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Sample records for based biokinetic pbbk

  1. A physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) model for estragole bioactivation and detoxification in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study defines a physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) model for the alkenylbenzene estragole in rat based on in vitro metabolic parameters determined using relevant tissue fractions, in silico derived partition coefficients, and physiological parameters derived from the literature. The model consists of eight compartments including liver, lung and kidney as metabolizing compartments, and additional compartments for fat, arterial blood, venous blood, rapidly perfused tissue and slowly perfused tissue. Evaluation of the model was performed by comparing the PBBK predicted dose-dependent formation of the estragole metabolites 4-allylphenol and 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide to literature reported levels of these metabolites, which were demonstrated to be in the same order of magnitude. With the model obtained the relative extent of bioactivation and detoxification of estragole at different oral doses was examined. At low doses formation of 4-allylphenol, leading to detoxification, is observed to be the major metabolic pathway, occurring mainly in the lung and kidney due to formation of this metabolite with high affinity in these organs. Saturation of this metabolic pathway in the lung and kidney leads to a relative increase in formation of the proximate carcinogenic metabolite 1'-hydroxyestragole, occurring mainly in the liver. This relative increase in formation of 1'-hydroxyestragole leads to a relative increase in formation of 1'-hydroxyestragole glucuronide and 1'-sulfooxyestragole the latter being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole. These results indicate that the relative importance of different metabolic pathways of estragole may vary in a dose-dependent way, leading to a relative increase in bioactiviation of estragole at higher doses

  2. Physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) modeling and validation of dose-, species-, interindividual- and matrix dependent effects on the bioactivation and detoxification of safrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martati, E.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: safrole, PBBK model, DNA adduct, mace  Safrole has been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in rodent studies at high doses of the pure compound. The use of pure safrole in foodshas already been prohibited. As a result, the main exposu

  3. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 μM did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  4. A physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model for estragole DNA binding in rat liver based on in vitro kinetic data and estragole DNA adduct formation in primary hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estragole has been shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species at high-dose levels. Translation of these results into the likelihood of formation of DNA adducts, mutation, and ultimately cancer upon more realistic low-dose exposures remains a challenge. Recently we have developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for rat and human predicting bioactivation of estragole. These PBBK models, however, predict only kinetic characteristics. The present study describes the extension of the PBBK model to a so-called physiologically based biodynamic (PBBD) model predicting in vivo DNA adduct formation of estragole in rat liver. This PBBD model was developed using in vitro data on DNA adduct formation in rat primary hepatocytes exposed to 1'-hydroxyestragole. The model was extended by linking the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole formation predicted by the PBBK model to the area under the curve for 1'-hydroxyestragole in the in vitro experiments. The outcome of the PBBD model revealed a linear increase in DNA adduct formation with increasing estragole doses up to 100 mg/kg bw. Although DNA adduct formation of genotoxic carcinogens is generally seen as a biomarker of exposure rather than a biomarker of response, the PBBD model now developed is one step closer to the ultimate toxic effect of estragole than the PBBK model described previously. Comparison of the PBBD model outcome to available data showed that the model adequately predicts the dose-dependent level of DNA adduct formation. The PBBD model predicts DNA adduct formation at low levels of exposure up to a dose level showing to cause cancer in rodent bioassays, providing a proof of principle for modeling a toxicodynamic in vivo endpoint on the basis of solely in vitro experimental data.

  5. Biokinetics of radioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetics of radioactive compounds in the human organism represent the central notion in this work, consisting of a theoretical and an experimental part. The first chapter contains definitions and explanations on the importance of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in clinical therapy and pharmaceuticals research as well as for assessing radiation exposure and radiation hazards. Chapter 2 describes the bases of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in the medical and non-medical sector, and biokinetics. Chapter 3 deals with obtaining biokinetics data for radioactive compounds from investigations in animals and man, evaluation of measurements, transferring data obtained by animal experiments to man, and with the variability of biokinetics data. In Chapter 4 the results of comprehensive studies in literature on the biokinetics of radioactive compounds are summarized. They relate to three areas: professional and environmental incorporation of radioactive compounds, use of radioactive pharmaceuticals in therapy and research, and incorporation of radioactive compounds by embryo and fetus in consequence of the uptake of radioactive compounds by the mother. Chapter 5 gives an assessment of radiation hazards from radioactive compounds in connection with occupational radiation exposure and nuclear diagnostics in vivo, and a comparison with other risks. For that purpose the concept of effective dose equivalent is applied in connection with suitable risk coefficients to professional and nuclear-medical radiation exposure. Chapter 6 is dedicated to measurement of the biokinetics of radioactive compounds in man using conventional devices. The object of Chapter 7 is measurement of the biokinetics of radioactive pharmaceuticals in man by means of single photon emission computed tomography. (orig./MG)

  6. Physiology-based modelling in radiation research: The biokinetics of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the biokinetics of radioactive substances was calculated on the basis of mathematical criteria only. Biokinetic compartments in most cases did not correspond to anatomically defined distribution areas in an organism but were operational values. However, the quality of the resulting models depends on how accurately their assumptions reflect reality. Ideally, a biokinetic model develops which reproduces reality. In the past few years, this need has resulted increasingly in physiological operational sequences being modelled in realistic anatomical structures of the body along with physicochemical parameters. In this study, an estimate of the biokinetic operational sequence after an incorporation of plutonium is made similar to the pharmacokinetics of a substance showing comparable chemical and physiological behaviours in the body. These behaviours are found for metals, iron and aluminium. Thus, comparison of the biokinetics of plutonium with the pharmacokinetics of aluminium results in some commonalities and some differences. A new model with physiological compartments for plutonium is presented on the basis of the biokinetics of aluminium. (authors)

  7. The Biokinetic Spectrum for Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; David A Ratkowsky; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We identify and describe the distribution of temperature-dependent specific growth rates for life on Earth, which we term the biokinetic spectrum for temperature. The spectrum has the potential to provide for more robust modeling in thermal ecology since any conclusions derived from it will be based on observed data rather than using theoretical assumptions. It may also provide constraints for systems biology model predictions and provide insights in physiology. The spectrum has a Δ-shape wit...

  8. Lead Bioaccumulation Factor of Cockle Shell (Anadara granosa) Base on Biokinetic Study that Used Radiotracer 210Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead is kind of hazardous heavy metal to human health and the concentration in the coastal environment should be monitored continuously because lead could be accumulated by marine biota. One of the monitoring techniques is bio indicator. Anadara granosa is a marine biota which spread in almost all Indonesian coastal, life in the bottom and mud sandy environment in the depth of until 4 meter and relatively still. Base on the book of environmental equilibrium balance DKI Jakarta, Anadara granosa is a macrozobenthos in Jakarta bay which have second highest density after Donax or with density of 14 individual per meter square. Base on the environmental equilibrium balance from 26 locations, 22 locations can be found Anadara granosa so this mollusk could be used for bio indicator. The objective of research for bioaccumulation that use 210Pb as a tracer is to find bio indicator base on biokinetic process which include concentration factor, uptake and depuration processes and biology half life. The result shows that Anadara granosa could be use as a lead bio indicator in Jakarta bay. (author)

  9. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  10. Biokinetic model for 137 Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to provide a realistic biokinetic model for 137 Cs metabolism. This model was based on the retention of cesium in 57 people contaminated in the Goiania accident, ages 1 to 73 y old, complemented by data obtained in an experiment with beagle dogs, and data taken from the open literature. Cesium is distributed among all tissues and organs of the body. Its main retention site is the skeletal muscle tissue. Mathematically, cesium retention in the body may be described by a sum of three terms exponential equation. The first term represents the fraction which is rapidly eliminated in urine. This fraction is weight dependent (negative correlation). The second term represents the retention of cesium in tissues and organs of the body. For children and adolescents, the second term biological half-life is a function of the weight. For adults, it is correlated with sex. Men present a higher retention of cesium than women. The third term correspond to a retention fraction of the order of 0,1% of the initial body burden. It is characterized by a very long half-life and represents a subcellular retention of cesium in the skeletal muscle tissue. During pregnancy the transfer factor from the mother to the fetus is correlated to the amount of cesium in the blood and it is equal to 1, if the intake of cesium occurs pregnancy. (author)

  11. Dosimetric and biokinetic model for transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranic elements are members of the actinide series beyond uranium, all are artificially produced in nuclear reactors and several include alpha-emitting radioisotopes with very long half-lives. Among them neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium are the most abundant and the most important from the health physics view point. The International Commission on Radiological Protection developed a comprehensive dosimetric system with biokinetic models and parameters for the internal exposure to workers in its Publication 30. Since then the ICRP published a new recommendation in 1990 and published several reports related to the internal dosimetry as Publication 66 in 1994, Publication 67 and Publication 68 in 1995, Publication 69 and Publication 71 in 1996. The new dosimetric and biokinetic model for transuranic elements described in Publication 67 is a recycling compartment model composed of 19 compartments and 28 transfer rates, which are a product of many efforts devoted to the improvement of internal dosimetry. The new model is related to the human physiology and is based on the information obtained from studies on human tissue samples and animal experiments. Dose coefficients derived from these models should be used in the dose calculation for the radiation protection for members of the public. (author)

  12. Towards a consensus-based biokinetic model for green microalgae – The ASM-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Valverde Pérez, Borja; Sæbø, Mariann;

    2016-01-01

    the systematic approach of the activated sludge modelling (ASM) framework. The process model – identified based on a literature review and using new experimental data – accounts for factors influencing photoautotrophic and heterotrophic microalgal growth, nutrient uptake and storage (i.e. Droop model) and decay...... and substrate availability can introduce significant variability on parameter values for predicting the reaction rates for bulk nitrate and the intracellularly stored nitrogen state-variables, thereby requiring scenario specific model calibration. ASM-A was identified using standard cultivation medium...... and it can provide a platform for extensions accounting for factors influencing algal growth and nutrient storage using wastewater resources....

  13. Comparison between biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the paucity of human data after inhalation of different chemical forms of radionuclides, the implications for human exposure are often based on animal studies. Biokinetic studies of plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in human volunteers and rats are described. The results, together with information from other studies with radionuclides, suggests that animal studies can be used with advantage for assessing the biokinetic behavior in humans, and for providing guidance on the assessment of intake and optimal monitoring regimens. (author)

  14. The STATFLUX code: a statistical method for calculation of flow and set of parameters, based on the Multiple-Compartment Biokinetical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Helene, O.; Vanin, V.; Milian, F.; Deppman, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Rodriguez, O.

    2007-03-01

    The code STATFLUX, implementing a new and simple statistical procedure for the calculation of transfer coefficients in radionuclide transport to animals and plants, is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. Flow parameters were estimated by employing two different least-squares procedures: Derivative and Gauss-Marquardt methods, with the available experimental data of radionuclide concentrations as the input functions of time. The solution of the inverse problem, which relates a given set of flow parameter with the time evolution of concentration functions, is achieved via a Monte Carlo simulation procedure. Program summaryTitle of program:STATFLUX Catalogue identifier:ADYS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYS_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Micro-computer with Intel Pentium III, 3.0 GHz Installation:Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, Department of Experimental Physics, University of São Paulo, Brazil Operating system:Windows 2000 and Windows XP Programming language used:Fortran-77 as implemented in Microsoft Fortran 4.0. NOTE: Microsoft Fortran includes non-standard features which are used in this program. Standard Fortran compilers such as, g77, f77, ifort and NAG95, are not able to compile the code and therefore it has not been possible for the CPC Program Library to test the program. Memory required to execute with typical data:8 Mbytes of RAM memory and 100 MB of Hard disk memory No. of bits in a word:16 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:6912 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:229 541 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:The investigation of transport mechanisms for

  15. Experimental study on biokinetics of radionuclides in age groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, it becomes evident that dose coefficients for members of the public are necessary. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a task group of Committee 2 charged with the assessment of dose coefficients as a function of an individual's age. However, little data is available on the biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile and is a need to develop age-dependent biokinetic models, such as for the gastrointestinal tract. The present paper reviewed an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 106Ru, 110mAg, 115Cd, 125Sb, 137Cs, 141Ce, 203Hg and 3H. Generally, intestinal absorption and whole-body retention of radionuclides in Juveniles were higher than that of adult. In the case of sucklings, it is very important to study how radionuclides are transferred through the placenta and milk. The transfer rate of radionuclides through the placenta and milk is dependent on the period of gestation at the time of dosing. The IDES (Internal Dose Estimation System) which is based on the ICRP model was used for dose calculation. We modified the IDES using the biokinetic data which was gained by animal experiment. The IDES is flexible because the absorbed dose can be calculated by substituting arbitrary physical and physiological parameters and also substituting ingested dose coefficients not only for the ICRP Reference Man, but also for Japanese of 1 year old, 5 years old, 10 years old, 15 years old and the adult, respectively. (author)

  16. Biokinetics and dose assessment of radionuclides in juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, it becomes evident that dose coefficients for members of the public are necessary. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) established a task group of Committee 2 charged with the assessment of dose coefficients as a function of an individual's age. However, little data is available on the biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile and there is a need to develop age-dependent biokinetic models, such as for the gastrointestinal tract. The present paper reviewed an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 106Ru, 110mAg, 115mCd, 125Sb, 137Cs, 141Ce, 203Hg and 3H. Generally, intestinal absorption and whole-body retention of radionuclides in juveniles were higher than that of adult. In the case of sucklings, it is very important to study how radionuclides are transferred through the placenta and milk. The transfer rate of radionuclides through the placenta and milk is dependent on the period of gestation at the time of dosing. The IDES(Internal Dose Estimation System) which is based on the ICRP model was used for dose calculation. We modified the IDES using the biokinetic data which was gained animal experiment. The IDES is flexible because the absorbed dose can be calculated by substituting arbitrary physical and physiological parameters and also substituting ingested dose coefficients not only for the ICRP Reference Man, but also for Japanese of 1 year old, 5 years old, 10 years old, 15 years old and the adult, respectively. (author)

  17. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, R; Giussani, A

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews biokinetic data for technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans. The development of parameter values focuses on data for pertechnetate TcO(-)(4) the most commonly encountered form of technetium and the form expected to be present in body fluids. The model is intended as a default model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium, i.e. applicable in the absence of form- or site-specific information. Tissues depicted explicitly in the model include thyroid, salivary glands, stomach wall, right colon wall, liver, kidneys, and bone. Compared with the ICRP's current biokinetic model for occupational or environmental intake of technetium (ICRP 1993, 1994), the proposed model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the systemic behaviour of technetium and is based on a broader set of experimental and medical data. For acute input of (99m)Tc (T(1/2) = 6.02 h) to blood, the ratios of cumulative (time-integrated) activity predicted by the current ICRP model to that predicted by the proposed model range from 0.4-7 for systemic regions addressed explicitly in both models. For acute input of (99)Tc (T(1/2) = 2.1 × 10(5) year) to blood, the corresponding ratios range from 0.2-30. PMID:25859762

  18. 4.3 Collection of Biokinetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the section '4.3 Collection of Biokinetic Data' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'

  19. The Determination of Bio-kinetic Coefficients of Crude Oil Biodegradation Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Talaie Khozani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Oil pollution can be generated as a result of spillage, leakage, discharge, exploration, production, refining, transport and storage of crude oil and fuels in the environment. Consequently, many researchers have developed and studied the chemical, physical and biological methods to degrade crude oil. Among them, the biological treatments are the most interesting as they are simple and economical methods. The aim of this study was to determine biokinetic coefficients of crude oil degradation by pseudomonas aerogenusa. This microorganism was isolated in our previous work."nMaterials and Methods: In this study the bio-kinetic coefficients of crude oil biodegradation were evaluated. Pseudomonas aerogenusa bacteria which had been isolated from the soil sample taken from a gas station in our previous work were used in this study. This microorganism was cultured in the liquid medium containing crude oil as sole carbon source. Finally with determining the amount of microorganisms and crude oil concentration during biodegradation process, the bio-kinetic coefficients based on modified Monod equation were calculated."nResults: bio-kinetic coefficients obtained from laboratory studies are vital factors in industrial applications. As a result, the bio-kinetic study was performed to find bio-kinetic coefficients for biodegradation of crude oil using the isolated bacteria. The results showed that ,Y, k and were equal 0.107 , 0.882 , 9.39 and 169.3 respectively."nCoculusion:Our results showed that pseudomonas aerogenusa is usable for treatment of oily wastewaters in the full scale facility. Results of this study indicated bio kinetics confections.

  20. A biokinetics of radionuclides in juvenile animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of dose coefficient in the general population, especially infants, poses a problem in that physical function and biokinetics in infants are different from those in adults. This paper gives an outline on characteristics of biokinetics of radionuclides in jevenile animals, focusing on the previous experimental data. The following radionuclides are discussed: cesium, strontium, cobalt, manganese, lead, ruthenium, cerium, silver and antimony. The retention rate of any kind of radionuclide in the body after the oral administration has been shown to be age-dependent in rats. Dose coefficient in adults has been shown to be unsuitable for that in infants, even if limited to the rate of digestive absorption. Although fetuses are also included in the general population, there is a paucity of such information. Actually, exposure assessment remains, as yet, an issue unsettled. (N.K.)

  1. Development, implementation and quality assurance of biokinetic models within CONRAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Task Group 5.2 'Research Studies on Biokinetic Models' of the CONRAD project is presented. New biokinetic models have been implemented by several European institutions. Quality assurance procedures included intercomparison of the results as well as quality assurance of model formulation. Additionally, the use of the models was examined leading to proposals of tuning parameters. Stable isotope studies were evaluated with respect to their implications to the new models, and new biokinetic models were proposed on the basis of their results. Furthermore, the development of a biokinetic model describing the effects of decorporation of actinides by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid treatment was initiated. (authors)

  2. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: US Government III. Plutonium as a case study of uncertainties in the systemic biokinetics of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a case study of the validity of different data sources and modelling approaches commonly used to build biokinetic models for radionuclides. The paper examines the basis and apparent predictive accuracy of each of the biokinetic models for Pu used over the years by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), in view of recent improvements in the database. The results of this study and similar retrospective studies for other elements suggest the following five points. (1) Extrapolation of biokinetic data from laboratory animals to man is particularly uncertain for the liver due to qualitative differences among species in the handling of many elements by this organ. (2) As a 'default' approach to biokinetic modelling or model assessment, biokinetic data for unhealthy human subjects should be given higher weight than information extrapolated across animal species or chemical families, but there are counter examples. (3) Little confidence can be placed in biokinetic model predictions for long times after exposure based solely on curve fits to short-term biokinetic data. (4) Bioassay and dosimetry models for a radionuclide should not be developed separately. (5) Where feasible, the systemic biokinetic model for a radionuclide should be developed within a physiologically realistic model structure, because this allows biokinetic data from experimental studies to be supplemented with physiological information, provides a basis for extrapolation of data across animal species or chemical families, results in models that can be used for both bioassay interpretation and dosimetry, and provides a logical basis for extrapolation of data to subgroups of the population (e.g., various ages) or to times outside the period of observation. (author)

  3. Biokinetics and dosimetry of radioactively labelled organic C-14 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report starts with summarising research work and the resulting scientific information in connection with the dosimetry of C-14 labelled organic compounds. Biokinetic models are developed for compounds such as benzene, phenol, aniline, nitrobenzene, and a selection of pharmaceuticals, in order to show the radioactivity distribution after administration of the C-14 labelled substances. Based on the those models, dose coefficients and excretion rates are derived. The following synoptic view of the available data library leads on to a discussion of various aspects, as eg. the question of whether and how monitoring for detection of incorporation of C-14 administered with labelled organic compounds is possible. None of the questions and aspects arising in connection with this subject can be adequately dealt with in the present document, but concepts and methods are presented which permit an interpretation of radioactivity excretion data measured after incorporation of C-14 labelled organic substances. (orig./CB)

  4. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass. PMID:26613352

  5. Improvements in the biokinetic model for strontium with allowance for age and gender differences in bone mineral metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N.B.; Tolstykh, E.I.; Degteva, M.O

    2003-07-01

    An age- and gender-dependent biokinetic model for strontium was developed based on the study of a population living along the Techa River exposed to effluents from the Mayak Production Association. To estimate parameters of a new model (Techa biokinetic model, TBM) many data sets have been assembled: our whole-body counter data on long-term retention of {sup 90}Sr in humans, data from studies during the period of global fallout, data resulting from deliberate injections of strontium radionuclides, and non-radiological data regarding bone formation and resorption, mineral content of the body, etc. The model was developed using the basic structure of the ICRP biokinetic model for strontium, but new age- and gender-specific parameters were derived. This paper discusses the approaches applied to develop the new model. (author)

  6. Improvements in the biokinetic model for strontium with allowance for age and gender differences in bone mineral metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An age- and gender-dependent biokinetic model for strontium was developed based on the study of a population living along the Techa River exposed to effluents from the Mayak Production Association. To estimate parameters of a new model (Techa biokinetic model, TBM) many data sets have been assembled: our whole-body counter data on long-term retention of 90Sr in humans, data from studies during the period of global fallout, data resulting from deliberate injections of strontium radionuclides, and non-radiological data regarding bone formation and resorption, mineral content of the body, etc. The model was developed using the basic structure of the ICRP biokinetic model for strontium, but new age- and gender-specific parameters were derived. This paper discusses the approaches applied to develop the new model. (author)

  7. Biokinetic study of free 177Lu in NIH mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 177Lu has been identified, by the scientific community, as a radionuclide with interesting advantages compared with 90Y and other beta emitters used in nuclear medicine. This paper analyses the free 177Lu biokinetic behavior in NIH male mice from activity measurements performed by the Radiopharmacy Division of CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica) in the frame of an IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) Coordinated Research Project. The study of experimental data is a previous condition that allows drawing the activity-time curves for organs and to know the biodistribution of 177Lu. The cumulated activity in organs of interest in NIH male mice are calculated and critical organs are identified. The organs selected for analysis in this paper are the liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, intestine, lungs, skeleton and red marrow. The last one is estimated from the activity measured in blood based on a recognized method published by Sgouros (2000). The results has been extrapolated to human assuming the same biokinetic behaviour as mice being the applicability of the different extrapolation methods also discussed. The direct extrapolation from mice data was the method of election from a radiological protection point of view. The measurement procedures, the data processing, the extrapolation techniques and the analysis performed in this study will contribute as a basis for future research of this group in the area of antibodies and other radiopharmaceutical labeled with 177Lu. The cumulated activity calculated in each organ is relevant because it makes possible to perform the dose assessment through the application of appropriate dose coefficients. It is a necessary step in order to evaluate the toxicity risk that is required in a pre-clinical study. (author)

  8. Biokinetics of radionuclides and treatment of accidental intakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the objectives and reviews the progress of EULEP Working Party 5, convened under the auspices of the European Union's Fifth Framework Programme, to 'cluster' two EU-supported contracts, Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Internal Contamination (BIODOS (EU Contract FIS5-1999-00214)) and Radionuclide Biokinetics Database (EULEP) ( RBDATA-EULEP (Concerted Action Contract FIS5-1999-00218), and two non-EU funded projects, Biokinetics of Radionuclides in Human Volunteers (RNHV (non-EU Funded Project) and Treatment of Accidental Intakes of Radionuclides (TAIR (part-funded by EULEP)). (author)

  9. Biokinetic models for radionuclides in experimental animals; Modelos biocineticos de radionucleidos en animales de experimentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M. A. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The biokinetic models for many radionuclides are, to a large extent, based on data obtained in experimental animals. The methods used in the experimental development of a biokinetic model can be classified in two groups (i) those applied during the experimental work, which include the activity determination of a given radionuclide at different times and in different biological media such as blood, serum, organs/tissues, urine, bile and faeces and (ii) those methods used for the analysis and study of the experimental data, based in mathematical tools. Some of these methods are reviewed,with special emphasis in the whole body macro autoradiography. To conclude, the contribution that this type of studies can have in two fields of radiation protection is discussed, namely optimization of dosimetric evaluations and decorporation of radionuclides. (Author)

  10. Biokinetics and dosimetry of inhaled tritiated aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A. [Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Y.S. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Inhalation of tritiated pump oils and metal tritides is a potential radiological protection problem in some situations in tritium facilities. At present, the biokinetic data and validated dose models do not generally exist for chemical forms of tritium other than tritiated water and tritium gas. This situation calls for improving our radiobiological and dosimetric understanding for inhalation of tritiated aerosols. When tritiated pump oils or metal tritides were instilled into the lung, tritium was biotransformed to organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) in the body. The biokinetics of tritium-in-urine exhibited a sum of two exponential functions for OBT and HTO: short and long-term clearance components. For tritiated pump oils, 68% of the instilled activity was excreted in feces and less than 10% in urine. More than 90% of the applied activity was retained in the lung up to 5 d post-exposure, this declined to 40% and 5% of the instilled activity 7 d and 28 d post-exposure, respectively. No major long-term storage of OBT was observed in the body. For metal tritides (i.e., titanium tritide), 37% of instilled activity was eliminated via urine, 29% via feces, and 16% through exhaled air. The results on distribution and dynamics of tritium in the body were remarkably similar with our earlier studies on percutaneous absorption of tritiated pump oils or skin-contact exposure to tritium-gas-contaminated metal surfaces. Urinary excretion bioassay data from workers exposed to metal tritides or pump oils were analyzed using the MS-Windows 95 PC version of GENMOD{sup TM} internal dosimetry code. (GENMOD implements the ICRP Publication 66 respiratory tract model and compartment models rather than retention functions of tritium compounds as describes by ICRP Publication 67). The simulated tritium urinary excretion data for exposed workers indicated that Type S solubility classification is more appropriate that Type M default as prescribed ICRP Publication 66

  11. Matrix modulation of the toxicity of alkenylbenzenes, studied by an integrated approach using in vitro, in vivo, and physiologically based biokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkenylbenzenes such as estragole and methyleugenol are common components of spices and herbs such as tarragon, basil, fennel, mace, allspice, star anise and anise and their essential oils (Smithet al., 2002). There is an interest in the safety evaluation of alkenylbenzenes because these compounds can induce hepatic tumours in rodents when dosed orally at high dose levels (Milleret al., 1983; NTP, 2000). Based on the rodent studies with estragole, methyleugenoland structurally related alkenyl...

  12. Distribution, biokinetics and dosimetry of tritiated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the biodistribution and biokinetics of tritium-in-macromolecules of male hairless rats for a period of up to 42 d post-exposure after skin contact exposure to tritiated pump oil or tritiated formaldehyde. Most of the retained organically bound tritium (OBT) was found in the cellular lipid (76%) and protein (22%), when the source of tritium intake was pump oil. For tritiated formaldehyde, 36 % of the OBT was in lipid and 49 % in the protein of tissues. The biological half-lives for tritium-in-lipid were about 3 d for the fast component and 12 d for the slower component. The tritium-in-protein has half-lives of about 0.5 d and 7 d. Tritium in DNA and RNA was cleared with half-lives of about 0.5 d and 20 d. The time-integrated tritium activity in macromolecules showed that the percent contribution to the total OBT dose was exposure- and organ-specific. Most of the OBT dose was due to lipid (42-74% for tritiated pump oil) and acid-insoluble protein (52-69% for tritiated formaldehyde). Only 2-8% of time-integrated OBT activity was found in the nuclei acids. These in vivo biokinetics results of OBT have indicated that a majority of tritium in organic macromolecules of the tissue is incorporated and retained in lipid and protein. The low levels of tritium bound to genetic materials, taken up by the cells in organs, are unlikely to contribute significantly to the effective dose. (authors)

  13. Comparative biokinetics of radiogallium and radioindium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of radiogallium and radioindium in normal mice are compared using the compartmental modelling analysis. The rate constants obtained provide useful information in understanding the physiological and biochemical kinetics of radionuclides in the intact object. A comparison of the compartmental models for gallium and indium reveals the similarities and differences between the biokinetics of the two radionuclides. Furthermore, the results provide valuable information and guidance for human studies and clinical use

  14. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of biokinetic models for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models for kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in humans were developed and are used to estimate the radiation absorbed dose for patients in nuclear medicine by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. However, due to the fact that the residence times used were derived from different subjects, partially even with different ethnic backgrounds, a large variation in the model parameters propagates to a high uncertainty of the dose estimation. In this work, a method was developed for analysing the uncertainty and sensitivity of biokinetic models that are used to calculate the residence times. The biokinetic model of 18F-FDG (FDG) developed by the MIRD Committee was analysed by this developed method. The sources of uncertainty of all model parameters were evaluated based on the experiments. The Latin hypercube sampling technique was used to sample the parameters for model input. Kinetic modelling of FDG in humans was performed. Sensitivity of model parameters was indicated by combining the model input and output, using regression and partial correlation analysis. The transfer rate parameter of plasma to other tissue fast is the parameter with the greatest influence on the residence time of plasma. Optimisation of biokinetic data acquisition in the clinical practice by exploitation of the sensitivity of model parameters obtained in this study is discussed. (authors)

  15. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  16. Calculations of radionuclide organ retentions from ICRP biokinetic recycling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has revised biokinetic models for dose calculations from intakes of radionuclides. For workers and reference persons of the public, these models include recycling exchanges of the activity between the mixed blood and soft tissue pool and the other organs. Current work is aimed at providing a calculation tool to solve such recycling systems based on matrix algebra. The software, named CYCLOMOD, is written in Visual Basic language using Excel5. Database files provide radionuclide compartment transfer parameters corresponding to adults and children. CYCLOMOD processes any combination of acute and/or chronic intake by inhalation, ingestion and injection, for a chosen monitoring period of time following intake. Output files provide radionuclide remaining quantities, disintegrated amounts and number of disintegrations in each compartment as a function of time after intake. For each compartment, tissue and organ data are also presented graphically and thus could be related to in vivo organ measurements. The daily faecal and urinary excretions can also be calculated by subtraction. (author)

  17. Assessment of internal dose from radionuclides - dosimetric and biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the assessment of annual limits on intakes of radionuclides by workers, and of dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by members of the public and patients, the ICRP has developed biokinetic models for the uptake of radionuclides by the gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract as well as for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides and their elimination from the body. The dosimetric and biokinetic models and data used for the assessments are described in detail. Present results and future activities of the ICRP on secondary limits for internal exposure are briefly mentioned. (orig./HP)

  18. Practical identifiability of biokinetic parameters of a model describing two-step nitrification in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, D; Rosenwinkel, K-H; Morgenroth, E

    2008-10-15

    Parameter estimation and model calibration are key problems in the application of biofilm models in engineering practice, where a large number of model parameters need to be determined usually based on experimental data with only limited information content. In this article, identifiability of biokinetic parameters of a biofilm model describing two-step nitrification was evaluated based solely on bulk phase measurements of ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate. In addition to evaluating the impact of experimental conditions and available measurements, the influence of mass transport limitation within the biofilm and the initial parameter values on identifiability of biokinetic parameters was evaluated. Selection of parameters for identifiability analysis was based on global mean sensitivities while parameter identifiability was analyzed using local sensitivity functions. At most, four of the six most sensitive biokinetic parameters were identifiable from results of batch experiments at bulk phase dissolved oxygen concentrations of 0.8 or 5 mg O(2)/L. High linear dependences between the parameters of the subsets (KO2,AOB,muAOB) and (KO2,NOB,muNOB) resulted in reduced identifiability. Mass transport limitation within the biofilm did not influence the number of identifiable parameters but, in fact, decreased collinearity between parameters, especially for parameters that are otherwise correlated (e.g., muAOB) and KO2,AOB, or muNOB and KO2,NOB). The choice of the initial parameter values had a significant impact on the identifiability of two parameter subsets, both including the parameters muAOB and KO2,AOB. Parameter subsets that did not include the subsets muAOB and KO2,AOB or muNOB and KO2,NOB were clearly identifiable independently of the choice of the initial parameter values. PMID:18512262

  19. Strontium biokinetic model for mouse-like rodent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model describing the biokinetics of strontium for murine rodent is suggested. The model represents modification of the ICRP model for reference human with reduced number of compartments: Blood, Gastrointestinal tract, Soft tissues, Skeleton, Urinary bladder. To estimate transfer rates of the model the published experimental data on strontium retention in body of laboratory and wild mice were analyzed. A set of eleven transfer rates suggested for the strontium biokinetic model for murine rodent satisfactorily describes both the laboratory experiments (relative standard error of 9.5%) and data on radiostrontium content available for wild animals. Application of the model allows estimation of strontium distribution by organs and tissues both in the cases of acute and chronic exposure with assessment of strontium activity in organs with time since beginning of exposure. The developed strontium biokinetic model will be used for internal dose assessment for murine rodents inhabiting East-Ural Radioactive Trace, where 90Sr intake is a significant source of contemporary internal exposure. -- Highlights: ► We examined 20 published experiments on 90Sr retention in rodents. ► Strontium biokinetic model for mouse-like rodent is suggested. ► Model satisfactory describes retention both in laboratory and wild animals

  20. The biokinetics of thorium nitrate after deposition in the rat lung: implications for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetic studies in rats have indicated that: 1) thorium nitrate behaves more like a Class Y compound than a Class W compound as defined by ICRP; 2) any increased excretion of thorium in the presence of excessive amounts of Class D uranium compounds does little to arrest the substantial reduction in the ALI from that based on uranium alone; 3) the behaviour of thorium is sufficiently different from that of its gamma-ray emitting daughter radionuclides as to cast doubt on the reliability of external monitoring techniques for assessing intake; and 4) the chelating agent DTPA will be of little value for treating workers overexposed to thorium. (Author)

  1. 99mTc-UBI Biokinetics: A Specific Peptide for Infection Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as new agents to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes. Based on these considerations, Ubiquicidin peptide 29-41 (UBI) has been labeled with 99mTc using a new direct method showing a radiochemical purity > 97 %, high stability in human serum, and low protein binding. In addition 99mTc-UBI showed a specific in vitro and in vivo binding to bacteria. However its biokinetic parameters have not been evaluated since it is one of the new generation radiopharmaceuticals based on peptide structures. Therefore the aim of this project was to establish the biokinetic model for 99mTc-UBI. An activity from 74 to 148 MBq was injected to patients with bone infection and 5 whole body scans were taken at 1, 30, 120, 240 min and 24 h after radiopharmaceutical administration, with a dual head scanner. Urine was collected for 24 h. An antropomorphic phantom was previously used to calculate the effect of attenuation and scattered radiation on the gamma camera acquisition images. ROIs of the selected organs in patients (kidney, liver, heart, bone, soft tissue and lesion) were drawn, and attenuation and scatter corrected. The % urine elimination at 24 h and time integrated ROIs (cpm/pixel/ROIs) were used to obtain the residence time (τ) in each tissue and to establish the biokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic data show that blood clearance is biexponential with a mean residence time in the central compartment of 0.52 h. The images showed non-accumulation in metabolic organs. More than 75 % of the injected activity was eliminated by renal clearance 4 h after 99mTc-UBI administration. The mean radiation dose calculated according to the MIRD formalism was 0.130 mGy/MBq for kidney and the effective dose was 4.29 x 10-3 mSv/MBq

  2. 99mTc-UBI Biokinetics: A Specific Peptide for Infection Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; Meléndez-Alafort, L.; Herrera-Rodríguez, R.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Mitsoura, E.; Martínez-Duncker, C.

    2003-09-01

    Recently, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as new agents to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes. Based on these considerations, Ubiquicidin peptide 29-41 (UBI) has been labeled with 99mTc using a new direct method showing a radiochemical purity > 97 %, high stability in human serum, and low protein binding. In addition 99mTc-UBI showed a specific in vitro and in vivo binding to bacteria. However its biokinetic parameters have not been evaluated since it is one of the new generation radiopharmaceuticals based on peptide structures. Therefore the aim of this project was to establish the biokinetic model for 99mTc-UBI. An activity from 74 to 148 MBq was injected to patients with bone infection and 5 whole body scans were taken at 1, 30, 120, 240 min and 24 h after radiopharmaceutical administration, with a dual head scanner. Urine was collected for 24 h. An antropomorphic phantom was previously used to calculate the effect of attenuation and scattered radiation on the gamma camera acquisition images. ROIs of the selected organs in patients (kidney, liver, heart, bone, soft tissue and lesion) were drawn, and attenuation and scatter corrected. The % urine elimination at 24 h and time integrated ROIs (cpm/pixel/ROIs) were used to obtain the residence time (τ) in each tissue and to establish the biokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic data show that blood clearance is biexponential with a mean residence time in the central compartment of 0.52 h. The images showed non-accumulation in metabolic organs. More than 75 % of the injected activity was eliminated by renal clearance 4 h after 99mTc-UBI administration. The mean radiation dose calculated according to the MIRD formalism was 0.130 mGy/MBq for kidney and the effective dose was 4.29 × 10-3 mSv/MBq.

  3. Validation of biokinetic models for strontium. Analysis of the Techa River and Chernobyl data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP models used in radiation protection to estimate doses resulting from internal irradiation are based on biokinetic models for different radionuclides. Strontium-90 was one of the main sources of environmental contamination due to accidents in the ''Mayak'' plutonium production complex (Southern Urals, 1949-1956) and the Chernobyl accident (1986). Over 800 measurements of bone-autopsy, and 31,000 Whole body Counter 90Sr measurements for Techa River population were made at URCRM (Chelyabinsk). Measurements of 90Sr contents in skeleton were performed for residents of the area contaminated due to Chernobyl accident (RPI, Kiev). These unique data allowed to validate the predictions of 90Sr biokinetic models at different times after ingestion, and in the case of complicated rate of intake. Model validation can be considered as best approach for quantifying the reliability of the model's predictions. Available data on 90Sr content in human skeleton were analyzed. 90Sr measurements cover the long period after start of intake: from 2 to 45 years after contamination (Techa River data). Model predictions for all age groups were compared with Techa River and Chernobyl data. For adult persons calculated and measured values of 90Sr body content were found to be very close, especially over the first 15 years after the major intake. After the majority of measured people had attained the age of 45 years and changes of calcium metabolism resulted in a significant increase of strontium elimination rate. The particularities of bone mineral turnover in old persons are not considered in the framework of the ICRP model. The latter feature resulted in a divergence between the model curve and the results of 90Sr measurements for old persons. For children and adolescents the differences between calculated values and measured 90Sr body contents are more significant. The comparison of different strontium biokinetic models is discussed in the paper. (author)

  4. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to interact with circulatory and cellular proteins differentially leading to the altered parameters of their biokinetics, including adsorption, distribution, translocation, transformation, and elimination. A direct relationship between the surface area, reactive oxygen species generating capability, and proinflammatory effects of NPs have been found in respiratory tract toxicity. Additionally, complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanodrugs have been well defined. Inhalation studies of some NPs have confirmed the translocation of inhaled materials to extra pulmonary organs such as central nervous system (CNS via olfactory neurons and induction of inflammatory response. Injectable uncoated NPs have a tendency to remain on the injection site while the poly ethanol glycol (PEG-coated NPs can be notably drained from the injection site to get as far as the lymph nodes where they accumulate. This confirms the existence of channels within the extracellular matrix for NPs to move along. Furthermore, induction of DNA strand breaks and formation of micronuclei have been recorded for exposure to some NPs such as single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the recent years, most of the studies have simply outlined better efficacy of nanodrugs, but few discussed their possible toxic reactions specially if used chronically. Therefore, we emphasize that this part of the nanoscience must not be undermined and toxicologists must be sensitive to

  5. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Mohammadi, Hamidreza; Ramazani, Ali; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to interact with circulatory and cellular proteins differentially leading to the altered parameters of their biokinetics, including adsorption, distribution, translocation, transformation, and elimination. A direct relationship between the surface area, reactive oxygen species generating capability, and proinflammatory effects of NPs have been found in respiratory tract toxicity. Additionally, complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanodrugs have been well defined. Inhalation studies of some NPs have confirmed the translocation of inhaled materials to extra pulmonary organs such as central nervous system (CNS) via olfactory neurons and induction of inflammatory response. Injectable uncoated NPs have a tendency to remain on the injection site while the poly ethanol glycol (PEG)-coated NPs can be notably drained from the injection site to get as far as the lymph nodes where they accumulate. This confirms the existence of channels within the extracellular matrix for NPs to move along. Furthermore, induction of DNA strand breaks and formation of micronuclei have been recorded for exposure to some NPs such as single-walled carbon nanotubes.In the recent years, most of the studies have simply outlined better efficacy of nanodrugs, but few discussed their possible toxic reactions specially if used chronically. Therefore, we emphasize that this part of the nanoscience must not be undermined and toxicologists must be sensitive to set up suitable in vivo or in

  6. Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Meck, Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2008-10-01

    studied radionuclides. (4) The biokinetics of a radionuclide in the human body typically represents the greatest source of uncertainty or variability in dose per unit intake. (5) Characterization of uncertainty in dose per unit exposure is generally a more straightforward problem for external exposure than for intake of a radionuclide. (6) For many radionuclides the most important outcome of a large-scale critical evaluation of databases and biokinetic models for radionuclides is expected to be the improvement of current models. Many of the current models do not fully or accurately reflect available radiobiological or physiological information, either because the models are outdated or because they were based on selective or uncritical use of data or inadequate model structures. In such cases the models should be replaced with physiologically realistic models that incorporate a wider spectrum of information.

  7. Simplified excretion functions for recent recycling biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent trends in biokinetic model development have seen the replacement of a simple, schematic one-way transfer of materials between compartments with more realistic and complex linkages, including 'recycling'. In its Publications 67 and 69, ICRP proposes the use of such models for Am, Np, Pu, Ba, Ra, Sr, Pb, Fe, Th, U and 1. These models have been developed primarily with a view- to providing time-dependent organ retention data which may be used as the basis for calculations of effective dose. However, these new models may also be of value in predicting faecal and urinary excretion rates, particularly if models are adapted for non-standard subjects such as children. In this paper simplified functions for organ retention and instantaneous excretion rates are obtained from the above models, and the latter are compared with excretion functions given in ICRP Publication 54. The potential for using future biokinetic models to predict urinary and faecal excretion rates is discussed. (author)

  8. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitations for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr–AGe model). The Sr–AGe model has a similar structure to the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly re-evaluated: gastrointestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr–AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr–AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general populations exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes. (paper)

  9. A recycling systemic model for the biokinetics of molybdenum radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the available data on molybdenum biokinetics and metabolism in humans is presented, with special emphasis on the results of stable tracer studies conducted in recent years, after the publication of the systemic model for incorporated radionuclides of molybdenum recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). On the basis of the presented information, a new structure for a compartmental model of molybdenum biokinetics, including the return of material from the organs back to the systemic circulation, was developed. The structure chosen is a compromise between the attempt to provide a realistic description of the biokinetics and the need to have a simple tool for dose estimation. The model consists of two compartments associated to the extracellulare fluids (blood plasma and interstitial fluids), liver, kidneys, and one generic compartment to represent all other tissues. The possibility of a direct excretion pathway into the urine was introduced, in order to correctly describe the rapid excretion as observed in the human studies. Reference values of the model parameters have been estimated taking into consideration that the amounts of radioactive molybdenum accidentally incorporated are negligible in comparison to the daily dietary intake of stable molybdenum

  10. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  11. A physiological biokinetic model for the [7(N)-3H]-cholesterol dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major source of deaths worldwide according to WHO (World Health Organization). It is well-known that the change of the level of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the cholesterol transport in the bloodstream, is a main cause of these diseases. For this reason, to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deepen the understanding of associated diseases. The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose, due to the intake of [7(N)-3H] –Cholesterol in physiological issues, in metabolic studies. The internal dosimetry is important to know the biological effects of radiation. The model was based on Schwartz et al (2004), using parameters for the plasmatic lipoproteins and ICRP 30 (1979) gastrointestinal tract; the dose in the compartments were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis by Matlab® software. The coefficients were estimated for an adult phantom with a body mass of 73.3 kg. (author)

  12. A physiological biokinetic model for the [7(N)-{sup 3}H]-cholesterol dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Adriano dos Santos; Martins, Joao Francisco Trencher; Velo, Alexandre Franca; Hamada, Margarida M.; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de, E-mail: adriano_oliveira@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a major source of deaths worldwide according to WHO (World Health Organization). It is well-known that the change of the level of plasma lipoproteins, which are responsible for the cholesterol transport in the bloodstream, is a main cause of these diseases. For this reason, to know the biokinetic parameters of plasma lipoproteins and quantifies them is important to correct and deepen the understanding of associated diseases. The main objective of this work is to provide a biokinetic model in order to estimate the radiometric dose, due to the intake of [7(N){sup -3}H] –Cholesterol in physiological issues, in metabolic studies. The internal dosimetry is important to know the biological effects of radiation. The model was based on Schwartz et al (2004), using parameters for the plasmatic lipoproteins and ICRP 30 (1979) gastrointestinal tract; the dose in the compartments were calculated using the MIRD methodology and the compartmental analysis by Matlab® software. The coefficients were estimated for an adult phantom with a body mass of 73.3 kg. (author)

  13. Human biokinetic data and a new compartmental model of zirconium - A tracer study with enriched stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiter, Matthias B., E-mail: matthias.greiter@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Giussani, Augusto, E-mail: AGiussani@BfS.de; Hoellriegl, Vera, E-mail: vera.hoellriegl@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Li Weibo, E-mail: wli@helmholtz-muenchen.de; Oeh, Uwe, E-mail: uwe.oeh@helmholtz-muenchen.de

    2011-09-01

    Biokinetic models describing the uptake, distribution and excretion of trace elements are an essential tool in nutrition, toxicology, or internal dosimetry of radionuclides. Zirconium, especially its radioisotope {sup 95}Zr, is relevant to radiation protection due to its production in uranium fission and neutron activation of nuclear fuel cladding material. We present a comprehensive set of human data from a tracer study with stable isotopes of zirconium. The data are used to refine a biokinetic model of zirconium. Six female and seven male healthy adult volunteers participated in the study. It includes 16 complete double tracer investigations with oral ingestion and intravenous injection, and seven supplemental investigations. Tracer concentrations were measured in blood plasma and urine collected up to 100 d after tracer administration. The four data sets (two chemical tracer forms in plasma and urine) each encompass 105-240 measured concentration values above detection limits. Total fractional absorption of ingested zirconium was found to be 0.001 for zirconium in citrate-buffered drinking solution and 0.007 for zirconium oxalate solution. Biokinetic models were developed based on the linear first-order kinetic compartmental model approach used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The main differences of the optimized systemic model of zirconium to the current ICRP model are (1) recycling into the transfer compartment made necessary by the observed tracer clearance from plasma, (2) different parameters related to fractional absorption for each form of the ingested tracer, and (3) a physiologically based excretion pathway to urine. The study considerably expands the knowledge on the biokinetics of zirconium, which was until now dominated by data from animal studies. The proposed systemic model improves the existing ICRP model, yet is based on the same principles and fits well into the ICRP radiation protection approach. - Research

  14. The biokinetics of alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past two decades have seen wide interest in the application of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted endoradiotherapy and a large number of compounds labeled with 211At (T1/2 7.21 h), 212Bi (T1/2 1 h) or 213Bi (T1/2 0.78 h) have been studied. Knowledge of the biokinetic behaviour of such agents is important both for their optimal clinical exploitation and for general radiological protection purposes. Animal studies of the distribution and retention of 211At compounds, including ionic astatide, substituted aromatic compounds and labelled monoclonal antibodies, have provided new information on the biochemistry of astatine. With respect the thyroid gland the uptake of the astatide ion has been shown to be very much lower than that of the iodide ion. Less information is available for 212Bi-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. The available data for both 211At and 212Bi radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed. Cautious generic biokinetic models for inorganic and simple organic compounds of 211At and 212Bi; for [211At]-, and [212Bi]-biphosphonates and for [211At]-, and [212Bi]-monoclonal antibodies, are proposed for use in general radiological protection when compound-specific data are not available. (orig.)

  15. A biokinetic model for systemic technetium in adult humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently is updating its biokinetic and dosimetric models for internally deposited radionuclides. Technetium (Tc), the lightest element that exists only in radioactive form, has two important isotopes from the standpoint of potential risk to humans: the long-lived isotope99Tm(T1/2=2.1x105 y) is present in high concentration in nuclear waste, and the short-lived isotope 99mTc (T1/2=6.02 h) is the most commonly used radionuclide in diagnostic nuclear medicine. This paper reviews data on the biological behavior of technetium and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic technetium in the adult human body for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current occupational model for systemic technetium, the proposed model provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of technetium in the body; provides greater consistency with experimental and medical data; and, for most radiosensitive organs, yields substantially different estimates of cumulative activity (total radioactive decays within the organ) following uptake of 99Tm or 99mTc to blood

  16. The biokinetics of alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.M. [School of Chemistry, Cardiff Univ., Cardiff (United Kingdom); Duffield, J.R. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Univ. of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    The past two decades have seen wide interest in the application of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted endoradiotherapy and a large number of compounds labeled with {sup 211}At (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 7.21 h), {sup 212}Bi (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 1 h) or {sup 213}Bi (T{sup 1}/{sub 2} 0.78 h) have been studied. Knowledge of the biokinetic behaviour of such agents is important both for their optimal clinical exploitation and for general radiological protection purposes. Animal studies of the distribution and retention of {sup 211}At compounds, including ionic astatide, substituted aromatic compounds and labelled monoclonal antibodies, have provided new information on the biochemistry of astatine. With respect the thyroid gland the uptake of the astatide ion has been shown to be very much lower than that of the iodide ion. Less information is available for {sup 212}Bi-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. The available data for both {sup 211}At and {sup 212}Bi radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed. Cautious generic biokinetic models for inorganic and simple organic compounds of {sup 211}At and {sup 212}Bi; for [{sup 211}At]-, and [{sup 212}Bi]-biphosphonates and for [{sup 211}At]-, and [{sup 212}Bi]-monoclonal antibodies, are proposed for use in general radiological protection when compound-specific data are not available. (orig.)

  17. A biokinetic study of {sup 209}Po in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henricsson, C.F.; Ranebo, Y. [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Lund (Sweden); Hansson, M. [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Raeaef, C.L., E-mail: Christopher.Raaf@med.lu.se [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Holm, E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteras (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Five adult volunteers participated in a biokinetic study of radioactive polonium. Portions of about 10 Bq of {sup 209}Po were orally administrated to four of the volunteers in a single ingestion. The fifth volunteer ingested a daily amount of 53 mBq of 209Po for 243 d to study the time to achieve equilibrium between intake and excretion for protracted intakes. For the subjects ingesting single intakes of {sup 209}Po complete sampling of urine and feces was subsequently collected the first few days upon the ingestion. The samples were processed with radiochemical extraction and analyzed with alpha spectrometry. In the study, the maximum daily excretion rates in feces were 18-50% of the ingested activity, observed within 3 d after intake. Regarding the urine excretion, the daily excretion peaked, on average, at 0.15-1% of the ingested activity within two days upon intake. These results indicate an average gastro-intestinal uptake fraction of 0.46 {+-} 0.08, which agrees well with earlier biokinetic studies of polonium in man. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human metabolism of an oral intake of polonium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4 individuals were administrated about 10 Bq polonium-209. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gastro-intestinal uptake fraction, if orally administrated polonium-209 was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biological half-time of polonium in human body was studied.

  18. Some elements for a revision of the americium reference biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of individual activity measurement after a contamination by 241Am or its parent nuclide 241Pu is based on the reference americium (Am) biokinetic model published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1993 [International Commission on Radiological Protection. Age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides: Part 2 Ingestion dose coefficients. ICRP Publication 67. Ann. ICRP 23(3/4) (1993)]. The authors analysed the new data about Am biokinetics reported afterwards to propose an update of the current model. The most interesting results, from the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries post-mortem measurement database [Filipy, R. E. and Russel, J. J. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries as sources for actinide dosimetry and bio-effects. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 185-187 (2003)] and the long-term follow-up of cases of inhalation intake [Malatova, I., Foltanova, S., Beckova, V., Filgas, R., Pospisilova, H. and Hoelgye, Z. Assessment of occupational doses from internal contamination with 241Am. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 325-328 (2003)], seemed to show that the current model underestimates the retention in the massive soft tissues and overestimates the retention in the skeleton and the late urinary excretion. However, a critical review of the data demonstrated that all were not equally reliable and suggested that only a slight revision of the model, possibly involving a change in the balance of activity between massive soft tissues, cortical and trabecular bone surfaces, may be required. (authors)

  19. Compared biokinetic and biological studies of chronic and acute inhalations of uranium compounds in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a natural, radioactive heavy metal, widely used in the nuclear industry in various chemical and isotopic forms. Its use in the fuel cycle involves the risk of radiological exposure for the workers, mainly via the inhalation of uranium particles. According to the workplace configuration, uranium contaminations can be acute or repeated, involve various chemical forms and different levels of enrichment, as well as involving one or several components. The dosimetric concepts and models available for workers' radiological protection, as well as most of the studies of the biological effects, correspond to acute exposure situations. Moreover the processes leading to pathological effects are little known in vivo. In this context, the main question is to know whether exposures due to repeated inhalation by rats induce the element kinetics and toxicity, which may be different from those observed after an acute exposure. In this study, comparison of the experimental and theoretical biokinetics of an insoluble uranium repeatedly inhaled over three weeks shows that a chronic contamination is correctly modelled, except for bone retention, by the sum of acute, successive and independent incorporations. Moreover, the kinetics of a soluble uranium inhaled irregularly can be modified by previous repeated exposure to an insoluble uranium. In certain cases therefore, exposure to uranium could modify its biokinetics during later exposures. At a toxicological level, the study demonstrates that the uranium particles inhaled repeatedly induce behavioural disruptions and genotoxic effects resulting in various sorts of DNA damage, in several cell types and certainly depending on the quantity inhaled. Exposures involving several uraniferous components produce a synergy effect. Moreover, repeated inhalations worsen the genotoxic effects in comparison to an acute exposure. This work demonstrates the importance of not ignoring the effects of the repetition of uranium exposure. It

  20. Study of the influence of radionuclide biokinetics on in vivo counting using voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo measurement is an efficient method to estimate the retention of activity in case of internal contamination. However, it is currently limited by the use of physical phantoms for the calibration, not enabling to reproduce neither the morphology of the measured person nor the actual distribution of the contamination. The current method of calibration therefore leads to significant systematic uncertainties on the quantification of the contamination. To improve the in vivo measurement, the Laboratory of Internal Dose Assessment (LEDI, IRSN) has developed an original numerical calibration method with the OEDIPE software. It is based on voxel phantoms created from the medical images of persons, and associated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code of particle transport. The first version of this software enabled to model simple homogeneous sources and to better estimate the systematic uncertainties in the lung counting of actinides due to the detector position and to the heterogeneous distribution of activity inside the lungs. However, it was not possible to take into account the dynamic feature, and often heterogeneous distribution between body organs and tissues of the activity. Still, the efficiency of the detection system depends on the distribution of the source of activity. The main purpose of the thesis work is to answer to the question: what is the influence of the biokinetics of the radionuclides on the in vivo counting? To answer it, it was necessary to deeply modify OEDIPE. This new development enabled to model the source of activity more realistically from the reference biokinetic models defined by the ICRP. The first part of the work consisted in developing the numerical tools needed to integrate the biokinetics in OEDIPE. Then, a methodology was developed to quantify its influence on the in vivo counting from the results of simulations. This method was carried out and validated on the model of the in vivo counting system of the LEDI. Finally, the

  1. Biokinetic study for SRC-I wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    Biooxidation is an important part of the overall wastewater treatment system for the proposed SRC-I Demonstration Plant in Newman, Kentucky. After the completion of a Baseline Design for the plant in April 1982, various refinements were evaluated. One of these was the inclusion of a process for phenol recovery from four sour-water streams. As part of this evaluation, an extensive laboratory treatability study was conducted on wastewaters both with and without this phenol recovery step. The purpose of the study was to compare the results of different treatment schemes on different wastewaters and did not include the development of the kinetic coefficients that govern the biooxidation process. Additional treatability testing documented herein, has been performed to establish the kinetic coefficients for biooxidation of the SRC-I wastewaters. This will provide a rational basis for any subsequent changes in design. The wastewater feed used in this study was process recycle water from the Fort Lewis, Washington, pilot plant. Prior to biooxidation, it was pretreated by solvent extraction for removal of phenolics and by steam stripping for removal of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. Two, 2-stage bench scale bioreactors were operated for approximately eight months, during which time they were stabilized at various steady-state conditions. Kinetic coefficients were evaluated according to the Lawrence and McCarty model, based on BOD, COD, and TOC. Nitrification, oxygen utilization, and solids settling velocities were also studied. The results showed that BOD is a poor basis for the model mainly because almost all BOD/sub 5/ was removed at all steady-state conditions. Also, the model was more accurate for steady-state conditions of lower solids retention times. The bulk of both organic and ammonia reductions occurred in the first stage reactors.

  2. Multigenerational cadmium acclimation and biokinetics in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-05-01

    A Cd exposure (3 microg L(-1)) experiment was conducted for six successive generations to investigate the responses to chronic Cd stress in Daphnia magna. We observed a biphasic accumulation of Cd in the six generations and suggested a similar pattern with respect to daphnids' tolerance. Cd assimilation efficiencies, daphnid growth, and reproduction corresponded to the changes of tolerance, which was partially accounted for by metallothionein induction. When maternally exposed neonates grew in Cd-free water for one or two generations, their growth, MT concentration and biokinetic parameters partially or totally recovered. The rapid recovery suggests the high potential for ecological restoration from Cd pollution. Our results indicate that the tolerance of sensitive D. magna clones to Cd was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure. The tolerance developed within the first several generations might not be maintained, and the animals may become even more sensitive to Cd stress in subsequent generations. PMID:16202491

  3. A biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments involving injection and inhalation of uranium compounds into several animal species as well as those associated with humans are described and analyzed. A revised biokinetic and dosimetric model for the metabolism of uranium suitable for bioassay procedures is proposed. The model consists of a systematic part coupled to a model of the respiratory tract. The model has been tested against human data which incorporates in vivo measurements over the chest and measurements of urine, feces, and autopsy and biopsy samples.In particular the lung model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, Publication 30 ( ICRP-30 ), has been modified in order to provide a model which more nearly predicts urinary excretion in accord with the experiences in humans and animals. We have also tested the data against the new ICRP (LUDEP) lung model. (author). 55 refs., 14 tabs., 33 figs

  4. A genetic algorithm as an aid to biokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe health effects of inhaled toxicants in a meaningful way, one must have a measure of the dose of the toxicant that caused the effect. For toxicants such as inhaled Pu, the dose is different for different organs and at different times after exposure. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a biokinetic model to simulate the distribution of Pu activity in the tissues and excreta of a dog as a function of time after it is inhaled. Such a model needed to account for all of the substance through a materials balance. It also had to model the amount of material retained in each major organ separately, with each organ divided into multiple compartments to depict different forms of Pu in the organ. Transfer between organs was controlled using transfer coefficients that were either constants, functions of particle size, or functions of time after deposition. This model required a large number of parameters because of its complexity

  5. Investigation of radiocesium biokinetics in Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to better understand the biokinetics of radiocesium in clams living in sediment. The accumulation and depuration kinetics of 134Cs were investigated in the Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) under controlled laboratory conditions. The concentration factor was found to be 3.0 for 134Cs in the whole body; however, the concentration factor in the soft part of the clams (12) was significantly higher than those in the whole body and shell (0.80). The depuration kinetics of the radionuclide were described by a two-component exponential model for the whole body. The biological half-lives in the fast and slow components were found to be 0.63 and 22.1 days, respectively. The depuration kinetics for 134Cs in the soft parts were described by a single-component exponential model with a resultant the biological half-life of 18.0 days. (author)

  6. A case of accidental intake of Molybdenum Radionuclides: analysis of data with a revised biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, a series of investigations on the biokinetics of molybdenum in humans, conducted using stable isotopes of Mo as tracers, has provided valuable experimental data about the dynamics of relevant processes such as the uptake from the gut walls, the clearance from the systemic circulation and the elimination pathways. The results of these studies are in good agreement with the findings of a group of nutritionist who also performed biokinetic studies with stable tracers. All measurements show several deviations from the predictions of the current ICRP model. On the basis of these data, a preliminary revision of the biokinetic model for Mo was presented. The modified model was thus used as a starting point for a new series of biokinetic investigations, aimed at a better definition of some of its features. In a total of 54 studies conducted in 15 volunteers, the influence of the mass and of the chemical form on intestinal absorption, internal kinetics and urinary excretion was investigated

  7. A generic biokinetic model for predicting the behaviour of the lanthanide elements in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the biokinetics of the 15 elements of the lanthanide series, 57La to 71Lu, is too sparse to permit individual development of meaningful biokinetic models to describe the behaviour of each of the elements in humans. The lanthanides show a regular gradation in chemical properties across the series, and animal studies indicate that this is reflected in regular differences in their deposition in tissues such as the liver and skeleton. These regular differences in chemical and biological behaviour have been utilised to construct a generic lanthanide biokinetic model and to define element-specific parameters for each element in the series. This report describes the use of the available biokinetic data for humans and animals to derive the parameters for each of the elements. (author)

  8. Biokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles: toxicokinetics, biological fates, and protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi SJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Jin Choi,1 Jin-Ho Choy2 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, 2Center for Intelligent Nano Bio Materials (CINBM, Department of Bioinspired Science and Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Biokinetic studies of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles involve systematic and quantitative analyses of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in plasma and tissues of whole animals after exposure. A full understanding of the biokinetics provides basic information about nanoparticle entry into systemic circulation, target organs of accumulation and toxicity, and elimination time, which is important for predicting the long-term toxic potential of nanoparticles. Biokinetic behaviors can be dependent on physicochemical properties, dissolution property in biological fluids, and nanoparticle–protein interaction. Moreover, the determination of biological fates of ZnO nanoparticles in the systemic circulation and tissues is critical in interpreting biokinetic behaviors and predicting toxicity potential as well as mechanism. This review focuses on physicochemical factors affecting the biokinetics of ZnO nanoparticles, in concert with understanding bioavailable fates and their interaction with proteins. Keywords: ZnO nanoparticles, biokinetics, distribution, excretion, fate, interaction

  9. A methodology for biokinetic studies using stable isotopes: results of repeated molybdenum investigations on a healthy volunteer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for biokinetic studies in humans using stable isotopes is presented. The technique is based on double tracer administration and on proton activation as the analytical method. As an application, the results of investigations on molybdenum metabolism in humans are reported. The contents of 95Mo and 96Mo in biological samples were determined by inducing (p,n) reactions and by analysing the γ-rays emitted by the radioactive products. The minimum detectable quantity was 2 ng/mL plasma for both Mo isotopes. Four investigations on molybdenum metabolism were performed on a healthy volunteer subject in the course of 3 yr. Two absorption studies with different amounts of tracers in aqueous solution were performed by giving 96Mo orally and 95Mo intravenously. Two investigations were performed with single oral administration of 96Mo in aqueous solution and of a 96Mo solution mixed with an infant formula respectively. The stability with time of the biokinetic parameters was tested. The fractional absorption values measured in this volunteer were 0.84, 0.98 and 0.95 for three studies with Mo in HCl and 0.51 for a single study with Mo administered in an infant formula, these data are discussed. (Author)

  10. Multigenerational cadmium acclimation and biokinetics in Daphnia magna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Rui [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program (AMCE), and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program (AMCE), and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2006-05-15

    A Cd exposure (3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) experiment was conducted for six successive generations to investigate the responses to chronic Cd stress in Daphnia magna. We observed a biphasic accumulation of Cd in the six generations and suggested a similar pattern with respect to daphnids' tolerance. Cd assimilation efficiencies, daphnid growth, and reproduction corresponded to the changes of tolerance, which was partially accounted for by metallothionein induction. When maternally exposed neonates grew in Cd-free water for one or two generations, their growth, MT concentration and biokinetic parameters partially or totally recovered. The rapid recovery suggests the high potential for ecological restoration from Cd pollution. Our results indicate that the tolerance of sensitive D. magna clones to Cd was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure. The tolerance developed within the first several generations might not be maintained, and the animals may become even more sensitive to Cd stress in subsequent generations. - Tolerance of sensitive Daphnia magna clones to cadmium was dependent on long-term or multigenerational exposure.

  11. Biokinetics and tolerance development of toxic metals in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Martin Tsz-Ki; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2007-05-01

    Daphnia magna is widespread in many freshwater systems of temperate regions and frequently is used to test metal toxicity. Recently, studies have been performed to determine metal biokinetics and development of tolerance in this important zooplankton species. In the present paper, we review the recent progress in these areas and suggest possible directions for future studies. Substantial differences exist in aqueous uptake, dietary assimilation, and elimination of several metals (Cd, Se, Zn, Ag, Hg, and MeHg) by D. magna. The routes of uptake are metal-specific, with Se and MeHg being accumulated predominantly through diet. All metals except Ag can be biomagnified from algae to D. magna, providing that metal concentrations in algae and algal food density are relatively low. Methylmercury is biomagnified in all situations. As a route for metal elimination in D. magna, maternal transfer is especially important for Se, Zn, and MeHg. On the other hand, the effect of single-generation exposure to metals on D. magna is very different from multigeneration exposure, which often results in a significantly higher metal tolerance. Moreover, D. magna easily loses metal tolerance developed through long-term exposure. Recovery from metal stress can temporarily increase the sensitivity of D. magna to metal toxicity. Finally, metallothionein-like protein is responsible for minimizing metal toxicity in D. magna. The results inferred from these studies can be extrapolated to other aquatic invertebrates as well as to other pollutants in the aquatic environment. PMID:17521151

  12. Biokinetics and dosimetry of several radiolabelled peptides in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; Ferro-Flores, G.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Pedraza-López, M.; Ramírez-Iglesias, M. A. T.

    Radiolabelled peptides have been used as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The goal of this research was the in vitro assessment of the uptake, internalization, externalization, and efflux of five radiolabelled peptides in cancer cells to estimate radiation-absorbed doses from experimental biokinetic data. 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate, 188Re-lanreotide, and 99mTc-HYNIC-octreotide were studied in the AR42J cell line. The PC3 and NCIH69 cells were used for 99mTc-HYNIC-bombesin and 177Lu-DOTA-minigastrin, respectively. The cumulated activities in the membrane and cytoplasm were calculated by integration of the experimental time-activity curves and used for dosimetry calculations according to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) cellular methodology. The mean absorbed dose to the cell nucleus were 0.69±0.09, 0.11±0.08, 0.55±0.09, 3.45±0.48, and 3.30±0.65 Gy/Bq for 99mTc-HYNIC-bombesin, 99mTc-HYNIC-octreotide, 177Lu-DOTA-minigastrin, 177Lu-DOTA-octreotate, and 188Re-lanreotide, respectively. If radiopharmaceutical cell kinetics were not used and only uptake data were considered, the calculated doses would be overestimated up to 25 times.

  13. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with clinical 131I-MIBG studies of patients with suspected sporadic pheochromocytoma or multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN II), quantitative biokinetic data have been collected in order to improve the present estimates of absorbed dose to various organs and tissues as well as of the effective dose equivalent and its variation from patient to patient. The authors find considerably higher liver uptake than earlier published, but their estimates of the uptake in the thyroid and in the normal adrenal medulla show lower values than earlier reported. This results in the following absorbed dose per activity unit administered (mGy/MGq) (mean and typical range): Liver: 0.83 (0.50 - 1.2); Spleen: 0.61 (0.17 - 1.3); Salivary glands: 0.22 (0.082 - 0.41); Thyroid (blocked): 0.1; Total body: 0.082 (0.055 -0.12). The effective dose equivalent was estimated to be 0.20 (0.1 -0.3) mSv/MBq when the thyroid is adequately blocked. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  14. The biokinetics of Rhuthenium and Zirconium radionuclides in humans studied with stable tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of the internal radiation dose delivered by radionuclides incorporated in the human body after accidental release into the environment requires the use of suitable biokinetic models. These models describe the absorption of radionuclides into the blood circulation, their distribution and retention in various organs and tissues, and the excretion routes. Biokinetic models are also employed for interpreting bioassay measurements in exposed subjects, like activity concentration measurements in body fluids (e.g. urine, blood), in order to estimate the incorporated amount of radioactive substances. The reliability of a biokinetic model is closely linked to the available experimental data used to develop the model itself. Biokinetic data for human subjects are available for most essential elements, as well as for some important non-essential elements such as caesium, lead, radium, uranium, americium and plutonium. For many other radionuclides, either very little or no information is available from human studies, and the respective models must be derived from other sources. These may include results from studies in animals, comparative data on the behaviour of similar radionuclides or chemical analogues in vitro. Biokinetic models developed from such a variety of data sources can be applied to humans only with a limited degree of confidence. The availability of data directly obtained on human subjects is therefore fundamental to set up more reliable and realistic models. Ruthenium and zirconium are among the elements characterised by a serious lack of reliable data in humans

  15. Implications of postmortem human tissue analysis on biokinetic models for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes and refinements to original biokinetic models, based on postmortem radiochemical measurements of the concentration and distribution of actinides in tissues obtained from volunteer donors with known occupational experience with actinides, are discussed with emphasis on applications to operational health physics. Analysis of five whole body donations to the United States Transuranium Registry indicates that the 239Pu model put forth in ICRP Publication 30 is generally applicable, although there is a significant fraction missing from the model that is retained in the muscle. For 241Am, the more recent model put forth in ICRP Publication 48 fits the autopsy data better than the model in Publication 30, although the observed retention half-time in the liver is on the order of two to three years rather than 20 years proposed by the model. An estimated 20% of the initial systemic deposition for 241Am goes to the muscle, where it has a residence half-time estimated at ten years. For both Pu and Am, less than 5% of the skeletal actinide in the skeleton is found in the marrow. The highest concentrations appear to be associated with the periosteum and endosteum. A significantly greater fraction of inhaled Pu and Am is retained in the lungs than is predicted by current models. Differences in the actinide distribution between lung and the associated lymph nodes are observed in smokers as compared with non-smokers. (author) 30 refs.; 1 tab

  16. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report 'Biokinetics and Dosimetry of Incorporated Radionuclides' presented here is one part of the 5 individual reports. The work to be carried out within this project is structured into four Work Packages: Workpackage 1 concentrates on ingested radionuclides, considering doses to the GI tract and radionuclide absorption. A major objective is the development of a new dosimetric model of the GI tract, taking account of most recent data on gut transit and dose to sensitive cells. Workpackage 2 seeks to improve and extend biokinetic and dosimetric models for systemic radionuclides. Existing models for adults and children will be extended to other elements and new models will be developed for the embryo and fetus. Workpackage 3 is to improve assessment of localised distribution of dose within tissues at the cellular level for specific examples of Auger emitters and alpha emitting isotopes, in relation to observed effects. The work will include experimental studies of dose/effect relationship and the development of localisation methods. Workpackage 4 concerns the development of computer codes for the new dosimetric models, quality assurance of the models and the calculation of dose coefficients. Formal sensitivity analysis will be used to identify critical areas of model development and to investigate the effects of variability and incertainty in biokinetic parameters. (orig.)

  17. Gender-specific differences in the biokinetics of plutonium and other actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The published data on the biokinetics of actinide distribution and retention in humans and animals have been reviewed. It is concluded that in humans there are strong indications that urinary and faecal excretion of plutonium is greater in females than males. Animal data indicate that this may also be true for americium, neptunium and uranium. (author)

  18. Distribution and biokinetic analysis of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in poultry due to ingestion of dicalcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casacuberta, N., E-mail: Nuria.Casacuberta@uab.es [Departament de Fisica and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Traversa, F.L. [Departament d' Electronica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Masque, P.; Garcia-Orellana, J. [Departament de Fisica and Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Anguita, M.; Gasa, J. [Departament de Ciencia Animal i dels Aliments, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Dicalcium phosphate (DCP) is used as a calcium supplement for food producing animals (i.e., cattle, poultry and pig). When DCP is produced via wet acid digestion of the phosphate rock and depending on the acid used in the industrial process, the final product can result in enhanced {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po specific activities ({approx} 2000 Bq.kg{sup -1}). Both {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po are of great interest because their contribution to the dose received by ingestion is potentially large. The aims of this work are to examine the accumulation of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in chicken tissues during the first 42 days of life and to build a suitable single-compartment biokinetic model to understand the behavior of both radionuclides within the entire animal using the experimental results. Three commercial corn-soybean-based diets containing different amounts and sources of DCP were fed to broilers during a period of 42 days. The results show that diets containing enhanced concentrations of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po lead to larger specific accumulation in broiler tissues compared to the blank diet. Radionuclides do not accumulate homogeneously within the animal body: {sup 210}Pb follows the calcium pathways to some extent and accumulates largely in bones, while {sup 210}Po accumulates to a large extent in liver and kidneys. However, the total amount of radionuclide accumulation in tissues is small compared to the amounts excreted in feces. The single-compartment non-linear biokinetic model proposed here for {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po in the whole animal takes into account the size evolution and is self-consistent in that no fitting parameterization of intake and excretions rates is required.

  19. Bayesian model selection validates a biokinetic model for zirconium processing in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidl Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In radiation protection, biokinetic models for zirconium processing are of crucial importance in dose estimation and further risk analysis for humans exposed to this radioactive substance. They provide limiting values of detrimental effects and build the basis for applications in internal dosimetry, the prediction for radioactive zirconium retention in various organs as well as retrospective dosimetry. Multi-compartmental models are the tool of choice for simulating the processing of zirconium. Although easily interpretable, determining the exact compartment structure and interaction mechanisms is generally daunting. In the context of observing the dynamics of multiple compartments, Bayesian methods provide efficient tools for model inference and selection. Results We are the first to apply a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to compute Bayes factors for the evaluation of two competing models for zirconium processing in the human body after ingestion. Based on in vivo measurements of human plasma and urine levels we were able to show that a recently published model is superior to the standard model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The Bayes factors were estimated by means of the numerically stable thermodynamic integration in combination with a recently developed copula-based Metropolis-Hastings sampler. Conclusions In contrast to the standard model the novel model predicts lower accretion of zirconium in bones. This results in lower levels of noxious doses for exposed individuals. Moreover, the Bayesian approach allows for retrospective dose assessment, including credible intervals for the initially ingested zirconium, in a significantly more reliable fashion than previously possible. All methods presented here are readily applicable to many modeling tasks in systems biology.

  20. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2012-01-01

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  1. Biokinetic and dosimetric modelling in the estimation of radiation risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk

    2009-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed biokinetic and dosimetric models that enable the calculation of organ and tissue doses for a wide range of radionuclides. These are used to calculate equivalent and effective dose coefficients (dose in Sv Bq{sup -1} intake), considering occupational and environmental exposures. Dose coefficients have also been given for a range of radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic medicine. Using equivalent and effective dose, exposures from external sources and from different radionuclides can be summed for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to risks from whole-body radiation exposure. Risk estimates are derived largely from follow-up studies of the survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. New dose coefficients will be required following the publication in 2007 of new ICRP recommendations. ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models are subject to continuing review and improvement, although it is arguable that the degree of sophistication of some of the most recent models is greater than required for the calculation of effective dose to a reference person for the purposes of regulatory control. However, the models are also used in the calculation of best estimates of doses and risks to individuals, in epidemiological studies and to determine probability of cancer causation. Models are then adjusted to best fit the characteristics of the individuals and population under consideration. For example, doses resulting from massive discharges of strontium-90 and other radionuclides to the Techa River from the Russian Mayak plutonium plant in the early years of its operation are being estimated using models adapted to take account of measurements on local residents and other population-specific data. Best estimates of doses to haemopoietic bone marrow, in utero and postnatally, are being used in epidemiological studies of radiation

  2. An empirical multivariate log-normal distribution representing uncertainty of biokinetic parameters for 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified biokinetic model for 137Cs has six parameters representing transfer of material to and from various compartments. Using a Bayesian analysis, the joint probability distribution of these six parameters is determined empirically for two cases with quite a lot of bioassay data. The distribution is found to be a multivariate log-normal. Correlations between different parameters are obtained. The method utilises a fairly large number of pre-determined forward biokinetic calculations, whose results are stored in interpolation tables. Four different methods to sample the multidimensional parameter space with a limited number of samples are investigated: random, stratified, Latin Hypercube sampling with a uniform distribution of parameters and importance sampling using a lognormal distribution that approximates the posterior distribution. The importance sampling method gives much smaller sampling uncertainty. No sampling method-dependent differences are perceptible for the uniform distribution methods. (authors)

  3. Biokinetic and molecular studies of methanogens in phased anaerobic digestion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Mirzaman; Parker, Wayne J; Verastegui, Yris; Neufeld, Josh D

    2013-12-01

    The influence of differing operational conditions of two-stage digesters on biokinetic characteristics and communities of methanogenic archaea was evaluated. Operating temperature of each phase influenced the archaeal communities significantly. Also, a strong correlation was observed between community composition and temperature and pH. The maximum specific substrate utilization rates (k max) of acetoclastic methanogens in the mesophilic and thermophilic 1st phases were 11.4 and 22.0 mgCOD mgCOD(-1)d(-1), respectively, whereas significantly lower k max values were estimated for the mesophilic and thermophilic 2nd-phase digesters which were 7.6 and 16.6 mgCOD mgCOD(-1)d(-1), respectively. It appeared that the biokinetic characteristics of the acetoclastic methanogen communities were reliant on digester loading rates. Also, higher temperature dependency coefficients (θ) were observed for the long retention time digesters when compared to the values computed for the 1st-phase digesters. Accordingly, the implementation of two sets of biokinetic parameters for acetoclastic methanogen will improve modeling of phased anaerobic digesters. PMID:24125797

  4. Biokinetics of nuclear fuel compounds and biological effects of nonuniform radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental releases of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds may occur at nuclear power plants during normal operation, after nuclear power plant accidents, and as a consequence of nuclear weapons testing. For example, the Chernobyl fallout contained extensive amounts of pulverized nuclear fuel composed of uranium and its nonvolatile fission products. The effects of these highly radioactive particles, also called hot particles, on humans are not well known due to lack of reliable data on the extent of the exposure. However, the biokinetics and biological effects of nuclear fuel compounds have been investigated in a number of experimental studies using various cellular systems and laboratory animals. In this article, we review the biokinetic properties and effects of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds, with special reference to UO2, PuO2, and nonvolatile, long-lived β-emitters Zr, Nb, Ru, and Ce. First, the data on hot particles, including sources, dosimetry, and human exposure are discussed. Second, the biokinetics of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds in the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract are reviewed. Finally, short- and long-term biological effects of nonuniform α- and β-irradiation on the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and skin are discussed. 191 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  5. A simplified computer method incorporating compartmental analysis with recycling for biokinetic studies of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In past few years ICRP has made major revisions in its recommendations regarding protection from ionizing radiations. It has developed a series of biokinetic and dosimetric models for calculating radiation doses from intake of radionuclides in the body. It has also developed a new Human Respiratory Tract (HRT) model for this purpose. The new models have been developed to enable dose estimates for radiation workers as well as the general public including the children of all age groups. The new HRT model has been incorporated for dose estimations only in a few standard codes like LUDEP and GENMOD where as the new biokinetic models have not been employed in any of the available codes, except the InDose. ICRP has presented retention and excretion data for some selected radionuclides using these new models in its Publication 78, and dose coefficients for most radionuclides for 1 and 5 μm AMAD size in ICRP Publications 72 and 68 respectively. These data have been provided to ICRP by some leading laboratories and the codes used for these data are generally not available to other laboratories. In this paper we describe a simplified computer method which incorporates compartmental analysis with recycling and can be used for biokinetic studies of various radionuclides for any plant specific/non standard input parameters, data for which can not be obtained from any of the ICRP publications. The method incorporates the compartmentalised form of the new HRT model, GI tract model and the new biokinetic model of 125Sb. It can calculate the amount of radioactivity at any future time t after the inhalation intake and the total number of disintegration (Us) over any time interval of interest in any organ. By operating SEE matrix it can calculate the equivalent dose and the effective dose along with the amount in excretion compartments for any given aerosol size. The method can be used for any radionuclide by incorporating its biokinetic model in compartmentalised form along with

  6. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors' code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses. PMID:26198990

  7. Implementation of iodine biokinetic model for interpreting I-131 contamination in breast milk after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kotaro; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant run by Tokyo Electric Power Company in 2011, breast milk samples obtained from volunteers living in Fukushima and neighboring prefectures were examined and small amounts of I-131 (2.2-36.3 Bq/kg) were detected in some samples. In this work, the I-131 concentrations in breast milk from nursing mothers in Ibaraki prefecture were calculated based on the iodine biokinetic model during lactation together with time-variable intake scenarios by inhalation of ambient air and ingestion of tap water, using the authors’ code. The calculated I-131 concentrations in breast milk generally agreed with those measured for the volunteers. Based on the results, thyroid equivalent doses to breast-fed infants were estimated for each place of residence of the volunteers on the assumption that these infants consumed 800 ml of breast milk every day, resulting in 10-11 mSv for Mito and Kasama cities and 1.1-1.8 mSv for Tsukuba and Moriya cities. It was suggested that breast milk consumption could be a major contributor to internal dose of breast-fed infants in areas with mild I-131 pollution; however, further studies considering personal behavior surveys would be necessary to estimate individual doses.

  8. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium; Proposta de um novo modelo biocinetico para o niobio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-07-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data.

  9. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficient for members of the public. 1. Sources of uncertainty in the biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the decade following the Chernobyl accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) developed dose coefficients (doses per unit intake) for ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by members of the public. The level of uncertainty in those coefficients varies considerably from one radionuclide to another, due largely to differences in the level of understanding of the biological behaviour of different elements in the human body. This paper is the first in a series that examines the sources and extent of uncertainties in the ICRP's biokinetic and dosimetric models for members of the public and the dose coefficients derived from those models. The present paper describes the different types of information generally used to develop biokinetic models for radionuclides, the main sources of uncertainty associated with each type of information, and the approach used in subsequent papers in this series to quantify the uncertainties in biokinetic and dosimetric estimates. (author)

  10. Automatic application of ICRP biokinetic models in voxel phantoms for in vivo counting and internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the improvement of calibration techniques of in vivo counting, the Laboratory of Internal Dose Assessment of the Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety has developed a computer tool, 'OEDIPE', to model internal contamination, to simulate in vivo counting and to calculate internal dose. The first version of this software could model sources located in a single organ. As the distribution of the contamination evolves from the time of intake according to the biokinetics of the radionuclide, a new facility has been added to the software first to allow complex heterogeneous source modelling and then to automatically integrate the distribution of the contamination in the different tissues estimated by biokinetic calculation at any time since the intake. These new developments give the opportunity to study the influence of the biokinetics on the in vivo counting, leading to a better assessment of the calibration factors and the corresponding uncertainties. (authors)

  11. Recent developments in biokinetic models and the calculation of internal dose coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most cases the measurement of radioactivity in an environmental or biological sample will be followed by some estimation of dose and possibly risk, either to a population or an individual. This will normally involve the use of a dose coefficient (dose per unit intake value) taken from a compendium. In recent years the calculation of dose coefficients has seen many developments in both biokinetic modelling and computational capabilities. ICRP has recommended new models for the respiratory tract and for the systemic behavior of many of the more important elements. As well as this, a general age-dependent calculation method has been developed which involves an effectively continuous variation of both biokinetic and dosimetric parameters, facilitating more realistic estimation of doses to young people. These new developments were used in work for recent ICRP, IAEA and CEC compendia of dose coefficients for both members of the public (including children) and workers. This paper presents a general overview of the method of calculation of internal doses with particular reference to the actinides. Some of the implications for dose coefficients of the new models are discussed. For example it is shown that compared with data in ICRP Publications 30 and 54: the new respiratory tract model generally predicts lower deposition in systemic tissues per unit intake; the new biokinetic models for actinides allow for burial of material deposited on bone surfaces; age-dependent models generally feature faster turnover of material in young people. All of these factors can lead to substantially different estimates of dose and examples of the new dose coefficients are given to illustrate these differences. During the development of the new models for actinides, human bioassay data were used to validate the model. Thus, one would expect the new models to give reasonable predictions of bioassay quantities. Some examples of the bioassay applications, e.g., excretion data for the

  12. Quantitative biokinetic analysis of radioactively labelled, inhaled Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Wenk, Alexander; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Lungenbiologie und Erkrankungen, Netzwerk Nanopartikel und Gesundheit

    2010-09-15

    The aim of this project was the determination of the biokinetics of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NP) in the whole body of healthy adult rats after NP administration to the respiratory tract - either via inhalation or instillation. We developed an own methodology to freshly synthesize and aerosolize TiO{sub 2}-NP in our lab for the use of inhalation studies. These NP underwent a detailed physical and chemical characterization providing pure polycrystalline anatase TiO{sub 2}-NP of about 20 nm (geometric standard deviation 1.6) and a specific surface area of 270 m{sup 2}/g. In addition, we developed techniques for sufficiently stable radioactive {sup 48}V labelling of the TiO{sub 2} NP. The kinetics of solubility of {sup 48}V was thoroughly determined. The methodology of quantitative biokinetics allows for a quantitative balance of the retained and excreted NP in control of the administered NP dose and provides a much more precise determination of NP fractions and concentrations of NP in organs and tissues of interest as compared to spotting biokinetics studies. Small fractions of TiO{sub 2}-NP translocate across the air-blood-barrier and accumulate in secondary target organs, soft tissue and skeleton. The amount of translocated TiO{sub 2}-NP is approximately 2% of TiO{sub 2}-NP deposited in the lungs. A prominent fraction of these translocated TiO{sub 2}-NP was found in the remainder. Smaller amounts of TiO{sub 2}-NP accumulate in secondary organs following particular kinetics. TiO{sub 2}-NP translocation was grossly accomplished within the first 2-4 hours after inhalation followed by retention in all organs and tissues studied without any detectable clearance of these biopersistent TiO{sub 2}-NP within 28 days. Therefore, our data suggest crossing of the air-blood-barrier of the lungs and subsequent accumulation in secondary organs and tissues depends on the NP material and its physico-chemical properties. Furthermore, we extrapolate that during repeated or chronic

  13. Comparison of predicted with observed biokinetics of inhaled plutonium nitrate and gadolinium oxide in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption kinetics to blood of plutonium and gadolinium after inhalation as nitrate and oxide in humans and animals has been studied. For each material, values describing the time dependence of absorption were derived from the studies in animals and used with the ICRP human respiratory tract model to predict lung retention and cumulative amounts to blood for the volunteers inhaling the same materials. Comparison with the observed behaviour in the volunteers suggests that absorption of plutonium and gadolinium is reasonably species independent, and that data obtained from animal studies can be used to assess their biokinetic behaviour in humans. (author)

  14. Quantitative biokinetic analysis of radioactively labelled, inhaled Titanium dioxide Nanoparticles in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was the determination of the biokinetics of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) in the whole body of healthy adult rats after NP administration to the respiratory tract - either via inhalation or instillation. We developed an own methodology to freshly synthesize and aerosolize TiO2-NP in our lab for the use of inhalation studies. These NP underwent a detailed physical and chemical characterization providing pure polycrystalline anatase TiO2-NP of about 20 nm (geometric standard deviation 1.6) and a specific surface area of 270 m2/g. In addition, we developed techniques for sufficiently stable radioactive 48V labelling of the TiO2 NP. The kinetics of solubility of 48V was thoroughly determined. The methodology of quantitative biokinetics allows for a quantitative balance of the retained and excreted NP in control of the administered NP dose and provides a much more precise determination of NP fractions and concentrations of NP in organs and tissues of interest as compared to spotting biokinetics studies. Small fractions of TiO2-NP translocate across the air-blood-barrier and accumulate in secondary target organs, soft tissue and skeleton. The amount of translocated TiO2-NP is approximately 2% of TiO2-NP deposited in the lungs. A prominent fraction of these translocated TiO2-NP was found in the remainder. Smaller amounts of TiO2-NP accumulate in secondary organs following particular kinetics. TiO2-NP translocation was grossly accomplished within the first 2-4 hours after inhalation followed by retention in all organs and tissues studied without any detectable clearance of these biopersistent TiO2-NP within 28 days. Therefore, our data suggest crossing of the air-blood-barrier of the lungs and subsequent accumulation in secondary organs and tissues depends on the NP material and its physico-chemical properties. Furthermore, we extrapolate that during repeated or chronic exposure to insoluble NP the translocated fraction of NP will accumulate in secondary

  15. The biokinetics of corrosion products from a water cooled reactor after deposition in the rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion of steels used in the fabrication of the primary cooling circuit of certain types of nuclear reactor results in the formation of oxide bearing debris which contains neutron activation products. These present a potential inhalation hazard during maintenance and decommissioning of the reactors. In this study, the biokinetics of a residue containing (by activity) 51Cr (6.8%), 54Mn (12.7%), 58Co (4.8%), 59Fe (4.6%), 60Co (60.2%) and 65Zn (10.9%) have been investigated in rats after intratracheal instillation. Transfer rates to blood for 54Mn, 59Fe, 60Co and 65Zn were obtained up to 282 days after exposure. Combination of these with the mechanical clearance rates from the alveolar region of the lung in the proposed ICRP lung model, provided estimates of biological half-times in the lung. Predicted biokinetics in man for 60Co, 65Zn and 59Fe were consistent with human data obtained after accidental intakes and experimental studies and hence would appear to validate the model used. (author)

  16. Acquisition of biokinetic data for internal dose calculations for some novel radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of radiation dose commitment, expresses as an effective dose equivalent, is a prior requisite to the application for a license to administer radiopharmaceuticals and, therefore, in the case of novel radiopharmaceuticals is leading to an increasing awareness of the need for dosimetry-orientated studies. In this laboratory potential new radiopharmaceuticals are investigated initially by animal studies to assess the possible distribution in man, and subsequently in controlled volunteer studies designed to obtain the maximum possible amount of biokinetic data to allow accurate estimation of radiation dose. A variety of techniques are used for this purpose, including profile counting, partial and whole-body scanning by LFOV gamma camera and whole-body counting, in addition to the analysis of radioactivity in blood and excreta. The use of these techniques is illustrated for the acquisition of biokinetic data and subsequent dosimetry of three novel radiopharmaceuticals: 77Br-p-bromospiperone (quantification of dopamine receptors in the brain). 99Tc/sup m/-porphyrins and 99Tc/sup m/ DEPE (a possible novel blood pool marker for MUGA studies). 14 references, 14 figures, 2 tables

  17. Biokinetics aand dosimetry of inhaled 238PuO2 in the beagle dog: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temporal and spatial distributions of 238Pu have been measured during the course of a dose-response study of the biological effects of inhaled 238PuO2 in Beagle dogs. These measurements were done on the dose-response study animals, as well as a separate group of dogs exposed to similar aerosols and killed serially out to 4 y after exposure. The data from this latter group provided the basis for the development of a biokinetic/dosimetric model for 238PuO2 in dogs. Since the publication of this model, several important findings have been made that affected the dosimetric evaluations. The first involved the discovery of significant quantities of natural uranium (U) in the feces samples. The U was measured with the plutonium (Pu), which inflated the values for purported Pu in feces. The second finding involved the addition of Pu biokinetics data from the dose-response dogs, which increased the period of observation from 4 y to 15 y; these later data were not consistent with the earlier model predictions. The purpose of this investigation was (1) to remove the analytical bias in the 238Pu radiochemical data due to the U and (2) to modify the original model of Mewhinney and Diel, taking into account all data from both studies

  18. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity; Biocinetique et toxicite de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menetrier, F.; Renaud-Salis, V.; Flury-Herard, A

    2000-07-01

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation.

  19. Relevance of the ICRP biokinetic model for dietary organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingested dietary tritium can participate in metabolic processes, and become synthesized into organically bound tritium in the tissues and organs. The distribution and retention of the organically bound tritium throughout the body are much different than tritium in the body water. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 56 (1989) has a biokinetic model to calculate dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium. The model predicts that the dose from the ingestion of organically bound dietary tritium is about 2.3 times higher than from the ingestion of the same activity of tritiated water. Under steady-state conditions, the calculated dose rate (using the first principle approach) from the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium can be twice that from the ingestion of tritiated water. For an adult, the upper-bound dose estimate for the ingestion of dietary organically bound tritium is estimated to be close to 2.3 times higher than that of tritiated water. Therefore, given the uncertainty in the dose calculation with respect to the actual relevant dose, the ICRP biokinetic model for organically bound tritium is sufficient for dosimetry for adults. (author)

  20. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments. PMID:16289344

  1. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: Effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Rui [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Atmospheric Marine Coastal Environment Program and Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments.

  2. Characterisation, implementation and quality assurance of biokinetic models. The experience of the CONRAD Task Group 5.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONRAD (Coordinated Network on Radiation Dosimetry) was an action funded by the European Commission within the 6th Framework Programme in order to link groups undertaking research relating to radiation dosimetry at workplaces. Workpackage 5 of CONRAD was dedicated to internal dosimetry. Task Group 5.2 ''Research Studies on Biokinetic Models'' dealt with the development, implementation, characterization and quality assurance of biokinetic models. The new ICRP model of the human alimentary tract (HATM), the new NCRP model for contaminated wounds, new systemic recycling models of the biokinetics of radioisotopes of polonium and plutonium presented in the scientific literature were implemented into the computer codes of five different institutions. Also new systemic biokinetic models for zirconium and molybdenum, developed on the basis of own results from stable tracer studies, were implemented. The excellent agreement among the results obtained by the different groups indicate that all the present models can be easily implemented into available software codes and that the outputs are independent of the computational approach used. It was also possible to better characterize the systemic models of plutonium by use of a partition factor expressing the relative distribution of material between skeleton and liver, and the NCRP wound model, by derivation of the exact analytical solutions for the wound retention resulting from the model formulation. (author)

  3. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: Effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments

  4. Evaluating Alternate Biokinetic Models for Trace Pollutant Cometabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Binning, Philip John; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    has not been systematically evaluated for a variety of operational/experimental conditions. Here five different models were considered: first-order; MichaelisMenten; reductant; competition; and combined models. The models were assessed on their ability to fit data from simulated batch experiments...... covering a realistic range of experimental conditions. The simulated observations were generated by using the most complex model structure and parameters based on the literature, with added experimental error. Three criteria were used to evaluate model fit: ability to fit the simulated experimental data......, identifiability of parameters using a colinearity analysis, and suitability of the model size and complexity using the Bayesian and Akaike Information criteria. Results show that no single model fits data well for a range of experimental conditions. The reductant model achieved best results, but required very...

  5. Dosimetric contribution of organs of biokinetics of 99mTc and 123I to estimate radiation doses in thyroids of children of 1 and 5 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorbed doses by thyroids during uptake studies through biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing 123I (iodine) or 99mTc (pertechnetate) are estimated. Using the MIRD scheme and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for thyroids in children of 1 and 5 years, the objective of the study was to determine whether the dosimetric biokinetic contributions of the organs of 123I (iodide) and 99mTc (pertechnetate) biokinetic are significant in the estimated of the absorbed dose for thyroid uptake studies

  6. Biokinetic behavior of Tc in the red abalone, Haliotis rufescens: a reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetic behavior of /sup 95m/Tc in the red abalone, Haliotis rufescens, is reviewed in light of recent experiments on other molluscs. Additional experimentation has confirmed that, when uptake is directly from labeled seawater, abalone exhibit concentration factors in excess of 100. Bivalve molluscs under the same experimental conditions have concentration factors that do not exceed 2. However, uptake and loss kinetics cannot be described by a single compartment model as had been previously advanced. Assimilation of /sup 95m/Tc by the abalone following a single feeding of labeled macroalga, Nereocystis pyrifera, is high (approx. 45%) and loss kinetics are similar to those observed following direct uptake from seawater

  7. Multigenerational acclimation of Daphnia magna to mercury: relationships between biokinetics and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Martin T K; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2005-11-01

    We examined the effects of multigenerational exposure of mercury (Hg) on Hg toxicity and biokinetics in a population of Daphnia magna. After chronic Hg exposure at 3.8 microg Hg/L, the first generation (F0) adults had an elevated 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) of Hg (76 microg/L) when compared to the control adults (56 microg/L). The dissolved influx rate of Hg was depressed significantly in the Hg-treated adults, which was accompanied by a reduced ingestion rate and enhanced induction of metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP). The second-generation (F1) juveniles originating from the control and exposed lines had no major differences in these parameters (except the dietary assimilation efficiency). Recovery from Hg stress enhanced the vulnerability of F1 adults to Hg toxicity, with a reduced 48-h LC50 (44 microg/L) and a decreased concentration of MTLP (80% of control). Nevertheless, Hg-treated F1 adults had similar tolerance (in terms of LC50s) as the control line, indicating that D. magna acclimated to Hg stress after the first generation of exposure. No major difference occurred in the Hg biokinetics and toxicity among different groups of F2 daphnids. However, the F2 neonates produced by the Hg-treated F1 adults had much higher 48-h LC50 (149 microg/L) and MTLP concentration (148% of control) when there was continuous Hg exposure after birth. We concluded that acclimation to Hg stress occurred quickly in D. magna, though animals recovering from Hg stress were more vulnerable to Hg toxicity. Both ingestion rate and MTLP may not be good biomarkers of Hg stress in the field, because acclimation can be achieved through multigenerational exposure to elevated Hg concentrations. PMID:16398130

  8. Assessment of physico-chemical and biokinetic properties of uranium peroxide hydrate UO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive studies on the radiotoxicological risk of an intermediate compound UO4, which is not specified in ICRP Recommendations, were motivated by its increased use in the nuclear fuel cycle and the lack of information such as physico-chemical and biokinetic properties. The aim of this work was to give an experimental basis for assessing the appropriate limits on intake for workers exposed to UO4 and to provide guidance for the interpretation of personal monitoring data. Particle size measurement of the UO4 dust indicated a geometric diameter D of 0.5 microm, which corresponds to an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1.1 microm. In vitro experiments conducted in culture medium showed that UO4 is a soluble compound with 66.2% dissolved in 1.9 d and 33.8% in 78 d. Results of dissolution obtained with macrophages showed a significant decrease of 50% at 1 d in terms of solubility. Biokinetic data in the rat obtained from two in vivo studies involving intratracheal instillation in rats indicated half-times in the lung of 0.5 d and 27 d for an initial lung deposit (ILD) of 195 microg, and 1.2 d and 38 d for an ILD of 7.6 microg. Absorption parameters to blood as defined in the ICRP Publication 66 human respiratory tract model were calculated with the specific software GIGAFIT and led to the rapid fraction fr, the rapid rate sr, and the slow rate ss. Effective dose coefficients by inhalation for this UO4 compound using the in vivo experimental results were calculated to be between 0.52 and 0.70 x 10-6 Sv Bq-1. Comparison of these values with effective dose coefficients defined in ICRP Publication 68 for workers showed that UO4 could be considered as a fast soluble compound of Type F

  9. Biokinetics of a transuranic (238PU) and a rare earth element (152Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element (238Pu and 152Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of 238Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of 152Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. 238Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). 152Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well as the cellular and molecular levels

  10. Intercomparison and biokinetic model validation of radionuclide intake assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment, including the conclusions of a Research Co-ordination Meeting held from 6 to 8 July 1998. The present CRP on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment is part of the activities of the IAEA's Occupational Protection programme. The objective of this programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA's activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques; and the promotion of application of these guidelines

  11. Biokinetic Mechanisms Linked With Musculoskeletal Health Disparities: Stochastic Models Applying Tikhonov’s Theorem to Biomolecule Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Asit K.; Liang, Yu; Sean S. Kohles

    2011-01-01

    Multiscale technology and advanced mathematical models have been developed to control and characterize physicochemical interactions, respectively, enhancing cellular and molecular engineering progress. Ongoing tissue engineering development studies have provided experimental input for biokinetic models examining the influence of static or dynamic mechanical stimuli (Saha, A. K., and Kohles, S. S., 2010, “A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Nanomechanical Stimulation ...

  12. A review of contributions of human tissue studies to biokinetics, bio-effects and dosimetry of plutonium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly reviews the contributions made by human tissue studies to improved understanding of the biokinetics, dosimetry and potential bio-effects of plutonium in man. It includes consideration of tissue donations from both environmental and occupational populations, along with a brief history of human experience with plutonium and consideration of the bio-ethical aspects of post-mortem human tissue sampling. (authors)

  13. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, K; Smets, B F; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2016-09-15

    The biokinetic behavior of NH4(+) removal was investigated at different depths of a rapid sand filter treating groundwater for drinking water preparation. Filter materials from the top, middle and bottom layers of a full-scale filter were exposed to various controlled NH4(+) loadings in a continuous-flow lab-scale assay. NH4(+) removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4(+) removal rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4(+) removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4(+) removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter is able to cope with a 4-fold instantaneous loading increase without compromising the effluent NH4(+). Ultimately, this filter up-shift capacity was limited by the density of AOB and their biokinetic behavior, both of which were strongly stratified. PMID:27295615

  14. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non Hodgkin's Iymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 prepared from Iyophilized kits, and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. Whole-body images were acquired at different times after 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC or 188Re-anti-CD20 administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities > 95 %. Regions of interest (ROls) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust the biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNlC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3 ± 0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h and the mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv. Results showed that after administration of 7 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to whole body would be 0.7 Gy (0.1 mGy/MBq) which is the indicated dose for non Hodgkin's Iymphome therapies. (Author)

  15. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Ahlgren, Lars; Mattsson, Soeren [Lund University, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Skaane University Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Johansson, Lennart [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    To review early recommendations and propose guidelines for breastfeeding interruption after administration of radiopharmaceuticals, based on additional biokinetic and dosimetric data. Activity concentrations in breast milk from 53 breastfeeding patients were determined. The milk was collected at various times after administration of 16 different radiopharmaceuticals. The fraction of the activity administered to the mother excreted in the breast milk, the absorbed doses to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the infant were estimated. The fraction of the administered activity excreted per millilitre of milk varied widely from 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -3} MBq/MBq administered. For {sup 99m}Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of the administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.0057 % for {sup 99m}Tc-labelled red blood cells (RBC) to 19 % for {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. The effective dose to an infant per unit activity administered to the mother ranged from 6.7 x 10{sup -6} mSv/MBq for {sup 99m}Tc-labelled RBC to 3.6 x 10{sup -2} mSv/MBq for {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. For the other radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.018 % ({sup 51}Cr-EDTA) to 48 % ({sup 131}I-NaI). The effective dose ranged from 5.6 x 10{sup -5} mSv{sub infant}/MBq{sub mother} ({sup 51}Cr-EDTA) to 106 mSv{sub infant}/MBq{sub mother} ({sup 131}I-NaI). Based on an effective dose limit of 1 mSv to the infant and a typical administered activity, we recommend cessation of breastfeeding for {sup 131}I-NaI and interruption of feeding for 12 h for {sup 125}I-iodohippurate, {sup 131}I-iodohippurate, {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA. During this 12-h period all breast milk should be expressed at least three times and discarded. For the other radiopharmaceuticals included in this study, no interruption of breastfeeding is necessary. (orig.)

  16. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review early recommendations and propose guidelines for breastfeeding interruption after administration of radiopharmaceuticals, based on additional biokinetic and dosimetric data. Activity concentrations in breast milk from 53 breastfeeding patients were determined. The milk was collected at various times after administration of 16 different radiopharmaceuticals. The fraction of the activity administered to the mother excreted in the breast milk, the absorbed doses to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the infant were estimated. The fraction of the administered activity excreted per millilitre of milk varied widely from 10-10 to 10-3 MBq/MBq administered. For 99mTc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of the administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.0057 % for 99mTc-labelled red blood cells (RBC) to 19 % for 99mTc-pertechnetate. The effective dose to an infant per unit activity administered to the mother ranged from 6.7 x 10-6 mSv/MBq for 99mTc-labelled RBC to 3.6 x 10-2 mSv/MBq for 99mTc-pertechnetate. For the other radiopharmaceuticals, the total fraction of administered activity excreted in the milk varied from 0.018 % (51Cr-EDTA) to 48 % (131I-NaI). The effective dose ranged from 5.6 x 10-5 mSvinfant/MBqmother (51Cr-EDTA) to 106 mSvinfant/MBqmother (131I-NaI). Based on an effective dose limit of 1 mSv to the infant and a typical administered activity, we recommend cessation of breastfeeding for 131I-NaI and interruption of feeding for 12 h for 125I-iodohippurate, 131I-iodohippurate, 99mTc-pertechnetate and 99mTc-MAA. During this 12-h period all breast milk should be expressed at least three times and discarded. For the other radiopharmaceuticals included in this study, no interruption of breastfeeding is necessary. (orig.)

  17. Biokinetics and estimation of dose from 99mTc-labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, polyclonal unspecific human immunoglobulin was suggested as a new agent for the localization of inflammatory lesions. Little information about the biodistibution of this radiopharmaceutical was reported so far. To obtain further information, 99mTc-labelled human immunoglobulin (HIG) was administered to a volunteer with presumend normal biokinetics. The absorbed doses to the organs were calculated according to the MIRD concept. The scintigraphic images at 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post injection demonstrated a prolonged activity retention in the blood and high activity in the kidneys, bladder and also in the liver. No significant uptake in the bowels and the marrow could be observed over the whole period of study. 27,4% of the administered activity was excreted in the urine within 24 h. The calculated organ absorbed doses, all in μGy/MBq, were estimated as follows; whole body 2.7, liver 7.3, spleen 12.0, kidneys 15.3, lungs 3.2, marrow 9.6 and gonads 17.0. From these results an effective dose equivalent of 7.9.10-3 mSv/MBq was calculated. The cancer risk estimate of 5.10-5, using 370 MBq 99mTc-HIG, may be considered quite low in comparison to other scintigraphic methods of diagnosing inflammation. (orig.)

  18. Biokinetics of 131I after endogenous and exogenous stimulation of TSH in patients with DTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The effective radioiodine treatment of patients with DTC is possible only after raising the TSH value over 30 microUI/ml. This effect might be obtained by either endogenous or exogenous stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in 131I biokinetics of selected regions of interest (ROIs) in cases of endogenous and exogenous stimulation. Material And Methods: Two groups of 50 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients were treated with 3.7 GBq of 131I; the first group after thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW), the second group after rh TSH administration (rh TSH). On the basis of post-treatment images, the uptake ratios over selected ROIs (thyroid remnants, mediastinum, liver, stomach, abdomen, and whole-body) were compared between groups. Results: In the case of uptake over the whole-body and the liver, statistically significant higher values were received for the THW group. For the remaining regions, the differences between groups were statistically insignificant, but uptake ratios in the rh TSH group were generally numerically lower compared to the THW group. (authors)

  19. Biokinetic and dosimetric investigations of 14C-labeled substances in man using AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now, radiation dose estimates from radiopharmaceuticals, labeled with pure β-emitting radionuclides, e.g., 14C or 3H have been very uncertain. Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) we have derived new and improved data for 14C-triolein and 14C-urea and are currently running a program related to the biokinetics and dosimetry of 14C-glycocholic acid and 14C-xylose. The results of our investigations have made it possible to widen the indications for the clinical use of the 14C-urea test for Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The use of ultra-low activities, which is possible with AMS (down to 1/1000 of that used for liquid scintillation counting), has opened the possibility for metabolic investigations on children as well as on other sensitive patient groups like new-borns, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. Using the full potential of AMS, new 14C-labeled drugs could be tested on humans at a much earlier stage than today, avoiding uncertain extrapolations from animal models

  20. Biokinetics of copper in black-banded rainbowfish (Melanotaenia nigrans) tolerant to elevated copper concentrations, using the radioisotope 64Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For over 40 years black-banded rainbowfish (Melanotaenia nigrans) living in the East Branch of the Finniss River, Northern Territory have been exposed to elevated copper concentrations due to mine waste from the Rum Jungle uranium/copper mine. In the 1970s prior to remediation of the mine, fish kills were observed along the length of the East Branch. While copper concentrations remain comparatively high (up to 2000 μg/L) in the East Branch since remediation of the mine site, M. nigrans have been observed in the area. It was, therefore, hypothesised that due to selective pressure of lethal exposure, the population of black-banded rainbowfish in the East Branch have developed a tolerance to elevated copper concentrations. This project aimed to demonstrate copper tolerance and evaluate possible mechanism(s). In May 2000, fish were collected from the East Branch (exposed fish) and from a catchment previously unexposed to elevated metal concentrations (reference fish). The 96-hour EC50, fish imbalance (i.e. the concentration of copper that affects 50% of fish over 96 hours) for the exposed fish was over 8 times higher than the reference fish. Using the radioisotope, 64Cu, the biokinetics of newly accumulated copper was traced in exposed and reference fish at low and elevated copper concentrations. The uptake rate, and therefore body burden, were significantly (p=0.000) lower in exposed fish, at both low and elevated copper concentrations compared to reference fish. Possible mechanisms of reducing copper uptake will be discussed. Tolerance was not lost when fish were maintained in relatively low copper concentrations in the laboratory. Also, the two populations of fish were genetically dissimilar based on allozyme analysis, which suggests that the mechanism is genetically mediated. The outcome of this project will be important in assisting accurate risk assessment and the development of environmental management strategies for the conservation of biota. The

  1. Investigation on biokinetics of 134Cs and 241Am radionuclides in three different organisms and a new evaluation by using discrete time model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, 134Cs and 241Am biokinetic experiments have been observed originally for Black Sea condition with using the gastropod Patella coerulea and the macro algae Enteremorpha linza and the common mussel Mytilus galloprovlncialis as bio indicator organisms. The experiments that have at least three originality, have been carried out very carefully and biokinetic parameters have been calculated by using classical model. The results are compared with the proportionally similar experiments in the literature globally. In this thesis, a new model application has proposed for the biokinetic evaluation for loss experiments of organisms. That is discrete time model. Loss experiments can be evaluated proportionally in a quick and easy way by using this model. Then, it can be observed that the calculated decreasing factor (r) by discrete time model, shows the loss process quality. Moreover, the loss experiments can be stopped when the decreasing factor goes to 1. So, the loss experiment can be evaluated rapidly and quickly with the adequate reliability by using discrete time model. Furthermore, the loss process in the organisms becomes slower and biologic half-lives becomes longer, when the decreasing factor (r) goes to 1. On the other hand, the biological depuration rate (k) goes to nearly zero. So, the proposed discrete time model that is applied in this thesis originally for biokinetic, can be evident that it has an adequate reliability for the biokinetic evaluation

  2. Study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide using the shadow-shield whole-body counter in the general hospital Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the whole-body counter at the Vienna General Hospital to the study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165Dy-DFH was investigated. Activity profiles of the four detectors allow the incorporated/injected radionuclide to be localized with an accuracy of ± 1 cm in the 3 coordinates. The main peak marks the position of the knee joint, the small peak on its right shows the position where a small amount of activity escaped . This small peak can be related to the anatomical structure. A rather high background is due to scattered rays. Based on data derived from phantom measurements, it is possible to determine the amount of activity applied and the exposure to non-target organs. The MIRDOSE II code was used to determine the energy dose in the organs. Radiation exposure of the patient whose urinary bladder has concentrated escaped activity can be reduced if the patients urinates immediately after the leakage was detected. The leakage of 165Dy-DFH out of the joint is negligible and radiation exposure due to the treatment is relatively low. The whole-body counter allows activity leakage to be detected with a considerably higher sensitivity than a gamma camera does. The biodistribution of 165Dy-DFH can be determined and leakage can be localized and related to the organs. (P.A.)

  3. Investigation of biokinetics of cadmium in the mussel in various environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics of cadmium were investigated under different environmental conditions in mussel (M. galloprovincialis) using sup(115m)Cd as tracer. The accumulation experiment was followed from water for 34 days and observed concentration factor 68 was obtained. On the other hand, it is observed that between the concentrations used in the experiment, the accumulation increased proportionally with the stable cadmium concentration in water. During depuration, more than one compartment has been observed on the loss curves carried out under different temperature and salinity. The results showed that mussels under 22-10C lost cadmium more rapidly at the beginning compared with the ones under 15-10C, which were kept in the same salinity, 0.21%. At the same time, the loss rates were found significantly different under different salinities. For example, the biological half-lives were 407.6 and 866.2 at the salinities 0.21% and 0.7% S respectively. The loss rate of cadmium was also followed under field condition. It is concluded that the results obtained in the field and the laboratory cannot be comparable; for example, the biological half-lives for the slow components in these two experiments were 350 and 612 days respectively. The relative distribution of cadmium in different organs and tissues are examined, it is observed that cadmium both after accumulation and loss periods, is localized in stomach hepatopancreas, gills and mantle. At the end of the accumulation experiment the highest relative percentage of cadmium was 30% in stomach, 22.7% in hepatopancreas. Likely at the end of loss periods the highest percentages of retained cadmium were 42% in stomach and 32% in hepatopancreas. (author)

  4. Radionuclide decorporation: matching the biokinetics of actinides by transdermal delivery of pro-chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism by the deliberate detonation of a nuclear weapon or radiological dispersion device ("dirty bomb") has made emergency response planning a priority. The only FDA-approved treatments for contamination with isotopes of the transuranic elements Am, Pu, and Cm are the Ca and Zn salts of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). These injectable products are not well suited for use in a mass contamination scenario as they require skilled professionals for their administration and are rapidly cleared from the circulation. To overcome the mismatch in the pharmacokinetics of the DTPA and the biokinetics of these transuranic elements, which are slowly released from contamination sites, the penta-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E5) was prepared and formulated in a nonaqueous gel for transdermal administration. When gels comprised of 40% C2E5, 40-45% Miglyol® 840, and 15-20% ethyl cellulose were spiked with [(14)C]-C2E5 and applied to rat skin; over 60% of the applied dose was absorbed within a 24-h period. Radioactivity was observed in urinary and fecal excretions for over 3 days after removal of the gel. Using an (241)Am wound contamination model, transdermal C2E5 gels were able to enhance total body elimination and reduce the liver and skeletal burden of (241)Am in a dose-dependent manner. The efficacy achieved by a single 1,000 mg/kg dose to contaminated rats was statistically comparable to intravenous Ca-DTPA at 14 mg/kg. The effectiveness of this treatment, favorable sustained release profile of pro-chelators, and ease of administration support its use following radiological emergencies and for its inclusion in the Strategic National Stockpile. PMID:23990504

  5. Comparison of observed skeleton retention of strontium in average indian adult with the value predicted by the ICRP biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The daily dietary intake of strontium and its content in skeleton, for an Indian adult population group were estimated by experimentally measuring its concentration in total cooked diet and autopsy skeleton samples using radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The data on daily dietary intake of strontium were used to compute its contents in skeleton using ICRP Publication 67 biokinetic model for strontium. The theoretically computed value of strontium (213.8 mg) compared favourably with the measured values (GM 181.2 mg) in an urban population group living in Mumbai representing an average Indian adult (Reference Indian Man). (authors)

  6. A novel bench-scale column assay to investigate site-specific nitrification biokinetics in biological rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A bench-scale assay was developed to obtain site-specific nitrification biokinetic information from biological rapid sand filters employed in groundwater treatment. The experimental set-up uses granular material subsampled from a full-scale filter, packed in a column, and operated with controlled....../m3 packed sand/h could easily be determined at 7.5 g NH4+–N/m3 packed sand/h. This assay, with conditions reflecting full-scale observations, and where the biological activity is subject to minimal physical disturbance, provides a simple and fast, yet powerful tool to gain insight in nitrification...

  7. Inhalation dose assessment of indoor radon progeny using biokinetic and dosimetric modeling and its application to Jordanian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High indoor radon concentrations in Jordan result in internal exposures of the residents due to the inhalation of radon and its short-lived progeny. It is therefore important to quantify the annual effective dose and further the radiation risk to the radon exposure. This study describes the methodology and the biokinetic and dosimetric models used for calculation of the inhalation doses exposed to radon progeny. The regional depositions of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract were firstly calculated. For the attached progeny, the activity median aerodynamic diameters of 50 nm, 230 nm and 2500 nm were chosen to represent the nucleation, accumulation and coarse modes of the aerosol particles, respectively. For the unattached progeny, the activity median thermodynamic diameter of 1 nm was chosen to represent the free progeny nuclide in the room air. The biokinetic models developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were used to calculate the nuclear transformations of radon progeny in the human body, and then the dosimetric model was applied to estimate the organ equivalent doses and the effective doses with the specific effective energies derived from the mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. The dose conversion coefficient estimated in this study was 15 mSv WLM-1 which was in the range of the values of 6-20 mSv WLM-1 reported by other investigators. Implementing the average indoor radon concentration in Jordan, the annual effective doses were calculated to be 4.1 mSv y-1 and 0.08 mSv y-1 due to the inhalation of radon progeny and radon gas, respectively. The total annual effective dose estimated for Jordanian population was 4.2 mSv y-1. This high annual effective dose calculated by the dosimetric approach using ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models resulted in an increase of a factor of two in comparison to the value by epidemiological study. This phenomenon was presented by the ICRP in its new published statement on radon

  8. Software for biokinetic modeling of the radiopharmaceuticals used in PET; Software para modelagem biocinetica de radiofarmacos utilizados em PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, Leanderson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-RE),Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A. de; Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br, E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this work will be presented the current state of software in development to estimate the dose from PET images. Will be given the main biokinetic models used in PET, as well as the general features of a tool in development, whose current features allow quantitative analysis of compartmental models. Further, the tool allows display images 2D PET (in DICOM format) and quantify the intensity map of regions of interest in counts per second coincidence events. The next step is to insert in the same tool to estimate the activity concentration for ROI and estimate dose from PET images static and / or dynamic.

  9. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Association Contract covers a range of research domains that are important to the Radiation Protection Research Action, especially in the areas 'Evaluation of Radiation Risks' and 'Understanding Radiation Mechanisms and Epidemiology'. Three research projects concentrate on radiation dosimetry research and two projects on the modelling of radiation carcinogenesis. The following list gives an overview on the topics and responsible scientific project leaders of the Association Contract: Study of radiation fields and dosimetry at aviation altitudes. Biokinetics and dosimetry of incorporated radionuclides. Dose reconstruction. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Experimental data for the induction of cancer by radiation of different qualities. (orig.)

  10. Biokinetics and dosimetry with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Ferro-Flores, Ge; Pedraza-López, M.; Murphy-Stack, E.

    Malignant pancreatic tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to determine biokinetic parameters in mice, in order to estimate the induced pancreatic tumour absorbed doses and to evaluate an `in house' 177Lu-DOTA-TATE radiopharmaceutical as part of preclinical studies for targeted therapy in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (nD22) to obtain biokinetic and dosimetric data of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. The mean tumour uptake 2 h post injection was 14.76±1.9% I.A./g; kidney and pancreas uptake, at the same time, were 7.27±1.1% I.A./g (1.71±0.90%/organ) and 4.20±0.98% I.A./g (0.42±0.03%/organ), respectively. The mean absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 0.58±0.02 Gy/MBq; 0.23±0.01 Gy/MBq and 0.14±0.01 Gy/MBq, respectively. These studies justify further dosimetric estimations to ensure that 177Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in humans.

  11. Biokinetics of 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in nude mice transplanted with a human carcinoid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long time biokinetics of the radiolabeled somatostatin analogues 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was studied in nude mice transplanted with the human carcinoid tumor, GOT1. The results were compared with those from the patient with the original tumor. This patient has been diagnosed and later treated with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. The animals received about 2 MBq 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide (0.1 μg) by injection into a tail vein. The animals were killed 0.5 h-14 d after injection of the radiopharmaceutical. Tumor tissue and normal tissues were collected and weighed and measured for 111In activity. The 111In uptake in the tumor was higher than in all normal tissues except the kidneys. The tumor-to-normal-tissue activity concentration, TNC, increased with time for all normal tissues studied. These data were similar to those observed for the original tumor in the patient. The similar biokinetics for 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in the tumor-bearing mice and the patient makes this animal model suitable as a model for evaluation of therapy of somatostatin receptor (sstr) expressing tumors with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues. Furthermore, the increase with time of TNC both in mice and the patient indicates that long-lived radionuclides are preferred for therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues

  12. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, Viriato, E-mail: viriatoleal@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: this article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and methods: a software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiacoes Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C ⧣ programming language. Results: with the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion: the user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. (author)

  13. Biokinetics and dosimetry of depleted uranium (DU) in rats implanted with DU fragments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, Ray A.; Hahn, Fletcher F.; Durbin, P. W.

    2004-01-01

    A number of U. S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War were wounded with depleted uranium (DU) metal fragments as a result of 'friendly fire' incidents, in which Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles were struck by DU anti-armor munitions. Some of the crew members who survived were left with multiple small fragments of DU in their muscles and soft tissues. The number, size and location of the fragments made them inoperable in general, and therefore subject to long-term retention. Because there was inadequate data to predict the potential carcinogenicity of DU fragments in soft tissues, Hahn et al. (2003) conducted a lifespan cancer study in rats. As part of that study, a number of rats were maintained to study the biokinetics and dosimetry of DU implanted intramuscularly in male Wistar rats. Typically, four metal fragments, either as cylindrical pellets or square wafers were implanted into the biceps femoris muscles of the rats. Urine samples were collected periodically during their lifespans, and DU was analyzed in kidneys and eviscerated carcass (minus the implant sites) at death. The daily DU urinary excretion rate increased steeply during the first 30 d after implantation peaking at about 90 d at 3-10 x 10{sup -3}%/d. During the first 150 d, the average excretion rate was 2.4 x 10{sup -3}%/d, decreasing thereafter to about 1 x 10{sup -3}%/d. Serial radiographs were made of the wound sites to monitor gross morphologic changes in the DU implant and the surrounding tissue. As early as 1 w after implantation, radiographs showed the presence of surface corrosion and small, dense bodies near the original implant, presumably DU. This corrosion from the surface of the implant continued with time, but did not result in an increasing amount of DU reaching the blood and urine after the first 3 mo. During this 3-mo period, connective tissue capsules formed around the implants, and are hypothesized to have reduced the access of DU to tissue fluids by limiting the

  14. Compared biokinetic and biological studies of chronic and acute inhalations of uranium compounds in the rat; Etudes biocinetique et biologique comparees d'inhalations chroniques et aigues de composes uraniferes chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monleau, M

    2005-12-15

    Uranium is a natural, radioactive heavy metal, widely used in the nuclear industry in various chemical and isotopic forms. Its use in the fuel cycle involves the risk of radiological exposure for the workers, mainly via the inhalation of uranium particles. According to the workplace configuration, uranium contaminations can be acute or repeated, involve various chemical forms and different levels of enrichment, as well as involving one or several components. The dosimetric concepts and models available for workers' radiological protection, as well as most of the studies of the biological effects, correspond to acute exposure situations. Moreover the processes leading to pathological effects are little known in vivo. In this context, the main question is to know whether exposures due to repeated inhalation by rats induce the element kinetics and toxicity, which may be different from those observed after an acute exposure. In this study, comparison of the experimental and theoretical biokinetics of an insoluble uranium repeatedly inhaled over three weeks shows that a chronic contamination is correctly modelled, except for bone retention, by the sum of acute, successive and independent incorporations. Moreover, the kinetics of a soluble uranium inhaled irregularly can be modified by previous repeated exposure to an insoluble uranium. In certain cases therefore, exposure to uranium could modify its biokinetics during later exposures. At a toxicological level, the study demonstrates that the uranium particles inhaled repeatedly induce behavioural disruptions and genotoxic effects resulting in various sorts of DNA damage, in several cell types and certainly depending on the quantity inhaled. Exposures involving several uraniferous components produce a synergy effect. Moreover, repeated inhalations worsen the genotoxic effects in comparison to an acute exposure. This work demonstrates the importance of not ignoring the effects of the repetition of uranium exposure

  15. Improvement in DTPA efficacy for plutonium decorporation: biokinetic and dosimetric approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DTPA for pulmonary administration. DTPA has already been formulated as a micronized dry powder for inhalation and delivered to humans with a Spinhaler TM inhalator device. Both the powder and the inhalator device were far from being optimized since only 3% of the powder actually deposits in the lungs [3]. We have formulated DTPA into porous particles with optimised physical properties for major deposition in the deep lung [4]. Aerodynamic evaluation of our powder show that up to 60% of the initial dose deposits in the lungs with about 30% in the alveolar region. The ability of the DTPA powder to de-corporate Pu was evaluated in rats after contamination by inhalation with industrial Pu oxide. Six days after the exposure, the treatment was performed by a single insufflation of the dry DTPA powder [5]. After 24 hours, results showed a significant decrease of the alpha activity in the liver and in the bone, associated with an increase of actinide urinary excretion as compared to untreated rats. These results suggested that the novel DTPA formulation, which may be rapidly administered at the workplace, allows a fast systemic delivery of DTPA. Studies are in progress to compare the Pu decorporation efficacy of such DTPA powder with free DTPA intravenous injection in rats after contamination with more soluble Pu forms. To complete the biokinetic approach, modeling of DTPA decorporation from biological data reported after accidental contamination of workers is in progress [6]. Our aim is to estimate the reduction of dose associated with chelate treatment. The first case analyzed corresponds to a Pu wound which has been treated by repeated perfusions of DTPA during several months. The hypothesis that a 90 Pu decorporation involves only blood and interstitial fluids (STO) was initially applied. The first results show that the systemic model of ICRP 67 was not suitable to fit a theoretic curve to the amount of Pu excreted in urines. This was mainly due to an underestimate of the

  16. Cadmium bioavailability to Hyalella azteca from a periphyton diet compared to an artificial diet and application of a biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences between the bioavailability of cadmium in a periphyton diet and an artificial laboratory diet (TetraMin®) have important consequences for predicting bioaccumulation and toxicity in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. The assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cd was compared between periphyton and TetraMin® at low (1510 and 358 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) and chronically lethal (31,200 and 2890 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) Cd concentrations and in fresh and dry forms using a 109Cd radiotracer pulse-chase feeding technique. Assimilation efficiency of Cd from periphyton (AE = 3–14%) was lower than that for TetraMin® (AE = 44–86%) regardless of Cd concentration or food form. Ingestion rate (IR) was lower for dry than fresh forms of periphyton (0.042 and 0.16 g AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and TetraMin® (0.19 and 0.87 AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and depuration rate (ke) did not differ statistically with food type, form or Cd concentration (0.032–0.094 d−1). Biokinetic models with parameters of AE, IR and ke were used to estimate bioaccumulation from the separate food types. These estimates were compared to those from an independent chronic Cd saturation bioaccumulation model. While the model estimates did not concur, a sensitivity analysis indicated that AE and IR were the most influential biokinetic model parameters for Cd in periphyton and TetraMin® respectively. It was hypothesized that AE was underestimated for Cd in periphyton due to a non-adapted gut enzyme system and IR was overestimated for Cd in TetraMin® due to an initial rapid ingestion phase in H. azteca's feeding habits. This research demonstrated the importance of using ecologically relevant food types in laboratory experiments and verifying acute biokinetic model predictions of dietary metal contribution with those derived from a chronic exposure which is more representative of a field exposure scenario.

  17. Radiocesium biokinetics in olive flounder inhabiting the Fukushima accident-affected Pacific coastal waters of eastern Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs) originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1FNPP) has contaminated coastal waters and been subsequently transferred to the marine biota along the Pacific coastal region of eastern Japan. To clarify the mechanism of radiocesium biokinetics in olive flounder, a commercially valuable and piscivorous predator, the biokinetics of 137Cs was simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model and then validated with the measured concentrations in available monitoring data. The 137Cs concentrations in seawater of the Pacific coastal sites of eastern Japan, from Kesen-numa (170 km north from the 1FNPP) to Choshi (190 km south from the 1FNPP), were reconstructed by fitting the simulated levels to the observed concentrations. Simulated values were verified by measured radiocesium levels in sedentary organism such as macro-algae and mussels inhabiting each study site which had accumulated radiocesium in their ambient environment from the beginning of the accident. Using reconstructed 137Cs concentrations in seawater, the 137Cs levels in olive flounder and its main planktivorous prey fish, e.g. anchovy, sand lance, whitebait, etc., were simulated and compared with observed concentrations to clarify the biokinetics of radiocesium in these organisms. This assessment showed that the determining factor for the maximum radiocesium concentrations in fish in the plankton food chain is likely to be the initial radiocesium concentration which they were exposed to during the contamination stage. Furthermore, the simulated 137Cs concentrations in gut contents of olive flounder were verified by measured 137Cs concentrations in the stomach contents of this fish collected within 30 km from the 1FNPP. These results indicated that the decrease of 137Cs levels in their prey organisms was the primary determining factor of radiocesium depuration, and the resultant ecological half-lives were 140–160 d in the olive flounder, by the simulation

  18. Cadmium bioavailability to Hyalella azteca from a periphyton diet compared to an artificial diet and application of a biokinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lisa A., E-mail: lisa.golding@csiro.au [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Borgmann, Uwe [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario L7R 4A6 (Canada); George Dixon, D. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Differences between the bioavailability of cadmium in a periphyton diet and an artificial laboratory diet (TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign }) have important consequences for predicting bioaccumulation and toxicity in the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca. The assimilation efficiency (AE) of Cd was compared between periphyton and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} at low (1510 and 358 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) and chronically lethal (31,200 and 2890 nmol/g ash-free dry mass respectively) Cd concentrations and in fresh and dry forms using a {sup 109}Cd radiotracer pulse-chase feeding technique. Assimilation efficiency of Cd from periphyton (AE = 3-14%) was lower than that for TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} (AE = 44-86%) regardless of Cd concentration or food form. Ingestion rate (IR) was lower for dry than fresh forms of periphyton (0.042 and 0.16 g AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} (0.19 and 0.87 AFDM/g H. azteca/day respectively) and depuration rate (k{sub e}) did not differ statistically with food type, form or Cd concentration (0.032-0.094 d{sup -1}). Biokinetic models with parameters of AE, IR and k{sub e} were used to estimate bioaccumulation from the separate food types. These estimates were compared to those from an independent chronic Cd saturation bioaccumulation model. While the model estimates did not concur, a sensitivity analysis indicated that AE and IR were the most influential biokinetic model parameters for Cd in periphyton and TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} respectively. It was hypothesized that AE was underestimated for Cd in periphyton due to a non-adapted gut enzyme system and IR was overestimated for Cd in TetraMin{sup Registered-Sign} due to an initial rapid ingestion phase in H. azteca's feeding habits. This research demonstrated the importance of using ecologically relevant food types in laboratory experiments and verifying acute biokinetic model predictions of dietary metal contribution with

  19. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 14C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used 14C-breath tests: 14C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low 14C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform 14C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of 14C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: 14C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, 14C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, 14C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and 14C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the 14C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  20. Modeling Aspects of Activated Sludge Processes Part l l: Mathematical Process Modeling and Biokinetics of Activated Sludge Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical process modeling and biokinetics of activated sludge process were reviewed considering different types of models. It has been evaluated the task group models of ASMI. and 2, and 3 versioned by Henze et al considering the conditions of each model and the different processes of which every model consists. It is revealed that ASMI contains some defects avoided in ASM3. Relied on homogeneity, Models can be classified into homogenous models characterized by taking the activated sludge process as one phase. In this type of models, the internal mass transfer inside the floes was neglected.. Hence, the kinetic parameter produces can be considered inaccurate. The other type of models is the heterogeneous model This type considers the mass transfer operations in addition to the biochemical reaction processes; hence, the resulted kinetic parameters can be considered more accurate than that of homogenous type

  1. Biokinetic and dosimetric studies of {sup 188}Re-hyaluronic acid: a new radiopharmaceutical for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez-Alafort, Laura [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy)], E-mail: laura.melendez@unipd.it; Nadali, Anna; Zangoni, Elena [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy); Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Oncologiche e Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua (Italy); Rosato, Antonio [Dipartimento di Scienze Oncologiche e Chirurgiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua (Italy); Istituto Oncologico Veneto, IOV, Padova, Padua (Italy); Mazzi, Ulderico [Dipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padua (Italy)

    2009-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and has very limited therapeutic options. Recently, it has been found that hyaluronic acid (HA) shows selective binding to CD44 receptors expressed in most cancer histotypes. Since the trend in cancer treatment is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy, the aim of this research was to label HA with rhenium-188 and to evaluate its potential use as a hepatocarcinoma therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. Methods: {sup 188}Re-HA was prepared by a direct labelling method to produce a ReO(O-COO){sub 2}-type coordination complex. {sup 188}Re-HA protein binding and its stability in saline, phosphate buffer, human serum and cysteine solutions were determined. Biokinetic and dosimetric data were estimated in healthy mice (n=60) using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose methodology and mouse model beta-absorbed fractions. To evaluate liver toxicity, alanine aminotranferase (AST) and aspartate aminotranferase (ALT) levels in mice were assessed and the liver maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 188}Re-HA was determined. Results: A stable complex of {sup 188}Re-HA was obtained with high radiochemical purity (>90%) and low serum protein binding (2%). Biokinetic studies showed a rapid blood clearance (T{sub 1/2}{alpha}=21 min). Four hours after administration, {sup 188}Re-HA was almost totally removed from the blood by the liver due to the selective uptake via HA-specific receptors (73.47{+-}5.11% of the injected dose). The liver MTD in mice was {approx}40 Gy after 7.4 MBq of {sup 188}Re-HA injection. Conclusions: {sup 188}Re-HA complex showed good stability, pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics that confirm its potential as a new agent for HCC radiation therapy.

  2. Biokinetic and dosimetric studies of 188Re-hyaluronic acid: a new radiopharmaceutical for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and has very limited therapeutic options. Recently, it has been found that hyaluronic acid (HA) shows selective binding to CD44 receptors expressed in most cancer histotypes. Since the trend in cancer treatment is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy, the aim of this research was to label HA with rhenium-188 and to evaluate its potential use as a hepatocarcinoma therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. Methods: 188Re-HA was prepared by a direct labelling method to produce a ReO(O-COO)2-type coordination complex. 188Re-HA protein binding and its stability in saline, phosphate buffer, human serum and cysteine solutions were determined. Biokinetic and dosimetric data were estimated in healthy mice (n=60) using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose methodology and mouse model beta-absorbed fractions. To evaluate liver toxicity, alanine aminotranferase (AST) and aspartate aminotranferase (ALT) levels in mice were assessed and the liver maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 188Re-HA was determined. Results: A stable complex of 188Re-HA was obtained with high radiochemical purity (>90%) and low serum protein binding (2%). Biokinetic studies showed a rapid blood clearance (T1/2α=21 min). Four hours after administration, 188Re-HA was almost totally removed from the blood by the liver due to the selective uptake via HA-specific receptors (73.47±5.11% of the injected dose). The liver MTD in mice was ∼40 Gy after 7.4 MBq of 188Re-HA injection. Conclusions: 188Re-HA complex showed good stability, pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics that confirm its potential as a new agent for HCC radiation therapy.

  3. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide prepared from lyophilized kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to establish a biokinetic model for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC prepared from lyophilized kits, and to evaluate its dosimetry as a tumor imaging agent in patients with histologically confirmed neuroendocrine tumors. Whole-body images from eight patients were acquired at 5, 60, 90, 180 min and 24 h after 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities >95%. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all eight scans and the count per minute (cpm) of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust a biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h. The mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv

  4. In vitro and in vivo interactions of selected nanoparticles with rodent serum proteins and their consequences in biokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang G. Kreyling

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When particles incorporated within a mammalian organism come into contact with body fluids they will bind to soluble proteins or those within cellular membranes forming what is called a protein corona. This binding process is very complex and highly dynamic due to the plethora of proteins with different affinities and fractions in different body fluids and the large variation of compounds and structures of the particle surface. Interestingly, in the case of nanoparticles (NP this protein corona is well suited to provide a guiding vehicle of translocation within body fluids and across membranes. This NP translocation may subsequently lead to accumulation in various organs and tissues and their respective cell types that are not expected to accumulate such tiny foreign bodies. Because of this unprecedented NP accumulation, potentially adverse biological responses in tissues and cells cannot be neglected a priori but require thorough investigations. Therefore, we studied the interactions and protein binding kinetics of blood serum proteins with a number of engineered NP as a function of their physicochemical properties. Here we show by in vitro incubation tests that the binding capacity of different engineered NP (polystyrene, elemental carbon for selected serum proteins depends strongly on the NP size and the properties of engineered surface modifications. In the following attempt, we studied systematically the effect of the size (5, 15, 80 nm of gold spheres (AuNP, surface-modified with the same ionic ligand; as well as 5 nm AuNP with five different surface modifications on the binding to serum proteins by using proteomics analyses. We found that the binding of numerous serum proteins depended strongly on the physicochemical properties of the AuNP. These in vitro results helped us substantially in the interpretation of our numerous in vivo biokinetics studies performed in rodents using the same NP. These had shown that not only the

  5. Influence of zinc on the biokinetics of Zn-65 and hepatic trace elements of ethanol treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of zinc on the biokinetics of 65Zn and hepatic trace elements of ethanol treated rats. The effect of zinc on the biokinetics of 65Zn in liver and whole body and its relation to the hepatic levels of different elements was evaluated in male wistar rats under alcoholic conditions. The rats were segregated into four treatment groups viz., normal control, ethanol treated, zinc treated and combined zinc+ethanol treated. Animals were fed 3ml of 30% ethanol orally daily and zinc in the form of zinc sulfate (ZnSo4 7H2O) was administrated to rats at a dose level of 227mg/L mixed in their drinking water for a total duration of 2 months. Whole body counting studies indicated that the Tb1 i.e., the faster elimination of the radiotracer. On the contrary, Tb2 i.e., the slower component was increased significantly following ethanol treatment. Percent uptake values of 65Zn were found to be increased in liver, intestine, muscle and kidney and decreased in bone under alcoholic conditions. A significant elevation was noticed in in vitro uptake 65Zn in ethanol treated animals. In the above said conditions, the values were reverted back to within normal limits upon zinc supplementation to these ethanol intoxicated animals, except in the case of in vitro 65Zn uptake in liver where the uptake was further increased upon combined treatment. A significant decrease in zinc contents was noticed in ethanol treated rats, which however were raised to normal levels upon zinc supplementation. Copper levels, on the other hand, were found to be significantly enhanced in both ethanol fed and combined ethanol+zinc supplemented animals. Calcium levels were found to e significantly decreased in both ethanol and zinc treated rats, which however were further reduced upon zinc supplementation to ethanol fed rats. However, no significant change was observed in the concentrations of sodium and potassium in any of the treatment groups. Therefore, zinc appears to play a protective role by reverting

  6. Biokinetic and dosimetric study of a locally produced kit 177Lu-EDTMP for use as a pain palliative agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals like the ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) labeled with β--emitting radioisotopes have demonstrated their efficacy in the palliative treatment of skeletal metastasis. A biokinetic and dosimetric study of 177Lu-EDTMP in NIH mice was performed. The results obtained were extrapolated to human. We estimate the absorbed doses in organs for two models: an adult male and an adult female. 177Lu-EDTMP has a selective uptake in bone, a rapid elimination from blood and negligible uptake in non-skeletal tissues. The estimated dose in bone is between 14.7-15.3 cGy/mCi for men and between 19.6-20.4 cGy/mCi for women. Bone marrow toxicity represents the limiting factor in this kind of therapy, and to avoid exceed the maximum dose it can tolerate (200 cGy), it was found that the maximum safe activity of 177Lu-EDTMP to be injected to male (73.9 kg), corresponds to a value of 1.01 mCi/kg and a value of 1.25 mCi/kg for female (56.9 kg)

  7. Biokinetics of a transuranic ({sup 238}PU) and a rare earth element ({sup 152}Eu) in the lobster (Homarus gammarus): transfer mechanisms (accumulation and detoxification) in organs and at the cellular level; Biocinetiques d'un element transuranien, le {sup 238}PU, et d'une terre rare, le {sup 152}EU, chez le homard homarus gammarus (organes et niveau cellulaire) modalites des transferts (accumulation et detoxication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocquet, N

    1995-07-01

    The work presented here is an experimental investigation of the biokinetics of transfer of a transuranic and a rare earth element ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 152}Eu) in the lobster Homarus gammarus. The study of {sup 238}Pu biokinetics forms part of a wider framework of research concerning the transfer of transuranic elements in marine species, while the study of {sup 152}Eu is carried out with a view to supporting the analogy between the behaviour of transuranics and rare earths in living organisms. Exactly the same experimental protocol, based on techniques from various disciplines (biology, biochemistry and metrology), was used to Investigate the biokinetics of transfer of these two radionuclides. The Individual lobsters were radiolabelled by means of one-shot or chronic ingestion of spiked meals. As the first approach, the kinetics and transfer mechanisms were studied In whole animal samples and in different organs distinct series of pathways through the different organs were identified in the case of both radionuclides, being mainly linked to digestive processes induced by the meal as well as the transport function of hemo-lymph in this way, the Important role of the digestive gland was picked out, with two of four cellular types displaying a successive involvement In the fixation and then the retention of the studied radionuclides. As a corroborative approach, the digestive gland was subjected to a more detailed investigation with the aim of describing the mechanisms of Incorporation and elucidating transfer processes at the cellular and molecular levels. {sup 238}Pu is preferentially partitioned into the cytosol, where it is associated with various constituents such as ferritin (iron-storing protein). {sup 152}Eu is more diffusely distributed in the hepato-pancreatic cells, while the lysosomes appear to play a more important role during transfer. The results obtained in this study, both on the macroscopic scale (i.e. the whole animal and different organs) as well

  8. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 111In-DOTA-NOC-ATE compared with 111In-DTPA-octreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetics and dosimetry of 111In-DOTA-NOC-ATE (NOCATE), a high-affinity ligand of SSTR-2 and SSTR-5, and 111In-DTPA-octreotide (Octreoscan trademark, OCTREO) were compared in the same patients. Seventeen patients (10 men, 7 women; mean age 60 years), referred for an OCTREO scan for imaging of a neuroendocrine tumour (15), thymoma (1) or medullary thyroid carcinoma (1), agreed to undergo a second study with NOCATE. Whole-body anterior-posterior scans were recorded 0.5 (100 % reference scan), 4, 24 and 48 h (17 patients) and 120 h (5 patients) after injection. In 16 patients the OCTREO scan (178 ± 15 MBq) was performed 16 ± 5 days before the NOCATE scan (108 ± 14 MBq) with identical timing; 1 patient had the NOCATE scan before the OCTREO scan. Blood samples were obtained from 14 patients 5 min to 48 h after injection. Activities expressed as percent of the initial (reference) activity in the whole body, lung, kidney, liver, spleen and blood were fitted to biexponential or single exponential functions. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM. Initial whole-body, lung and kidney activities were similar, but retention of NOCATE was higher than that of OCTREO. Liver and spleen uptakes of NOCATE were higher from the start (p 1/2β for NOCATE was longer (19 vs. 6 h). As a result, the effective dose of NOCATE (105 μSv/MBq) exceeded that of OCTREO (52 μSv/MBq), and the latter result was similar to the ICRP 106 value of 54 μSv/MBq. Differential activity measurement in blood cells and plasma showed an average of <5 % of NOCATE and OCTREO attached to globular blood components. NOCATE showed a slower clearance from normal tissues and its effective dose was roughly double that of OCTREO. (orig.)

  9. Biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 111}In-DOTA-NOC-ATE compared with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubaker, Ariane; Prior, John O.; Champendal, Melanie; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Willi, Jean-Pierre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Kosinski, Marek; Baechler, Sebastien [Lausanne University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Ginj, Mihaela [University Health Network, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Buchegger, Franz [Lausanne University Hospital, CHUV, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    The biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 111}In-DOTA-NOC-ATE (NOCATE), a high-affinity ligand of SSTR-2 and SSTR-5, and {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide (Octreoscan trademark, OCTREO) were compared in the same patients. Seventeen patients (10 men, 7 women; mean age 60 years), referred for an OCTREO scan for imaging of a neuroendocrine tumour (15), thymoma (1) or medullary thyroid carcinoma (1), agreed to undergo a second study with NOCATE. Whole-body anterior-posterior scans were recorded 0.5 (100 % reference scan), 4, 24 and 48 h (17 patients) and 120 h (5 patients) after injection. In 16 patients the OCTREO scan (178 {+-} 15 MBq) was performed 16 {+-} 5 days before the NOCATE scan (108 {+-} 14 MBq) with identical timing; 1 patient had the NOCATE scan before the OCTREO scan. Blood samples were obtained from 14 patients 5 min to 48 h after injection. Activities expressed as percent of the initial (reference) activity in the whole body, lung, kidney, liver, spleen and blood were fitted to biexponential or single exponential functions. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM. Initial whole-body, lung and kidney activities were similar, but retention of NOCATE was higher than that of OCTREO. Liver and spleen uptakes of NOCATE were higher from the start (p < 0.001) and remained so over time. Whole-body activity showed similar {alpha} and {beta} half-lives, but the {beta} fraction of NOCATE was double that of OCTREO. Blood T{sub 1/2}{beta} for NOCATE was longer (19 vs. 6 h). As a result, the effective dose of NOCATE (105 {mu}Sv/MBq) exceeded that of OCTREO (52 {mu}Sv/MBq), and the latter result was similar to the ICRP 106 value of 54 {mu}Sv/MBq. Differential activity measurement in blood cells and plasma showed an average of <5 % of NOCATE and OCTREO attached to globular blood components. NOCATE showed a slower clearance from normal tissues and its effective dose was roughly double that of OCTREO. (orig.)

  10. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, A.; Zhu, M.; Tiwari, A.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load).

  11. Design, analysis and testing of a piezoelectric flex transducer for harvesting bio-kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing prevalence of low power consuming electronics brings greater potential to mobile energy harvesting devices as a possible power source. A new piezoelectric energy harvesting device, called the piezoelectric flex transducer (PFT), is presented and developed. A Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed to design and analyse the PFT. The PFT consists of a piezoelectric element sandwiched between substrate layers and metal endcaps that are able to amplify the axial force on the piezoelectric element. Based on the concept of the Cymbal transducer, the PFT can withstand higher forces, was retrofitted into a shoe and used to power a wireless sensor module whilst the subject with a body weight of 760N was wearing the shoe and ran at 3.1mph (1.4HZ on shoe), the PFT produced an average maximum power of 2.5mW (over 2MΩ load)

  12. Dosimetric contribution of organs of biokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I to estimate radiation doses in thyroids of children of 1 and 5 years; Contribucion dosimetrica de organos de la biocinetica del {sup 99m}Tc y {sup 123}I para estimar dosis en tiroides de ninos de 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.V.; Castillo, C.E.; Abanto, D.M.; Rocha, D.; Garcia, W.H.; Marin, K., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo (UNT), Trujillo (Peru); Quispe, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The absorbed doses by thyroids during uptake studies through biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing {sup 123}I (iodine) or {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) are estimated. Using the MIRD scheme and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for thyroids in children of 1 and 5 years, the objective of the study was to determine whether the dosimetric biokinetic contributions of the organs of {sup 123}I (iodide) and {sup 99m}Tc (pertechnetate) biokinetic are significant in the estimated of the absorbed dose for thyroid uptake studies.

  13. Application of a canine 238Pu biokinetics/dosimetry model to human bioassay data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, A W; Griffith, W C; Roessler, G S; Guilmette, R A

    1995-03-01

    Associated with the use of 238Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes is the potential for human exposure, primarily by inhalation and most likely as 238PuO2. Several models have been developed for assessing the level of intake and predicting the resulting radiation dose following human exposure to 239Pu. However, there are indications that existing models do not adequately describe the disposition and dosimetry of 238Pu following human exposure. In this study, a canine model that accounts for these differences has been adapted for use with human excretion data. The model is based on existing knowledge about organ retention of plutonium. An analysis of the sensitivity of the model to changes in aerosol-associated properties indicated that predictions of urinary excretion are most sensitive to changes in particle solubility and diameter and in the ratio of fragment:particle surface area. Application of the model to urinary excretion data from seven workers exposed to a 238Pu ceramic aerosol gave estimated intakes of 390-8,200 Bq and associated initial pulmonary burdens of 80-1,700 Bq. The resulting 50-y dose commitments to critical organs per Bq of 238Pu intake were estimated to be 0.5 mSv for the thoracic region, 0.2 mSv for the liver, and 1 mSv for the bone surfaces. PMID:7860307

  14. Synthesis, labeling with 99mTc and biokinetics of brains scintigraphy diaminodithiol perfusion radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent tomography status using radiopharmaceuticals have been contributing greatly with the 'age of certainty' in the diagnosis examination of syndromes, pathologies and clinical signs, because they can evidence some phenomena occurring in a molecular manner. The purpose of this work have had the development of new diaminodithiol (DADT) perfusion radiopharmaceuticals to be used in brain diagnosis using S.P.E.T. (Single Photon Emission Tomography). Initially, the rational planning had been performed with the new DADT molecular structures as radiopharmaceutical candidates. Using of Q.S.A.R. (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) techniques, the molecular descriptors such as partition coefficient and effective polarizability, have been studied in order to increase the blood brain barrier transport and the brain uptake respectively. Applying the Q.S.P.R. (Quantitative Structure Property Relationship) concepts to perform drug latentiation, based on bio-labile functional groups, the congener DADT derivative has been transformed into a pro-drug that works as a DADT moiety carrier, allowing the increasing of brain radiopharmaceutical uptake. Later on, synthetic routes and chemical purifications have been developed allowing the creation of the proposed chemical structure. Each new DADT derivative has been synthesized and analyzed in terms of elemental analysis, infrared and NMR spectra, in order to confirm its proposed chemical structure. Then, the new derivative has been labeled with 99mTc, radiochemically purified, intravenously injected in Swiss mice, allowing its biodistribution to evidence its brain transport and uptake. The rational planning studies have been re-evaluated after each biodistribution had been performed, to see what kind of molecular descriptor was responsible for causing a stronger optimization in the brain perfusion characteristics and then, new DADT derivatives have been prepared. Three new DADT derivatives have been obtained by using QSAR

  15. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of {sup 14}C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    {sup 14}C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used {sup 14}C-breath tests: {sup 14}C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low {sup 14}C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform {sup 14}C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of {sup 14}C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and {sup 14}C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the {sup 14}C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  16. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of 99mTc-HYNIC-Lys3-Bombesin: images of GRP receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is expressed in several normal human tissues and is over-expressed in various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently [99mTc]EDDA/HYNIC-Lys3-bombesin (99mTc-HYNIC-BN) was reported as a radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-r binding and rapid cell internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-HYNIC-BN to image GRP-r and to assess the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics and dosimetry in 4 breast cancer patients and in 7 healthy women. Methods: Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after 99mTc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 11 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-HYNIC-BN time-activity curves in each organ in order to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions, according with MIRD methodology. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Results: Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with renal excretion as predominant route. 99mTc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in cancer mammary glands and well differentiated from the ubiquitous GRP-r expression in normal breast, lungs and airways. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the radiation absorbed doses between cancer patients and healthy women. The average equivalent doses (n=11) for a study using 740 MBq were 24.8 +- 8.8 mSv (kidneys), 7.3 +- 1.8 mSv (lungs), 6.5 +- 4.0 mSv (breast) 2.0 +- 0.3 mSv (pancreas), 1.6 +- 0.3 mSv (liver), 1.2 +- 0.2 mSv (ovaries) and 1.0 +- 0.2 mSv (red marrow). The mean effective dose was 3

  17. Performance analysis of numeric solutions applied to biokinetics of radionuclides; Analise de desempenho de solucoes numericas aplicadas a biocinetica de radionuclideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingatos, Danielle dos Santos; Bevilacqua, Joyce da Silva, E-mail: dani@ime.usp.br, E-mail: joyce@ime.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IME/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Matematica e Estatistica; Todo, Alberto Saburo; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando, E-mail: astodo@ipen.br, E-mail: rodrijr@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Biokinetics models for radionuclides applied to dosimetry problems are constantly reviewed by ICRP. The radionuclide trajectory could be represented by compartmental models, assuming constant transfer rates between compartments. A better understanding of physiological or biochemical phenomena, improve the comprehension of radionuclide behavior in the human body and, in general, more complex compartmental models are proposed, increasing the difficulty of obtaining the analytical solution for the system of first order differential equations. Even with constant transfer rates numerical solutions must be carefully implemented because of almost singular characteristic of the matrix of coefficients. In this work we compare numerical methods with different strategies for ICRP-78 models for Thorium-228 and Uranium-234. The impact of uncertainty in the parameters of the equations is also estimated for local and global truncation errors. (author)

  18. Investigation on the effect of incorporated radioactive and nonradioactive particles and their synergism by long-term animal studies - physicochemical and biokinetic properties of zirconium dioxide colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effect of thorotrast should presumably be attributed not only to ionizing radiation but also to nonradiation effects, i.e. foreign-body effects and/or chemical toxicity, possibly involving synergism. In order to identify and quantitatively assess the nonradiation effect of thorotrast, long-term animal studies have been performed in rats, using non-radioactive and radioactive colloids with identical physicochemical properties and with biophysical behavior comparable to that of thorotrast. In this study, nonradioactive colloidal ZrO2 (zirconotrast) and 230Th/228Th-enriched zirconium dioxide colloid (radiozirconotrast) are compared to thorotrast with regard to 5 criteria. The results of the biokinetic, histological and physical investigations justify the use of colloidal ZrO2 as a substitute colloid for studying the non-radiation effect of Thorotrast. (orig.)

  19. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide prepared from lyophilized kits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Vazquez, Armando [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Militar (Mexico); Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52045 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gff@nuclear.inin.mx; Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico); Gutierrez-Garcia, Zohar [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Militar (Mexico)

    2006-07-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC) has shown high in vitro and in vivo stability, rapid background clearance and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. The aim of this study was to establish a biokinetic model for {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC prepared from lyophilized kits, and to evaluate its dosimetry as a tumor imaging agent in patients with histologically confirmed neuroendocrine tumors. Whole-body images from eight patients were acquired at 5, 60, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC administration obtained from instant freeze-dried kit formulations with radiochemical purities >95%. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all eight scans and the count per minute (cpm) of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-TOC time-activity curves in each organ, to adjust a biokinetic model using the SAAM software, and to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed an average tumor/blood (heart) ratio of 4.3{+-}0.7 in receptor-positive tumors at 1 h. The mean radiation absorbed dose calculated for a study using 740 MBq was 24, 21.5, 5.5 and 1.0 mSv for spleen, kidneys, liver and bone marrow respectively and the effective dose was 4.4 mSv.

  20. Comparison of radioiodine biokinetics following the administration of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and after thyroid hormone withdrawal in thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, Markus; Lassmann, Michael; Haenscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sherman, Steven I. [Section of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Skarulis, Monica C. [Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Reynolds, James R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnusen Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Iodine kinetics were studied in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer while euthyroid under exogenous thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and while hypothyroid to detect differences in radioiodine uptake, distribution and elimination. Nine patients with total or near-total thyroidectomy on thyroid hormone suppressive therapy received two or three daily doses of 0.9 mg recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) followed by administration of a diagnostic activity of 2 mCi (74 MBq) iodine-131. After the biokinetics assessments had been performed, patients stopped taking thyroid hormones to become hypothyroid. A second 2 mCi (74 MBq) diagnostic activity of {sup 131}I was administered, followed by a second set of biokinetics assessments. One week later the patients underwent remnant ablation with a therapeutic activity of {sup 131}I. A comparison of the {sup 131}I kinetics in the patients while euthyroid and while hypothyroid showed major differences in the doses to the remnant as well as in residence times and radiation exposure to the blood. In the first diagnostic assessment the remnant dose was higher in eight of the nine patients and clearance of the activity from the blood was faster in all of them. The data from this study suggest that radioiodine administration is potent and safe when administered to euthyroid patients following rhTSH administration. Enhanced residence time in the remnant and decreased radiation exposure to the blood were noted when patients were euthyroid compared to when they were rendered hypothyroid. However, all patients received diagnostic activities in the same order: first while euthyroid, followed by hypothyroidism. It is quite possible that ''stunning'' from the radioiodine administered in the initial uptake study inhibited the subsequent uptake of radioiodine by the remnant lesions in the second uptake study. (orig.)

  1. Estimation of parameters biokinetics from the resolution of a model compartment for I-131. Application to a patient with thyroid carcinoma hemodialysis; Estimacion de parametros bioceniticos a partir de la resolucion de un modelo compartimental para I-131. Aplicacion a un paciente hemodializado con carcinoma de torioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Jimenez Feltstrom, D.; Luis dimon, F. J.; Sanchez Carmona, G.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to define a biokinetic model for the I-131, and solve it for different conditions of the patient or person affected (normal, with cancer of the thyroid or hyperthyroid). Solve the model in the case of a patient treated with I-131 for ablation of thyroid remnants with undergoing renal insufficiency and hemodialysis . Get the parameters Biokinetic this model for different situations. (Author)

  2. Estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in thyroid cancer patients: probe detection versus image quantification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willegaignon, José; Pelissoni, Rogério Alexandre; Lima, Beatriz Christine de Godoy Diniz; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Queiroz, Marcelo Araújo; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the probe detection method with the image quantification method when estimating 131I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in the treatment of thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients with metastatic thyroid cancer, without metastatic bone involvement, were submitted to therapy planning in order to tailor the therapeutic amount of 131I to each individual. Whole-body scans and probe measurements were performed at 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after 131I administration in order to estimate the effective half-life (Teff) and residence time of 131I in the body. Results The mean values for Teff and residence time, respectively, were 19 ± 9 h and 28 ± 12 h for probe detection, compared with 20 ± 13 h and 29 ± 18 h for image quantification. The average dose to the red marrow and whole body, respectively, was 0.061 ± 0.041 mGy/MBq and 0.073 ± 0.040 mGy/MBq for probe detection, compared with 0.066 ± 0.055 mGy/MBq and 0.078 ± 0.056 mGy/MBq for image quantification. Statistical analysis proved that there were no significant differences between the two methods for estimating the Teff (p = 0.801), residence time (p = 0.801), dose to the red marrow (p = 0.708), and dose to the whole body (p = 0.811), even when we considered an optimized approach for calculating doses only at 4 h and 96 h after 131I administration (p > 0.914). Conclusion There is full agreement as to the feasibility of using probe detection and image quantification when estimating 131I biokinetics and red-marrow/whole-body doses. However, because the probe detection method is inefficacious in identifying tumor sites and critical organs during radionuclide therapy and therefore liable to skew adjustment of the amount of 131I to be administered to patients under such therapy, it should be used with caution.

  3. Control of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide after radiation synovectomy using the whole-body counter in the general hospital Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation synovectomy is suggested to be an alternative to surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of the whole-body counter in the General Hospital Vienna for the study of the biodistribution and biokinetics of 165-dysprosium-ferric-hydroxide (165Dy-DFH). During this study it was possible to measure 42 patients, who were treated with 165Dy-DFH. The applied activity ranged from 520 MBq to 12955 MBq. The emission of γ-radiation with an energy of 95 keV is used to monitor the kinetic distribution of 165Dy by performing activity profiles with the whole-body counter 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. The doses to non-target organs were calculated using the software MIRDOSE II. In 32 patients no leakage could be monitored. In 3 patients a concentration of leakage was detected in the urinary bladder, in 2 patients a leakage was detected in the liver and in 6 patients a small leakage was detected in the inguinal lymphatic nodes of the treated legs. Using a whole-body counter activity leakage could be detected with much higher sensitivity than by using a gamma camera. Biodistribution of 165Dy-DFH could be determined, leakage could be localised and related to organs. (orig.)

  4. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of relationship between inhalation of 131I thyroid uptake and administration time of stable iodine tablets. Calculation for Japanese by using biokinetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine incorporated into the body is inhibited by the administration of stable iodine tablets. In this paper, the thyroid retention functions in the case of the acute inhalation of 131I for Japanese were analyzed by using the biokinetic models of radioactive and stable iodine. The influence of the Wolff-Chaikoff effect that the composition of thyroid hormone is temporarily inhibited by the intake of superfluous stable iodine is newly taken into consideration in the analysis of stable iodine. By comparing the computed thyroid retention functions between with and without the administration of stable iodine tablets, the inhibitory effects of the 131I thyroid uptake are evaluated. As a result, the inhibitory effect reaches about 50% when administration was conducted 2 days before 131I intake and it increases more than 80% in case of from 1 day to just before the intake. On the other hand, the inhibitory effect falls rapidly when administration was conducted after the intake, resulting in 20% or less than 7% in case of 12 hours or 1 day after the intake. (author)

  6. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996 - 1999. Mid-term reports for the period 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Roth, P. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Michael, B.D. [Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (United Kingdom). Gray Lab.; O`Sullivan, D. [Dublin Inst. for Advanced Studies (Ireland)

    1998-12-31

    The main objectives of the first dosimetry project are the measurement of neutron and charged particle flux and energy spectra at altitudes in civil aviation, the determination of response characteristics for detectors, the investigation of calibration procedures, and the evaluation of exposures of aircrews. The overall objective of the second dosimetry project is to improve estimates of dose following the intake of radionuclides by adults and children. The work includes the development of biokinetic and dosimetric models, including models of the gastrointestinal tract, for the systemic behaviour of radionuclides, and for the developing embryo and foetus. Further subjects are target cell dosimetry for short-range particles and the development of computational tools for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis models. The third dosimetry project encompasses the study of different methods for retrospective dose assessments for individuals or groups of individuals accidentally exposed to increased levels of radiation. The methods investigated include electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of tooth enamel and chromosome painting (FISH) for lymphocytes in peripheral blood for individual retrospective dose assessments, luminescence techniques on materials in inhabited environment (ceramics, bricks) and model calculations using environmental data as input. (orig.)

  7. Biokinetics of ultrafine gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) relating to redistribution and urinary excretion: a long-term in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Farhat; Koul, Veena; Srivastava, Amita; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of ultrafine size have drawn attention for their use in drug delivery systems. Tissue toxicity may be an issue when AuNPs are used for such applications. We investigated the long-term biokinetics (90 d), redistribution, and urinary excretion of three different-sized (2 ± 0.5 nm, 5 ± 1 nm, and 10 ± 2 nm) AuNPs after a single intravenous (i.v.) administration of 1250 µg/kg dose in mice. ICP-AES analysis of lungs, liver, spleen, heart, kidney, brain, blood, and urine revealed highest accumulation of gold in spleen around 15 d after injection. A low concentration was detected in brain after 1 d without any residual AuNPs after 30 d. Ultrastructural study of brain tissue also showed few AuNPs in lysosome with no changes in cellular architecture. Renal retention of AuNPs was limited indicating low nephrotoxic potential. AuNPs were detectable in urine till 30 d after single injection indicating slow excretion from the body. No evidence of significant toxicity was observed in hemogram, serum biochemistry, and tissue histology. No mortality, changes in behavior, hair color, weight, and food intake was observed as compared to control mice. Therefore, we conclude that the ultrafine AuNPs are predominantly excreted in urine without any systemic toxicity following i.v. administration and are hence safe for use in drug delivery systems. PMID:26837799

  8. Dimer of the peptide cycle (Ar-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiolabeled with 99mTc for the integrin s over-expression image: formulation, biokinetics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast cancer, α(v)β(3) and/or α(v)β(5) integrin s are over-expressed in both endothelial and tumour cells. Radiolabeled peptides based on the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence are radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity and selectivity for those integrin s. The RGD-dimer peptide (E-[c(RGDfK)]2) radiolabeled with 99mTc has been reported as a radiopharmaceutical with 10-fold higher affinity for the α(v)β(3) integrin as compared to the RGD-monomer. EDDA (Ethylenediamine-N,N-diacetic acid) is a hydrophilic molecule that may favours renal excretion when used as coligand in the 99mTc labelling of HYNIC-peptides and can easily be formulated in a lyophilized kit. Aim: Establish a biokinetic model for 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 prepared from lyophilized kits and evaluate the dosimetry as breast cancer imaging agent. Methods: 99mTc labelling was performed by addition of sodium pertechnetate solution and 0.2 M phosphate buffer ph 7.0 to a lyophilized formulation containing E-[c(RGDfK)]2, EDDA, tricine, mannitol and stannous chloride. Radiochemical purity was evaluated by reversed phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Stability studies in human serum were carried out by size-exclusion HPLC. In-vitro cell uptake was tested using breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231) with blocked and non-blocked receptors. Biodistribution and tumour uptake were determined in MCF7 tumour-bearing nude mice with blocked and non-blocked receptors, and images were obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT. Whole-body images from seven healthy women were acquired at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 administration obtained with radiochemical purities of >94 %. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 time-activity curves in each organ in order to adjust the biokinetic model and to calculate the

  9. Sentinel lymph node diagnostic in prostate carcinoma. Part II. Biokinetics and dosimetry of 99mTc-nanocolloid after intraprostatic injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To visualise the sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) of the prostate we injected the radiotracer into the parenchyma of the prostate. The activity was deposited in liver, spleen, bone marrow, urinary bladder and regional lymphatic system. The aim of this work is to determine biokinetical data and to estimate radiation doses to the patient. Methods: The patients with prostate cancer received a sonographically controlled, transrectal administration of 99mTc-Nanocoll trademark, injected directly into both prostate lobes. In 10 randomly selected patients radionuclide distribution and its time course was determined via regions of interest (ROIs) over prostate, urinary bladder, liver, spleen and the lymph nodes. The uptake in the SLNs was estimated from gamma probe measurements at the surgically removed nodes. To compare tumour positive with tumour free lymph nodes according to SLN-uptake and SLN-localisation we evaluated 108 lymph nodes out of 24 patients with tumour positive SLN. For calculating the effective dose according to ICRP 60 of the patients we used the MIRD-method and the Mirdose 3.1 software. Results: The average uptake of separate organs was: bladder content 24%, liver 25.5%, spleen 2%, sum of SLN 0.5%. An average of 9% of the applied activity remained in the prostate. The residual activity was mainly accumulated in bone marrow and blood. Occasionally a weak activity enrichment in intestinal tract and kidneys could be recognized. The effective dose to the patient was estimated to 7.6 μSv/MBq. The radioactivity uptake of the SLN varied in several orders of magnitude between 0.006% and 0.6%. The probability of SLN-metastasis was found to be independent from tracer uptake in the lymph node. The radioactivity uptake of the SLNs in distinct lymph node regions showed no significant differences. Conclusion: The radiotracer is transferred out of the prostate via blood flow, by direct transfer via the urethra into the bladder and by lymphatic transport. Injecting a

  10. The Biokinetic Model of Americium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To improve in vivo measurements for detecting internal exposure from transuranium radio nuclides, such as neptunium, plutonium, americium, the bioknetic model was studied. According to ICRP report (1993, 1995, 1997) and other research, the

  11. Matrix modulation of the toxicity of alkenylbenzenes, studied by an integrated approach using in vitro, in vivo, and physiologically based biokinetic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkenylbenzenes such as estragole and methyleugenol are common components of spices and herbs such as tarragon, basil, fennel, mace, allspice, star anise and anise and their essential oils (Smithet al., 20

  12. Matrix Modulation of the Bioactivation of Estragole by Constituents of Different Alkenylbenzene-containing Herbs and Spices and Physiologically Based Biokinetic Modeling of Possible In Vivo Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Husainy, W.A.A.M.; Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Paini, A.; Campana, A.; Asselman, M.; Spenkelink, A.; Punt, A.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.B.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.

    2012-01-01

    The alkenylbenzene estragole is a constituent of several herbs and spices. It induces hepatomas in rodents at high doses following bioactivation by cytochrome P450s and sulfotransferases (SULTs) giving rise to the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole which forms DNA adducts. Methano

  13. Dosimetric evaluation in organs of the Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} bio-kinetics to estimate dose in thyroid children 1 and 5 years; Evaluacion dosimetrica en organos de la biocinetica del Tc{sup 99m}, I{sup 123} para estimar dosis en tiroides ninos 1 y 5 anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, A. M.; Quispe, R.; Vasquez, D. J.; Rocha, M. D.; Morales, N. R.; Marin, R. K. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru); Zelada, A. L., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Cesar Vallejo, Grupo de Fisica Medica, Av. Larco s/n, Trujillo (Peru)

    2012-10-15

    Using the formalism MIRD and the representation of Cristy-Eckerman for the thyroid in children of 1 and 5 years, is demonstrated that the dosimetric contribution of the organs of I{sup 123} (iodure) bio-kinetics is not significant in the dose estimate. The total dose absorbed by the gland is its auto dose. The dosimetric contribution of the organs source of the Tc{sup 99m} (pertechnetate) bio-kinetics in the gland is significant in the dose estimate like to be ignored. The reported results for the iodure are not significantly different to the found for the Marinelli scheme (auto-dose) for thyroid represented by a sphere of 1,78 and 3,45 grams. (Author)

  14. Dosimetric contribution of the organs of the I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} and I{sup 131} bio-kinetics in the dose estimate for euthyroid adults; Contribucion dosimetrica de los organos de la biocinetica de I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} y I{sup 131} en el estimado de dosis para adultos eutiroideos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, A. M.; Rojas, A. R.; Castillo, D. C.; Idrogo, C. J.; Flores, U. H., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Trujillo (Peru)

    2011-10-15

    Using the formalism MIRD and the representation of Crysty-Eckerman for the thyroid adult, is demonstrated that the dosimetric contributions of source organs of the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceuticals I{sup 123}, I{sup 124} and I{sup 131} (iodine) are not significant in the dose estimate. Therefore, the total absorbed dose by the gland is its auto-dose. Equally, the reported results do not present significant differences to the results found by the Marinelli scheme (auto-dose) for the thyroid represented by a sphere of 20 grams. (Author)

  15. Dimer of the peptide cycle (Ar-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc for the integrin s over-expression image: formulation, biokinetics and dosimetry; Dimero del peptido ciclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) radiomarcado con {sup 99m}Tc para la imagen de sobre-expresion de integrinas: formulacion, biocinetica y dosimetria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz A, Z.

    2013-07-01

    In breast cancer, α(v)β(3) and/or α(v)β(5) integrin s are over-expressed in both endothelial and tumour cells. Radiolabeled peptides based on the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence are radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity and selectivity for those integrin s. The RGD-dimer peptide (E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}) radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc has been reported as a radiopharmaceutical with 10-fold higher affinity for the α(v)β(3) integrin as compared to the RGD-monomer. EDDA (Ethylenediamine-N,N-diacetic acid) is a hydrophilic molecule that may favours renal excretion when used as coligand in the {sup 99m}Tc labelling of HYNIC-peptides and can easily be formulated in a lyophilized kit. Aim: Establish a biokinetic model for {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} prepared from lyophilized kits and evaluate the dosimetry as breast cancer imaging agent. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc labelling was performed by addition of sodium pertechnetate solution and 0.2 M phosphate buffer ph 7.0 to a lyophilized formulation containing E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}, EDDA, tricine, mannitol and stannous chloride. Radiochemical purity was evaluated by reversed phase HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. Stability studies in human serum were carried out by size-exclusion HPLC. In-vitro cell uptake was tested using breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231) with blocked and non-blocked receptors. Biodistribution and tumour uptake were determined in MCF7 tumour-bearing nude mice with blocked and non-blocked receptors, and images were obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT. Whole-body images from seven healthy women were acquired at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} administration obtained with radiochemical purities of >94 %. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. Each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} time-activity curves in each

  16. Bench-scale studies of reactor-based treatment of fuel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological treatment of hazardous wastes from accidental spills or underground storage tank leaks has generated interest in bioremediation as a natural, economical mechanism for site decontamination. Because of drawbacks of batch systems, and the successful use of continuous flow treatment of wastewater for several decades, it was felt that continuous treatment of such soils would be a feasible alternative treatment technique. Therefore, bench-scale bioreactor treatability studies were conducted and used contaminated soil made in the laboratory using No. 2 diesel fuel and sand. Contamination levels studied were from 1,335--6,675 mg (TPH) as derived from No. 2 fuel oil per kg sand. Variation in mean cell age was obtained between reactors, with sufficient nutrients and oxygen made available to ensure the fuel oil organics were the only limit to microbial growth. A theoretical biokinetic model was formulated based on Monod's theory of limiting substrate and continuous cultures. Biokinetic constants and removal efficiencies were evaluated. The off-gases, CO2, and volatile hydrocarbons were monitored for mass balance analysis of the process. The solids retention times for evaluating final TPH concentration of 100 mg/kg were also calculated. Removal efficiencies of up to 91% were attained at a loading of 1,335 mg TPH/kg wet sand, operated at a biological solid retention time (BSRT) of 60 days. Experiments also showed that TPH desorption and volatilization were not rate-limiting in the overall removal process. Sand-to-moisture ratios in excess of 3:1 were also shown to retard TPH removal rates very little. However, biokinetic constants were found to vary over a range of values. This was particularly true at varying diesel loading levels. Nevertheless, significant removal efficiency (up to 86%) was noted at the highest loading level tested, 6,675 mg TPH/kg wet sand

  17. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with [sup 111]In-DOTA-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. (Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy)); Stabin, M.G. (Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)); Orsi, F.O. (Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)); Jermann, E. (Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland)); Robertson, C. (Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy))

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe[sup 1]-Tyr[sup 3]-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 [mu]g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of [sup 111]In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ [mu]mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for [sup 111]In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9[+-]0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%[+-]11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2[+-]1.8 h in spleen, 1.7[+-]1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4[+-]1.9 h in liver, 1.5[+-]0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4[+-]5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6[+-]6.3 (spleen), 3.3[+-]2.2 (kidneys), 0.7[+-]0.6 (liver), 2.2[+-]0.3 (bladder), 0.03[+-]0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of [sup 90]Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  18. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with {sup 111}In-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, M.; Ferrari, M.; Maecke, H.R.; Tosi, G. [Department of Health Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Zoboli, S.; Chinol, M.; Fiorenza, M.; Paganelli, G. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, via Ripamonti, 435, I-20141-Milan (Italy); Stabin, M.G. [Nuclear Energy Department, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Orsi, F.O. [Department of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Jermann, E. [Nuclear Medicine Department, University of Basel (Switzerland); Robertson, C. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 {mu}g), labelled with 150-185 MBq of {sup 111}In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ {mu}mol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for {sup 111}In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9{+-}0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%{+-}11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2{+-}1.8 h in spleen, 1.7{+-}1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4{+-}1.9 h in liver, 1.5{+-}0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4{+-}5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6{+-}6.3 (spleen), 3.3{+-}2.2 (kidneys), 0.7{+-}0.6 (liver), 2.2{+-}0.3 (bladder), 0.03{+-}0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation

  19. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients administered with 111In-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide: implications for internal radiotherapy with 90Y-DOTATOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in receptor-mediated tumour imaging have resulted in the development of a new somatostatin analogue, DOTA-dPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide. This new compound, named DOTATOC, has shown high affinity for somatostatin receptors, ease of labelling and stability with yttrium-90 and favourable biodistribution in animal models. The aim of this work was to evaluate the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with indium-111, in anticipation of therapy trials with 90Y-DOTATOC in patients. Eighteen patients were injected with DOTATOC (10 μg), labelled with 150-185 MBq of 111In. Blood and urine samples were collected throughout the duration of the study (0-2 days). Planar and single-photon emission tomography images were acquired at 0.5, 3-4, 24 and 48 h and time-activity curves were obtained for organs and tumours. A compartmental model was used to determine the kinetic parameters for each organ. Dose calculations were performed according to the MIRD formalism. Specific activities of >37 GBq/ μmol were routinely achieved. Patients showed no acute or delayed adverse reactions. The residence time for 111In-DOTATOC in blood was 0.9±0.4 h. The injected activity excreted in the urine in the first 24 h was 73%±11%. The agent localized primarily in spleen, kidneys and liver. The residence times in source organs were: 2.2±1.8 h in spleen, 1.7±1.2 h in kidneys, 2.4±1.9 h in liver, 1.5±0.3 h in urinary bladder and 9.4±5.5 h in the remainder of the body; the mean residence time in tumour was 0.47 h (range: 0.03-6.50 h). Based on our findings, the predicted absorbed doses for 90Y-DOTATOC would be 7.6±6.3 (spleen), 3.3±2.2 (kidneys), 0.7±0.6 (liver), 2.2±0.3 (bladder), 0.03±0.01 (red marrow) and 10.1 (range: 1.4-31.0) (tumour) mGy/MBq. These results indicate that high activities of 90Y-DOTATOC can be administered with low risk of myelotoxicity, although with potentially high radiation doses to the spleen and kidneys. Tumour doses were high enough in most

  20. Human biokinetics of inhaled terbium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four healthy men inhaled a monodisperse aerosol of 160Tb-labelled terbium oxide particles. The behaviour of the tracer was studied through measurements of body radioactivity and of its urinary and faecal excretion. Estimated early faecal losses in the four subjects ranged from 3% to 31% of the initial respiratory-tract deposit; most of the residue had become systemic within a year, with the principal deposit apparently in bone. Interference from this systemic deposit prevented accurate determination of the long-term pulmonary clearance kinetics, but the pattern was broadly what would be expected for Type M materials in the ICRP's Human Respiratory Tract Model. Averaged trends in the whole-body residue after ∼ 1 year suggest a clearance half-life of about 5 y. (author)

  1. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin: images of GRP receptors; Biocinetica y dosimetria en humanos de {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesina: imagenes de receptores GRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C. L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is expressed in several normal human tissues and is over-expressed in various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently [{sup 99m}Tc]EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN) was reported as a radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-r binding and rapid cell internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN to image GRP-r and to assess the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics and dosimetry in 4 breast cancer patients and in 7 healthy women. Methods: Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 11 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN time-activity curves in each organ in order to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions, according with MIRD methodology. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Results: Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with renal excretion as predominant route. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in cancer mammary glands and well differentiated from the ubiquitous GRP-r expression in normal breast, lungs and airways. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the radiation absorbed doses between cancer patients and healthy women. The average equivalent doses (n=11) for a study using 740 MBq were 24.8 +- 8.8 mSv (kidneys), 7.3 +- 1.8 mSv (lungs), 6.5 +- 4.0 mSv (breast) 2.0 +- 0.3 mSv (pancreas), 1.6 +- 0.3 mSv (liver), 1.2 +- 0.2 mSv (ovaries) and 1.0 +- 0.2 mSv (red

  2. Providing a theoretical basis for nanotoxicity risk analysis departing from traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dirk P.

    The same novel properties of engineered nanoparticles that make them attractive may also present unique exposure risks. But, the traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling assumption of instantaneous equilibration likely does not apply to nanoparticles. This simulation-based research begins with development of a model that includes diffusion, active transport, and carrier mediated transport. An eigenvalue analysis methodology was developed to examine model behavior to focus future research. Simulations using the physico-chemical properties of size, shape, surface coating, and surface charge were performed and an equation was determined which estimates area under the curve for arterial blood concentration, which is a surrogate of nanoparticle dose. Results show that the cellular transport processes modeled in this research greatly affect the biokinetics of nanoparticles. Evidence suggests that the equation used to estimate area under the curve for arterial blood concentration can be written in terms of nanoparticle size only. The new paradigm established by this research leverages traditional in vitro, in vivo, and PBPK modeling, but includes area under the curve to bridge animal testing results to humans. This new paradigm allows toxicologists and policymakers to then assess risk to a given exposure and assist in setting appropriate exposure limits for nanoparticles. This research provides critical understanding of nanoparticle biokinetics and allows estimation of total exposure at any toxicological endpoint in the body. This effort is a significant contribution as it highlights future research needs and demonstrates how modeling can be used as a tool to advance nanoparticle risk assessment.

  3. Imaging based, patient specific dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The prognosis of achieving longtime remission for disseminated cancer disease is in many cases poor. A systemic treatment is required and therefore external beam radiation therapy is less suited. Treatment with radiolabeled pharmaceuticals, so called radionuclide therapy is such a systemic treatment. In radionuclide therapy, the absorbed dose is delivered by administration of radionuclides that emit electrons or alpha particles. It is here assumed that the released kinetic energy is transferred by interactions to sensitive parts of the cells activating cell death, and thus an accurate dosimetry is important. However, absorbed dose planning for radionuclide therapy is a real challenge in that the source cannot be turned on or off (as in external beam therapy) but decays exponentially with characteristics depending on the biokinetics and the radionuclide half-life. On a small-scale, the radiopharmaceutical is also heterogeneously distributed which means that the energy deposition is generally nonuniform. The biokinetics may also change over time which means that activity measurements need to be made at several time points to estimate the total amount of released energy in an organ or tumour. Practical issues regarding the number of measurements and patient mobility may therefore limit the accuracy in this calculation. The dose-rate for radionuclide therapy is also much lower than in external beam therapy. Since the treatment is systemic, circulating activity may result in absorbed doses to normal organs and tissues. Often this poses a problem and puts a limit on the amount of activity to can be administered. This is one of the major reasons for the requirement of an accurate patient-specific dosimetry. One of the major problems is that the biokinetics varies between patients and the activity uptake and clearance should therefore be measured for each individual patient in order to estimate the total number of decays in a particular organ/tissue. The way

  4. Radiation exposure of the patient in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Experimental studies of the biokinetics of 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, 99mTc-MIBI, 14C-triolein and 14C-urea, and development of dosimetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biokinetic and dosimetric models for a number of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals, for which information on the radiation dosimetry is scarce, have been produced. On patients undergoing investigations with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide (for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours) and 99mTc-MIBI (for myocardial perfusion imaging), whole body gamma camera scanning was performed several times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Total body and organ activity content was determined using the geometric mean of the number of counts in two 180 deg opposed planar images. A thorough investigation of sources influencing the accuracy of the quantification of activity was carried out, showing an overall uncertainty varying from 10% to 30% for organs with a significant uptake and 5% for the whole body. The activity in blood and urine was also measured. 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was predominantly excreted via the kidney-bladder system and a typical investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 8.4 mSv (0.076 mSv/MBq). 99mTc-MIBI was to a great extent excreted via the gastrointestinal tract and an investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 13 mSv (0.011 mSv/MBq). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the possibility to measure ultra-low activity concentrations of 14CO2, in exhaled air from patients undergoing 14C-breath tests, with special application to 14C-triolein (for study of fat malabsorption). AMS was proven to be a useful technique for long-term retention studies of 14C, and was used together with liquid scintillation counting in an investigation of the biokinetics of 14C-urea in adult and paediatric patients (for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the upper gastrointestinal tract). The effective dose for 14C-urea was 0.019 mSv/MBq for adults and from 0.041 to 0.019 mSv/MBq for seven- to fourteen -year-old children, resulting in an effective dose of approximately 0.002 mSv per investigation

  5. Radiation exposure of the patient in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Experimental studies of the biokinetics of {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI, {sup 14}C-triolein and {sup 14}C-urea, and development of dosimetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide Svegborn, S

    1999-03-01

    Biokinetic and dosimetric models for a number of clinically used radiopharmaceuticals, for which information on the radiation dosimetry is scarce, have been produced. On patients undergoing investigations with {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide (for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours) and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI (for myocardial perfusion imaging), whole body gamma camera scanning was performed several times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical. Total body and organ activity content was determined using the geometric mean of the number of counts in two 180 deg opposed planar images. A thorough investigation of sources influencing the accuracy of the quantification of activity was carried out, showing an overall uncertainty varying from 10% to 30% for organs with a significant uptake and 5% for the whole body. The activity in blood and urine was also measured. {sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}-octreotide was predominantly excreted via the kidney-bladder system and a typical investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 8.4 mSv (0.076 mSv/MBq). {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was to a great extent excreted via the gastrointestinal tract and an investigation with 1200 MBq resulted in an effective dose of 13 mSv (0.011 mSv/MBq). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the possibility to measure ultra-low activity concentrations of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, in exhaled air from patients undergoing {sup 14}C-breath tests, with special application to {sup 14}C-triolein (for study of fat malabsorption). AMS was proven to be a useful technique for long-term retention studies of {sup 14}C, and was used together with liquid scintillation counting in an investigation of the biokinetics of {sup 14}C-urea in adult and paediatric patients (for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in the upper gastrointestinal tract). The effective dose for {sup 14}C-urea was 0.019 mSv/MBq for adults and from 0.041 to 0.019 mSv/MBq for seven- to fourteen -year-old children

  6. Synthesis, labeling with {sup 99m}Tc and biokinetics of brains scintigraphy diaminodithiol perfusion radiopharmaceuticals; Sintese, marcacao com {sup 99m}Tc e biocinetica de radiofarmacos perfusorios diaminoditiolicos para cintilografias cerebrais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Marcos Moises

    1999-07-01

    The recent tomography status using radiopharmaceuticals have been contributing greatly with the 'age of certainty' in the diagnosis examination of syndromes, pathologies and clinical signs, because they can evidence some phenomena occurring in a molecular manner. The purpose of this work have had the development of new diaminodithiol (DADT) perfusion radiopharmaceuticals to be used in brain diagnosis using S.P.E.T. (Single Photon Emission Tomography). Initially, the rational planning had been performed with the new DADT molecular structures as radiopharmaceutical candidates. Using of Q.S.A.R. (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) techniques, the molecular descriptors such as partition coefficient and effective polarizability, have been studied in order to increase the blood brain barrier transport and the brain uptake respectively. Applying the Q.S.P.R. (Quantitative Structure Property Relationship) concepts to perform drug latentiation, based on bio-labile functional groups, the congener DADT derivative has been transformed into a pro-drug that works as a DADT moiety carrier, allowing the increasing of brain radiopharmaceutical uptake. Later on, synthetic routes and chemical purifications have been developed allowing the creation of the proposed chemical structure. Each new DADT derivative has been synthesized and analyzed in terms of elemental analysis, infrared and NMR spectra, in order to confirm its proposed chemical structure. Then, the new derivative has been labeled with {sup 99m}Tc, radiochemically purified, intravenously injected in Swiss mice, allowing its biodistribution to evidence its brain transport and uptake. The rational planning studies have been re-evaluated after each biodistribution had been performed, to see what kind of molecular descriptor was responsible for causing a stronger optimization in the brain perfusion characteristics and then, new DADT derivatives have been prepared. Three new DADT derivatives have been

  7. Investigations on the biokinetics of carbon 14 in algae cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of 14C by Scenedesmus quadricauda is quantitatively investigated by simulation models of radio ecological relevance. Due to the complexing of the procedures in the natural ecosystem, it was only possible to consider idealized conditions. The batch culture ressembles the conditons of still waters or relatively still waters without notable water exchange. The effect of the 14C enrichment, as well as the drastic carbon reduction in the substrate as a result of algae growth, was avoided in the modified batch culture under conditions of simultaneous substrate diffusion by means of a permeation system. The 14C and 12C uptake of the cells thus took place solely under the conditions of constant concentration in the culture medium. The consequences for flowing water resulting from a nuclear power plant accident are to be simulated for the extent of the 14C uptake by green algae using the continuous culture model with dynamic 14C exposure. The continuous infusion of 14C in the continuous culture corresponds to the possible cases where 14C escapes into a flowing water at a constant rate over a long period of time, whether this may be via chronical release from a nuclear power plant or by 'fallout' resulting from nuclear arms testing. The results shown lead to the conclusion that the emission of 14C to the environment, which according to prognoses will be considerably higher after the year 2000, presents a serious radioactivity potential which man and environment will have to live with should these developments continue and the prognoses come true. (orig./MG)

  8. Biokinetic studies on 14C-chitosan in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption and the basic metabolism of chitosan in rats are investigated. The results indicated that 14C-chitosan from gastrointestinal tract was absorbed, metabolized and excreted quickly without re-bioavailability. The radioactive compounds perhaps with specifically chemical forms in serum, liver and the contents of small intestines were separated on GPC column and measured by radioactivity counting. A big pile of peaks with the retention volume almost same as that of standard 14C-chitosan and another sharp one with the retention volume in the range of higher molecular weight same as that of BSA were discovered in analysis respectively for contents of intestine and serum or liver. The sharp peak would disappear if the proteins contained in the serum or liver were removed. In addition, and interesting tail peak, followed with the pile ones and eluted with the retention volume of lower molecular weight range same as that of chitooligosaccharides was also found in each of the 3 samples, ignoring the protein removal or not. These results suggested that most of 14C-chitosan was not to be digested in intestine. On the other hand, a small amount of 14C-chitosan was likely to be absorbed directly or after degraded to small molecular compounds into blood, liver and other tissues, and then connected with the proteins. Perhaps it is these trace materials that were playing important roles in reduction of the bioavailability of radiostrontium in rats

  9. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, inclu

  10. Biokinetics of 131I in the human organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time evolution of the cumulated activity in human body is one of the key characteristics determining medical impacts of ionizing radiation. In nuclear medicine, so called effective half-life is mostly used for describing the evolution. This quantity is usually estimated by fitting a straight line in semi-logarithmic coordinates. Its novel Bayesian estimate was also proposed and its advantageous properties were verified. During extensive tests, it was found that the effective half-life has limited use as the underlying deterministic relationship time-activity can hardly be taken as (mono)exponential. It stimulated the search for a better and still simple model. A quadratic dependence of ln (activity) on ln (time) was found as an adequate candidate. Preliminary experiments on a restricted set of real data were promising enough to justify its further elaboration. The paper reports on the progress made in verifying and exploiting this non-standard model. Its potential exploitation in dosimetric tasks is outlined. The core of the paper describes a positive verification of our result on an extensive set of real data. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab

  11. Upon biodistribution and biokinetics of radioiodine-labelled diethylstilbestroldiphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine-labelled (131I, 125I, 123I) diethylstilbestroldiphosphate (DES) was investigated with respect to measuring radio-labelled hormone derivatives in animals and men. DES was injected intravenously in Wistar rats and mammatumor-bearing mice (Carcinoma solidum simplex), and activities were measured in several organs between 10 minutes and 7 days, p.inj. The liver showed strong activity concentration and long-lasting retention, smaller concentrations were found in kidneys, adrenals, blood, abdominal wall and prostate. The tumor concentration between 10 minutes and 15 hours p.inj. was below the blood concentrations and later on up to 7 days in the order of the blood concentrations, however, always significantly exceeding muscle tissue concentrations. Respective measurements were done in men using tissue cylinders from the prostate gained by puncture-biopsy or other tissue specimens gained during surgery. Activity concentration in the liver is high, therefore the scintigraphic visualization of the liver is possible immediately after injection up to 13 days later. Potentially it is a receptor-sensitive scintigraphy of the liver. (orig.)

  12. Nitrification biokinetics in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina

    Danmarks drikkevandsforsyning er udelukkende baseret på grundvand – og mere end 2500 vandværker behandler hver dag vand til de danske forbrugere. Selv om denne vandbehandling betegnes som simpel, er den i virkeligheden baseret på komplicerede mikrobielle processer, som vi hidtil har vidst relativ...

  13. Different biokinetics of nanomedicines linking to their toxicity; an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Mohammad; Ramazani Ali; Mohammadi Hamidreza; Mostafalou Sara

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In spite of the extreme rise to the knowledge of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences, there are currently limited experimental works studying the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the biological system. Adjustment of size and surface area plays the main role in the reaction between NPs and cells leading to their increased entrance into cells through skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory system. Moreover, change in physicochemical reactivity of NPs causes them to int...

  14. Technoeconomic evaluation of bio-based styrene production by engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claypool, Joshua T; Raman, D Raj; Jarboe, Laura R; Nielsen, David R

    2014-08-01

    Styrene is an important commodity chemical used in polymers and resins, and is typically produced from the petrochemical feedstocks benzene and ethylene. Styrene has recently been produced biosynthetically for the first time using engineered Escherichia coli, and this bio-based route may represent a lower energy and renewable alternative to petroleum-derived styrene. However, the economics of such an approach has not yet been investigated. Using an early-stage technoeconomic evaluation tool, a preliminary economic analysis of bio-based styrene from C(6)-sugar feedstock has been conducted. Owing to styrene's limited water solubility, it was assumed that the resulting fermentation broth would spontaneously form two immiscible liquid phases that could subsequently be decanted. Assuming current C(6) sugar prices and industrially achievable biokinetic parameter values (e.g., product yield, specific growth rate), commercial-scale bio-based styrene has a minimum estimated selling price (MESP) of 1.90 USD kg(-1) which is in the range of current styrene prices. A Monte Carlo analysis revealed a potentially large (0.45 USD kg(-1)) standard deviation in the MESP, while a sensitivity analysis showed feedstock price and overall yield as primary drivers of MESP. PMID:24939174

  15. Development of secondary and derived limits for protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary and derived limits for protection against ionizing radiation based on ICRP-60 recommendation were calculated using dose limit and committed effective dose coefficient of ICRP, IAEA and EU report. In order to analyze the impact of implementing secondary and derived limit on nuclear facilities, the derived values in this study were compared with those prescribed in 10 CFR part 20 as well as Notice No. 98-12 of MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). According to the comparison results, the derived values in this study show lower values(i.e., more conservative), for most part, than those in Notice No. 98-12 of MOST. These differences are due to reduction of dose limit, applications of new respiratory tract model and bio-kinetics models. Especially, for uranium elements(i.e., U-235, U-238 etc.), which are governing ones in the nuclear fuel industries, liquid-effluent concentrations in this study are approximately two order of magnitude lower than those in Notice No. 98-12 of MOST, because of newly recommended dose coefficients for ingestion pathway and reduction of dose limit

  16. An alternative QSAR-based approach for predicting the bioconcentration factor for regulatory purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissi, Andrea; Gadaleta, Domenico; Floris, Matteo; Olla, Stefania; Carotti, Angelo; Novellino, Ettore; Benfenati, Emilio; Nicolotti, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    The REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals) and BPR (Biocide Product Regulation) regulations strongly promote the use of non-animal testing techniques to evaluate chemical risk. This has renewed the interest towards alternative methods such as QSAR in the regulatory context. The assessment of Bioconcentration Factor (BCF) required by these regulations is expensive, in terms of costs, time, and laboratory animal sacrifices. Herein, we present QSAR models based on the ANTARES dataset, which is a large collection of known and verified experimental BCF data. Among the models developed, the best results were obtained from a nine-descriptor highly predictive model. This model was derived from a training set of 608 chemicals and challenged against a validation and blind set containing 152 and 76 chemicals. The model's robustness was further controlled through several validation strategies and the implementation of a multi-step approach for the applicability domain. Suitable safety margins were used to increase sensitivity. The easy interpretability of the model is ensured by the use of meaningful biokinetics descriptors. The satisfactory predictive power for external compounds suggests that the new models could represent a reliable alternative to the in vivo assay, helping the registrants to fulfill regulatory requirements in compliance with the ethical and economic necessity to reduce animal testing. PMID:24247988

  17. Generally applicable limits on intakes of uranium based on its chemical toxicity and the radiological significance of intakes at those limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, M C; Wilson, J

    2015-12-01

    Uranium is chemically toxic and radioactive, and both considerations have to be taken into account when limiting intakes of the element, in the context of both occupational and public exposures. Herein, the most recent information available on the chemical toxicity and biokinetics of uranium is used to propose new standards for limiting intakes of the element. The approach adopted allows coherent standards to be set for ingestion and inhalation of different chemical forms of the element by various age groups. It also allows coherent standards to be set for occupational and public exposures (including exposures of different age groups) and for various exposure regimes (including short-term and chronic exposures). The proposed standards are more restrictive than those used previously, but are less restrictive than the Minimal Risk Levels proposed recently by the US Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Having developed a set of proposed limits based solely on chemical toxicity considerations, the radiological implications of exposure at those proposed limits are investigated for natural, depleted and enriched uranium. PMID:26418079

  18. The role of patient-based treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiansyah, Deni; Attarwala, Ali Asgar [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Maass, Christian; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Mueller, Berthold [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Kletting, Peter [Universitaet Ulm, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Accurate treatment planning is recommended in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) to minimize the toxicity to organs at risk while maximizing tumor cell sterilization. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of different degrees of individualization on the prediction accuracy of individual therapeutic biodistributions in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). A recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was fitted to the biokinetic data of 15 patients with NETs after pre-therapeutic injection of {sup 111}In-DTPAOC. Mathematical phantom patients (MPP) were defined using the assumed true (true MPP), mean (MPP 1A) and median (MPP 1B) parameter values of the patient group. Alterations of the degree of individualization were introduced to both mean and median patients by including patient-specific information as a priori knowledge: physical parameters and hematocrit (MPP 2A/2B). Successively, measurable individual biokinetic parameters were added: tumor volume V{sub tu} (MPP 3A/3B), glomerular filtration rate GFR (MPP 4A/4B), and tumor perfusion f{sub tu} (MPP 5A/5B). Furthermore, parameters of MPP 5A/5B and a simulated {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET measurement 60 min p.i. were used together with the population values used as Bayesian parameters (MPP 6A/6B). Therapeutic biodistributions were simulated assuming an infusion of {sup 90}Y-DOTATATE (3.3 GBq) over 30 min to all MPPs. Time-integrated activity coefficients were predicted for all MPPs and compared to the true MPPs for each patient in tumor, kidneys, spleen, liver, remainder, and whole body to obtain the relative differences RD. The large RD values of MPP 1A [RD{sub tumor} = (625 ± 1266)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 38)% ], and MPP 1B [RD{sub tumor} = (197 ± 505)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 39)% ] demonstrate that individual treatment planning is needed due to large physiological differences between patients. Although addition of individual patient parameters reduced the

  19. Output parameters of the 131I bi-phasic vs. monoexponential biokinetics model in thyroid gland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, F.; Jirsa, Ladislav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 4 (2006), s. 177-177. [Days of Medical Biophysics /29./. 16.05.2006-18.05.2006, Bratislava] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET100750404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : thyroid activity * model of activity * effective half-life * residence time * radiation dose Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  20. Biokinetics of nuclear fuel compounds and biological effects of nonuniform radiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, S.; Servomaa, K.; Kosma, V M; Rytömaa, T

    1995-01-01

    Environmental releases of insoluble nuclear fuel compounds may occur at nuclear power plants during normal operation, after nuclear power plant accidents, and as a consequence of nuclear weapons testing. For example, the Chernobyl fallout contained extensive amounts of pulverized nuclear fuel composed of uranium and its nonvolatile fission products. The effects of these highly radioactive particles, also called hot particles, on humans are not well known due to lack of reliable data on the ex...

  1. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noelle; Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing...... particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity...... sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu...

  2. Biokinetics of indium-111 labeled platelets after cryotherapy of hepatic metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present investigation was performed to evaluate mean platelet live-span and the proportion of platelet disposal in different organs in patients after hepatic cryotherapy. Seven patients with advanced colorectal cancer and liver metastases were included. Directly before the surgical procedure a blood specimen was drawn and an in vitro labeling of patients platelets with 18 MBq Indium-111 oxime was performed. Reinjection was done intraoperatively just before cryotherapy. Blood specimen were drawn at 1, 2, 3, 24 und 48 h p.i.. Whole-body scintigraphy was acquired on day two alter operation. The evaluation comprised the calculation of mean platelet live-span and of organ activities as percentage of whole-body activity. The local disposal of platelets at the site of cryotherapy ranged from 0 to 35.2 percent, the mean value was 16,2 ± 12,2 percent (mean ± SD). The mean half-time of time-activity curve gave 0.6 to 2.4 days (mean ± SD: 1.6 ± 0.6 d; normal value: 3.5-6 d), the mean platelet life-span was between 2.1 and 5.2 days corresponding to a mean value of 3.4 ± 1.0 days (normal value: 7-11 d). The evaluation of SPECT slices of large liver metastases demonstrated that platelet disposal takes place at the border zone of the metastases just around the necrotic center. We conclude that the enhanced local platelet trapping is a major cause for cryothermia-induced systemic thrombocytopenia. (author)

  3. Biokinetic of plutonium in human beings. Analysis and modification of ICRP 67 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary research of the available data and empirical functions for the plutonium excretion after injection was carried out. The ICRP model presented in the Publication no. 67 was then analyzed comparing its predictions for the activity in urine and, at a lesser extent, in feces and blood, with the collected data and empirical curves. The model was modified and an optimized age-related compartmental model was developed. A new skeletal model recently developed was also introduced and age depending bone remodelling rates were assumed on the basis of the ICRP Publication 70. This model provides a better agreement with measured urinary excretion data than the current ICRP 67 model, avoiding unphysiological assumptions such as the transfer of activity from soft tissue to urinary bladder, that were part of the ICRP model. The new optimized model predictions of the activity in faeces and in blood after an injection are also closer to the available data than the ICRP 67 estimations. A good agreement with the partitioning factor of plutonium between skeleton and liver obtained from different autopsy studies was also observed

  4. Nanomaterial translocation - the biokinetics, tissue accumulation, toxicity and fate of materials in secondary organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Balharry, Dominique; Wallin, Håkan;

    2015-01-01

    dioxide and quantum dots) or fast (e.g. zinc oxide) solubility. The translocation of NMs following intratracheal, intranasal and pharyngeal aspiration is higher (up to 10% of administered dose), however the relevance of these routes for risk assessment is questionable. Uptake of the materials from the...

  5. Biokinetics of different-shaped copper oxide nanoparticles in the freshwater gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Forbes, Valery E.; Selck, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is recognized as a major environmental sink for contaminants, including engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Consequently, sediment-living organisms are likely to be exposed to NPs. There is evidence that both accumulation and toxicity of metal NPs to sediment-dwellers increase with decreasing particle size, although NP size does not always predict effects. In contrast, not much is known about the influence of particle shape on bioaccumulation and toxicity. Here, we examined the influence of copper oxide (CuO) NP shape (rods, spheres, and platelets) on their bioaccumulation kinetics and toxicity to the sediment-dwelling gastropod, Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The influence of Cu added as CuCl2 (i.e., aqueous Cu treatment) was also examined. Exposure to sediment mixed with aqueous Cu or with different-shaped CuO NPs at an average measured exposure concentration of 207 μg Cu per g dry weight sediment for 14 days did not significantly affect snail mortality. However, growth decreased for snails exposed to sediment amended with CuO NP spheres and platelets. P. antipodarum accumulated Cu from all Cu forms/shapes in significant amounts compared to control snails. In addition, once accumulated, Cu was efficiently retained (i.e., elimination rate constants were generally not significantly different from zero). Consequently, snails are likely to concentrate Cu over time, from both aqueous and NP sources, resulting in a high potential for toxicity.

  6. Comparative studies on transuranium nuclide biokinetics in sediment-dwelling invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment-dwelling molluscs (bivalve and gastropod), echinoderms (ophiuroid and holothurian) and annelids (polychaete) were analyzed for accumulation tissue distribution and loss of 237Pu, 241Am and 242Cm. After a 3-week exposure to a given radionuclide organisms were transferred to clean sea water for the depuration phase. Some individuals were dissected following both the uptake and loss period. Concentration factors varied widely (1-103), strongly dependent on species and radionuclide. All species tested took up more 241Am than 237Pu with the exception of the brittle star Ophiura texturata which showed a preference for 237Pu over 241Am by a factor of 5. The highest uptake of 241Am was noted in the polychaete Hermione hystrix which reached concentration factors of 103 and showed no indication of approaching steady state after 20 days. The detritivorous gastropod Aporrhais pespelicani attained somewhat higher 241Am concentration factors (550) than did the suspension-feeding clam (330). The lowest 241Am concentration factors were found in the brittle star (60) and the sea cucumber Stichopus regalis (20). Transuranics accumulated in polyaetes > molluscs > echinoderms, with ophiuroids reaching higher levels than holothurians, most of the radionuclides (80-90%) associating with shell or body wall. Particularly high concentration factors (103-104) were noted in chitinous setae of the polychaete and digestive tissues and gonads of the ophiuroid. Tranfer probably takes place via the coelomic fluid. Tbsub(1/2) ranged from 2-13 months, a function of species rather than the transuranic element. Benthic species of the sediment-water interface can readily accumulate transuranic elements retaining them for relatively long periods of time

  7. Review of QSAR Models and Software Tools for predicting Biokinetic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    MOSTRAG-SZLICHTYNG A.; Worth, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In the assessment of industrial chemicals, cosmetic ingredients, and active substances in pesticides and biocides, metabolites and degradates are rarely tested for their toxicologcal effects in mammals. In the interests of animal welfare and cost-effectiveness, alternatives to animal testing are needed in the evaluation of these types of chemicals. In this report we review the current status of various types of in silico estimation methods for Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretio...

  8. Comparative investigations on the biokinetics of colloidal thorium, zirconium, and hafnium dioxides in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the investigations is to establish biophysical data as a basis for dose calculations of realized projected long-term animal experiments devoted to the problem radiation and nonradiation effect of Thorotrast. For this purpose a Thorotrast-equivalent thorium dioxide aquasol as well as dextrin-stabilized aquasols of zirconium and hafnium dioxides (Zirconotrast, Hafnorast) of our own production have been injected intravascularly into rats. The animals subdivided in four subgroups have been administered 60 to 600 μl of any colloid per rat. Four subgroups were sacrificed at different times between 1 and 100 days after injection. The whole-body kinetics of Thorotrast and Hafnotrast have been studied by single whole-body counting of altogether 10 animals during the total time of exposure. Both the distribution of the colloids and the activity ratios between 232Th and daughters have been determined. Supplementary to these investigations studies were performed on the Thorotrast kinetics in mice and in one dog

  9. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by acclimated and unacclimated activated sludge-Evaluation of biokinetic coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unacclimated and acclimated activated sludges were examined for their ability to degrade 4-CP (4-chlorophenol) in the presence and absence of a readily growing substrate using aerobic batch reactors. The effects of 4-CP on the μ (specific growth rate), COD removal efficiency, Y (yield coefficient), and q (specific substrate utilization rate) were investigated. It was observed that the toxicity of 4-CP on the culture decreased remarkably after acclimation. For example, the IC50 value on the basis of μ was found to increase from 130 to 218mg/L with the acclimation of the culture. Although an increase in 4-CP concentration up to 300mg/L has no adverse effect on the COD removal efficiency of the acclimated culture, a considerable decrease was observed in the case of an unacclimated culture. Although 4-CP removal was not observed with an unacclimated culture, almost complete removal was achieved with the acclimated culture, up to 300mg/L. The Haldane kinetic model adequately predicted the biodegradation of 4-CP and the kinetic constants obtained were qm=41.17mg/(gMLVSSh), Ks=1.104mg/L, and Ki=194.4mg/L. The degradation of 4-CP led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was further metabolized, indicating complete degradation of 4-CP via a meta-cleavage pathway

  10. Biokinetics of radiocesium in shrimp (Palaemon adspersus): seawater and food exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioaccumulation of 134Cs was studied in the shrimp Palaemon adspersus (Rathke, 1837) using dissolved or food pathways. The uptake and loss kinetics (following seawater and food uptake) were followed for 27 and 38 days, respectively. The steady state concentration factor (CFss) value of 134Cs in the whole body of the shrimp was found to be 15 ± 0.08. The loss kinetics of radiocesium was described by a two-component exponential model, with a biological half-life of 85.5 days for the whole body. The depuration kinetics of 134Cs was best fitted to a single-component exponential model for both edible and inedible parts. The depuration kinetics of 134Cs following exposure via pulse-chase feeding was also described by a two-component exponential model, with a biological half-life of 84.2 days. Assimilation efficiency (AE) was found to be 38.5%. Most of the radioactivity was accumulated in muscular tissues (the edible part) of the shrimp compared to the remaining soft parts. The average of the total body burden of 134Cs eliminated with molting was %15.3 ± 8.1. - Highlights: • Bioaccumulation of 134Cs was studied in shrimp Palaemon adspersus. • Uptake and loss experiments were carried out under controlled laboratory conditions. • CFss value was found to be 15 ± 0.58 for whole body of shrimp. • Tb1/2 were found to be 85.5 ± 1.05 and 84.2 ± 2.93 days for long periods of dissolved and dietary pathways, respectively. • The average of the total body burden of 134Cs eliminated with molting was %15.3 ± 8.1

  11. DOSIMETRIC AND BIOKINETIC MODELS OF THE ICRPF OR THE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL DOSES FROM RADIO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    1IntroductionTheequivalentdosetoatargetorganfromtheactivityofaradionuclideinasourceorganisproportionaltothetotalnumberoftrans...

  12. Biokinetic study of radionuclides in rats after feeding a chitosan diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan is derived from chitin, which is a cellulose-like biopolymer distributed widely in nature, especially in crustaceans, insects, fungi and yeast. Chitin and chitosan are known to be one of the naturals chelating agents. We already reported that the whole-body retention of orally administered 85Sr in rats decreased remarkably after feeding a chitosan diet when comparing them with controls. The present study was to investigate whether chitosan can be applied to the animal and human bodies in order to reduce the bioavailability of radionuclides in food. Wistar strain male rats were used in this experiment. These rats were fed with different diets in order to observe the removal of ingested radio-iron and zinc by chitosan. The whole-body retention of radio-iron was slightly lower in the 5%-chitosan diet group than non-chitosan diet group. In tissue distribution study, rats were sacrificed 14 days after administration. The relative concentration of iron in the blood and spleen was found to be lower in the 5%-chitosan diet group. The whole-body retention of 65Zn decreased sharply in the rats given 3% phytate water in advance of 65Zn administration when compared with the control rats. The rats given 5% chitosan and 1% phytate water also showed a significant reduction in radio-zinc. However, 5% chitosan diet on it's own did not have a significant effect on accelerating the removal of radio-zinc in the rats. Previous studies have shown that the administration of 1% phytate water is also not effective in reducing radio-zinc in rats. These results suggest that the effectiveness of phytate and chitosan in reducing the bioavailability of radio-zinc depend on their concentration. (author)

  13. Uptake kinetics and biodistribution of 14C-d-luciferin - a radiolabeled substrate for the firefly luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence reaction: impact on bioluminescence based reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of d-luciferin to oxyluciferin in the presence of cofactors, producing bioluminescence. This reaction is used in optical bioluminescence-based molecular imaging approaches to detect the expression of the firefly luciferase reporter gene. Biokinetics and distribution of the substrate most likely have a significant impact on levels of light signal and therefore need to be investigated. Benzene ring 14C(U)-labeled d-luciferin was utilized. Cell uptake and efflux assays, murine biodistribution, autoradiography and CCD-camera based optical bioluminescence imaging were carried out to examine the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the tracer in cell culture and in living mice respectively. Radiolabeled and unlabeled d-luciferin revealed comparable levels of light emission when incubated with equivalent amounts of the firefly luciferase enzyme. Cell uptake assays in pCMV-luciferase-transfected cells showed slow trapping of the tracer and relatively low uptake values (up to 22.9-fold higher in firefly luciferase gene-transfected vs. nontransfected cells, p=0.0002). Biodistribution studies in living mice after tail-vein injection of 14C-d-luciferin demonstrated inhomogeneous tracer distribution with early predominant high radioactivity levels in kidneys (10.6% injected dose [ID]/g) and liver (11.9% ID/g), followed at later time points by the bladder (up to 81.3% ID/g) and small intestine (6.5% ID/g), reflecting the elimination routes of the tracer. Kinetics and uptake levels profoundly differed when using alternate injection routes (intravenous versus intraperitoneal). No clear trapping of 14C-d-luciferin in firefly luciferase-expressing tissues could be observed in vivo. The data obtained with 14C-d-luciferin provide insights into the dynamics of d-luciferin cell uptake, intracellular accumulation, and efflux. Results of the biodistribution and autoradiographic studies should be useful for optimizing and

  14. A practical guideline for the release of patients treated by I-131 based on Monte Carlo dose calculations for family members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently published effective doses per time-integrated activity (mSv MBq−1 s−1) for paediatric and adult family members exposed to an adult patient released from hospital following I-131 therapy. In the present study, we intend to provide medical physicists with a methodology to estimate family member effective dose in daily clinical practice because the duration of post-radiation precautions for the patient–family member exposure scenario has not been explicitly delineated based on the effective dose. Four different exposure scenarios are considered in this study including (1) a patient and a family member standing face to face, (2) a patient and a family member lying side by side, (3) an adult female patient holding a newborn child to her chest and (4) a one-year-old child standing on the lap of an adult female patient following her I-131 therapy. The results of this study suggest that an adult female hyperthyroidism (HT) patient who was administered with 740 MBq should keep a distance of 100 cm from a 15-year-old child for six days and the same distance from other adults for seven days. The HT female patient should avoid holding a newborn against her chest for at least 16 days following hospital discharge, and a female patient treated with 5550 MBq for differentiated thyroid cancer should not hold her newborn child for at least 15 days following hospital discharge. This study also gives dose coefficients allowing one to predict age-specific effective doses to family members given the measured dose rate (mSv h−1) of the patient. In conclusion, effective dose-based patient release criteria with a modified NRC two-component model provide a site medical physicist with less restrictive and age-specific radiation precaution guidance as they fully consider a patient’s iodine biokinetics and photon attenuation within both the patient and the exposed family members. (note)

  15. Effect of iron retention in the alimentary tract on the committed effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICRP Publication 100 provides a new human alimentary tract model (HATM). This model allows for the possibility of radionuclide retention within any tract tissue. Iron isotopes are among relevant radionuclides in this respect. The present study was aimed at the development of a biokinetic alimentary tract model which combines the HATM with the model in ICRP Publication 69 and allows for retention in the small intestine based on available literature. The model modification was used to simulated conceivable biokinetics deviations such as anemia, dysfunction of iron absorption or different colon transit times. The calculated committed equivalent doses and committed effective doses were compared. (orig.)

  16. Determination and reliability of dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals; Ermittlung der Zuverlaessigkeit von Dosiskoeffizienten fuer Radiopharmaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, V.; Li, W.B.; Zankl, M.; Oeh, U.

    2015-11-15

    The dose coefficients used in nuclear medicine for dose calculations of radiopharmaceuticals are based on recommendations by ICRP (International Commission on radiological protection) and the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee) using mathematical models for the temporal activity distributions in organs and tissues (biokinetic models) and mathematical models of the human body. These models using an idealized human body do not include uncertainty estimations. The research project is aimed to determine the uncertainties and thus the reliability of the dose coefficients for radiopharmaceuticals and to identify the biokinetic and dosimetric parameters that contribute most of the uncertainties.

  17. Biokinetics of selected heavy metals and radionuclides in two marine macrophytes: the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnau, M. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium). Lab. de Biologie Marine; Fowler, S.W.; Teyssie, J.-L. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.

    1996-08-02

    Uptake and loss kinetics of Zn, Ag, Cd, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 241}Am by shoots of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and fronds of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia were determined in controlled laboratory radiotracer experiments using low contaminant concentrations. The two species accumulated most of the elements efficiently. The only exceptions were {sup 134}Cs in both P. oceanica and C. taxifolia and Cd in C. taxifolia (concentration factors {<=} 6.4). Steady state in uptake was reached in C.taxifolia for each element except Ag. In P. oceanica, steady state was noted for the uptake of Ag and {sup 134}Cs whereas Zn, Cd, and {sup 241}Am were linearly accumulated during the course of the experiment (15 d). With respect to relative metal bioavailability, the different compartments of P. oceanica shoots were generally ranked in the order: leaf epiphytes > adult leaves intermediate leaves > leaf sheaths. The long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element in P. oceanica was characterized by a relatively short biological half-life (T{sub b1/2} 28 d). However, observations for the individual compartments indicated that adult leaves had a high retention capacity for Ag and {sup 134}Cs, with virtually 100% retained after 21 d in uncontaminated sea water. In C. taxifolia, the long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element was characterized by a T{sub b1/2} value that was not significantly different from infinity, an observation which suggests that a substantial fraction of the metal or radionuclide incorporated during a contamination event would be irreversibly bound by this algal species. (author).

  18. Biokinetics of selected heavy metals and radionuclides in two marine macrophytes: the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake and loss kinetics of Zn, Ag, Cd, 134Cs, and 241Am by shoots of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica and fronds of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia were determined in controlled laboratory radiotracer experiments using low contaminant concentrations. The two species accumulated most of the elements efficiently. The only exceptions were 134Cs in both P. oceanica and C. taxifolia and Cd in C. taxifolia (concentration factors ≤ 6.4). Steady state in uptake was reached in C.taxifolia for each element except Ag. In P. oceanica, steady state was noted for the uptake of Ag and 134Cs whereas Zn, Cd, and 241Am were linearly accumulated during the course of the experiment (15 d). With respect to relative metal bioavailability, the different compartments of P. oceanica shoots were generally ranked in the order: leaf epiphytes > adult leaves intermediate leaves > leaf sheaths. The long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element in P. oceanica was characterized by a relatively short biological half-life (Tb1/2 28 d). However, observations for the individual compartments indicated that adult leaves had a high retention capacity for Ag and 134Cs, with virtually 100% retained after 21 d in uncontaminated sea water. In C. taxifolia, the long-lived component of the loss kinetics for each element was characterized by a Tb1/2 value that was not significantly different from infinity, an observation which suggests that a substantial fraction of the metal or radionuclide incorporated during a contamination event would be irreversibly bound by this algal species. (author)

  19. Comparative radioanalytical and biokinetic studies of 99mTc-Tin and 99mTc-sulphur colloid kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel chromatography scanning technique (GCS) was used to study the radioanalytical behaviour of 99mTc-tin colloid and 99mTc-sulphur colloid kits. Sepharose has been found to be more accurate and versatile than the other conventional analytical procedures for radioanalytical evaluation of 99mTc-labelled colloids. The obtained radioanalytical results showed that 99mTc-sulphur colloid is more susceptible than the 99mTc-tin colloids to change due to the analytical environment. This is related to the nature of oxidation state of technetium atom in both colloids. The formation of 99mTc-tin colloid is achieved within few minutes after pertechnetate addition, while labeling of sulphur colloid is accomplished through a rather slow process. The organ distribution in mice shows that more than 90% of the injected dose of both colloids are accumulated in the liver, which proved the colloid labeling and optimal size particle. The minor size difference in the blood residual activity is due to the presence of hydrophilic stabilizer in 99mTc-sulphur colloid. The blood clearance study in rabbits showed that the biological half-times of activity disappearance of fast phase are longer periods extend to 125 and 65 minutes to 99mTc-tin and 99mTc-sulphur colloids, respectively. The in vitro plasma protein binding studies revealed by the GSC method showed that about 85% of 99mTc-tin colloid and 16% of 99mTc-sulphur colloid were bound to plasma protein, which proved that it does not influence the in vivo kinetics of both colloids

  20. Labelling study of galacturonic acid with Tc-99m and investigation of the biokinetic behaviour in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main criterion in the selection of a proper ligand to be labelled with Technetium is to match the requirement of a radiopharmaceutical of good biological specificity, where the target organ-to-background ratio is considerably high. Perliminary study on experimental animals has shown, that galacturonic acid is among those ligands of high renal specificity after complexing with Tc-99. In this communication we describe for the first time the labelling of galacturonic acid with Tc-99, using stannous chloride as a reducing agent for pertechnetate. The radioanalytical results assessed by gelchromatography column scanning (GCS) method, reveal that, the labelling efficiency of (Tc)99-galacturonate complex is promoted by raising the pH of the reaction mixture to a value higher than 7 using tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane buffer. The optimal amounts of the reactants to obtain a high labelled and stable complex with high kidney uptake, were found to be not less than 50 mg galacturonic acid and not more than 200 Mg SnCl2.H2O in the preparation

  1. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4 + removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times...

  2. Biokinetics of Hg and Pb accumulation in the encapsulated egg of the common cuttlefish Sepia officinalis: Radiotracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacoue-Labarthe, T., E-mail: tlacouel@gmail.com [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France); Warnau, M., E-mail: warnaumichel@yahoo.com [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Metian, M. [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France); International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Oberhaensli, F. [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine Ier, MC-98000 (Monaco); Rouleau, C. [Institut Maurice-Lamontagne, 850 Route de la Mer, C.P. 1000, Mont-Joli, Quebec (Canada); Bustamante, P., E-mail: pbustama@univ-lr.fr [Littoral, Environnement et Societes (LIENSs), UMR 6250, CNRS-Universite de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, F-17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01 (France)

    2009-12-01

    Uptake and depuration kinetics of dissolved {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb were determined during the entire embryonic development of the eggs of the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis (50 d at 17 {sup o}C). {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb were accumulated continuously by the eggs all along the development time reaching load/concentration ratio (LCR) of 467 {+-} 43 and 1301 {+-} 126 g, respectively. During the first month, most of the {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Pb remained associated with the eggshell indicating that the latter acted as an efficient shield against metal penetration. From this time onwards, {sup 203}Hg accumulated in the embryo, indicating that it passed through the eggshell, whereas {sup 210}Pb did not cross the chorion during the whole exposure time. It also demonstrated that translocation of Hg associated with the inner layers of the eggshell is a significant source of exposure for the embryo. This study highlighted that the maturing embryo could be subjected to the toxic effects of Hg in the coastal waters where the embryonic development is taking place.

  3. Analytical methods of biokinetics models with a large compartmental neutral systems. Applications of ICRP 66 and 78 models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New computer programs that include symbolic capability, like Mathematics, can be used to solve analytically large compartmental systems. In this paper some techniques are developed in order to make feasible a computer program that gives not only faster and more accurate solutions, but also analytic solutions for this kind of models. the main idea is to make a partition of subsystem and solve them sequentially. The concept of pseudo-trap compartments in a subsystem is crucial at this point. Impulse (acute), constant, and continuous (such as exponential) intakes are considered. This technique has been applied to develop a computer code (Hum orap) in Mathematic a for solving the ICRP 66 and 78 models. (Author) 11 refs

  4. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Dose reconstruction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project Dose Reconstruction was conducted within the five work packages: - EPR with teeth, - Chromosome painting (FISH) in lymphocytes, - Luminescence methods, - Modelling, and - Evaluation. (orig.)

  5. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liepe, K. [GH Hospital Frankfurt/Oder, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Frankfurt an der Oder (Germany); Becker, A. [GH Hospital Frankfurt/Oder, Department of Internal Medicine, Frankfurt an der Oder (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Since the 1990s the advantages of breastfeeding have been emphasized and the number of women who nurse their infant has increased significantly. Although women in this population are generally healthy and relatively rarely need radionuclide imaging or radionuclide therapies, the issue of radiation protection of breastfed children arises because of their higher radiosensitivity. Approximately 55 papers on excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after radionuclide imaging or therapy have been published. Unfortunately, most of them are case reports or include only a small number of cases. In 1955 the first report was published about a breastfeeding woman after radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis. This early study showed a higher concentration of radioiodine in breast milk than in plasma and investigated the risk to the infant, especially to the thyroid gland.

  6. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after nuclear medicine examinations. Biokinetic and dosimetric data and recommendations on breastfeeding interruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the 1990s the advantages of breastfeeding have been emphasized and the number of women who nurse their infant has increased significantly. Although women in this population are generally healthy and relatively rarely need radionuclide imaging or radionuclide therapies, the issue of radiation protection of breastfed children arises because of their higher radiosensitivity. Approximately 55 papers on excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after radionuclide imaging or therapy have been published. Unfortunately, most of them are case reports or include only a small number of cases. In 1955 the first report was published about a breastfeeding woman after radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis. This early study showed a higher concentration of radioiodine in breast milk than in plasma and investigated the risk to the infant, especially to the thyroid gland.

  7. Study of the biokinetic behavior of 99mTc-DMSA in renal scintigraphy of pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil, renal studies with 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-DMSA constitute about 18% of pediatric diagnostic procedures. A retrospective non-randomized study was conducted in 2010, for absolute quantification of kidney activities. In 2010,51 patients underwent renal studies in the Hospital of the Rio de Janeiro State University - HUPE-UERJ/ RJ, Brazil. 19 of them with 9±4 years of age and body mass of 31.8±20.8 kg showed relative uptake of 99mTc-DMSA between 45% and 55%. Still images (AP, PA and posterior oblique abdomen incidences) were acquired 4 h after intravenous administration of 115.69±42.31 MBq of 99mTc-DMSA using gamma camera (Siemens E-Cam), LEHR collimator, matrix of 256x256 and 5min imaging. In 2012, 3 patients (9.3±2.1 years, 31.97±10.75 kg) in the previous study were followed in a prospective study. All urinary excretions samples were collected from administration of 99mTc-DMSA to 6 h after, while simultaneously images were acquired AP and PA abdominal region with Philips model Picker Prism 2000XP. Aliquots of each urine sample were measured in gamma counter shaft GenesysTM Gamma 1 with Nal (TI) detector. For whole body, the biological half-life estimate was 11.0±2.0 h, and the residence time was found to be 5.6±0.4 h while the literature suggests 4.l±0.5 h for age range studied. Residence time for kidney was found to be 0.7±0.4 h, while the literature shows, 3.07 h and 1.4 h for patients with normal and renal pathologies, respectively. This difference may be attributed to the methodology because while the images were taken during the first 6 h, SMITH et aI. (1996) performed images of the kidneys and whole body 30 h after administration of 99mTcDMSA, incorporating the slow term of biological half-life. For liver, it was found the average residence time of 3.0±0.4 min, whereas the literature indicates 20.8 min and 25.1 min, respectively according to SMITH et. ai (1996) and ICRP (1998). The fact that the administered activity was higher than the activity estimated by 3 different criteria is not a single parameter to be considered for the optimization of doses, once for diagnostic image quality it must be ensured. Therefore, the analysis of the quality of the images should be part of the study. It is recommended to include in the study protocol whole body images on the first day and 24 h after administration of 99mTc-DMSA. To quantify the activity in the whole body, it is recommended to perform the patient attenuation map through an emission image. For organ images, it is recommended to use physical simulator to obtain the calibration factor of the respective body. The acquisition time of the images should follow the estimated time for the biological half-life of 2 terms (fast and slow). (author)

  8. Biokinetic and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-14F7-monoclonal antibody in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Calderon, Carlos; Pimentel, Gilmara; Oliva, Juan P., E-mail: jgg@infomed.sld.cu [Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto de Oncologia y Radiobiologia, Cidad Habana (Cuba); Casaco, Angel [Division de Ensayos Clinicos, Centro de Inmunologia Molecular, Reparto Siboney, Ciudad Habana (Cuba)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: The 14F7 murine MAb is an IgG1 that binds specifically to GM3(Neu-Gc) ganglioside strongly recognizing the antigen displayed in human breast and melanoma tumors. A preliminary report showed in vivo evidences of presence of GM3(Neu-Gc) ganglioside in human breast primary tumors using 14F7 MAb labelled with {sup 99m}Tc. In this work the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 MAb in patient with breast cancer were studied. The absorbed dose in normal organ and tumors was also calculated. The patients were selected from a Phase I/II clinical trial which included 14 female patients with cytological diagnose of breast carcinoma in stage II without previous onco-specific treatment. Three groups were conformed: Group I (0.3mg, n=5), Group II (1mg, n=5) and Group III (3mg, n=4). The activity ranged in 1.11 - 1.48GBq (30- 40mCi) was intravenously administered during 1-2min. The {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 plasma clearance was determined by blood sampling at 5, 10, 20, 30min and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24h after injection. All urine excreted by patients was collected during 24h after injection at intervals of 0-2h, 2-8h and 8-24h. Prior to injection, a transmission scan of head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis was obtained using a {sup 57}Co flood source. Anterior and posterior whole body images were acquired at 30min, 2h, 4h, 8h and 24h after injection using a Gamma Camera (SophyCamera DS7) with pinhole collimator. Static anterior and posterior images were obtained from head, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and lateral images of each breast in pendular position at 2h, 4h, 8h and 24h. Internal absorbed dose calculation was performed according to MIRD formalism using the S values for adult non-pregnant female phantom downloaded from the RADAR website. Self-absorbed tumor dose were calculated assuming those as spheres with uniform distribution of activity. The plasma clearance of radiotracer in all groups shows a monoexponential decay behaviour with biological elimination half time ranged in 15h and 19h. The distribution volume was similar to physiological volume in normal subject. A low urinary excretion was observed. The biodistribution shows a high retention of radiotracer in whole-body. A high uptake and retention was observed in bone marrow, kidneys and liver. The highest absorbed dose per MBq was observed in liver and kidneys. The {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 shows a rapid tumor uptake (<2.5h) with a delayed biological elimination half time (>4.5 days). In most cases, the maximum activity uptake in tumor (<1%/100g of tumor) was observed at 24 hours after injection. The pharmacokinetic data observed for {sup 99m}Tc-14F7 MAb behaves as a monoexponential model showing a slow clearance from plasma and a low urinary excretion. (author)

  9. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry for patients undergoing a glycerol tri[1-14C]oleate fat malabsorption breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glycerol tri[1-14C]olein test for fat malabsorption was carried out in two male volunteers and measurements of the loss of 14C in expired air, urine and faeces and the retention of 14C in biopsy samples of abdominal fat were made using accelerator mass spectrometry. Exhalation accounted for 73% and 55% of the administered activity and could be described by three-component exponential functions with halftimes of about 1 h, 2 days and 150 days, respectively. Urinary excretion accounted for 24% of the administered activity, almost all during the first 24 h after administration; about 2% was excreted in the faeces in 48 h. The halftime of retention of 14C in fat ranged from 137 to 620 days. Absorbed dose calculations indicate that for a normal adult the largest dose, 1.5-7.0 mGy/MBq is received by the adipose tissue, and that the effective dose is 0.3-0.5 mSv/MBq. It is concluded that no restrictions need to be placed on radiation safety grounds on the administration of 0.05-0.1 MBq 14C-triolein for the triolein breath test

  10. Experimental studies on the biokinetics of Cs-134 and Cd-109 in the blood cockle (Anadara granosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioaccumulation and depuration study under controlled laboratory conditions of Cs and Cd in Anadara granosa collected at coastal Kapar, Selangor was carried out using respective radiotracer, Cs-134 and Cd-109. The radioactivity of Cs-134 and Cd-109 were determined using high resolution hyper germanium detector. Our results demonstrate that Cd-109 was accumulated efficiently by this species, except Cs-134. The steady state concentration factor (CF) for accumulation of Cs-134 and Cd-109 from seawater was estimated to be about 5.86 and 51.31, respectively. For the depuration stage, loss kinetics of Cs-134 and Cd-109 was best described by 2-compartment exponential model. Results shown that A. granosa exposed to Cs-134 have a total loss of 69% in compared to 19 % of Cd-109. Results gained in this experiment are a baseline data to evaluate future released of radioactive material from nuclear power programme facilities within this region. (author)

  11. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjelsvik, R.; Brown, J.; Holm, E.; Roos, P.; Saxen, R.; Outola, I.

    2012-01-15

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  12. Polonium-210 and other radionuclides in terrestrial, freshwater and brackish environments Results from the NKS project GAPRAD (Filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for non-human biota)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The background and rationale to filling knowledge gaps in radiation protection methodologies for biota are presented. Concentrations of Po-210 and Pb-210 are reported for biota sampled in Dovrefjell, Norway and selected lake and brackish ecosystems in Finland. Furthermore, details in relation to Po-210 uptake and biokinetics in humans based on experimental studies are recounted. (Author)

  13. Touch BASE

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Nature article (see here), the BASE collaboration reported the most precise comparison of the charge-to-mass ratio of the proton to its antimatter equivalent, the antiproton. This result is just the beginning and many more challenges lie ahead.   CERN's AD Hall, where the BASE experiment is set-up. The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) was approved in June 2013 and was ready to take data in August 2014. During these 14 months, the BASE collaboration worked hard to set up its four cryogenic Penning traps, which are the heart of the whole experiment. As their name indicates, these magnetic devices are used to trap antiparticles – antiprotons coming from the Antiproton Decelerator – and particles of matter – negative hydrogen ions produced in the system by interaction with a degrader that slows the antiprotons down, allowing scientists to perform their measurements. “We had very little time to set up the wh...

  14. Monetary base

    OpenAIRE

    Richard G. Anderson

    2006-01-01

    This brief essay is a working draft of an article in preparation for the forthcoming International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 2nd ed., examining the role of the monetary base in monetary economics and monetary policymaking. Comments are welcome.

  15. Web based foundry knowledge base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stawowy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main assumptions and functions of proposed Foundry Knowledge Base (FKB are presented in this paper. FKB is a framework forinformation exchange of casting products and manufacturing methods. We use CMS (Content Management System to develope andmaintain our web-based system. The CastML – XML dialect developed by authors for description of casting products and processes – isused as a tool for information interchange between ours and outside systems, while SQL is used to store and edit knowledge rules and alsoto solve the basic selection problems in the rule-based module. Besides the standard functions (companies data, news, events, forums and media kit, our website contains a number of nonstandard functions; the intelligent search module based on expert system is the main advantage of our solution. FKB is to be a social portal which content will be developed by foundry community.

  16. COMPARISON OF TOXICOKINTICS BASED BIOACCUMULATION OF COPPER AND CADMIUM BY EARTHWORM LAMPTITO MAURITHI (KINBERG UNDER CONTROLLED LABORATORY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. SUDHA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available ntevertebrates particularly earthworms are being used extensively in laboratory test of evaluating the toxicity of chemicals. Earthworms are also known to accumulate large concentration of metals into their tissues when exposed to contaminated soil. Bioavailability of metals to organism is strongly site specific and is controlled by the species of the metral, the organism are exposed and the ability of the organisms to reduce or eliminate metal and effect to vulnerable tissues by sequestration etc. Thus uptake of the metal by earthworms is not simply a case of bioavailability of the metal but also depends on the biokinetics of uptake, storage and excretion. The rate at which these process occur will determine the amount of metal in the organism at any one time and the toxicity of any contaminant. Toxicokinetics studies are of major importance in soil eco-toxicology since many effect can hardly be recognized in acute and chronic toxicity tests. Cadmium and copper are two of the toxic heavy metals. The general aim of the present study was to investigate toxicokinetic behaviour of heavy metals, copper and cadmium on earthworm Lampito mauritii. The sutdy revealed that the biokinetics process follows first order kinetic equation, But the rate of accumulation differs for the two metals

  17. Plutonium contamination in the environment. May 1978-April 1987 (A Bibliography from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for May 1978-April 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the ecological impact of plutonium contamination in the environment. Topics include plutonium contamination in freshwater and marine sediments, plutonium bioaccumulation, plutonium transport in the food chain, plutonium accumulation in the soil, methods of analysis, plutonium removal from contaminated soils, plutonium contamination from nuclear fallout and nuclear facilities, and the presence of plutonium in seaspray and in the atmosphere. Plutonium biokinetics in humans, and fetal effects from plutonium contamination are also described. (Contains 93 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  18. Reliability of the ICRP's dose coefficients for members of the public: IV. Basis of the human alimentary tract model and uncertainties in model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biokinetic and dosimetric model of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract applied in current documents of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) was developed in the mid-1960's. The model was based on features of a reference adult male and was first used by the ICRP in Publication 30, Limits for Intakes of Radionuclides by Workers (Part 1, 1979). In the late 1990's an ICRP task group was appointed to develop a biokinetic and dosimetric model of the alimentary tract that reflects updated information and addresses current needs in radiation protection. The new age-specific and gender-specific model, called the Human Alimentary Tract Model (HATM), has been completed and will replace the GI model of Publication 30 in upcoming ICRP documents. This paper discusses the basis for the structure and parameter values of the HATM, summarises the uncertainties associated with selected features and types of predictions of the HATM and examines the sensitivity of dose estimates to these uncertainties for selected radionuclides. Emphasis is on generic biokinetic features of the HATM, particularly transit times through the lumen of the alimentary tract, but key dosimetric features of the model are outlined, and the sensitivity of tissue dose estimates to uncertainties in dosimetric as well as biokinetic features of the HATM are examined for selected radionuclides. (authors)

  19. Foundation: Transforming data bases into knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, R. B.; Carnes, James R.; Cutts, Dannie E.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to transforming information stored in relational data bases into knowledge based representations and back again is described. This system, called Foundation, allows knowledge bases to take advantage of vast amounts of pre-existing data. A benefit of this approach is inspection, and even population, of data bases through an intelligent knowledge-based front-end.

  20. INVOLUTIVE BASES UNDER COMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zailiang TANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the behaviors of involutive bases under composition operation are studied.For two kinds of involutive bases, i.e., Pommaret bases, Janet bases, we study their behavior problems under composition. Some further problems are also proposed.

  1. A multiple endpoint approach to predict the hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Truisi, Germaine Loredana

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was evaluated to predict the hepatotoxic potential of pharmaceuticals. For this purpose, primary rat and human hepatocytes cultured in an optimised sandwich configuration were used; thus, allowing the long-term, repeat-dosing of drugs. The strategy based on the evaluation of multiple endpoints, including cytotoxicity, biokinetic profiling, transcriptomics and proteomics. Pharmaceuticals with known toxicities and pharmacokinetic properties were used as model compounds.

  2. Specific absorbed fractions and S-factors for calculating absorbed dose to embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of specific absorbed fractions from maternal tissues to embryo/fetus is investigated for four different target masses and geometries. S-factors are calculated for selected radionuclides assumed to be distributed uniformly in fetal tissues represented by spheres from 1 mg to 4 kg. As an example, the dose to fetal tissues for iodine-131 and iron-59 is estimated based on human biokinetic data for various stages of pregnancy. 24 references, 4 tables

  3. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of 14C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic 14C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings

  4. An experimental study of americium-241 biokinetics in the Lobster Homarus Gammarus. Analysis of the accumulation/storage and detoxification processes at the subcellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of americium-241 kinetics has been conducted in the lobster Homarus gammmarus. The investigations were conducted at all the levels from the whole body to the subcellular and molecular levels. The animals were contaminated by a single or chronic ingestion of 241 Am labelled mussels. Assessments of accumulation, elimination and distribution of the radionuclide were established on organisms kept in the laboratory; they made it possible to demonstrate the importance of the digestive gland in the radionuclide transfer pathways. The preliminary results led to structural then ultrastructural investigations of the digestive gland in association with radioautographic studies and cellular extractions methods. Four cellular types were demonstrated, only two of them being implied in the radionuclide retention, the former being responsible for americium intake and the latter for its long-term retention. By means of biochemical techniques, subcellular accumulation was studied and the organelles implied in the nuclide retention were specified. Finally, a method of cellular nuclei dissociation was developed; it made it possible to analyse the molecular nature of americium ligands and to demonstrate the function of the protein nuclear matrix in the nuclide retention

  5. Biokinetics of cadmium, selenium, and zinc in freshwater alga Scenedesmus obliquus under different phosphorus and nitrogen conditions and metal transfer to Daphnia magna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of Cd, Se(IV) and Zn by the freshwater alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the subsequent transfer and release budget in Daphnia magna were investigated under different nutrient additions and cell incubation conditions. An increase in ambient phosphate concentrations from 0.5 μmol l-1 to 50 μmol l-1 significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of Cd (by 18x) and Zn (by 5x), but decreased the accumulation of Se (by 126x) in the alga. The percentage of these metals distributing in the intracellular pool of algae also increased substantially with increasing ambient P concentrations. Nitrate addition from 5.0 to 200 μmol l-1 did not influence the uptake of any of the three metals, although a significant decrease in the intracellular Se distribution was observed. Radiolabeled algae under different nutrient manipulations (semi-continuous culture, starvation, and P-pulse treatments) were used to measure trophic transfer assimilation efficiency (AE) in Daphnia. When the algal cells were grown in a semi-continuous culture, starved for N and P, or were treated with P-pulse, the AEs of Cd and Zn were generally independent of the nutritional conditions, but the Se AE was significantly affected by different P levels. The efflux rate constants, determined during 10 d depuration following 7 days of dietary uptake, decreased significantly for Cd and Zn, but were relatively constant for Se with increasing P concentration. N-addition caused no effect on the metal efflux rate constants. P- or N-additions did not influence the release budget (including molting, neonates, excretion and feces) for all three elements in Daphnia. Our study indicated that phosphate enrichment may substantially increase metal uptake in green alga S. obliquus. Responses of trophic transfer in Daphnia to nutrient enrichment were metal specific. P-enrichment can possibly lead to considerable decrease on Se transfer from algae to zooplankton. - Phosphorous enrichment influences metal uptake by algae, but not transfer to a zooplankton grazer

  6. The estimation of daily intake and organ content of Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in Indian population: Application to the study of their biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical methods involving both instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation techniques (INAA and RNAA) are being standardised for the determination of the elements Cs, I, Sr, Th and U in various kinds of biological samples. The sampling method proposed to be adopted for the estimation of the daily dietary intake, of the above elements is described. Also reported in this paper are the preliminary results on the concentrations of these elements in the food ingredients which form important components of the diet of Indian population. (author)

  7. Radiation fields, dosimetry, biokinetics and biophysical models for cancer induction by ionising radiation 1996-1999. Biophysical models for the induction of cancer by radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall project is organised into seven work packages. WP1 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, quantitative models for radiation oncogenesis using selected data sets from radiation epidemiology and from experimental animal studies. WP2 concentrates on the development of mechanistic, mathematical models for the induction of chromosome aberrations. WP3 develops mechanistic models for radiation mutagenesis, particularly using the HPRT-mutation as a paradigm. WP4 will develop mechanistic models for damage and repair of DNA, and compare these with experimentally derived data. WP5 concentrates on the improvement of our knowledge on the chemical reaction pathways of initial radiation chemical species in particular those that migrate to react with the DNA and on their simulation in track structure codes. WP6 models by track structure simulation codes the production of initial physical and chemical species, within DNA, water and other components of mammalian cells, in the tracks of charged particles following the physical processes of energy transfer, migration, absorption, and decay of excited states. WP7 concentrates on the determination of the start spectra of those tracks considered in WP6 for different impinging radiation fields and different irradiated biological objects. (orig.)

  8. In vivo biokinetic and metabolic characterization of the {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1-selective peptidomimetic FR366

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Alessandria, Calogero; Pohle, Karolin; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Rechenmacher, Florian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Kessler, Horst [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) and Center of Integrated Protein Science (CIPSM), Department Chemie, Garching (Germany); Notni, Johannes; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Pharmazeutische Radiochemie, Garching (Germany); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Ulm University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors responsible for cell-cell adhesion and cell-extracellular matrix binding and play an important role in angiogenesis and tumour metastasis. For this reason, integrins are increasingly used as targets for molecular imaging. Up to now interest has mostly been focused on the integrin subtype αvβ3. However, targeting of other subtypes such as the integrin α5β1 is also of high interest due to its central role in colonization of metastatic cells, resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy and ionizing radiation, and tumour aggressiveness. Recently, a highly active antagonist ligand (2,2'-(7-(1-carboxy-4-((6-((3-(4-(((S)-1-carboxy-2-(2- (3-guanidinobenzamido)acet amido)ethyl)carbamoyl)-3,5-dimethylphenoxy) propyl)amino)-6-oxohexyl)amino)-4-oxo butyl)-1,4,7-triazonane-1,4-diyl)diacetic acid, FR366) for the integrin subtype α5β1 with high selectivity versus αvβ3, has been developed and tested successfully in preliminary in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we present our results of an investigation of the use of {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1 ligand in PET imaging. The free α5β1 peptidomimetic ligand was functionalized with a spacer (6-aminohexanoic acid) and the bifunctional chelator 1-((1,3-dicarboxy)propyl) -4,7-(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (NODAGA) to yield FR366 and labelled with {sup 68}Ga. To confirm selective in vivo targeting of α5β1, female BALB/c nude mice xenografted with α5β1-expressing RKO cells in the right shoulder and α5β1/αvβ3-expressing M21 cells in the left shoulder were subjected to PET/CT scans and biodistribution experiments. Specificity of tracer uptake was proven by blocking studies. Metabolic stability of the injected tracer was measured in urine and in plasma. MicroPET/CT scans with radiolabelled FR366 showed a good tumour-to-normal tissue ratio with low uptake in the liver (0.32 ± 0.14 %ID/g) and good retention of {sup 68}Ga-NODAGA-FR366 in the tumour (0.71 ± 0.20 %ID/g and 0.40 ± 0.12 %ID/g for RKO and M21 tumours, respectively, at 90 min after injection). Biodistribution experiments showed uptake in the α5β1-expressing RKO tumour of 1.05 ± 0.23 %ID/g at 90 min after injection. Specificity of tracer uptake was demonstrated by injection of 5 mg/kg unlabelled ligand 10 min prior to tracer injection, resulting in a 67 % reduction in uptake in the RKO tumour. The tracer was found to be metabolically stable in urine and plasma 30 min after injection. Our results show that PET imaging of α5β1 expression with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled α5β1-specific ligand is feasible with good image quality. Thus, FR366 is a promising new tool for investigating the role of α5β1 in angiogenesis and the influence of this integrin subtype on cancer aggressiveness and metastatic potential. (orig.)

  9. Biokinetics and repeated exposure in in vitro assays : A detailed study into the behaviour of chlorpromazine and diazepam in different cell systems

    OpenAIRE

    Broeders, J.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The potential risk of compounds is commonly assessed with animal experimentation and extrapolation of these data to assess human health effects. The use of Integrated Testing o Strategies combines different methods, including in vitro tests and in silico methods, to perform risk assessment with less costs and less animal experiments. Although alternatives to animal tests have been developed and validated, research into alternatives for certain toxicological endpoints is yet limited. One of th...

  10. Biokinetics and repeated exposure in in vitro assays : A detailed study into the behaviour of chlorpromazine and diazepam in different cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, J.J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The potential risk of compounds is commonly assessed with animal experimentation and extrapolation of these data to assess human health effects. The use of Integrated Testing o Strategies combines different methods, including in vitro tests and in silico methods, to perform risk assessment with less

  11. The biokinetics of four 239Pu/241Am dioxide bearing dusts in the rat after inhalation: the implications for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the work described here were to provide an experimental basis for evaluating the committed effective dose equivalent per unit intake together with the ALI for four industrial oxide bearing dusts, and to assess the extent to which 241Am could be used for estimating the 239Pu content of the lung after an accidental intake of these materials. (author)

  12. Experimental study of Americium-241 biokinetics in Homarus Gammarus lobster. Analysis of the accumulation and detoxication mechanisms at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Americium 241 radioelement accumulation and elimination rate and mechanisms in the lobster organism have been experimentally studied; incorporation and detoxification capacities of each organ are evaluated. The existence of various biological compartments is shown; the major role of the digestive gland in accumulation of the radioelement, its distribution towards the various organs, and its resorption is comprehensively described, with an analysis at the subcellular and molecular levels. 401 p., 65 fig., 43 tab., 428 ref

  13. A dynamic knowledge base based search engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-jin; HU Hua; LI Qing

    2005-01-01

    Search engines have greatly helped us to find thedesired information from the Intemet. Most search engines use keywords matching technique. This paper discusses a Dynamic Knowledge Base based Search Engine (DKBSE), which can expand the user's query using the keywords' concept or meaning. To do this, the DKBSE needs to construct and maintain the knowledge base dynamically via the system's searching results and the user's feedback information. The DKBSE expands the user's initial query using the knowledge base, and returns the searched information after the expanded query.

  14. Knowledge Based Strategies for Knowledge Based Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Cristina Tocan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present, we can observe that a new economy is arising. It is an economy based on knowledge and ideas, in which the key factor for prosperity and for creation of the new jobs is the knowledge capitalization. Knowledge capitalization, intellectual capital, obtaining prosperity in the market economy imposes a new terminology, new managerial methods and techniques, new technologies and also new strategies. In other words, knowledge based economy, as a new type of economy; impose a new type of management- knowledge based management and a new type of enterprise-knowledge based enterprise.Taking in consideration these predictable evolutions, this paper will try to present: • The main ideas of the researches the field of the knowledge based economy • The characteristics and principles of the knowledge based organizations and knowledge based management • The challenges and opportunities for knowledge based organizations.The first part of the paper will present the principles of the new economy- knowledge base economy, the essential and interrelated elements necessary to build and to implement a strategy in a knowledge economy and the opportunities and challenges to the countries as they seek to build regionally and globally competitive knowledge-based economies.The second part of the paper will present the characteristics of the knowledge based organizations, the principles and characteristics of their management. For many organizations, knowledge management is a relatively new concept, because they are discovering the knowledge value in their operations. Many firms have undertaken formal and informal knowledge management initiatives designed to improve process performance, increase customer responsiveness and spur innovation. But while some organizations have reaped significant benefits from their investment in knowledge efforts, others have run into noteworthy challenges.

  15. Dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in internal dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals are summarised, with special reference to work carried out within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Differences and similarities with internal dosimetry for occupationally exposed workers and for members of the public are identified. What is unique for radiopharmaceuticals is their special biokinetics. The products are designed to get high uptake in certain organs and tissues. When a new compound is introduced there are few long-term retention data for humans available. Therefore efforts have continuously to be made to investigate the biokinetics and dosimetry of new products as well as older products, for which the dosimetry is uncertain, e.g. pure β-emitters. Serial, quantitative gamma camera images of patients will continue to be the base for biokinetic information together with analysis of urine samples. The observed time-activity curves are described using exponential functions with specified fractional activities and half-times. The physical calculations are based on the MIRD formalism. For more detailed dosimetry, CT, MR and ultrasound can be used to localise organs and to determine their volumes. Such measurements are also needed for the construction of realistic phantoms (mathematically describable phantoms, 'voxel' phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms) which are the geometrical base for dose calculations. Variations in anatomy and biokinetics between individuals due to age, gender and disease have to be given greater consideration in the future. Information on the distribution of a radionuclide within organs and tissues is of importance for its therapeutic use as is the intracellular localisation of low energy electron emitters both in therapy and diagnosis. (author)

  16. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs

  17. Influence on dose coefficients for workers of the new metabolic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently reviewed the biokinetic models used in the internal contamination dose assessment. ICRP has adopted a new model for the human respiratory tract and has updated, in ICRP Publications 56, 67 and 69, some of the biokinetic models of ICRP Publication 30. In this paper, the dose coefficients for some selected radionuclides issued in ICRP Publication 68 are compared with those obtained using the software LUPED (LUng Dose Evaluation Program). The former were calculated using the new systemic models, while the latter are based on the old metabolic models. The aim is to know to what extent the new models for systematic retention influence the dose coefficients for workers. (author)

  18. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus was on...... the influence of key biokinetic parameters (maximum specific growth rates, oxygen and nitrogen affinity constants of AOB (ammonium oxidizing bacteria) and NOB (nitrite oxidizing bacteria)) and their ratios on nitritation efficiency in these geometries. This exhaustive simulation study revealed that...... nitritation strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE...

  19. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries are unique parallel research programs devoted to the study of the actinide elements in man. The primary mission of the Registries is to verify and ensure the adequacy and applicability of radiation protection standards for the actinides. To accomplish this task, the Registries utilize tissues obtained postmortem from informed volunteer donors with confirmed or high likelihood of exposure to plutonium, americium, or other actinides. These are collected at autopsy and radiochemically analyzed for actinide content. The results, along with relevant details of occupational and exposure history, medical history and health physics data are used to determine the distribution, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinides in humans, and to correlate estimates of deposition and dose made during life with postmortem findings. Other important applications of the Registries' research is scaling of animal studies to man and validation or refinement of biokinetic models on which the safety standards are based

  20. Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Sweet, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), when properly implemented, includes many, if not all, of the common elements of evidence-based best practices. To explain this, a brief overview of TBL is presented. The authors examine the relationship between the best practices of evidence-based teaching and the principles that constitute team-based learning. (Contains…

  1. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  2. Case Base Maintenance Approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Haouchine, Mohamed-Karim; Chebel-Morello, Brigitte; Zerhouni, Noureddine

    2007-01-01

    Case base Maintenance is an active Case Based Reasoning research area. The main stream focuses on the method for reducing the size of the case-base while maintaining case-base competence. This paper gives an overview of these works, and proposes a case deletion strategy based on competence criteria using a novel approach. The proposed method, even if inspired from existing literature, combines an algorithm with a Competence Metric (CM). A series of tests are conducted using two standards data...

  3. Internal dose coefficients for off-site radiological consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OSCAAR computer code for use in probabilistic accident consequence assessment (Level 3PSA) developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has calculated dose to the public with internal dose conversion factors based on dosimetric models and biokinetic data provided in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30. Since ICRP issued age-dependent biokinetic models for a limited set of radioisotopes are ICRP Publication 56, a new Human Respiratory Tract model, age-dependent biokinetic model for other radioisotopes and urinary and faecal excretion models were issued. ICRP has published age-dependent internal dose coefficients for a large set of radionuclides in its publications, but they provided only committed effective dose coefficients for inhalation and ingestion. Since OSCAAR estimated acute and late health effects for members of the public, it needs internal dose coefficients for specific tissues and organs in arbitrary integration times. This report describes a preprocessor code DSYS developed for use with OSCAAR for calculating inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients based on these new ICRP models. It also provides the internal dose coefficients for 54 radionuclides used in OSCAAR calculations. (author)

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Hollow-Fiber Membrane System in Biological Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian PENG

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of mathematical models were derived based on the bio-kinetics and material balance principles to describe the performance of membrane system in this research. A synthetic wastewater and a meat packing wastewater were processed through a lab-scale membrane bioreactor system to generate experimental data for calibration and verification of the derived models. For the synthetic wastewater treatment, a high and stable Total Organic Carbon (TOC removal was achieved with volumetric organic loading from 0.2 to 24.2 kg TOC/m3ƒ(d. It was found that the derived system models fit the experimental data well. The bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd in the models were found to be 0.16 d-1, 1.0 mg/L, 1.75 mg Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids (MLVSS/mg TOC and 0.11 d-1, respectively. For the meat packing wastewater treatment, the bio-kinetic coefficients of k, Ks, Y and kd were found to be 0.48 d-1, 56.3 mg/L, 0.53 mg MLVSS/mg COD and 0.04 d-1, respectively. F/M ratio of 0.08 was found to be the proper operating condition for the system. Based on the proposed system models, the optimum MLSS concentration and F/M ratio can be computed to yield minimum cost of a membrane bioreactor system without excess biomass production.

  5. Knowledge Based Strategies for Knowledge Based Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Madalina Cristina Tocan

    2012-01-01

    In the present, we can observe that a new economy is arising. It is an economy based on knowledge and ideas, in which the key factor for prosperity and for creation of the new jobs is the knowledge capitalization. Knowledge capitalization, intellectual capital, obtaining prosperity in the market economy imposes a new terminology, new managerial methods and techniques, new technologies and also new strategies. In other words, knowledge based economy, as a new type of economy; impose a new type...

  6. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  7. Beyond Zero Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Daniel M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that the most practical budgeting system for most managers is a formalized combination of incremental and zero-based analysis because little can be learned about most programs from an annual zero-based budget. (Author/IRT)

  8. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  9. "Education-based Research"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    This paper lays out a concept of education-based research-the production of research knowledge within the framework of tertiary design education-as an integration of problem-based learning and research-based education. This leads to a critique of reflective practice as the primary way to facilitate...... learning at this level, a discussion of the nature of design problems in the instrumentalist tradition, and some suggestions as to how design studies curricula may facilitate education-based research....

  10. The ground based plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a report of ''The Ground Based Plan'' of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The ground based plan is a plan for research in astronomy and planetary science by ground based techniques. The contents of the report contains a description of:- the scientific objectives and technical requirements (the basis for the Plan), the present organisation and funding for the ground based programme, the Plan, the main scientific features and the further objectives of the Plan. (U.K.)

  11. Problem Based Learnig

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmos, Anette; Kuru, Selahattin; Hansen, Hans; Eskil, Taner; Podesta, Luca; Fink, Flemming; Graaff, Erik de; Uwe Wolff, Jan; Soylu, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    This report discuss Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning (PBL) as an approach to meeting the demand for the educational requirements of the next generation engineering graduates. The report is prepared as the final report of the Special Interest Group (SIG) B5 of the Erasmus Thematic Network Project TREE (Teaching and Research in Engineering Education) on Problem- Based and Project-Based Learning. In engineering education there is a shift in emphasis from professional skill...

  12. Stolen Base Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting, the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The…

  13. Convergent Filter Bases

    OpenAIRE

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-01-01

    We are inspired by the work of Henri Cartan [16], Bourbaki [10] (TG. I Filtres) and Claude Wagschal [34]. We define the base of filter, image filter, convergent filter bases, limit filter and the filter base of tails (fr: filtre des sections).

  14. A physiological systems model for iodine for use in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for iodine in the human body and proposes a biokinetic model for use in dose assessments for radioiodine. The model unifies and extends existing physiological systems models describing three subsystems of the iodine cycle in the body: circulating (extrathyroidal) inorganic iodide; thyroidal iodine (trapping and organic binding of iodide, and synthesis, storage, and secretion of thyroid hormones); and extrathyroidal organic iodine. Thyroidal uptake of iodide is described as a function of daily stable iodine intake and requirements for thyroid hormones. Baseline parameter values are developed for adults with typical iodine intakes and hormone requirements. Estimated thyroid doses derived from the baseline parameter values and reference thyroid weights are higher than values predicted by the current model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for adults for intake of iodine isotopes with half-lives up to a few hours but consistent with ICRP predictions for longer-lived isotopes. For nearly all iodine isotopes, the proposed model yields order-of-magnitude differences from the ICRP's current iodine model for adults for stomach wall, salivary gland, and kidneys. Dose estimates for intravenously injected 131I-labeled thyroid hormones based on the present model differ substantially from current ICRP values for adult patients for some organs, including the thyroid. Subsequent studies will address age-specific biokinetics of iodine, reduction of doses from radioiodine due to thyroid blocking, and effects of dietary iodine levels and thyroid hormone requirements on thyroid doses from radioiodine.

  15. Fermentation and growth kinetic study of Aeromonas caviae under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Jaai; Hwang, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2009-06-01

    Although Aeromonas caviae is pathogenic to a broad range of invertebrates including human, frequent in aquatic environments, and potentially vital for acidogenesis in anaerobic digestion, virtually no biokinetic information on its anaerobic growth is at hand. Therefore, this study focused on evaluating its anaerobic growth kinetics on glucose. To provide a set of relevant biokinetic coefficients for modeling, a combination of curve fitting and numerical modeling was used. Microcultivations were performed at eight different initial glucose concentrations of 0.1 to 2.5 g l(-1) to establish a function of specific growth rate versus substrate concentration. A batch anaerobic bioreactor was then operated to collect a data set for the numerical analysis. Kinetic coefficients were estimated from three different biomass growth profiles monitored by optical density, volatile suspended solids (VSS), or DNA measurement, and applied for simulating continuous operations at various hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Assuming the influent glucose concentration is 5,000 mg l(-1), the substrate utilization efficiency predicted to be 77.2% to 92.0% at 17 to 36 h HRTs. For the VSS-model-based simulation, the washout HRT was estimated to be 16.6 h, and similar for the other models. Overall, the anaerobic biokinetic coefficients of A. caviae grown on glucose were successfully estimated and found to follow a substrate inhibition model. PMID:19343339

  16. Weak mutually unbiased bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered. The properties of lines in the Z(d)xZ(d) phase space of these systems are studied. Weak mutually unbiased bases in these systems are defined as bases for which the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is equal to d−1/2 or alternatively to one of the d−1/2i, 0 (where di is a divisor of d apart from d, 1). They are designed for the geometry of the Z(d)xZ(d) phase space, in the sense that there is a duality between the weak mutually unbiased bases and the maximal lines through the origin. In the special case of prime d, there are no divisors of d apart from 1, d and the weak mutually unbiased bases are mutually unbiased bases. (fast track communication)

  17. Search Based Software Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspreet Bedi; Kuljit Kaur

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the search based software engineering research and finds the major milestones in this direction. The SBSE approach has been the topic of several surveys and reviews. Search Based Software Engineering (SBSE) consists of the application of search-based optimization to software engineering. Using SBSE, a software engineering task is formulated as a search problem by defining a suitable candidate solution representation and a fitness function to differentiate be...

  18. Case-based reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodner, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Case-based reasoning is one of the fastest growing areas in the field of knowledge-based systems and this book, authored by a leader in the field, is the first comprehensive text on the subject. Case-based reasoning systems are systems that store information about situations in their memory. As new problems arise, similar situations are searched out to help solve these problems. Problems are understood and inferences are made by finding the closest cases in memory, comparing and contrasting the problem with those cases, making inferences based on those comparisons, and asking questions whe

  19. XML-BASED REPRESENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. KELSEY

    2001-02-01

    For focused applications with limited user and use application communities, XML can be the right choice for representation. It is easy to use, maintain, and extend and enjoys wide support in commercial and research sectors. When the knowledge and information to be represented is object-based and use of that knowledge and information is a high priority, then XML-based representation should be considered. This paper discusses some of the issues involved in using XML-based representation and presents an example application that successfully uses an XML-based representation.

  20. Gasification-based biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The gasification-based biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  1. Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB) is a compilation of emissions measurement and monitoring techniques associated with air pollution control devices, industrial...

  2. Guarded Hybrid Knowledge Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Heymans, Stijn; Predoiu, Livia; Feier, Cristina; Van Nieuwenborgh, Davy

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the integration of Description Logics and rules on the Semantic Web.We define guarded hybrid knowledge bases (or g-hybrid knowledge bases) as knowledge bases that consist of a Description Logic knowledge base and a guarded logic program, similar to the DL+log knowledge bases from (Rosati 2006). G-hybrid knowledge bases enable an integration of Description Logics and Logic Programming where, unlike in other approaches, variables in the rules of a guarded program do not need to appear in positive non-DL atoms of the body, i.e. DL atoms can act as guards as well. Decidability of satisfiability checking of g-hybrid knowledge bases is shown for the particular DL DLRO, which is close to OWL DL, by a reduction to guarded programs under the open answer set semantics. Moreover, we show 2-EXPTIME-completeness for satisfiability checking of such g-hybrid knowledge bases. Finally, we discuss advantages and disadvantages of our approach compared with DL+log knowledge bases.

  3. BIOMETRICS BASED USER AUTHENTICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tanuj Tiwari; Tanya Tiwari2; Sanjay Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics is automated methods of recognizing a person based on a physiological or behavioral characteristic. Biometrics technologies are base for a plethora of highly secure identification and personal verification solutions. It is measurement of biological characteristics – either physiological or behavioral – that verify the claimed identity of an individual. Physiological biometrics include fingerprints, iris recognition. voice verification, retina recognition, palm vein patt...

  4. Model-based geostatistics

    CERN Document Server

    Diggle, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Model-based geostatistics refers to the application of general statistical principles of modeling and inference to geostatistical problems. This volume provides a treatment of model-based geostatistics and emphasizes on statistical methods and applications. It also features analyses of datasets from a range of scientific contexts.

  5. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...

  6. Arkansas' Disappearing Tax Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoppmeyer, Martin; Venters, Tommy

    State legislation that has contributed to the reduction of Arkansas' tax base is described in this paper. Amendment 59, adopted in 1980, has reduced the state tax base by millions of dollars. At the end of 1992, the majority of school districts have equalized their real, personal, and carrier and utility property. Act 34, the current foundation…

  7. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination...... features, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  8. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination...... features, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  9. Zero-Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichowski, Chester

    1979-01-01

    The zero-based budgeting approach is designed to achieve the greatest benefit with the fewest undesirable consequences. Seven basic steps make up the zero-based decision-making process: (1) identifying program goals, (2) classifying goals, (3) identifying resources, (4) reviewing consequences, (5) developing decision packages, (6) implementing a…

  10. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y.; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a tar

  11. Game-Based Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines theoretical and empirical perspectives on how Game-Based Teaching can be integrated within the context of formal schooling. Initially, this is done by describing game scenarios as models for possible actions that need to be translated into curricular knowledge practices...... approaches to game-based teaching, which may or may not correspond with the pedagogical models of particular games....

  12. Secure base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Brusilovsky, Alec; McLellan, Rae; Mullender, Sape; Polakos, Paul

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of the third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) base station router (BSR) and fourth generation (4G) base stations, such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) Evolved Node B (eNB), it has become important to se

  13. Bases de dades relacionals

    OpenAIRE

    Villegas González, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Les empreses de reclutament de personal han d¿afrontar una sèrie de reptes per les seves tasques diàries, pel gran volum de candidats per cobrir les necessitats del mercat de llocs de treball. RecruitCAT és una empresa de reclutament de personal que necessita gestionar la seva base de dades. El objectiu és dissenyar i implementar una base de dades per gestionar una empresa de reclutament de personal, assolint les tasques d¿estudi, plantejament teòric i els scripts de generació de la base d...

  14. Profile Based Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar shaikh,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper present Profile Based information retrieval system(PBIR. This system provide the user to register with it and based on the users registered areas of interest the system searches the related and efficient information form the world wide web using the technique of web text mining and arranges the unstructured data into structured format and present it to the user. This system also stores the previously searched data and based on users areas of interest and rating awarded to the interest by the user his profile will be updated at particular scheduled time.

  15. CLOUD COMPUTING BASED ORIENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    K. Jithendar; K.Srujan Raju; K. Neeraja

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the technology internet plays a major role in the society with the existence of the cloud based scenario. Where it is very much useful in the technology based on information related to the software oriented approach. It is mainly concerned about the utilities of the system which is the primary goal. It play a key role in the transmission of the data with a high definition oriented security based analysis respectively. Therefore whenever the user in the form of the c...

  16. Data base management study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  17. QuickBase

    CERN Document Server

    Conner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Ready to put Intuit's QuickBase to work? Our new Missing Manual shows you how to capture, modify, share, and manage data and documents with this web-based data-sharing program quickly and easily. No longer do you have to coordinate your team through a blizzard of emails or play frustrating games of "guess which document is the right one."QuickBase saves your organization time and money, letting you manage and share the information that makes your business tick: sales figures, project timelines, drafts of documents, purchase or work requests--whatever information you need to keep business flowi

  18. Lidar base specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Hans Karl.

    2012-01-01

    In late 2009, a $14.3 million allocation from the “American Recovery and Reinvestment Act” for new light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data prompted the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) to develop a common base specification for all lidar data acquired for The National Map. Released as a draft in 2010 and formally published in 2012, the USGS–NGP “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” (now Lidar Base Specification) was quickly embraced as the foundation for numerous state, county, and foreign country lidar specifications.

  19. Biometric-based Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    OECD

    2004-01-01

    This report is intended to provide an understanding of the benefits and limitations of biometric-based technologies. It also includes information on existing privacy and security methodologies for assessing biometrics.

  20. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  1. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However...... model and in general problem based and project based learning. We apply the principle of teach as you preach. The poster aims to outline the visitors’ workshop programme showing the results of some recent evaluations......., the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7...

  2. Noncommutative Involutive Bases

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, G A

    2006-01-01

    The theory of Groebner Bases originated in the work of Buchberger and is now considered to be one of the most important and useful areas of symbolic computation. A great deal of effort has been put into improving Buchberger's algorithm for computing a Groebner Basis, and indeed in finding alternative methods of computing Groebner Bases. Two of these methods include the Groebner Walk method and the computation of Involutive Bases. By the mid 1980's, Buchberger's work had been generalised for noncommutative polynomial rings by Bergman and Mora. This thesis provides the corresponding generalisation for Involutive Bases and (to a lesser extent) the Groebner Walk, with the main results being as follows. (1) Algorithms for several new noncommutative involutive divisions are given, including strong; weak; global and local divisions. (2) An algorithm for computing a noncommutative Involutive Basis is given. When used with one of the aforementioned involutive divisions, it is shown that this algorithm returns a noncom...

  3. Mutually unbiased bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaturvedi

    2002-08-01

    After a brief review of the notion of a full set of mutually unbiased bases in an -dimensional Hilbert space, we summarize the work of Wootters and Fields (W K Wootters and B C Fields, Ann. Phys. 191, 363 (1989)) which gives an explicit construction for such bases for the case = r, where is a prime. Further, we show how, by exploiting certain freedom in the Wootters–Fields construction, the task of explicitly writing down such bases can be simplified for the case when is an odd prime. In particular, we express the results entirely in terms of the character vectors of the cyclic group of order . We also analyse the connection between mutually unbiased bases and the representations of .

  4. Kelomehele preemia Baseli festivalil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Baselis festivalil "VIPER - International Festival for Film Video and New Media" tunnistati parimaks CD-ROMiks Gustav Deutschi/Anna Schimeki "Odysee today", netiprojektiks itaallaste "01.ORG", äramärkimispreemia - Raivo Kelomehe "Videoweaver"

  5. WormBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible...

  6. Language-Based Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Language-Based Learning Disabilities (Reading, Spelling, and Writing) What ... a language-based learning disability ? What is a language-based learning disability? Language-based learning disabilities are ...

  7. Participatory design based research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne; Falk, Lars; Jensen, Louise Bach

    2014-01-01

    This poster reveal how participatory design based research by the use of a CoED inspired creative process can be used for designing solutions to problems regarding students study activities outside campus.......This poster reveal how participatory design based research by the use of a CoED inspired creative process can be used for designing solutions to problems regarding students study activities outside campus....

  8. DSP Based Waveform Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The DSP Based Waveform Generator is used for CSR Control system to control special controlled objects, such as the pulsed power supply for magnets, RF system, injection and extraction synchronization, global CSR synchronization etc. This intelligent controller based on 4800 MIPS DSP and 256M SDRAM technology will supply highly stable and highly accurate reference waveform used by the power supply of magnets. The specifications are as follows:

  9. Optimisation-based clearance

    OpenAIRE

    Varga, Andras

    2002-01-01

    The basic feature of the optimisation-based clearance approach is to reformulate the clearance problems as equivalent minimum distance problems for which ”anti”-optimisation is performed to determine the worst-case parameter combination/ flight condition leading to worst performance. The basic requirements for the applicability of the optimisation-based approach are the availability of suitable parametric models describing the overall nonlinear dynamics of the augmented aircraft and of accomp...

  10. Computer-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonoaie, C.; Antonoaie, N.

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based simulation replicates an environment through a computer program designed to consider multiple variables, interactions, and system constraints. Computer-based simulation is used in organization studies to model human social systems to better understand the dynamics between individual and group behaviours.These methods advance organization studies research in many ways. They can be used for extrapolating theory, validating hypotheses, or revealing emergent behaviour. Simulation...

  11. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... and electronic patient records for diabetes patients, this paper reports research in progress regarding the prospects and pitfalls of evidence-based development....

  12. Layered nickel based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Filip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Tuson [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kurita, Nobuyuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimczuk, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Movshovich, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, J D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sefat, A S [ORNL; Mandrus, D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We review the properties of Ni-based superconductors which contain Ni{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X=As, P, Bi, Si, Ge, B) planes, a common structural element to the recently discovered FeAs superconductors. We also compare the properties ofthe Ni-and Fe-based systems from a perspective ofelectronic structure as well as structure-property relations.

  13. Team Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    ALTINTAŞ, Levent; ALİMOĞLU, Mustafa Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Team-based learning is a learner-centered instructional strategy led by an expert instructor and applied in large learner groups composed of teams including 5-7 individuals in each. The method requires some out-of-class and in-class activities and special team assignments for students to learn at individual and team level. In pure team-based learning, there are three phases: preparation, readiness assurance and application-oriented activities. Peer assessment is used to ensure desire...

  14. Compression-based similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitányi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    First we consider pair-wise distances for literal objects consisting of finite binary files. These files are taken to contain all of their meaning, like genomes or books. The distances are based on compression of the objects concerned, normalized, and can be viewed as similarity distances. Second, we consider pair-wise distances between names of objects, like "red" or "christianity." In this case the distances are based on searches of the Internet. Such a search can be performed by any search...

  15. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a target occlusion location. The hydrogel is configured to permanently occlude the target occlusion location in the swollen state. The hydrogel may be an electro-activated hydrogel (EAH) which could be ...

  16. REST based mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  17. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  18. Noncommutative Involutive Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alun Evans, Gareth

    2006-02-01

    The theory of Groebner Bases originated in the work of Buchberger and is now considered to be one of the most important and useful areas of symbolic computation. A great deal of effort has been put into improving Buchberger's algorithm for computing a Groebner Basis, and indeed in finding alternative methods of computing Groebner Bases. Two of these methods include the Groebner Walk method and the computation of Involutive Bases. By the mid 1980's, Buchberger's work had been generalised for noncommutative polynomial rings by Bergman and Mora. This thesis provides the corresponding generalisation for Involutive Bases and (to a lesser extent) the Groebner Walk, with the main results being as follows. (1) Algorithms for several new noncommutative involutive divisions are given, including strong; weak; global and local divisions. (2) An algorithm for computing a noncommutative Involutive Basis is given. When used with one of the aforementioned involutive divisions, it is shown that this algorithm returns a noncommutative Groebner Basis on termination. (3) An algorithm for a noncommutative Groebner Walk is given, in the case of conversion between two harmonious monomial orderings. It is shown that this algorithm generalises to give an algorithm for performing a noncommutative Involutive Walk, again in the case of conversion between two harmonious monomial orderings. (4) Two new properties of commutative involutive divisions are introduced (stability and extendibility), respectively ensuring the termination of the Involutive Basis algorithm and the applicability (under certain conditions) of homogeneous methods of computing Involutive Bases.

  19. Nitramine Double Base Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bhalerao

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available This review paper broadly covers the studies conducted on nitramine double base (DB propellants, particularly in the field of formulations, evaluation, catalysis and combustion mechanism . Addition of RDX and HMX in double base matrix shows relatively low burn rates and high paper index values. Further, the burn rate of this class of propellants enhances in the presence of energetic binders/plasticisers like glycidyl azide polymer. This paper also discusses the combustion mechanism of HMX/RDX-based DB propellants, especially in the presence of catalytic salts. As scanty data is available on extruded nitramine DB propellants, further work is needed in the field of formulation as well as evaluation with a view to generate exhaustive data.

  20. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  1. Cantilever Based Mass Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Cantilever based mass sensors utilize that a change in vibrating mass will cause a change in the resonant frequency. This can be used for very accurate sensing of adsorption and desorption processes on the cantilever surface. The change in resonant frequency caused by a single molecule depends...... on various parameters including the vibrating mass of the cantilever and the frequency at which it vibrates. The minimum amount of molecules detectable is highly dependent on the noise of the system as well as the method of readout. The aim of this Ph.D. thesis has been twofold: To develop a readout method...... suitable for a portable device and to investigate the possibility of enhancing the functionality and sensitivity of cantilever based mass sensors. A readout method based on the hard contact between the cantilever and a biased electrode placed in close proximity to the cantilever is proposed. The viability...

  2. Location-based Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Christensen, Knud

    the predominant scheduling method since it was introduced in the late 1950s. Over the years, CPM has proven to be a very powerful technique for planning, scheduling and controlling projects, which among other things is indicated by the development of a large number of CPM-based software applications available...... on the market. However, CPM is primarily an activity based method that takes the activity as the unit of focus and there is criticism raised, specifically in the case of construction projects, on the method for deficient management of construction work and continuous flow of resources. To seek solutions...... to the identified limitations of the CPM method, an alternative planning and scheduling methodology that includes locations is tested. Location-based Scheduling (LBS) implies a shift in focus, from primarily the activities to the flow of work through the various locations of the project, i.e. the building. LBS uses...

  3. Inkjet-based micromanufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Korvink, Jan G; Shin, Dong-Youn; Brand, Oliver; Fedder, Gary K; Hierold, Christofer; Tabata, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet-based Micromanufacturing Inkjet technology goes way beyond putting ink on paper: it enables simpler, faster and more reliable manufacturing processes in the fields of micro- and nanotechnology. Modern inkjet heads are per se precision instruments that deposit droplets of fluids on a variety of surfaces in programmable, repeating patterns, allowing, after suitable modifications and adaptations, the manufacturing of devices such as thin-film transistors, polymer-based displays and photovoltaic elements. Moreover, inkjet technology facilitates the large-scale production of flexible RFID tr

  4. Identity-based encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sanjit

    2011-01-01

    Identity Based Encryption (IBE) is a type of public key encryption and has been intensely researched in the past decade. Identity-Based Encryption summarizes the available research for IBE and the main ideas that would enable users to pursue further work in this area. This book will also cover a brief background on Elliptic Curves and Pairings, security against chosen Cipher text Attacks, standards and more. Advanced-level students in computer science and mathematics who specialize in cryptology, and the general community of researchers in the area of cryptology and data security will find Ide

  5. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  6. Domain based metering

    OpenAIRE

    Párhonyi, Robert; Beijnum, van, Bert-Jan

    2000-01-01

    In the last two years, there is a gaining interest in usage based accounting for the Internet. One of the driving forces for this growing interest is the progress being made in providing some form of quality assurance in IP packet forwarding. One of the key processes in an accounting system is metering, gathering of network usage parameters on which the accounting is or can be based. In this paper are addressed issues that are potentially of interest in Internet accounting. One of these issue...

  7. Iron-based superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Peter D; Yin, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents an in-depth review of experimental and theoretical studies on the newly discovered Fe-based superconductors.  Following the Introduction, which places iron-based superconductors in the context of other unconventional superconductors, the book is divided into three sections covering sample growth, experimental characterization, and theoretical understanding.  To understand the complex structure-property relationships of these materials, results from a wide range of experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are described that probe the electronic and magnetic prope

  8. Plasmonics based VLSI processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In continuum to my previous paper titled ‘Implementation of plasmonics in VLSI’, this paper attempts to explore further, the actual physical realization of an all-plasmonic chip. In this paper, various methods of plasmon-based photolithography have been discussed and an observation is made w.r.t the cost effectiveness and ease of adaptability. Also, plasmonics based active element has been discussed which would help unravel further arenas of approaches and methods towards the realization of an all-plasmonic chip.

  9. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft...

  10. Skull Base Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  11. Base tree property

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, B.; Doucha, Michal; Hrušák, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2015), s. 69-81. ISSN 0167-8094 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : forcing * Boolean algebra s * base tree Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.621, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11083-013-9316-2

  12. Surfel Based Geometry Resonstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vedrana; Aanæs, Henrik; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    We propose a method for retrieving a piecewise smooth surface from noisy data. In data acquired by a scanning process sampled points are almost never on the discontinuities making reconstruction of surfaces with sharp features difficult. Our method is based on a Markov Random Field (MRF) formulat...

  13. 80537 based distance relay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Knud Ole Helgesen

    1999-01-01

    A method for implementing a digital distance relay in the power system is described.Instructions are given on how to program this relay on a 80537 based microcomputer system.The problem is used as a practical case study in the course 53113: Micocomputer applications in the power system.The relay is...

  14. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  15. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  16. Zero Base Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarndal, Anne G.

    1979-01-01

    Traditional budgeting starts with the previous year's budget, but zero base budgeting demands that each activity be justified from "scratch," and establishes a number of increments for each unit, in order of priority. Given the set of increments and the money available, management can determine what activities to finance. (Author)

  17. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features...

  18. BASE - Progress Report 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S; Mooser, A; Sellner, S; Nagahama, H; Higuchi, T; Borchert, M; Schneider, G; Tanaka, T; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Ospelkaus, C; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2016-01-01

    The BASE collaboration aims at high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of the proton and the antiproton, namely, the magnetic g-factors as well as the charge-to-mass ratios of the particles. This annual report summarizes the achievements made in CERN's 2015 antiproton run.

  19. Animation-based Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    experiments has been carried out, applying animation-based sketching in various contexts and at varying points in the design process. In the studies, I evaluate the viability of the approach, the practical integration into the design process, and map how consensus between stakeholders in design can be...

  20. XML Based UIScript

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bin; LIAO Jian-xin; SHEN Qi-wei

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, after the analyzing the UIScript mechanism in intelligent peripheral, a new approach of XML-based UIScript is put forward. The related issues such as the design of UIScript language, the execution environment and its relationship with other script languages are discussed.

  1. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for...

  2. Centroid Based Text Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Maheshwari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Web mining is a burgeoning new field that attempts to glean meaningful information from natural language text. Web mining refers generally to the process of extracting interesting information and knowledge from unstructured text. Text clustering is one of the important Web mining functionalities. Text clustering is the task in which texts are classified into groups of similar objects based on their contents. Current research in the area of Web mining is tacklesproblems of text data representation, classification, clustering, information extraction or the search for and modeling of hidden patterns. In this paper we propose for mining large document collections it is necessary to pre-process the web documents and store the information in a data structure, which is more appropriate for further processing than a plain web file. In this paper we developed a php-mySql based utility to convert unstructured web documents into structured tabular representation by preprocessing, indexing .We apply centroid based web clustering method on preprocessed data. We apply three methods for clustering. Finally we proposed a method that can increase accuracy based on clustering ofdocuments.

  3. Inservice testing bases program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inservice testing (IST) programs generally address those components necessary for safe operation as specified in Subsections IWP-1100 and IWV-1100 of Section 11 (American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code) and Position 11 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Letter 89-04. Program tables, generated manually or from computer databases, are frequently used to describe those components and testing requirements contained in IST programs. Table entries are usually derived from review of system drawings, accident analysis, and other technical documents; however, the bases for such entries are not always documented. Because IST programs are dynamic, the continual evaluation of program entries may be inhibited if bases for program entries are unclear. When IST programs have been developed by architect-engineers, nuclear steam supply system suppliers, or other contractors, the bases for IST program contents become even more nebulous to the program users. The presentation provides a discussion of IST bases programs used by Entergy Operations' four nuclear plants, and the benefits derived from their use

  4. Dictionary Based Image Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for weakly supervised segmentation of natural images, which may contain both textured or non-textured regions. Our texture representation is based on a dictionary of image patches. To divide an image into separated regions with similar texture we use an implicit level sets...

  5. Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Deborah E.; Donham, Richard S.; Bernhardt, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), students working in collaborative groups learn by resolving complex, realistic problems under the guidance of faculty. There is some evidence of PBL effectiveness in medical school settings where it began, and there are numerous accounts of PBL implementation in various undergraduate contexts, replete with…

  6. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  7. Aptamer-based nanobiosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Seok; Raston, Nurul Hanun Ahmad; Gu, Man Bock

    2016-02-15

    It has been more than two decades since aptamer and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method were discovered by Larry Gold and Andrew Ellington in 1990, respectively. Based on the various advantages of aptamers, they have become a potent rival of antibodies in therapeutics and bio-analysis. Especially, the recent advances in aptamer biosensor application are remarkable due to its intrinsic properties of aptamers as nucleic acids and target induced conformational changes, in addition to the introduction of graphene oxide-based easy and simple immobilization-free screening method even for dual aptamers. In addition, the incorporation of various nanomaterials such as metallic nanoparticles, carbon materials, and functional nanospheres in aptasensors has facilitated the improvement of analytical performance and commercial application of aptasensors. In this review, recent prominent reports on aptasensors utilizing nanomaterials were introduced to understand the principle of aptamer-based biosensors and provide an insight for new strategies of aptasensors and the application of various nanomaterials. The perspective on aptamer-based biosensors and diagnostics was also discussed in view of technology and market. PMID:26139320

  8. Lunar Base Sitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehle, Robert L.; Burke, James D.; Snyder, Gerald C.; Dowling, Richard; Spudis, Paul D.

    1993-12-01

    Speculation with regard to a permanent lunar base has been with us since Robert Goddard was working on the first liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's. With the infusion of data from the Apollo Moon flights, a once speculative area of space exploration has become an exciting possibility. A Moon base is not only a very real possibility, but is probably a critical element in the continuation of our piloted space program. This article, originally drafted by World Space Foundation volunteers in conjuction with various academic and research groups, examines some of the strategies involved in selecting an appropriate site for such a lunar base. Site selection involves a number of complex variables, including raw materials for possible rocket propellant generation, hot an cold cycles, view of the sky (for astronomical considerations, among others), geological makeup of the region, and more. This article summarizes the key base siting considerations and suggests some alternatives. Availability of specific resources, including energy and certain minerals, is critical to success.

  9. PROJECT-BASES RISK MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Sandu

    2010-01-01

    The project-bases concept is presented. There are defined operations on project-bases. The software developed for project-bases management is analyzed based in its structure and functionality. A series of criteria of structuring risks is listed are tailored for project-bases management. Next there are suggested solutions of mitigating risks by maintaining efficiency within acceptable thresholds.

  10. Estimation of Radiation Doses in the Marshall Islands Based on Whole Body Counting of Cesium-137 (137Cs) and Plutonium Urinalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J; Hickman, D; Kehl, S; Hamilton, T

    2007-06-11

    measurement. The amount of {sup 137}Cs detected is often reported in activity units of kilo-Becquerel (kBq), where 1 kBq equals 1000 Bq and 1 Bq = 1 nuclear transformation per second (t s{sup -1}). [However, in the United States the Curie (Ci) continues to be used as the unit of radioactivity; where 1 Ci = 3.7 x 10{sup 10} Bq.] The detection of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu in bioassay (urine) samples indicates the presence of internally deposited (systemic) plutonium in the body. Urine samples that are collected in the Marshall Islands from volunteers participating in the RSMP are transported to LLNL, where measurements for {sup 239+240}Pu are performed using a state-of-the-art technology based on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) (Hamilton et al., 2004, 2007; Brown et al., 2004). The urinary excretion of plutonium by RSMP volunteers is usually described in activity units, expressed as micro-Becquerel ({micro}Bq) of {sup 239+240}Pu (i.e., representing the sum of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu activity) excreted (lost) per day (d{sup -1}), where 1 {micro}Bq d{sup -1} = 10{sup -6} Bq d{sup -1} and 1 Bq = 1 t s{sup -1}. The systemic burden of plutonium is then estimated from biokinetic relationships as described by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., see ICRP, 1990). In general, nuclear transformations are accompanied by the emission of energy and/or particles in the form of gamma rays ({gamma}), beta particles ({beta}), and/or alpha particles ({alpha}). Tissues in the human body may adsorb these emissions, where there is a potential for any deposited energy to cause biological damage. The general term used to quantify the extent of any radiation exposure is referred to as the dose. The equivalent dose is defined by the average absorbed dose in an organ or tissue weighted by the average quality factor for the type and energy of the emission causing the dose. The effective dose equivalent (EDE; as applied to the whole body), is the sum of the average

  11. Quasigroup based crypto-algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Shcherbacov, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Modifications of Markovski quasigroup based crypto-algorithm have been proposed. Some of these modifications are based on the systems of orthogonal n-ary groupoids. T-quasigroups based stream ciphers have been constructed.

  12. Spintronics-based computing

    CERN Document Server

    Prenat, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to spintronics-based computing for the next generation of ultra-low power/highly reliable logic, which is widely considered a promising candidate to replace conventional, pure CMOS-based logic. It will cover aspects from device to system-level, including magnetic memory cells, device modeling, hybrid circuit structure, design methodology, CAD tools, and technological integration methods. This book is accessible to a variety of readers and little or no background in magnetism and spin electronics are required to understand its content.  The multidisciplinary team of expert authors from circuits, devices, computer architecture, CAD and system design reveal to readers the potential of spintronics nanodevices to reduce power consumption, improve reliability and enable new functionality.  .

  13. Graphene-based electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Fan, Zhanxi; Liu, Juqing; Zhang, Hua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, 639798 (Singapore)

    2012-11-27

    Graphene, the thinnest two dimensional carbon material, has become the subject of intensive investigation in various research fields because of its remarkable electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties. Graphene-based electrodes, fabricated from mechanically cleaved graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene, or massively produced graphene derivatives from bulk graphite, have been applied in a broad range of applications, such as in light emitting diodes, touch screens, field-effect transistors, solar cells, supercapacitors, batteries, and sensors. In this Review, after a short introduction to the properties and synthetic methods of graphene and its derivatives, we will discuss the importance of graphene-based electrodes, their fabrication techniques, and application areas. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Graphene-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Fan, Zhanxi; Liu, Juqing; Zhang, Hua

    2012-11-27

    Graphene, the thinnest two dimensional carbon material, has become the subject of intensive investigation in various research fields because of its remarkable electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties. Graphene-based electrodes, fabricated from mechanically cleaved graphene, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene, or massively produced graphene derivatives from bulk graphite, have been applied in a broad range of applications, such as in light emitting diodes, touch screens, field-effect transistors, solar cells, supercapacitors, batteries, and sensors. In this Review, after a short introduction to the properties and synthetic methods of graphene and its derivatives, we will discuss the importance of graphene-based electrodes, their fabrication techniques, and application areas. PMID:22927209

  15. Sparse approximation with bases

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book systematically presents recent fundamental results on greedy approximation with respect to bases. Motivated by numerous applications, the last decade has seen great successes in studying nonlinear sparse approximation. Recent findings have established that greedy-type algorithms are suitable methods of nonlinear approximation in both sparse approximation with respect to bases and sparse approximation with respect to redundant systems. These insights, combined with some previous fundamental results, form the basis for constructing the theory of greedy approximation. Taking into account the theoretical and practical demand for this kind of theory, the book systematically elaborates a theoretical framework for greedy approximation and its applications.  The book addresses the needs of researchers working in numerical mathematics, harmonic analysis, and functional analysis. It quickly takes the reader from classical results to the latest frontier, but is written at the level of a graduate course and do...

  16. Knowledge based maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, A. [Hamburgische Electacitaets-Werke AG Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The establishment of maintenance strategies is of crucial significance for the reliability of a plant and the economic efficiency of maintenance measures. Knowledge about the condition of components and plants from the technical and business management point of view therefore becomes one of the fundamental questions and the key to efficient management and maintenance. A new way to determine the maintenance strategy can be called: Knowledge Based Maintenance. A simple method for determining strategies while taking the technical condition of the components of the production process into account to the greatest possible degree which can be shown. A software with an algorithm for Knowledge Based Maintenance leads the user during complex work to the determination of maintenance strategies for this complex plant components. (orig.)

  17. Content Based Video Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V.Patel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Content based video retrieval is an approach for facilitating the searching and browsing of large image collections over World Wide Web. In this approach, video analysis is conducted on low level visual properties extracted from video frame. We believed that in order to create an effective video retrieval system, visual perception must be taken into account. We conjectured that a technique which employs multiple features for indexing and retrieval would be more effective in the discrimination and search tasks of videos. In order to validate this claim, content based indexing and retrieval systems were implemented using color histogram, various texture features and other approaches. Videos were stored in Oracle 9i Database and a user study measured correctness of response.

  18. Content Based Video Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Patel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Content based video retrieval is an approach for facilitating the searching and browsing of large image collections over World Wide Web. In this approach, video analysis is conducted on low level visual properties extracted from video frame. We believed that in order to create an effective video retrieval system, visual perception must be taken into account. We conjectured that a technique which employs multiple features for indexing and retrieval would be more effective in the discrimination and search tasks of videos. In order to validate this claim, content based indexing and retrieval systems were implemented using color histogram, various texture features and other approaches. Videos were stored in Oracle 9i Database and a user study measured correctness of response.

  19. Trajectory Based Traffic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin;

    2013-01-01

    We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point-and-click a......We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point......-and-click analysis, due to a novel and efficient indexing structure. With the web-site daisy.aau.dk/its/spqdemo/we will demonstrate several analyses, using a very large real-world data set consisting of 1.9 billion GPS records (1.5 million trajectories) recorded from more than 13000 vehicles, and touching most of...

  20. Maintaining Relationship Based Procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Davis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alliance and relationship projects are increasingin number and represent a large pool of work. Tobe successful relationship style contracts dependon soft-dollar factors, particularly the participants'ability to work together within an agreedframework, generally they are not based on lowbid tendering. Participants should be prepared todo business in an open environment based ontrust and mutually agreed governance. Theresearch evaluates relationship maintenance inthe implementation phase of constructionalliances - a particular derivative of relationshipstyle contracts. To determine the factors thatcontribute to relationship maintenance forty-nineexperienced Australian alliance projectmanagers were interviewed. The main findingswere; the development of relationships early inthe project form building blocks of success fromwhich relationships are maintained and projectvalue added; quality facilitation plays animportant part in relationship maintenance and ahybrid organisation created as a result of alliancedevelopment overcomes destructiveorganisational boundaries. Relationshipmaintenance is integral to alliance project controland failure to formalise it and pay attention toprocess and past outcomes will undermine analliance project's potential for success.

  1. Radiation-based security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems presented in different security areas are varied but the solutions that have been offered are generally based upon the same principles. Employing radiation to locate and identify explosives or contraband has been most obvious at airports but other locations are now receiving equal attention. Neutron and X-ray interrogation are the systems most frequently employed. However, the more recently developed approaches such as multi-view dual-energy imaging and the use of high-speed diffraction measurements are the most likely systems to become widely available. This review looks briefly at the neutron and X-ray based systems that have been developed indicating their mode of operation and their advantages and disadvantages. It then summarizes the current state-of-the-art. The paper finishes by looking in some detail at one of the most promising areas of development--in-line diffraction measurements. (author)

  2. Skull base bone hyperpneumatization

    OpenAIRE

    Houet, E J; Kouokam, L.M.; Nchimi, A L

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a long standing history of compulsive Valsalva maneuvers, complaining of episodes of vertigo underwent head computed tomography. Axial CT slices at the level of the skull base (Fig. A) and the first cervical vertebrae (Fig. B) shows an extensive unusual pneumatization of both the body and lateral processes of the first cervical vertebrae (arrows), with air pouches dissecting planes between bone cortex and the periosteum around the occipital bone and the lateral process...

  3. Spiritual-based Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruzan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although far from mainstream, the concept of spiritual-based leadership is emerging as an inclusive and yet highly personal approach to leadership that integrates a leader’s inner perspectives on identity, purpose, responsibility and success with her or his decisions and actions in the outer world...... of business—and therefore it is also emerging as a significant framework for understanding, practicing, communicating and teaching the art and profession of leadership....

  4. Refrigerator Based on Chemisorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1987-01-01

    Reversible chemical reaction generates pressurized oxygen for cooling. Concept for cryogenic refrigerator based on chemical absorption of oxygen by praseodymium/cerium oxide (PCO) compound. Refrigerator produces cryogenic liquid for cooling infrared sensors. Also used for liquefying air and separating oxygen from nitrogen in air. In chemisorption refrigerator, PCO alternately absorbs and desorbs oxygen depending on whether cooled or heated. One pair of compressors accepts oxygen while others releases it. Compressed oxygen liquefied when precooked and expanded.

  5. Model-based segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Heimann, Tobias; Delingette, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    This chapter starts with a brief introduction into model-based segmentation, explaining the basic concepts and different approaches. Subsequently, two segmentation approaches are presented in more detail: First, the method of deformable simplex meshes is described, explaining the special properties of the simplex mesh and the formulation of the internal forces. Common choices for image forces are presented, and how to evolve the mesh to adapt to certain structures. Second, the method of point...

  6. Onlincolnshire Knowledge Base Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Ted; Bosworth, Gary; Deville, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the Onlincolnshire Knowledge Base Collaboration project undertaken by Lincoln Business School between May 2014 and September 2015. Onlincolnshire is a Lincolnshire County Council-run project which is part-funded by the East Midlands European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) Programme 2007 to 2013. As well as improving the broadband infrastructure, Onlincolnshire delivered a range of support to Lincolnshire’s Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) through the “Business...

  7. Ferrocene base metal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of the works, devoted to different types of ferrocene metal chelates and to a possibility of ferrocene-containing ligand modification by means of complexing, is presented. Structure, properties and spectral characteristics of transitional metal, rare earth element, Cd2+, UO22+, Th4+ etc. complexes with ferrocene diketones, ferrocene acyl derivatives based on thiosemicarbazones and hydrazones and other heterometal ferrocene-containing metal chelates, are considered. 134 refs., 1 tab

  8. Polysiloxane based neutron detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla Palma, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, neutron detection has been attracting the attention of the scientific community for different reasons. On one side, the increase in the price of 3He, employed in the most efficient and the most widely used neutron detectors. On the other side, the harmfulness of traditional xylene based liquid scintillators, used in extremely large volumes for the detection of fast neutrons. Finally, the demand for most compact and rough systems pushed by the increased popularity of neutro...

  9. Argument based machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Možina, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Thesis presents a novel approach to machine learning, called ABML (argument based machine learning). This approach combines machine learning from examples with some concepts from the field of defeasible argumentation, where arguments are used together with learning examples by learning methods in the induction of a hypothesis. An argument represents a relation between the class value of a particular learning example and its attributes and can be regarded as a partial explanation of this e...

  10. OCR Based Pixel Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Al-Hmouz

    2012-01-01

    Character recognition is the process that allows the automatic identification of character images, which is generally referred as Optical Character Recognition (OCR). The characters are either handwritten or typed. This study proposed a novel OCR approach based on the likelihood functions of pixels, which were obtained by averaging a trained set of character images. A Bayesian fusion process for all pixel probabilities decides the recognition of characters. Further tests using Support V...

  11. Lignocellulose-based bioproducts

    CERN Document Server

    Karimi, Keikhosro

    2015-01-01

    This volume provides the technical information required for the production of biofuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. It starts with a brief overview of the importance, applications, and production processes of different lignocellulosic products. Further chapters review the perspectives of waste-based biofuels and biochemicals; the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production; cellulolytic enzyme systems for the hydrolysis of lignocelluloses; and basic and applied aspects of the production of bioethanol, biogas, biohydrogen, and biobutanol from lignocelluloses.

  12. REST based service composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Ingstrup, Mads; Pløger, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing work developing and testing a Service Composition framework based upon the REST architecture named SECREST. A minimalistic approach have been favored instead of a creating a complete infrastructure. One focus has been on the system's interaction model. Indeed, an aim...... is to allow users in different healthcare scenarios to experiment with service composition to support highly individual and changing needs....

  13. Evidence based pediatrics.

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeta ZISOVSKA

    2015-01-01

    It is very difficult to define the entire phrase “Evidence based pediatrics”, covering all components of this overused sentence. The definition comes out of the common sentence and it means integration of the individual clinical expertize together with the best external clinically available evidence of the systematic reviews which are of interest and benefit of the individual patient.Development of clinically appropriate structured question follows PICO model, i.e. containing f...

  14. Design bases - Concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most suitable title for Section 2 is 'Design Bases', which covers not only calculation but also the following areas: - Structural design concepts. - Project criteria. - Material specifications. These concepts are developed in more detail in the following sections. The numbering in this document is neither complete nor hierarchical since, for easier cross referencing, it corresponds to the paragraphs of Eurocode 2 Part 1 (hereinafter 'EUR-2') which are commented on. (author)

  15. MEMS based reference oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Hedestig, Joel

    2005-01-01

    The interest in tiny wireless applications raises the demand for an integrated reference oscillator with the same performance as the macroscopic quartz crystal reference oscillators. The main challenge of the thesis is to prove that it is possible to build a MEMS based oscillator that approaches the accuracy level of existing quartz crystal oscillators. The MEMS resonator samples which Philips provides are measured and an equivalent electrical model is designed for them. This model is used in...

  16. Dictionary Based Image Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for weakly supervised segmentationof natural images, which may contain both textured or non-texturedregions. Our texture representation is based on a dictionary of imagepatches. To divide an image into separated regions with similar texturewe use an implicit level sets representation of the curve, which makesour method topologically adaptive. In addition, we suggest a multi-labelversion of the method. Finally, we improve upon a similar texture representation,by formulating...

  17. Knowledge Based Economy Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Madalina Cristina Tocan

    2012-01-01

    The importance of knowledge-based economy (KBE) in the XXI century is evident. In the article the reflection of knowledge on economy is analyzed. The main point is targeted to the analysis of characteristics of knowledge expression in economy and to the construction of structure of KBE expression. This allows understanding the mechanism of functioning of knowledge economy. The authors highlight the possibility to assess the penetration level of KBE which could manifest itself trough the exist...

  18. Instance based function learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ramon, Jan; De Raedt, Luc

    1999-01-01

    The principles of instance based function learning are presented. In IBFL one is given a set of positive examples of a functional predicate. These examples are true ground facts that illustrate the input output behaviour of the predicate. The purpose is then to predict the output of the predicate given a new input. Further assumptions are that there is no background theory and that the inputs and outputs of the predicate consist of structured terms. IBFL is a novel technique that addresses th...

  19. Plasmonics based VLSI processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In continuum to my previous paper titled‘Implementation of plasmonics in VLSI’, this paperattempts to explore further, the actual physicalrealization of an all-plasmonic chip. In this paper,various methods of plasmon-basedphotolithography have been discussed and anobservation is made w.r.t the cost effectiveness andease of adaptability. Also, plasmonics based activeelement has been discussed which would helpunravel further arenas ofapproaches and methodstowards the realization of an all-plasmonic chip.

  20. Graphene-based nanodynamometer

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, N. A.; Siahlo, A. I.; Vyrko, S. A.; Popov, A. M.; Lozovik, Yu. E.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Knizhnik, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    A new concept of an electromechanical nanodynamometer based on the relative displacement of layers of bilayer graphene is proposed. In this nanodynamometer, force acting on one of the graphene layers causes the relative displacement of this layer and related change of conductance between the layers. Such a force can be determined by measurements of the tunneling conductance between the layers. Dependences of the interlayer interaction energy and the conductance between the graphene layers on ...

  1. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J V Yakhmi

    2009-06-01

    The conventional magnetic materials used in current technology, such as, Fe, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, SmCo5, Nd2Fe14B etc are all atom-based, and their preparation/processing require high temperature routes. Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material with long-range magnetic order, mainly because one can play with the weak intermolecular interactions. Since the first successful synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be categorized on the basis of the chemical nature of the magnetic units involved: organic-, metal-based systems, heterobimetallic assemblies, or mixed organic–inorganic systems. The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of molecular magnets. Being weakly coloured, unlike their opaque classical magnet ‘cousins’ listed above, possibilities of photomagnetic switching exist. Persistent efforts also continue to design the ever-elusive polymer magnets towards applications in industry. While providing a brief overview of the field of molecular magnetism, this article highlights some recent developments in it, with emphasis on a few studies from the author’s own lab.

  2. Internet Based Social Lending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Dhand

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Social lending is community-based lending. The “family and friends” loans community has been extended and formalized to create a marketplace of borrowers and lenders. In Internet-based Social Lending (IBSL, the company runs a website that connects potential lenders with potential borrowers. By removing the overheads and bulky infrastructure of the banking system, IBSL provides lenders a higher rate of return in exchange for only slightly higher risk. Borrowers here are those who are unsatisfied with the rates offered by banks or those that fall outside of the traditional banking systems due to unattractive credit ratings, high risk profiles or project-based, sporadic compensation. Borrowers are also attracted by the possibility of getting lower interest rates. We believe that this has the potential to impact the genesis of many small and medium level enterprises, besides providing a perennial source of financial leverage. The focus of this paper is not just the underlying technology and innovation, but also the market it creates. We take the example of one of the key players in the field, Zopa, and study its organization

  3. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  4. Location-based games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    In this dissertation, it is explored which prerequisites are necessary in location-based games (LBGs) to make meaningful the meeting between players and spatiality with an emphasis on physical locations. Throughout the dissertation, it has been shown that LBGs affect players’ perception of and be......In this dissertation, it is explored which prerequisites are necessary in location-based games (LBGs) to make meaningful the meeting between players and spatiality with an emphasis on physical locations. Throughout the dissertation, it has been shown that LBGs affect players’ perception...... experiences of being in the world and the creation of meaning. The theory on motivation defines what motivation consists of and how it relates to our actions. This theory has been combined with theories concerning play and play culture, digital media, (digital) games, (optimal) experiences, landscape...... architecture, everyday practices (related to walking in the city), and the existing theories on LBGs as well as pervasive games. The methodological approach incorporates design-based research. It combines and aims at improving design, research, and practice concurrently. A design of an LBG – Visions of Sara...

  5. Knowledge-based utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation provides industry examples of successful marketing practices by companies facing deregulation and competition. The common thread through the examples is that long term survival of today's utility structure is dependent on the strategic role of knowledge. As opposed to regulated monopolies which usually own huge physical assets and have very little intelligence about their customers, unregulated enterprises tend to be knowledge-based, characterized by higher market value than book value. A knowledge-based enterprise gathers data, creates information and develops knowledge by leveraging it as a competitive weapon. It institutionalizes human knowledge as a corporate asset for use over and over again by the use of databases, computer networks, patents, billing, collection and customer services (BCCS), branded interfaces and management capabilities. Activities to become knowledge-based such as replacing inventory/fixed assets with information about material usage to reduce expenditure and achieve more efficient operations, and by focusing on integration and value-adding delivery capabilities, were reviewed

  6. Route based forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurendonk, I. W.; Wokke, M. J. J.

    2009-09-01

    Road surface temperatures can differ several degrees on a very short distance due to local effects. In order to get more insight in the local temperature differences and to develop safer gritting routes, Meteogroup has developed a system for route based temperature forecasting. The standard version of the road model is addressed to forecast road surface temperature and condition for a specific location. This model consists of two parts. First a physical part, based on the energy balance equations. The second part of the model performs a statistical correction on the calculated physical road surface temperature. The road model is able to create a forecast for one specific location. From infrared measurements, we know that large local differences in road surface temperature exist on a route. Differences can be up to 5 degrees Celsius over a distance of several hundreds of meters. Based on those measurements, the idea came up to develop a system that forecasts road surface temperature and condition for an entire route: route based forecasting. The route is split up in sections with equal properties. For each section a temperature and condition will be calculated. The main factors that influence the road surface temperature are modelled in this forecasting system: •The local weather conditions: temperature, dew point temperature, wind, precipitation, weather type, cloudiness. •The sky view: A very sheltered place will receive less radiation during daytime and emit less radiation during nighttime. For a very open spot, the effects are reversed. •The solar view: A road section with trees on the southern side, will receive less solar radiation during daytime than a section with tress on the southern side. The route based forecast shows by means of a clear Google Maps presentation which sections will be slippery at what time of the coming night. The final goal of this type of forecast, is to make dynamical gritting possible: a variable salt amount and a different

  7. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  8. Characteristics Data Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LWR Serial Numbers Database System (SNDB) contains detailed data about individual, historically discharged LWR spent fuel assemblies. This data includes the reactor where used, the year the assemblies were discharged, the pool where they are currently stored, assembly type, burnup, weight, enrichment, and an estimate of their radiological properties. This information is distributed on floppy disks to users in the nuclear industry to assist in planning for the permanent nuclear waste repository. This document describes the design and development of the SNDB. It provides a complete description of the file structures and an outline of the major code modules. It serves as a reference for a programmer maintaining the system, or for others interested in the technical detail of this database. This is the initial version of the SNDB. It contains historical data through December 31, 1987, obtained from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA obtains the data from the utility companies via the RW-859 Survey Form. It evaluates and standardizes the data and distributes the resulting batch level database as a large file on magnetic tape. The Characteristics Data Base obtains this database for use in the LWR Quantities Data Base. Additionally, the CDB obtains the individual assembly level detail from EIA for use in the SNDB. While the Quantities Data Base retains only the level of detail necessary for its reporting, the SNDB does retain and use the batch level data to assist in the identification of a particular assembly serial number. We expect to update the SNDB on an annual basis, as new historical data becomes available

  9. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  10. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature by observing an apparent angular shift in an interference fringe pattern produced by back or forward scattering interferometry, ambiguities in the measurement caused...... by the apparent shift being consistent with one of a number of numerical possibilities for the real shift which differ by 2n are resolved by combining measurements performed on the same sample using light paths therethrough of differing lengths....

  11. Problem Based Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    At Aalborg University’s department of Medialogy, we are utilizing the Problem Based Learning method to encourage students to solve game design problems by pushing the boundaries and designing innovative games. This paper is concerned with describing this method, how students employ it in various...... projects and how they learn to analyse, design, and develop for innovation by using it. We will present various cases to exemplify the approach and focus on how the method engages students and aspires for innovation in digital entertainment and games....

  12. COMPUTER BASED ENVIRONMENT CONTROLS

    OpenAIRE

    Macoveiciuc Pastorel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to give an overview of the main activities of computer based activities controls. The basic principles of computer controls should be common to all sectors and to most types of hardware and software. The absence of a common definition of computer control may, in part, be due to the relative newness of computer controls. A key feature of many organisations today is change. Although not necessarily the driver of change, IT is invariably an intrinsec component and much ...

  13. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  14. Barium zirconate base ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical corrosion at high temperatures is a serious problem in the refractory materials field, leading to degradation and bath contamination by elements of the refractory. The main objective of this work was to search for ceramics that could present higher resistance to chemical attack by aggressive molten oxides. The general behaviour of a ceramic material based on barium zirconate (Ba Zr O3) with the addition of different amounts of liquid phase former was investigated. The densification behaviour occurred during different heat treatments, as well as the microstructure development, as a function of the additives and their reactions with the main phase, were observed and are discussed. (author)

  15. Microcontroller based electronic load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microcontroller based electronic load has been designed and developed for testing of power supplies in CAT, Indore. This system is designed to operate in 4 different modes viz. constant current, constant power, constant resistance and constant resistance-inductance mode. This dynamic electronic load is very useful because a single load can be used in four different modes and different values can be emulated in each mode. It can be used as a switching load too. User interface has been provided to set the mode of operation and the set point during run time. (author)

  16. Speckle-based wavemeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Chakrabarti, Maumita

    2015-01-01

    A spectrometer based on the application of dynamic speckles will be disclosed. The method relies on scattering of primarily coherent radiation from a slanted rough surface. The scattered radiation is collected on a detector array and the speckle displacement is monitored during a change in the...... incident wavelength. The change of wavelength gives an almost linear phaseshift across the scattering surface resulting in an almost linear shift of the speckle pattern, which is subsequently monitored. It is argued that frequency changes close to 100 MHz can be probed using a common CMOS array...

  17. Teradata data base computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    To meet the growing demand for information management of large databases, Teradata Corporation has introduced the DBC/1012 data base computer, an IBM plug-compatible system that can handle data volumes up to a trillion bytes. Teradata estimates the DBC/1012 to be one-third the cost of an all-software relational system on a general purpose mainframe. Cost effectiveness, as well as fault tolerance, is achieved by a parallel architecture which processes data asynchronously using multiple independent microprocessors. Another cost saving results from the resources on the host mainframe that become available once the mainframe is relieved of the burden of maintaining the database.

  18. Wood-Based Bioenergy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoel, Michael; Sletten, Thea Marcelia

    2014-01-01

    During recent years increased attention has been given to second-generation wood-based bioenergy. The carbon stored in the forest is highest when there is little or no harvest from the forest. Increasing the harvest from a forest, in order to produce more bioenergy, may thus conflict with the direct benefit of the forest as a carbon sink. We analyze this conflict using a simple model where bioenergy and fossil energy are perfect substitutes. Our analysis shows how the social optimum will depe...

  19. OCR Based Pixel Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Al-Hmouz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Character recognition is the process that allows the automatic identification of character images, which is generally referred as Optical Character Recognition (OCR. The characters are either handwritten or typed. This study proposed a novel OCR approach based on the likelihood functions of pixels, which were obtained by averaging a trained set of character images. A Bayesian fusion process for all pixel probabilities decides the recognition of characters. Further tests using Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier were carried out on characters with the same shape. This method was used to test noisy images and achieved an accuracy of 97.95%, thus, outperforming other OCR methods.

  20. Technical Design Report BASE

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Blaum, K; Franke, K; Matsuda, Y; Nagahama, H; Quint, W; Walz, J; Mooser, A; Schneider, G; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2013-01-01

    We propose a direct high-precision measurement of the magnetic moment, or g-factor, of a single antiproton stored in a cryogenic Penning trap. Currently the most precise value of the magnetic moment of the antiproton is extracted from super-hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms, and known with a relative precision of only about 3 10^{-3}. BASE aims at a measurement with a relative precision of 10^{-9} or better. A Letter of Intent which was submitted to CERN was welcomed by the SPSC and we were invited to submit this Technical Design Report.

  1. Bi-based superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Mousavi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   In this paper, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BCSCCO system superconductor is made by the solid state reaction method. The effect of doping Pb, Cd, Sb, Cu and annealing time on the critical temperature and critical current density have been investigated. The microstructure and morphology of the samples have been studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray. The results show that the fraction of Bi-2223 phase in the Bi- based superconductor, critical temperature and critical current density depend on the annealing temperature, annealing time and the kind and amount of doping .

  2. Agent-Based Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jędrzejowicz, Piotr; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of original research works by leading specialists focusing on novel and promising approaches in which the multi-agent system paradigm is used to support, enhance or replace traditional approaches to solving difficult optimization problems. The editors have invited several well-known specialists to present their solutions, tools, and models falling under the common denominator of the agent-based optimization. The book consists of eight chapters covering examples of application of the multi-agent paradigm and respective customized tools to solve  difficult optimization problems arising in different areas such as machine learning, scheduling, transportation and, more generally, distributed and cooperative problem solving.

  3. RF Based Spy

    OpenAIRE

    Robot Prerna Jain; Pallavi N. Firke

    2014-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to reduce human victims in terrorist attack such as 26/11. So this problem can be overcome by designing the RF based spy robot which involves wireless camera. so that from this we can examine rivals when it required. This robot can quietly enter into enemy area and sends us the information via wireless camera. On the other hand one more feature is added in this robot that is colour sensor. Colour sensor senses the colour of surface and according ...

  4. Mars base buildup scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station

  5. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus. PMID:27076308

  6. WAP - based telemedicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telemedicine refers to the utilization of telecommunication technology for medical diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. Its aim is to provide expert-based health care to remote sites through telecommunication and information technologies. The significant advances in technologies have enabled the introduction of a broad range of telemedicine applications, which are supported by computer networks, wireless communication, and information superhighway. For example, some hospitals are using tele-radiology for remote consultation. Such a system includes medical imaging devices networked with computers and databases. Another growing area is patient monitoring, in which sensors are used to acquire biomedical signals, such as electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, and body temperature, from a remote patient, who could be in bed or moving freely. The signals are then relayed to remote systems for viewing and analysis. Telemedicine can be divided into two basic modes of operations: real-time mode, in which the patient data can be accessed remotely in real-time, and store-and-forward mode, in which the acquired data does not have to be accessed immediately. In the recent years, many parties have demonstrated various telemedicine applications based on the Internet and cellular phone as these two fields have been developing rapidly. A current, recognizable trend in telecommunication is the convergence of wireless communication and computer network technologies. This has been reflected in recently developed telemedicine systems. For example, in 1998 J. Reponen, et al. have demonstrated transmission and display of computerized tomography (CT) examinations using a remote portable computer wirelessly connected to a computer network through TCP/IP on a GSM cellular phone. Two years later, they carried out the same tests with a GSM-based wireless personal digital assistant (PDA). The WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) Forum was founded in 1997 to create a global protocol

  7. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M;

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  8. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U.

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classif...

  9. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  10. Accelerator-based BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the 9Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. - Highlights: • The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. • Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. • The present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. • Topics cover intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams and beam diagnostics, among others

  11. Model Based Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Sidney E.

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, the Engineering Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) created the Design System Focus Team (DSFT). MSFC was responsible for the in-house design and development of the Ares 1 Upper Stage and the Engineering Directorate was preparing to deploy a new electronic Configuration Management and Data Management System with the Design Data Management System (DDMS) based upon a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Product Data Management (PDM) System. The DSFT was to establish standardized CAD practices and a new data life cycle for design data. Of special interest here, the design teams were to implement Model Based Definition (MBD) in support of the Upper Stage manufacturing contract. It is noted that this MBD does use partially dimensioned drawings for auxiliary information to the model. The design data lifecycle implemented several new release states to be used prior to formal release that allowed the models to move through a flow of progressive maturity. The DSFT identified some 17 Lessons Learned as outcomes of the standards development, pathfinder deployments and initial application to the Upper Stage design completion. Some of the high value examples are reviewed.

  12. Design Based Wilderness Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Saulnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT has been collaborating since 2010 with the Singapore Ministry of Education to help develop the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD. One element of this collaboration, the Global Leadership Program (GLP, aims to provide SUTD students with the opportunity to interact with the MIT community and experience MIT’s academic culture. During GLP students participate in a program designed to develop leadership ability while also increasing their understanding of engineering science and design thinking. This paper introduces a curriculum combining the pedagogies of design-based learning and wilderness education that was implemented in the summer of 2014 to holistically address the development of these three competencies. Through design-based learning activities, both for and in a natural environment, students were encouraged to develop competencies in engineering science and engineering design while exploring the diverse attributes essential for success as an engineer. This paper examines the results of a retrospective post-then-pre survey administered to the participants upon completion of the program to explore the effects of the program on the development of professional engineering competencies. We find a statistically significant increase in items associated with Individual Leadership Skill, Group Leadership Skill and the role of Society and the Economy. These results are triangulated with student exit interviews and instructor observations.

  13. Challenge Based Innovation gala

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Utriainen, Tuuli Maria; Toivonen, Harri; Nordberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Challenge Based Innovation gala   There’s a new experiment starting in CERN called IdeaLab where we work together with detector R&D researchers to help them to bridge their knowledge into a more human, societally oriented context. Currently we are located in B153, but will move our activities to a new facility next to the Globe in May 2014. One of our first pilot projects is a 5 month course CBI (Challenge Based Innovation) where two multidisciplinary student teams join forces with Edusafe & TALENT projects at CERN. Their goal is to discover what kind of tools for learning could be created in collaboration with the two groups. After months of user interviews and low resolution prototyping they are ready to share the results with us in the form of an afternoon gala. We warmly welcome you to join us to see the students' results and experience the prototypes they have conceived. The event is in three parts, you are welcome to visit all of them,...

  14. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  15. Knowledge Based Economy Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Cristina Tocan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of knowledge-based economy (KBE in the XXI century isevident. In the article the reflection of knowledge on economy is analyzed. The main point is targeted to the analysis of characteristics of knowledge expression in economy and to the construction of structure of KBE expression. This allows understanding the mechanism of functioning of knowledge economy. Theauthors highlight the possibility to assess the penetration level of KBE which could manifest itself trough the existence of products of knowledge expression which could be created in acquisition, creation, usage and development of them. The latter phenomenon is interpreted as knowledge expression characteristics: economic and social context, human resources, ICT, innovative business and innovation policy. The reason for this analysis was based on the idea that in spite of the knowledge economy existence in all developed World countries adefinitive, universal list of indicators for mapping and measuring the KBE does not yet exists. Knowledge Expression Assessment Models are presented in the article.

  16. Constraint-based reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gotlieb

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iterative imperative programs can be considered as infinite-state systems computing over possibly unbounded domains. Studying reachability in these systems is challenging as it requires to deal with an infinite number of states with standard backward or forward exploration strategies. An approach that we call Constraint-based reachability, is proposed to address reachability problems by exploring program states using a constraint model of the whole program. The keypoint of the approach is to interpret imperative constructions such as conditionals, loops, array and memory manipulations with the fundamental notion of constraint over a computational domain. By combining constraint filtering and abstraction techniques, Constraint-based reachability is able to solve reachability problems which are usually outside the scope of backward or forward exploration strategies. This paper proposes an interpretation of classical filtering consistencies used in Constraint Programming as abstract domain computations, and shows how this approach can be used to produce a constraint solver that efficiently generates solutions for reachability problems that are unsolvable by other approaches.

  17. BIOMETRICS BASED USER AUTHENTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Tiwari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biometrics is automated methods of recognizing a person based on a physiological or behavioral characteristic. Biometrics technologies are base for a plethora of highly secure identification and personal verification solutions. It is measurement of biological characteristics – either physiological or behavioral – that verify the claimed identity of an individual. Physiological biometrics include fingerprints, iris recognition. voice verification, retina recognition, palm vein patterns, finger vein patterns, hand geometry and DNA But there arises a need for more robust systems in order to tackle the increasing incidents of security breaches and frauds. So there is always a need for fool proof technology that can provide security and safety to individuals and the transactions that the individuals make. Biometrics is increasingly used by organizations to verify identities, but coupled with quantum cryptography it offers a new range of security benefits with quantum cryptography where we form a key when we need it and then destroy it. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the field of biometrics and summarize some of its advantages, disadvantages, strengths, limitations, and related privacy concerns.

  18. Workplace Based Assessment in Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Ayse Devrim Basterzi; O. Surel Karabilgin

    2009-01-01

    Workplace based assessment refers to the assessment of working practices based on what doctors actually do in the workplace, and is predominantly carried out in the workplace itself. Assessment drives learning and it is therefore essential that workplace-based assessment focuses on important attributes rather than what is easiest to assess. Workplacebased assessment is usually competency based. Workplace based assesments may well facilitate and enhance various aspects of educational supervisi...

  19. MS Based Metabonomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Want, Elizabeth J.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2010-03-01

    Metabonomics is the latest and least mature of the systems biology triad, which also includes genomics and proteomics, and has its origins in the early orthomolecular medicine work pioneered by Linus Pauling and Arthur Robinson. It was defined by Nicholson and colleagues in 1999 as the quantitative measurement of perturbations in the metabolite complement of an integrated biological system in response to internal or external stimuli, and is often used today to describe many non-global types of metabolite analyses. Applications of metabonomics are extensive and include toxicology, nutrition, pharmaceutical research and development, physiological monitoring and disease diagnosis. For example, blood samples from millions of neonates are tested routinely by mass spectrometry (MS) as a diagnostic tool for inborn errors of metabolism. The metabonome encompasses a wide range of structurally diverse metabolites; therefore, no single analytical platform will be sufficient. Specialized sample preparation and detection techniques are required, and advances in NMR and MS technologies have led to enhanced metabonome coverage, which in turn demands improved data analysis approaches. The role of MS in metabonomics is still evolving as instrumentation and software becomes more sophisticated and as researchers realize the strengths and limitations of current technology. MS offers a wide dynamic range, high sensitivity, and reproducible, quantitative analysis. These attributes are essential for addressing the challenges of metabonomics, as the range of metabolite concentrations easily exceeds nine orders of magnitude in biofluids, and the diversity of molecular species ranges from simple amino and organic acids to lipids and complex carbohydrates. Additional challenges arise in generating a comprehensive metabolite profile, downstream data processing and analysis, and structural characterization of important metabolites. A typical workflow of MS-based metabonomics is shown in Figure

  20. Space-Based Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Space-Based Range (SBR), previously known as Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS), is a multicenter NASA proof-of-concept project to determine if space-based communications using NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) can support the Range Safety functions of acquiring tracking data and generating flight termination signals, while also providing broadband Range User data such as voice, video, and vehicle/payload data. There was a successful test of the Range Safety system at Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on December 20, 2005, on a two-stage Terrier-Orion spin-stabilized sounding rocket. SBR transmitted GPS tracking data and maintained links with two TDRSS satellites simultaneously during the 10-min flight. The payload section deployed a parachute, landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 90 miles downrange from the launch site, and was successfully recovered. During the Terrier-Orion tests flights, more than 99 percent of all forward commands and more than 95 percent of all return frames were successfully received and processed. The time latency necessary for a command to travel from WFF over landlines to White Sands Complex and then to the vehicle via TDRSS, be processed onboard, and then be sent back to WFF was between 1.0 s and 1.1 s. The forward-link margins for TDRS-10 (TDRS East [TDE]) were 11 dB to 12 dB plus or minus 2 dB, and for TDRS-4 (TDRS Spare [TDS]) were 9 dB to 10 dB plus or minus 1.5 dB. The return-link margins for both TDE and TDS were 6 dB to 8 dB plus or minus 3 dB. There were 11 flights on an F-15B at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) between November 2006 and February 2007. The Range User system tested a 184-element TDRSS Ku-band (15 GHz) phased-array antenna with data rates of 5 Mbps and 10 Mbps. This data was a combination of black-and-white cockpit video, Range Safety tracking and transceiver data, and aircraft and antenna controller data streams. IP data formatting was used.

  1. Nanocrystalline copper based microcomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Stobrawa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate microstructure, mechanical properties and deformation behavior of copper microcomposites: Cu- Y2O3, Cu- ZrO2 and Cu-WC produced by powder metallurgy techniques.Design/methodology/approach: Tests were made with Cu-Y2O3, Cu-ZrO2 and Cu-WC microcomposites containing up to 2% of a strengthening phase. The materials were fabricated by powder metallurgy techniques, including milling of powders, followed by their compacting and sintering. The main mechanical properties of the materials were determined from the compression test and, additionally, measurements of HV hardness and electrical conductivity were made. Analysis of the initial nanocrystalline structure of these materials was made and its evolution during sintering and cold deformation was investigated.Findings: It was found out that addition of up to 2 wt.% of a strengthening phase significantly improves mechanical properties of the material and increases its softening point. The obtained strengthening effect have been discussed based on the existing theories related to strengthening of nanocrystalline materials. The studies have shown importance of “flows” existing in the consolidated materials and sintered materials in pores or regions of poor powder particle connection which significantly deteriorate the mechanical properties of microcomposites produced by powder metallurgy.Research limitations/implications: The powder metallurgy techniques make it possible to obtain copperbased bulk materials by means of input powder milling in a planetary ball mill, followed by compacting and sintering. Additional operations of hot extrusion are also often used. There is some danger, however, that during high-temperature processing or application of these materials at elevated or high temperatures this nanometric structure may become unstable.Practical implications: A growing trend to use new copper based microcomposites is observed recently worldwide

  2. Mucin-Based Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jonathan P.; MacMillan, Derek

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated cell surface and secreted glycoproteins . In addition to orchestrating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions in healthy organisms mucins are also the major carriers of altered glycosylation in carcinomas. Tumor-associated antigens displayed by cancer cells comprise oligosaccharide and glycopeptide motifs not encountered in the same locale or at the same frequency in healthy cells, and potentially confer a selective advantage to the tumor. Frequently tumor-associated antigens are under-glycosylated and prematurely sialylated, and it is these relatively simple saccharide and glycopeptide structures that have been targeted to serve as drug candidates in most cases. A major goal is to assemble glycopeptide vaccine candidates based on partial mucin sequences and displaying tumor-associated antigens that can mount a potent immunological tumor-specific response when, in reality, the tumor has already coerced the immune system into a state of co-existence.

  3. Situation based housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder; Welling, Helen; Wiell Nordberg, Lene;

    2007-01-01

    variety of approaches to these goals. This working paper reviews not only a selection of new housing types, but also dwellings from the past, which each contain an aspect of changeability. Our study is based on information from users in the selected housing schemes, gathered from questionnaires...... the average family's lifestyle. These dwellings were ground-breaking when they were built, but today are clearly a product of their time. The reaction to functionalism and the postwar mass production gave rise to flexible dwelling with countless possibilities for room division. The housing of this...... period has characteristics which in the long run have proven to be unfortunate both in terms in terms of durability and architectural quality. Today there is a focus on the development of more open and functionally non-determined housing. A number of new housing schemes in and around Copenhagen reveal a...

  4. Touching base with OPERA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Three seminars – at CERN, at Gran Sasso and in Japan – and an article calling for the scrutiny of the scientific community: the OPERA Collaboration opened its research publicly. In addition to huge press coverage, this triggered welcome reactions from colleagues around the world, many of whom will attempt to independently interpret and reproduce the measurement. OPERA’s Spokesperson touches base with the Bulletin.   The CERN Main Auditorium was crowded as OPERA Physics co-ordinator Dario Autiero presented the results of their research (23 September 2011). According to the OPERA strategy, the results of the measurements are in the hands of the scientific community and, as for any other scientific result, several months will be needed before other groups will be able to perform an independent measurement. In the meantime, the OPERA Collaboration is dealing with an avalanche of emails from the scientific community, members of the general public, and the press. &...

  5. Plasma based accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Allen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The concept of laser-induced plasma wakefields as a technique to accelerate charged particles was introduced 35 years ago as a means to go beyond the accelerating gradients possible with metallic cavities supporting radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Significant developments in laser technology have made possible the pulse intensity needed to realize this concept, and rapid progress is now underway in the realization of laser-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. It has also been realized that similar accelerating gradients can be produced by particle beams propagating in plasmas, and experimental programs have also been undertaken to study this possibility. Positive results have been achieved with electron-driven plasma wakefields, and a demonstration experiment with proton-driven wakefields is under construction at CERN. The concepts behind these different schemes and their pros and cons are described, as well as the experimental results achieved. An outlook for future practical uses of plasma based accelerators will also be given.

  6. Integrated data base program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IDB Program provides direct support to the DOE Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs and their lead sites and support contractors by providing and maintaining a current, integrated data base of spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections. All major waste types (HLW, TRU, and LLW) and sources (government, commerical fuel cycle, and I/I) are included. A major data compilation was issued in September, 1981: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories and Projections as of December 31, 1980, DOE/NE-0017. This report includes chapters on Spent Fuel, HLW, TRU Waste, LLW, Remedial Action Waste, Active Uranium Mill Tailings, and Airborne Waste, plus Appendices with more detailed data in selected areas such as isotopics, radioactivity, thermal power, projections, and land usage. The LLW sections include volumes, radioactivity, thermal power, current inventories, projected inventories and characteristics, source terms, land requirements, and a breakdown in terms of government/commercial and defense/fuel cycle/I and I

  7. Al - BASED CAST COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Yadav

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The economy is very important feature nowadays in themarket. The researches are playing an important role inengineering field to increase the life of machine parts /components and decrease the cost. The compositematerials have the potential to replace widely used steeland aluminium due to their good characteristics withbetter performance. The Al-based composites have foundextensive applications in automobile industries andaerospace industries due to their increased stiffness,strength, thermal conductivity and wear resistanceproperties. A number of particulate phases have beenemployed in the Al-alloy matrix. The cast aluminiumceramicparticulate composites are finding applications inpistons, connecting rods, cylinder liner, engine cylinderblock, electrical contacts etc.The present investigation isbased on study of the effect of particulate phase on theSEM study, micro-hardness, elastic modulus, tensilestrength and the wear behaviour of Al-5 % SiC-7 % Fe,Al-10 % SiC-6 % Fe and Al-15 % SiC-5 % Fe composites.

  8. Space-based detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.;

    2014-01-01

    planned for 2015. This mission and its payload “LISA Technology Package” will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical......The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is...... bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of...

  9. Base isolation: Fresh insight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shustov, V.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of the research is a further development of the engineering concept of seismic isolation. Neglecting the transient stage of seismic loading results in a widespread misjudgement: The force of resistance associated with velocity is mostly conceived as a source of damping vibrations, though it is an active force at the same time, during an earthquake type excitation. For very pliant systems such as base isolated structures with relatively low bearing stiffness and with artificially added heavy damping mechanism, the so called `damping`` force may occur even the main pushing force at an earthquake. Thus, one of the two basic pillars of the common seismic isolation philosophy, namely, the doctrine of usefulness and necessity of a strong damping mechanism, is turning out to be a self-deception, sometimes even jeopardizing the safety of structures and discrediting the very idea of seismic isolation. There is a way out: breaking with damping dependancy.

  10. Graphene based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan; Salmankurt, Bahadır

    2016-03-01

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  11. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  12. Base Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett Sondreal; John Hendrikson

    2009-03-31

    In June 2009, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed 11 years of research under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40320 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy (OFE) and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). A wide range of diverse research activities were performed under annual program plans approved by NETL in seven major task areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, (6) advanced materials, and (7) strategic studies. This report summarizes results of the 67 research subtasks and an additional 50 strategic studies. Selected highlights in the executive summary illustrate the contribution of the research to the energy industry in areas not adequately addressed by the private sector alone. During the period of performance of the agreement, concerns have mounted over the impact of carbon emissions on climate change, and new programs have been initiated by DOE to ensure that fossil fuel resources along with renewable resources can continue to supply the nation's transportation fuel and electric power. The agreement has addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration while expanding the supply and use of domestic energy resources for energy security. It has further contributed to goals for near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources (e.g., wind-, biomass-, and coal-based electrical generation).

  13. The office based CHIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passariello F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fausto Passariello,1 Stefano Ermini,2 Massimo Cappelli,3 Roberto Delfrate,4 Claude Franceschi5 1Centro Diagnostico Aquarius, Napoli, Italy; 2Private Practice, Grassina, Italy; 3Private Practice, Firenze, Italy; 4Casa di Cure Figlie di Maria, Cremona, Italy; 5Hospital St Joseph, Service d'Explorations Vasculaires, Paris, France Abstract: The cure Conservatrice Hémodynamique de l'Insuffisance Veineuse en Ambulatoire (CHIVA can be office based (OB. The OB-CHIVA protocol is aimed at transferring CHIVA procedures to specialists rooms. The protocol will check the feasibility of OB-CHIVA, data pertaining to recurrence, and will offer the opportunity to study saphenous femoral junction (SFJ stump evolution, the role of the washing vessels and the arch recanalization rate, and gather new data about the effect of the length of the treated saphenous vein. A simplified diagnostic procedure will allow an essential ultrasound examination of the venous net while a schematic and easily readable algorithm guides therapeutic choices. The Riobamba draining crossotomy (RDC tactic is composed of a set of OB procedures. While some of these procedures are, at the moment, only proposals, others are already applied. Devices generally used in ablative procedures such as Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER, radio frequency, steam, and mechanical devices are used in this context to serve to conservative interventions for CHIVA. New techniques have also been proposed for devalvulation and tributary disconnection. Detailed follow-up is necessary in order to determine the effects of therapy and possible disease evolution. Finally, information is added about the informed consent and the ethical considerations of OB-CHIVA research. Keywords: CHIVA, office based procedures, LASER, RF, steam

  14. Usability Issues in Content Based Multimedia Computer Based Trainings

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Muhammad Qasim; Rehman, Zia ur

    2009-01-01

    In distance education, students and teachers are at different places and interact with each other with the help of different technologies. Broadcast television, two-way video conferencing, asynchronous learning mode, virtual learning environment (VLE) and content based multimedia computer based trainings (CB-MCBTs) are some of the technologies used to provide distance education. Content Based Multimedia Computer Based Trainings (CB-MCBT) is a computerized learning environment. The acceptance ...

  15. Computer-based multi-channel analyzer based on internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined the technology of Internet with computer-based multi-channel analyzer, a new kind of computer-based multi-channel analyzer system which is based on browser is presented. Its framework and principle as well as its implementation are discussed

  16. Risk-based configuration control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation discusses the following issues: The Configuration Control; The Risk-based Configuration Control (during power operation mode, and during shutdown mode). PSA requirements. Use of Risk-based Configuration Control System. Configuration Management (basic elements, benefits, information requirements)

  17. Mixture Based Outlier Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pecherková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Success/failure of adaptive control algorithms – especially those designed using the Linear Quadratic Gaussian criterion – depends on the quality of the process data used for model identification. One of the most harmful types of process data corruptions are outliers, i.e. ‘wrong data’ lying far away from the range of real data. The presence of outliers in the data negatively affects an estimation of the dynamics of the system. This effect is magnified when the outliers are grouped into blocks. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for outlier detection and removal. It is based on modelling the corrupted data by a two-component probabilistic mixture. The first component of the mixture models uncorrupted process data, while the second models outliers. When the outlier component is detected to be active, a prediction from the uncorrupted data component is computed and used as a reconstruction of the observed data. The resulting reconstruction filter is compared to standard methods on simulated and real data. The filter exhibits excellent properties, especially in the case of blocks of outliers. 

  18. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  19. Scintillator based beta batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  20. RF Based Spy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robot Prerna Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this paper is to reduce human victims in terrorist attack such as 26/11. So this problem can be overcome by designing the RF based spy robot which involves wireless camera. so that from this we can examine rivals when it required. This robot can quietly enter into enemy area and sends us the information via wireless camera. On the other hand one more feature is added in this robot that is colour sensor. Colour sensor senses the colour of surface and according to that robot will change its colour. Because of this feature this robot can’t easily detected by enemies. The movement of this robot is wirelessly controlled by a hand held RF transmitter to send commands to the RF receiver mounted on the moving robot. Since human life is always Valueable, these robots are the substitution of soldiers in war areas. This spy robot can also be used in star hotels, shopping malls, jewelry show rooms, etc where there can be threat from intruders or terrorists.

  1. Explanation-Based Auditing

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbri, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    To comply with emerging privacy laws and regulations, it has become common for applications like electronic health records systems (EHRs) to collect access logs, which record each time a user (e.g., a hospital employee) accesses a piece of sensitive data (e.g., a patient record). Using the access log, it is easy to answer simple queries (e.g., Who accessed Alice's medical record?), but this often does not provide enough information. In addition to learning who accessed their medical records, patients will likely want to understand why each access occurred. In this paper, we introduce the problem of generating explanations for individual records in an access log. The problem is motivated by user-centric auditing applications, and it also provides a novel approach to misuse detection. We develop a framework for modeling explanations which is based on a fundamental observation: For certain classes of databases, including EHRs, the reason for most data accesses can be inferred from data stored elsewhere in the da...

  2. Geovisualization based upon KML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Zichar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The extension kml refers to a human readable file format that is based on a markup language deriving from XML and became rather popular mainly due to Google Earth. This type of files uses not only the classical geometric data, but coordinates of longitude and latitude (in case of 3D system also coordinate of altitude to visualize the different geographically referenced objects, phenomena and processes. Nowadays more than 10 millions of kml files can be accessed via the internet, and this number is still increasing. However, knowledge of the standard features of kml is not always sufficient, because the circumstances of its application influence its usage. The functionality of the APIs for the web-embeddable Google Maps and Google Earth programs is determinative concerning this issue. The elements of the standard KML cannot be always used without any change, but the clever usage of the API can result effective tools of dynamism. My aim is to review how wide the range of kml files application is, to describe their differences and to share some personal experiences.

  3. ‘"Education-based Research"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    This paper lays out a concept of education-based research-the production of research knowledge within the framework of tertiary design education-as an integration of problem-based learning and research-based education. This leads to a critique of reflective practice as the primary way to facilitate...... learning at this level, a discussion of the nature of design problems in the instrumentalist tradition, and some suggestions as to how design studies curricula may facilitate education-based research....

  4. Organizational Semantic Web based Portals

    OpenAIRE

    necula, sabina-cristiana

    2011-01-01

    This paper tries to treat organizational semantic web based portals. The first part of the paper focuses on concepts regarding semantic web based portals. After discussing some concepts we treat the basic functionalities that a semantic web based portal must have and we finish by presenting these functionalities by actual examples. We present semantic web based portals after studying the necessary implementations from literature and practice. We develop some examples that use semantic web bas...

  5. The Activity-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, Michael G.; Rindt, Craig

    2008-01-01

    What is the activity-based approach (ABA) and how does it differ from the conventional trip-based model of travel behavior? From where has the activity approach evolved, what is its current status, and what are its potential applications in transportation forecasting and policy analysis. What have been the contributions of activity-based approaches to understanding travel behavior? The conventional trip-based model of travel demand forecasting (see Chapters 2 and 3) has always lacked...

  6. Securing web-based exams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessink, O.D.T.; Beeftink, H.H.; Tramper, J.; Hartog, R.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Learning management systems may offer web-based exam facilities. Such facilities entail a higher risk to exams fraud than traditional paper-based exams. The article discusses security issues with web-based exams, and proposes precautionary measures to reduce the risks. A security model is presented

  7. PMIS: Data Base Design Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddleman, Richard; Gorman, Michael M.

    1972-01-01

    PMIS is a computer-based planning and management information system for local school districts. This report centers on the PMIS data bases that contain school system data by reviewing the major phases involved in their creation, explaining the factors that caused the unique orientation of the data bases, reviewing the two tasks that comprise the…

  8. Image Data Bases on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Reid; Mathieson, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    A description of how image database technology was used to develop two prototypes for academic and administrative applications at Yale University, one using a video data base integration and the other using document-scanning data base technology, is presented. Technical underpinnings for the creation of data bases are described. (Author/MLW)

  9. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  10. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  11. Space-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  12. Soy-based renoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Nancy J; Krul, Elaine S; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth; Parrish, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem as risk factors such as advanced age, obesity, hypertension and diabetes rise in the global population. Currently there are no effective pharmacologic treatments for this disease. The role of diet is important for slowing the progression of CKD and managing symptoms in later stages of renal insufficiency. While low protein diets are generally recommended, maintaining adequate levels of intake is critical for health. There is an increasing appreciation that the source of protein may also be important. Soybean protein has been the most extensively studied plant-based protein in subjects with kidney disease and has demonstrated renal protective properties in a number of clinical studies. Soy protein consumption has been shown to slow the decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate and significantly improve proteinuria in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nephropathy. Soy's beneficial effects on renal function may also result from its impact on certain physiological risk factors for CKD such as dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia. Soy intake is also associated with improvements in antioxidant status and systemic inflammation in early and late stage CKD patients. Studies conducted in animal models have helped to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms that may play a role in the positive effects of soy protein on renal parameters in polycystic kidney disease, metabolically-induced kidney dysfunction and age-associated progressive nephropathy. Despite the established relationship between soy and renoprotection, further studies are needed for a clear understanding of the role of the cellular and molecular target(s) of soy protein in maintaining renal function. PMID:27152261

  13. Nanoparticle-based Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Khanna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles exhibit several unique properties that can be applied to develop chemical and biosensorspossessing desirable features like enhanced sensitivity and lower detection limits. Gold nanoparticles arecoated with sugars tailored to recognise different biological substances. When mixed with a weak solution ofthe sugar-coated nanoparticles, the target substance, e.g., ricin or E.coli, attaches to the sugar, thereby alteringits properties and changing the colour. Spores of bacterium labeled with carbon dots have been found to glowupon illumination when viewed with a confocal microscope. Enzyme/nanoparticle-based optical sensors forthe detection of organophosphate (OP compounds employ nanoparticle-modified fluorescence of an inhibitorof the enzyme to generate the signal for the OP compound detection. Nanoparticles shaped as nanoprisms,built of silver atoms, appear red on exposure to light. These nanoparticles are used as diagnostic labels thatglow when target DNA, e.g., those of anthrax or HIV, are present. Of great importance are tools like goldnanoparticle-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensor and silver nanoparticle surface-enhanced portableRaman integrated tunable sensor. Nanoparticle metal oxide chemiresistors using micro electro mechanical systemhotplate are very promising devices for toxic gas sensing. Chemiresistors comprising thin films of nanogoldparticles, encapsulated in monomolecular layers of functionalised alkanethiols, deposited on interdigitatedmicroelectrodes, show resistance changes through reversible absorption of vapours of harmful gases. Thispaper reviews the state-of-the-art sensors for chemical and biological terror agents, indicates their capabilitiesand applications, and presents the future scope of these devices.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.608-616, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1683

  14. Development and evaluation of a technique for in vivo monitoring of 60Co in human lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, J. Q.; Lucena, E. A.; Dantas, A. L. A.; Dantas, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    60Co is a fission product of 235U and represents a risk of internal exposure of workers in nuclear power plants, especially those involved in the maintenance of potentially contaminated parts and equipment. The control of 60Co intake by inhalation can be performed through in vivo monitoring. This work describes the evaluation of a technique through the minimum detectable activity and the corresponding minimum detectable effective doses, based on biokinetic and dosimetric models of 60Co in the human body. The results allow to state that the technique is suitable either for monitoring of occupational exposures or evaluation of accidental intake.

  15. Conjugate whole-body scanning system for quantitative measurement of organ distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of accurate, quantitative, biokinetic distribution of an internally dispersed radionuclide in humans is important in making realistic radiation absorbed dose estimates, studying biochemical transformations in health and disease, and developing clinical procedures indicative of abnormal functions. In order to collect these data, a whole-body imaging system is required which provides both adequate spatial resolution and some means of absolute quantitation. Based on these considerations, a new whole-body scanning system has been designed and constructed that employs the conjugate counting technique. The conjugate whole-body scanning system provides an efficient and accurate means of collecting absolute quantitative organ distribution data of radioactivity in vivo

  16. Barrier Data Base user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special purpose data base for physical security barriers has been developed. In addition to barriers, the entities accommodated by the Barrier Data Base (BDB) include threats and references. A threat is established as a configuration of people and equipment which has been employed to penetrate (or attempt to penetrate) a barrier. References are used to cite publications pertinent to the barriers and threats in the data base. Utilization and maintenance of the Barrier Data Base is achieved with LIST, QUERY, ENTER, DELETE, and CHANGE commands which are used to manipulate the data base entities

  17. From oil-based mud to water-based mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maersk Olie og Gas AS has used low toxic oil-based muds extensively since 1982 for drilling development wells and later in the development of horizontal well drilling techniques. However, in view of the strong drive towards a reduction in the amount of oil discharged to the North Sea from the oil industry, Maersk Olie og Gas AS initiated trials with new or improved types of water-based mud, first in deviated wells (1989) and then in horizontal wells (1990). The paper reviews Maersk Olie og Gas As experience with oil-based mud since the drilling of the first horizontal well in 1987, specifically with respect to cuttings washing equipment, oil retention on cuttings, and the procedure for monitoring of this parameter. It describes the circumstances leading to the decision to revert to water-based mud systems. Finally, it reviews the experience gained so far with the new improved types of water-based mud systems, mainly glycol and KCl/polymer mud systems. Comparison of operational data, such as rate of penetration, torque and drag, etc., is made between wells drilled with oil-based mud and water-based mud. The trials with the new improved types of water-based mud systems have been positive, i.e. horizontal wells can be drilled successfully with water-based mud. As a result, Maersk Olie og and Gas AS has decided to discontinue the use of low toxic oil-based muds in the Danish sector of the North Sea

  18. Workplace Based Assessment in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Devrim Basterzi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Workplace based assessment refers to the assessment of working practices based on what doctors actually do in the workplace, and is predominantly carried out in the workplace itself. Assessment drives learning and it is therefore essential that workplace-based assessment focuses on important attributes rather than what is easiest to assess. Workplacebased assessment is usually competency based. Workplace based assesments may well facilitate and enhance various aspects of educational supervisions, including its structure, frequency and duration etc. The structure and content of workplace based assesments should be monitored to ensure that its benefits are maximised by remaining tailored to individual trainees' needs. Workplace based assesment should be used for formative and summative assessments. Several formative assessment methods have been developed for use in the workplace such as mini clinical evaluation exercise (mini-cex, evidence based journal club assesment and case based discussion, multi source feedback etc. This review discusses the need of workplace based assesments in psychiatry graduate education and introduces some of the work place based assesment methods.

  19. Measurement-based quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  20. Bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to the cladoceran Daphnia magna in relation to cadmium exposure history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui

    The cladoceran Daphnia magna is widely used in freshwater bioassessments and ecological risk assessments. This study designed a series of experiments employing radiotracer methodology to quantify the trace metals (mainly Cd and Zn) biokinetics in D. magna under different environmental and biological conditions and to investigate the influences of different Cd exposure histories on the bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to D. magna. A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was finally applied in predicting the Cd accumulation dynamics in D. magna and the model validity under non-steady state was assessed. Cd assimilation was found in this study to be influenced by the food characteristics (e.g., metal concentration in food particles), the metal exposure history of the animals, and the genetic characteristics. Some of these influences could be interpreted by the capacity and/or competition of those metal binding sites within the digestive tract and/or the detoxifying proteins metallothionein (MT). My study demonstrated a significant induction of MT in response to Cd exposure and it was the dominant fraction in sequestering the internal nonessential trace metals in D. magna. The ratio of Cd body burden to MT might better predict the Cd toxicity on the digestion systems of D. magna than the Cd tissue burden alone within one-generational exposure to Cd. It was found that metal elimination (rate constant and contribution of different release routes) was independent of the food concentration and the dietary metal concentration, implying that the elimination may not be metabolically controlled. The incorporation of the bioenergetic-based kinetic model, especially under non-steady state, is invaluable in helping to understand the fate of trace metals in aquatic systems and potential environmental risks. The dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors rather than on genotypes implies a great potential of using biokinetics in inter-laboratory comparisons.

  1. Case-based reasoning: The marriage of knowledge base and data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulaski, Kirt; Casadaban, Cyprian

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of data and knowledge has a synergistic effect when building an intelligent data base. The goal is to integrate the data and knowledge almost to the point of indistinguishability, permitting them to be used interchangeably. Examples given in this paper suggest that Case-Based Reasoning is a more integrated way to link data and knowledge than pure rule-based reasoning.

  2. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  3. Optimal pricing decision model based on activity-based costing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福胜; 常庆芳

    2003-01-01

    In order to find out the applicability of the optimal pricing decision model based on conventional costbehavior model after activity-based costing has given strong shock to the conventional cost behavior model andits assumptions, detailed analyses have been made using the activity-based cost behavior and cost-volume-profitanalysis model, and it is concluded from these analyses that the theory behind the construction of optimal pri-cing decision model is still tenable under activity-based costing, but the conventional optimal pricing decisionmodel must be modified as appropriate to the activity-based costing based cost behavior model and cost-volume-profit analysis model, and an optimal pricing decision model is really a product pricing decision model construc-ted by following the economic principle of maximizing profit.

  4. Knowledge base verification based on enhanced colored petri net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verification is a process aimed at demonstrating whether a system meets it's specified requirements. As expert systems are used in various applications, the knowledge base verification of systems takes an importatn position. The conventional Petri net approach that has been studied recently in order to verify the knowledge base is found that it is inadequate to verify the knowledge base of large and complex system, such as alarm processing system of nuclear power plant. Thus, we propose an improved method that models the knowledge base as enhanced colored Petri net. In this study, we analyze the reachability and the error characteristics of the knowledge base and apply the method to verification of simple knowledge base

  5. Knowledge base verification based on enhanced colored petri net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Verification is a process aimed at demonstrating whether a system meets it`s specified requirements. As expert systems are used in various applications, the knowledge base verification of systems takes an important position. The conventional Petri net approach that has been studied recently in order to verify the knowledge base is found that it is inadequate to verify the knowledge base of large and complex system, such as alarm processing system of nuclear power plant. Thus, we propose an improved method that models the knowledge base as enhanced colored Petri net. In this study, we analyze the reachability and the error characteristics of the knowledge base and apply the method to verification of simple knowledge base. 8 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  6. ANALYSIS-BASED SPARSE RECONSTRUCTION WITH SYNTHESIS-BASED SOLVERS

    OpenAIRE

    Cleju, Nicolae; Jafari, Maria,; Plumbley, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis based reconstruction has recently been introduced as an alternative to the well-known synthesis sparsity model used in a variety of signal processing areas. In this paper we convert the analysis exact-sparse reconstruction problem to an equivalent synthesis recovery problem with a set of additional constraints. We are therefore able to use existing synthesis-based algorithms for analysis-based exact-sparse recovery. We call this the Analysis-By-Synthesis (ABS) approach. We evaluate o...

  7. XML-Based SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi

    2008-01-01

    The SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language software has been designed to more efficiently send new knowledge bases to spacecraft that have been embedded with the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) tool. The intention of the behavioral model is to capture most of the information generally associated with a spacecraft functional model, while specifically addressing the needs of execution within SHINE and Livingstone. As such, it has some constructs that are based on one or the other.

  8. Graph Cuts based Image Segmentation using Fuzzy Rule Based System

    OpenAIRE

    Khokher, M. R.; A. Ghafoor; A.M. Siddiqui

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the segmentation of gray scale, color and texture images using graph cuts. From input image, a graph is constructed using intensity, color and texture profiles of the image simultaneously. Based on the nature of image, a fuzzy rule based system is designed to find the weight that should be given to a specific image feature during graph development. The graph obtained from the fuzzy rule based weighted average of different image features is further used in normalized graph...

  9. Location-based Modeling and Analysis: Tropos-based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Raian; Dalpiaz, Fabiano; Giorgini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The continuous growth of interest in mobile applications makes the concept of location essential to design and develop software systems. Location-based software is supposed to be able to monitor the location and choose accordingly the most appropriate behavior. In this paper, we propose a novel conceptual framework to model and analyze location-based software. We mainly focus on the social facets of locations adopting concepts such as social actor, resource, and location-based behavior. Our a...

  10. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  11. Remote Monitoring System for Communication Base Based on Short Message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yu Fu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents design and development of an automatic monitoring system of communication base which is an important means to realize modernization of mobile communication base station management. Firstly, this paper proposes the architecture of the monitoring system. The proposed system consists of mocrocontrollers, sensors, GSM module and MFRC500 etc. The value of parameters is measured in the system including terminal is studied and designed, including hardware design based on embedded system and software design. Finally, communication module is discussed. The monitoring system which is designed  based on GSM SMS(short message service can improve the integrity, reliability, flexibility and intellectuality of monitoring system.

  12. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  13. Radioiodine Therapy of Hyperthyroidism. Simplified patient-specific absorbed dose planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism is the most frequently performed radiopharmaceutical therapy. To calculate the activity of 131I to be administered for giving a certain absorbed dose to the thyroid, the mass of the thyroid and the individual biokinetic data, normally in the form of uptake and biologic half-time, have to be determined. The biologic half-time is estimated from several uptake measurements and the first one is usually made 24 hours after the intake of the test activity. However, many hospitals consider it time-consuming since at least three visits of the patient to the hospital are required (administration of test activity, first uptake measurement, second uptake measurement plus treatment). Instead, many hospitals use a fixed effective half-time or even a fixed administered activity, only requiring two visits. However, none of these methods considers the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. In this work a simplified patient-specific method for treating hyperthyroidism is proposed, based on one single uptake measurement, thus requiring only two visits to the hospital. The calculation is as accurate as using the individual biokinetic data. The simplified method is as patient-convenient and time effective as using a fixed effective half-time or a fixed administered activity. The simplified method is based upon a linear relation between the late uptake measurement 4-7 days after intake of the test activity and the product of the extrapolated initial uptake and the effective half-time. Treatments not considering individual biokinetics in the thyroid result in a distribution of administered absorbed dose to the thyroid, with a range of -50 % to +160 % compared to a protocol calculating the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. Treatments with a fixed administered activity of 370 MBq will in general administer 250 % higher activity to the patient, with a range of -30 % to +770 %. The absorbed dose to other organs

  14. Contribution of environmental lead exposure to blood lead level among infants based on IEUBK model%基于IEUBK模型研究环境铅对婴儿血铅的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王波; 邵迪初; 项张华; 叶虹; 倪为民; 杨水莲; 吴翠娥; 李凭健; 傅华

    2011-01-01

    目的 利用环境铅、出生前铅暴露数据和暴露吸收生物动力学模型(IEUBK模型),探讨环境铅对婴儿6月龄时血铅浓度的影响.方法 利用2005-2007年的出生队列资料、出生前铅暴露数据和婴儿6月龄时血铅浓度值,以及婴儿居住环境土壤、大气和饮用水等介质中的铅检测数据,基于IEUBK模型计算环境铅引起的婴儿血铅增高水平.结果 婴儿出生前就存在铅暴露,孕晚期母亲血铅浓度几何均数为(40.3±3.7)μg/L,6月龄婴儿的血铅浓度的几何均数为(54.7±6.7)μg/L,有17.3%的婴儿血铅浓度超过100μg/L.研究对象居住环境中多种介质均能检测到铅,土壤、大气和饮水中铅的几何均数浓度分别为45.57mg/kg、0.023μg/m3和3.25μg/L.根据IEUBK模型计算的由环境铅及出生前铅暴露引起的婴儿6月龄血铅浓度几何均数值为12.4μg/L,占其实际血铅浓度的22.7%.结论 研究区域婴儿仍存在较高水平的血铅暴露,其居住环境内存在一定程度的铅污染现象.除环境铅外,当地婴儿可能还存在其他的铅暴露来源.%Objective To evaluate the influence of environmental lead exposure on infant' s blood lead through integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model for lead in children (IEUBK) model, based on environmental lead and prenatal lead exposure. Methods The data is from a prospective study conducted among pregnant women during 2005 -2007. Blood lead of the pregnant women in the late pregnancy, environmental lead values including lead concentration in soil, air and drink-water were measured. Moreover, the blood lead concentrations of infants were measured as well. Results Infants were exposed to lead from the pregnant women during the pregnancy, and in the late pregnancy the geometric mean blood lead of pregnant women was (40. 3 ± 3.7 ) μg/L. The geometric mean blood lead concentration of six-month old infants was (54. 7 ± 6.7) μg/L and there were 17. 3% infants whose blood lead

  15. Concurrent array-based queue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  16. Fast Density Based Clustering Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Trikha; Singh Vijendra

    2013-01-01

    Clustering problem is an unsupervised learning problem. It is a procedure that partition data objects into matching clusters. The data objects in the same cluster are quite similar to each other and dissimilar in the other clusters. The traditional algorithms do not meet the latest multiple requirements simultaneously for objects. Density-based clustering algorithms find clusters based on density of data points in a region. DBSCAN algorithm is one of the density-based clustering algorithms. I...

  17. Restructuring and simplifying rule bases

    OpenAIRE

    Vanthienen, Jan; Dries, E; WETS, G

    1995-01-01

    Rule bases are commonly acquired, by expert and/or knowledge engineer, in a form which is well suited for acquisition purposes. When the knowledge base is executed, however, a different structure may be required. Moreover, since human experts normally do not provide the knowledge in compact chunks, rule bases often suffer from redundancy. This may considerably harm efficiency. In this paper a procedure is examined to transform rules that are specified in the knowledge acquisition process ...

  18. Principles of models based engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes a Models Based Engineering (MBE) philosophy and implementation strategy that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology. A major theme in this discussion is that models based engineering is an information management technology enabling the development of information driven engineering. Unlike other information management technologies, models based engineering encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from design intent through product definition to consumer application.

  19. Risk-based configuration management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk-based configuration management is an important research area of using PSA technology to evaluate and improve the Technical Specification Requirements of nuclear power plant. Some aspects on risk-based configuration management are discussed, including evaluation methods, risk acceptance criteria and essential elements which should be paid attention to during the management process. And results of the case study based on a real nuclear power plant are presented

  20. dBASE IV basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  1. Instantaneous noise-based logic

    OpenAIRE

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Khatri, Sunil; Peper, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    We show two universal, Boolean, deterministic logic schemes based on binary noise timefunctions that can be realized without time-averaging units. The first scheme is based on a new bipolar random telegraph wave scheme and the second one makes use of the recent noise-based logic which is conjectured to be the brain's method of logic operations [Physics Letters A 373 (2009) 2338-2342]. Error propagation and error removal issues are also addressed.

  2. Feature-Based Attention and Feature-Based Expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Christopher; Egner, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Foreknowledge of target stimulus features improves visual search performance as a result of 'feature-based attention' (FBA). Recent studies have reported that 'feature-based expectation' (FBE) also heightens decision sensitivity. Superficially, it appears that the latter work has simply rediscovered (and relabeled) the effects of FBA. However, this is not the case. Here we explain why. PMID:27079632

  3. Trace-Based Code Generation for Model-Based Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanstrén, T.; Piel, E.; Gross, H.-G.

    2009-01-01

    Paper Submitted for review at the Eighth International Conference on Generative Programming and Component Engineering. Model-based testing can be a powerful means to generate test cases for the system under test. However, creating a useful model for model-based testing requires expertise in the (fo

  4. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    /or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...

  5. Isochronous cyclotron data base description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relational data base of the control parameters of the isochronous cyclotron, Isochronous Cyclotron Data Base (ICDB), is described. The relational data base under consideration, written in Transact SQL for the MS SQL Server 2000 with the use of MS Enterprise Manager and MS Query Analyzer, was installed on the server of the AIC144 isochronous cyclotron in Krakow, which operates under the control of the operating system MS Windows Server 2003 (Standard Edition). The interface of the data base under considerations is written in C++ with the use of Visual C++ .NET and is built in the Cyclotron Operator Help Program (COHP), which is used for modeling the operational modes of the isochronous cyclotron. Communication between the COHP and the relational data base is realised on the base of the Open Data Base Connectivity protocol. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron is intended: firstly, for systematization and automatic use of all measured and modelled magnetic field maps in the process of modeling the operational modes; secondly, for systematization and convenient access to the stored operational modes; thirdly, for simplifying the operator's work. The relational data base of the control parameter of the isochronous cyclotron reflects its physical structure and the logic of its operator's work. (author)

  6. Distributed event-based systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fiege, Ludger; Pietzuch, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth description of event-based systems, covering topics ranging from local event matching and distributed event forwarding algorithms, through a practical discussion of software engineering issues raised by the event-based style, to state-of-the-art research in event-based systems like composite event detection and security. The authors offer a comprehensive overview, and show the power of event-based architectures in modern system design, encouraging professionals to exploit this technique in next generation large-scale distributed applications like information diss

  7. Web-based support systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, JingTao

    2010-01-01

    The emerging interdisciplinary study of Web-based support systems focuses on the theories, technologies and tools for the design and implementation of Web-based systems that support various human activities. This book presents the state-of-the-art in Web-based support systems (WSS). The research on WSS is multidisciplinary and focuses on supporting various human activities in different domains/fields based on computer science, information technology, and Web technology. The main goal is to take the opportunities of the Web, to meet the challenges of the Web, to extend the human physical limita

  8. Capability-based computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  9. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: 11C- acetate, 11C- methionine, 18F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I, fragment of antibody, F(ab')2 labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either 99mTc, 111In, 123I or 131I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. 14C-urea (children age 3-6 years), 14C-glycocholic acid, 14C-xylose and 14C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested

  10. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  11. Enhancements in application for in-vivo monitoring: source, detector and geometry relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vivo monitors are prepared for the direct assessment of internal contamination of workers and members of public. The type of monitor and the used detection geometry are mostly influenced by the biokinetic of the internal deposited radioactive materials. The objective of the present work is to combine enhanced expertise in in vivo measurement techniques in order to improve the performance of in vivo measurements in combination with anthropomorphic and numerical phantoms and biokinetic modelling for the assessment of internal exposure. To promote the optimization of in vivo monitors this report contains basic information about detector - geometry - shielding correlation's which are influenced by the detection method, the source geometry as well as by the radiation of interest and the background radiation. In direct in-vivo monitoring technique the optimum choice of the detectors to be applied for different monitoring tasks has been investigated in terms of material, size and background in order to improve conditions namely to increase counting efficiency and reduce background. Furthermore, this report is trying to outline some in vivo monitors which are state-of-the-art and, last but not least, developments of most recent techniques such as large surface Germanium as well as Silicon based detection devices. The main selection criteria for optimization of in-vivo counters are: biokinetic and retention of the radioisotopes of interest; whole body and organ size and positions; detector material, size and crystal dimension; preselection methods; measurement (detector-source-size) geometry; shielding technology; calibration. Human body head (skeleton) measurement for low energy radionuclides such as U-238/Th-234, U-235/Th-231, Th-232, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Pu-isotopes for actual and retrospective exposure studies and their calibration with optimal phantoms are presented and discussed. (author)

  12. IDAC2.0 a new generation of internal dosimetric calculations for diagnostic examinations in nuclear medicine using the adult ICRP/ICRU reference computational voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim and background: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group 36 (TG 36) has the commission to propose biokinetic data and estimates of absorbed doses to organs and tissues and the effective dose to patients from various radiopharmaceuticals. To this date the program IDAC1.0 has been used to perform the dose calculations and OLINDA-EXM as an independent validation of the calculations. Both these calculations are based on photon specific absorption fractions (SAF) simulated from the mathematical phantoms created by Cristy and Eckerman in 1987 while the kinetic energy of electrons is mainly assumed to be absorbed locally. To improve the accuracy of the calculations, ICRP has now adopted a more realistic voxel phantom to incorporate in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of new electron and photon SAF-values. The internal dosimetry computer program, IDAC, has been substantially upgraded (IDAC2.0) and incorporates these new SAF-values for calculations of the absorbed doses and the effective dose. Material and methods: with IDAC2.0 it is possible to calculate the dose from 1252 different radionuclides. The program uses the latest biokinetic models and assumptions of the ICRP TG 36, which also includes the incorporation of the Human Alimentary Tract Model (ICRP 100) and the latest tissue weighting factors (ICRP 103). The S-values are generated through mono-energetic photon and electron SAF-values from the new voxel phantom and decay data of ICRP publication 107. The input data of the source regions included in the model for the absorbed doses and effective dose calculations in IDAC2.0 can be given in a descriptive biokinetic model or by constructing a compartment model with defined transfer coefficients or just as the total number of disintegrations per unit administered activity. Absorbed doses and the effective dose are calculated and presented here for 120 different radiopharmaceuticals based on earlier

  13. Polyurethane Based Inhibition for High Flame Temperature Nitramine Based Composite Modified Double Base propellant

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Kakade; M. V. Vaidya; D. G. Khangaonkar; P. K. Divekar; U. B. Kadam; S. N. Asthana

    1998-01-01

    The findings for polypropylene glycol (PPG) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based inhibition systems are reported. These findings established that the inhibition system comprising HTPB-IPDI-IDP binder and Sb/sub 2/O/sub 3/-C black filler is most suitable for advanced nitramine-based composite modified double-base propellants in terms of mechanical properties and processibility. The promising composition was characterised for glass-transition behaviour and propellant-inhibi...

  14. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...

  15. Interpretation-Based Grammar Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to the usual approach to teaching grammar, this article argues for a comprehension-based approach. Based on a model of second-language acquisition, it examines a number of possible goals for grammar instruction (e.g., to promote "intake" of new grammatical features by helping learners notice input features and comprehend the meaning).…

  16. Methods in Logic Based Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Georg Kronborg

    1999-01-01

    Desing and theory of Logic Based Control systems.Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh Map, Quine McClusky's algorithm. Sequential control design. Logic Based Control Method, Cascade Control Method. Implementation techniques: relay, pneumatic, TTL/CMOS,PAL and PLC- and Soft_PLC implementation. PLC...

  17. The knowledge base of journalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svith, Flemming

    theories on practice and knowledge. As the result of an abductive reasoning is a theory proposal, there is a need for more deductive approaches to test the validity of this knowledge base claim. It is thus relevant to investigate which rationales are included in the knowledge base of journalism, as the...

  18. Team-Based Global Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zander, Lena; Butler, Christina Lea; Mockaitis, Audra;

    2015-01-01

    Purpose-We propose team-based organizing as an alternative to more traditional forms of hierarchy-based organizing in global firms. Methodology/approach-Advancements in the study of global teams, leadership, process, and outcomes were organized into four themes: (1) openness toward linguistic and...

  19. FAST WATERSHED-BASED DILATION

    OpenAIRE

    Jakub Smołka

    2014-01-01

    A watershed-based region growing image segmentation algorithm requires a fast watershed-based dilation implementation for effective operation. This paper presents a new way for watershed image representation and uses this representation for effective implementation of dilation. Methods for improving the algorithm speed are discussed. Presented solutions may also be used for solving other problems where fast set summation is required.

  20. Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher P Price

    2004-01-01

    @@ Whilst there have been several definitions of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), the one given by David Sackett is probably the most accurate and well accepted; he stated that "evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients"[1].