equivalents (METs) value. The physical and mental components of health-related quality of life (QOL) (based on SF-36 questionnaire) as well as depression-anxiety (based on Costello-Comrey Depression and Anxiety Scale) were notably improved in the two study groups after the CR program, while changes in the QOL components scores and also depression-anxiety score were not different between the off-pump and on-pump techniques. Regarding QOL and psychological status, there were no differences in the CR outcome between those who underwent off-pump bypass surgery and those who underwent on-pump surgery; nevertheless, the off-pump technique was superior to the on-pump method on METs improvement following CR.

  5. Primary care provider perceptions of intake transition records and shared care with outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamnik Veronica

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recommended that records are kept between primary care providers (PCPs and specialists during patient transitions from hospital to community care, this communication is not currently standardized. We aimed to assess the transmission of cardiac rehabilitation (CR program intake transition records to PCPs and to explore PCPs' needs in communication with CR programs and for intake transition record content. Method 144 PCPs of consenting enrollees from 8 regional and urban Ontario CR programs participated in this cross-sectional study. Intake transition records were tracked from the CR program to the PCP's office. Sixty-six PCPs participated in structured telephone interviews. Results Sixty-eight (47.6% PCPs received a CR intake transition record. Fifty-eight (87.9% PCPs desired intake transition records, with most wanting it transmitted via fax (n = 52, 78.8%. On a 5-point Likert scale, PCPs strongly agreed that the CR transition record met their needs for providing patient care (4.32 ± 0.61, with 48 (76.2% reporting that it improved their management of patients' cardiac risk. PCPs rated the following elements as most important to include in an intake transition record: clinical status (4.67 ± 0.64, exercise test results (4.61 ± 0.52, and the proposed patient care plan (4.59 ± 0.71. Conclusions Less than half of intake transition records are reaching PCPs, revealing a large gap in continuity of patient care. PCP responses should be used to develop an evidence-based intake transition record, and procedures should be implemented to ensure high-quality transitional care.

  6. Randomised controlled trial of a 12 week yoga intervention on negative affective states, cardiovascular and cognitive function in post-cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alan; Kiat, Hosen; Denniss, A Robert; Cheema, Birinder S; Bensoussan, Alan; Machliss, Bianca; Colagiuri, Ben; Chang, Dennis

    2014-10-24

    Negative affective states such as anxiety, depression and stress are significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease, particularly in cardiac and post-cardiac rehabilitation populations.Yoga is a balanced practice of physical exercise, breathing control and meditation that can reduce psychosocial symptoms as well as improve cardiovascular and cognitive function. It has the potential to positively affect multiple disease pathways and may prove to be a practical adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation in further reducing cardiac risk factors as well as improving self-efficacy and post-cardiac rehabilitation adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviours. This is a parallel arm, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial that will assess the outcomes of post- phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation patients assigned to a yoga intervention in comparison to a no-treatment wait-list control group. Participants randomised to the yoga group will engage in a 12 week yoga program comprising of two group based sessions and one self-administered home session each week. Group based sessions will be led by an experienced yoga instructor. This will involve teaching beginner students a hatha yoga sequence that incorporates asana (poses and postures), pranayama (breathing control) and meditation. The primary outcomes of this study are negative affective states of anxiety, depression and stress assessed using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Secondary outcomes include measures of quality of life, and cardiovascular and cognitive function. The cardiovascular outcomes will include blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, pulse wave velocity, carotid intima media thickness measurements, lipid/glucose profiles and C-reactive protein assays. Assessments will be conducted prior to (week 0), mid-way through (week 6) and following the intervention period (week 12) as well as at a four week follow-up (week 16). This study will determine the effect of yoga practice on negative affective states

  7. Self-rating level of perceived exertion for guiding exercise intensity during a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme and the influence of heart rate reducing medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lars H.; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation or following heart valve surgery and participating in exercise-based rehabilitation were included. The 12-week rehabilitation outpatient programme comprised three weekly training sessions, each consisting of 20min aerobic exercise divided into three steps. Patients......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether self-rating level of perceived exertion can adequately guide exercise intensity during a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme. DESIGN: Linear regression analysis using rehabilitation data from two randomised controlled trials. METHODS: Patients undergoing...... were asked to base their exercise intensity for each step on a predefined rating of perceived exertion specified in a training diary. Exercise intensity was objectively measured by heart rate during the last 2min for each exercise step. Comparative analysis and linear regression of the rating...

  8. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56

  9. A Randomized Trial Comparing Cardiac Rehabilitation to Standard of Care for Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Rhodes, Jonathan; Landzberg, Michael J; Bhatt, Ami B; Shafer, Keri M; Yeh, Doreen DeFaria; Crouter, Scott E; Ubeda Tikkanen, Ana

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise capacity and quality of life while reducing mortality in adults with acquired heart disease. Cardiac rehabilitation has not been extensively studied in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial (NCT01822769) of a 12-week clinical CR program compared with standard of care (SOC). Participants were ≥16 years old, had moderate or severe CHD, had O 2 saturation ≥92%, and had peak O 2 consumption ([Formula: see text]) exercise capacity, physical activity, quality of life, self-reported health status, and other variables at baseline and after 12 weeks. The prespecified primary end point was change in [Formula: see text]. We analyzed data on 28 participants (aged 41.1 ± 12.1 years, 50% male), 13 randomized to CR and 15 to SOC. [Formula: see text] averaged 16.8 ± 3.8 mL/kg/min, peak work rate = 95 ± 28 W, and median Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) score = 27 (interquartile range: 11-44). Cardiac rehabilitation participants were older (48 ± 9 years vs 36 ± 12 years; P = .01), but there were no significant between-group differences in other variables. There were no adverse events related to CR. [Formula: see text] increased in the CR group compared with SOC (+2.2 mL/kg/min, 95% confidence interval: 0.7-3.7; P = .002, age-adjusted +2.7 mL/kg/min; P = .004); there was a nonsignificant improvement in work rate (+8.1 W; P = .13). Among the 25 participants with baseline MLHFQ > 5, there was a clinically important >5-point improvement in 72.7% and 28.6% of CR and SOC participants, respectively ( P = .047). Cardiac rehabilitation was also associated with improved self-assessment of overall health ( P Cardiac rehabilitation is safe and is associated with improvement in aerobic capacity and self-reported health status compared with SOC in adults with CHD.

  10. Social inequality and barriers to cardiac rehabilitation in the rehab-North register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graversen, Christina Boesgaard; Eichhorst, Regina; Ravn, Lisbeth; Christiansen, Susanne Svane Riis; Johansen, Martin Berg; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2017-12-01

    Barriers to participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) may occur at three levels of the referral process (lack of information, declining to participate, and referral to appropriate CR programme). The aim is to analyse the impact of socioeconomic status on barriers to CR and investigate whether such barriers influenced the choice of referral. The Rehab-North Register, a cross-sectional study, enrolled 5455 patients hospitalised at Aalborg University Hospital with myocardial infarction (MI) during 2011-2014. Patients hospitalised with ST-elevated MI and complicated non-ST-elevated MI were to be sent to specialized CR, whereas patients with uncomplicated non-ST-elevated MI and unstable angina pectoris were to be sent to community-based CR. Detailed selected socioeconomic information was gathered from statistical registries in Statistics Denmark. Data was assessed using logistic regression. Patients being retired, low educated, and/or with an annual gross income social inequality may help in tailoring a better approach in the referral process to CR.

  11. A national survey of cardiac rehabilitation services in New Zealand: 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Geoff; Doolan-Noble, Fiona; Humphreys, Grace; Williams, Gina; O'Shaughnessy, Helen; Devlin, Gerry

    2016-05-27

    Guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes inform best practice. In Aotearoa NewZealand, little information exists about the structure and services provided by CR programmes and there is a poor understanding of how existing CR programmes are delivered with respect to evidence-based national guidelines. All 46 CR providers in New Zealand were invited to participate in a national survey in 2015. The survey sought information on the following: unit structure; referral processes; patient assessment; audit (including quality assurance activity); Phase 2 CR content; and support for special populations. Simple descriptive analysis of the responses was conducted, involving forming counts and percentages. Thirty-six distinct units completed the survey and 94% provided Phase 2. Assessment tools, Phase 2 educational components, and the methods of providing the exercise component varied. Most units audited their services, 25% audited their programme six-monthly or more frequently. Just over half of the units (56%) reported key performance indicators. The survey identified variations in delivery and content of CR in New Zealand, with poor understanding of the impact on patient outcomes. This is likely due to the absence of standardised audit practices and routine collection of key performance indicators on a national basis.

  12. Influence of Low Peak Respiratory Exchange Ratio on Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul; Choi, Hee Eun; Lee, Ki Hoon; Kim, Young Joo; Lee, Sang Jae

    2016-12-01

    To compare and analyze the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in two groups based on the peak respiratory exchange ratio (RER peak ) 1.1 values using the exercise tolerance test (ETT) results, and to investigate the reasons for early termination of ETT. Patients with acute coronary syndrome who participated in CR exercise training were selected and all subjects underwent 6 weeks of CR exercise training. ETT was performed on a treadmill using a Modified Bruce Protocol before and after CR exercise training. According to the result of the first ETT, the subjects were divided into two groups: those with an RER peak ≥1.1 (n=33) and those with an RER peak rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and RPP (rate pressure product) at stage 3 decreased in both the RER peak means that patients with a lower exercise tolerance could also benefit from the effects of CR. Thoughtful consideration to identify the direct and indirect causes for the early termination of ETT would be necessary to improve the efficiency of CR.

  13. Exercise training characteristics in cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a cross-sectional survey of Australian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Bridget; Glasziou, Paul; Briffa, Tom; Hoffmann, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), however, little information exists regarding the specific exercise interventions currently provided for coronary heart disease in Australian practice. We aimed to analyse the current status of exercise-based CR services across Australia. Cross-sectional survey. Australian sites offering exercise-based CR were identified from publically available directories. All sites were invited by email to participate in an online Survey Monkey questionnaire between October 2014 and March 2015, with reminders via email and phone follow-up. Questions investigated the demographics and format of individual programmes, as well as specific exercise training characteristics. 297 eligible programmes were identified, with an 82% response rate. Most sites (82%) were based at hospital or outpatient centres, with home (15%), community (18%) or gym-based options (5%) less common. While CR was most often offered in a comprehensive format (72% of sites), the level of exercise intervention varied greatly among programmes. Most frequently, exercise was prescribed 1-2 times per week for 60 min over 7 weeks. Almost one-quarter (24%) had a sole practitioner supervising exercise, although the majority used a nurse/physiotherapist combination. Low to moderate exercise intensities were used in 60% of programmes, however, higher intensity prescriptions were not uncommon. Few sites (service remains within traditional models of care. A continuing focus on service improvement and evidence-based care should, therefore, be considered a core aim of those providing exercise for CR in order to improve health service delivery and optimise outcomes for patients.

  14. Evaluation of a self-management patient education program for patients with chronic heart failure undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Karin; Musekamp, Gunda; Seekatz, Bettina; Glatz, Johannes; Karger, Gabriele; Kiwus, Ulrich; Knoglinger, Ernst; Schubmann, Rainer; Westphal, Ronja; Faller, Hermann

    2013-08-23

    Chronic heart failure requires a complex treatment regimen on a life-long basis. Therefore, self-care/self-management is an essential part of successful treatment and comprehensive patient education is warranted. However, specific information on program features and educational strategies enhancing treatment success is lacking. This trial aims to evaluate a patient-oriented and theory-based self-management educational group program as compared to usual care education during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. The study is a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in four cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Clusters are patient education groups that comprise HF patients recruited within 2 weeks after commencement of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Cluster randomization was chosen for pragmatic reasons, i.e. to ensure a sufficient number of eligible patients to build large-enough educational groups and to prevent contamination by interaction of patients from different treatment allocations during rehabilitation. Rehabilitants with chronic systolic heart failure (n = 540) will be consecutively recruited for the study at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. Data will be assessed at admission, at discharge and after 6 and 12 months using patient questionnaires. In the intervention condition, patients receive the new patient-oriented self-management educational program, whereas in the control condition, patients receive a short lecture-based educational program (usual care). The primary outcome is patients' self-reported self-management competence. Secondary outcomes include behavioral determinants and self-management health behavior (symptom monitoring, physical activity, medication adherence), health-related quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Treatment effects will be evaluated separately for each follow-up time point using multilevel regression analysis, and adjusting for baseline values. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a

  15. An alternative view of psychological well-being in cardiac rehabilitation: Considering temperament and character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Douglas, Kitrina; Fox, Kenneth; McKenna, Jim

    2006-09-01

    Research suggests that personality is related to recovery from cardiac events, yet few conceptions of personality provide hope or possibility of improvement for patients with the least adaptive personality types. Psychobiological theory of personality has potential in this regard, but, to date, no research has investigated temperament and character in cardiac settings. To explore relationships between temperament, character and psychological well-being among cardiac patients. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 81 cardiac patients to obtain data on personality (TCI [Cloninger CR, Przybeck T, Svrakic D, & Wetzel RD. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): A guide to its development and use. St Louis (MO), Center for Psychobiology of Personality, Washington University;1994]), anxiety and depression (HADS [Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983;67(6): 361-70]) and satisfaction with life [Diener E, Emmons RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S. The satisfaction with life scale. J Pers Assess 1985;49(1):71-5]. The interaction of two personality dimensions (harm avoidance and self-directedness) was significantly related to measures of psychological well-being. Patients with low self-directedness combined with high harm avoidance reported significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and lower levels of satisfaction with life. This exploratory study suggests that psychobiological theory of personality may be useful for practitioners in cardiac rehabilitation seeking to identify patients at risk of poor psychological well-being.

  16. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Maria Nery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results: The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard.

  17. Stress, anxiety and depression in heart disease patients: A major challenge for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet-Gelinier, Jean-Christophe; Bonin, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular events and emotional disorders share a common epidemiology, thus suggesting fundamental pathways linking these different diseases. Growing evidence in the literature highlights the influence of psychological determinants in somatic diseases. A patient's socio-economic aspects, personality traits, health behavior and even biological pathways may contribute to the course of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac events often occur suddenly and the episode can be traumatic for people not prepared for such an event. In this review of the literature, the authors tackle the question of psychobiological mechanisms of stress, in a pathophysiological approach to fundamental pathways linking the brain to the heart. Various psychological, biological and genetic arguments are presented in support of the hypothesis that various etiological mechanisms may be involved. The authors finally deal with biological and psychological strategies in a context of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, in this context, cardiac rehabilitation, with its global approach, seems to be a good time to diagnose emotional disorders like anxiety and depression, and to help people to cope with stressful events. In this field, cardiac rehabilitation seems to be a crucial step in order to improve patients' outcomes, by helping them to understand the influence of psychobiological risk factors, and to build strategies in order to manage daily stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation services in Denmark: still room for expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O; Traeden, Ulla I; Videbaek, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    support, dietary counselling, smoking cessation, and pharmaceutical risk factor management) were available during each of three phases: (I) in hospital; (II) outpatient; and (II) community-based services. RESULTS: Many hospitals offered one or more of the CR components during phases I and II: physical...

  19. Are there meaningful longitudinal changes in health related quality of life--SF36, in cardiac rehabilitation patients?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKee, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to observe changes in quality of life and minimal clinical important differences of quality of life over time in cardiac rehabilitation patients and to compare these with published normal data. METHODS: In this non-randomised study, SF36 questionnaires were completed by 187 patients recruited to a Phase III cardiac rehabilitation multidisciplinary outpatient programme. Data was collected at beginning, end and six months after Phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in physical functioning, role limitation due to physical function, pain and general health perception scales, over the above time frame, from both a statistically and a mean clinical important difference point of view. These improvements occurred mainly during the cardiac rehabilitation programme phase. CONCLUSIONS: These improvements meant that patients six months post-cardiac rehabilitation were only 5% below the quality of life for an aged matched normal group. However patients still had significant deficits in physical role and emotional role limitations. Suitable measurement of quality of life on an individual basis, supported by normal values is needed. This would facilitate the identification of shortfalls in patient quality of life and the subsequent tailoring of care to address these individualised patient needs.

  20. A mHealth cardiac rehabilitation exercise intervention: findings from content development studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfaeffli Leila

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involving stakeholders and consumers throughout the content and study design ensures interventions are engaging and relevant for end-users. The aim of this paper is to present the content development process for a mHealth (mobile phone and internet-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR exercise intervention. Methods An innovative mHealth intervention was developed with patient input using the following steps: conceptualization, formative research, pre-testing, and pilot testing. Conceptualization, including theoretical and technical aspects, was undertaken by experts. For the formative component, focus groups and interviews with cardiac patients were conducted to discuss their perceptions of a mHealth CR program. A general inductive thematic approach identified common themes. A preliminary library of text and video messages were then developed. Participants were recruited from CR education sessions to pre-test and provide feedback on the content using an online survey. Common responses were extracted and compiled. An iterative process was used to refine content prior to pilot testing and conduct of a randomized controlled trial. Results 38 CR patients and 3 CR nurses participated in the formative research and 20 CR patients participated in the content pre-testing. Participants perceived the mHealth program as an effective approach to inform and motivate patients to exercise. For the qualitative study, 100% (n = 41 of participants thought it to be a good idea, and 11% of participants felt it might not be useful for them, but would be for others. Of the 20 participants who completed the online survey, 17 out of 20 (85% stated they would sign up to a program where they could receive information by video messages on a website, and 12 out of 20 (60% showed interest in a texting program. Some older CR patients viewed technology as a potential barrier as they were unfamiliar with text messaging or did not have mobile phones. Steps to

  1. A practical review for cardiac rehabilitation professionals of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices: historical and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Bottio, Tomaso; Compostella, Caterina; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Livi, Ugolino; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino; Bellotto, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with end-stage heart failure are being treated with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (cf-LVADs). These patients provide new challenges to the staff in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Even though experience remains limited, it seems that patients supported by cf-LVADs may safely engage in typical rehabilitative activities, provided that some attention is paid to specific aspects, such as the presence of a short external drive line. In spite of initial physical deconditioning, CR allows progressive improvement of symptoms such as fatigue and dyspnea. Intensity of rehabilitative activities should ideally be based on measured aerobic capacity and increased appropriately over time. Regular, long-term exercise training results in improved physical fitness and survival rates. Appropriate adjustment of cf-LVAD settings, together with maintenance of adequate blood volume, provides maximal output, while avoiding suction effects. Ventricular arrhythmias, although not necessarily constituting an immediate life-threatening situation, deserve treatment as they could lead to an increased rate of hospitalization and poorer quality of life. Atrial fibrillation may worsen symptoms of right ventricular failure and reduce exercise tolerance. Blood pressure measurements are possible in cf-LVAD patients only using a Doppler technique, and a mean blood pressure ≤80 mmHg is considered "ideal." Some patients may present with orthostatic intolerance, related to autonomic dysfunction. While exercise training constitutes the basic rehabilitative tool, a comprehensive intervention that includes psychological and social support could better meet the complex needs of patients in which cf-LVAD may offer prolonged survival.

  2. Music-based interventions in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Särkämö, Teppo; Leo, Vera; Tervaniemi, Mari; Altenmüller, Eckart; Soinila, Seppo

    2017-08-01

    During the past ten years, an increasing number of controlled studies have assessed the potential rehabilitative effects of music-based interventions, such as music listening, singing, or playing an instrument, in several neurological diseases. Although the number of studies and extent of available evidence is greatest in stroke and dementia, there is also evidence for the effects of music-based interventions on supporting cognition, motor function, or emotional wellbeing in people with Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, or multiple sclerosis. Music-based interventions can affect divergent functions such as motor performance, speech, or cognition in these patient groups. However, the psychological effects and neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of music interventions are likely to share common neural systems for reward, arousal, affect regulation, learning, and activity-driven plasticity. Although further controlled studies are needed to establish the efficacy of music in neurological recovery, music-based interventions are emerging as promising rehabilitation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impaired cerebrovascular function in coronary artery disease patients and recovery following cardiac rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udunna C Anazodo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR to hypercapnia in 34 coronary artery disease (CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate, insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the anterior cingulate, insula, postcentral and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in gray matter volume were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-month exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral anterior cingulate, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right anterior cingulate, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the anterior cingulate is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control.

  4. The effect of an educational intervention on coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients' participation rate in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a controlled health care trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov Ilia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation has a beneficial effect on the prognosis and quality of life of cardiac patients, and has been found to be cost-effective. This report describes a comprehensive and low cost educational intervention designed to increase the attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs of patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods/Design A controlled prospective intervention trial. The control arm comprised 520 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery between January 2004 and May 2005 in five medical centers across Israel. This group received no additional treatment beyond usual care. The intervention arm comprised 504 patients recruited from the same cardiothoracic departments between June 2005 and November 2006. This group received oral and written explanations about the advantages of participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs and a telephone call two weeks after hospital discharge intended to further encourage their enrollment. The medical staff attended a one-hour seminar on cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, it was recommended that referral to cardiac rehabilitation be added to the letter of discharge from the hospital. Both study groups were interviewed before surgery and one-year post surgery. A one-year post-operative interview assessed factors affecting patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation programs, as well as the structure and content of the cardiac rehabilitation programs attended. Anthropometric parameters were measured at pre- and post-operative interviews;- and medical information was obtained from patient medical records. The effect of cardiac rehabilitation on one- and three-year mortality was assessed. Discussion We report a low cost yet comprehensive intervention designed to increase cardiac rehabilitation participation by raising both patient and medical staff awareness to the potential benefits of cardiac rehabilitation. Trial

  5. Physicians' tacit and stated policies for determining patient benefit and referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W; Pezzo, Mark V; Beckie, Theresa M; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C; Grace, Sherry L

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented; however, physicians continue to underuse CR programs, and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods, which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here used clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on 5 characteristics (gender, age, type of cardiovascular procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral scale. Consistent with previous studies, there was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies, and self-insight was modest. On the whole, physicians showed evidence of systematic gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Insight data suggest that 1 in 3 physicians were unaware of their own bias. There was greater agreement among physicians in how they described their judgments (stated policies) than in how they actually made them (tacit policies). Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates.

  6. Physicians’ Tacit and Stated Policies for Determining Patient Benefit and Referral to Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W.; Pezzo, Mark V.; Beckie, Theresa M.; Shahraki, Farnaz; Kentner, Amanda C.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The benefits of prescribing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for patients following heart surgery is well documented. However physicians continue to underutilize CR programs and disparities in the referral of women are common. Previous research into the causes of these problems has relied on self-report methods which presume that physicians have insight into their referral behavior and can describe it accurately. In contrast, the research presented here employed clinical judgment analysis (CJA) to discover the tacit judgment and referral policies of individual physicians. Purpose The specific aims were to determine 1) what these policies were, 2) the degree of self-insight that individual physicians had into their own policies, 3) the amount of agreement among physicians, and 4) the extent to which judgments were related to attitudes toward CR. Method Thirty-six Canadian physicians made judgments and decisions regarding 32 hypothetical cardiac patients, each described on five characteristics (gender, age, type of surgical procedure, presence/absence of musculoskeletal pain, and degree of motivation) and then completed the 19 items of the Attitude towards Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral instrument. Results There was wide variation among physicians in their tacit and stated judgment policies. Physicians exhibited greater agreement in what they believed they were doing (stated policies) than in what they actually did (tacit policies). Nearly one-third of the physicians showed evidence of systematic, and perhaps subliminal, gender bias as they judged women as less likely than men to benefit from CR. Correlations between attitude statements and CJA measures were modest. Conclusions These findings offer some explanation for the slow progress of efforts to improve CR referrals and for gender disparities in referral rates. PMID:23784848

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  9. [Assessment the lifestyle in patients after recent acute coronary syndrome qualified for cardiac rehabilitation and in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejer, Anna; Irzmański, Robert; Pawlicki, Lucjan; Kowalski, Jan

    2013-07-01

    Results of a lot of research indicate that preventive activities consisting in the fighting of risk factors have the greatest influence on the reduction of the incidence of ischaemic heart disease. THE AIM OF THE STUDY was to assess the lifestyle in patients after recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS) qualified for cardiac rehabilitation and in healthy subjects (with no diagnosis of coronary thrombosis). The research included 86 patients, 64 men and 22 women aged 42-78 (mean age 61.7 +/- 9.6 years) after recent ACS, treated with PCI (percutaneous coronary interventions), and qualified for cardiac rehabilitation (stage II)--group I. The control group included 88 people, 54 men and 34 women aged 34-75 (mean age 56.2 +/- 9.7 years), who were clinically healthy--group II. The assessment of a lifestyle was performed based on the presence of four positive behaviours, i.e. eating appropriate amount of vegetables and (or) fruit every day, refraining from smoking, satisfactory levels of physical activity, and correct body mass. Based on these factors, a lifestyle index was calculated, from 0 (no positive health behaviours) to 4 (all positive health behaviours present), the so-called healthy lifestyle index. Among the examined elements of lifestyle index in ill and healthy subjects, satisfactory physical activity was the rarest (in 16.67% of men and in 9.09% women after ACS and in 16.22% of healthy men and 11.63% healthy women). Healthy lifestyle index was determined in 4.88% of patients after ACS. It was not found in healthy subjects. The analysis of the lifestyle index shows that a change of one's lifestyle is necessary as an initial and secondary prevention.

  10. Lifestyle after Cardiac Rehabilitation: Did the Message Come across, and Was It Feasible? An Analysis of Patients’ Narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Veje; Laustsen, Sussie; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    2014-01-01

    ) considering prior lifestyle to be appropriate, maybe with minor ad- justments; 2) acknowledging the need for incorporating lifestyle changes; and 3) reconciling or feeling guilt when being unable to manage changes. Participation in the cardiac rehabilitation programme was a positive experience, but it had...

  11. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  12. Cardiac Acceleration at the Onset of Exercise : A Potential Parameter for Monitoring Progress During Physical Training in Sports and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Florentina J.; Monden, Paul G.; van Meeteren, Nico L. U.; Daanen, Hein A. M.

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  13. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: A potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were

  14. Effects of expanded cardiac rehabilitation on psychosocial status in coronary artery disease with focus on type D characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Monica Rydell; Edström-Plüss, Catrin; Held, Claes; Henriksson, Peter; Billing, Ewa; Wallén, N Håkan

    2007-06-01

    Type D personality has been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the effects of expanded cardiac rehabilitation on type D score and psychosocial characteristics in 224 CAD patients randomised to either expanded cardiac rehabilitation (stress management, increased physical training, stay at a "Patient Hotel" after discharge and cooking sessions), or routine rehabilitation. Follow-up was 1 year. At baseline patients with a high type D score [patients in the upper quartile of type D score (Q4) i.e., type D patients] had a lower sense of coherence (p quality of life (p quality of life scores (p Quality of life was also improved in control type D patients (Q4; p quality of life in type D patients.

  15. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation improves outcome for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Findings from the COPE-ICD randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    Aims:The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation intervention including exercise training and psycho-education vs 'treatment as usual' in patients treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).Methods:In this study 196 patients...... with first time ICD implantation (mean age 57.2 (standard deviation (SD)=13.2); 79% men) were randomised (1:1) to comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation vs 'treatment as usual'. Altogether 144 participants completed the 12 month follow-up. The intervention consisted of twelve weeks of exercise training and one...... year of psycho-educational follow-up focusing on modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes. Two primary outcomes, general health score (Short Form-36 (SF-36)) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2), were used. Post-hoc analyses included SF-36 and ICD therapy history.Results:Comprehensive cardiac...

  16. Brief psychological intervention in phase I of cardiac rehabilitation after acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana Cláudia; McIntyre, Teresa; Coelho, Rui; Prata, Joana; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2017-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is an important cause of mortality and significant personal and financial costs. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs have shown positive effects in reducing cardiovascular mortality and improving functional capacity. However, adherence is low and appears to be influenced by psychosocial factors, such as patients' cognitions and emotional state. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of a brief in-hospital psychological intervention to promote cognitive and emotional adaptation after ACS. One hundred and twenty-one patients with ACS, admitted to a coronary care unit in a central hospital, were randomized to an experimental group (EG, n=65) and a control group (CG, n=56). Portuguese versions of the HADS and BIPQ were used to measure emotional well-being and illness cognitions. Two 1 h 15 min sessions were conducted 2-3 days after hospital admission, and a 20-minute follow-up session took place one month after discharge. Patients were assessed at four different time points: pre-test, post-test, and at 1- and 2-month follow-up. The intervention had significant effects on anxiety, depression and illness cognitions. Anxiety and depression were significantly reduced and illness cognitions improved significantly in the EG compared to the control group. For the EG, these changes were maintained or enhanced at 1- and 2-month follow-up, whereas for the CG there was a deterioration in psychosocial adjustment. These results indicate that a brief psychological intervention program delivered during hospitalization for ACS and combined with standard medical care can have positive effects in terms of psychosocial outcomes that have proven impact on cardiac rehabilitation and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Attitude toward the out-patient cardiac rehabilitation program and facilitators for maintenance of exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza M L; Zhong, Xue Bing; Sit, Janet W H; Chair, Sek Ying; Leung, Doris Y P; Leung, Carmen; Leung, K C

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the attitudes of Chinese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) toward the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCRP), as well as their exercise behavior, intention, maintenance and related factors. A qualitative descriptive study design was used, and 22 CHD patients were recruited in Hong Kong in 2014. In-depth interviews and content analyses were conducted. The tripartite model of attitudes was adopted as research framework. Two themes were identified: (1) informant attitude (perception, affection, and practice) toward the OCRP and (2) Exercise Behavior - intention, maintenance and its related factors. Most informants showed positive perception and affection regarding the outpatient rehabilitation program, leading to regular practice of exercise in the program and at home. Peer, group dynamic, social support and Chinese culture influences on exercise behavior may serve as major facilitators to maintain exercise behavior. Positive attitude toward the OCRP enhanced the participation rate, whereas peer and social support from the family and workplace were useful to improve the maintenance of exercise behavior. Overall, this study provides insights into strategic planning for the OCRP and continual support for CHD patients in the community.

  18. Motivational processes and well-being in cardiac rehabilitation: a self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rachel Jane; Hudson, Joanne; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Doust, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the processes underpinning changes in psychological well-being and behavioural regulation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients using self-determination theory (SDT). A repeated measures design was used to identify the longitudinal relationships between SDT variables, psychological well-being and exercise behaviour during and following a structured CR programme. Participants were 389 cardiac patients (aged 36-84 years; M(age) = 64 ± 9 years; 34.3% female) referred to a 12-week-supervised CR programme. Psychological need satisfaction, behavioural regulation, health-related quality of life, physical self-worth, anxiety and depression were measured at programme entry, exit and six month post-programme. During the programme, increases in autonomy satisfaction predicted positive changes in behavioural regulation, and improvements in competence and relatedness satisfaction predicted improvements in behavioural regulation and well-being. Competence satisfaction also positively predicted habitual physical activity. Decreases in external regulation and increases in intrinsic motivation predicted improvements in physical self-worth and physical well-being, respectively. Significant longitudinal relationships were identified whereby changes during the programme predicted changes in habitual physical activity and the mental quality of life from exit to six month follow-up. Findings provide insight into the factors explaining psychological changes seen during CR. They highlight the importance of increasing patients' perceptions of psychological need satisfaction and self-determined motivation to improve well-being during the structured component of a CR programme and longer term physical activity.

  19. Patient perspectives on the Hula Empowering Lifestyle Adaptation Study: benefits of dancing hula for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gregory G; Look, Mele; Tolentino, Kalehua; Trask-Batti, Mililani; Seto, Todd; de Silva, Mapuana; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku

    2015-01-01

    The Hula Empowering Lifestyle Adaption Study, funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, was a 5-year research trial evaluating the impact of the traditional Native Hawaiian dance form, hula, as an exercise modality for cardiac rehabilitation, compared with usual care, on individuals recently hospitalized for a cardiac event or who had recently undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Seeking to learn what physical, mental, spiritual, and social effects the intervention may have had for participants, we interviewed 20 of a total of 35 patients who were enrolled in the dance arm of the study. Classical thematic triangulation analysis was used. Participants recognized that hula's coordination of body, mind, and spirit as a group activity deepened their appreciation of and connections to Hawaiian culture. This was true for those who were Native Hawaiian, connecting to their own cultural heritage, as well as for non-Native Hawaiians, who found that it improved their appreciation of the surrounding cultural traditions of the host culture where they now live. Not only was hula a safe activity that improved functional capacity, participants also regarded its significant sociocultural aspects-even for participants who are not Native Hawaiian -as enhancing its value and meaningfulness. Learning the words of well-known Hawaiian songs provided additional long-term cues that encouraged "ownership" of the therapy and acted as practical reminders of the importance of exercise and lifestyle moderation while also offering new spiritual connections to the surrounding social environment. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Improving cardiac rehabilitation attendance and completion through quality improvement activities and a motivational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Johnson, Lezlie L; Barr, Laurie M; Daniels, Stephanie R; Wolter, Anne D; Squires, Ray W; Perez-Terzic, Carmen M; Thomas, Randal J

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that patients who attend more cardiac rehabilitation (CR) sessions have lower subsequent mortality rates than those who attend fewer sessions. We analyzed the impact of several phased-in policy and process changes implemented to increase patient participation in CR. In March 2010, our CR program changed from a policy of individualizing the recommended number of CR sessions per patient to a policy that recommended all 36 CR sessions. In October 2010, we introduced a 7-minute video describing the benefits of CR. In August 2011, we introduced a motivational program that rewarded patients after every sixth CR session. The number of CR sessions attended was determined through review of billing records. Enrollment and completion were defined as attending ≥1 session and ≥30 sessions, respectively. We identified 1103 patients sequentially enrolled in CR between May 2009 and January 2012. Overall, the median number of sessions per patient improved from 12 to 20 (P attendance by a median of 3 sessions per patient (P = .04), but this effect was limited to local CR participants. Financial analysis suggested that for every $100 spent on motivational rewards, patients attended an additional 6.6 (95% CI, -1 to 14) sessions of CR. Quality improvement activities significantly increased CR participation. Wide implementation of such programs may favorably impact patient participation in CR and potentially decrease the rate of subsequent cardiac events.

  1. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestehorn, Kurt; Jannowitz, Christina; Horack, Martin; Karmann, Barbara; Halle, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3-4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university). Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline- Oriented Risk Factor Management) were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7%) were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6%) or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%). Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral arterial disease, had lower exercise capacity, and received less treatment with statins and guideline-orientated therapy in general. In the multivariate model, good control was significantly more likely in men (odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.46), less likely in patients of higher age (0.99; 0.99-0.99), with diabetes (0.90; 0.85-0.95), or peripheral arterial disease (0.88; 0.82-0.95). Compared with a low level education, a mid level education was associated with poor control (0.94; 0.89-0.99), while high education did not have a significant effect (1.08; 0.99-1.17). Patients with different levels of education treated in cardiac rehabilitation did not differ relevantly in terms of

  2. Exercise-based approaches to dysphagia rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Catriona M

    2012-01-01

    Rehabilitative techniques for dysphagia (swallowing impairment) increasingly employ exercise modeled on methods used to train muscles in sports medicine. Three techniques in particular show promise for improving muscle strength and function related to swallowing: the Shaker exercise, expiratory muscle strength training, and tongue pressure resistance training. All three techniques invoke principles of task specificity, muscular load, resistance, and intensity, and aim to achieve functional changes in swallowing through changes in muscle physiology derived from strength or endurance training. To date, studies of treatment benefit arising from these techniques involve small sample sizes; this is particularly true of randomized studies with controls receiving standard treatment or experiencing spontaneous recovery. Nevertheless, a review of the available literature shows that improvement of penetration-aspiration is a common finding for individuals with dysphagia receiving one of these three treatment approaches. Although hypothesized as an expected outcome of swallow muscle strength training, improvements in post-swallow residues are noted to be uncommon as an outcome of these exercise-based approaches. The available evidence suggests that exercise-based approaches to swallowing rehabilitation do succeed in changing muscle strength and function, but generalization to true swallowing tasks may be somewhat limited. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The cardiac model of rehabilitation for reducing cardiovascular risk factors post transient ischaemic attack and stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hayden; Kersten, Paula; Crawford, Pamela; Keens, Angela; Ashburn, Ann; Conway, Joy

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a standard National Health Service cardiac rehabilitation programme on risk factor reduction for patients after a minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Cardiac rehabilitation classes. Twenty-four patients. All participants received standard care. In addition, the intervention group undertook an eight-week cardiac rehabilitation programme consisting of weekly exercise and education classes. Cardiovascular disease risk score; lipid profiles; resting blood pressure; C-reactive protein (measured with a high sensitive assay) and fibrinogen levels; blood glucose; obesity; physical activity levels; subjective health status (SF-36); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Group comparison with independent t-tests showed a significantly greater improvement in the cardiovascular disease risk score for participants in the intervention group compared to standard care (intervention 25.7 ± 22.8 to 23.15 ± 18.3, control 25.03 ± 15.4 to 27.12 ± 16.1, t = -1.81, P rehabilitation programmes are a feasible and effective means of reducing the risk of future cardiovascular events for patients after minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

  4. Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This process is rehabilitation. Rehabilitation often focuses on Physical therapy to help your strength, mobility and fitness Occupational therapy to help you with your daily activities Speech-language therapy to help with speaking, understanding, ...

  5. Gender-specific issues in cardiac rehabilitation: do women with ischaemic heart disease need specially tailored programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Grande, Gesine; Loewel, Hannelore; Völler, Heinz; Mittag, Oskar

    2007-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has changed from a disease of middle-aged men in the late 1970s to a disease of elderly women in the 2000s. Most clinical studies during the past three decades have been conducted with men. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes were also developed with special regard to improving the rate of return to work in middle-aged men. The rehabilitation needs of older patients and women in particular have been largely neglected. The aim of this review is briefly to outline our present knowledge on gender issues in cardiac rehabilitation, and to specify barriers with regard to physical activities especially in (older) women. Coping with a cardiac event, women tend to minimize or play down the impact of their health situation and avoid burdening their social contacts. After a first cardiac event, women report greater psychological distress and lower self-efficacy and self-esteem. In addition, older age, lower exercise levels and reduced functional capacity or co-morbid conditions such as osteoporosis and urinary incontinence are barriers to physical activities in women with IHD. Recent studies on psychosocial intervention revealed less favourable results in women compared with men. These findings have not yet been well explained. This emphasizes our current lack of knowledge about the processes and determinants of successful psychosocial interventions in men and women with IHD. A large (European) trial on gender-specific coping styles, needs, and preferences of older women, and the effects of psychosocial intervention is proposed.

  6. Impact of Obesity and Other Chronic Conditions on Lifestyle Exercise During the Year After Completion of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Abdus; Josephson, Richard; Moore, Shirley M

    2017-07-01

    Patients who attend cardiac rehabilitation programs have a high prevalence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). The extent to which different constellations of MCC influence lifestyle exercise in the year after completion of an outpatient phase 2 cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) is unknown. Our objective was to examine the effects of MCC on lifestyle exercise in the year after completion of a CRP. The effects of different constellations of comorbidities on objectively measured lifestyle exercise were examined using data from a randomized controlled trial testing lifestyle behavior change interventions in patients with cardiac events (n = 379) who completed a phase 2 CRP. Adjusting for important covariates, the relationships between the primary outcome, exercise amount, and the presence of common chronic conditions (hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and arthritis) were studied using robust linear mixed-effects models. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and their dyads, triads, and quads have a negative impact on amount of exercise. For example, the cooccurrences of obesity and hypertension reduced lifestyle exercise by 2.83 hours per month (95% CI, 1.33-4.33) after adjustment for the effects of covariates. The presence of obesity was a major factor in the comorbid constellations affecting lifestyle exercise. The presence of obesity and other chronic conditions negatively impacts lifestyle exercise in the year after a CRP. The magnitude of the effect depends on the comorbidities. Different constellations of comorbid conditions can be used to identify those persons at greatest risk for not exercising after cardiac rehabilitation.

  7. A qualitative study exploring patients' experiences of standard care or cardiac rehabilitation post minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsdon, Kaye M; Kersten, Paula; Kirk, Hayden J S

    2013-09-01

    To explore individuals' experiences of receiving either standard care or comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation post minor stroke or transient ischaemic attack. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, alongside a randomized controlled trial, exploring the effectiveness of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation compared with standard care. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Individuals' homes. People who have experienced a minor stroke or transient ischaemic attack and who were partaking in a secondary prevention randomized controlled trial (6-7 months post the event, 17 males, five females; mean age 67 years). Not relevant. Not relevant. Four themes were identified: information delivery, comparing oneself with others, psychological impact, attitudes and actions regarding risk factor reduction. Participants indicated a need for improved information delivery, specific to their own risk factors and lifestyle changes. Many experienced psychological impact as a result of their minor stroke. Participants were found to make two types of social comparison; the comparison of self to another affected by stroke, and the comparison of self to cardiac patients. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was reported to have positive effects on people's motivation to exercise. Following a minor stroke, many individuals do not recall information given or risk factors specific to them. Downward comparison with individuals who have had a cardiovascular event led to some underplaying the significance of their minor stroke.

  8. Is the Cardiovascular Response Equivalent Between a Supervised Center-Based Setting and a Self-care Home-Based Setting When Rating of Perceived Exertion Is Used to Guide Aerobic Exercise Intensity During a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lars H.; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Kikkenborg Berg, Selina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate if exercise intensity guided by rating of perceived exertion (RPE) results in an equivalent cardiovascular response when applied in either a center-based or a home-based setting. DESIGN: Data from patients with heart disease (post–valve surgery...... intensity was objectively measured using heart rate (HR) monitors. RESULTS: A total of 2622 RPE values with corresponding HR data were available. There was no difference in the level of association (interaction P = 0.51) between HR and RPE seen in the center-based setting (mean of 6.1 beats/min per 1...

  9. Community-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Stroke Survivors' Rehabilitation Participation and Functional Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Xiaojuan; Dai, Hong; Jiang, Bin; Li, Ninghua; Zhao, Xingquan; Hong, Zhen; He, Li; Wang, Wenzhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based rehabilitation appropriate technique (CRAT) intervention program in increasing rehabilitation participation and improving functional recovery of stroke survivors. This study followed a quasi-experimental design. In each of 5 centers servicing approximately 50,000 individuals, 2 communities were designated as either the intervention or control community. A CRAT intervention program, including 2-year rehabilitation education and 3-month CRAT treatment, was regularly implemented in the intervention communities, whereas there was no special intervention in the control community. Two sampling surveys, at baseline and after intervention, were administered to evaluate the rehabilitation activity undertaken. In intervention communities, stroke survivor's motor function, daily activity, and social activity were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment, using the Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment, Barthel index, and Social Functional Activities Questionnaire. The proportion of individuals participating in rehabilitation-related activity was increased significantly (P rehabilitation (P 0.05). Community-based rehabilitation appropriate technique increases rehabilitation participation rates and enhances motor function, daily activity, and social activity of stroke survivors.

  10. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitt A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anselm Gitt1, Christina Jannowitz2, Marthin Karoff3, Barbara Karmann2, Martin Horack1, Heinz Völler4,51Institut für Herzinfarktforschung an der Universität Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen,2Medical Affairs, MSD Sharp and Dohme GmbH, Haar, 3Klinik Königsfeld der Deutschen Rentenversicherung Westfalen in Ennepetal (NRW, Klinik der Universität Witten-Herdecke, 4Kardiologie, Klinik am See, Rüdersdorf, 5Center of Rehabilitation Research, University Potsdam, GermanyAim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR, and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1 patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2 risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3 control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR.Methods: Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status.Results: In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male, with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819 compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085 were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%. Patients with Met

  11. Reabilitação cardíaca com ênfase no exercício: uma revisão sistemática Rehabilitación cardíaca con énfasis en el ejercicio: una revisión sistemática Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalma Rabelo Ricardo

    2006-10-01

    pacientes con enfermedad arterial coronaría. Se analizaron apenas ensayos clínicos controlados y randomizados (ECCR con folow-up igual o superior a seis meses, publicados entre 1990 y 2004. Se usaron los criterios propuestos por la Clinical Practice Guideline: cardiac rehabilitation para juzgar los estudios seleccionados. Hicieron parte de esta revisión 21 ECCR envolviendo 2220 pacientes entre 49 y 63 años (86% hombres. La mayoría de los ECCR presentaron resultados favorables a la RCEE para mortalidad total y cardíaca cuando fueron comparadas a los cuidados usuales (control. Ese hecho también fue observado para los eventos de reinfarto y revascularización del miocardio. Los resultados de la RCEE sobre los factores de riesgo modificables y la calidad de vida no fueron conclusivos cuando se compararon a la intervención control, a pesar de algunos estudios haber presentado diferencias estadísticas a favor de la RCEE. Esta revisión confirma los beneficios de la RCEE en el abordaje terapéutico de enfermos de coronarias, reduciendo sus tasas de mortalidad cardíaca y todas sus causas, además de contribuir para la disminución de ocurrencia de otros eventos de coronaría, tales como la revascularización miocárdica y la tasa de reinfarto. En relación a los factores de riesgo modificables y la calidad de vida hubo una tendencia favorable a la utilización de RCEE. Avanzando un poco más, parece ser que el ejercicio físico regular per si constituye el principal responsable por los resultados favorables de la intervención en relación a los hechos estudiados.The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR on mortality, modifiable risk factors and quality of life related to health, in patients with coronary artery disease. Only Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs with follow up equal or higher than six months published between 1990 and 2004 were analyzed. The criteria proposed by the Clinical Practice

  12. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical exercise training in sports and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, F.J.; Monden, P.G.; Van Meeteren, N.L.U.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HR

  13. Current state of cardiac rehabilitation in Germany: patient characteristics, risk factor management and control status, by education level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestehorn K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Kurt Bestehorn1, Christina Jannowitz2, Martin Horack3, Barbara Karmann2, Martin Halle4, Heinz Völler5 1Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Technical University, Dresden; 2Medical Department, MSD Sharp and Dohme GmbH, Haar; 3Institut für Herzinfarktforschung Ludwigshafen an der Universität Heidelberg, Ludwigshafen; 4Center for Prevention and Sports Medicine, Technical University, Munich; 5Klinik am See, Rehabilitation Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Rüdersdorf, Germany Background: After the acute hospital stay, most cardiac patients in Germany are transferred for a 3–4-week period of inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. We aim to describe patient characteristics and risk factor management of cardiac rehabilitation patients with a focus on drug treatment and control status, differentiated by education level (low level, elementary school; intermediate level, secondary modern school; high level, grammar school/university. Methods: Data covering a time period between 2003 and 2008 from 68,191 hospitalized patients in cardiac rehabilitation from a large-scale registry (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management were analyzed descriptively. Further, a multivariate model was applied to assess factors associated with good control of risk factors. Results: In the total cohort, patients with a manifestation of coronary artery disease (mean age 63.7 years, males 71.7% were referred to cardiac rehabilitation after having received percutaneous coronary intervention (51.6% or coronary bypass surgery (39.5%. Statin therapy increased from 76.3% at entry to 88.9% at discharge, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL rates increased from 31.1% to 69.6%. Mean fasting blood glucose decreased from 108 mg/dL to 104 mg/dL, and mean exercise capacity increased from 78 W to 95 W. Age and gender did not differ by education. In contrast with patients having high education, those with low education had more diabetes

  14. Learning and coping strategies versus standard education in cardiac rehabilitation: a cost-utility analysis alongside a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbarez, Nasrin Tayyari; Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole; Søgaard, Rikke

    2015-09-28

    Learning and coping education strategies (LC) was implemented to enhance patient attendance in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. This study assessed the cost-utility of LC compared to standard education (standard) as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with ischemic heart disease and heart failure. The study was conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial with 825 patients who were allocated to LC or standard rehabilitation and followed for 5 months. The LC approach was identical to the standard approach in terms of physical training and education, but with the addition of individual interviews and weekly team evaluations by professionals. A societal cost perspective including the cost of intervention, health care, informal time and productivity loss was applied. Cost was based on a micro-costing approach for the intervention and national administrative registries for other cost categories. Quality adjusted life years (QALY) were based on SF-6D measurements at baseline, after intervention and follow-up using British preference weights. Multiple imputation was used to handle non-response on the SF-6D. Conventional cost effectiveness methodology was employed to estimate the net benefit of the LC and to illustrate cost effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped standard errors. An additional cost of DKK 6,043 (95% CI -5,697; 17,783) and a QALY gain of 0.005 (95% CI -0.001; 0.012) was estimated for LC. However, better utility scores in both arms were due to higher utility while receiving the intervention than better health after the intervention. The probability that LC would be cost-effective did not exceed 29% for any threshold values of willingness to pay per QALY. The alternative scenario analysis was restricted to a health care perspective and showed that the probability of cost-effectiveness increased to 62% over the threshold values. The LC was unlikely to be cost-effective within 5

  15. Rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Mogens; Søndergaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    To describe the rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction (MI) to identify focus areas for long-term cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in general practice. Design. Population-based cross-sectional study.......To describe the rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction (MI) to identify focus areas for long-term cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in general practice. Design. Population-based cross-sectional study....

  16. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafaella Zulianello Dos; Bonin, Christiani Decker Batista; Martins, Eliara Ten Caten; Pereira Junior, Moacir; Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Macedo, Kassia Rosangela Paz de; Benetti, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men) were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach's alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach's correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  17. Development and Psychometric Validation of HIPER-Q to Assess Knowledge of Hypertensive Patients in Cardiac Rehabilitation

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    Rafaella Zulianello dos Santos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The absence of instruments capable of measuring the level of knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease reflects the lack of specific recommendations for these patients. Objective: To develop and validate a questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs about their disease. Methods: A total of 184 hypertensive patients (mean age 60.5 ± 10 years, 66.8% men were evaluated. Reproducibility was assessed by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by the Cronbach’s alpha and the construct validity by the exploratory factorial analysis. Results: The final version of the instrument had 17 questions organized in areas considered important for patient education. The instrument proposed showed a clarity index of 8.7 (0.25. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.804 and the Cronbach’s correlation coefficient was 0.648. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with knowledge areas. Regarding the criterion validity, patients with higher education level and higher family income showed greater knowledge about hypertension. Conclusion: The instrument has a satisfactory clarity index and adequate validity, and can be used to evaluate the knowledge of hypertensive participants in cardiac rehabilitation programs.

  18. Core competencies for cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals: 2010 update: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Larry F; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Ades, Philip A; Berra, Kathy; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Roitman, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are typically delivered by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that to provide high-quality services, it is important for these health care professionals to possess certain core competencies. This update to the previous statement identifies 10 areas of core competencies for CR/SP health care professionals and identifies specific knowledge and skills for each core competency. These core competency areas are consistent with the current list of core components for CR/SP programs published by the AACVPR and the American Heart Association and include comprehensive cardiovascular patient assessment; management of blood pressure, lipids, diabetes, tobacco cessation, weight, and psychological issues; exercise training; and counseling for psychosocial, nutritional, and physical activity issues.

  19. The Association Between Insomnia Symptoms and Mood Changes During Exercise Among Patients Enrolled in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Codie R; Horsley, Kristin J; Morse, Erin; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Bacon, Simon L; Campbell, Tavis S

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia symptoms (ie, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and early awakenings) are common among patients with cardiovascular disease and may interfere with the beneficial impact of exercise on mood state. This study investigated the association of insomnia symptom severity with mood disturbance and with changes in mood state during exercise in a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) population. Insomnia symptom severity was measured using the Insomnia Severity Index upon admission to a 12-week CR program (n = 57). The Physical Activity Affect Scale was administered before and during a single bout of moderate intensity exercise to measure changes in mood state. Indices of mood disturbance included depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and pre-exercise mood state (Physical Activity Affect Scale). Greater severity of insomnia symptoms was associated with less pleasant mood overall (r = -0.45, P mood state (b = 0.26, standard error = 0.10, P = .009) and tranquility (b = 0.09, standard error = 0.04, P = .04), following statistical adjustment for demographic variables and pre-exercise mood state. Although CR patients reporting insomnia symptoms tend to experience daytime mood disturbance, they may benefit from mood-elevating properties of exercise. Future research is needed to help optimize mood during exercise, which may have implications for improving psychological distress and CR adherence.

  20. Commercial insurance coverage for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirapatarapong, Wilawan; Thomas, Randal J; Pack, Quinn; Sharma, Saurabh; Squires, Ray W

    2014-01-01

    Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF), studies suggest variable uptake by patients with HF, as well as variable coverage by insurance carriers. The purpose of this study was to determine the percentage of large commercial health insurance companies that provide coverage for outpatient (CR) for patients with HF. We identified a sample of the largest US commercial health care providers and analyzed their CR coverage policies for patients with HF. We surveyed 44 large private health care insurance companies, reviewed company Web sites, and, when unclear, contacted companies by e-mail or telephone. We excluded insurance clearinghouses because they did not directly provide health care insurance. Of 44 eligible insurance companies, 29 (66%) reported that they provide coverage for outpatient CR in patients with HF. The majority of companies (83%) covered CR for patients with any type of HF. A minority (10%) did not cover CR for patients with HF if it was considered a preexisting condition. A significant percentage of commercial health care insurance companies in the United States report that they currently cover outpatient CR for patients with HF. Because health insurance coverage is associated with patient participation in CR, it is anticipated that patients with HF will increasingly participate in CR in coming years.

  1. Utility of Walk Tests in Evaluating Functional Status Among Participants in an Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kristie M; Anderson, Derek R; Landers, Jacob D; Emery, Charles F

    2017-09-01

    Although walk tests are frequently used in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), no prior study has evaluated the capacity of these measures to predict peak oxygen uptake during exercise testing ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak). This study evaluated the interrelationship of objective measures of exercise performance (walk and exercise testing) among patients entering CR as well as a novel measure of functional status assessment for use in CR. Forty-nine patients (33 males) referred to an outpatient CR program were evaluated with objective measures of ambulatory functional status (peak oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak], 6-minute walk test [6MWT], and 60-ft walk test [60ftWT]). All measures of functional status were moderately to highly intercorrelated (r values from 0.50 to 0.88; P values text article.)O2peak and other measures. Measures of functional status, including (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak, 6MWT, and 60ftWT, were highly correlated among CR patients, suggesting the plausibility of using them interchangeably to fit the needs of the patient and testing environment. Among women, walk tests may not be appropriate substitutes for (Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak. Because of the brevity of the 60ftWT, it may be particularly useful for measuring functional status in patients with greater symptoms and those with comorbidities limiting walking.

  2. Perceiving Cardiac Rehabilitation Staff as Mainly Responsible for Exercise: A Dilemma for Future Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, Parminder K; McMahon, Casey J; Locke, Sean R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise therapy facilitates patient recovery and better health following a cardiovascular event. However, post-CR adherence to self-managed (SM)-exercise is suboptimal. Part of this problem may be participants' view of CR staff as mainly responsible for help and program structure. Does post-CR exercise adherence for those perceiving high CR staff responsibility suffer as a consequence? Participants in this prospective, observational study were followed over 12 weeks of CR and one month afterward. High perceived staff responsibility individuals were examined for a decline in the strength of adherence-related social cognitions and exercise. Those high and low in perceived staff responsibility were also compared. High perceived staff responsibility individuals reported significant declines in anticipated exercise persistence (d = .58) and number of different SM-exercise options (d = .44). High versus low responsibility comparisons revealed a significant difference in one-month post-CR SM-exercise volume (d = .67). High perceived staff responsibility individuals exercised half of the amount of low responsibility counterparts at one month post-CR. Perceived staff responsibility and CR SRE significantly predicted SM-exercise volume, R 2 adj = .10, and persistence, R 2 adj = .18, one month post-CR. Viewing helpful well-trained CR staff as mainly responsible for participant behavior may be problematic for post-CR exercise maintenance among those more staff dependent. © 2017 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  3. Patient satisfaction with cardiac rehabilitation: association with utilization, functional capacity, and heart-health behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saba; Chessex, Caroline; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca; Grace, Sherry L

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) societies recommend assessment of patient satisfaction given its association with health care utilization and outcomes. Recently, the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC, Glasgow) was recommended as an appropriate tool for the CR setting. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe patient satisfaction with CR, 2) test the psychometric properties of the PACIC in the CR setting, and 3) assess the association of patient satisfaction with CR utilization and outcomes. Methods Secondary analysis was conducted on an observational, prospective CR program evaluation cohort. A convenience sample of patients from 1 of 3 CR programs was approached at their first CR visit, and consenting participants completed a survey. Clinical data were extracted from charts pre- and post-program. Participants were e-mailed surveys again 6 months (including the PACIC) and 1 and 2 years later. Results Of 411 consenting patients, 247 (60.2%) completed CR. The mean PACIC score was 2.8±1.1/5. Internal reliability was α=0.95. The total PACIC score varied significantly by site (F=3.12, P=0.046), indicating discriminant validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly related to greater CR adherence (r=0.22, Ppatient satisfaction with CR. PMID:28479853

  4. Fatalism and short-termism as cultural barriers to cardiac rehabilitation among underprivileged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mathieu; Dumas, Alex; Stuart, Stephen A

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death and disability in Canada, and individuals of low socioeconomic status appear particularly vulnerable to such disorders. Although many health-related institutions have promoted cardiovascular health and have created cardiac rehabilitation programmes, they have not attained their desired outcomes, especially amongst socioeconomically deprived men. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's sociocultural theory, this qualitative study aims to understand the social mechanisms underpinning the lifestyles and health practices of men who had suffered a cardiovascular incident requiring hospitalisation. In all, 20 interviews were conducted with francophone men aged 40 to 65 years living in the province of Québec, Canada. The analysis strongly suggests that the respondents' living conditions and disease were significant obstacles to their adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Their despair and pessimism, apparently originating in the harshness of their financial realities, physical limitations and social networks, led them to believe that they could do little to control their lives, thereby limiting the fulfillment of any long-term ambitions. Therefore, the adoption of a habitus characterised by fatalistic and short-term perceptions of health influenced their lifestyle choices, leading them to maintain lives that were in stark contrast with the recommendations made by health promotion experts. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Work-related outcome after acute coronary syndrome: Implications of complex cardiac rehabilitation in occupational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Monica; Ratti, Gennaro; Gerardi, Donato; Capogrosso, Cristina; Ricciardi, Gianfranco; Fulgione, Cosimo; Latte, Salvatore; Tammaro, Paolo; Covino, Gregorio; Nienhaus, Albert; Grazillo, Elpidio Maria; Mallardo, Mario; Capogrosso, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is frequent in the working-age population. Traditional outcomes, such as mortality and hospital readmission, are useful for evaluating prognosis. Fit-for-work is an emerging outcome with clinical as well as socioeconomic significance. We describe the possible benefit of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program for return to work (RTW) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We evaluated 204 patients with recent ACS. They were divided into 4 groups on the basis of their occupational work load: very light (VL), light (L), moderate (M), and heavy (H). Work-related outcomes were assessed with the Work Performance Scale (WPS) of the Functional Status Questionnaire and as "days missed from work" (DMW) in the previous 4 weeks. The variables considered for outcomes were percent ejection fraction, functional capacity expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs), and participation or non-participation in the CR program (CR+ and CR-). One hundred thirty (66%) patients took part in the CR program. Total WPS scores for CR+ and CR- subgroups were VL group: 18±4 vs. 14±4 (p workplace, in particular among clerical workers. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  6. Psychosocial aspects in cardiac rehabilitation: From theory to practice. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogosova, Nana; Saner, Hugo; Pedersen, Susanne S; Cupples, Margaret E; McGee, Hannah; Höfer, Stefan; Doyle, Frank; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-10-01

    A large body of empirical research shows that psychosocial risk factors (PSRFs) such as low socio-economic status, social isolation, stress, type-D personality, depression and anxiety increase the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and also contribute to poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and prognosis in patients with established CHD. PSRFs may also act as barriers to lifestyle changes and treatment adherence and may moderate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Furthermore, there appears to be a bidirectional interaction between PSRFs and the cardiovascular system. Stress, anxiety and depression affect the cardiovascular system through immune, neuroendocrine and behavioural pathways. In turn, CHD and its associated treatments may lead to distress in patients, including anxiety and depression. In clinical practice, PSRFs can be assessed with single-item screening questions, standardised questionnaires, or structured clinical interviews. Psychotherapy and medication can be considered to alleviate any PSRF-related symptoms and to enhance HRQoL, but the evidence for a definite beneficial effect on cardiac endpoints is inconclusive. A multimodal behavioural intervention, integrating counselling for PSRFs and coping with illness should be included within comprehensive CR. Patients with clinically significant symptoms of distress should be referred for psychological counselling or psychologically focused interventions and/or psychopharmacological treatment. To conclude, the success of CR may critically depend on the interdependence of the body and mind and this interaction needs to be reflected through the assessment and management of PSRFs in line with robust scientific evidence, by trained staff, integrated within the core CR team. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  7. Mental Retardation, Poverty and Community Based Rehabilitation

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    Einar Helander

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A person with moderate mental retardation would, in a western country, be "diagnosed" early on in life. Consequently, such a child is likely to be sent for special education. Given the high level of job requirements, such a person is unlikely to be employed in the open market later in life. Mental retardation is one of the most frequent disabilities in most studies, mental retardation is found in about three percent of the population. Persons even with mild mental retardation have very large difficulties finding employment and are for this reason often deprived of opportunities for suitable and productive income generation this is why most stay poor. But disability does not only cause poverty poverty itself causes disability. This study follows an analysis, based on a review of the Swedish programme for mental retardation during the period 1930-2000. It is concluded that in Sweden a very large proportion of mild and moderate mental retardation has been eliminated though the combination of poverty alleviation with a community-based rehabilitation programme. For these situations a pro-active programme analysing and meeting the needs of the target groups should be useful as a means to achieve poverty alleviation.

  8. Exercise Trajectories of Women from Entry to a 6-Month Cardiac Rehabilitation Program to One Year after Discharge

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    Heather M. Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical activity is associated with reduced mortality and morbidity. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is an effective intervention for patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD. Unfortunately, women are less likely to engage in, or sustain, regular physical activity. Objectives were to (1 describe women’s guidelines-based levels of physical activity during and after CR and (2 determine the physical activity trajectories of women from entry to CR to one year after CR. Methods and Results. A prospective, longitudinal study of 203 women with CVD enrolled in a 6-month CR program. Physical activity was measured using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LSI, focusing on moderate-strenuous activity. Data were analyzed using latent class growth analysis (LCGA and logistic regression. Mean scores on the LSI showed women to be “active” at all follow-up points. LCGA revealed a two-class model, respectively, called “inactive relapsers” and “moderately active relapsers.” Predictors of the “moderately active relapsers” class were employment status and diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Conclusions. Women achieved the recommended physical activity levels by the end of CR and sustained them until one year after CR. LCGA allowed us to determine the class trajectories associated with moderate-strenuous activity and, from these, to identify implications for targeted intervention.

  9. Baseline Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Stress Test Can Predict Exercise Indices following Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

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    Akram Sardari

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systolic blood pressure recovery (rSBP is of prognostic value for predicting the survival and co-morbidity rate in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. This study investigated the association between rSBP and exercise indices after complete cardiac rehabilitation program (CR in a population-based sample of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG.Methods: The sample population consisted of 352 patients who underwent pure CABG. The patients underwent standard symptom-limited exercise testing immediately before and also after the completion of the CR sessions. rSBP was defined as the ratio of the systolic blood pressure at 3 minutes in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise.Results: An abnormal baseline rSBP after exercise was a strong predictor of exercise parameters in the last session, including metabolic equivalents (β = -0.617, SE = 0.127, p value < 0.001 and peak O2 consumption (β = -1.950, SE = 0.363, p value < 0.001 measured in the last session adjusted for baseline exercise characteristics, demographics, function class, and left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusion: The current study strongly emphasizes the predictive role of baseline rSBP after exercise in evaluating exercise parameters following CR. This baseline index can predict abnormal METs value, peak O2 consumption, post-exercise heart rate, and heart rate recovery after a 24-session CR program.

  10. Measurement of physical performance by field tests in programs of cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travensolo, Cristiane; Goessler, Karla; Poton, Roberto; Pinto, Roberta Ramos; Polito, Marcos Doederlein

    2018-04-13

    The literature concerning the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on field tests results is inconsistent. To perform a systematic review with meta-analysis on field tests results after programs of CR. Studies published in PubMed and Web of Science databases until May 2016 were analyzed. The standard difference in means correct by bias (Hedges' g) was used as effect size (g) to measure que amount of modifications in performance of field tests after CR period. Potential differences between subgroups were analyzed by Q-test based on ANOVA. Fifteen studies published between 1996 e 2016 were included in the review, 932 patients and age ranged 54,4 - 75,3 years old. Fourteen studies used the six-minutes walking test to evaluate the exercise capacity and one study used the Shuttle Walk Test. The random Hedges's g was 0.617 (P<0.001), representing a drop of 20% in the performance of field test after CR. The meta-regression showed significantly association (P=0.01) to aerobic exercise duration, i.e., for each 1-min increase in aerobic exercise duration, there is a 0.02 increase in effect size for performance in the field test. Field tests can detect physical modification after CR, and the large duration of aerobic exercise during CR was associated with a better result. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Practical Guide to Enhance Patient Outcomes Through Continuity of Care

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    Catherine Giuliano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide. Referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a class I recommendation for all patients with CAD based on findings that participation can reduce cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as well as improve functional capacity and quality of life. However, programme uptake remains low, systematic progression through the traditional CR phases is often lacking, and communication between health care providers is frequently suboptimal, resulting in fragmented care. Only 30% to 50% of eligible patients are typically referred to outpatient CR and fewer still complete the programme. In contemporary models of CR, patients are no longer treated by a single practitioner, but rather by an array of health professionals, across multiples specialities and health care settings. The risk of fragmented care in CR may be great, and a concerted approach is required to achieve continuity and optimise patient outcomes. ‘Continuity of care’ has been described as the delivery of services in a coherent, logical, and timely fashion and which entails 3 specific domains: informational, management, and relational continuity. This is examined in the context of CR.

  12. Improvement of myocardial perfusion detected by 201Tl scintigraphy on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Linxue; Nohara, Ryuji; Makita, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cardiac rehabilitation (mean 70±48 months) on myocardial perfusion was assessed using thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) exercise study in 63 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were those in a rehabilitation group (Rh=42) participating in supervised sports training two to three times per week and the control group (Ct=21) not taking active daily exercise. The interval between two 201 Tl SPECT studies was 19±16 months. After physical training, total duration of the exercise test increased from 443±112 to 536±121 seconds (+19%) in the Rh group, and from 484±129 to 432±115 seconds in the Ct group (-10.7%) (p 2 to 269.8±58 x 10 2 in the Rh group and decreased from 218.7±40 x 10 2 to 216.6±76 x 10 2 (p 201 Tl myocardial perfusion defect on exercise improved more in 54.8% (stress 59.5%, rest 35.7%) in the Rh group than in the Ct group (9.5%, p 201 Tl perfusion defect decreased from 68 (23.1%) to 49 regions (16.7%) of 294 total myocardial regions in the Rh group on exercise. However. it increased from 39 (26.5%) to 44 (29.9%) regions of 147 regions in the Ct group (p<0.01). Thus, cardiac rehabilitation increases exercise tolerance with improvement of myocardial perfusion. suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is an advisable and effective treatment for patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  13. Perceptions of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation: a cross-sectional study targeting the Chinese population in the Midlands, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Za, Tay; Lau, Jeff C F; Wong, Arthur C K; Wong, Alice W S; Lui, Sally; Fong, James W D; Chow, Patrick Y C; Jolly, Kate B

    2012-01-01

    To find out and explore the knowledge and opinion of Chinese people on cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. A cross-sectional study using 14-item bilingual (Chinese and English) questionnaires that include information on demographics, health status, cardiovascular disease related knowledge and perception, and awareness and understanding of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Chinese community groups in the Midlands, UK from January to April 2008. 436 questionnaires from Chinese adults over 18 were obtained. Current knowledge and attitude towards cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Obesity was the most common risk factor identified by 80.7% of participants. Those originated from China had significantly less knowledge compared with subjects from other countries (pChinese living in the UK than people without experience. A majority (81.7%) used orthodox medicine and perceived it to be most effective against cardiac disease. Only 30% of participants were aware of cardiac rehabilitation. The coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors of Chinese population have increased significantly in the last decade. Cardiac rehabilitation awareness was poor among the sample population of this study and language barrier is still a problem. More large studies on Chinese population assessing CAD risk should be done to provide more evidence on CAD prevention for this growing population in the Western world.

  14. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

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    El Demerdash, Salah [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Khorshid, Hazem, E-mail: hazemkhorshid@yahoo.com [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A. [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salem, Alaa M. [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Demerdash, Salah; Khorshid, Hazem; Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A.; Salem, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  16. Women's experiences accessing a women-centered cardiac rehabilitation program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Danielle E; Sutton, Erica J; Landry, Mireille; Sternberg, Len; Price, Jennifer A D

    2010-01-01

    The health benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for women living with heart disease are well documented, yet women remain underrepresented in traditionally structured CR programs. This health service delivery gap has been attributed to a number of sex-related factors experienced by women, including lower rates of physician referral, travel-related barriers, competing work and caregiving responsibilities, greater cardiovascular disease severity, and number of comorbid health conditions. Whether a program specifically designed for women is able to address these barriers and facilitate women's participation is a question that has seldom been explored in the CR literature. As part of a larger study exploring whether 6 predefined principles of women's health (empowerment of women, accessible programs, broad definition of health care, high-quality of care, collaborative planning, and innovative and creative approaches) are reflected in the practices of the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative (WCHI) (a comprehensive CR and primary prevention program designed for women), the objective of this analysis was to explore how the principle of "accessible programs" is experienced by women participating in the WCHI. Fourteen women previously enrolled in the WCHI program participated in a single, in-person qualitative interview. Transcripts were analyzed using a constant-comparative approach to identify relevant themes related to program accessibility. Key themes identified included participants' experiences with acquiring physician referral, negotiating transportation issues, and navigating program schedules. Women discussed how peer support and staff members' willingness to address their health-related concerns facilitated their participation. While a women-centered CR/primary prevention program may facilitate and encourage women's participation by providing flexible program schedules as well as peer and professional support, efforts are still required to address

  17. Drive time to cardiac rehabilitation: at what point does it affect utilization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Donna E

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A 30 minute drive time threshold has often been cited as indicative of accessible health services. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a chronic disease management program designed to enhance and maintain cardiovascular health, and geographic barriers to utilization are often cited. The purpose of this study was to empirically test the drive time threshold for CR utilization. Methods A prospective study, using a multi-level design of coronary artery disease outpatients nested within 97 cardiologists. Participants completed a baseline sociodemographic survey, and reported CR referral, enrollment and participation in a second survey 9 months later. CR utilization was verified with CR sites. Geographic information systems were used to generate drive times at 60, 80 and 100% of the speed limit to the closest CR site from participants' homes, to take into consideration various traffic conditions. Bivariate analysis was used to test for differences in CR referral, enrollment and degree of participation by drive time. Logistic regression was used to test drive time increments where significant differences were found. Results Drive times were generated for 1209 outpatients. Overall, CR referral was verified for 523 (43.3% outpatients, with verified enrollment for 444 (36.7% participating in a mean of 86.4 ± 25.7% of prescribed sessions. There were significant differences in CR referral and enrollment by drive time (ps Conclusions Physicians may be taking geography into consideration when referring patients to CR. Empirical consideration also reveals that patients are significantly less likely to enroll in CR where they must drive 60 minutes or more to the closest program. Once enrolled, distance has no significant effect on degree of participation.

  18. Correlation between changes in diastolic dysfunction and health-related quality of life after cardiac rehabilitation program in dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Sherin H.M. Mehani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a complex syndrome characterized by progressive decline in left ventricular function, low exercise tolerance and raised mortality and morbidity. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction plays a major role in CHF and progression of most cardiac diseases. The current recommended goals can theoretically be accomplished via exercise and pharmacological therapy so the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of cardiac rehabilitation program on diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life and to determine the correlation between changes in left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Forty patients with chronic heart failure were diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM with systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The patients were equally and randomly divided into training and control groups. Only 30 of them completed the study duration. The training group participated in rehabilitation program in the form of circuit-interval aerobic training adjusted according to 55–80% of heart rate reserve for a period of 7 months. Circuit training improved both diastolic and systolic dysfunction in the training group. On the other hand, only a significant correlation was found between improvement in diastolic dysfunction and health related quality of life measured by Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. It was concluded that improvement in diastolic dysfunction as a result of rehabilitation program is one of the important underlying mechanisms responsible for improvement in health-related quality of life in DCM patients.

  19. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic syndrome in Iranian patients with coronary heart disease: the role of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Ali; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Amini, Afshin; Aryan, Reza Safi; Kerahroodi, Fahimeh Habibi; Rabiei, Katayoun; Taghipour, Hamid Reza; Moghimi, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    Due to high prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in Iran, and their mutual relationship, we evaluated how comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can affect MetS in patients with CHD. In this study (1998-2003), we evaluated 547 patients with CHD undergoing comprehensive CR. Cases with MetS decreased from 42.8% to 33.3% after CR program (p < .001). Decrease in high fasting plasma glucose, triglyceridemia, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and increase in HDL cholesterol, functional capacity, and left ventricular ejection fraction was more prominent in the "MetS but not obese" group. However, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, weight, body mass index, and waist circumference showed a greater decrease in groups with obesity. Cardiac rehabilitation is an effective treatment of MetS, particularly in the absence of obesity. This represents an additional argument for the prevention of obesity and the linked insulin resistance. © 2012 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  20. A prospective study examining the influence of cardiac rehabilitation on the sedentary time of highly sedentary, physically inactive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, A; Oh, P I; Faulkner, G E; Alter, D A

    2017-09-08

    Prolonged sedentary time is recognized as a distinct health risk, and mortality risks are expected to be greatest for individuals with low exercise levels. It is unknown whether participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs influences sedentary behaviour particularly among those patients expected to be at greatest mortality risk. This study examined the influence of CR participation on sedentary behaviour and identified the proportion and characteristics (socio-demographic and clinical) of patients who do not meet exercise recommendations and have prolonged sedentary times. A prospective study was conducted among patients of an exercise-based CR program and assessments performed at baseline and 3 months. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour information were collected by self-report, and convergent validity was examined on an accelerometer-wearing subsample. Of 468 CR patients approached, 130 participants were recruited with an average sedentary time of 8hours/day. Sedentary behaviour remained consistent at follow-up (relative change= -2.4%, P=0.07) notwithstanding a greater proportion meeting exercise recommendations (relative change= 57.4%). 19.2% of participants were classified to have prolonged sedentary time and not meet exercise recommendations at baseline. No significant differences were found between the characteristics of high-risk individuals and lower risk subgroups. Findings were consistent among the accelerometer-derived subgroup and the overall sample despite poor to moderate convergent validity. These results suggest that the exercise-focus of CR may not reduce sedentary behaviours. Future studies are needed to determine whether sedentary behaviour-specific reduction strategies are more effective than traditional exercise-based strategies and lead to meaningful improvements in clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. CAMERA-BASED SOFTWARE IN REHABILITATION/THERAPY INTERVENTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Use of an affordable, easily adaptable, ‘non-specific camera-based software’ that is rarely used in the field of rehabilitation is reported in a study with 91 participants over the duration of six workshop sessions. ‘Non-specific camera-based software’ refers to software that is not dependent......, and accessible software EyeCon is a potent and significant tool in the field of rehabilitation/therapy and warrants wider exploration....

  2. Participant-selected music and physical activity in older adults following cardiac rehabilitation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Imogen N; Baker, Felicity A; Peiris, Casey L; Shoebridge, Georgie; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate effects of participant-selected music on older adults' achievement of activity levels recommended in the physical activity guidelines following cardiac rehabilitation. A parallel group randomized controlled trial with measurements at Weeks 0, 6 and 26. A multisite outpatient rehabilitation programme of a publicly funded metropolitan health service. Adults aged 60 years and older who had completed a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Experimental participants selected music to support walking with guidance from a music therapist. Control participants received usual care only. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants achieving activity levels recommended in physical activity guidelines. Secondary outcomes compared amounts of physical activity, exercise capacity, cardiac risk factors, and exercise self-efficacy. A total of 56 participants, mean age 68.2 years (SD = 6.5), were randomized to the experimental ( n = 28) and control groups ( n = 28). There were no differences between groups in proportions of participants achieving activity recommended in physical activity guidelines at Week 6 or 26. Secondary outcomes demonstrated between-group differences in male waist circumference at both measurements (Week 6 difference -2.0 cm, 95% CI -4.0 to 0; Week 26 difference -2.8 cm, 95% CI -5.4 to -0.1), and observed effect sizes favoured the experimental group for amounts of physical activity (d = 0.30), exercise capacity (d = 0.48), and blood pressure (d = -0.32). Participant-selected music did not increase the proportion of participants achieving recommended amounts of physical activity, but may have contributed to exercise-related benefits.

  3. A Canadian, Multicentre, Randomized Clinical Trial of Home-Based Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Copd: Rationale and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Maltais

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation remains largely underused. Self-monitored, home-based rehabilitation is a promising approach to improving the availability of pulmonary rehabilitation.

  4. The effect of the cardiac rehabilitation program on obese and non-obese females with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esteki Ghashghaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is strongly associated with coronary heart disease and it is known as an independent risk factor. So, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of phase II comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on obesity indexes, functional capacity, lipid profiles, and fasting blood sugar in obese and non-obese female patients with coronary heart disease and to compare changes in these groups. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and five women with coronary heart disease participated in our study. At the beginning of study, body mass index, functional capacity, and lipid profiles and fasting blood sugar were evaluated; then, these patients were divided into two groups, patients who had BMI≥30 were known as obese and who had BMI<30 were known as non-obese patients. All of them completed the period of cardiac rehabilitation program, and 2 months later, all risk factors were examined for the second time in each group. Data were analyzed with SPSS software version 15. For comparing the mean of outcomes, independent t-tests and paired t-tests were used. Results: Data revealed that unless in weight (P=0.00 and functional capacity (P=0.001, there were no significant differences in obese and non-obese female patients, at baseline. As a result of the cardiac rehabilitation program, both groups had significant improvement in functional capacity (P=0.00, weight reduction (P=0.00, triglyceride (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.01, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (P=0.00 and P=0.003, respectively. As well, significant improvement was observed in high-density lipoprotein (P=0.01 only in obese female, and non-obese female had significant differences in total cholesterol (P=0.003. However, there were not significant changes in total cholesterol (P=0.05 and fasting blood sugar (P=0.09 in obese female. Also, non-obese females didn′t have

  5. Rehabilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørdam, Britta

    2008-01-01

    En interviewundersøgelse af patienter, der får gennemført hofteoperation, en opgørelse af deres selvvurdere helbredsstatus med henblik på at tilrettelægge rehabilitering baseret på patienternes egne præmisser.......En interviewundersøgelse af patienter, der får gennemført hofteoperation, en opgørelse af deres selvvurdere helbredsstatus med henblik på at tilrettelægge rehabilitering baseret på patienternes egne præmisser....

  6. Rehabilitacija bolnikov po možganski kapi: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation: Evidence-based stroke rehabilitation:

    OpenAIRE

    Goljar, Nika

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of post-stroke rehabilitation, the evidence base remains weaker than in other areas of stroke management. European Stroke Organization (ESO) published (in 2008) its Guidelines for Management of Ischaemic Stroke (updated in 2009). They cover the whole spectrum of ischaemic stroke, including rehabilitation. Following the systematic literature search, the selected articles were screened for data relevance and quality, and the evidence base for post-stroke...

  7. Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation in Tanzania: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urio, Elisaphinate Moses; Jeje, Benedict; Ndossi, Godwin

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Malnutrition among children under the age of five continues to be a significant public health problem in Tanzania. Despite numerous nutritional interventions that have been implemented, the country still experiences high rates of malnutrition. According to Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey of 2010 the prevalence of underweight was estimated to be 16%, wasting 5% and stunting 42 %. Factors contributing to causes of malnutrition include immediate, underlying and basic causes. All these factors are interlinked and operate synergistically and not independently. Approaches for managing malnourished children in Tanzania evolved from facility based Nutrition Rehabilitation Units (NURU) in the late 1960s to Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation (CBNR) in late 1980s. In the latter approach, malnourished children are rehabilitated in the same environment (village, home) that precipitated the condition, using resources and infrastructures available in the community. Mothers are taught about child feeding using family foods to make good food mixtures and of the importance of feeding frequency for the young child. Limitations for this approach include inadequate advocacy to leaders from districts down to the community level, few trained health providers and community health workers on knowledge and skills on community based nutrition rehabilitation, inadequate equipment and supplies for identification and categorization of malnutrition, low awareness of parents, care givers and community leaders on home rehabilitation of malnourished children. Nonetheless, Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation approach has the potential to address malnutrition in children given political will and resources. (author)

  8. Secondary Prevention Recommendation Attainment with Cardiac Rehabilitation: Is There a Gender Disparity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk-Adawi, Karam I; Oldridge, Neil B; Vitcenda, Mark J; Tarima, Sergey S; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-01-01

    Achievement of secondary prevention guideline recommendations (i.e., goals) with cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is not well-documented, especially for women. This study examined achievement of the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) goals before and after CR by gender. Of 12,976 patients enrolled in the Wisconsin CR Outcomes Registry, 8,929 (68.8%) completed CR and were included in the sample. Attainment of 15 AHA/ACC goals before and after CR was examined by extracting corresponding data points in the registry as entered by CR program staff. Gender differences in achievement of these goals after CR were examined via generalized estimating equations technique. Attainment of AHA/ACC goals before CR ranged from 15.3% of patients (physical activity) to 98.1% (aspirin), and by 17.6% (physical activity) to 98.4% (diastolic blood pressure) by CR completion. Significant improvements were achieved for 8 goals (53.3%), ranging from 0.7% for body mass index (BMI) to 50.8% for physical activity. Women were significantly less likely than men to achieve the following goals by CR completion: triglycerides (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.66), physical activity (AOR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.59-0.74), and hemoglobin A1C (AOR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.78). Women were significantly more likely than men to achieve the high-density lipoprotein goal (AOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.86). There were no gender differences in goal achievement for blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, BMI, smoking cessation, or medication use. More than 94% of patients were taking three of four recommended secondary prevention medications both before and after the program. Men and women generally improved similarly in terms of AHA/ACC goal achievement. Quality improvement strategies need to focus on physical activity and blood glucose control in women. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, H.; Werner, C.; Bernhardt, R.; Hesse, S.; Krüger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill traini...

  10. Predicting non-return to work in patients attending cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samkange-Zeeb, Florence; Altenhöner, Thomas; Berg, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    programme which can be integrated into existing rehabilitation programmes, we developed a screening instrument for the identification of persons at risk of not returning to work at the onset of the rehabilitation process. More than 65% of the participants who had not returned to work 6 and 12 months...

  11. Trends and Predictors of Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Data From the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anthony E; Keeley, Ellen C

    2017-12-29

    Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute myocardial infarction has been proven to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. Historically, participation rates have been low, and although recent efforts have increased referral rates, current data on CR participation are limited. Utilizing data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System conducted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we performed a population-based, cross-sectional analysis of CR post-acute myocardial infarction. Unadjusted participation from 2005 to 2015 was evaluated by univariable logistic regression. Multivariable logistic regression was performed with patient characteristic variables to determine adjusted trends and associations with participation in CR in more recent years from 2011 to 2015. Among the 32 792 survey respondents between 2005 and 2015, participation ranged from 35% in 2005 to 39% in 2009 ( P =0.005) and from 38% in 2011 to 32% in 2015 ( P =0.066). Between 2011 and 2015, participants were less likely to be female (odds ratio [OR] 0.763, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.646-0.903), black (OR 0.700, 95% CI 0.526-0.931), uninsured (OR 0.528, 95% CI 0.372-0.751), less educated (OR 0.471, 95% CI 0.367-0.605), current smokers (OR 0.758, 95% CI 0.576-0.999), and were more likely to be retired or self-employed (OR 1.393, 95% CI 1.124-1.726). Only one third of patients participate in CR following acute myocardial infarction despite the known health benefits. Participants are less likely to be female, black, and uneducated. Future studies should focus on methods to maximize the proportion of CR referrals converted into CR participation. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  12. The effects of cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors in CABG Patients aged 45-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rahim Mirnasuri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most common cause of mortalily and inability. In Iran, one third of mortality causes are coronary heart diseases. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a Cardiac Rehabilitation program (CR on exercise capacity (VO2max and coronary risk factors in CABG patients aged 45-65 . Materials and Methods: Of 36 CABG patients randomly selected from Hamadan Shahid Beheshti hospital, 18 subjects as experimental group (with mean age 54.57±6.26 years and weight 72.14±10.83 kg participated in CR program, and 18 subjects as control group (with mean age 57.64±4.75 years and weight 76.5±12 kg without participation in any exercise and CR program participated in this study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. CR program was an eight-week involving warm-up, aerobic exercises and cool-down. Variables including: anthropometrics measurements and exercise capacity (VO2max, and also coronary risk factors such as body mass index (BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, fasting blood sugar (FBS, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL-HDL ratio (LHR, body fat percent (BFP were determined at the first and the last week of CR program in both groups. Results: Statistical analysis by independent t-test indicated that after program, there was a significant difference between 2 groups in VO2max, BMI, WHR, SBP, DBP, TC, TG, LDL, LHR (P<0.05, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in FBS, HDL, BFP. Conclusion: The CR program of the present study indicated a significant effect on exercise capacity and some coronary risk factors profile in CABG patients of 45-65 and can it be considered as a suitable program for CABG patients.

  13. Hydrogel based approaches for cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saludas, Laura; Pascual-Gil, Simon; Prósper, Felipe; Garbayo, Elisa; Blanco-Prieto, María

    2017-05-25

    Heart failure still represents the leading cause of death worldwide. Novel strategies using stem cells and growth factors have been investigated for effective cardiac tissue regeneration and heart function recovery. However, some major challenges limit their translation to the clinic. Recently, biomaterials have emerged as a promising approach to improve delivery and viability of therapeutic cells and proteins for the regeneration of the damaged heart. In particular, hydrogels are considered one of the most promising vehicles. They can be administered through minimally invasive techniques while maintaining all the desirable characteristics of drug delivery systems. This review discusses recent advances made in the field of hydrogels for cardiac tissue regeneration in detail, focusing on the type of hydrogel (conventional, injectable, smart or nano- and micro-gel), the biomaterials used for its manufacture (natural, synthetic or hybrid) and the therapeutic agent encapsulated (stem cells or proteins). We expect that these novel hydrogel-based approaches will open up new possibilities in drug delivery and cell therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation in the transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    Relevance: Stroke is one of the major chronic diseases leading to long-term disability. Stroke treatment has improved and in-hospital stays have been reduced, leading to increasing emphasis on home-based rehabilitation. The transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation is critical, as vital...... are vague. Purpose: The purpose was to examine the use of outcome measures used in clinical practice in the transition from hospital to home-based rehabilitation. Methods/Analysis: A questionnaire were sent to the heads of 26 hospitals discharging patients with stroke and 52 municipalities' health services...... rehabilitation, especially in the transition between hospital and home-based rehabilitation. A nationwide, interprofessional and intersectional group is currently discussing recommendations for the use of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation. Results from this group will be presented at the conference...

  15. Translation, Cross-cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Validation of the Korean-Language Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS-K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Yookyung; Grace, Sherry L; Kim, Won-Seok

    2017-10-01

    To perform a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale (CRBS) for use in Korea, followed by psychometric validation. The CRBS was developed to assess patients' perception of the degree to which patient, provider and health system-level barriers affect their cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation. The CRBS consists of 21 items (barriers to adherence) rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The first phase was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the CRBS to the Korean language. After back-translation, both versions were reviewed by a committee. The face validity was assessed in a sample of Korean patients (n=53) with history of acute myocardial infarction that did not participate in CR through semi-structured interviews. The second phase was to assess the construct and criterion validity of the Korean translation as well as internal reliability, through administration of the translated version in 104 patients, principle component analysis with varimax rotation and cross-referencing against CR use, respectively. The length, readability, and clarity of the questionnaire were rated well, demonstrating face validity. Analysis revealed a six-factor solution, demonstrating construct validity. Cronbach's alpha was greater than 0.65. Barriers rated highest included not knowing about CR and not being contacted by a program. The mean CRBS score was significantly higher among non-attendees (2.71±0.26) than CR attendees (2.51±0.18) (pbarriers to CR utilization in Korea.

  16. Gender Differences in Patients' Beliefs About Biological, Environmental, Behavioral, and Psychological Risk Factors in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Saeidi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are significant gender differences in the epidemiology and presentation of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, physiological aspects of CVDs, response to diagnostic tests or interventions, and prevalence or incidence of the associated risk factors. Considering the independent influence of gender on early dire consequences of such diseases, this study was conducted to investigate gender differences in patients' beliefs about biological, environmental, behavioral, and psychological risk factors in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Materials and Methods: This study has cross sectional design. The sample was composed of 775 patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation unit in Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran. The data were collected using clinical interview and patients’ medical records. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, and chi-square test​​. To do the statistical analysis, SPSS version 20 was utilized. Results: As the results indicated, there was a significant difference between the beliefs of men and women about risk factors of heart disease (X2= 48.36; P

  17. Assessing the effectiveness of enhanced psychological care for patients with depressive symptoms attending cardiac rehabilitation compared with treatment as usual (CADENCE): study protocol for a pilot cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Suzanne H; Dickens, Chris; Anderson, Rob; Richards, David A; Taylor, Rod S; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Kessler, David; Turner, Katrina; Kuyken, Willem; Gandhi, Manish; Knight, Luke; Gibson, Andrew; Davey, Antoinette; Warren, Fiona; Winder, Rachel; Wright, Christine; Campbell, John

    2016-02-02

    Around 17% of people eligible for UK cardiac rehabilitation programmes following an acute coronary syndrome report moderate or severe depressive symptoms. While maximising psychological health is a core goal of cardiac rehabilitation, psychological care can be fragmented and patchy. This study tests the feasibility and acceptability of embedding enhanced psychological care, composed of two management strategies of proven effectiveness in other settings (nurse-led mental health care coordination and behavioural activation), within the cardiac rehabilitation care pathway. This study tests the uncertainties associated with a large-scale evaluation by conducting an external pilot trial with a nested qualitative study. We aim to recruit and randomise eight comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation teams (clusters) to intervention (embedding enhanced psychological care into routine cardiac rehabilitation programmes) or control (routine cardiac rehabilitation programmes alone) arms. Up to 64 patients (eight per team) identified with depressive symptoms upon initial assessment by the cardiac rehabilitation team will be recruited, and study measures will be administered at baseline (before starting rehabilitation) and at 5 months and 8 months post baseline. Outcomes include depressive symptoms, cardiac mortality and morbidity, anxiety, health-related quality of life and service resource use. Trial data on cardiac team and patient recruitment, and the retention and flow of patients through treatment will be used to assess intervention feasibility and acceptability. Qualitative interviews will be undertaken to explore trial participants' and cardiac rehabilitation nurses' views and experiences of the trial methods and intervention, and to identify reasons why patients declined to take part in the trial. Outcome data will inform a sample size calculation for a definitive trial. The pilot trial and qualitative study will inform the design of a fully powered cluster randomised

  18. Rehabilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caswell, Dorte; Høybye-Mortensen, Matilde; Dall, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitering som både begreb og indsats har været genstand for stigende fokus i de seneste år, på både politisk, organisatorisk og praksis-niveau. Fra januar 2013 træder en større reform af førtidspension og fleksjob i kraft, og med reformen etableres ’rehabilitering’ som både mål og middel i...

  19. Lifestyle and the importance of health education in the cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial revascularization surgery - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p213

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Gonçaleves Moura Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of ischemic cardiopathy, the prevention has a main role and the modifications in the lifestyle are indispensable for the good prognosis of the disease. The goal of the study was to describe the lifestyle regarding the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, dietary habits and sedentary behaviors before myocardial revascularization surgery and during the period of cardiac rehabilitation in a private institution that did not comprise structured health education activities. This was a retrospective, observational study, with a qualitative approach, held with 50 patients submitted to cardiac rehabilitation (36 men and 14 women; age 61±12.74 years. The data were collected from clinical records of the pre-cardiac rehabilitation evaluation which consisted of clinical data and information referring to the patients’ lifestyle. Amongst the most prevalent co-morbidities in the sample, there were: the hypertension (n=24; 48%, the diabetes mellitus (n=18; 36% and dyslipidemias (n=17; 34%. A high rate of smoke cessation (100% and 58% of sedentary behaviors (n=29 was observed after the cardiac surgery. This same number (n=29; 58% referred to have adhered to changes in dietary habits after the myocardial acute infarct. There was also an increase in the prevalence of alcohol consumption (n=21; 42% after myocardial revascularization. We conclude with this research that a cardiac rehabilitation program should provide to their patients, health education actions, for a necessary and real change in lifestyle habits, with the presence of a multidisciplinary team.

  20. The effect of computerized decision support on barriers to guideline implementation: a qualitative study in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, Rick; van Engen-Verheul, Mariette; de Keizer, Nicolette F; Bal, Roland; Hasman, Arie; Hellemans, Irene M; Peek, Niels

    2010-06-01

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) can be used to improve the implementation of clinical practice guidelines by changing the behaviour of care professionals. While the influence of system characteristics on the effectiveness of CDSSs is studied, little is known about the relation between cognitive, organizational and environmental factors, and CDSSs' effectiveness. To assess the effect of CDSSs on cognitive, organizational, and environmental factors that hamper guideline implementation. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with care professionals, on reasons for improved adherence or persistent non-adherence to the prevailing guideline after successful adoption of a CDSS. All remarks regarding guideline implementation were extracted and classified using the conceptual framework from Cabana et al. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Care professionals that used the CARDSS decision support system for therapeutic decision making in cardiac rehabilitation. Twenty-nine rehabilitation nurses and physiotherapists from 21 Dutch clinics were interviewed. CARDSS improved guideline adherence by increasing its users' familiarity with the guidelines' recommendations and decision logic, by overcoming users' inertia to previous practice, and by reducing guideline complexity for example by facilitating calculation and interpretation of data. If the system's recommendations were shared with patients, refusal to participate in therapies reduced. CARDSS never incited users to target barriers related to organizational or environmental constraints. Our results suggest that computerized decision support can improve guideline implementation by increasing the knowledge of preferred practice, by reducing inertia to previous practice, and by reducing guideline complexity. However, computerized decision support is not effective when organizational or procedural changes are required that users consider to be beyond their tasks and responsibilities. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  1. Developing an Adapted Cardiac Rehabilitation Training for Home Care Clinicians: PATIENT PERSPECTIVES, CLINICIAN KNOWLEDGE, AND CURRICULUM OVERVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Jodi L; Russell, David; Mola, Ana; Bowles, Kathryn H; Lipman, Terri H

    2017-11-01

    There is limited evidence that home care clinicians receive education on the core competencies of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). This article describes the development and implementation of a CR training program adapted for home care clinicians, which incorporated the viewpoints of homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Literature and guideline reviews were performed to glean curriculum content, supplemented with themes identified among patients and clinicians. Semistructured interviews were conducted with homebound patients regarding their perspectives on living with cardiovascular disease and focus groups were held with home care clinicians regarding their perspectives on caring for these patients. Transcripts were analyzed with the constant comparative method. A 15-item questionnaire was administered to home care nurses and rehabilitation therapists pre- and posttraining, and responses were analyzed using a paired sample t test. Three themes emerged among patients: (1) awareness of heart disease; (2) motivation and caregivers' importance; and (3) barriers to attendance at outpatient CR; and 2 additional themes among clinicians: (4) gaps in care transitions; and (5) educational needs. Questionnaire results demonstrated significantly increased knowledge posttraining compared with pretraining among home care clinicians (pretest mean = 12.81; posttest mean = 14.63, P < .001). There was no significant difference between scores for nurses and rehabilitation therapists. Home care clinicians respond well to an adapted CR training to improve care for homebound patients with cardiovascular disease. Clinicians who participated in the training demonstrated an increase in their knowledge and skills of the core competencies for CR.

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Demerdash, Salah; Khorshid, Hazem; Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A; Salem, Alaa M

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient's symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3months after the end of the study. The mean age was 56.8±3.1years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3±2.9 vs. 31.2±1.9, pstress and at rest (SDS) was significantly lower after CRP (4.4±3 vs. 7.2±3, pischemic burden in patients with IHD who are unfit or not suitable for conventional cardiac revascularization. In addition the decreased ischemic burden, functional capacity, hemodynamic and metabolic profiles also improve for this group of patients and thus, cardiac rehabilitation should be implemented for routine management of those patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stroke rehabilitation therapy in a patient with a cardiac pacemaker for chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hikaru; Koike, Kimiko

    2003-12-01

    A 65-year-old man was implanted with an artificial pacemaker for chronic bradycardic atrial fibrillation associated with hypertensive heart disease. Five years after the pacemaker implantation, he suffered from a cerebral embolism. Approximately 4.5 months after the ictus, he was transferred to the rehabilitation ward. He had flaccid left hemiplegia and severe disuse syndrome. He could not sit and could tilt his head up for only two minutes because of severe orthostatic hypotension. By modulating the rate-responsive mode of the pacemaker every 2-4 weeks, we were able to rehabilitate the patient. Thus, the patient could sit in a wheelchair for more than three hours. This case emphasizes the importance of examining the mode and function of a previously implanted artificial pacemaker. In accord with varying rehabilitation programs and gradual improvement in a patient's physical activities, periodic modulation of a programmable pacemaker can lead to a better functional outcome during rehabilitation therapy.

  4. [Subjective Aspects of Return to Work and Social Reintegration in Patients with Extensive Work-related Problems in Cardiac Rehabilitation - Results of a Qualitative Investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Behrendt, C; Salzwedel, A; Rabe, S; Ortmann, K; Völler, H

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated subjective biopsychosocial effects of coronary heart disease (CHD), coping strategies and social support in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and having extensive work-related problems. A qualitative investigation was performed in 17 patients (48.9±7.0 y, 13 male) with extensive work-related problems (SIMBO-C>30). All patients were interviewed with structured surveys. Data analysis was performed using a software that is based on the content analysis approach of Mayring. In regard to effects of disease, patients indicated social aspects including occupational aspects (62%) more often than physical or mental factors (9 or 29%). Applied coping strategies and support services are mainly focused on physical impairments (70 or 45%). The development of appropriate coping strategies was insufficient although social effects of disease were subjectively meaningful for patients in CR. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. VA FitHeart, a Mobile App for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Alexis L; Magnusson, Sara L; Fortney, John C; Sayre, George G; Whooley, Mary A

    2018-01-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes for patients with ischemic heart disease or heart failure but is underused. New strategies to improve access to and engagement in CR are needed. There is considerable interest in technology-facilitated home CR. However, little is known about patient acceptance and use of mobile technology for CR. The aim of this study was to develop a mobile app for technology-facilitated home CR and seek to determine its usability. We recruited patients eligible for CR who had access to a mobile phone, tablet, or computer with Internet access. The mobile app includes physical activity goal setting, logs for tracking physical activity and health metrics (eg, weight, blood pressure, and mood), health education, reminders, and feedback. Study staff demonstrated the mobile app to participants in person and then observed participants completing prespecified tasks with the mobile app. Participants completed the System Usability Scale (SUS, 0-100), rated likelihood to use the mobile app (0-100), questionnaires on mobile app use, and participated in a semistructured interview. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology and the Theory of Planned Behavior informed the analysis. On the basis of participant feedback, we made iterative revisions to the mobile app between users. We conducted usability testing in 13 participants. The first version of the mobile app was used by the first 5 participants, and revised versions were used by the final 8 participants. From the first version to revised versions, task completion success rate improved from 44% (11/25 tasks) to 78% (31/40 tasks; P=.05), SUS improved from 54 to 76 (P=.04; scale 0-100, with 100 being the best usability), and self-reported likelihood of use remained high at 76 and 87 (P=.30; scale 0-100, with 100 being the highest likelihood). In interviews, patients expressed interest in tracking health measures ("I think it'll be good to track my exercise and to see what I'm doing

  6. It is not just a Minor Thing - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutic Study of Patients' Experiences when afflicted by a Minor Heart Attack and Participating in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-06-01

    To improve cardiac care, especially cardiac rehabilitation, patients' perspectives should be better addressed. In Denmark, patients afflicted by a minor heart attack in terms of unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction are treated in fast-track programmes with subacute treatment in hospital, early discharge and follow-up specialised outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Knowledge of these patients' experiences of their life situation is essential to develop sufficient care protocols. To gain in-depth understanding of how patients afflicted by a minor heart attack experience their life situation when following cardiac rehabilitation. Focus group interviews and individual interviews were conducted with 11 patients enrolled in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Data consisted of text in the form of transcribed interviews. A three-phased interpretation inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was applied. As an overall concept, the patients experienced being forced into a demanding life shaking journey. Three themes emerged: Difficulty accepting the disease: facing the disease is a difficult challenge for the patients, leading to vulnerability and helplessness; Understanding that life has become frail: patients feel shaken as they realise that the disease is chronic and life-threatening; and An altered life: patients must adjust to new limitations in their everyday lives. Patients experience an overall demanding transition when they are afflicted by a minor heat attack, whereby their lives are sweepingly changed. Supporting patients' integrity, which becomes vulnerable during the various stages of transitions, is essential to ensure a healthy outcome. Being together with fellow patients during cardiac rehabilitation is a facilitating factor in the course of transition. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Preparing for change in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: a qualitative evaluation of cardiac rehabilitation within a region of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander M; Barbour, Rosaline S; McIntyre, Paul D

    2002-09-01

    Secondary prevention of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is often poorly managed and its benefits attained in only a minority of those with CHD. Guidelines developed in the United Kingdom and North America suggest that in future cardiac rehabilitation programmes should provide services through individualized programmes that cater for a wide range of conditions associated with CHD. This will involve substantial and costly changes to current programmes that are mostly standardized and for postmyocardial infarction patients. Based on change theory, this study examined the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses of an existing programme in a Scottish region which was due to undergo the changes suggested by guidelines. To examine the perceived provision of secondary prevention services for CHD from the perspectives of health professionals within one region in the West of Scotland. A purposive sample of 14 health professionals (eight primary and six secondary care health professionals) was selected to cover a range of professional roles including both specialists and generalists. Separate focus group discussions (2) were held with primary care and secondary care professionals. Whilst the health professionals were enthusiastic about CHD prevention and their involvement, they perceived barriers to the success of the existing service as being complex and multifactorial, including patient, social and service-related factors. Although both groups identified motivation as the most influential personal factor, secondary care staff tended to focus on the importance of patient factors in influencing motivation to change, whereas the primary care staff referred more to the cumulative effects of social and cultural factors. Professionals highlighted weaknesses in the transition between hospital and community-based services with regard to the information flow between primary and secondary care. Although the study has immediate relevance for the local area, it highlighted issues of more

  8. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  9. Design of a randomized controlled trial of comprehensive rehabilitation in patients with myocardial infarction, stabilized acute coronary syndrome, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting: Akershus Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation Trial (the CORE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kogstad Else

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives 1. To assess the long-term effectiveness of a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programme on quality of life and survival in patients with a large spectrum of cardiovascular diseases (myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass grafting. 2. To establish the degree of correlation between expected improvement of health-related quality of life and improvement in physical function attributable to rehabilitation in the intervention group, in comparison with similar changes in the conventional care group. Design Randomized, controlled, parallel-group design (intervention/conventional care. Setting Akershus County, southeast of Oslo City, Norway. Participants 500 patients, men and women, aged 40-85 years, who have sustained at least one of the above-mentioned cardiovascular diseases. Interventions 8 weeks of supervised, structured physical training of three periods of 20 min per week, targeting a heart rate of 60-70% of the individual's maximum; home-based physical exercise training with the same basic schedule as in the supervised period; quantification of patients' compliance with the exercise programme by the use of wristwatches, information stored in the watch memory being retrieved once a month during the 3-year follow-up period; and life-style modification with an emphasis on the cessation of smoking and on healthy nutrition and weight control.

  10. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Renae J; McKeough, Zoe J; Mo, Laura R; Dallimore, Jamie T; Dennis, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years) commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71%) completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers. The convenience and accessibility of a community venue for rehabilitation contributed to high levels of satisfaction and a positive experience for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease and physiotherapists.

  11. Movement-based interaction applied to physical rehabilitation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Navarro, Juan Enrique; Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-12-09

    Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient's actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient's progress. The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their interaction with the system allowed us to obtain

  12. Serious Games for Home-based Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Raoul; Hiesel, Patrick; Peters, Sebastian; Siewiorek, Daniel P; Smailagic, Asim; Brügge, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    On average, two thousand residents in the United States experience a stroke every day. These circumstances account for $28 billion direct costs annually and given the latest predictions, these costs will more than triple by 2030. In our research, we propose a portfolio of serious games for home-based stroke rehabilitation. The objective of the game approach is to enrich the training experience and establish a higher level of compliance to prescribed exercises, while maintaining a supportive training environment as found in common therapy sessions. Our system provides a collection of mini games based on rehabilitation exercises used in conventional physical therapy, monitors the patient's performance while exercising and provides clinicians with an interface to personalize the training. The clinician can set the current state of rehabilitation and change the playable games over time to drive diversification. While the system still has to be evaluated, an early stage case study with one patient offered positive indications towards this concept.

  13. Cancer survivors' experience of exercise-based cancer rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Julie; Hammer, Nanna Maria; Andersen, Christina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise training as a therapeutic and rehabilitative intervention for cancer survivors is accumulating. However, whereas the evidence for the efficacy of exercise training has been established in several meta-analyses, synthesis of qualitative...... research is lacking. In order to extend healthcare professionals' understanding of the meaningfulness of exercise in cancer survivorship care, this paper aims to identify, appraise and synthesize qualitative studies on cancer survivors' experience of participation in exercise-based rehabilitation. MATERIAL......-based rehabilitation according to cancer survivors. Accordingly, the potential of rebuilding structure in everyday life, creating a normal context and enabling the individual to re-establish confidentiality and trust in their own body and physical potential constitute substantial qualities fundamental...

  14. Short-term results of a 5-week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program after first-time myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallavollita, Luca; Marsili, Bruno; Castelli, Sandro; Cucchi, Francesca; Santillo, Elpidio; Marini, Luciano; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    A prospective single-center interventional cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a 5-week comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on terms exercise capacity, quality of life, echocardiographic findings and autonomic modulation after first-time myocardial infarction. We studied 37 consecutive post-myocardial infartion patients (mean age 66 years). All patients began a 5-week cardiac rehabilitation supervised training. The exercise program consisted of 40 minutes of training, three times a week, on a cycle ergometer at 60-80% of the maximal heart rate. At baseline and after training program we analyzed: the distance walked after the Six-Minutes Walking Test (6MWT); quality of life (QoL) assesed using the Psychological General Well-Being Inventory (PGWBI) questionnaire; echocardiographic finding and autonomic balance assesed heart rate variability (HRV). We observed statistically significant improvement in exercise capacity (from 423±94 to 496±13 m; P<0.05). Also we observed statistically significant improvements in the many PGWBI dimensions; particularly, anxiety +5.8% (from 18.11±5.2 to 19.12±4.4); depression +6.0% (from 12.00±3.0 to 12.73±2.4); positive well-being +6% (from 11.55±3.5 to 12.23±4.0); general health +10.3% (from 9.48±3.5 to 10.46±2.87); vitality +6.8% (from 12.96±4.2 to 13.85±4.2). Finally, we observed changes in HRV indices after training program: RR (from 903±169 ms to 952±163 ms; P<0.05), pNN50% (from 4.74±4.89 to 6.23±5.53; P<0.05), in time-domain; LF (from 274±169 to 362±233 ms2; P<0,05); HF (from 214±154 to 314±194 ms2; P<0.05) and LF/HF (from 1.53±0.54 to 1.24±0.47; P<0.05) in frequency-domain. The study suggest that a cardiac rehabilitation program in postmyocardial infarction improves exercise capacity, QoL and autonomic modulation.

  15. Update to the study protocol, including statistical analysis plan for a randomized clinical trial comparing comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery with control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Laerum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Hansen, Tina Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    , either valve replacement or repair, remains the treatment of choice. However, post-surgery, the transition to daily living may become a physical, mental and social challenge. We hypothesize that a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program can improve physical capacity and self-assessed mental health...

  16. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Bárbara Maria; Cardoso, Dannuey Machado; Gomes, Tiago José Nardi; Santos, Tamires Daros dos; Vicente, Marília Severo; Pereira, Sérgio Nunes; Barbosa, Viviane Acunha; Albuquerque, Isabella Martins de

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance) group (GCR + IMT, n=12) and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12), over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of Pinspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation.

  17. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  18. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Rolf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. Results With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I. For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Conclusion Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles

  19. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-02-09

    Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning promoting a task-specific repetitive

  20. Implementing international sexual counselling guidelines in hospital cardiac rehabilitation: development of the CHARMS intervention using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Sharry, J; Murphy, P J; Byrne, M

    2016-10-10

    Decreased sexual activity and sexual problems are common among people with cardiovascular disease, negatively impacting relationship satisfaction and quality of life. International guidelines recommend routine delivery of sexual counselling to cardiac patients. The Cardiac Health and Relationship Management and Sexuality (CHARMS) baseline study in Ireland found, similar to international findings, limited implementation of sexual counselling guidelines in practice. The aim of the current study was to develop the CHARMS multi-level intervention to increase delivery of sexual counselling by healthcare professionals. We describe the methods used to develop the CHARMS intervention following the three phases of the Behaviour Change Wheel approach: understand the behaviour, identify intervention options, and identify content and implementation options. Survey (n = 60) and focus group (n = 14) data from two previous studies exploring why sexual counselling is not currently being delivered were coded by two members of the research team to understand staff's capability, opportunity, and motivation to engage in the behaviour. All potentially relevant intervention functions to change behaviour were identified and the APEASE (affordability, practicability, effectiveness, acceptability, side effects and equity) criteria were used to select the most appropriate. The APEASE criteria were then used to choose between all behaviour change techniques (BCTs) potentially relevant to the identified functions, and these BCTs were translated into intervention content. The Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist was used to specify details of the intervention including the who, what, how and where of proposed intervention delivery. Providing sexual counselling group sessions by cardiac rehabilitation staff to patients during phase III cardiac rehabilitation was identified as the target behaviour. Education, enablement, modelling, persuasion and

  1. Web-based home rehabilitation gaming system for balance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Kachmar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, most systems for virtual rehabilitation and motor training require quite complex and expensive hardware and can be used only in clinical settings. Now, a low-cost rehabilitation game training system has been developed for patients with movement disorders; it is suitable for home use under the distant supervision of a therapist. It consists of a patient-side application installed on a home computer and the virtual rehabilitation Game Server in the Internet. System can work with different input gaming devices connected through USB or Bluetooth, such as a Nintendo Wii balance board, a Nintendo Wii remote, a MS Kinect sensor, and custom made rehabilitation gaming devices based on a joystick. The same games can be used with all training devices. Assessment of the Home Rehabilitation Gaming System for balance training was performed on six patients with Cerebral Palsy, who went through daily training sessions for two weeks. Preliminary results showed balance improvement in patients with Cerebral Palsy after they had completed home training courses. Further studies are needed to establish medical requirements and evidence length.

  2. An interactive game-based shoulder wheel system for rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou LW

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Ming Chang,1,* Yen-Ching Chang,2,3 Hsiao-Yun Chang,4 Li-Wei Chou5,6,* 1Department of Applied Informatics and Multimedia, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan; 2Department of Medical Informatics, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 3Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 4Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 6School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Increases in the aging population and in the number of accidents have resulted in more people suffering from physical impairments or disabilities. Rehabilitation therapy thus attracts greater attention as a means of helping patients recover and return to a normal life. With the extremely long and tedious nature of traditional rehabilitation, patients are reluctant to continue the entire process, thus the expected effects of the therapy cannot be obtained. Games are well known to help patients improve their concentration and shift their attention away from the discomfort of their injuries during rehabilitation. Thus, incorporating game technology into a rehabilitation program may be a promising approach.Methods: In this study, a gaming system used for shoulder rehabilitation was developed. The mechanical parts and electric circuits were integrated to mimic the functionalities of a shoulder wheel. Several games were also designed to suit the rehabilitation needs of the patients based on the age and gender differences among the individual users, enabling individuals to undergo the rehabilitation process by playing games. Two surveys were conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of the participants regarding the gaming system.Results: The results of the online survey among a larger population

  3. Effects of Training in Community-Based Rehabilitation on Attitudinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based rehabilitation on attitude of non-disabled people toward people with disabilities. A total of 75 unit committee members of the KEEA District assembly who were put in 3 groups responded to the ATPD Scale. Data were analysed using the ...

  4. Exploring the scope of community-based rehabilitation in ensuring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Globally, it has been estimated that almost 15% of world's population live with some form of disability, of which the majority are from developing nations. Objectives: To explore the role of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) in the health sector, identify the prevalent challenges, and to suggest measures to ...

  5. Home-based rehabilitation: Physiotherapy student and client ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) in under-resourced areas in a primary healthcare (PHC) context exposes students to the real-life situations of their clients. There is a scarcity of literature on student and client experiences of HBR in the physiotherapy context. Increased knowledge of HBR could result in an ...

  6. [Development and Evaluation of herzwegweiser.de - An Informational Website designed for Post-Rehabilitation Support of Cardiac Patients and their Healthcare Professionals in Berlin-Brandenburg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm-Balderjahn, Sabine; Bartel, Susanne; Wilke, Kristin; Spyra, Karla

    2018-02-01

    The internet portal 'herzwegweiser.de' was developed to assist individuals with cardiovascular diseases in the phase III rehabilitation in the region of Berlin-Brandenburg. It provides information on this specific disease as well as on aftercare services, e. g. regional cardiac groups. For the medical and therapeutic colleagues specific information such as treatment guidelines and a cardiac group placement service for trainers and medical doctors were set up. The study was based on a mixed-methods design. Initially, structured interviews were conducted to identify the expectations and needs of the internet portal. After implementation of the portal, a partially standardized written survey was used to evaluate its acceptance and usability. 105 former rehab patients and 42 medical colleagues participated. The evaluation of the questionnaires was carried out with frequency distributions, mean comparisons and Chi-square tests. The site was rated with an overall high approval rating. Over 90% of the former rehab patients rated content, structure, design, and the search function of the portal positive as did more than 85% of the medical colleagues. 97% of the former rehab patients and 95% professionals would recommend 'herzwegweiser.de'. This internet portal can serve as a model for other regions and possibly other diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Clinical effects and implications of cardiac rehabilitation for implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Moons, Philip; Christensen, Anne Vingaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The Copenhagen Outpatient ProgrammE-Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator trial was a randomized clinical trial that compared a complex rehabilitation intervention including exercise training and psychoeducational interventions with usual care. A significant difference between rehab...... and death and regain trust in their bodies. CONCLUSION:: The program has a clinical effect and is perceived as beneficial through supportive coping....

  8. Industrial Fitness, Adult Fitness, and Cardiac Rehabilitation. Graduate Programs Specific to Training Exercise Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Philip K.; Hall, Linda K.

    1984-01-01

    With the increase in industrial and adult fitness and rehabilitation programs, more individuals qualified as exercise program professionals are needed. This article discusses universities and colleges that offer specialized graduate programs. Entrance criteria, prerequisites and deficiencies, degree requirements, and field experience training for…

  9. EMG based FES for post-stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyus, Ceethal K.; Anjaly Cherian, V.; Nageswaran, Sharmila

    2017-11-01

    Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG Abstract—Annually, 15 million in world population experiences stroke. Nearly 9 million stroke survivors every year experience mild to severe disability. The loss of upper extremity function in stroke survivors still remains a major rehabilitation challenge. The proposed EMG based FES system can be used for effective upper limb motor re-education in post stroke upper limb rehabilitation. The governing feature of the designed system is its synchronous activation, in which the FES stimulation is dependent on the amplitude of the EMG signal acquired from the unaffected upper limb muscle of the hemiplegic patient. This proportionate operation eliminates the undesirable damage to the patient’s skin by generating stimulus in proportion to voluntary EMG signals. This feature overcomes the disadvantages of currently available manual motor re-education systems. This model can be used in home-based post stroke rehabilitation, to effectively improve the upper limb functions.

  10. Waiting Time for Start of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Correlations of Non Compliance to Systematic Referral After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soroush

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To assess the waiting time, number of delays, and correlations of non-commitment to the systematic referral to the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR among coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG patients. Methods The cross-sectional study data were gathered through evaluations related to 1,187 CABG patients who were referred to the outpatient CR of 1 hospital in western Iran during 2010 to 2014. The instruments included were demographics and actual risk factors checklist, single item of perceived risk factors, and Beck depression inventory (BDI. Data was analyzed via chi-square test, ANOVA, Bonferroni post hoc test, and binary logistic regression analysis. Results Among 1 187 patients (830 male, 27% had delayed referral, and the number of delays decreased from 2010 (49.3% to 2014 (7.6% (P < 0.001. The mean of the waiting time to receive outpatient CR in western Iran was an estimated 59 days. This mean has been reduced from 66 days (2010 to 53 days (2014 (P < 0.001. After adjustment for all demographics, the results indicated that diabetic patients (P = 0.002 and patients with biological (P = 0.002, behavioral (P = 0.003, or psychological (P = 0.002 perceived risk factors have less commitment. In addition, a family history of cardiac increases the possibility of commitment as 2.41 times (P < 0.001. Conclusions Despite the progressive process of patients’ admittance and acceptability of the present waiting time, especially after 2014, it seems that more attention to diabetic patients and patients without a family history of cardiac, and modification of attitudes about multiple risk factors can associate the self-care with more responsibility and it may also be affective in the control of harm consequences through commitment to the systematic referral.

  11. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training within cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan AL

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Hannan,1 Wayne Hing,1 Vini Simas,1 Mike Climstein,2,3 Jeff S Coombes,4 Rohan Jayasinghe,5–7 Joshua Byrnes,8 James Furness1 1Faculty of Health Sciences & Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 2Exercise Health and Performance Faculty Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Water Based Research Unit, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 4School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 5Cardiology Department, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 6Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 7Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 8Centre for Applied Health Economics, School of Medicine, Griffith University, Logan, QLD, Australia Background: Aerobic capacity has been shown to be inversely proportionate to cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and there is growing evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT appears to be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness within the cardiac population. Previously published systematic reviews in cardiovascular disease have neither investigated the effect that the number of weeks of intervention has on cardiorespiratory fitness changes, nor have adverse events been collated. Objective: We aimed to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs within the cardiac population that investigated cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT and to collate adverse events. Methods: A critical narrative synthesis and meta-analysis was conducted after systematically searching relevant databases up to July 2017. We searched for RCTs that compared cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT interventions within the cardiac population. Results: Seventeen studies, involving 953 participants (465

  12. Intertester reliability of the talk test in a cardiac rehabilitation population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annemette Krintel; Maribo, Thomas; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The validity of the Talk Test (TT) is well documented, but the reliability of the test is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the absolute and relative intertester reliability of the TT in cardiac patients. METHODS: Cardiac patients (n = 64) who had completed an exercise...... randomized to tests. Workload in watts at the first negative stage of the TT was registered as the test result. Patients and physiotherapists were blinded to test results of the first test. Absolute reliability of the TT was assessed with Bland-Altman plot, standard error of measurement, and minimal...... detectable change. Relative reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: Mean difference in peak workload between test and retest was 0.8 W (95% CI: -4.8 to 3.3). Limit of agreement was estimated to be +31/-32 W. Standard error of measurement was 11 W (95% CI: 10...

  13. Use of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Among Heart Attack Survivors - 20 States and the District of Columbia, 2013 and Four States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Ayala, Carma; Luncheon, Cecily; Ritchey, Matthew; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2017-08-25

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States (1). Each year, approximately 790,000 adults have a myocardial infarction (heart attack), including 210,000 that are recurrent heart attacks (2). Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) includes exercise counseling and training, education for heart-healthy living, and counseling to reduce stress. Cardiac rehab provides patients with education regarding the causes of heart attacks and tools to initiate positive behavior change, and extends patients' medical management after a heart attack to prevent future negative sequelae (3). A systematic review has shown that after a heart attack, patients using cardiac rehab were 53% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 41%-62%) less likely to die from any cause and 57% (95% CI = 21%-77%) less likely to experience cardiac-related mortality than were those who did not use cardiac rehab (3). However, even with long-standing national recommendations encouraging use of cardiac rehab (4), the intervention has been underutilized. An analysis of 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data found that only 34.7% of adults who reported a history of a heart attack also reported subsequent use of cardiac rehab (5). To update these estimates, CDC used the most recent BRFSS data from 2013 and 2015 to assess the use of cardiac rehab among adults following a heart attack. Overall use of cardiac rehab was 33.7% in 20 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in 2013 and 35.5% in four states in 2015. Cardiac rehab use was underutilized overall and differences were evident by sex, age, race/ethnicity, level of education, cardiovascular risk status, and by state. Increasing use of cardiac rehab after a heart attack should be encouraged by health systems and supported by the public health community.

  14. Depressive mood after a cardiac event: gender inequality and participation in rehabilitation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrman, Signild; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Eriksson, Marie; Hedbäck, Bo; Burell, Gunilla; Brulin, Christine

    2004-12-01

    Depressive mood after a cardiac event is common with serious consequences for the patient. To compare gender in depressive mood during the first year after a cardiac event and to evaluate the effect of participating in a multidimensional secondary prevention program on depressive mood. 166 men and 54 women, <73 years, consecutively answered a questionnaire concerning depressive mood at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 5 months and 1 year after discharge after a cardiac event. At 2 weeks, each patient met a nurse, and was informed about the disease and received individual support about lifestyle changes. Of those invited to participate in a secondary prevention program, 127 patients accepted, and 93 declined participation. At each of the four follow-ups, women had significantly higher depression scores than men. Depressive mood in both women and men was significantly reduced at 6 weeks. Thereafter, it increased to the 2-week level in women and to above the 2-week level in men. No differences were seen in patients participating or not in secondary prevention programs. Women had higher depressive mood scores than men and secondary prevention programs failed to improve depressive mood in both women and men.

  15. Designing a theory- and evidence-based tailored eHealth rehabilitation aftercare program in Germany and the Netherlands: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinwand, Dominique; Kuhlmann, Tim; Wienert, Julian; de Vries, Hein; Lippke, Sonia

    2013-11-19

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs aim to improve health status and to decrease the risk of further cardiac events. Persons undergoing rehabilitation often have difficulties transferring the learned health behaviors into their daily routine after returning home and maybe to work. This includes physical activity as well as fruit and vegetable consumption. Computer-based tailored interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing physical activity as well as fruit and vegetable consumption. The aim of this study is, to support people in transferring these two learned behavior changes and their antecedents into their daily life after cardiac rehabilitation. The study will have a randomized controlled design and will be conducted among German and Dutch people who participated in cardiac rehabilitation. The study will consist of one intervention group which will be compared to a waiting list control group. During the eight week duration of the intervention, participants will be invited to participate in the online after-care program once per week. The intervention encourages participants to define individual health behavior goals as well as action, and coping plans to reach these self-determined goals. The effectiveness of the program will be compared between the intervention condition and the control group in terms of behavior change, antecedents of behavior change (e.g., self-efficacy), ability to return to work and increased well-being. Further, subgroup-differences will be assessed including differences between the two countries, socioeconomic inequalities and across age groups. The present study will make a contribution to understanding how such an online-based tailored interventions enables study participants to adopt and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Implications can include how such an online program could enrich cardiac rehabilitation aftercare further. NTR 3706, NCT01909349.

  16. CAMERA-BASED SOFTWARE IN REHABILITATION/THERAPY INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Lewis Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Use of an affordable, easily adaptable, ‘non-specific camera-based software’ that is rarely used in the field of rehabilitation is reported in a study with 91 participants over the duration of six workshop sessions. ‘Non-specific camera-based software’ refers to software that is not dependent on specific hardware. Adaptable means that human tracking and created artefact interaction in the camera field of view is relatively easily changed as one desires via a user-friendly GUI. The significance of having both available for contemporary intervention is argued. Conclusions are that the mature, robust, and accessible software EyeCon is a potent and significant user-friendly tool in the field of rehabilitation/therapy and warrants wider exploration.

  17. Reconsidering evidence-based practice in prosthetic rehabilitation : a shared enterprise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Twillert, S.; Geertzen, J.; Hemminga, T.; Postema, K.; Lettinga, A.

    Background: A divide is experienced between producers and users of evidence in prosthetic rehabilitation. Objective: To discuss the complexity inherent in establishing evidence-based practice in a prosthetic rehabilitation team illustrated by the case of prosthetic prescription for elderly

  18. The Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan: Cardiac rehabilitation as an exemplar of chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, H M; Suskin, N; Bayley, M; Fortin, M; Howlett, J; Heckman, G; Lewanczuk, R

    2010-01-01

    In October 2006, federal funding was announced for the development of a national strategy to fight cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Canada. The comprehensive, independent, stakeholder-driven Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan (CHHS-AP) was delivered to the Minister of Health on February 24, 2009. The mandate of CHHS-AP Theme Working Group (TWG) 6 was to identify the optimal chronic disease management model that incorporated timely access to rehabilitation services and end-of-life planning and care. The purpose of the present paper was to provide an overview of worldwide approaches to CVD and cardiac rehabilitation (CR) strategies and recommendations for CR care in Canada, within the context of the well-known Chronic Care Model (CCM). A separate paper will address end-of-life issues in CVD. TWG 6 was composed of content representatives, primary care representatives and patients. Input in the area of Aboriginal and indigenous cardiovascular health was obtained through individual expert consultation. Information germane to the present paper was gathered from international literature and best practice guidelines. The CCM principles were discussed and agreed on by all. Prioritization of recommendations and overall messaging was discussed and decided on within the entire TWG. The full TWG report was presented to the CHHS-AP Steering Committee and was used to inform the recommendations of the CHHS-AP. Specific actionable recommendations for CR are made in accordance with the key principles of the CCM. The present CR blueprint, as part of the CHHS-AP, will be a first step toward reducing the health care burden of CVD in Canada.

  19. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB): A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Taylor, Rod S; May, Ole

    2017-06-01

    Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. 825 patients with ischaemic heart disease or heart failure were open label randomised to either the LC arm (LC plus CR) or the control arm (CR alone) across three hospital units in Denmark. Both arms received same amount of training and education hours. LC consisted of individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced patients as co-educators, situational, reflective and inductive teaching. The control arm received structured deductive teaching. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to at least 75% of the exercise training or education sessions. We tested for subgroup effects on the primary outcomes using interaction terms. The primary outcomes were compared across arms using logistic regression. More patients in the LC arm adhered to at least 75% of the exercise training sessions than control (80% versus 73%, adjusted odds ratio (OR):1.48; 95% CI:1.07 to 2.05, P=0.018) and 75% of education sessions (79% versus 70%, adjusted OR:1.61, 1.17 to 2.22, P=0.003). Some evidence of larger effects of LC on adherence was seen for patients with heart failure, low education and household income. Addition of LC strategies improved adherence in rehabilitation both in terms of exercise training and education. Patients with heart failure, low levels of education and household income appear to benefit most from this adherence promoting intervention. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01668394. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Nature-Based Rehabilitation to Restart a Stalled Process of Rehabilitation in Individuals with Stress-Related Mental Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Sahlin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available After a period of decrease, sick leave in Sweden due to psychiatric diagnoses is on the increase. The lack of established rehabilitation programmes for patients with stress-related mental disorders (SRMD has opened up for the use of garden/nature in a multimodal rehabilitation context (Nature-Based Rehabilitation, NBR. Region Västra Götaland (VGR started an NBR to offer additional rehabilitation for its employees on long-term sick leave due to SRMD, where initial care had not been sufficient. The aim was to explore whether the mental health and well-being of NBR participants had improved at the end of the NBR and at three follow-ups, and to explore the development of sick leave and health care utilization according to the NBR model (n = 57 and an occupational health service (OHS model (n = 45. Self-assessment instruments for measuring burnout, depression, anxiety and wellbeing, and data from regional and national registers were used. Results showed decreased scores on burnout, depression and anxiety, and increased well-being scores and significantly reduced health care utilization in the NBR group. A large movement from ordinary sickness benefit to rehabilitation benefit was observed, which was not observed in the OHS group. The two groups were in different rehabilitation phases, which limited comparisons. The results point to beneficial effects of using NBR for this patient group and for enhancing a stalled rehabilitation process.

  1. Long-term effects of an expanded cardiac rehabilitation programme after myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery: a five-year follow-up of a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plüss, Catrine Edström; Billing, Ewa; Held, Claes; Henriksson, Peter; Kiessling, Anna; Karlsson, Monica Rydell; Wallen, Håkan N

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the long-term effect of expanded cardiac rehabilitation on a composite end-point, consisting of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or readmission for cardiovascular disease, in patients with coronary artery disease. Single-centre prospective randomized controlled trial. University hospital. Two hundred and twenty-four patients with acute myocardial infarction or undergoing coronary artery by-pass grafting. Patients were randomized to expanded cardiac rehabilitation (a one-year stress management programme, increased physical training, staying at a 'patient hotel' for five days after the event, and cooking sessions), or to standard cardiac rehabilitation. Data on cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, readmission for cardiovascular disease and days at hospital for cardiovascular reasons were obtained from national registries of the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The primary end-point occurred in 121 patients altogether (54%). The number of cardiovascular events were reduced in the expanded rehabilitation group compared with the standard cardiac rehabilitation (53 patients (47.7%) versus 68 patients (60.2%); hazard ratio 0.69; P =0.049). This was mainly because of a reduction of myocardial infarctions in the expanded rehabilitation group. During the five years 12 patients (10.8%) versus 23 patients (20.3%); hazard ratio 0.47; P =0.047 had a myocardial infarction. Days at hospital for cardiovascular reasons were significantly reduced in patients who received expanded cardiac rehabilitation (median 6 days) compared with standard cardiac rehabilitation (median 10 days; P =0.02). Expanded cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafting reduces cardiovascular morbidity and days at hospital for cardiovascular reasons.

  2. High and low contact frequency cardiac rehabilitation programmes elicit similar improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Stephen A; Lacombe, Shawn P; Koppikar, Sahil; Lun, Grace; Parsons, Trisha L; Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a proven intervention that substantially improves physical health and decreases death and disability following a cardiovascular event. Traditional CR typically involves 36 on-site exercise sessions spanning a 12-week period. To date, the optimal dose of CR has yet to be determined. This study compared a high contact frequency CR programme (HCF, 34 on-site sessions) with a low contact frequency CR programme (LCF, eight on-site sessions) of equal duration (4 months). A total of 961 low-risk cardiac patients (RARE score cardiovascular risk factors were measured on admission and discharge. Similar proportions of patients completed HCF (n = 346) and LCF (n = 351) (p = 0.398). Patients who were less fit (<8 METs) were more likely to drop out of the LCF group, while younger patients (<60 years) were more likely to drop out of the HCF group. Both groups experienced similar reductions in weight (-2.3 vs. -2.4 kg; p = 0.779) and improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (+1.5 vs. +1.4 METs; p = 0.418). Patients in the LCF programme achieved equivalent results to those in the HCF programme. Certain subgroups of patients, however, may benefit from participation in a HCF programme, including those patients who are predisposed to prematurely discontinuing the programme and those patients who would benefit from increased monitoring. The LCF model can be employed as an alternative option to widen access and participation for patients who are unable to attend HCF programmes due to distance or time limitations. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Maria Hermes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods: A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance group (GCR + IMT, n=12 and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12, over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax, peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2 and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001, PEmax (P<0.001, peak VO2 (P<0.001 and quality of life scores (P<0.001. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation.

  4. Body Image and quality of life of senior citizens included in a cardiac rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Amaral

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people who have to live with some kind of disease tend to adopt healthy habits and create new ways of seeing themselves. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between the index of quality of life and self perception of patients included in a cardiovascular rehabilitation program in Florianopolis/Brazil. The sample consists of 24 subjects of 62 ± 1.3 years of age, who have coronary artery disease. The Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to assess the quality of life, and to identify the degree of body image discontentment the Stunkard and Sorensen questionnaire (1993 was applied. Statistical analysis was made through statistics programs and the software SPSS 11.0. The degree of association between variables was studied with Kendall test. It was verified that the higher the BMI and the current body shape, the greatest the degree of body image dissatisfaction. The emotional symptoms also appear to be significantly correlated with a desire for a smaller body shape and with indicators of lower quality of life (r = 0474 = 0735, p major 0.05. The physical symptoms were also considerably associated with the emotional symptoms. These results suggest that the variables concerning the quality of life are meaningful to significant body image and satisfaction, which seems to correlate with fewer emotional problems and better facing of the disease. Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Programs that implement physical activity in daily habits proves to be a suitable tool for improving these ailments in this post-acute phase

  5. Family support and cardiac rehabilitation: a comparative study of the experiences of South Asian and White-European patients and their carer's living in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Felicity; Atkin, Karl; Darr, Aliya

    2008-03-01

    Effective lifestyle modification facilitated by cardiac rehabilitation is known to reduce the occurrence of adverse coronary events and mortality. South Asians have poorer outcomes after a myocardial infarction than the general UK population, but little is known about their experiences of family support, cardiac rehabilitation and lifestyle change. To explore the nature of family support available to a sample of South Asian and White-European cardiac patients and to highlight similarities and differences between these groups with regard to cardiac rehabilitation and lifestyle modification. Using a qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews (in 1 of 6 languages) were conducted by researchers with; 45 South Asian patients and 37 carers and 20 White-European patients and 17 carers. Interviews were conducted in a home setting, up to eighteen months after discharge from hospital following myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass surgery or unstable angina. The main themes that emerged related to the provision of advice and information, family support and burden, dietary change and exercise regimes. Several cultural and ethnic differences were identified between patients and their families alongside similarities, irrespective of ethnicity. These may represent generic characteristics of recovery after a cardiac event. Health professionals should develop a cultural repertoire to engage with diversity and difference. Not every difficulty a person encounters as they try to access appropriate service delivery can be attributed to ethnic background. By improving services generally, support for South Asian populations can be improved. The challenge is to know when ethnicity makes a difference and mediates a person's relationship with service support and when it does not.

  6. Patient perspectives of participating in the cardiac CopenHeartRFA rehabilitation program for patients treated with ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Lind, Johanne; J McCabe, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The CopenHeartRFA trial was designed and conducted to explore the effects of rehabilitation on patients treated with ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). It included a cardiac rehabilitation program consisting of physical exercise and psychoeducational consultations over 6 months...... rehabilitation program. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used. A purposive sample of 10 patients who had completed the intervention consented to participate. The interviews were conducted face-to-face and were audio-recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analyses were used to analyze the data....... The interviews were analyzed individually by two researchers and themes were constructed and discussed. Results: The sample included 10 participants, mean age 54.6 years. Four categories were identified and labeled: 1) strengthening belief in one’s own physical capacity and survival; 2) still struggling...

  7. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara RJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renae J McNamara,1,2 Zoe J McKeough,3 Laura R Mo,3 Jamie T Dallimore,4 Sarah M Dennis3 1Physiotherapy Department, 2Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 4Eastern Sydney Medicare Local, Rosebery, NSW, Australia Background: Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods: Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results: Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71% completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers

  8. Effects of exercise rehabilitation on cardiac electrical instability assessed by T-wave alternans during ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring in coronary artery disease patients without and with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenttä, Tuomas; Tulppo, Mikko P; Nearing, Bruce D; Karjalainen, Jaana J; Hautala, Arto J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Huikuri, Heikki V; Verrier, Richard L

    2014-09-15

    Effects of exercise rehabilitation on electrocardiographic markers of risk for sudden cardiac death have not been adequately studied. We examined effects of controlled exercise training on T-wave alternans (TWA) in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) without and with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed CAD were recruited to join the ARTEMIS (Innovation to Reduce Cardiovascular Complications of Diabetes at the Intersection) study. Exercise (n = 65) and control groups (n = 65) were matched on age, sex, DM, and previous myocardial infarction. Ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded before and after a 2-year training period. TWA was assessed using time domain-modified moving average method by an investigator blinded to patients' clinical status. Average TWA values decreased in the rehabilitation group but not in control patients (rehabilitation [mean ± SEM]: 52.8 ± 1.7 μV vs 48.7 ± 1.5 μV, p exercise versus 10% (n = 2 of 20) of controls (p = 0.020). In CAD patients, 30% (n = 8 of 27) of positive TWA cases were converted with exercise versus 4% (n = 1 of 28) of controls (p = 0.012). In conclusion, this is the first report of the effectiveness of exercise rehabilitation to reduce TWA, a marker of sudden cardiac death risk, in patients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Unifying and Elevating Rehabilitation Counseling through Model-Driven, Diversity-Sensitive Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fong; Tarvydas, Vilia; Blalock, Kacie; Strauser, David; Atkins, Bobbie J.

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation counseling must embrace an evidence-based practice paradigm to remain a vital and respected member of the future community of professions in rehabilitation and mental health care and to fully discharge its responsibility to assist consumers in accessing effective rehabilitation interventions and exercising truly informed choice. The…

  10. Randomized controlled trial of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibulchai, Nisakorn; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients who had a myocardial infarction. Sixty-six hospitalized patients of various ages and both genders were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants in the experimental group took part in three individualized in-hospital education sessions and three weekly sessions of telephone counseling. The control group primarily engaged in a supervised exercise and activities of a daily living performance regimen, and received education in this regard. Self-efficacy and functional status were measured via questionnaire. Four weeks after discharge, the experimental group was found to have significantly higher total self-efficacy and functional status scores than the control group. In addition, the experimental group exhibited significantly higher subscale scores on social activity, household tasks, occupation, and exercise self-efficacy than the control group. These results indicate that the program is effective in improving the self-efficacy and functional status of Thai patients who have had a myocardial infarction. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Vital exhaustion and anxiety are related to subjective quality of life in patients with acute myocardial infarct before cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Beatrix; Simon, Attila; Drótos, Gergely; Balog, Piroska

    2014-10-01

    To examine psychological risk factors and somatic factors in patients after myocardial infarction. To study the relationship between somatic and psychological factors, their influence on subjective quality of life (well-being) and also to examine possible gender differences. There has been a growing body of evidence that psychosocial factors are risk factors for incident and recurrent myocardial infarction. Descriptive correlational and cross-sectional survey design. In patients (n = 97, 67 men), the level of depression and anxiety, vital exhaustion, sleep disturbances and well-being were assessed. Left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular diastolic diameter, body mass index, metabolic equivalents and the number of diseased vessels were retrieved from medical records. Anxiety, vital exhaustion and sleep disturbances were significantly higher in women than in men. Well-being showed a significant linear correlation with body mass index, anxiety, depression, vital exhaustion and sleep disturbances scores. After adjustment for psychological risk factors and somatic parameters, only vital exhaustion and anxiety correlated significantly with well-being. However, there were gender differences in predictive variables of well-being. Anxiety in men and vital exhaustion in women showed a linear correlation with the subjective quality of life. Our study revealed that only vital exhaustion and anxiety showed a significant correlation with well-being in patients. During cardiac rehabilitation, it is important to detect and treat not only depression but also vital exhaustion and anxiety, because by reducing these psychological conditions, we can improve well-being. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety as Barriers to Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Among Arab and Jewish Patients in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchinsky, Noa; Reges, Orna; Leibowitz, Morton; Khaskia, Abdulrahim; Mosseri, Morris; Kark, Jeremy D

    2018-05-01

    Despite its proven efficacy, low participation rates in cardiac prevention and rehabilitation programs (CPRPs) prevail worldwide, especially among ethnic minorities. This is strongly evident in Israel's Arab minority. Since psychological distress has been found to be associated with CPRP participation and minorities are subjected to higher levels of distress, it is plausible that distress may be an important barrier for CPRP participation among minority patients. The current prospective study assessed the contribution of depression and anxiety symptoms to participation in a CPRP after acute coronary syndrome, both in the enrollment phase and when considering adherence over time, among Jewish (majority) and Arab (minority) patients in Israel. Patients were interviewed during hospitalization about their emotional status and at a 6-mo follow-up concerning participation in a CPRP. Analyses were performed on 397 patients. The Brief Symptom Inventory was used. Logistic regression modeling was applied. Symptoms of depression, but not anxiety, were frequently observed among Arab patients compared with their Jewish counterparts. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, having symptoms of anxiety was associated with less participation in a CPRP, evident for both Jews and Arabs; this association was less evident for symptoms of depression. Multivariable adjusted models did not show a significant association of symptoms of anxiety or depression with adherence in a CPRP. Accounting for psychological distress did not reduce the sharp difference between Jews and Arabs in CPRP participation. Symptoms of distress may serve as barriers to CPRP participation, regardless of ethnic origin.

  13. Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Factors Impacting Referral to and Participation in Cardiac Rehabilitation for African American Patients: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler Hildebrandt, Aubry N; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Dodor, Bernice A; Knight, Sharon M; Rappleyea, Damon L

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this systematic review were to (1) review the literature related to the demographic and biopsychosocial-spiritual factors impacting cardiac rehabilitation (CR) referral and participation of African American patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD); (2) identify barriers and facilitators to CR referral and participation for this population; (3) identify gaps in the literature; and (4) make recommendations for future research studies and interventions. The Cooper 7-step protocol for research synthesis was followed to formulate a research question and search MEDLINE via PubMed, PsycINFO via EBSCO, and CINAHL via EBSCO. A second reviewer repeated the searches performed by the first author in the initial review. A total of 1640 articles identified using the search strategy yielded 7 articles that fit the search criteria. Most studies measured demographic or social factors. Two studies measured biological factors, 1 study measured psychological factors, and no study measured spiritual factors. According to the studies reviewed, African American patients with CVD were less likely to receive a CR referral, more likely to enroll in CR with more cardiovascular risk factors, and less likely to participate in and complete CR due to factors related to low socioeconomic status (eg, lack of insurance, work conflicts, lower level of education) than non-Hispanic white patients. Further research is needed on the interaction between demographic/biopsychosocial-spiritual factors and referral to and participation of African Americans in CR in order to ensure that interventions fit the needs of this particular population.

  14. Blood gases and oxygen saturation response to active cycle of breathing techniques in COPD patients during phase I of cardiac rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheraz, S.; Siddiqi, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of active cycle of breathing techniques (ACBTs) on arterial blood gases (ABG), oxygen saturation and other vitals including chest expansion, heart rate, and respiratory rate in COPD patients during phase I of cardiac rehabilitation program after open heart surgery. Methodology: In this experimental study, sample size chosen was 100 patients, randomly divided into experimental (n=50) and control (n=50) groups. Pre-test values of ABG, oxygen saturation, chest expansion, respiratory rate, and heart rate of the participants were taken. Then, conventional physical therapy including spirometry was performed 2 hourly by the control group whereas the experimental group performed ACBTs along with spirometry twice a day for a period of one week. Participants were re-assessed after one week treatment. Results: There was highly significant difference (p<0.01) in pre-test and post-test values of PCO/sub 2/ and oxygen saturation in experimental group as compared to control group. The results of bicarbonate values, base excess and heart rate were statistically significant (p<0.01) in control group and there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in experimental group. The values of pH, chest expansion and respiratory rate were highly significant (p<0.01) in both control as well as experimental group. Conclusion: ACBT was more effective to decrease post CABG complication as compared to conventional chest physical therapy. Some parameters like bicarbonate values, base excess and heart rate did not show improvement with ACBT. (author)

  15. [Detecting cardiac arrhythmias based on phase space analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongrong; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Su; Fang, Zuxiang

    2008-08-01

    It is important for cardiac therapy devices such as the automated external defibrillator to discriminate different cardiac disorders based on Electrocardiogram analysis. A phase space analysis based algorithm is proposed to detect cardiac arrhythmias effectively. Firstly, the phase space of the signal is reconstructed. Then from the viewpoint of geometry and information theory, the distribution entropy of the point density in the two-dimensional reconstructed phase space is calculated as the features in the further classification. Finally the nearest-neighbour method based on Mahalanobis distance is used to classify the sinus rhythm (SR), supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (SVTA), atrial flutter (AFL) and atrial fibrillation (AF). To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this proposed method in the cardiac arrhythmias classification, the MIT-BIH arrhythmias database and the canine endocardial database are studied respectively. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method can detect SR, SVTA, AFL and AF signals rapidly and accurately with the simple computation. It promises to find application in automated devices for cardiac arrhythmias therapy.

  16. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing

  17. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  18. Characterization of Cardiac Patients Based on the Synergy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavangar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardiac patients need comprehensive support due to the adverse effects of this disease on different aspects of their lives. Synergy intervention is a model that focuses on patients' requirements. Objectives This study aimed to determine the eightfold characteristic of cardiac patients based on the synergy model that represent their clinical requirements. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 cardiac patients hospitalized at the cardiac care unit (CCU of Yazd Afshar Hospital were randomly selected. The data were collected by using a two-part check-list including demographic characteristics and also by studying eight characteristics of patients through interviewing and reviewing their records. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequency (percentage and analytical statistics such as Spearman and Mann-Whitney test with the SPSS software, version 18. Results The results showed that among patients' internal characteristics, reversibility (70.6%, vulnerability (68.6%, and predictability (80.4% at level 1 (the minimum score had the highest frequency and stability (49% and complexity (54.9% were at level 3 (average score. Among external characteristics participation in decision-making (80.4% at level 1 had the highest frequency while care (62.7% and recourses (98% were at level 3. Conclusions Ignoring any of the eightfold characteristics based on the synergy model interferes with comprehensive support of cardiac patients. Therefore, it is necessary for professional health practitioners, especially nurses, to consider patients' eightfold characteristics in order to provide quality care.

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure compared with coronary artery disease: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, Alis; Marzolini, Susan; Oh, Paul

    2017-03-06

    To examine clinical outcomes and completion rates of cardiac rehabilitation in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure. Data for women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure were compared with those for age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Retrospective data were obtained from the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute database for dates between 1998 and 2011, for cardiopulmonary exercise test results at baseline and 6 months, body composition measures, and cardiac rehabilitation completion rates. A total of 29 women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure (mean 57 years (standard deviation (SD) 9.4)) and 29 age-matched women with coronary artery disease were identified. There was no significant difference between the proportion of women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure and those with coronary artery disease who completed the programme. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 16.2 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 3.4) to mean 18.5 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) ; p = 0.002) and in the coronary artery disease group (mean 18.9 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.5) to mean 20.8 ml-1.kg-1.min-1 (SD 4.9); p = 0.01). Body fat percentage increased in the breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure group (mean 34.8% (SD 8.5) to mean 36.3% (SD 6.9); p = 0.04). Women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure participating in cardiac rehabilitation demonstrate similar significant gains in VO2peak and similar completion rates to those of age-matched women with coronary artery disease. Further research is needed to determine interventions that improve body composition in women with breast cancer and treatment-related heart failure.

  20. Evaluation of a Telerehabilitation System for Community-Based Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Schutte

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of web-based portals, while increasing in popularity in the fields of medicine and research, are rarely reported on in community-based rehabilitation programs.  A program within the Pennsylvania Office of Vocational Rehabilitation’s Hiram G. Andrews Center, the Cognitive Skills Enhancement Program (CSEP, sought to enhance organization of program and participant information and communication between part- and full-time employees, supervisors and consultants. A telerehab system was developed consisting of (1 a web-based portal to support a variety of clinical activities and (2 the Versatile Integrated System for Telerehabilitation (VISyTER video-conferencing system to support the collaboration and delivery of rehabilitation services remotely.  This descriptive evaluation examines the usability of the telerehab system incorporating both the portal and VISyTER. Telerehab system users include CSEP staff members from three geographical locations and employed by two institutions. The IBM After-Scenario Questionnaire (ASQ and Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ, the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ, and two demographic surveys were administered to gather both objective and subjective information. Results showed generally high levels of usability.  Users commented that the telerehabilitation system improved communication, increased access to information, improved speed of completing tasks, and had an appealing interface. Areas where users would like to see improvements, including ease of accessing/editing documents and searching for information, are discussed.         

  1. EFFECT OF SUPERVISED MODERATE INTENSITY EXERCISE PROGRAM IN PHASE ONE CARDIAC REHABILITATION OF POST OPERATIVE CABG PATIENTS - A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Modi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increasing number of cases for CABG, the cardiac rehabilitation has gained importance. The trends in rehabilitation of a coronary artery disease patient are changing by incorporating a variety of aerobic exercises and resisted training in to their rehabilitation program. The outcome of any exercise chiefly depends on the training parameters like intensity, frequency and duration. Hence the present study focused to know the effects of supervised moderate intensity exercises on patients during hospital discharge following CABG. The objective of is to study the effectiveness of supervised moderate intensity exercise on distance walked and Quality of Life at hospital discharge following CABG. Methods: Study recruited randomly 46 patients between age group 40-65 years who were posted for non-emergency CABG for the first time. Pre-operative assessment was done thoroughly and was divided in to two groups, Group A conventional treatment and Group B Moderate intensity exercise group. The patients were treated using different protocols in terms of intensity for 8-10 days immediate post CABG. Then the outcome parameters of 6MWT and sf-36 were compared for analysis. Results: Both groups individually showed extremely significant results for two outcome measures. 6 MWD difference between two treatment groups showed significant results with unpaired t test (t = 8.5720,p<0.001. Quality of life score difference within group showed very significant results but there is no difference found between both groups. Conclusion: Moderate intensity exercises can also be included in the immediate post-operative phase of CABG, as they reduce the length of hospital stay and quicken the cardiac rehabilitation process. But there need to be a lot of randomized control trails to confirm the benefits of moderate intensity exercises in phase one rehabilitation program after CABG.

  2. Morphological and molecular bases of cardiac development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobylińska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a mesoderm-derived organ, whose formation is regulated by various genes. Initially, the most important is expression of Nkx2.5, CR1, pitx2, anf and mhc2a, which are responsible for differentiation of cardiomyocytes. In a later phase activation of mhc2b, pitx2c, mesp1, pcmf1, vmhc, xin, mcl2v, mlc2a, mlc2a, mef2, hand1 and hand2 was revealed. Their expression is regulated by various molecules, including transcription (XIN, GATA, MEF, Tbx5, Baf60c, PECAM, tie-2, MEF2 and growth (VEGF, FGF, PDGF factors, as well as proteins (i.e., dickkopf-1, cerberus, cytotactin, fibrillin, nodal, thrombomodulin, Wnt, bone morphometric ones – BMP2, BMP 4, BMP5, BMP7 and other substances, such as retinoid and folic acid. Crucial steps in cardiac organogenesis are development of the ventricle and atrial formation, as well as septation and valve formation. Any disturbances of such processes may lead to various congenital heart diseases and defects that could be initiated by various genetic, epigenetic or environmental factors. The most common heart malformations are: stenosis (coarctation of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, bicuspid aortic valve, atrial and/or ventricular septal defect, persistent truncus arteriosus (Botallo duct, transposition of the great vessels, tricuspid atresia, hypoplastic left and right heart, as well as syndrome of Lutembachera, Cantrell, Ebstein, Eisenmenger and Shone and trilogy, tetralogy, pentalogy of Fallot.

  3. Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation for Secondary Prevention After Transient Ischemic Attack or Mild Stroke: PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Peter L; Hachinski, Vladimir; Chan, Richard; Unsworth, Karen; Mytka, Sharon; Harnadek, Michael; OʼCallaghan, Christina; Suskin, Neville

    2017-11-01

    Having previously reported that comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) is effective for secondary prevention post-transient ischemic attack (TIA)/mild nondisabling stroke (MNDS), we present psychometric findings for the same sample that elucidate subacute TIA/MNDS psychological outcomes and test whether CCR would be independently associated with psychological improvements. In this prospective cohort trial patients with ≥1 risk factor, recruited from a stroke prevention clinic within 12 months (mean = 11.5 weeks) post-TIA/MNDS, entered CCR. Of the 110 recruited patients, 100 (mean age = 65.4 years; 46 females) entered CCR and 80 completed CCR (mean duration = 7.6 months). At CCR entry, 16.5% and 39.2% screened positively for depression and anxiety, decreasing nonsignificantly at exit to 4.2%, and significantly to 16.9% (P = .008), respectively. Age-corrected deficits occurred more frequently than expected (P ≤ .03); at entry, mental health status (13.3%), clock-drawing (31.6%), oral-verbal fluency (16.9%), word-list learning (11.2%), and recall (12.6%); at exit, clock-drawing (30.0%). Entry-to-exit, mean depression, anxiety, mental and physical health status, word-list learning, memory, digit-symbol coding, and oral-verbal fluency scores improved significantly (P ≤ .031). No reliable change indices were significant. Psychological service recipients improved significantly more than nonrecipients in depression (P = .049). Baseline North American Adult Reading Test score predicted exercise attendance (R = 0.275; P = .044); New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and depression score predicted exit physical health status (R = 0.770, P psychological improvements. CCR psychological treatment may benefit depression. Subacute NYHA class and depression may later affect quality of life.

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation outcomes no different after on-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Adrian; Klinger, Troy A; McConnell, Timothy R

    2007-01-01

    Clinical evidence supports lower morbidity with off-pump coronary revascularization surgery as well as superior short- and mid-term outcomes, equivalent graft patency, and reduced cost. The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac rehabilitation (CR) outcomes between patients undergoing on-pump versus off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Data were retrospectively examined for patients who participated in CR between 1996 and 2004. Two hundred ninety-five patients who underwent bypass surgery and completed at least 80% of their 36 required sessions were divided into on-pump and off-pump groups. Pre- and post-CR measures included grip strength, flexibility, energy expended during class, quality of life, and self-efficacy. Both groups were similar with respect to age, sex, ejection fraction, and mean number of grafts. There were no statistical differences between the on-pump and off-pump groups (P > .05) for weight, abdominal and hip circumferences, grip strength, flexibility, and total energy expenditure. In addition, there were no between-group differences regarding quality of life and self-efficacy. Grip strength, flexibility, and energy expenditure during class improved with CR regardless of the surgical procedure (P = .001). Quality of life (P = .001) and self-efficacy (P = .001) also improved. The present data support the concept that although there are clinical advantages to off-pump surgery, there is no benefit over on-pump surgery regarding CR. Subsequently, patients undergoing off-pump surgery should be managed similarly as their on-pump counterparts.

  5. Marital quality and loneliness as predictors for subjective health status in cardiac rehabilitation patients following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roijers, Joost; Sunamura, Madoka; Utens, Elisabeth Mwj; Dulfer, Karolijn; Ter Hoeve, Nienke; van Geffen, Myrna; Draaijer, Jan; Steenaard, Rebecca; van Domburg, Ron T

    2016-08-01

    Low marital quality is associated with adverse health outcomes and lower personal well-being. Loneliness increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality and predicts poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between marital quality and loneliness and subjective health status in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) patients who underwent cardiac rehabilitation (CR). In a prospective cohort study, pPCI patients that followed CR were included between 2009-2011. A total of 223 patients responded to the Short Form 12 (SF-12) (subjective health status), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ-6) (marital quality) and University of California, Los Angeles - Revised (UCLA-R) questionnaires at baseline (pre-CR) and at three months (post-CR) or at 12 months follow-up. Subjective health status is displayed by a physical component summary (PCS) score and a mental component summary (MCS) score. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were performed to test improvements in subjective health status. Changes over time in subjective health status scores were similar between patients with optimal marital quality vs patients with less optimal marital quality and non-lonely patients vs lonely patients. The MCS level at one-year follow-up of both patients with less optimal marital quality and lonely patients was lower compared with a healthy Dutch population (respectively; mean MCS score 47.3 (standard deviation (SD) 10.5); p = 0.013 and mean MCS score 46.1 (SD 11.2); p = 0.010). Both patients with less optimal marital quality and lonely patients did not reach the MCS level of a healthy Dutch population. Therefore, extra care and support should be given to these patients in a CR programme. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  6. Towards an IoT-based upper limb rehabilitation assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhou Jiang; Yajie Qin; IkHwan Kim; Yuanyuan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation of stroke survivors has been increasing in importance in recent years with increase in the occurrence of stroke. However, current clinical classification assessment is time-consuming while the result is not accurate and varies across physicians. This paper introduces an IoT-based upper limb rehabilitation assessment system for stroke survivors based on wireless sensing sub-system, data cloud, computing cloud and software based on Android platform. The system can automatically perform objective assessment. It is designed for home rehabilitation as well as for the concept of graded rehabilitation therapy.

  7. Cost-utility analysis of cardiac rehabilitation after conventional heart valve surgery versus usual care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2017-01-01

    and monthly psycho-educational consultations or to usual care. Costs were measured from a societal perspective and quality-adjusted life years were based on the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D). Estimates were presented as means and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on bootstrapping. Costs...... and effect differences were presented in a cost-effectiveness plane and were transformed into net benefit and presented in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results No statistically significant differences were found in total societal costs (-1609 Euros; 95% CI: -6162 to 2942 Euros) or in quality...

  8. Web-based home rehabilitation gaming system for balance training

    OpenAIRE

    Oleh Kachmar; Volodymyr Kozyavkin; Vadim Markelov; Vasyl Melnychuk; Bohdan Kachmar

    2014-01-01

    Currently, most systems for virtual rehabilitation and motor training require quite complex and expensive hardware and can be used only in clinical settings. Now, a low-cost rehabilitation game training system has been developed for patients with movement disorders; it is suitable for home use under the distant supervision of a therapist. It consists of a patient-side application installed on a home computer and the virtual rehabilitation Game Server in the Internet. System can work with diff...

  9. CASE STUDY: Community Based Ecological Mangrove Rehabilitation (CBEMR) in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ben; Fadillah, Ratna; Nurdin, Yusran; Soulsby, Iona; Ahmad, Rio

    2014-01-01

    While successful examples of large-scale (5 000-10 000 ha) ecological wetland/mangrove rehabilitation projects exist worldwide, mangrove rehabilitation efforts in Indonesia, both large and small, have mainly failed. The majority of projects (both government programs and non-government initiatives) have oversimplified the technical processes of mangrove rehabilitation, favouring the direct planting of a restricted subset of mangrove species (from the family Rhizophoracea), commonly in the lowe...

  10. The benefit of early rehabilitation following tendon repair of the hand: A population-based claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Pei-Chi; Yang, Shu-Yu; Ho, Chung-Han; Chou, Willy; Lu, Shiang-Ru

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective cohort. The benefits of early rehabilitation after hand tendon repair have not been analyzed using population-based datasets. to analyze whether early rehabilitation reduces the resurgery risk and the use of rehabilitation resources. Patients (n = 1219) who underwent hand tendon repairs followed by rehabilitation were identified from a nationwide claims database and divided into 3 groups: early (6 wk) rehabilitation. The resurgery rate and the use of rehabilitation resources after tendon repair were calculated. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relevant predictors of resurgery. The early rehabilitation group exhibited the lowest resurgery rate and used the fewest rehabilitation resources. Compared with late rehabilitation, early or intermediate rehabilitation conferred protective effects against resurgery in patients without a concomitant upper-limb fracture. Our findings suggest the benefit of early rehabilitation after hand tendon repair. 4. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Game-Based Rehabilitation for Myoelectric Prosthesis Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahm, Cosima; Vujaklija, Ivan; Kayali, Fares; Purgathofer, Peter; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-02-09

    A high number of upper extremity myoelectric prosthesis users abandon their devices due to difficulties in prosthesis control and lack of motivation to train in absence of a physiotherapist. Virtual training systems, in the form of video games, provide patients with an entertaining and intuitive method for improved muscle coordination and improved overall control. Complementary to established rehabilitation protocols, it is highly beneficial for this virtual training process to start even before receiving the final prosthesis, and to be continued at home for as long as needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate (1) the short-term effects of a commercially available electromyographic (EMG) system on controllability after a simple video game-based rehabilitation protocol, and (2) different input methods, control mechanisms, and games. Eleven able-bodied participants with no prior experience in EMG control took part in this study. Participants were asked to perform a surface EMG test evaluating their provisional maximum muscle contraction, fine accuracy and isolation of electrode activation, and endurance control over at least 300 seconds. These assessments were carried out (1) in a Pregaming session before interacting with three EMG-controlled computer games, (2) in a Postgaming session after playing the games, and (3) in a Follow-Up session two days after the gaming protocol to evaluate short-term retention rate. After each game, participants were given a user evaluation survey for the assessment of the games and their input mechanisms. Participants also received a questionnaire regarding their intrinsic motivation (Intrinsic Motivation Inventory) at the end of the last game. Results showed a significant improvement in fine accuracy electrode activation (Pgames when collecting items and facing challenging game play. Most upper limb amputees use a 2-channel myoelectric prosthesis control. This study demonstrates that this control can be effectively trained by

  12. Modern stroke rehabilitation through e-health-based entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Krukowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a new, “e-Health” approach to stroke rehabilitation.  The authors propose an alternative approach that combines state of the art ICT technologies ranging from Augmented and Virtual Reality gaming environments to latest advances in immersive user interfaces for delivering a mixed-reality training platform, along with advanced embedded micro sensing and computing devices exhibiting enhanced power autonomy by using the latest Bluetooth Smart communication interfaces and energy saving approaches. These technologies are integrated under the umbrella of an online Personal Health Record (PHR) services allowing for delivery of personalized, patient-centric medical services whether at home, in a clinic or on the move. Describes innovative ways for achieving mixed-reality gaming environments; Enhances immersive experience by combining virtual projections with user interfaces based on body motion analysis; Offers cost-effective body motion capture by hybridizing wearable sensor data; Utilizes e...

  13. Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS: A practical and evidence-based framework for clinical rehabilitation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan A. Franck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The volume of information on new treatment techniques supporting the restoration of arm-hand function (AHF and arm-hand skill performance (ASHP in stroke survivors overwhelms therapists in everyday clinical practice when choosing the appropriate therapy. The Concise Arm and Hand Rehabilitation Approach in Stroke (CARAS is designed for paramedical staff to structure and implement training of AHF and AHSP in stroke survivors. The CARAS is based on four constructs: (a stratification according to the severity of arm–hand impairment (using the Utrecht Arm/Hand -Test [UAT], (b the individual’s rehabilitation goals and concomitant potential rehabilitation outcomes, (c principles of self-efficacy, and (d possibilities to systematically incorporate (new technology and new evidence-based training elements swiftly. The framework encompasses three programs aimed at treating either the severely (UAT 0-1, moderately (UAT 2-3, or mildly (UAT 4-7 impaired arm-hand. Program themes are: taking care of the limb and prevention of complications (Program 1, task-oriented gross motor grip performance (Program 2, and functional AHSP training (Program 3. Each program is preceded and followed by an assessment. Training modularity facilitates rapid interchange/adaptation of sub-elements. Proof-of-principle in clinical rehabilitation has been established. The CARAS facilitates rapid structured design and provision of state-of-the-art AHF and ASHP treatment in stroke patients.

  14. Exoskeleton Technology in Rehabilitation: Towards an EMG-Based Orthosis System for Upper Limb Neuromotor Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Vaca Benitez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitation of patients should not only be limited to the first phases during intense hospital care but also support and therapy should be guaranteed in later stages, especially during daily life activities if the patient’s state requires this. However, aid should only be given to the patient if needed and as much as it is required. To allow this, automatic self-initiated movement support and patient-cooperative control strategies have to be developed and integrated into assistive systems. In this work, we first give an overview of different kinds of neuromuscular diseases, review different forms of therapy, and explain possible fields of rehabilitation and benefits of robotic aided rehabilitation. Next, the mechanical design and control scheme of an upper limb orthosis for rehabilitation are presented. Two control models for the orthosis are explained which compute the triggering function and the level of assistance provided by the device. As input to the model fused sensor data from the orthosis and physiology data in terms of electromyography (EMG signals are used.

  15. Effect of cardiac rehabilitation on metabolic syndrome and its components: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Kasaei, Zahra; Sajjadieh-Khajooie, Hamidreza; Heidari, Ramin; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Although the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) prognosis has been well-documented by several systematic reviews, none have focused on the effect of CR on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its related components. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effect of CR on MetS and its components. PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane library, and Google Scholar database were searched up to February 2014 with no date and language restrictions. The random effects model was used to assess the overall effect of CR on MetS prevalence and the change in metabolic or anthropometric measures. Fifteen studies with 19,324 subjects were included in the present systematic review and meta-analysis. Our analysis showed that the CR could significantly reduce MetS prevalence [reduction rate: 0.25, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21, 0.3, P value <0.001; P value for heterogeneity <0.001, I-squared: 86.2%]. Additionally, results showed the protective role of CR on all MetS components including high density lipoprotein cholesterol [mean difference (MD): 2.13 mg/dL, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.1], triglyceride (MD: -27.45 mg/dL, 95% CI: -36.92, -17.98), systolic blood pressure (SBP) (MD: -6.20 mmHg, 95% CI: -8.41, -3.99), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (MD: -2.53 mmHg, 95% CI: -3.64, -1.41), fasting blood sugar (FBS) (MD: -6.42 mg/dL, 95% CI: -6.85, -5.99), and waist circumference (WC) (MD: -2.25 cm, 95% CI: -3.15, -1.35). CR has resulted in improvement in MetS and its entire components, and could be considered as a useful tool for MetS patients, especially among those with CVD.

  16. Does effect of rehabilitation based on sensory conflicts in patients with vestibular deficits exceed learning effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierchała, Katarzyna; Lachowska, Magdalena; Morawski, Krzysztof; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to assess learning and rehabilitation effect and their influence on Sensory Organization Test results in young and elderly patients with peripheral, central and mixed vestibular pathology. 26 patients with different vestibular system deficits participated in this study. Rehabilitation was held five days a week, for two weeks. To assess learning effect, SOT was administered to each patient twice and compared: 1) on the day preceding the beginning of rehabilitation (SOT1), and 2) on the first day of rehabilitation (SOT2). To evaluate rehabilitation effect, results of SOT2 were compared to SOT3 (administered on the last day of rehabilitation). Learning effect showed similar improvement in CS in all groups but young. Rehabilitation caused further improvement in CS in all groups but central pathology. This improvement was similar between those groups. There was no significant difference found between learning and rehabilitation effect in CS. The results of our study indicate that none of the groups achieved significant benefit from rehabilitation based on sensory conflicts that would overcome the learning effect. However, the lack of significant advantage of rehabilitation over learning does not mean that it does not exist.

  17. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... program to your needs. • Exercise using a treadmill, bike, rowing machine or walking/jogging track. • Be monitored ... their families, at heartinsight.org . Connect with others sharing similar journeys with heart disease and stroke by ...

  18. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot‐assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three‐dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot‐assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patientʹs EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patientʹs motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post‐stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot‐assisted training with motor imagery‐ based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  19. Robot-Aided Upper-Limb Rehabilitation Based on Motor Imagery EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Xu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In this paper, a novel robot-assisted rehabilitation system based on motor imagery electroencephalography (EEG is developed for regular training of neurological rehabilitation for upper limb stroke patients. Firstly, three-dimensional animation was used to guide the patient image the upper limb movement and EEG signals were acquired by EEG amplifier. Secondly, eigenvectors were extracted by harmonic wavelet transform (HWT and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier was utilized to classify the pattern of the left and right upper limb motor imagery EEG signals. Finally, PC triggered the upper limb rehabilitation robot to perform motor therapy and gave the virtual feedback. Using this robot-assisted upper limb rehabilitation system, the patient's EEG of upper limb movement imagination is translated to control rehabilitation robot directly. Consequently, the proposed rehabilitation system can fully explore the patient's motivation and attention and directly facilitate upper limb post-stroke rehabilitation therapy. Experimental results on unimpaired participants were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the rehabilitation system. Combining robot-assisted training with motor imagery-based BCI will make future rehabilitation therapy more effective. Clinical testing is still required for further proving this assumption.

  20. Welfare based primate rehabilitation as a potential conservation strategy: does it measure up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Amanda J; Curnoe, Darren; Banks, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Many primate species are threatened with extinction and are the focus of extensive conservation efforts including re-introduction, captive breeding and habitat conservation. Welfare-based rehabilitation (hereafter also 'rehabilitation') is a management strategy commonly used for primates, particularly those species targeted by the pet and bush meat trades. Rehabilitation of rescued primates typically has the dual motivation of welfare and conservation, but has not been assessed as a conservation strategy. As the species involved in rehabilitation are often endangered (e.g. chimpanzees, gorillas, orang-utans), it is important for rehabilitation projects to follow a 'best practice' model in order to increase positive outcomes. In this study, we compared the approaches of 28 welfare-based primate rehabilitation projects to the 'IUCN guidelines for nonhuman primate re-introductions', in addition to components of the 'Best practice guidelines for the re-introduction of great apes' in order to assess where additional work might be needed for released animals to contribute to conservation outcomes. Few projects examined complied with the guidelines for re-introduction, failing to incorporate important factors such as quarantine, long term post-release monitoring and training for predator awareness. Further development of species-specific rehabilitation guidelines may improve the outcomes of future rehabilitation projects. To support this, we recommend that detailed methods and results be published for all rehabilitation efforts, regardless of the outcome.

  1. Efficacy of a nutritional education program to improve diet in patients attending a cardiac rehabilitation program: outcomes of a one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Maria Luisa Eliana; Biffi, Barbara; Gheri, Chiara Francesca; Sarli, Ennio; Rafanelli, Elena; Graziano, Emanuela; Vidali, Sofia; Fattirolli, Francesco; Gensini, Gian Franco; Macchi, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Dietary habits are widely reported to play a primary role in the occurrence of coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation is a multidisciplinary intervention that includes nutritional education. Proper nutrition plays an important role in cardiovascular health outcomes and in decreasing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) as highlighted in the literature. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of an educational program to improve the diet of cardiac rehabilitation patients compared to usual treatment. 160 patients with CAD, (124 M, 36 F) were randomized into two groups. Data analysis was conducted on 133 patients (11 % dropped out). All enrolled patients attended two educational seminars about proper nutrition and cardiovascular prevention, and completed a questionnaire about dietary habits (before CAD). The Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated, and basal glycaemia and plasma lipids were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the study (12 months after hospital discharge). The intervention group patients underwent a mid-term evaluation of nutrient intakes, BMI, and received a personalized educational reinforcement by a dietitian. At the end of the study, the intervention group was shown to have significantly reduced their daily caloric intake (reduction of total proteins, total fat, carbohydrate, alcohol), and showed a significant reduction of weight and BMI compared to the control group. Individual nutritional counseling session as a reinforcement of a standard educational program is effective in reducing caloric intake and BMI, which may reduce cardiovascular risk factors in cardiovascular patients.

  2. The 10m incremental shuttle walk test is a highly reliable field exercise test for patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation: a retest reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Lisa C; Taylor, Nicholas F; McBurney, Helen

    2016-09-01

    To determine the retest reliability of the 10m incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) in a mixed cardiac rehabilitation population. Participants completed two 10m ISWTs in a single session in a repeated measures study. Ten participants completed a third 10m ISWT as part of a pilot study. Hospital physiotherapy department. 62 adults aged a mean of 68 years (SD 10) referred to a cardiac rehabilitation program. Retest reliability of the 10m ISWT expressed as relative reliability and measurement error. Relative reliability was expressed in a ratio in the form of an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and measurement error in the form of the standard error of measurement (SEM) and 95% confidence intervals for the group and individual. There was a high level of relative reliability over the two walks with an ICC of .99. The SEMagreement was 17m, and a change of at least 23m for the group and 54m for the individual would be required to be 95% confident of exceeding measurement error. The 10m ISWT demonstrated good retest reliability and is sufficiently reliable to be applied in practice in this population without the use of a practice test. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac magnetic source imaging based on current multipole model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Fa-Kuan; Wang Qian; Hua Ning; Lu Hong; Tang Xue-Zheng; Ma Ping

    2011-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the heart current source can be reduced into a current multipole. By adopting three linear inverse methods, the cardiac magnetic imaging is achieved in this article based on the current multipole model expanded to the first order terms. This magnetic imaging is realized in a reconstruction plane in the centre of human heart, where the current dipole array is employed to represent realistic cardiac current distribution. The current multipole as testing source generates magnetic fields in the measuring plane, serving as inputs of cardiac magnetic inverse problem. In the heart-torso model constructed by boundary element method, the current multipole magnetic field distribution is compared with that in the homogeneous infinite space, and also with the single current dipole magnetic field distribution. Then the minimum-norm least-squares (MNLS) method, the optimal weighted pseudoinverse method (OWPIM), and the optimal constrained linear inverse method (OCLIM) are selected as the algorithms for inverse computation based on current multipole model innovatively, and the imaging effects of these three inverse methods are compared. Besides, two reconstructing parameters, residual and mean residual, are also discussed, and their trends under MNLS, OWPIM and OCLIM each as a function of SNR are obtained and compared. (general)

  4. Effect of a group-based rehabilitation programme on glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Frølich, Anne; Perrild, Hans Jørgen Duckert

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a group-based rehabilitation programme with an individual counselling programme at improving glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes.......To compare the effectiveness of a group-based rehabilitation programme with an individual counselling programme at improving glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes....

  5. Developing and Evaluating Creativity Gamification Rehabilitation System: The Application of PCA-ANFIS Based Emotions Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the factors in a patient's rehabilitation achievement after a total knee replacement (TKR) patient exercises, using a PCA-ANFIS emotion model-based game rehabilitation system, which combines virtual reality (VR) and motion capture technology. The researchers combine a principal component analysis (PCA) and an adaptive…

  6. Community based rehabilitation: a strategy for peace-building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgson Jennifer

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain features of peace-building distinguish it from peacekeeping, and make it an appropriate strategy in dealing with vertical conflict and low intensity conflict. However, some theorists suggest that attempts, through peace-building, to impose liberal values upon non-democratic cultures are misguided and lack an ethical basis. Discussion We have been investigating the peace-building properties of community based approaches to disability in a number of countries. This paper describes the practice and impact of peace-building through Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR strategies in the context of armed conflict. The ethical basis for peace-building through practical community initiatives is explored. A number of benefits and challenges to using CBR strategies for peace-building purposes are identified. Summary During post-conflict reconstruction, disability is a powerful emotive lever that can be used to mobilize cooperation between factions. We suggest that civil society, in contrast to state-level intervention, has a valuable role in reducing the risks of conflict through community initiatives.

  7. Impact of traditional Greek dancing on jumping ability, muscular strength and lower limb endurance in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vordos, Zacharias; Kouidi, Evangelia; Mavrovouniotis, Fotios; Metaxas, Thomas; Dimitros, Eleftherios; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Deligiannis, Asterios

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a training programme based on traditional Greek dance on the jumping ability, muscle strength and lower limb endurance in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Forty Greek patients with CHF graded as NYHA ⩽ II and aged 73.2±4.7 years were randomly divided into two groups. Group A ( n=20) participated in a three-month physical rehabilitation programme based on Greek traditional dances, whereas group B ( n=20) remained untrained and served as the control group. All patients were studied before and after the 12-week exercise training programme. At baseline and follow-up the exercise capacity of the patients was evaluated by the six-minute walking test, their lower extremity muscle strength was evaluated by an isokinetic dynamometer and their jumping ability by the Myotest-Pro test, which includes three types of jumps (plyometric, countermovement and squat jumps). No significant difference was observed between the two groups at the baseline evaluation. At follow-up, group A showed significant improvements in walking distance calculated from the six-minute walking test (10.0% improvement; pGreek traditional dances in patients with CHF are both safe and effective in improving lower limb function.

  8. Gender and age-dependent differences in body composition changes in response to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Socha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is the standard procedure in persons after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Its basic aim is to combat coronary heart disease (CHD risk factors through physical activity and normalization of body mass. Many authors highlight the differences in response to training in CR as dependent on gender, age and occurrence of accompanying disease. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a three-week early CR in reference to changing body composition parameters in patients over 50 years of age. The study involved a random group of 65 patients (44 men and 21 women between the ages of 50–76 (average: 62.6 ± 7.2 years with CHD following CABG. Anthropometric and body composition (bioelectrical impedance method measurements were taken at the commencement of CR and after the training programme. After CR, body mass and body mass index were reduced in men < 65 and ≥ 65 years, and in women <65 years. A reduction % body fat and increase % fat free mass and % total body water was observed only in patients <65. years. Furthermore, in men < 65 years, an increase in % body cell mass was observed. In women ≥ 65 years, no statistically significant changes were observed in body fat indices and body composition features between initial and final study. Patients ≥ 65 years of age following surgery over a period of hospital cardiac rehabilitation do not experience the same significant improvement in body composition parameters associated with risk of CHD as middle-aged adults. Older women post-cardiac surgery are characterized by a higher disability index in relation to tolerance to physical stress in comparison with men of the same age and persons < 65 years of age.

  9. Gender and age-dependent differences in body composition changes in response to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Małgorzata; Wronecki, Krzysztof; Sobiech, Krzysztof A

    2017-09-21

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is the standard procedure in persons after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Its basic aim is to combat coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors through physical activity and normalization of body mass. Many authors highlight the differences in response to training in CR as dependent on gender, age and occurrence of accompanying disease. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a three-week early CR in reference to changing body composition parameters in patients over 50 years of age. The study involved a random group of 65 patients (44 men and 21 women) between the ages of 50-76 (average: 62.6 ± 7.2) years with CHD following CABG. Anthropometric and body composition (bioelectrical impedance method) measurements were taken at the commencement of CR and after the training programme. After CR, body mass and body mass index were reduced in men < 65 and ≥ 65 years, and in women <65 years. A reduction % body fat and increase % fat free mass and % total body water was observed only in patients <65. years. Furthermore, in men < 65 years, an increase in % body cell mass was observed. In women ≥ 65 years, no statistically significant changes were observed in body fat indices and body composition features between initial and final study. Patients ≥ 65 years of age following surgery over a period of hospital cardiac rehabilitation do not experience the same significant improvement in body composition parameters associated with risk of CHD as middle-aged adults. Older women post-cardiac surgery are characterized by a higher disability index in relation to tolerance to physical stress in comparison with men of the same age and persons < 65 years of age.

  10. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hui Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment.

  11. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios López-Liria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients’ functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC. Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left or clinical characteristics (P>0.05. After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P<0.001 from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale, the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices, balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective.

  12. Health related quality of life assessment in acute coronary syndrome patients: the effectiveness of early phase I cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchah, Lawrence; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Lim, Melissa Siaw Han; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Sim, Kui Hian; Ong, Tiong Kiam

    2017-01-13

    Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) is one of the most burdensome cardiovascular diseases in terms of the cost of interventions. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Programme (CRP) is well-established in improving clinical outcomes but the assessment of actual clinical improvement is challenging, especially when considering pharmaceutical care (PC) values in phase I CRP during admission and upon discharge from hospital and phase II outpatient interventions. This study explores the impact of pharmacists' interventions in the early stages of CRP on humanistic outcomes and follow-up at a referral hospital in Malaysia. We recruited 112 patients who were newly diagnosed with ACS and treated at the referral hospital, Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia. In the intervention group (modified CRP), all medication was reviewed by the clinical pharmacists, focusing on drug indication; understanding of secondary prevention therapy and adherence to treatment strategy. We compared the "pre-post" quality of life (QoL) of three groups (intervention, conventional and control) at baseline, 6 months and 12 months post-discharge with Malaysian norms. QoL data was obtained using a validated version of Short-Form 36 Questionnaire (SF-36). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure tests was used to compare the mean differences of scores over time. A pre-post quasi-experimental non-equivalent group comparison design was applied to 112 patients who were followed up for one year. At baseline, the physical and mental health summaries reported poor outcomes in all three groups. However, these improved gradually but significantly over time. After the 6-month follow-up, the physical component summary reported in the modified CRP (MCRP) participants was higher, with a mean difference of 8.02 (p = 0.015) but worse in the mental component summary, with a mean difference of -4.13. At the 12-month follow-up, the MCRP participants performed better in their physical component (PCS) than those in the

  13. Rehabilitation regimes based upon psychophysical studies of prosthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. C.; Suaning, G. J.; Morley, J. W.; Lovell, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    Human trials of prototype visual prostheses have successfully elicited visual percepts (phosphenes) in the visual field of implant recipients blinded through retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Researchers are progressing rapidly towards a device that utilizes individual phosphenes as the elementary building blocks to compose a visual scene. This form of prosthetic vision is expected, in the near term, to have low resolution, large inter-phosphene gaps, distorted spatial distribution of phosphenes, restricted field of view, an eccentrically located phosphene field and limited number of expressible luminance levels. In order to fully realize the potential of these devices, there needs to be a training and rehabilitation program which aims to assist the prosthesis recipients to understand what they are seeing, and also to adapt their viewing habits to optimize the performance of the device. Based on the literature of psychophysical studies in simulated and real prosthetic vision, this paper proposes a comprehensive, theoretical training regime for a prosthesis recipient: visual search, visual acuity, reading, face/object recognition, hand-eye coordination and navigation. The aim of these tasks is to train the recipients to conduct visual scanning, eccentric viewing and reading, discerning low-contrast visual information, and coordinating bodily actions for visual-guided tasks under prosthetic vision. These skills have been identified as playing an important role in making prosthetic vision functional for the daily activities of their recipients.

  14. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  15. Increasing patient engagement during virtual reality-based motor rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Lukas; Jacky, Mario; Lünenburger, Lars; Riener, Robert; Bolliger, Marc

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the influence of different design characteristics of virtual reality exercises on engagement during lower extremity motor rehabilitation. Correlational study. Spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation center. Subjects with SCI (n=12) and control subjects (n=10). Not applicable. Heart rate and electromyographic activity from both legs at the tibialis anterior, the gastrocnemius medialis, the rectus femoris, and the biceps femoris were recorded. Interactivity (ie, functionally meaningful reactions to motor performance) was crucial for the engagement of subjects. No significant differences in engagement were found between exercises that differed in feedback frequency, explicit task goals, or aspects of competition. Functional feedback is highly important for the active participation of patients during robotic-assisted rehabilitation. Further investigations on the design characteristics of virtual reality exercises are of great importance. Exercises should thoroughly be analyzed regarding their effectiveness, while user preferences and expectations should be considered when designing virtual reality exercises for everyday clinical motor rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training within cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Amanda L; Hing, Wayne; Simas, Vini; Climstein, Mike; Coombes, Jeff S; Jayasinghe, Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua; Furness, James

    2018-01-01

    Aerobic capacity has been shown to be inversely proportionate to cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and there is growing evidence that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) appears to be more effective than moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in improving cardiorespiratory fitness within the cardiac population. Previously published systematic reviews in cardiovascular disease have neither investigated the effect that the number of weeks of intervention has on cardiorespiratory fitness changes, nor have adverse events been collated. We aimed to undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the cardiac population that investigated cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT and to collate adverse events. A critical narrative synthesis and meta-analysis was conducted after systematically searching relevant databases up to July 2017. We searched for RCTs that compared cardiorespiratory fitness changes resulting from HIIT versus MICT interventions within the cardiac population. Seventeen studies, involving 953 participants (465 for HIIT and 488 for MICT) were included in the analysis. HIIT was significantly superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness overall (SMD 0.34 mL/kg/min; 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.2-0.48]; p HIIT intervention (n=9). However, some adverse events (n=5) were not classified by intervention group. HIIT is superior to MICT in improving cardiorespiratory fitness in participants of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness are significant for CR programs of >6-week duration. Programs of 7-12 weeks' duration resulted in the largest improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness for patients with coronary artery disease. HIIT appears to be as safe as MICT for CR participants.

  17. Fuzzy logic-based mobile computing system for hand rehabilitation after neurological injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Wen; Chen, Yenming J; Su, Ching-I; Hwang, Kao-Shing; Ho, Wen-Hsien

    2018-01-01

    Effective neurological rehabilitation requires long term assessment and treatment. The rapid progress of virtual reality-based assistive technologies and tele-rehabilitation has increased the potential for self-rehabilitation of various neurological injuries under clinical supervision. The objective of this study was to develop a fuzzy inference mechanism for a smart mobile computing system designed to support in-home rehabilitation of patients with neurological injury in the hand by providing an objective means of self-assessment. A commercially available tablet computer equipped with a Bluetooth motion sensor was integrated in a splint to obtain a smart assistive device for collecting hand motion data, including writing performance and the corresponding grasp force. A virtual reality game was also embedded in the smart splint to support hand rehabilitation. Quantitative data obtained during the rehabilitation process were modeled by fuzzy logic. Finally, the improvement in hand function was quantified with a fuzzy rule database of expert opinion and experience. Experiments in chronic stroke patients showed that the proposed system is applicable for supporting in-home hand rehabilitation. The proposed virtual reality system can be customized for specific therapeutic purposes. Commercial development of the system could immediately provide stroke patients with an effective in-home rehabilitation therapy for improving hand problems.

  18. Home Based Training: Main Strategy in Community Based Rehabilitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Salamati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Study of effectiveness of “home based training” in community based rehabilitation program on disabled people, under supervised of 21 pilot cities health and medical networks, who were trained and evaluated at the end of the course. Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 614 disabled people who had participated in “home based training” were selected with stratified random sampling method. They were evaluated according to function progress level variables by community based rehabilitation programme experts. Age, sex, disability groups, employment state and teacher’s relation variables were studied from their files and recording datas. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-square test. Results: There was a relationship between age group and disability group with functional progress level (P = 0.014 & P <0.001. Low age groups, visional disabled group, epileptic patients and individuals with learning problems had the best results. High age groups, mixed disability group and individuals with verbal and hearing problems had the least results. There was a relationship between teacher’s relation with progress or nonprogress state (P = 0.038. Individuals that they were own teachers had the best results and individuals with teachers other than first or second relation or health worker had the least results. Conclusion: Home based training in community based rehabilitation programme is an effective method for improving disabled people in some selected groups.

  19. Toward cardiac electrophysiological mapping based on micro-Tesla NMR: a novel modality for localizing the cardiac reentry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwoong Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Matching the proton magnetic resonance frequency to the frequency of a periodic electrophysiological excitation of myocardium enables direct localization of the cardiac reentry by magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The feasibility of this new idea has been demonstrated by conducting a numerical simulation based on a realistic heart model and experimental parameters in SQUID-based micro-Tesla NMR.

  20. Theory of arrhythmia based on mechano-electric feedback between cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Kolmakow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When analyzing the articles submitted to our current issue, we involved into the preparation processing some relevant papers deserving special attention. The papers reveal the mechano-electric mechanism of the feedback between cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts that is capable of directly initiating cardiac arrhythmia. In the meantime, unfortunately, direct communication with Russian researchers Kamkin A.G., Kiseleva I.S. and Yarygin V.N. was not possible, but nevertheless, we are of the opinion that it is reasonable to review their articles, which discuss this interesting and logically justified mechanism of arrhythmia.

  1. accelerated hydrotherapy and land-based rehabilitation in soccer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beeson PM, Robey RR. Evaluating single-subject treatment research: Lessons from Aphasia Literature. Neuropsychol Rev 2006; 16: 161-9. 2. Biscarini A, Cerulli G. Modelling of the knee joint load in rehabilitative knee extension exercises under water. J Biomech 2007; 40(2): 345-55. 3. Brosseau L, Balmer S, Tousignant M, ...

  2. Home based rehabilitation for patients with COPD : an attractive alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation programs are well established to provide a multidisciplinary approach to control and alleviate symptoms and to optimise functional capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the last decade a large number of studies have investigated the

  3. The effect of integrated cardiac rehabilitation versus treatment as usual for atrial fibrillation patients treated with ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe Stelling; Zwisler, Ann-Dorth Olsen; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2013-01-01

    . The intervention consists of a rehabilitation programme including four psychoeducative consultations with a specially trained nurse and 12 weeks of individualised exercise training, plus the standard medical follow-up. Patients in the control group will receive the standard medical follow-up. The primary outcome...

  4. Homecare-based motor rehabilitation in musculoskeletal chronic graft versus host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tendas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD is a frequent complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Extensive musculoskeletal and skin involvement may induce severe functional impairment, disability and quality of life deterioration. Physical rehabilitation is recommended as ancillary therapy in these forms, but experiences are sparse. A 39-year-old man affected by musculoskeletal and skin chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD was treated with a homecare-based motor rehabilitation program during palliation for disease progression. Significant functional improvement was obtained. Motor rehabilitation should be strongly considered for patients with musculoskeletal cGVHD, both in the palliative and in the curative phase of disease.

  5. Designing informed game-based rehabilitation tasks leveraging advances in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Belinda; Koenig, Sebastian; Chang, Chien-Yen; McConnell, Eric; Suma, Evan; Bolas, Mark; Rizzo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This paper details a brief history and rationale for the use of virtual reality (VR) technology for clinical research and intervention, and then focuses on game-based VR applications in the area of rehabilitation. An analysis of the match between rehabilitation task requirements and the assets available with VR technology is presented. Low-cost camera-based systems capable of tracking user behavior at sufficient levels for game-based virtual rehabilitation activities are currently available for in-home use. Authoring software is now being developed that aims to provide clinicians with a usable toolkit for leveraging this technology. This will facilitate informed professional input on software design, development and application to ensure safe and effective use in the rehabilitation context. The field of rehabilitation generally stands to benefit from the continual advances in VR technology, concomitant system cost reductions and an expanding clinical research literature and knowledge base. Home-based activity within VR systems that are low-cost, easy to deploy and maintain, and meet the requirements for "good" interactive rehabilitation tasks could radically improve users' access to care, adherence to prescribed training and subsequently enhance functional activity in everyday life in clinical populations.

  6. Identifying similar and different factors effecting long-term cardiac exercise rehabilitation behavior modification between New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Stephanie; Lark, Sally; Fallows, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programs are the most cost-effective measure for reducing morbidity associated with Coronary Vascular Disease (CVD). To be more effective there is a need to understand what influences the maintenance of healthy behaviors. This study identifies similar and different influences in CR of the United Kingdom (UK) and New Zealand (NZ). A retrospective study. Participants had previously been discharged from CR for 6 to 12+ months within the UK (n = 22) and NZ (n = 21). Participant's attended a focus group. Discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed then thematically analyzed. The CR programs were observed over 2 months to enable comment on findings relating to 'theory in practice.' Similar positive patient experiences influencing behavior between groups and countries were; support, education, positive attitude, and motivation. Companionship and exercising alongside people with similar health problems was the major determinant for positive exercise behavior. Barriers to maintaining exercise included; physical disabilities, time constraints, and weather conditions. NZ participants were more affected by external factors (eg, opportunity, access, and time). Both CR programs were successful in facilitating the maintenance of healthy lifestyles. Exercising with other cardiac patients for support in a structured environment was the strongest influence in maintaining healthy lifestyles beyond CR programs.

  7. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A. Des Roches

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  8. Technology-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Communication after Acquired Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Roches, Carrie A; Kiran, Swathi

    2017-01-01

    The utilization of technology has allowed for several advances in aphasia rehabilitation for individuals with acquired brain injury. Thirty-one previous studies that provide technology-based language or language and cognitive rehabilitation are examined in terms of the domains addressed, the types of treatments that were provided, details about the methods and the results, including which types of outcomes are reported. From this, we address questions about how different aspects of the delivery of treatment can influence rehabilitation outcomes, such as whether the treatment was standardized or tailored, whether the participants were prescribed homework or not, and whether intensity was varied. Results differed by these aspects of treatment delivery but ultimately the studies demonstrated consistent improvement on various outcome measures. With these aspects of technology-based treatment in mind, the ultimate goal of personalized rehabilitation is discussed.

  9. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  10. Mobile Game-based Virtual Reality Program for Upper Extremity Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2018-03-08

    Stroke rehabilitation requires repetitive, intensive, goal-oriented therapy. Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to satisfy these requirements. Game-based therapy can promote patients' engagement in rehabilitation therapy as a more interesting and a motivating tool. Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs can provide personalized home-based therapy with interactive communication between patients and clinicians. In this study, a mobile VR upper extremity rehabilitation program using game applications was developed. The findings from the study show that the mobile game-based VR program effectively promotes upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. In addition, patients completed two weeks of treatment using the program without adverse effects and were generally satisfied with the program. This mobile game-based VR upper extremity rehabilitation program can substitute for some parts of the conventional therapy that are delivered one-on-one by an occupational therapist. This time-efficient, easy to implement, and clinically effective program would be a good candidate tool for tele-rehabilitation for upper extremity recovery in patients with stroke. Patients and therapists can collaborate remotely through these e-health rehabilitation programs while reducing economic and social costs.

  11. The effects of centre-based rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction on exercise capacity and risk factors for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Polona Mlakar; Barbara Salobir; Borut Jug; Nusret Čobo; Marjeta Terčelj; Mišo Šabovič

    2014-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a crucial part of secondary prevention for coronary heart disease. The aim of our study was to determine the efficiency of our national in-patient rehabilitation program in improving exercise capacity and lowering risk factors for coronary heart disease.Methods 25 patients 3-9 weeks after AMI, undergoing 2 week in-patient cardiac rehabilitation, were included in our study. We performed exercise stress testing and measure...

  12. A proposal to design a Location-based Mobile Cardiac Emergency System (LMCES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keikhosrokiani, Pantea; Mustaffa, Norlia; Zakaria, Nasriah; Sarwar, Muhammad Imran

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare for elderly people has become a vital issue. The Wearable Health Monitoring System (WHMS) is used to manage and monitor chronic disease in elderly people, postoperative rehabilitation patients and persons with special needs. Location-aware healthcare is achievable as positioning systems and telecommunications have been developed and have fulfilled the technology needed for this kind of healthcare system. In this paper, the researchers propose a Location-Based Mobile Cardiac Emergency System (LMCES) to track the patient's current location when Emergency Medical Services (EMS) has been activated as well as to locate the nearest healthcare unit for the ambulance service. The location coordinates of the patients can be retrieved by GPS and sent to the healthcare centre using GPRS. The location of the patient, cell ID information will also be transmitted to the LMCES server in order to retrieve the nearest health care unit. For the LMCES, we use Dijkstra's algorithm for selecting the shortest path between the nearest healthcare unit and the patient location in order to facilitate the ambulance's path under critical conditions.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Szot; Joanna Zając; Magdalena Kostkiewicz; Jakub Owoc; Iwona Bojar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX) was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL). According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA).Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels) has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were intr...

  14. Burden, screening, and treatment of depressive and anxious symptoms among women referred to cardiac rehabilitation: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, Megan C.; Arthur, Heather M.; Chessex, Caroline; Oh, Paul; Turk-Adawi, Karam; Grace, Sherry L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among women. Women with CVD experience a greater burden of psychosocial distress than men, and practice guidelines promote screening in cardiac patients, especially women. The objectives herein were to describe the burden of psychosocial distress, extent of screening, forms of treatment, and whether receipt of treatment was related to psychosocial distress symptom severity at follow-up, among wo...

  15. Web-based rehabilitation interventions for people with rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikesavan, Cynthia; Bryer, Catherine; Ali, Usama; Williamson, Esther

    2018-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation approaches for people with rheumatoid arthritis include joint protection, exercises and self-management strategies. Health interventions delivered via the web have the potential to improve access to health services overcoming time constraints, physical limitations, and socioeconomic and geographic barriers. The objective of this review is to determine the effects of web-based rehabilitation interventions in adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Randomised controlled trials that compared web-based rehabilitation interventions with usual care, waiting list, no treatment or another web-based intervention in adults with rheumatoid arthritis were included. The outcomes were pain, function, quality of life, self-efficacy, rheumatoid arthritis knowledge, physical activity and adverse effects. Methodological quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and quality of evidence with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Results Six source documents from four trials ( n = 567) focusing on self-management, health information or physical activity were identified. The effects of web-based rehabilitation interventions on pain, function, quality of life, self-efficacy, rheumatoid arthritis knowledge and physical activity are uncertain because of the very low quality of evidence mostly from small single trials. Adverse effects were not reported. Conclusion Large, well-designed trials are needed to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of web-based rehabilitation interventions in rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Improving Vision-Based Motor Rehabilitation Interactive Systems for Users with Disabilities Using Mirror Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bueso, Pau; Moyà-Alcover, Biel

    2014-01-01

    Observation is recommended in motor rehabilitation. For this reason, the aim of this study was to experimentally test the feasibility and benefit of including mirror feedback in vision-based rehabilitation systems: we projected the user on the screen. We conducted a user study by using a previously evaluated system that improved the balance and postural control of adults with cerebral palsy. We used a within-subjects design with the two defined feedback conditions (mirror and no-mirror) with two different groups of users (8 with disabilities and 32 without disabilities) using usability measures (time-to-start (T s) and time-to-complete (T c)). A two-tailed paired samples t-test confirmed that in case of disabilities the mirror feedback facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. The measured times were significantly worse in the absence of the user's own visual feedback (T s = 7.09 (P < 0.001) and T c = 4.48 (P < 0.005)). In vision-based interaction systems, the input device is the user's own body; therefore, it makes sense that feedback should be related to the body of the user. In case of disabilities the mirror feedback mechanisms facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. Results recommends developers and researchers use this improvement in vision-based motor rehabilitation interactive systems. PMID:25295310

  17. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  18. Developing community based rehabilitation for cancer survivors: Organizing for coordination and coherence in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Cutchin, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increasing incidence of cancer combined with prolonged survival have raised the need for developing community based rehabilitation. The objectives of the analysis were to describe and interpret the key issues related to coordination and coherence of community-based cancer rehabilitation....... A Grounded Theory approach was used to analyze the data. Results. A lack of shared cultures among health care providers and systems of delivery was a primary barrier to collaboration which was essential for establishing coordination of care. Formal multidisciplinary steering committees, team......-based organization, and informal relationships were fundamental for developing coordination and coherence. Conclusions. Coordination and coherence in community-based rehabilitation relies on increased collaboration, which may best be optimized by use of shared frameworks within and across systems. Results highlight...

  19. Older adults' experiences of internet-based vestibular rehabilitation for dizziness: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essery, Rosie; Kirby, Sarah; Geraghty, Adam W A; Yardley, Lucy

    2017-11-01

    Factors influencing engagement with self-managed rehabilitation are not well understood, but evidence suggests they may change over time. Despite increasing digitalisation of self-managed interventions, little is known about the role of internet-based interventions in patients' experiences of self-directed rehabilitation. This longitudinal qualitative study investigated individuals' ongoing experiences of internet-guided, self-managed rehabilitation within the context of rehabilitation for dizziness. Eighteen adults aged fifty and over who experienced dizziness used the 'Balance Retraining' internet intervention for six weeks. Participants took part in semi-structured telephone interviews at two-week intervals to explore their experiences. Data were inductively thematically analysed. The internet intervention was reported to facilitate engagement with rehabilitation exercises, providing motivation to continue through symptom reduction and simple but helpful strategies. It was perceived as informative, reassuring, visually pleasing and easy to use. Barriers to engagement included practicalities, symptoms and doubts about exercise efficacy. Participants' perceptions did not always remain consistent over time. The internet intervention may be a feasible method of supporting self-managed vestibular rehabilitation. More generally, longitudinal findings suggest that appearance-related perceptions of online interventions may be especially important for initial engagement. Furthermore, intervention features targeting self-efficacy seem important in overcoming barriers to engagement.

  20. Gait disorder rehabilitation using vision and non-vision based sensors: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asraf Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Even though the amount of rehabilitation guidelines has never been greater, uncertainty continues to arise regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of the rehabilitation of gait disorders. This question has been hindered by the lack of information on accurate measurements of gait disorders. Thus, this article reviews the rehabilitation systems for gait disorder using vision and non-vision sensor technologies, as well as the combination of these. All papers published in the English language between 1990 and June, 2012 that had the phrases “gait disorder” “rehabilitation”, “vision sensor”, or “non vision sensor” in the title, abstract, or keywords were identified from the SpringerLink, ELSEVIER, PubMed, and IEEE databases. Some synonyms of these phrases and the logical words “and” “or” and “not” were also used in the article searching procedure. Out of the 91 published articles found, this review identified 84 articles that described the rehabilitation of gait disorders using different types of sensor technologies. This literature set presented strong evidence for the development of rehabilitation systems using a markerless vision-based sensor technology. We therefore believe that the information contained in this review paper will assist the progress of the development of rehabilitation systems for human gait disorders.

  1. Work Rehabilitation Questionnaire (WORQ): development and preliminary psychometric evidence of an ICF-based questionnaire for vocational rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Monika E; Escorpizo, Reuben; Bostan, Cristina; De Bie, Rob

    2014-09-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has proven to be a valuable framework for vocational rehabilitation (VR). No reliable and valid ICF-based instruments to capture work functioning is known, hence, the aims of this study were: (1) to outline the process for developing an ICF-based questionnaire, the Work Rehabilitation Questionnaire (WORQ) to assess functioning in VR and (2) to report preliminary psychometric evidence. ICF categories were selected from the ICF Core Sets for VR using explorative Rasch-analysis and VR literature review. Questions were worded to assess identified ICF categories. WORQ was translated from English to German. Psychometrics for the German version of WORQ was examined in one VR centre in Switzerland. 44 ICF categories were selected which resulted in 36 questions related to functioning. The psychometric evaluation of WORQ showed high test-retest reliability (Spearman correlation 0.79) (n = 53) and good internal consistency (Cronbachs Alpha 0.88) (n = 74) WORQ showed moderate correlation with Beck Depression Inventory II (Spearman correlation 0.511) and low correlation (Spearman correlation -0.353) with SF-36. WORQ appears to be a reliable, ICF-based questionnaire to evaluate functioning in VR, easy to administer by health or vocational professionals. The additional information gained when using WORQ would contribute to improving interdisciplinary understanding of the patient's situation and therefore support the integrative planning of the return-to-work process or engagement in gainful employment. However, further studies are needed to further examine its use in clinical practice and research, when validated in other patient populations and settings.

  2. Game System for Rehabilitation Based on Kinect is Effective for Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Ying

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinect has already been widely used in the area of retardation, and this study is to evaluate whether the Game System for Rehabilitation based on Kinect is effective for children with mental retardation. The subjects in this paper are 112 children with mental retardation in Zhejiang province of China. The Game System for Rehabilitation based on Kinect was applied to assist the rehabilitation of children. Before the training, the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI was used to evaluate abilities of children, including self-care, mobility, and social function. And after having been trained for a month, the abilities of these children were evaluated again by PEDI. The results in this paper is that, after the application of Game System for Rehabilitation based on Kinect, the PEDI score of children is significantly higher than the score before training. And it can be concluded that the Game System for Rehabilitation based on Kinect can significantly improve self-care, mobility, and social function of children with MR.

  3. Design Issues and Application of Cable-Based Parallel Manipulators for Rehabilitation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ottaviano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cable-based manipulators are proposed for application in rehabilitation therapies. Cable-based manipulators show good features that are very useful when the system has to interact with humans. In particular, they can be used to aid motion or as monitoring/training systems in rehabilitation therapies. Modelling and simulation of both active and passive cable-based parallel manipulators are presented for an application to help older people, patients or disabled people in the sit-to-stand transfer and as a monitoring/training system. Experimental results are presented by using built prototypes.

  4. Development of a wearable exoskeleton rehabilitation system based on hybrid control mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Long

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower limb rehabilitation exoskeletons usually help patients walk based on fixed gait trajectories. However, it is not suitable for unilateral lower limb disorders. In this article, a hybrid training mode is proposed to be applied in rehabilitation for unilateral lower limb movement disorders. The hybrid training includes two modes, that is, the passive training mode and the active assist mode. At an early stage of the rehabilitation therapy, the passive training mode is utilized, in which microelectromechanical systems-based attitude and heading reference system is used to collect the gait trajectory of the healthy limb. The exoskeleton on the unhealthy limb will be driven to track the joint trajectory of the healthy limb. If the patient’s abilities recovered, the rehabilitation system can be switched to the active assist mode. Two force sensors are imbedded into the interface on the thigh to measure the interaction information in order to detect the patient’s initiative walking intention. In the active mode, the walking gait trajectory is modified and generated based on the gait trajectory of the healthy side via the attitude and heading reference system. In this article, a position close control loop is designed to drive the mechanical leg to help the unhealthy limb walk. Laboratory experiments are performed on a healthy human subject to illustrate the proposed approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method can be applied and extended in the passive and active rehabilitation mode for the unilateral lower limb disorders.

  5. Strategy for developing an evidence-based transdisciplinary vision rehabilitation team approach to treating vision impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Lori Latowski

    2008-04-01

    Many individuals with vision impairment experience significant loss of the ability to perform daily living activities, which often results in a further decline and loss of quality of life. Appropriate rehabilitation of the population with vision impairment has the potential to both improve individual abilities for health and personal management as well as maximize utilization of available health care resources. The case for an evidence-based model for the vision rehabilitation health care team as a medical rehabilitation program is presented. The recommended strategy has 3 main components: development of a consensus team clinical practice guideline leading to a future evidence-based team guideline for vision rehabilitation; evaluation and measurement of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of the involved vision rehabilitation professionals before and after implementation of the new paradigm; and measurement of outcomes that estimate the effects of the proposed paradigm on patient care by measuring both the improvement in visual ability of the patient and the economic impact of the model on optometric practice. Development of a state-of-the-art evidence-based transdisciplinary team model guideline will facilitate improvement in the quality of life of individuals with diseases that result in chronic vision impairment.

  6. The MOTIV-HEART Study: A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Pilot Study of Brief Strategic Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychological distress, biomedical parameters, and unhealthy lifestyles contribute to a poorer prognosis for cardiac disease. Public health's challenge is to motivate patients to utilize self-care. Objective: This prospective, randomized, single-blind pilot study aimed at testing the incremental efficacy of Brief Strategic Therapy (BST) combined with Motivational Interviewing (MI) in improving selected biomedical and psychological outcomes over and beyond those of the stand-alone BST in a residential Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) program. Method: Fourty-two inpatients (17 females), enrolled in a 1-month CR program, were randomly allocated into two conditions: (a) Three sessions of BST and (b) Three sessions of BST plus MI. Data were collected at baseline, discharge, and after 3 months through phone interviews. Results: At discharge, no significant between-group difference was found in any outcome variable. Changes from pre- to post-treatment within each condition showed significant improvements only in the BST group, where the level of external regulation diminished, and both the participants' self-regulation (Relative Autonomous Motivation Index, RAI) and willingness to change improved. At the 3-month follow-up, within-group analyses on responders (BST = 9; BST + MI = 11) showed a statistically significant improvement in the level of systolic blood pressure in both groups. Discussion: Findings showed no evidence of the incremental efficacy of combining BST and MI over and beyond BST alone on either selected biomedical or psychological outcomes among CR patients. Conclusions: Ends and limitations from the present pilot study should be considered and addressed in future investigations.

  7. The MOTIV-HEART Study: A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Pilot Study of Brief Strategic Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychological distress, biomedical parameters, and unhealthy lifestyles contribute to a poorer prognosis for cardiac disease. Public health's challenge is to motivate patients to utilize self-care. Objective: This prospective, randomized, single-blind pilot study aimed at testing the incremental efficacy of Brief Strategic Therapy (BST) combined with Motivational Interviewing (MI) in improving selected biomedical and psychological outcomes over and beyond those of the stand-alone BST in a residential Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) program. Method: Fourty-two inpatients (17 females), enrolled in a 1-month CR program, were randomly allocated into two conditions: (a) Three sessions of BST and (b) Three sessions of BST plus MI. Data were collected at baseline, discharge, and after 3 months through phone interviews. Results: At discharge, no significant between-group difference was found in any outcome variable. Changes from pre- to post-treatment within each condition showed significant improvements only in the BST group, where the level of external regulation diminished, and both the participants' self-regulation (Relative Autonomous Motivation Index, RAI) and willingness to change improved. At the 3-month follow-up, within-group analyses on responders (BST = 9; BST + MI = 11) showed a statistically significant improvement in the level of systolic blood pressure in both groups. Discussion: Findings showed no evidence of the incremental efficacy of combining BST and MI over and beyond BST alone on either selected biomedical or psychological outcomes among CR patients. Conclusions: Ends and limitations from the present pilot study should be considered and addressed in future investigations. PMID:28223950

  8. Towards an ICF- and IMMPACT-based pain vocational rehabilitation core set in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneman, M F; Beemster, T T; Edelaar, M J A; van Velzen, J M; van Bennekom, C; Escorpizo, R

    2013-12-01

    For clinical use and research of pain within the context of vocational rehabilitation, a specific core set of measurements is needed. The recommendations of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) brief Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and those of Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) cover two broad areas. These two sources can be integrated when made applicable to vocational rehabilitation and pain. Objective To develop a core set of diagnostic and evaluative measures specifically for vocational rehabilitation of patients with subacute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, while using the brief ICF core set for VR as the reference framework in VR, and the IMMPACT recommendations in the outcome measurements around pain. Three main steps were taken. The first step was to remove irrelevant and duplicate domains of the brief ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation and the IMMPACT recommendations around pain. The second step was to match the remaining domains with existing instruments or measures. Instruments were proposed based on availability and its proven use in Dutch practice and based on proof of sufficient clinimetric properties. In step 3, the preliminary VR-Pain core set was presented to 3 expert panels: proposed users, Dutch pain rehabilitation experts, and international VR experts. Experts agreed with the majority of the proposed domains and instruments. The final VR-Pain Core Set consists of 18 domains measured with 12 instruments. All instruments possessed basic clinimetric properties. An agreed-upon VR-Pain Core Set with content that covers relevant domains for pain and VR and validated instruments measuring these domains has been developed. The VR-Pain Core Set may be used for regular clinical purposes and research in the field of vocational rehabilitation and pain, but adaptations should be considered for use outside the Netherlands.

  9. The Utilization of Rehabilitation in Patients with Hemophilia A in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Min Chen

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation plays an important role in the physical health of patients with hemophilia. However, comprehensive information regarding the utilization of rehabilitation for such patients remains scarce.This population-based study aimed to examine the characteristics, trends, and most important factors affecting rehabilitation usage in patients with hemophilia A using a nationwide database in Taiwan.Data from 777 patients with hemophilia A who were registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed using SAS 9.0.Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and clotting factor VIII concentrate costs were identified as factors affecting rehabilitation usage; musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures (odds ratio = 3.788; P < 0.001 were the most important predictor of whether a patient with hemophilia A would use rehabilitation services. Joint disorders, arthropathies, bone and cartilage disorders, intracranial hemorrhage, and brain trauma were common diagnoses during rehabilitation use. The costs of physical therapy (physiotherapy comprised the majority (71.2% of rehabilitation therapy categories. Increasingly, rehabilitation therapy was performed at physician clinics. The total rehabilitation costs were <0.1% of the total annual medical costs.Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and increased use of clotting factor VIII concentrate affect the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A the most. The findings in this study could help clinicians comprehensively understand the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A.

  10. Biomechanical bases of rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlet'yarova, K. V.; Korshunov, S. D.; Kapilevich, L. V.

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis and the study results of children's with cerebral palsy (CP) muscles bioelectrical activity while walking on a flat surface are represented. Increased flexion in the hip and shoulder joints and extension in the elbow joint in children with cerebral palsy were observed, with the movement of the lower limbs had less smooth character in comparison with the control group. Herewith, the oscillation amplitude was significantly increased, and the frequency in the m. gastrocnemius and m. lateralis was decreased. It was shown, that the dynamic stereotype of walking in children with cerebral palsy was characterized by excessive involvement of m. gastrocnemius and m.latissimus dorsi in locomotion. Thus, resulting biomechanical and bioelectrical parameters of walking should be considered in the rehabilitation programs development.

  11. Computer- and Suggestion-based Cognitive Rehabilitation following Acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas Kristoffer

    This thesis is an empirical investigation into two cost-effective treatment options for patients with acquired brain injury. Based on an experiment and a review, I argue that in general computer-based cognitive rehabilitation, as it is currently practiced, has virtually no effect on untrained tas...

  12. Cardiac Patients’ Experiences and Perceptions of Social Media: Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Stephanie R; Grunseit, Anne C; Gallagher, Patrick; Freeman, Becky; O'Hara, Blythe J; Neubeck, Lis; Due, Sarah; Paull, Glenn; Ding, Ding; Bauman, Adrian; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional in-person cardiac rehabilitation has substantial benefits for cardiac patients, which are offset by poor attendance. The rapid increase in social media use in older adults provides an opportunity to reach patients who are eligible for cardiac rehabilitation but unable to attend traditional face-to-face groups. However, there is a paucity of research on cardiac patients’ experiences and perspectives on using social media to support their health. Objective The aim of this study was to describe cardiac rehabilitation patients’ experiences in using social media in general and their perspective on using social media, particularly Facebook, to support their cardiac health and secondary prevention efforts. Methods A mixed-methods study was undertaken among cardiac rehabilitation patients in both urban and rural areas. First, this study included a survey (n=284) on social media use and capability. Second, six focus group interviews were conducted with current Facebook users (n=18) to elucidate Facebook experience and perspectives. Results Social media use was low (28.0%, 79/282) but more common in participants who were under 70 years of age, employed, and had completed high school. Social media users accessed Web-based information on general health issues (65%, 51/79), medications (56%, 44/79), and heart health (43%, 34/79). Participants were motivated to invest time in using Facebook for “keeping in touch” with family and friends and to be informed by expert cardiac health professionals and fellow cardiac participants if given the opportunity. It appeared that participants who had a higher level of Facebook capability (understanding of features and the consequences of their use and efficiency in use) spent more time on Facebook and reported higher levels of “liking,” commenting, or sharing posts. Furthermore, higher Facebook capability appeared to increase a participants’ willingness to participate in a cardiac Facebook support group

  13. Effect of complex cardiac rehabilitation on physical activity and quality of life during long-term follow-up after surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierat-Haponiuk, Katarzyna; Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Szalewska, Dominika; Chojnicki, Maciej; Jaworski, Radosław; Niedoszytko, Piotr; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Bakuła, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) is an important element of the comprehensive management of grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH) patients after surgical correction of congenital heart disease (CHD) but access to this treatment is still limited. We still lack Polish guidelines on CCR, including controlled training in young adults several years after surgical correction of CHD. To assess the effect of a CCR program on physical capacity, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and severity of depressive symptoms in GUCH patients long-term after surgical correction of CHD. We studied 57 CHD patients (30 females, 27 males, mean age 23 ± 3.4 years) at least 12 months after surgical correction of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD II). All patients were offered a CCR program, and 31 of them participated (rehabilitation group [Reh]) and 26 refused (non-rehabilitated group [NReh]). All patients underwent baseline cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using a cycloergometer and a ramp protocol with an initial load of 20 W followed by 10 W load increments per minute. Psychological evaluation included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Euro QoL 5D questionnaire to evaluate quality of life. Patients were reassessed 30 days after the initial evaluation using the same investigations. During CPET, all patients reached peak exercise intensity at the level of 15-17 in the Borg scale without complications. Resting HR was lower in the Reh group (74 ± 8 bpm) compared to the NReh group (81 ± 14 bpm). During CPET, patients in the Reh group reached significantly higher peak HR and percent maximum HR. Workload increased nonsignificantly (144 W vs. 124 W, p = 0.121), while duration of exercise and peak oxygen consumption was significantly longer in the Reh group compared to the NReh group (14 min vs. 11 min, p = 0.001; and 27.5 mL/kg/min vs. 23 mL/kg/min, p = 0.003, respectively). Patients in the NReh group showed non

  14. Fun During Knee Rehabilitation: Feasibility and Acceptability Testing of a New Android-Based Training Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, Thomas Sanjay; Colcuc, Christian; Hanke, Alexander; Clausen, Jan-Dierk; James, Paul Abraham; Horstmann, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    The initial goals of rehabilitation after knee injuries and operations are to achieve full knee extension and to activate quadriceps muscle. In addition to regular physiotherapy, an android-based knee training device is designed to help patients achieve these goals and improve compliance in the early rehabilitation period. This knee training device combines fun in a computer game with muscular training or rehabilitation. Our aim was to test the feasibility and acceptability of this new device. 50 volunteered subjects enrolled to test out the computer game aided device. The first game was the high-striker game, which recorded maximum knee extension power. The second game involved controlling quadriceps muscular power to simulate flying an aeroplane in order to record accuracy of muscle activation. The subjects evaluated this game by completing a simple questionnaire. No technical problem was encountered during the usage of this device. No subjects complained of any discomfort after using this device. Measurements including maximum knee extension power, knee muscle activation and control were recorded successfully. Subjects rated their experience with the device as either excellent or very good and agreed that the device can motivate and monitor the progress of knee rehabilitation training. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first android-based tool available to fast track knee rehabilitation training. All subjects gave very positive feedback to this computer game aided knee device.

  15. Increasing patient engagement in rehabilitation exercises using computer-based citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laut, Jeffrey; Cappa, Francesco; Nov, Oded; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Patient motivation is an important factor to consider when developing rehabilitation programs. Here, we explore the effectiveness of active participation in web-based citizen science activities as a means of increasing participant engagement in rehabilitation exercises, through the use of a low-cost haptic joystick interfaced with a laptop computer. Using the joystick, patients navigate a virtual environment representing the site of a citizen science project situated in a polluted canal. Participants are tasked with following a path on a laptop screen representing the canal. The experiment consists of two conditions: in one condition, a citizen science component where participants classify images from the canal is included; and in the other, the citizen science component is absent. Both conditions are tested on a group of young patients undergoing rehabilitation treatments and a group of healthy subjects. A survey administered at the end of both tasks reveals that participants prefer performing the scientific task, and are more likely to choose to repeat it, even at the cost of increasing the time of their rehabilitation exercise. Furthermore, performance indices based on data collected from the joystick indicate significant differences in the trajectories created by patients and healthy subjects, suggesting that the low-cost device can be used in a rehabilitation setting for gauging patient recovery.

  16. Community-based rehabilitation and stigma management by physically disabled people in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassah, A K

    1998-02-01

    Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) has been recommended by the World Health Organization as an antidote to the poor coverage of rehabilitation facilities in the developing countries. This attempt is to make it possible for disabled people to receive the help they need to be able to go about their daily activities aided by trained personnel from their own communities. Research has however indicated that many disabled people do not patronize rehabilitation programmes. Many who give it a try leave dissatisfied. Most of the disabled people will rather migrate to the cities to beg. Many reasons, including economic and location of rehabilitation centres in the cities, have been assigned for this trend of affairs. This paper however sees the problem as attempts by disabled people and their families to manage 'felt' and 'enacted' stigma. The paper seeks to question the importance of Community-Based Rehabilitation, since experienced and perceived stigma seem to be more pronounced in the rural areas, and begging is often seen as the fastest way to gain some independence, reduce stigma and avoid stigmatized environments.

  17. Physical training for intermittent claudication: a comparison of structured rehabilitation versus home-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degischer, Steve; Labs, Karl-Heinz; Hochstrasser, Jacques; Aschwanden, Markus; Tschoepl, Martin; Jaeger, Kurt A

    2002-05-01

    In a non-randomized, open-label study results after a structured institution-based peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD) rehabilitation program were compared with the results of training at home. Three groups were compared: group 1 (n = 19) PAD rehabilitation; group 2 (n = 19) PAD rehabilitation + clopidogrel 75 mg once daily; group 3 (n = 21) home-based training. The training period was 3 months for all groups, which was followed by a 3-month observation phase (without prescribed training). The rehabilitation program consisted of 3 training hours per week. Background variables, demographics, and baseline claudication distances were comparable between groups. After 3 months of training the absolute claudication distances (ACD) improved by 82.7%, 131.4%, and 5.4% for groups 1, 2 and 3. The initial claudication distances (ICD) changed by 163.8%, 200.6%, and 44.4%, respectively. All changes, except the ACD result for group 3, were statistically significant (p training groups (1 and 2) performed significantly better than group 3 (p training groups and the results of group 3 amounted to 474.3 m [95% CI 270.2-678.4 m] and 242.4 m [95% CI 99.0-385.7 m], for ACD and ICD, respectively. Structured, supervised PAD rehabilitation is a highly efficacious treatment for intermittent claudication and may be regarded as the present gold standard among conservative treatment options.

  18. Multisensory-Based Rehabilitation Approach: Translational Insights from Animal Models to Early Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Purpura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Multisensory processes permit combinations of several inputs, coming from different sensory systems, allowing for a coherent representation of biological events and facilitating adaptation to environment. For these reasons, their application in neurological and neuropsychological rehabilitation has been enhanced in the last decades. Recent studies on animals and human models have indicated that, on one hand multisensory integration matures gradually during post-natal life and development is closely linked to environment and experience and, on the other hand, that modality-specific information seems to do not benefit by redundancy across multiple sense modalities and is more readily perceived in unimodal than in multimodal stimulation. In this review, multisensory process development is analyzed, highlighting clinical effects in animal and human models of its manipulation for rehabilitation of sensory disorders. In addition, new methods of early intervention based on multisensory-based rehabilitation approach and their applications on different infant populations at risk of neurodevelopmental disabilities are discussed.

  19. Integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation efficacy in multiple sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilo, Oiane; Peña, Javier; Ojeda, Natalia; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Mendibe-Bilbao, Mar; Gómez-Gastiasoro, Ainara; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of the integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation programme, REHACOP, on improving cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Fourty-two MS patients were randomized to the treatment programme REHACOP (n = 21) or waiting list control condition (n = 21). The REHACOP group received cognitive rehabilitation in group format for three months focused on attention, processing speed, learning and memory, language, executive functioning, and social cognition. Patients completed a neuropsychological assessment at baseline and follow-up, which included tests of attention, processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, verbal fluency, and executive functioning. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) was used to determine the efficacy of the cognitive rehabilitation programme. Group × Time interactions revealed significant improvements in the REHACOP group as compared with the control group for processing speed (p = 0.011, n p 2  = 0.16), working memory (p = 0.014, n p 2  = 0.15), verbal memory (p = 0.025, n p 2  = 0.13), and executive functioning (p = 0.024, n p 2  = 0.13), showing medium-large effect sizes. Patients receiving REHACOP showed improvements in several cognitive domains. This preliminary study thus provides evidence supporting the efficacy of this integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation intervention in MS. Future research should confirm these findings, examine the impact of the treatment on everyday life functioning and explore the presence of brain changes associated with cognitive rehabilitation. Implications for rehabilitation This study provides initial evidence for integrative group-based cognitive rehabilitation efficacy in MS patients through the implementation of the REHACOP cognitive rehabilitation programme. Patients received cognitive rehabilitation for three months (3 one-hour-sessions per week) focused on training

  20. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter–based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh SH

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sheik Hussain Salleh,1 Hadrina Sheik Hussain,2 Tan Tian Swee,2 Chee-Ming Ting,2 Alias Mohd Noor,2 Surasak Pipatsart,3 Jalil Ali,4 Preecha P Yupapin31Department of Biomedical Instrumentation and Signal Processing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Malaysia; 2Centre for Biomedical Engineering Transportation Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 3Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MalaysiaAbstract: Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss–Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise

  1. Neurorehabilitation using the virtual reality based Rehabilitation Gaming System: methodology, design, psychometrics, usability and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameirão, Mónica S; Badia, Sergi Bermúdez I; Oller, Esther Duarte; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2010-09-22

    Stroke is a frequent cause of adult disability that can lead to enduring impairments. However, given the life-long plasticity of the brain one could assume that recovery could be facilitated by the harnessing of mechanisms underlying neuronal reorganization. Currently it is not clear how this reorganization can be mobilized. Novel technology based neurorehabilitation techniques hold promise to address this issue. Here we describe a Virtual Reality (VR) based system, the Rehabilitation Gaming System (RGS) that is based on a number of hypotheses on the neuronal mechanisms underlying recovery, the structure of training and the role of individualization. We investigate the psychometrics of the RGS in stroke patients and healthy controls. We describe the key components of the RGS and the psychometrics of one rehabilitation scenario called Spheroids. We performed trials with 21 acute/subacute stroke patients and 20 healthy controls to study the effect of the training parameters on task performance. This allowed us to develop a Personalized Training Module (PTM) for online adjustment of task difficulty. In addition, we studied task transfer between physical and virtual environments. Finally, we assessed the usability and acceptance of the RGS as a rehabilitation tool. We show that the PTM implemented in RGS allows us to effectively adjust the difficulty and the parameters of the task to the user by capturing specific features of the movements of the arms. The results reported here also show a consistent transfer of movement kinematics between physical and virtual tasks. Moreover, our usability assessment shows that the RGS is highly accepted by stroke patients as a rehabilitation tool. We introduce a novel VR based paradigm for neurorehabilitation, RGS, which combines specific rehabilitative principles with a psychometric evaluation to provide a personalized and automated training. Our results show that the RGS effectively adjusts to the individual features of the user

  2. Neurorehabilitation using the virtual reality based Rehabilitation Gaming System: methodology, design, psychometrics, usability and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschure Paul FMJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a frequent cause of adult disability that can lead to enduring impairments. However, given the life-long plasticity of the brain one could assume that recovery could be facilitated by the harnessing of mechanisms underlying neuronal reorganization. Currently it is not clear how this reorganization can be mobilized. Novel technology based neurorehabilitation techniques hold promise to address this issue. Here we describe a Virtual Reality (VR based system, the Rehabilitation Gaming System (RGS that is based on a number of hypotheses on the neuronal mechanisms underlying recovery, the structure of training and the role of individualization. We investigate the psychometrics of the RGS in stroke patients and healthy controls. Methods We describe the key components of the RGS and the psychometrics of one rehabilitation scenario called Spheroids. We performed trials with 21 acute/subacute stroke patients and 20 healthy controls to study the effect of the training parameters on task performance. This allowed us to develop a Personalized Training Module (PTM for online adjustment of task difficulty. In addition, we studied task transfer between physical and virtual environments. Finally, we assessed the usability and acceptance of the RGS as a rehabilitation tool. Results We show that the PTM implemented in RGS allows us to effectively adjust the difficulty and the parameters of the task to the user by capturing specific features of the movements of the arms. The results reported here also show a consistent transfer of movement kinematics between physical and virtual tasks. Moreover, our usability assessment shows that the RGS is highly accepted by stroke patients as a rehabilitation tool. Conclusions We introduce a novel VR based paradigm for neurorehabilitation, RGS, which combines specific rehabilitative principles with a psychometric evaluation to provide a personalized and automated training. Our results show that the

  3. “I Just Can’t Do It Anymore” Patterns of Physical Activity and Cardiac Rehabilitation in African Americans with Heart Failure: A Mixed Method Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret McCarthy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation (CR are components of heart failure (HF self-care. The aims of this study were to describe patterns of physical activity in African Americans (n = 30 with HF and to explore experience in CR. This was a mixed method, concurrent nested, predominantly qualitative study. Qualitative data were collected via interviews exploring typical physical activity, and CR experience. It was augmented by quantitative data measuring HF severity, self-care, functional capacity and depressive symptoms. Mean age was 60 ± 15 years; 65% were New York Heart Association (NYHA class III HF. Forty-three percent reported that they did less than 30 min of exercise in the past week; 23% were told “nothing” about exercise by their provider, and 53% were told to do “minimal exercise”. A measure of functional capacity indicated the ability to do moderate activity. Two related themes stemmed from the narratives describing current physical activity: “given up” and “still trying”. Six participants recalled referral to CR with one person participating. There was high concordance between qualitative and quantitative data, and evidence that depression may play a role in low levels of physical activity. Findings highlight the need for strategies to increase adherence to current physical activity guidelines in this older minority population with HF.

  4. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  5. Virtual reality in acquired brain injury upper limb rehabilitation: evidence-based evaluation of clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Nick; Wilson, Peter H

    2009-03-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is associated with significant cognitive, behavioural, psychological and physical impairment. Hence, it has been important to leverage assessment approaches in rehabilitation by using current and emerging technologies, including virtual reality (VR). A number of VR rehabilitation programmes have been designed in recent years, mainly to improve upper limb function. However, before this technology gains widespread use, evaluation of the scientific evidence supporting VR-assisted rehabilitation is needed. The present review aimed to assess the rationale, design and methodology of research investigating the clinical impact of VR on ABI upper-limb rehabilitation. A total of 22 studies were surveyed using a Cochrane-style review. Studies were classified on a number of key criteria: theoretical bases and aims, sample populations and recruitment procedures, characteristics of the VR systems, evaluation design including control procedures and statistical analysis of results. Studies were rated using the Downs and Black (DB) scale. The review demonstrated that few studies used a conventional randomized controlled study design. Moderate support was shown for both teacher-animation and game-like systems. While VR-assisted rehabilitation shows early promise, clinicians are advised to be cautious about adopting these technologies before adequate data is available.

  6. A soil radiological quality guideline value for wildlife-based protection in uranium mine rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A soil guideline value for radiological protection of the environment was determined for the impending rehabilitation of Ranger uranium mine in the wet-dry tropics of northern Australia. The guideline value was 1000 Bq kg(-1) of (226)Ra in the proposed waste rock substrate of the rehabilitated landform and corresponded to an above-baseline dose rate of 100 μGy h(-1) to the most highly exposed individuals of the limiting organism. The limiting organism was reptile based on an assessment using site-specific concentration ratio data. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impedance Control of the Rehabilitation Robot Based on Sliding Mode Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawang; Zhou, Zude; Ai, Qingsong

    As an auxiliary treatment, the 6-DOF parallel robot plays an important role in lower limb rehabilitation. In order to improve the efficiency and flexibility of the lower limb rehabilitation training, this paper studies the impedance controller based on the position control. A nonsingular terminal sliding mode control is developed to ensure the trajectory tracking precision and in contrast to traditional PID control strategy in the inner position loop, the system will be more stable. The stability of the system is proved by Lyapunov function to guarantee the convergence of the control errors. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the target impedance model and show that the parallel robot can adjust gait trajectory online according to the human-machine interaction force to meet the gait request of patients, and changing the impedance parameters can meet the demands of different stages of rehabilitation training.

  8. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  9. Prison-based rehabilitation: Predictors of offender treatment participation and treatment completion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.; Kunst, M.; Dirkzwager, A.J.E.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine to what extent risk factors and treatment readiness were related to engagement (i.e., participation and completion) in prison-based rehabilitation programs. The sample consisted of the total 6-month inflow of male detainees in the Netherlands who were

  10. Foot worn inertial sensors for gait assessment and rehabilitation based on motorized shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aminian, K.; Mariani, B.; Paraschiv-Ionescu, A.; Hoskovec, C.; Bula, C.; Penders, J.; Tacconi, C.; Marcellini, F.

    2011-01-01

    Fall prevention in elderly subjects is often based on training and rehabilitation programs that include mostly traditional balance and strength exercises. By applying such conventional interventions to improve gait performance and decrease fall risk, some important factors are neglected such as the

  11. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Sheldon, Aaron; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Costantino, Giorgio; Furlan, Raffaello; Shen, Win-Kuang; Sheldon, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. Seven studies (the derivation sample) reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States). From these, 10 criteria

  12. Qualitative exploration of the benefits of group-based memory rehabilitation for people with neurological disabilities: implications for rehabilitation delivery and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliara, Niki; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2016-09-19

    To identify patient-perceived benefits of memory rehabilitation and draw transferrable lessons for the delivery and evaluation of similar interventions for people with neurological disabilities. A qualitative study was conducted as part of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial comparing 2 memory rehabilitation approaches with a self-help control group. Postintervention interviews were conducted with 20 participants with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis or stroke. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Participants receiving memory rehabilitation reported that the sessions responded to previously unmet needs for information on brain injury and memory function and developed their insight along with a sense of self-efficacy and control over the management of their memory problems. Although they did not experience major improvements in their memory function per se, they reported that rehabilitation gave them the skills to effectively cope with the residual deficits. Respondents in the control groups did not report similar benefits. The opportunities for interaction offered by the group setting were greatly valued by all respondents. Mixed aetiology groups were received positively; however, marked differences in cognitive performance were frustrating for some participants. The study highlighted important patient-perceived outcomes that should be considered by researchers and rehabilitation professionals when evaluating the effects of memory rehabilitation. The use of domain-specific outcome measures which reflect these areas is recommended. Qualitative changes in the use of memory aids may be achieved which cannot be captured by frequency indices alone. The benefits of the group-based rehabilitation approach were stressed by participants, suggesting that a combination of group and individual sessions might be a good practice. ISRCTN92582254; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  13. Toward an evidence-based patient-provider communication in rehabilitation: linking communication elements to better rehabilitation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Silva, Isabel Lopes

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing interest in linking aspects of patient-provider communication to rehabilitation outcomes. However, the field lacks a conceptual understanding on: (a) 'how' rehabilitation outcomes can be improved by communication; and (b) through 'which' elements in particular. This article elaborates on the conceptual developments toward informing further practice and research. Existing models of communication in healthcare were adapted to rehabilitation, and its outcomes through a comprehensive literature review. After depicting mediating mechanisms and variables (e.g. therapeutic engagement, adjustment toward disability), this article presents the '4 Rehab Communication Elements' deemed likely to underpin rehabilitation outcomes. The four elements are: (a) knowing the person and building a supportive relationship; (b) effective information exchange and education; (c) shared goal-setting and action planning; and (d) fostering a more positive, yet realistic, cognitive and self-reframing. This article describes an unprecedented, outcomes-oriented approach toward the design of rehabilitation communication, which has resulted in the development of a new intervention model: the '4 Rehab Communication Elements'. Further trials are needed to evaluate the impact of this whole intervention model on rehabilitation outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Submaximal fitness and mortality risk reduction in coronary heart disease: a retrospective cohort study of community-based exercise rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claire; Tsakirides, Costas; Moxon, James; Moxon, James William; Dudfield, Michael; Witte, Klaus K; Ingle, Lee; Carroll, Sean

    2016-06-30

    To examine the association between submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness (sCRF) and all-cause mortality in a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) cohort. Retrospective cohort study of participants entering CR between 26 May 1993 and 16 October 2006, followed up to 1 November 2013 (median 14 years, range 1.2-19.4 years). A community-based CR exercise programme in Leeds, West Yorkshire, UK. A cohort of 534 men (76%) and 136 women with a clinical diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD), aged 22-82 years, attending CR were evaluated for the association between baseline sCRF and all-cause mortality. 416 participants with an exercise test following CR (median 14 weeks) were examined for changes in sCRF and all-cause mortality. All-cause mortality and change in sCRF expressed in estimated metabolic equivalents (METs). Baseline sCRF was a strong predictor of all-cause mortality; compared to the lowest sCRF group (adults with CHD. Improving fitness through exercise-based CR is associated with significant risk reduction for the least fit. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Audiovisual Rehabilitation in Hemianopia: A Model-Based Theoretical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magosso, Elisa; Cuppini, Cristiano; Bertini, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Hemianopic patients exhibit visual detection improvement in the blind field when audiovisual stimuli are given in spatiotemporally coincidence. Beyond this “online” multisensory improvement, there is evidence of long-lasting, “offline” effects induced by audiovisual training: patients show improved visual detection and orientation after they were trained to detect and saccade toward visual targets given in spatiotemporal proximity with auditory stimuli. These effects are ascribed to the Superior Colliculus (SC), which is spared in these patients and plays a pivotal role in audiovisual integration and oculomotor behavior. Recently, we developed a neural network model of audiovisual cortico-collicular loops, including interconnected areas representing the retina, striate and extrastriate visual cortices, auditory cortex, and SC. The network simulated unilateral V1 lesion with possible spared tissue and reproduced “online” effects. Here, we extend the previous network to shed light on circuits, plastic mechanisms, and synaptic reorganization that can mediate the training effects and functionally implement visual rehabilitation. The network is enriched by the oculomotor SC-brainstem route, and Hebbian mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and is used to test different training paradigms (audiovisual/visual stimulation in eye-movements/fixed-eyes condition) on simulated patients. Results predict different training effects and associate them to synaptic changes in specific circuits. Thanks to the SC multisensory enhancement, the audiovisual training is able to effectively strengthen the retina-SC route, which in turn can foster reinforcement of the SC-brainstem route (this occurs only in eye-movements condition) and reinforcement of the SC-extrastriate route (this occurs in presence of survived V1 tissue, regardless of eye condition). The retina-SC-brainstem circuit may mediate compensatory effects: the model assumes that reinforcement of this circuit can

  16. Audiovisual Rehabilitation in Hemianopia: A Model-Based Theoretical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Magosso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemianopic patients exhibit visual detection improvement in the blind field when audiovisual stimuli are given in spatiotemporally coincidence. Beyond this “online” multisensory improvement, there is evidence of long-lasting, “offline” effects induced by audiovisual training: patients show improved visual detection and orientation after they were trained to detect and saccade toward visual targets given in spatiotemporal proximity with auditory stimuli. These effects are ascribed to the Superior Colliculus (SC, which is spared in these patients and plays a pivotal role in audiovisual integration and oculomotor behavior. Recently, we developed a neural network model of audiovisual cortico-collicular loops, including interconnected areas representing the retina, striate and extrastriate visual cortices, auditory cortex, and SC. The network simulated unilateral V1 lesion with possible spared tissue and reproduced “online” effects. Here, we extend the previous network to shed light on circuits, plastic mechanisms, and synaptic reorganization that can mediate the training effects and functionally implement visual rehabilitation. The network is enriched by the oculomotor SC-brainstem route, and Hebbian mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and is used to test different training paradigms (audiovisual/visual stimulation in eye-movements/fixed-eyes condition on simulated patients. Results predict different training effects and associate them to synaptic changes in specific circuits. Thanks to the SC multisensory enhancement, the audiovisual training is able to effectively strengthen the retina-SC route, which in turn can foster reinforcement of the SC-brainstem route (this occurs only in eye-movements condition and reinforcement of the SC-extrastriate route (this occurs in presence of survived V1 tissue, regardless of eye condition. The retina-SC-brainstem circuit may mediate compensatory effects: the model assumes that reinforcement of this

  17. Should Family and Friends Be Involved in Group-Based Rehabilitation Programs for Adults with Low Vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, G.; Saw, C.; Larizza, M.; Lamoureux, E.; Keeffe, J.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the views of clients with low vision and vision rehabilitation professionals on the involvement of family and friends in group-based rehabilitation programs. Both groups outlined advantages and disadvantages to involving significant others, and it is essential that clients are given the choice. Future work is…

  18. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life--A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birk