WorldWideScience

Sample records for base tumors analysis

  1. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narkhede Sachin G.,

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI intensity and anatomical meaning. With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation, an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed. This is motivated by potential performance improvement in the general automatic brain tumor segmentation systems which are important for many medical and scientific applications. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI segmentation is a complex problem in the field of medical imaging despite various presented methods. MR image of human brain can be divided into several sub-regions especially soft tissues such as gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. Although edge information is the main clue in image segmentation, it can’t get a better result in analysis the content of images without combining other information. Our goal is to detect the position and boundary of tumors automatically. Experiments were conducted on real pictures, and the results show that the algorithm is flexible and convenient.

  2. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    G., Narkhede Sachin; Khairnar, Vaishali; Kadu, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging intensity and anatomical meaning.With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation,an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed.This is motivated by potential performance improvement in the general automatic brain tu...

  3. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Mathematical Analysis and Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    Narkhede Sachin G.,; Prof. Vaishali Khairnar

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR) image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) intensity and anatomical meaning. With the objective of utilizing more meaningful information to improve brain tumor segmentation, an approach which employs bilateral symmetry information as an additional feature for segmentation is proposed. This is motivated by potential performance improvement in ...

  4. A survey of MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stefan; Wiest, Roland; Nolte, Lutz-P.; Reyes, Mauricio

    2013-07-01

    MRI-based medical image analysis for brain tumor studies is gaining attention in recent times due to an increased need for efficient and objective evaluation of large amounts of data. While the pioneering approaches applying automated methods for the analysis of brain tumor images date back almost two decades, the current methods are becoming more mature and coming closer to routine clinical application. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview by giving a brief introduction to brain tumors and imaging of brain tumors first. Then, we review the state of the art in segmentation, registration and modeling related to tumor-bearing brain images with a focus on gliomas. The objective in the segmentation is outlining the tumor including its sub-compartments and surrounding tissues, while the main challenge in registration and modeling is the handling of morphological changes caused by the tumor. The qualities of different approaches are discussed with a focus on methods that can be applied on standard clinical imaging protocols. Finally, a critical assessment of the current state is performed and future developments and trends are addressed, giving special attention to recent developments in radiological tumor assessment guidelines.

  5. Statistics-Based Prediction Analysis for Head and Neck Cancer Tumor Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Azimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current radiation therapy planning systems, which are based on pre-treatment Computer Tomography (CT images, assume that the tumor geometry does not change during the course of treatment. However, tumor geometry is shown to be changing over time. We propose a methodology to monitor and predict daily size changes of head and neck cancer tumors during the entire radiation therapy period. Using collected patients' CT scan data, MATLAB routines are developed to quantify the progressive geometric changes occurring in patients during radiation therapy. Regression analysis is implemented to develop predictive models for tumor size changes through entire period. The generated models are validated using leave-one-out cross validation. The proposed method will increase the accuracy of therapy and improve patient's safety and quality of life by reducing the number of harmful unnecessary CT scans.

  6. Readability analysis of internet-based patient information regarding skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Poonam; Kasabwala, Khushabu; Agarwal, Nitin; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2012-09-01

    Readability is an important consideration in assessing healthcare-related literature. In order for a source of information to be the most beneficial to patients, it should be written at a level appropriate for the audience. The National Institute of Health recommends that health literature be written at a maximum level of sixth grade. This is not uniformly found in current health literature, putting patients with lower reading levels at a disadvantage. In February 2012, healthcare-oriented education resources were retrieved from websites obtained using the Google search phrase skull base tumors. Of the first 25 consecutive, unique website hits, 18 websites were found to contain information for patients. Ten different assessment scales were utilized to assess the readability of the patient-specific web pages. Patient-oriented material found online for skull base tumors was written at a significantly higher level than the reading level of the average US patient. The average reading level of this material was found to be at a minimum of eleventh grade across all ten scales. Health related material related to skull base tumors available through the internet can be improved to reach a larger audience without sacrificing the necessary information. Revisions of this material can provide significant benefit for average patients and improve their health care. PMID:22810759

  7. Towards Engineered Processes for Sequencing-Based Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Love, J Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Sequencing-based analysis of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of metastatic cancer and improve clinical care. Technologies exist to enrich, identify, recover, and sequence single cells, but to enable systematic routine analysis of single CTCs from a range of cancer patients, there is a need to establish processes that efficiently integrate these specific operations. Such engineered processes should address challenges associated with the yield and viability of enriched CTCs, the robust identification of candidate single CTCs with minimal degradation of DNA, the bias in whole-genome amplification, and the efficient handling of candidate single CTCs or their amplified DNA products. Advances in methods for single-cell analysis and nanoscale technologies suggest opportunities to overcome these challenges, and could create integrated platforms that perform several of the unit operations together. Ultimately, technologies should be selected or adapted for optimal performance and compatibility in an integrated process. PMID:24839591

  8. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations.

  9. The analysis of respiration-induced pancreatic tumor motion based on reference measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate pancreatic tumor motion and its dynamics during respiration. This retrospective study includes 20 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who were treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. An online respiratory tumor tracking system was used. Periodical maximum and minimum tumor positions with respiration in superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were collected for tumor motion evaluation. The predictability of tumor motion in each axis, based on reference measurement, was analyzed. The use of a 20-mm and 5-mm constant margins for SI and LL/AP directions, avoids target underdosage, without the need for reference measurement. Pearson’s correlation coefficient indicated only a modest correlation between reference and subsequent measurements in the SI direction (r = 0.50) and no correlation in LL (r = 0.17) and AP (r = 0.35) directions. When margins based on the reference measurement of respiratory tumor motion are used, then 30% of patients have a risk zone of underdosage >3 mm (in average). ITV (internal target volume) optimization based on the reference measurement is possible, but allows only modest margin reduction (approximately from 20 mm to 16-17 mm) in SI direction and no reduction in AP and LL directions. Our results support the use of 20-mm margin in the SI direction and 5-mm margins in the LL and AP directions to account for respiratory motion without reference measurement. Single measurement of tumor motion allows only modest margin reduction. Further margin reduction is only possible when there is on-line tumor motion control according to internal markers

  10. Tumor type resulting in upgrade: An analysis based on 333 low grade soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langer, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Soft tissue sarcomas (STS are rare tumors. Based on histopathological criteria, three grades are distinguished from low (G1 to intermediate (G2 and high grade (G3. After complete initial surgical resection, some G1 STS recur as lesions with an upgrade of a previous G1 STS to a recurrent G2 STS. This upgrade indicates higher malignancy of the STS. Our aim was to find possible risk factors for these upgrades including age, localization of tumor and tumor type. Methods: This retrospective case-control study evaluated 333 patients. Of these 333, 54.7% were male and 45.3% female. All patients underwent R0 resections and among these, 10% subsequently upgraded. The processed data include age, gender, tumor type, tumor localization, local recurrence and upgrade. Results: Patients with upgrades have a higher mean age of 5.5 years than our reference collective. The tumor type has a significant effect on upgrades. Patients with fibrosarcomas are at a threefold risk of an upgrade compared to patients with other G1 STS.Conclusion: Our results indicate that age and tumor type play a key role in upgrades in G1 STS. Patients, age 60 and above and diagnosed with G1 fibrosarcomas, are three times as likely to upgrade compared to patients younger than 60 with other G1 STS. We discuss the significance of these risk factors and whether aside from complete tumor resection, additional therapies (e.g. irradiation may be applied to improve therapeutic outcome.

  11. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  12. Optimal Design Strategies of Femur Tumor Hyperthermia Based on Finite Element Analysis of Temperature Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monan Wang∗; Lei Sun

    2015-01-01

    A 3D femoral model was built to obtain the three⁃dimensional temperature distribution of femur and its surrounding tissues and provide references for clinical applications. According to the relationship between gray⁃value and material properties, the model was assigned with various materials to make sure that it is more similar to the real femur in geometry and physical properties. 3D temperature distribution is obtained by using finite element analysis software ANSYS 11�0 on the basis of heat conduction theory, Laplace equation, Pennes bio⁃heat transfer equation, thermo physical parameters of bone tissues, the boundary condition, and initial conditions. Taken the asymmetry of the 3D distribution of temperature into account, it is necessary to adopt the heating method with multiple heat sources. This method can ensure that the temperature fields match well with the tumor tissues and kill the tumor cells efficiently under the condition of protecting the normal tissues from damage. The analysis results supply important guidance for determining the needle position and the needle number and controlling the intensity of heating.

  13. Analysis of tumor suppressor genes based on gene ontology and the KEGG pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    Full Text Available Cancer is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. We urgently need to design effective treatments to cure this disease. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are a type of gene that can protect cells from becoming cancerous. In view of this, correct identification of TSGs is an alternative method for identifying effective cancer therapies. In this study, we performed gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the TSGs and non-TSGs. Some popular feature selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS, were employed to analyze the enrichment features. Accordingly, some GO terms and KEGG pathways, such as biological adhesion, cell cycle control, genomic stability maintenance and cell death regulation, were extracted, which are important factors for identifying TSGs. We hope these findings can help in building effective prediction methods for identifying TSGs and thereby, promoting the discovery of effective cancer treatments.

  14. Analysis of precision in tumor tracking based on optical positioning system during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Shen, Junshu; Li, Bing; Chen, Junting; Zhu, Xixu; Ge, Yun; Wang, Yongjian

    2016-03-19

    Tumor tracking is performed during patient set-up and monitoring of respiratory motion in radiotherapy. In the clinical setting, there are several types of equipment for this set-up such as the Electronic Portal imaging Device (EPID) and Cone Beam CT (CBCT). Technically, an optical positioning system tracks the difference between the infra ball reflected from body and machine isocenter. Our objective is to compare the clinical positioning error of patient setup between Cone Beam CT (CBCT) with the Optical Positioning System (OPS), and to evaluate the traditional positioning systems and OPS based on our proposed approach of patient positioning. In our experiments, a phantom was used, and we measured its setup errors in three directions. Specifically, the deviations in the left-to-right (LR), anterior-to-posterior (AP) and inferior-to-superior (IS) directions were measured by vernier caliper on a graph paper using the Varian Linear accelerator. Then, we verified the accuracy of OPS based on this experimental study. In order to verify the accuracy of phantom experiment, 40 patients were selected in our radiotherapy experiment. To illustrate the precise of optical positioning system, we designed clinical trials using EPID. From our radiotherapy procedure, we can conclude that OPS has higher precise than conventional positioning methods, and is a comparatively fast and efficient positioning method with respect to the CBCT guidance system. PMID:27257880

  15. Treatment Analysis in a Cancer Stem Cell Context Using a Tumor Growth Model Based on Cellular Automata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Monteagudo

    Full Text Available Cancer can be viewed as an emergent behavior in terms of complex system theory and artificial life, Cellular Automata (CA being the tool most used for studying and characterizing the emergent behavior. Different approaches with CA models were used to model cancer growth. The use of the abstract model of acquired cancer hallmarks permits the direct modeling at cellular level, where a cellular automaton defines the mitotic and apoptotic behavior of cells, and allows for an analysis of different dynamics of the cellular system depending on the presence of the different hallmarks. A CA model based on the presence of hallmarks in the cells, which includes a simulation of the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC and their implications for the resultant growth behavior of the multicellular system, was employed. This modeling of cancer growth, in the avascular phase, was employed to analyze the effect of cancer treatments in a cancer stem cell context. The model clearly explains why, after treatment against non-stem cancer cells, the regrowth capability of CSCs generates a faster regrowth of tumor behavior, and also shows that a continuous low-intensity treatment does not favor CSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby allowing an unproblematic control of future tumor regrowth. The analysis performed indicates that, contrary to the current attempts at CSC control, trying to make CSC proliferation more difficult is an important point to consider, especially in the immediate period after a standard treatment for controlling non-stem cancer cell proliferation.

  16. Surgical Management of Solitary Nerve Sheath Tumors of the Cervical Spine: A Retrospective Case Analysis Based on Tumor Location and Extension

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Junya; Takami, Toshihiro; NAITO, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Complete resection of spinal nerve sheath tumors (NSTs) does not always result in significant neurological deficit. The purpose of this retrospective case analysis was to discuss the optimal surgical strategy for spinal NST of the cervical spine. Twenty-four patients who underwent surgery for solitary cervical NST over the past decade were included in this retrospective study. Patients with neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis were excluded. Seventeen of the 24 cases (70.8%) showed extradural...

  17. Surgical management of solitary nerve sheath tumors of the cervical spine: a retrospective case analysis based on tumor location and extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Junya; Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Complete resection of spinal nerve sheath tumors (NSTs) does not always result in significant neurological deficit. The purpose of this retrospective case analysis was to discuss the optimal surgical strategy for spinal NST of the cervical spine. Twenty-four patients who underwent surgery for solitary cervical NST over the past decade were included in this retrospective study. Patients with neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis were excluded. Seventeen of the 24 cases (70.8%) showed extradural dumbbell extension, most frequently at the C1 or C2 vertebral level. Neurological condition was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema and sensory pain scale. Total removal of the tumor was achieved in 20 of 24 cases (83.3%). Staged surgery using combined anterior and posterior approaches was applied for 2 of 17 cases with extradural dumbbell extension. Tumor involvement with nerve root fibers critical for upper extremity function (C5-C8) was recognized in 6 of 24 cases (25.0%), with complete resection in all 6 cases. Final assessment of neurological function revealed satisfactory or acceptable recovery in all 6 patients. Spinal NSTs with extradural dumbbell extension are a common condition in the cervical spine. Complete removal of spinal NST of the cervical spine may carry a risk of permanent neurological deficit, but such sequelae appeared to be the exception in the present case analysis. A radical and safe surgical strategy, including staged surgery combining anterior and posterior approaches, should be tailored to the individual case. PMID:25367583

  18. Texture-based analysis of 100 MR examinations of head and neck tumors. Is it possible to discriminate between benign and malignant masses in a multicenter trial?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruehwald-Pallamar, J.; Czerny, C. [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Subdiv. of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology; Hesselink, J.R.; Mafee, M.F. [UCSD Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Holzer-Fruehwald, L.; Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate whether texture-based analysis of standard MRI sequences can help in the discrimination between benign and malignant head and neck tumors. The MR images of 100 patients with a histologically clarified head or neck mass, from two different institutions, were analyzed. Texture-based analysis was performed using texture analysis software, with region of interest measurements for 2D and 3D evaluation independently for all axial sequences. COC, RUN, GRA, ARM, and WAV features were calculated for all ROIs. 10 texture feature subsets were used for a linear discriminant analysis, in combination with k-nearest-neighbor classification. Benign and malignant tumors were compared with regard to texture-based values. There were differences in the images from different field-strength scanners, as well as from different vendors. For the differentiation of benign and malignant tumors, we found differences on STIR and T2-weighted images for 2D, and on contrast-enhanced T1-TSE with fat saturation for 3D evaluation. In a separate analysis of the subgroups 1.5 and 3 Tesla, more discriminating features were found. Texture-based analysis is a useful tool in the discrimination of benign and malignant tumors when performed on one scanner with the same protocol. We cannot recommend this technique for the use of multicenter studies with clinical data.

  19. Texture-based analysis of 100 MR examinations of head and neck tumors. Is it possible to discriminate between benign and malignant masses in a multicenter trial?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether texture-based analysis of standard MRI sequences can help in the discrimination between benign and malignant head and neck tumors. The MR images of 100 patients with a histologically clarified head or neck mass, from two different institutions, were analyzed. Texture-based analysis was performed using texture analysis software, with region of interest measurements for 2D and 3D evaluation independently for all axial sequences. COC, RUN, GRA, ARM, and WAV features were calculated for all ROIs. 10 texture feature subsets were used for a linear discriminant analysis, in combination with k-nearest-neighbor classification. Benign and malignant tumors were compared with regard to texture-based values. There were differences in the images from different field-strength scanners, as well as from different vendors. For the differentiation of benign and malignant tumors, we found differences on STIR and T2-weighted images for 2D, and on contrast-enhanced T1-TSE with fat saturation for 3D evaluation. In a separate analysis of the subgroups 1.5 and 3 Tesla, more discriminating features were found. Texture-based analysis is a useful tool in the discrimination of benign and malignant tumors when performed on one scanner with the same protocol. We cannot recommend this technique for the use of multicenter studies with clinical data.

  20. Automated brain tumor segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging based on sliding-window technique and symmetry analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Yanyun; Song Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important step toward surgical planning,treatment planning,monitoring of therapy.However,manual tumor segmentation commonly used in clinic is time-consuming and challenging,and none of the existed automated methods are highly robust,reliable and efficient in clinic application.An accurate and automated tumor segmentation method has been developed for brain tumor segmentation that will provide reproducible and objective results close to manual segmentation results.Methods Based on the symmetry of human brain,we employed sliding-window technique and correlation coefficient to locate the tumor position.At first,the image to be segmented was normalized,rotated,denoised,and bisected.Subsequently,through vertical and horizontal sliding-windows technique in turn,that is,two windows in the left and the right part of brain image moving simultaneously pixel by pixel in two parts of brain image,along with calculating of correlation coefficient of two windows,two windows with minimal correlation coefficient were obtained,and the window with bigger average gray value is the location of tumor and the pixel with biggest gray value is the locating point of tumor.At last,the segmentation threshold was decided by the average gray value of the pixels in the square with center at the locating point and 10 pixels of side length,and threshold segmentation and morphological operations were used to acquire the final tumor region.Results The method was evaluated on 3D FSPGR brain MR images of 10 patients.As a result,the average ratio of correct location was 93.4% for 575 slices containing tumor,the average Dice similarity coefficient was 0.77 for one scan,and the average time spent on one scan was 40 seconds.Conclusions An fully automated,simple and efficient segmentation method for brain tumor is proposed and promising for future clinic use.Correlation coefficient is a new and effective feature for tumor

  1. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Eke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understand physiological and pathological cell behavior as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that more physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays are increasingly used, particularly proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates without compromising cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for Western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique would be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development.

  2. Detection of small bowel tumor based on multi-scale curvelet analysis and fractal technology in capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Kuang, Shuai; Wang, Yongbing

    2016-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a revolutionary technique to noninvasively inspect gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases, especially small bowel tumor. However, it is a tedious task for physicians to examine captured images. To develop a computer-aid diagnosis tool for relieving the huge burden of physicians, the intestinal video data from 89 clinical patients with the indications of potential tumors was analyzed. Out of the 89 patients, 15(16.8%) were diagnosed with small bowel tumor. A novel set of textural features that integrate multi-scale curvelet and fractal technology were proposed to distinguish normal images from tumor images. The second order textural descriptors as well as higher order moments between different color channels were computed from images synthesized by the inverse curvelet transform of the selected scales. Then, a classification approach based on support vector machine (SVM) and genetic algorithm (GA) was further employed to select the optimal feature set and classify the real small bowel images. Extensive comparison experiments validate that the proposed automatic diagnosis scheme achieves a promising tumor classification performance of 97.8% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity in the selected images from our clinical data. PMID:26829705

  3. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  4. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  5. Morphologic Analysis of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung Seok; Kang, Myunghee; Ha, Seung Yeon; An, Jungsuk; Roh, Mee Sook; Ha, Chang Won; Han, Jungho

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies on how to diagnose pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors through morphometric analysis have been reported. In this study, we measured and analyzed the characteristic parameters of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors using an image analyzer to aid in diagnosis. Methods Sixteen cases of typical carcinoid tumor, 5 cases of atypical carcinoid tumor, 15 cases of small cell carcinoma, and 51 cases of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma were analyzed. Using an image analyzer, we measure...

  6. Diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma based on combined measurement of multiple serum tumor markers using artificial neural network analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yingchi; Chen Hui; Wang Dong; Luo Wei; Zhu Biyun; Zhang Zhongtao

    2014-01-01

    Background Artificial neural network (ANN) has demonstrated the ability to assimilate information from multiple sources to enable the detection of subtle and complex patterns.In this reseamh,we evaluated an ANN model in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using multiple serum markers.Methods In this retrospective analysis,913 serum specimens collected at the Department of General Surgery of Beijing Friendship Hospital were analyzed for carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9),carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125),and caminoembryonic antigen (CEA).The three tumor marker values were used as inputs into an ANN and randomized into a training set of 658 (70.31% were malignant) and a test set of the remaining 255 samples (70.69% were malignant).The samples were also evaluated using a Logistic regression (LR) model.Results The ANN-derived composite index was superior to each of the serum tumor markers alone and the Logistic regression model.The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) was 0.905 (95% confidence Interval (CI) 0.868-0.942) for ANN,0.812 (95% CI 0.762-0.863) for the Logistic regression model,0.845 (95% CI 0.798-0.893)for CA19-9,0.795 (95% CI 0.738-0.851) for CA125,and 0.800 (95% Cl 0.746-0.854) for CEA.ANN analysis of multiple markers yielded a high level of diagnostic accuracy (83.53%) compared to LR (74.90%).Conclusion The performance of ANN model in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is better than the single tumor marker and LR model.

  7. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coolens, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.coolens@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Driscoll, Brandon [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ménard, Cynthia [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Center and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  8. Use of sodium fluorescein in skull base tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo da Silva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The authors present this study using sodium fluorescein (SF to enhance skull base tumors by performing a quantitative digital analysis of tumor enhancement. The purpose of this study is to observe the grade of SF enhancement by the tumors.Methods: A prospective experiment within-subjects study design was performed which included six patients with skull base lesions. Digital pictures were taken before and after the SF systemic injection, using the same light source of the microsurgical field. The pictures were analyzed by computer software which calculated the wavelength (WL of the SF pre- and post-injection.Results: The group of tumors was as follows: one vestibular schwannoma, three meningiomas, one craniopharyngioma and one pituitary adenoma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strongly positive. The digital analysis of the pictures, considering the SF WL pre- and post-injection, presented P = 0.028 (Wilcoxon T test.Conclusions: The enhancement of the tumors by SF was consistent and evident. The introductory results suggest the possibility of using SF as an adjuvant tool for the skull base surgery. Further studies should test the clinical application of the SF in skull base tumors.

  9. Clonal analysis of the epithelial component of Warthin's tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, K; Kashima, K; Daa, T; Yokoyama, S; Nakayama, I

    2000-11-01

    The proliferation of the epithelial component of Warthin's tumor is generally considered to represent a neoplastic condition. There has been much controversy about the histogenesis of this tumor, and the clonality of the epithelial component has not been clarified. We examined the clonal status of epithelial cells of Warthin's tumor by using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on trinucleotide repeat polymorphism of the X chromosome-linked human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) and on random inactivation of the gene by methylation. Total DNA was isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 16 women with Warthin's tumor. Of the 16 cases analyzed, 7 were heterozygous for the HUMARA polymorphism and informative. The epithelial components of the tumors from the 7 cases were microdissected under the light microscope, and were subjected to extraction of DNA and HUMARA analysis. Using a permanent aqueous mounting medium during microdissection, we succeeded in reducing the rate of contamination by lymphocytes in the samples to less than 10%. All 7 cases showed patterns of polyclonal proliferation in the HUMARA analysis. Our results showed the nonclonal nature of Warthin's tumor, suggesting that Warthin's tumor is a non-neoplastic tumor-like condition. HUM PATHOL 31:1377-1380. PMID:11112212

  10. Meta-Analysis of Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy Combined With Traditional Medicines for Colorectal Cancer: Contributions of Specific Plants to Tumor Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Menghua; May, Brian H; Zhou, Iris W; Xue, Charlie C L; Zhang, Anthony L

    2016-03-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates the clinical evidence for the addition of traditional medicines (TMs) to oxaliplatin-based regimens for colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of tumor response rate (TRR). Eight electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy combined with TMs compared to the same oxaliplatin-based regimen. Data on TRR from 42 randomized controlled trials were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1. Studies were conducted in China or Japan. Publication bias was not evident. The meta-analyses suggest that the combination of the TMs with oxaliplatin-based regimens increased TRR in the palliative treatment of CRC (risk ratio [RR] 1.31 [1.20-1.42], I(2) = 0%). Benefits were evident for both injection products (RR 1.36 [1.18-1.57], I(2) = 0%) and orally administered TMs (RR 1.27 [1.15-1.41], I(2) = 0%). Further sensitivity analysis of specific plant-based TMs found that Paeonia, Curcuma, and Sophora produced consistently higher contributions to the RR results. Compounds in each of these TMs have shown growth-inhibitory effects in CRC cell-line studies. Specific combinations of TMs appeared to produce higher contributions to TRR than the TMs individually. Notable among these was the combination of Hedyotis, Astragalus, and Scutellaria. PMID:26254190

  11. Wavelet Based Image Fusion for Detection of Brain Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CYN Dwith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor, is one of the major causes for the increase in mortality among children and adults. Detecting the regions of brain is the major challenge in tumor detection. In the field of medical image processing, multi sensor images are widely being used as potential sources to detect brain tumor. In this paper, a wavelet based image fusion algorithm is applied on the Magnetic Resonance (MR images and Computed Tomography (CT images which are used as primary sources to extract the redundant and complementary information in order to enhance the tumor detection in the resultant fused image. The main features taken into account for detection of brain tumor are location of tumor and size of the tumor, which is further optimized through fusion of images using various wavelet transforms parameters. We discuss and enforce the principle of evaluating and comparing the performance of the algorithm applied to the images with respect to various wavelets type used for the wavelet analysis. The performance efficiency of the algorithm is evaluated on the basis of PSNR values. The obtained results are compared on the basis of PSNR with gradient vector field and big bang optimization. The algorithms are analyzed in terms of performance with respect to accuracy in estimation of tumor region and computational efficiency of the algorithms.

  12. Dendritic cell based tumor vaccination in prostate and renal cell cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Draube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than 200 clinical trials have been performed using dendritic cells (DC as cellular adjuvants in cancer. Yet the key question whether there is a link between immune and clinical response remains unanswered. Prostate and renal cell cancer (RCC have been extensively studied for DC-based immunotherapeutic interventions and were therefore chosen to address the above question by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data was obtained after a systematic literature search from clinical trials that enrolled at least 6 patients. Individual patient data meta-analysis was performed by means of conditional logistic regression grouped by study. Twenty nine trials involving a total of 906 patients were identified in prostate cancer (17 and RCC (12. Objective response rates were 7.7% in prostate cancer and 12.7% in RCC. The combined percentages of objective responses and stable diseases (SD amounted to a clinical benefit rate (CBR of 54% in prostate cancer and 48% in RCC. Meta-analysis of individual patient data (n = 403 revealed the cellular immune response to have a significant influence on CBR, both in prostate cancer (OR 10.6, 95% CI 2.5-44.1 and in RCC (OR 8.4, 95% CI 1.3-53.0. Furthermore, DC dose was found to have a significant influence on CBR in both entities. Finally, for the larger cohort of prostate cancer patients, an influence of DC maturity and DC subtype (density enriched versus monocyte derived DC as well as access to draining lymph nodes on clinical outcome could be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a 'proof of principle' a statistically significant effect of DC-mediated cellular immune response and of DC dose on CBR could be demonstrated. Further findings concerning vaccine composition, quality control, and the effect of DC maturation status are relevant for the immunological development of DC-based vaccines.

  13. Development and Application of Microarray-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization : Analysis of Neurofibromatosis Type-2, Schwannomatosis and Related Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with the clinical hallmark of bilateral eighth cranial nerve schwannomas. However, the diagnostic criterion is complicated by the presence of a variable phenotype, with the severe form presenting with additional tumors such as peripheral schwannoma, meningioma and ependymoma. We constructed a microarray spanning 11Mb of 22q, encompassing the NF2 gene, to detect deletions in schwannoma. Forty seven patients were analyzed and hete...

  14. Should Patient Setup in Lung Cancer Be Based on the Primary Tumor? An Analysis of Tumor Coverage and Normal Tissue Dose Using Repeated Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of the dose distribution for lung cancer patients using a patient setup procedure based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. Methods and materials: For 39 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, the planning fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan was registered to a repeated FDG-PET/CT scan made in the second week of treatment. Two patient setup methods were analyzed based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. The original treatment plan was copied to the repeated scan, and target and normal tissue structures were delineated. Dose distributions were analyzed using dose–volume histograms for the primary tumor, lymph nodes, lungs, and spinal cord. Results: One patient showed decreased dose coverage of the primary tumor caused by progressive disease and required replanning to achieve adequate coverage. For the other patients, the minimum dose to the primary tumor did not significantly deviate from the planned dose: −0.2 ± 1.7% (p = 0.71) and −0.1 ± 1.7% (p = 0.85) for the bony anatomy setup and the primary tumor setup, respectively. For patients (n = 31) with nodal involvement, 10% showed a decrease in minimum dose larger than 5% for the bony anatomy setup and 13% for the primary tumor setup. The mean lung dose exceeded the maximum allowed 20 Gy in 21% of the patients for the bony anatomy setup and in 13% for the primary tumor setup, whereas for the spinal cord this occurred in 10% and 13% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: In 10% and 13% of patients with nodal involvement, setup based on bony anatomy or primary tumor, respectively, led to important dose deviations in nodal target volumes. Overdosage of critical structures occurred in 10–20% of the patients. In cases of progressive disease, repeated imaging revealed underdosage of the primary tumor. Development of practical ways for setup procedures based on repeated high-quality imaging of all tumor sites during

  15. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  16. Anterior and middle skull base reconstruction after tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; WU Sheng-tian; LI Zhi; LIU Pi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical management of skull base tumors is still challenging today due to its sophisticated operation procedure. Surgeons who specialize in skull base surgery are making endeavor to promote the outcome of patients with skull base tumor. A reliable skull base reconstruction after tumor resection is of paramount importance in avoiding life-threatening complications, such as cerebrospinal fluid leakage and intracranial infection. This study aimed at investigating the indication, operation approach and operation technique of anterior and middle skull base reconstruction.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on 44 patients who underwent anterior and middle skull base reconstruction in the Department of Neurosurgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between March 2005 and March 2008. Different surgical approaches were selected according to the different regions involved by the tumor. Microsurgery was carried out for tumor resection and combined endoscopic surgery was performed in some cases. According to the different locations and sizes of various defects after tumor resection, an individualized skull base soft tissue reconstruction was carried out for each case with artificial materials, pedicled flaps, free autologous tissue, and free vascularized muscle flaps, separately. A skull base bone reconstruction was carried out in some cases simultaneously.Results Soft tissue reconstruction was performed in all 44 cases with a fascia lata repair in 9 cases, a free vascularized muscle flap in 1 case, a pedicled muscle flap in 14 cases, and a pedicled periosteal flap in 20 cases. Skull base bone reconstruction was performed on 10 cases simultaneously. The materials for bone reconstruction included titanium mesh, free autogenous bone, and a Medpor implant. The result of skull base reconstruction was satisfactory in all patients. Postoperative early-stage complications occurred in 10 cases with full recovery after conventional treatment.Conclusions The specific

  17. First epidemiological analysis of breast cancer incidence and tumor characteristics after implementation of population-based digital mammography screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to epidemiologically evaluate the impact of digital mammography screening on incidence rates and tumor characteristics for breast cancer. Materials and methods: the first German digital screening units in the clinical routine were evaluated during the implementation period by using data from the cancer registry to compare the incidence rate of breast cancers and prognostic characteristics. 74% of women aged 50-69 within the region of Muenster/Coesfeld/Warendorf were invited between 10/2005 and 12/2007 for initial screening; 55% participated (n = 35961). Results: in 2002-2004 the average breast cancer incidence rate (per 100000) was 297.9. During the implementation of screening, the rate rose to 532.9 in 2007. Of the 349 cancers detected with screening, 76% (265/349) were invasive compared to 90% (546/608) of cases not detected with screening during the same period. 37% (97/265) of cancers detected in the screening program had a diameter of ≤ 10 mm and 75% (198/265) were node-negative compared to 15% (79/546) and 64% (322/503), respectively, in cancers detected outside the screening program. The distribution of invasive tumor size (pT categories) and the nodal status differed with statistical significance between cancers detected in and outside the program (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). (orig.)

  18. Combined Scintigraphy and Tumor Marker Analysis Predicts Unfavorable Histopathology of Neuroblastic Tumors with High Accuracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Peter Fendler

    Full Text Available Our aim was to improve the prediction of unfavorable histopathology (UH in neuroblastic tumors through combined imaging and biochemical parameters.123I-MIBG SPECT and MRI was performed before surgical resection or biopsy in 47 consecutive pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumor. Semi-quantitative tumor-to-liver count-rate ratio (TLCRR, MRI tumor size and margins, urine catecholamine and NSE blood levels of neuron specific enolase (NSE were recorded. Accuracy of single and combined variables for prediction of UH was tested by ROC analysis with Bonferroni correction.34 of 47 patients had UH based on the International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification (INPC. TLCRR and serum NSE both predicted UH with moderate accuracy. Optimal cut-off for TLCRR was 2.0, resulting in 68% sensitivity and 100% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.86, p < 0.001. Optimal cut-off for NSE was 25.8 ng/ml, resulting in 74% sensitivity and 85% specificity (AUC-ROC 0.81, p = 0.001. Combination of TLCRR/NSE criteria reduced false negative findings from 11/9 to only five, with improved sensitivity and specificity of 85% (AUC-ROC 0.85, p < 0.001.Strong 123I-MIBG uptake and high serum level of NSE were each predictive of UH. Combined analysis of both parameters improved the prediction of UH in patients with neuroblastic tumor. MRI parameters and urine catecholamine levels did not predict UH.

  19. Nuclear Image Analysis Study of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Meeja; Baek, Taehwa; Baek, Jongho; Son, Hyunjin; Kang, Dongwook; Kim, Jooheon; Lee, Hyekyung

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a subjective disagreement about nuclear chromatin in the field of pathology. Objective values of red, green, and blue (RGB) light intensities for nuclear chromatin can be obtained through a quantitative analysis using digital images. Methods We examined 10 cases of well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the rectum, small cell lung carcinomas, and moderately differentiated squamous cell lung carcinomas respectively. For each case, we selected 30 representative cells a...

  20. WE-G-18C-09: Separating Perfusion and Diffusion Components From Diffusion Weighted MRI of Rectum Tumors Based On Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, N; Wengler, K; Mazaheri, Y; Hunt, M; Deasy, J; Gollub, M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pseudodiffusion arises from the microcirculation of blood in the randomly oriented capillary network and contributes to the signal decay acquired using a multi-b value diffusion weighted (DW)-MRI sequence. This effect is more significant at low b-values and should be properly accounted for in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) calculations. The purpose of this study was to separate perfusion and diffusion component based on a biexponential and a segmented monoexponential model using IVIM analysis Methods. The signal attenuation is modeled as S(b) = S0[(1−f)exp(−bD) + fexp(−bD*)]. Fitting the biexponetial decay leads to the quantification of D, the true diffusion coefficient, D*, the pseudodiffusion coefficient, and f, the perfusion fraction. A nonlinear least squares fit and two segmented monoexponential models were used to derive the values for D, D*,‘and f. In the segmented approach b = 200 s/mm{sup 2} was used as the cut-off value for calculation of D. DW-MRI's of a rectum cancer patient were acquired before chemotherapy, before radiation therapy (RT), and 4 weeks into RT and were investigated as an example case. Results: Mean ADC for the tumor drawn on the DWI cases was 0.93, 1.0 and 1.13 10{sup −3}×mm{sup 2}/s before chemotherapy, before RT and 4 weeks into RT. The mean (D.10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, D* 10{sup −3} × mm{sup 2}/s, and f %) based on biexponential fit was (0.67, 18.6, and 27.2%), (0.72, 17.7, and 28.9%) and (0.83,15.1, and 30.7%) at these time points. The mean (D, D* f) based on segmented fit was (0.72, 10.5, and 12.1%), (0.72, 8.2, and 17.4%) and (.82, 8.1, 16.5%) Conclusion: ADC values are typically higher than true diffusion coefficients. For tumors with significant perfusion effect, ADC should be analyzed at higher b-values or separated from the perfusion component. Biexponential fit overestimates the perfusion fraction because of increased sensitivity to noise at low b-values.

  1. Proton and carbon ion radiotherapy for primary brain tumors and tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Kessel, Kerstin; Habermehl, Daniel; Debus, Jurgen [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)], e-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To analyze clinical concepts, toxicity and treatment outcome in patients with brain and skull base tumors treated with photons and particle therapy. Material and methods: In total 260 patients with brain tumors and tumors of the skull base were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT). Patients enrolled in and randomized within prospective clinical trials as well as bony or soft tissue tumors are not included in this analysis. Treatment was delivered as protons, carbon ions, or combinations of photons and a carbon ion boost. All patients are included in a tight follow-up program. The median follow-up time is 12 months (range 2-39 months). Results: Main histologies included meningioma (n = 107) for skull base lesions, pituitary adenomas (n = 14), low-grade gliomas (n = 51) as well as high-grade gliomas (n = 55) for brain tumors. In all patients treatment could be completed without any unexpected severe toxicities. No side effects > CTC Grade III were observed. To date, no severe late toxicities were observed, however, for endpoints such as secondary malignancies or neuro cognitive side effects follow-up time still remains too short. Local recurrences were mainly seen in the group of high-grade gliomas or atypical meningiomas; for benign skull base meningiomas, to date, no recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: The specific benefit of particle therapy will potentially reduce the risk of secondary malignancies as well as improve neuro cognitive outcome and quality of life (QOL); thus, longer follow-up will be necessary to confirm these endpoints. Indication-specific trials on meningiomas and gliomas are underway to elucidate the role of protons and carbon ions in these indications.

  2. Quantitative analysis of PET measurements in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron emission tomograhpy (PET) has been used for the evaluation of the characteristics of various tumors. The role of PET in oncology has been evolved from a pure research tool to a methodology of enormous clinical potential. The unique characteristics of PET imaging make sophisticated quantitation possible. Several quantitative methods, such as standardized uptake values (SUV), simplifield quantitation method, Patlak graphical analysis, and Sokoloff's glucose metabolism measurement, have been used in the field of oncology. However, each quantitative method has limitations of its own. For example, the SUV has been used as a quantitative index of glucose metabolism for tumor classification and monitoring response to treatment, even though it depends on blood glucose level, body configuration of patient, and scanning time. The quantitative methods of PET are reviewed and strategy for implementing these methods are presented

  3. Improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal tumors by fuzzy logic-based tumor marker profiles including the tumor M2-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim; Bitterlich, Norman; Schulze, Guntram

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers by using fuzzy logic modeling in combination with a tumor marker panel (CEA, CA72-4, CA19-9) including Tumor M2-PK. In this prospective study histologically confirmed colorectal (n=247), esophageal (n=86) and gastric cancer (n=122) patients were investigated and compared to control (n=53) persons without any malignant diseases. Tumor M2-PK was measured in plasma with an ELISA (ScheBoBiotech, Germany); all other markers were measured in sera (Roche, Germany). At 95% specificity, tumor detection was possible by the best single marker in colorectal cancer patients in 48% (Tumor M2-PK), in gastric cancers in 61% (CA72-4) and in esophageal cancers in 56% (Tumor M2-PK). A fuzzy logic rule-based system employing a tumor marker panel increased sensitivity significantly in colorectal cancers (pTumor M2-PK and CEA), in gastric cancers (pTumor M2-PK and CA 72-4) and in esophageal cancers (pTumor M2-PK and CA72-4). Adding a third marker further improved the sensitivity only marginally. Fuzzy logic analysis has proven to be more powerful than measurement of single markers alone or combinations using multiple logistic regression analysis of the markers. Therefore, with the fuzzy logic method and a tumor marker panel (including Tumor M2-PK), a new diagnostic tool for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers is available.

  4. Advances in establishment and analysis of three-dimensional tumor spheroid-based functional assays for target validation and drug evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinci Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is overwhelming evidence that in vitro three-dimensional tumor cell cultures more accurately reflect the complex in vivo microenvironment than simple two-dimensional cell monolayers, not least with respect to gene expression profiles, signaling pathway activity and drug sensitivity. However, most currently available three-dimensional techniques are time consuming and/or lack reproducibility; thus standardized and rapid protocols are urgently needed. Results To address this requirement, we have developed a versatile toolkit of reproducible three-dimensional tumor spheroid models for dynamic, automated, quantitative imaging and analysis that are compatible with routine high-throughput preclinical studies. Not only do these microplate methods measure three-dimensional tumor growth, but they have also been significantly enhanced to facilitate a range of functional assays exemplifying additional key hallmarks of cancer, namely cell motility and matrix invasion. Moreover, mutual tissue invasion and angiogenesis is accommodated by coculturing tumor spheroids with murine embryoid bodies within which angiogenic differentiation occurs. Highly malignant human tumor cells were selected to exemplify therapeutic effects of three specific molecularly-targeted agents: PI-103 (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG (heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 inhibitor and CCT130234 (in-house phospholipase C (PLCγ inhibitor. Fully automated analysis using a Celigo cytometer was validated for tumor spheroid growth and invasion against standard image analysis techniques, with excellent reproducibility and significantly increased throughput. In addition, we discovered key differential sensitivities to targeted agents between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures, and also demonstrated enhanced potency of some agents against cell migration

  5. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for skull base tumors: analysis of treatment accuracy using a stereotactic mask fixation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montagnoli Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the accuracy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT using a stereotactic mask fixation system. Patients and Methods Sixteen patients treated with FSRT were involved in the study. A commercial stereotactic mask fixation system (BrainLAB AG was used for patient immobilization. Serial CT scans obtained before and during FSRT were used to assess the accuracy of patient immobilization by comparing the isocenter position. Daily portal imaging were acquired to establish day to day patient position variation. Displacement errors along the different directions were calculated as combination of systematic and random errors. Results The mean isocenter displacements based on localization and verification CT imaging were 0.1 mm (SD 0.3 mm in the lateral direction, 0.1 mm (SD 0.4 mm in the anteroposterior, and 0.3 mm (SD 0.4 mm in craniocaudal direction. The mean 3D displacement was 0.5 mm (SD 0.4 mm, being maximum 1.4 mm. No significant differences were found during the treatment (P = 0.4. The overall isocenter displacement as calculated by 456 anterior and lateral portal images were 0.3 mm (SD 0.9 mm in the mediolateral direction, -0.2 mm (SD 1 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 0.2 mm (SD 1.1 mm in the craniocaudal direction. The largest displacement of 2.7 mm was seen in the cranio-caudal direction, with 95% of displacements Conclusions The results indicate that the setup error of the presented mask system evaluated by CT verification scans and portal imaging are minimal. Reproducibility of the isocenter position is in the best range of positioning reproducibility reported for other stereotactic systems.

  6. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  7. CHONDROID SKULL BASE TUMORS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Gasparyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondroid skull base tumors are a rare and little studied pathology; many problems of their classification, diagnosis and treatment remain to be solved. This group of neoplasms is referred to as bone tumors arising from the cartilaginous tissue of the skull base bones, particularly from the bones formed during chondral osteogenesis. The paper details the clinical picture, X-ray and morphological diagnosis of chondroid tumors. Particular attention is given to surgery and radiotherapy for this category of tumors.

  8. Activity-based cost analysis of hepatic tumor ablation using CT-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy or CT-guided radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyse and compare the costs of hepatic tumor ablation with computed tomography (CT)-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) and CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) as two alternative minimally invasive treatment options of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An activity based process model was created determining working steps and required staff of CT-RFA and CT-HDRBT. Prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, and maintenance), costs of staff, and expenditure for disposables were identified in a sample of 20 patients (10 treated by CT-RFA and 10 by CT-HDRBT) and compared. A sensitivity and break even analysis was performed to analyse the dependence of costs on the number of patients treated annually with both methods. Costs of CT-RFA were nearly stable with mean overall costs of approximately 1909 €, 1847 €, 1816 € and 1801 € per patient when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients annually, as the main factor influencing the costs of this procedure was the single-use RFA probe. Mean costs of CT-HDRBT decreased significantly per patient ablation with a rising number of patients treated annually, with prorated costs of 3442 €, 1962 €, 1222 € and 852 € when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients, due to low costs of single-use disposables compared to high annual fix-costs which proportionally decreased per patient with a higher number of patients treated annually. A break-even between both methods was reached when treating at least 55 patients annually. Although CT-HDRBT is a more complex procedure with more staff involved, it can be performed at lower costs per patient from the perspective of the medical provider when treating more than 55 patients compared to CT-RFA, mainly due to lower costs for disposables and a decreasing percentage of fixed costs with an increasing number of treatments

  9. Genetic analysis of ovarian microcystic stromal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Cho, Nam Hoon; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Microcystic stromal tumor (MCST) of the ovary is a rare subtype of ovarian tumor first described in 2009. Although high nuclear expression of β-catenin and β-catenin gene (CTNNB1) mutation are related with ovarian MCST, the origin and genetic background of ovarian MCST remain unclear. In this study, two cases of ovarian MCST are presented. Microscopically, the tumors showed a microcystic pattern and regions with lobulated cellular masses with intervening hyalinized, fibrous stroma. Tumor cell...

  10. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies.

  11. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Primary skull base tumors of the developing child are rare and present a formidable challenge to both surgeons and radiation oncologists. Gross total resection with negative margins is rarely achieved, and the risks of functional, structural, and cosmetic deficits limit the radiation dose using conventional radiation techniques. Twenty-nine children and adolescents treated with conformal proton radiotherapy (proton RT) were analyzed to assess treatment efficacy and safety. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and April 1999, 29 patients with mesenchymal tumors underwent fractionated proton (13 patients) or fractionated combined proton and photon (16 patients) irradiation. The age at treatment ranged from 1 to 19 years (median 12); 14 patients were male and 15 female. Tumors were grouped as malignant or benign. Twenty patients had malignant histologic findings, including chordoma (n=10), chondrosarcoma (n=3), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=4), and other sarcomas (n=3). Target doses ranged between 50.4 and 78.6 Gy/cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE), delivered at doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy/CGE per fraction. The benign histologic findings included giant cell tumors (n=6), angiofibromas (n=2), and chondroblastoma (n=1). RT doses for this group ranged from 45.0 to 71.8 Gy/CGE. Despite maximal surgical resection, 28 (97%) of 29 patients had gross disease at the time of proton RT. Follow-up after proton RT ranged from 13 to 92 months (mean 40). Results: Of the 20 patients with malignant tumors, 5 (25%) had local failure; 1 patient had failure in the surgical access route and 3 patients developed distant metastases. Seven patients had died of progressive disease at the time of analysis. Local tumor control was maintained in 6 (60%) of 10 patients with chordoma, 3 (100%) of 3 with chondrosarcoma, 4 (100%) of 4 with rhabdomyosarcoma, and 2 (66%) of 3 with other sarcomas. The actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate was 72% and 56%, respectively, and the overall survival

  12. Clinical and radiological profile of ameloblastic fibro-odontoma: an update on an uncommon odontogenic tumor based on a critical analysis of 114 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Amos; Kaffe, Israel; Vered, Marilena

    2013-03-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontoma is an uncommon benign tumor of the jaws that belongs to the group of mixed odontogenic tumors. The descriptions of its clinical and radiological features in the literature are not always accurate and sometimes even contradictory. The aim of the present study was to critically evaluate their clinical and radiological features as reported in the English-language literature. A total of 114 well-documented cases of ameloblastic fibro-odontomas (103 from publications and 11 of our own new cases) were analyzed. The patients' age ranged from 8 months to 26 years (mean 9.6). There were 74 (65 %) males, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.85:1 (P = 0.001). The mandible was involved in 74 (65 %) cases, and the mandible-to-maxilla ratio was 1.85:1 (P odontomas are significantly more common in males and in the mandible, and that multilocular lesions are uncommon. It also revealed that, based on their clinical and radiological features, some of them are probably true neoplasms while others appear to be developing odontomas (hamartomas).

  13. mRNA-based vaccines synergize with radiation therapy to eradicate established tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eradication of large, established tumors by active immunotherapy is a major challenge because of the numerous cancer evasion mechanisms that exist. This study aimed to establish a novel combination therapy consisting of messenger RNA (mRNA)-based cancer vaccines and radiation, which would facilitate the effective treatment of established tumors with aggressive growth kinetics. The combination of a tumor-specific mRNA-based vaccination with radiation was tested in two syngeneic tumor models, a highly immunogenic E.G7-OVA and a low immunogenic Lewis lung cancer (LLC). The molecular mechanism induced by the combination therapy was evaluated via gene expression arrays as well as flow cytometry analyses of tumor infiltrating cells. In both tumor models we demonstrated that a combination of mRNA-based immunotherapy with radiation results in a strong synergistic anti-tumor effect. This was manifested as either complete tumor eradication or delay in tumor growth. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumors revealed a variety of substantial changes at the tumor site following radiation. Genes associated with antigen presentation, infiltration of immune cells, adhesion, and activation of the innate immune system were upregulated. A combination of radiation and immunotherapy induced significant downregulation of tumor associated factors and upregulation of tumor suppressors. Moreover, combination therapy significantly increased CD4+, CD8+ and NKT cell infiltration of mouse tumors. Our data provide a scientific rationale for combining immunotherapy with radiation and provide a basis for the development of more potent anti-cancer therapies. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/1748-717X-9-180) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  14. The Use of Radiation Therapy Appears to Improve Outcome in Patients With Malignant Primary Tracheal Tumors: A SEER-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Liyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Fan Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Sheets, Nathan C.; Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Jiang, Guo-Liang, E-mail: jianggl@shca.org.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Marks, Lawrence B., E-mail: marks@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To conduct a matched pair analysis assessing the impact of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with resectable and unresectable primary malignant tracheal tumors using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Patients and Methods: The SEER registry was used to identify every patient (or 'case') who received RT between 1988 and 2007 for primary malignant tracheal tumors, and to search for corresponding 'controls' (not treated with RT), with the same prognostic and treatment factors (surgery on the trachea, disease extension, histology, and gender). Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier methods. Results of OS and cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer in the cases and controls, and in various subsets, were compared using log-rank and Gray's tests. Results: Two hundred fifty-eight patients who received RT were identified, and 78 of these had appropriate matched controls identified, forming the basis of this analysis. In the 78 (+RT) cases, the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 10-192) in the survivors vs. 55 months (range, 2-187) in the controls (no-RT group). Patients in RT group had significantly better OS, and a lower cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer than no-RT patients (p < 0.05). Treatment with radiation was associated with improved survival in patients with squamous cell histology [p < 0.0001], regional disease extension [p = 0.030], or those that did not undergo resection [p = 0.038]. There were four deaths in RT group and three in no-RT group attributed to cardiac and respiratory causes. Conclusion: Our data suggest a survival benefit for the use of RT broadly for all patients with tracheal cancer. Nevertheless, the retrospective nature of this observational study limits its interpretation.

  15. Mapping In Vivo Tumor Oxygenation within Viable Tumor by 19F-MRI and Multispectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Shi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying oxygenation in viable tumor remains a major obstacle toward a better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and improving treatment strategies. Current techniques are often complicated by tumor heterogeneity. Herein, a novel in vivo approach that combines 19F magnetic resonance imaging (19F-MRIR1 mapping with diffusionbased multispectral (MS analysis is introduced. This approach restricts the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 measurements to viable tumor, the tissue of therapeutic interest. The technique exhibited sufficient sensitivity to detect a breathing gas challenge in a xenograft tumor model, and the hypoxic region measured by MS 19F-MRI was strongly correlated with histologic estimates of hypoxia. This approach was then applied to address the effects of antivascular agents on tumor oxygenation, which is a research question that is still under debate. The technique was used to monitor longitudinal pO2 changes in response to an antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (B20.4.1.1 and a selective dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor (GDC-0980. GDC-0980 reduced viable tumor pO2 during a 3-day treatment period, and a significant reduction was also produced by B20.4.1.1. Overall, this method provides an unprecedented view of viable tumor pO2 and contributes to a greater understanding of the effects of antivascular therapies on the tumor's microenvironment.

  16. Clinicopathological analysis of solitary fibrous tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiumei Zhang; Hai Wang; Shujing Wang; Jinfeng Miao; Zhengai Piao; Yingying Dong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, molecular genetics, treatment and prognosis of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Methods: The clinicopathological manifestations were analyzed retrospectively in 22 patients with surgically confirmed SFT. Results: There were 12 male patients and 10 female patients, with the age range 33–67 (mean 48.62) years. The SFTs originated from different from parts of the body, including 13 in the chest, 2 in the lungs, 3 in the abdomen, 1 in the lumbosacral area, 2 in the pelvis, and 1 in the left shoulder. There were 19 benign and 3 malignant tumors. Major clinical presentations were local masses and compression symptoms. Microscopy: the tumor was composed of areas of alternating hypercellularity and hypocellularity. The tumor cells were spindle to short-spindle shaped and arranged in fascicular or storiform pattern and hemangiopericytoma-like structure was presented. Immunohistochemically, Vimentin positive rate was 100% (22/22), Bcl-2 positive rate was 95.5% (21/22), CD99 positive rate was 86.4% (19/22), CD34 positive rate was 81.8 (18/22), focally positive for P53, as well as negative CK, S100 and Desmin. Ki67 labelling index was 2%–30%. Conclusion: SFT is a rare tumor which may be found in various parts of human body. SFT mostly is a benign tumor, but a few could be malignant. Its diagnosis mainly rely on its morphologic features and immunohistochemical profiles. The major treatment is to completely resect it by operation and long-term clinical follow-up is necessary.

  17. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations...

  18. Infrared signature analysis of the thyroid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloaia, Gheorghe; Ghemigian, Adina-Mariana; Gavriloaia, Mariuca-Roxana

    2009-07-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and about 30% of cancer deaths can be prevented. In the next future, the number of global cancer deaths is projected to increase 45% in the future. A general treatment has not yet been found. The best defense against cancer is early detection, when tumor dimensions are very small. The methods as mammography, ultrasounds, MRI, CT, etc., can detect anatomic or structural changes like tumors and cysts. They are anatomical imaging procedures, consequently, they have the ability to locate the area of the tumor, but they cannot detect a fast-growing cancer in the pre-invasive stage. Thermograms are looking for the physiologic changes in tissue; which may indicate a risk of developing cancer in the future. The results using a new device, operating in infrared band, are described. The paper focuses on thyroid cancer because it allows investigations on larger areas before surgery and on residual, smaller areas following surgery. The experiment results for 24 patients with thyroid nodules are described. Malign tumors have a distinct infrared signature. Only the area affected is thermal registered and that has an irregular shape and a strong nonuniform structure with rapid variations on skin temperature.

  19. Major copy proportion analysis of tumor samples using SNP arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common genetic variations in the human genome and are useful as genomic markers. Oligonucleotide SNP microarrays have been developed for high-throughput genotyping of up to 900,000 human SNPs and have been used widely in linkage and cancer genomics studies. We have previously used Hidden Markov Models (HMM to analyze SNP array data for inferring copy numbers and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH from paired normal and tumor samples and unpaired tumor samples. Results We proposed and implemented major copy proportion (MCP analysis of oligonucleotide SNP array data. A HMM was constructed to infer unobserved MCP states from observed allele-specific signals through emission and transition distributions. We used 10 K, 100 K and 250 K SNP array datasets to compare MCP analysis with LOH and copy number analysis, and showed that MCP performs better than LOH analysis for allelic-imbalanced chromosome regions and normal contaminated samples. The major and minor copy alleles can also be inferred from allelic-imbalanced regions by MCP analysis. Conclusion MCP extends tumor LOH analysis to allelic imbalance analysis and supplies complementary information to total copy numbers. MCP analysis of mixing normal and tumor samples suggests the utility of MCP analysis of normal-contaminated tumor samples. The described analysis and visualization methods are readily available in the user-friendly dChip software.

  20. Brain Tumor Detection Based On Symmetry Information

    OpenAIRE

    G., Narkhede Sachin; Khairnar, Vaishali

    2013-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have allowed researchers across many fields of endeavor to collect and maintain vast amounts of observational statistical data such as clinical data, biological patient data, data regarding access of web sites, financial data, and the like. This paper addresses some of the challenging issues on brain magnetic resonance (MR) image tumor segmentation caused by the weak correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) intensity and anatomical meaning. With th...

  1. In vivo analysis of fracture toughness of thyroid gland tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschowitz Sharon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human solid tumors that are hard or firm on physical palpation are likely to be cancerous, a clinical maxim that has been successfully applied to cancer screening programs, such as breast self-examination. However, the biological relevance or prognostic significance of tumor hardness remains poorly understood. Here we present a fracture mechanics based in vivo approach for characterizing the fracture toughness of biological tissue of human thyroid gland tumors. Methods In a prospective study, 609 solid thyroid gland tumors were percutaneously probed using standard 25 gauge fine needles, their tissue toughness ranked on the basis of the nature and strength of the haptic force feedback cues, and subjected to standard fine needle biopsy. The tumors' toughness rankings and final cytological diagnoses were combined and analyzed. The interpreting cytopathologist was blinded to the tumors' toughness rankings. Results Our data showed that cancerous and noncancerous tumors displayed remarkable haptically distinguishable differences in their material toughness. Conclusion The qualitative method described here, though subject to some operator bias, identifies a previously unreported in vivo approach to classify fracture toughness of a solid tumor that can be correlated with malignancy, and paves the way for the development of a mechanical device that can accurately quantify the tissue toughness of a human tumor.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisdas, Sotirios [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Konstantinou, George N [401 General Military Hospital, Athens (Greece); Lee, Puor Sherng [Department of Oncologic Imaging National Cancer Centre, 169610 Singapore (Singapore); Thng, Choon Hua [Department of Oncologic Imaging National Cancer Centre, 169610 Singapore (Singapore); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Baghi, Mehran [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Koh, Tong San [Center for Modeling and Control of Complex Systems, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore (Singapore)

    2007-10-21

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v{sub 1}), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v{sub 2}), vascular transit time (t{sub 1}), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k{sub 12} and k{sub 21}, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v{sub 1} in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t{sub 1} and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it

  4. Metallothionein Lower Under-Expression in Benign Tumors than That in Malignant Tumors: Systematic Review Article and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallothionein (MT manifests varying expression levels in carcinomas, and they may be considered as valuable cell cancerization biomarkers for diagnosis of patients with cancers. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate comprehensively the MT expression difference in various benign tumors and malignant tumors, which compared the high with low MT expression levels in patients of the available studies. Finally, a total of 13 studies dealing with various tumors were involved for this meta-analysis. The results indicated that lower expression of MT in various benign tumors tissue than that in corresponding malignant tumors with the pooled OR of 0.52 (95 % CI 0.18-1.47, P < 0.001. In conclusion, MT expression difference is associated with tumor various stages in tumor patients and could be a useful clinical criteria of distinguishing benign tumors and malignant tumors for those patients.

  5. Analysis of computed tomography of ovarian tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omura, Makoto; Taniike, Keiko; Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu

    1987-07-01

    One hundred and twenty six patients with ovarian mass were studied with computed tomography (CT) and classified into five groups according to its margin and inner structure. The incidence of malignancy of cystic ovarian mass with smooth margin was low and that of solid ovarian mass with irreglar margin was high. Three cases (6.7 %) of malignant ovarian tumor demonstrated completely cystic pattern. Ovarian teratomas contained well defined component of fat density.

  6. Characterization of tumor dose heterogeneity for 90Y microsphere therapies using voxel- based dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Mikell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dosimetry for 90Y microsphere therapies (YMT with Standard (SM and Partition (PM models provide only uniform dose estimates to tumor and liver. Our objective is to calculate tumor dose heterogeneity, known to effect response, using voxel-based dosimetry and investigate the limitations of SM and PM.Methods: Voxel-based dosimetry was performed on 17 YMT patients using Monte Carlo DOSXYZnrc. 90Y activity and tissue/density distributions were based on quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT. Tumors (n=31, liver, and treatment lobe/segments were segmented on diagnostic CT or MR. Dose volume histograms (DVH were created for tumors and normal liver. Bland-Altman analysis compared voxel-based mean absorbed doses to tumor and liver with SM and PM. Tumor and normal liver absorbed dose heterogeneity were investigated through metrics: integral uniformity (IU, D10/D90, COV. Correlations of heterogeneity with voxel-based mean doses and volumes were evaluated.Results: Heterogeneity metrics (mean ± 1σ for tumor dose were COV = 0.48 ± 0.28, D10/D90 = 4.7 ± 3.9, and IU = 0.8 ± 0.18. Heterogeneity metrics correlated with tumor volume (r > 0.58 but not tumor mean doses (r < 0.20. Voxel-based tumor mean doses correlated with PM (r = 0.84 but not SM (r = 0.08. Both yielded poor limits of agreement with of 83 ± 174 and -28 ± 181 Gy, respectively. Normal liver heterogeneity metrics (mean ± 1σ were COV = 0.83 ± 0.29, D10/D90 = 12 ± 15, and IU = 0.97 ± 0.03. Only D10/D90 (r = 0.49 correlated with mean normal liver absorbed dose. Voxel-based normal liver/lobe mean doses correlated with PM (r = 0.96, but had poor limits of agreement (26 ± 29 Gy.Conclusion: Tumor doses have high levels of heterogeneity that increase with volume but are independent of dose. Voxel-based DVH and dose heterogeneity metrics will promote accurate characterization of tumor response following YMT.--------------------------------------Cite this article as: Mikell J, Mourtada F

  7. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies. PMID:27501019

  8. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-07-07

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies.

  9. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guss, Zachary D.; Batra, Sachin [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Limb, Charles J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Gordon [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Sughrue, Michael E. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Redmond, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, Daniele [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Parsa, Andrew T. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chang, Steven [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lim, Michael, E-mail: mlim3@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was <25%. Bias was assessed using the Egger funnel plot test. Results: Across all studies, 97% of patients achieved tumor control, and 95% of patients achieved clinical control. Eight studies reported a mean or median follow-up time of >36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  10. 3-D in vivo brain tumor geometry study by scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Hoyos, F.; Martín-Landrove, M.

    2012-02-01

    A new method, based on scaling analysis, is used to calculate fractal dimension and local roughness exponents to characterize in vivo 3-D tumor growth in the brain. Image acquisition was made according to the standard protocol used for brain radiotherapy and radiosurgery, i.e., axial, coronal and sagittal magnetic resonance T1-weighted images, and comprising the brain volume for image registration. Image segmentation was performed by the application of the k-means procedure upon contrasted images. We analyzed glioblastomas, astrocytomas, metastases and benign brain tumors. The results show significant variations of the parameters depending on the tumor stage and histological origin.

  11. A clinicopathologic analysis of primary orbital yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG Ji-ying

    2012-02-01

    were diffusely positive for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3 and focal positive for AFP, CD99 and CD117, but negative for PLAP, CD30, S-100, CD45 and CD34. There was no evidence of mixture of other germ cell tumor component in this tumor by serial sections. Based on clinical presentation and histological findings, a final histological diagnosis of pure primary orbital yolk sac tumor, WHO grade Ⅳ, was made according to the criteria of WHO classification. The patient has not received chemotherapy and attended follow-up for 3 months, without any neurological deficit or signs of recurrence. Conclusion Despite the lower incidence, intracranial yolk sac tumors usually develop in the midline at the pineal or suprasellar regions occurring in children with distinctive histological features and immunohistochemical phenotypes. In general, intracranial yolk sac tumors are known to entail poor prognosis even after multidisciplinary treatment of operation, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. It is noted that intracranial yolk sac tumor should be differentiated histologically from other types of germ cell tumors and mixed germ cell tumor.

  12. Tumors of the skull base in children: review of tumor types and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Eve C; Santoreneos, Stephen; Rutka, James T

    2002-05-15

    Although many treatment strategies for skull base tumors in adults have been reported, relatively little has been reported regarding such therapies in the pediatric population. Skull base tumors in children present a therapeutic challenge because of their unique pathological composition, the constraints of the maturing skull and brain, and the small size of the patients. In this review, the authors examine the pediatric skull base lesions that occur in the anterior, middle, and posterior cranial base, focusing on unique pediatric tumors such as encepahalocele, fibrous dysplasia, esthesioneuroblastoma, craniopharyngioma, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, cholesteatoma, chordoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma. They review management strategies that include radio- and chemotherapy, as well as surgical approaches with emphasis on the modifications and complications associated with the procedures as they apply in children. Evidence for the advantages and limitations of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and surgery as it pertains to the pediatric population will be examined. With a working knowledge of skull base anatomy and special considerations of the developing craniofacial skeleton, neurosurgeons can treat skull base lesions in children with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates. Outcomes in this population may be better than those in adults, in part because of the benign histopathology that frequently affects the pediatric skull base, as well as the plasticity of the maturing nervous system.

  13. Cytogenetic analysis of colorectal adenomas: karyotypic comparisons of synchronous tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomme, L; Bardi, G; Pandis, N;

    1998-01-01

    The phenotypic progression of colorectal tumors is driven by their step-by-step acquisition of genomic alterations. These pathogenetically important mutations are at the same time markers of tumor clonality. The aim of this study was to describe the clonal relation among synchronous colorectal...... adenomas. Twenty-four colorectal adenomas from 11 patients were subjected to chromosome banding analysis. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in 20 tumors. Recurrent structural rearrangements involved chromosomes 1, 13, 17, and 18. The most common numerical changes were gain of chromosomes 7, 13, 20......, and 3 and loss of chromosome 18. Eight adenomas had subclones as evidence of clonal evolution. Similar clones in separate polyps were seen in tumors from 6 patients; these adenomas were always located in the same part of the large bowel. In 2 patients, both with one rectal adenoma and one adenoma...

  14. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  15. Individual Cell-Based Models of Tumor-Environment Interactions : Multiple Effects of CD97 on Tumor Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Galle, Joerg; Sittig, Doreen; Hanisch, Isabelle; Wobus, Manja; Wandel, Elke; Loeffler, Markus; Aust, Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    The presence of scattered tumor cells at the invading front of several carcinomas has clinical significance. These cells differ in their protein expression from cells in central tumor regions as recently shown for the EGF-TM7 receptor CD97. To understand the impact of such heterogeneity on tumor invasion, we investigated tumor cells with modified CD97 expression in vitro and in vivo. Applying an individual cell-based computer model approach, we linked specific cell properties of these cells t...

  16. Brain Tumor Database, a free relational database for collection and analysis of brain tumor patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Hamilton, David J; Castelletti, Lara; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we describe the development and utilization of a relational database designed to manage the clinical and radiological data of patients with brain tumors. The Brain Tumor Database was implemented using MySQL v.5.0, while the graphical user interface was created using PHP and HTML, thus making it easily accessible through a web browser. This web-based approach allows for multiple institutions to potentially access the database. The BT Database can record brain tumor patient information (e.g. clinical features, anatomical attributes, and radiological characteristics) and be used for clinical and research purposes. Analytic tools to automatically generate statistics and different plots are provided. The BT Database is a free and powerful user-friendly tool with a wide range of possible clinical and research applications in neurology and neurosurgery. The BT Database graphical user interface source code and manual are freely available at http://tumorsdatabase.altervista.org.

  17. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  18. Application of fluorescence-based semi-automated allelotyping to the molecular characterization of tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlicka, A.E.; DiSilvestre, D.; Holroyd, K.J. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In cancer genetics, identifying loss of heterozygosity (LOH) defines candidate regions which warrant further analyses to determine the presence of tumor suppressor genes. In addition, demonstrating LOH has potential utility for improving the pathologic classification of tumors. Molecular methods that improve the efficiency and accuracy of LOH studies will be helpful in both clinical and research applications. Here we demonstrate a fluorescence-based semi-automated alleotyping method for studies of LOH in cancer, using gliomas as an example. Gliomas are tumors arising from neuroglia, the supporting tissue intermingled with essential elements of the brain and spinal cord. Since this method utilizes PCR-based highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers, it is suitable for small and archival tumor specimens. We collected tumor tissue from a variety of gliomas, and DNA was extracted. White blood cells from the same individuals served as a source of {open_quotes}control{close_quotes} DNA. We PCR amplified markers from tumor and genomic DNA to detect molecular alterations in six people. Simultaneous analysis of 14 loci near gene candidates on chromosomes 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, and 22, were evaluated. Strikingly, in most cases there was allelic loss in brain tumor compared to genomic DNA for at least one of these loci. In addition, alleles of lesser intensity were also shown at a few loci of the tumor DNA, suggesting possible genetic instability. We conclude from these data that fluorescent semi-automated allelotyping is a quantitative and efficient process for determining and analyzing LOH in gliomas, and possibly other tumors. These methods will facilitate the identification of candidate loci critical in the development and progression of tumors.

  19. Radiosurgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: During the past two decades, radiosurgery has arisen as a promising approach to the management of glomus jugulare. In the present study, we report on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available published data on the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare tumors. Methods and Materials: To identify eligible studies, systematic searches of all glomus jugulare tumors treated with radiosurgery were conducted in major scientific publication databases. The data search yielded 19 studies, which were included in the meta-analysis. The data from 335 glomus jugulare patients were extracted. The fixed effects pooled proportions were calculated from the data when Cochrane's statistic was statistically insignificant and the inconsistency among studies was 36 months. In these studies, 95% of patients achieved clinical control and 96% achieved tumor control. The gamma knife, linear accelerator, and CyberKnife technologies all exhibited high rates of tumor and clinical control. Conclusions: The present study reports the results of a meta-analysis for the radiosurgical management of glomus jugulare. Because of its high effectiveness, we suggest considering radiosurgery for the primary management of glomus jugulare tumors.

  20. Tumors that Mimic Asbestos-Related Mesothelioma: Time to Consider a Genetics-Based Tumor Registry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Daniel Kerger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of mesothelioma is not always straightforward, despite known immunohistochemical markers and other diagnostic techniques. One reason for the difficulty is that extrapleural tumors resembling mesothelioma may have several possible etiologies, especially in cases with no meaningful history of amphibole asbestos exposure. When the diagnosis of mesothelioma is based on histologic features alone, primary mesotheliomas may resemble various primary or metastatic cancers that have directly invaded the serosal membranes. Some of these metastatic malignancies, particularly carcinomas and sarcomas of the pleura, pericardium and peritoneum, may undergo desmoplastic reaction in the pleura, thereby mimicking mesothelioma, rather than the primary tumor. Encasement of the lung by direct spread or metastasis, termed pseudomesotheliomatous spread, occurs with several other primary cancer types, including certain late-stage tumors from genetic cancer syndromes exhibiting chromosomal instability. Although immunohistochemical staining patterns differentiate most carcinomas, lymphomas, and mestastatic sarcomas from mesotheliomas, specific genetic markers in tumor or somatic tissues have been recently identified that may also distinguish these tumor types from asbestos-related mesothelioma. A registry for genetic screening of mesothelioma cases would help lead to improvements in diagnostic criteria, prognostic accuracy and treatment efficacy, as well as improved estimates of primary mesothelioma incidence and of background rates of cancers unrelated to asbestos that might be otherwise mistaken for mesothelioma. This information would also help better define the dose-response relationships for mesothelioma and asbestos exposure, as well as other risk factors for mesothelioma and other mesenchymal or advanced metastatic tumors that may be indistinguishable by histology and staining characteristics.

  1. Nonlinear microscopy, infrared, and Raman microspectroscopy for brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Bergner, Norbert; Bielecki, Christiane; Krafft, Christoph; Akimov, Denis; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-02-01

    Contemporary brain tumor research focuses on two challenges: First, tumor typing and grading by analyzing excised tissue is of utmost importance for choosing a therapy. Second, for prognostication the tumor has to be removed as completely as possible. Nowadays, histopathology of excised tissue using haematoxylin-eosine staining is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis of surgical pathology specimens. However, it is neither applicable in vivo, nor does it allow for precise tumor typing in those cases when only nonrepresentative specimens are procured. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy allow for very precise cancer analysis due to their molecular specificity, while nonlinear microscopy is a suitable tool for rapid imaging of large tissue sections. Here, unstained samples from the brain of a domestic pig have been investigated by a multimodal nonlinear imaging approach combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, second harmonic generation, and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, a brain tumor specimen was additionally analyzed by linear Raman and Fourier transform infrared imaging for a detailed assessment of the tissue types that is required for classification and to validate the multimodal imaging approach. Hence label-free vibrational microspectroscopic imaging is a promising tool for fast and precise in vivo diagnostics of brain tumors.

  2. Partially independent component analysis of tumor heterogeneities by DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, JunYing; Srikanchana, Rujirutana; Xuan, Jianhua; Choyke, Peter; Li, King; Wang, Yue J.

    2003-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has emerged as an effective tool to access tumor vascular characteristics. DCE-MRI can be used to characterize noninvasively, microvasculature providing information about tumor microvessel structure and function (e.g., tumor blood volume, vascular permeability, tumor perfusion). However, pixels of DCE-MRI represent a composite of more than one distinct functional biomarker (e.g., microvessels with fast or slow perfusion) whose spatial distributions are often heterogeneous. Complementary to various existing methods (e.g., compartment modeling, factor analysis), this paper proposes a blind source separation method which allows for a computed simultaneous imaging of multiple biomarkers from composite DCE-MRI sequences. The algorithm is based on a partially-independent component analysis, whose parameters are estimated using a subset of informative pixels defining the independent portion of the observations. We demonstrate the principle of the approach on simulated image data set, and we then apply the method to the tissue heterogeneity characterization of breast tumors where spatial distribution of tumor blood volume, vascular permeability, and tumor perfusion, as well as their time activity curves (TACs) are simultaneously estimated.

  3. Frozen Tumor Tissue Microarray Technology for Analysis of Tumor RNA, DNA, and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenberg Fejzo, Marlena; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2001-01-01

    Tissue microarray technology is a new method used to analyze several hundred tumor samples on a single slide allowing high throughput analysis of genes and proteins on a large cohort. The original methodology involves coring tissues from paraffin-embedded tissue donor blocks and placing them into a single paraffin block. One difficulty with paraffin-embedded tissue relates to antigenic changes in proteins and mRNA degradation induced by the fixation and embedding process. We have modified thi...

  4. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, and which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  5. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-02

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  6. Microchip-based immunomagnetic detection of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Kazunori; Huang, Yu-Yen; Lane, Nancy; Huebschman, Michael; Uhr, Jonathan W; Frenkel, Eugene P; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2011-10-21

    -cytokeratin, DAPI and anti-CD45. Subsequent immunofluorescence images were taken for the captured cells, followed by comprehensive computer aided analysis based on fluorescence intensities and cell morphology. Rare cancer cells (from ∼1000 cells down to ∼5 cells per mL) with very low tumor cell to blood cell ratios (about 1 : 10(7) to 10(9), including red blood cells) were successfully detected. Cancer cell capture rates of 90% and 86% were demonstrated for COLO205 and SKBR3 cells, respectively. PMID:21863182

  7. Tumors that mimic asbestos-related mesothelioma: time to consider a genetics-based tumor registry?

    OpenAIRE

    Kerger, Brent D.; James, Robert C.; Galbraith, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of mesothelioma is not always straightforward, despite known immunohistochemical markers and other diagnostic techniques. One reason for the difficulty is that extrapleural tumors resembling mesothelioma may have several possible etiologies, especially in cases with no meaningful history of amphibole asbestos exposure. When the diagnosis of mesothelioma is based on histologic features alone, primary mesotheliomas may resemble various primary or metastatic cancers that have direc...

  8. Correcting for catchment area nonresidency in studies based on tumor-registry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the effect of catchment area nonresidency on estimates of cancer incidence from a tumor-registry-based cohort study and demonstrate that a relatively simple correction is possible in the context of Poisson regression analysis if individual residency histories or the probabilities of residency are known. A comparison of a complete data maximum likelihood analysis with several Poisson regression analyses demonstrates the adequacy of the simple correction in a large simulated data set. We compare analyses of stomach-cancer incidence from the Radiation Effects Research Foundation tumor registry with and without the correction. We also discuss some implications of including cases identified only on the basis of death certificates. (author)

  9. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  10. Prediction of Tumor Outcome Based on Gene Expression Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Juan; Hitoshi Iba

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression microarray data can be used to classify tumor types. We proposed a new procedure to classify human tumor samples based on microarray gene expressions by using a hybrid supervised learning method called MOEA+WV (Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithm+Weighted Voting). MOEA is used to search for a relatively few subsets of informative genes from the high-dimensional gene space, and WV is used as a classification tool. This new method has been applied to predicate the subtypes of lymphoma and outcomes of medulloblastoma. The results are relatively accurate and meaningful compared to those from other methods.

  11. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  12. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  13. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (Pmean), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 ± 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between Pmean and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 ± 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 ± 1.1 mm distant from Pmean. Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  14. Identifying metastatic breast tumors using textural kinetic features of a contrast based habitat in DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Baishali; Zhou, Mu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Drukteinis, Jennifer S.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to identify aggressive tumors from indolent tumors using quantitative analysis on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) would dramatically change the breast cancer treatment paradigm. With this prognostic information, patients with aggressive tumors that have the ability to spread to distant sites outside of the breast could be selected for more aggressive treatment and surveillance regimens. Conversely, patients with tumors that do not have the propensity to metastasize could be treated less aggressively, avoiding some of the morbidity associated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We propose a computer aided detection framework to determine which breast cancers will metastasize to the loco-regional lymph nodes as well as which tumors will eventually go on to develop distant metastses using quantitative image analysis and radiomics. We defined a new contrast based tumor habitat and analyzed textural kinetic features from this habitat for classification purposes. The proposed tumor habitat, which we call combined-habitat, is derived from the intersection of two individual tumor sub-regions: one that exhibits rapid initial contrast uptake and the other that exhibits rapid delayed contrast washout. Hence the combined-habitat represents the tumor sub-region within which the pixels undergo both rapid initial uptake and rapid delayed washout. We analyzed a dataset of twenty-seven representative two dimensional (2D) images from volumetric DCE-MRI of breast tumors, for classification of tumors with no lymph nodes from tumors with positive number of axillary lymph nodes. For this classification an accuracy of 88.9% was achieved. Twenty of the twenty-seven patients were analyzed for classification of distant metastatic tumors from indolent cancers (tumors with no lymph nodes), for which the accuracy was 84.3%.

  15. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  16. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  17. [Progress of anti-tumor study based on BRAF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Gui-Rui; Xu, Zhi-Jian; Wang, He-Yao; Zhu, Wei-Liang

    2012-12-01

    BRAF is one of the most important pro-oncogenes, which is mutated in approximately 8% of human tumors. The most common BRAF mutation is a valine-to-glutamate transition (V600E) that is expressed primarily in melanoma, colorectal cancer and thyroid carcinoma. MEK/ERK is constitutively activated in the cells expressing BRAFV600E, leading to tumor development, invasion, and metastasis. Therefore, BRAFV600E is a therapeutic target for melanoma and some other BRAFV600E tumors. Vemurafenib, a BRAFV600E inhibitor, which was approved by FDA for the treatment of late-stage melanoma in 2011, produces improved rates of overall and progression-free survival in patients with the BRAFV600E mutation, making a dramatic breakthrough in melanoma treatment. Vemurafenib is also an individual target drug based on genetic diagnosis. However, its therapeutic success is limited by the emergence of drug resistance. Therefore, it is important to explore the mechanisms underlying the resistance for developing new inhibitor drugs and for preventing or delaying the resistance evolution to BRAF inhibitor drugs. In this review, we described the role of BRAFV600E as an anti-tumor drug target and the development of BRAF inhibitors. We also discussed the mechanisms leading to resistance of BRAFV600E inhibitors. Furthermore, therapeutic strategies that might be employed to overcome acquired resistance were proposed.

  18. Multiparametric analysis of fine needle aspirate biopsies from parotid tumors by laser scanning cytometry (LSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Andreas O.; Machlitt, Julia; Mueller, Anne-Kathrin; Tarnok, Attila; Oeken, Jens; Bootz, Friedrich

    2002-06-01

    In order to minimize hospitalization and morbidity with optimized therapy for a patient with a tumor of the parotid gland a malignancy must be confirmed or excluded as soon as possible. Up to now, non- and minimal-invasive methods do not yield this information. For fine needle aspirate biopsies (FNABs), analysis by a specialized cytologist yields subjective and qualitative but not objective and quantitative data. LSC is a semi-automated microscope-based technology and offers ideal prerequisites for the analysis of specimens fixed on a slide. We have established an assay for FNABs from parotid gland tumors. Cells are stained for cytokeratin and DNA. The analysis quantitatively determines the ploidy of the cells and the degree of condensation of the DNA; on this basis the percentage of cells undergoing mitosis can be determined. Subsequently the cells are stained by H&E and are re-localized on the slide at their fixed position. Micrographs are taken for objective documentation of the cells' morphology. Using this assay FNABs from parotid gland tumors were analyzed; tumors that were diagnosed as benign by routine histopathology showed no aneuploidy whereas malignant tumors were aneuploid. This preliminary study demonstrates the capacities of LSC for minimal-invasive assays yielding quantitative and objective data.

  19. Numerical simulation of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaiping Zhao; Jie Wu; Shixiong Xu; M. W. Collins; Quan Long; Carola S. K(o)nig; Yuping Jiang; Jian Wang; A. R. Padhani

    2007-01-01

    A coupled intravascular-transvascular-interstitial fluid flow model is developed to study the distributions of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on a tumor-induced microvascular network.This is generated from a 2D nine-point discrete mathematical model of tumor angiogenesis and contains two parent vessels.Blood flow through the microvascular network and interstitial fluid flow in tumor tissues are performed by the extended Poiseuille's law and Darcy's law, respectively, transvascular flow is described by Starling's law; effects of the vascular permeability and the interstitial hydraulic conductivity are also considered. The simulation results predict the heterogeneous blood supply, interstitial hypertension and low convectionon the inside of the tumor, which are consistent with physiological observed facts. These results may provide beneficial information for anti-angiogenesis treatment of tumor and further clinical research.

  20. Numerical simulation of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on tumor-induced angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gaiping; Wu, Jie; Xu, Shixiong; Collins, M. W.; Long, Quan; König, Carola S.; Jiang, Yuping; Wang, Jian; Padhani, A. R.

    2007-10-01

    A coupled intravascular transvascular interstitial fluid flow model is developed to study the distributions of blood flow and interstitial fluid pressure in solid tumor microcirculation based on a tumor-induced microvascular network. This is generated from a 2D nine-point discrete mathematical model of tumor angiogenesis and contains two parent vessels. Blood flow through the microvascular network and interstitial fluid flow in tumor tissues are performed by the extended Poiseuille’s law and Darcy’s law, respectively, transvascular flow is described by Starling’s law; effects of the vascular permeability and the interstitial hydraulic conductivity are also considered. The simulation results predict the heterogeneous blood supply, interstitial hypertension and low convection on the inside of the tumor, which are consistent with physiological observed facts. These results may provide beneficial information for anti-angiogenesis treatment of tumor and further clinical research.

  1. Comprehensive cost analysis of sentinel node biopsy in solid head and neck tumors using a time-driven activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crott, Ralph; Lawson, Georges; Nollevaux, Marie-Cécile; Castiaux, Annick; Krug, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is predominantly a locoregional disease. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy offers a minimally invasive means of accurately staging the neck. Value in healthcare is determined by both outcomes and the costs associated with achieving them. Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) may offer more precise estimates of the true cost. Process maps were developed for nuclear medicine, operating room and pathology care phases. TDABC estimates the costs by combining information about the process with the unit cost of each resource used. Resource utilization is based on observation of care and staff interviews. Unit costs are calculated as a capacity cost rate, measured as a Euros/min (2014), for each resource consumed. Multiplying together the unit costs and resource quantities and summing across all resources used will produce the average cost for each phase of care. Three time equations with six different scenarios were modeled based on the type of camera, the number of SLN and the type of staining used. Total times for different SLN scenarios vary between 284 and 307 min, respectively, with a total cost between 2794 and 3541€. The unit costs vary between 788€/h for the intraoperative evaluation with a gamma-probe and 889€/h for a preoperative imaging with a SPECT/CT. The unit costs for the lymphadenectomy and the pathological examination are, respectively, 560 and 713€/h. A 10 % increase of time per individual activity generates only 1 % change in the total cost. TDABC evaluates the cost of SLN in HNC. The total costs across all phases which varied between 2761 and 3744€ per standard case.

  2. Comprehensive cost analysis of sentinel node biopsy in solid head and neck tumors using a time-driven activity-based costing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crott, Ralph; Lawson, Georges; Nollevaux, Marie-Cécile; Castiaux, Annick; Krug, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is predominantly a locoregional disease. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy offers a minimally invasive means of accurately staging the neck. Value in healthcare is determined by both outcomes and the costs associated with achieving them. Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) may offer more precise estimates of the true cost. Process maps were developed for nuclear medicine, operating room and pathology care phases. TDABC estimates the costs by combining information about the process with the unit cost of each resource used. Resource utilization is based on observation of care and staff interviews. Unit costs are calculated as a capacity cost rate, measured as a Euros/min (2014), for each resource consumed. Multiplying together the unit costs and resource quantities and summing across all resources used will produce the average cost for each phase of care. Three time equations with six different scenarios were modeled based on the type of camera, the number of SLN and the type of staining used. Total times for different SLN scenarios vary between 284 and 307 min, respectively, with a total cost between 2794 and 3541€. The unit costs vary between 788€/h for the intraoperative evaluation with a gamma-probe and 889€/h for a preoperative imaging with a SPECT/CT. The unit costs for the lymphadenectomy and the pathological examination are, respectively, 560 and 713€/h. A 10 % increase of time per individual activity generates only 1 % change in the total cost. TDABC evaluates the cost of SLN in HNC. The total costs across all phases which varied between 2761 and 3744€ per standard case. PMID:27170361

  3. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  5. Linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2003-05-01

    To assess the safety and availability of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for metastatic brain tumors, we reviewed 54 consecutive cases with a total of 118 brain metastases treated with linear-accelerator-based stereotactic irradiation (STI). Nineteen patients with a total of 27 brain tumors that were larger than 3 cm or close to critical normal tissues were treated with SRT. The marginal dose of SRT was 15-21 Gy (median 21 Gy) in 3 fractions for 3 days. The median marginal dose of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was 20 Gy. Effective rates of imaging studies were 72.7% and 94.4%, and those of clinical symptoms were 46.7% and 55.6% for SRT and SRS, respectively. One-year and two-year survival rates of SRT were 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, and the median follow-up period was 6.4 months. The one-year survival rate of SRS was 32.7%, with a median follow-up of 4.6 months. Fourteen cases (7 cases each) had recurrent tumors at STI sites. Early complications were observed in one case of SRT and 8 cases of SRS, and late complications occurred in 3 cases of SRS. There were no significant differences among effective rates, survival rates, median follow-up times, recurrence rates, and complications between SRT and SRS. We concluded that SRT is a safe, effective therapy for large or eloquent area metastases. (author)

  6. 3D tissue engineered micro-tumors for optical-based therapeutic screening platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Joseph L.; Schmitt, Trevor J.; Bailey, Ryan C.; Hannon, Timothy S.; Elmajdob, Mohamed; Mason, Eric M.; Ye, Guochang; Das, Soumen; Seal, Sudipta; Fenn, Michael B.

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is an underserved area of cancer research, with little focus on studying the effects of tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) properties on melanoma tumor progression, metastasis, and treatment efficacy. We've developed a Raman spectral mapping-based in-vitro screening platform that allows for nondestructive in-situ, multi-time point assessment of a novel potential nanotherapeutic adjuvant, nanoceria (cerium oxide nanoparticles), for treating melanoma. We've focused primarily on understanding melanoma tumor ECM composition and how it influences cell morphology and ICC markers. Furthermore, we aim to correlate this with studies on nanotherapeutic efficacy to coincide with the goal of predicting and preventing metastasis based on ECM composition. We've compiled a Raman spectral database for substrates containing varying compositions of fibronectin, elastin, laminin, and collagens type I and IV. Furthermore, we've developed a machine learning-based semi-quantitative analysis platform utilizing dimensionality reduction with subsequent pixel classification and semi-quantitation of ECM composition using Direct Classical Least Squares for classification and estimation of the reorganization of these components by taking 2D maps using Raman spectroscopy. Gaining an understanding of how tissue properties influence ECM organization has laid the foundation for future work utilizing Raman spectroscopy to assess therapeutic efficacy and matrix reorganization imparted by nanoceria. Specifically, this will allow us to better understand the role of HIF1a in matrix reorganization of the tumor microenvironment. By studying the relationship between substrate modulus and nanoceria's ability to inhibit an ECM that is conducive to tumor formation, we endeavor to show that nanoceria may prevent or even revert tumor conducive microenvironments.

  7. Methylation-based classification of benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrich, Manuel; Koelsche, Christian; Schrimpf, Daniel; Capper, David; Sahm, Felix; Kratz, Annekathrin; Reuss, Jana; Hovestadt, Volker; Jones, David T W; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Becker, Albert; Weis, Joachim; Mawrin, Christian; Mittelbronn, Michel; Perry, Arie; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Hartmann, Christian; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Arp, Mirko; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Hänggi, Daniel; Heim, Stefanie; Paulus, Werner; Schittenhelm, Jens; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M; von Deimling, Andreas; Reuss, David E

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of peripheral nerve sheath tumors derive from the Schwann cell lineage and comprise diverse histological entities ranging from benign schwannomas and neurofibromas to high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), each with several variants. There is increasing evidence for methylation profiling being able to delineate biologically relevant tumor groups even within the same cellular lineage. Therefore, we used DNA methylation arrays for methylome- and chromosomal profile-based characterization of 171 peripheral nerve sheath tumors. We analyzed 28 conventional high-grade MPNST, three malignant Triton tumors, six low-grade MPNST, four epithelioid MPNST, 33 neurofibromas (15 dermal, 8 intraneural, 10 plexiform), six atypical neurofibromas, 43 schwannomas (including 5 NF2 and 5 schwannomatosis associated cases), 11 cellular schwannomas, 10 melanotic schwannomas, 7 neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors, 10 nerve sheath myxomas and 10 ganglioneuromas. Schwannomas formed different epigenomic subgroups including a vestibular schwannoma subgroup. Cellular schwannomas were not distinct from conventional schwannomas. Nerve sheath myxomas and neurofibroma/schwannoma hybrid tumors were most similar to schwannomas. Dermal, intraneural and plexiform neurofibromas as well as ganglioneuromas all showed distinct methylation profiles. Atypical neurofibromas and low-grade MPNST were indistinguishable with a common methylation profile and frequent losses of CDKN2A. Epigenomic analysis finds two groups of conventional high-grade MPNST sharing a frequent loss of neurofibromin. The larger of the two groups shows an additional loss of trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3). The smaller one retains H3K27me3 and is found in spinal locations. Sporadic MPNST with retained neurofibromin expression did not form an epigenetic group and most cases could be reclassified as cellular schwannomas or soft tissue sarcomas. Widespread immunohistochemical loss

  8. A Description of the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) Common Data Analysis Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Paul A; Markey, Sanford P; Roth, Jeri; Mirokhin, Yuri; Yan, Xinjian; Tchekhovskoi, Dmitrii V; Edwards, Nathan J; Thangudu, Ratna R; Ketchum, Karen A; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Stein, Stephen E

    2016-03-01

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has produced large proteomics data sets from the mass spectrometric interrogation of tumor samples previously analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program. The availability of the genomic and proteomic data is enabling proteogenomic study for both reference (i.e., contained in major sequence databases) and nonreference markers of cancer. The CPTAC laboratories have focused on colon, breast, and ovarian tissues in the first round of analyses; spectra from these data sets were produced from 2D liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses and represent deep coverage. To reduce the variability introduced by disparate data analysis platforms (e.g., software packages, versions, parameters, sequence databases, etc.), the CPTAC Common Data Analysis Platform (CDAP) was created. The CDAP produces both peptide-spectrum-match (PSM) reports and gene-level reports. The pipeline processes raw mass spectrometry data according to the following: (1) peak-picking and quantitative data extraction, (2) database searching, (3) gene-based protein parsimony, and (4) false-discovery rate-based filtering. The pipeline also produces localization scores for the phosphopeptide enrichment studies using the PhosphoRS program. Quantitative information for each of the data sets is specific to the sample processing, with PSM and protein reports containing the spectrum-level or gene-level ("rolled-up") precursor peak areas and spectral counts for label-free or reporter ion log-ratios for 4plex iTRAQ. The reports are available in simple tab-delimited formats and, for the PSM-reports, in mzIdentML. The goal of the CDAP is to provide standard, uniform reports for all of the CPTAC data to enable comparisons between different samples and cancer types as well as across the major omics fields. PMID:26860878

  9. A Description of the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) Common Data Analysis Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Paul A; Markey, Sanford P; Roth, Jeri; Mirokhin, Yuri; Yan, Xinjian; Tchekhovskoi, Dmitrii V; Edwards, Nathan J; Thangudu, Ratna R; Ketchum, Karen A; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Stein, Stephen E

    2016-03-01

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has produced large proteomics data sets from the mass spectrometric interrogation of tumor samples previously analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program. The availability of the genomic and proteomic data is enabling proteogenomic study for both reference (i.e., contained in major sequence databases) and nonreference markers of cancer. The CPTAC laboratories have focused on colon, breast, and ovarian tissues in the first round of analyses; spectra from these data sets were produced from 2D liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses and represent deep coverage. To reduce the variability introduced by disparate data analysis platforms (e.g., software packages, versions, parameters, sequence databases, etc.), the CPTAC Common Data Analysis Platform (CDAP) was created. The CDAP produces both peptide-spectrum-match (PSM) reports and gene-level reports. The pipeline processes raw mass spectrometry data according to the following: (1) peak-picking and quantitative data extraction, (2) database searching, (3) gene-based protein parsimony, and (4) false-discovery rate-based filtering. The pipeline also produces localization scores for the phosphopeptide enrichment studies using the PhosphoRS program. Quantitative information for each of the data sets is specific to the sample processing, with PSM and protein reports containing the spectrum-level or gene-level ("rolled-up") precursor peak areas and spectral counts for label-free or reporter ion log-ratios for 4plex iTRAQ. The reports are available in simple tab-delimited formats and, for the PSM-reports, in mzIdentML. The goal of the CDAP is to provide standard, uniform reports for all of the CPTAC data to enable comparisons between different samples and cancer types as well as across the major omics fields.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia: Existing Problems and Their Potential Model-Based Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kuangyu; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of tissue hypoxia generates contrast in hypoxic areas by applying hypoxia-specific tracers in organisms. In cancer tissue, the injected tracer needs to be transported over relatively long distances and accumulates slowly in hypoxic regions. Thus, the signal-to-background ratio of hypoxia imaging is very small and a non-specific accumulation may suppress the real hypoxia-specific signals. In addition, the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment makes the assessment of the tissue oxygenation status more challenging. In this study, the diffusion potential of oxygen and of a hypoxia tracer for 4 different hypoxia subtypes: ischemic acute hypoxia, hypoxemic acute hypoxia, diffusion-limited chronic hypoxia and anemic chronic hypoxia are theoretically assessed. In particular, a reaction-diffusion equation is introduced to quantitatively analyze the interstitial diffusion of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO. Imaging analysis strategies are explored based on reaction-diffusion simulations. For hypoxia imaging of low signal-to-background ratio, pharmacokinetic modelling has advantages to extract underlying specific binding signals from non-specific background signals and to improve the assessment of tumor oxygenation. Different pharmacokinetic models are evaluated for the analysis of the hypoxia tracer [(18)F]FMISO and optimal analysis model were identified accordingly. The improvements by model-based methods for the estimation of tumor oxygenation are in agreement with experimental data. The computational modelling offers a tool to explore molecular imaging of hypoxia and pharmacokinetic modelling is encouraged to be employed in the corresponding data analysis. PMID:27526129

  11. Effect of blood vessel segmentation on the outcome of electroporation-based treatments of liver tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Marčan

    Full Text Available Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses applied to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered with sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient anatomy. Extraction of patient's anatomy through segmentation of medical images inevitably produces some errors. In order to ensure the robustness of treatment planning, it is necessary to evaluate the potential effect of such errors on the electric field distribution. In this work we focus on determining the effect of errors in automatic segmentation of hepatic vessels on the electric field distribution in electroporation-based treatments in the liver. First, a numerical analysis was performed on a simple 'sphere and cylinder' model for tumors and vessels of different sizes and relative positions. Second, an analysis of two models extracted from medical images of real patients in which we introduced variations of an error of the automatic vessel segmentation method was performed. The results obtained from a simple model indicate that ignoring the vessels when calculating the electric field distribution can cause insufficient coverage of the tumor with electric fields. Results of this study indicate that this effect happens for small (10 mm and medium-sized (30 mm tumors, especially in the absence of a central electrode inserted in the tumor. The results obtained from the real-case models also show higher negative impact of automatic vessel segmentation errors on the electric field distribution when the central electrode is absent. However, the average error of the automatic vessel segmentation did not have an impact on the electric field distribution if the central electrode was present. This suggests the algorithm is robust enough to be used in creating a model for treatment parameter optimization, but with a central electrode.

  12. Automatización de un registro hospitalario de tumores Automatization of a hospital-based tumor registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josepa Ribes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El Instituto Catalán de Oncología automatizó los procedimientos manuales de captación de la información de las bases de datos del alta hospitalaria (AH y anatomía patológica (APA mediante una aplicación informática (ASEDAT con el objetivo de aumentar la fiabilidad de los datos y reducir los costes del Registro Hospitalario de Tumores (RHT. Material y Método: ASEDAT detecta los tumores incidentes del centro a partir de las bases de datos de APA y de las AH mediante la selección de la información básica para cada uno de ellos. Se resolvió el RHT para el período 1999-2000 mediante el procedimiento manual y automatizado, y se compararon entre sí los resultados. Resultados: Se detectaron 10.498 pacientes oncológicos. La resolución manual detectó 8.309 tumores incidentes y 2.374 tumores prevalentes. ASEDAT resolvió automáticamente 8.901 pacientes (84,8%, en los cuales se detectaron 8.367 tumores incidentes, 58 tumores más que con el procedimiento manual. La validación de la concordancia se realizó en los tumores incidentes detectados por ambos métodos (7.063 tumores. En 6.185 tumores (87,6%, la información coincidió en todas las variables. De los tumores discordantes, 692 (9,8% fueron generados por el personal del RHT en la resolución manual y el resto (n = 186; 2,6% por la aplicación (resolución automática. Conclusiones: La automatización de un registro de cáncer es posible siempre y cuando el centro disponga de las bases de datos de APA y AH codificadas e informatizadas.Introduction: To increase data reliability and reduce the costs associated with the HTR, the Catalan Institute of Oncology programmed the manual procedures of data collection from databases by means of a computer application (ASEDAT. Material and method: ASEDAT detects the incident tumors of the registry from the databases of the pathology records (PR and discharge records (DR and selects the basic information from both databases. Data

  13. Parotid tumor : differentiation of benign vs malignant tumors, based on CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K. H.; Lee, N. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seol, H. Y.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Anam Hospital, Korea Univ. Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To determine the CT findings by which between benign and malignant parotid tumors, may be diferntiated. The CT findings of 58 cases of parotid gland tumors confirmed by surgery and histopathology were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists;there were 42 cases of benign and 16 of malignant tumors. CT findings for differentiation were location, size, density, margin, calcification within tumors, necrosis, cystic change, invasion of extraglandular structure and lymphadenopathy. In benign parotid tumors, the margins of mass were clear in 34 cases (81%), irregular in 3 (7%), and indeterminate in 5 (12%). Necrotic changes were seen in 24 cases (57%) and lymphadenopathy in 1 (2%), but there was no extraglandular invasion. In 38 of 42 benign tumors the CT diagnosis for benignancy was correct. In malignant tumors, the margins were irregular in 11 cases (69%) and clear in 5 cases (31%). Evidence of extraglandular extension was seen in 6 cases (38%) and lymphadenopathy in 2 cases (13%). The CT diagnosis for malignancy was correct in 11 of 16 cases. Irregularities in tumor margin and findings of extraglandular extension are the most helpful indicators by which benign and malignant parotid tumors may be differentiated.

  14. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  15. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  16. Analysis of changes in DNA sequence copy number by comparative genomic hybridization in archival paraffin-embedded tumor samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Isola, J; DeVries, S; Chu, L; Ghazvini, S.; Waldman, F.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of previously unknown genetic aberrations in solid tumors has become possible through the use of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), which is based on competitive binding of tumor and control DNA to normal metaphase chromosomes. CGH allows detection of DNA sequence copy number changes (deletions, gains, and amplifications) on a genome-wide scale in a single hybridization. We describe here an improved CGH technique, which enables reliable detection of copy number changes in archi...

  17. Validation of whole genome amplification for analysis of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in limited amounts of tumor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasmats, Johanna; Green, Henrik; Solnestam, Beata Werne; Zajac, Pawel; Huss, Mikael; Orear, Cedric; Validire, Pierre; Bjursell, Magnus; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2012-08-24

    Personalized cancer treatment requires molecular characterization of individual tumor biopsies. These samples are frequently only available in limited quantities hampering genomic analysis. Several whole genome amplification (WGA) protocols have been developed with reported varying representation of genomic regions post amplification. In this study we investigate region dropout using a φ29 polymerase based WGA approach. DNA from 123 lung cancers specimens and corresponding normal tissue were used and evaluated by Sanger sequencing of the p53 exons 5-8. To enable comparative analysis of this scarce material, WGA samples were compared with unamplified material using a pooling strategy of the 123 samples. In addition, a more detailed analysis of exon 7 amplicons were performed followed by extensive cloning and Sanger sequencing. Interestingly, by comparing data from the pooled samples to the individually sequenced exon 7, we demonstrate that mutations are more easily recovered from WGA pools and this was also supported by simulations of different sequencing coverage. Overall this data indicate a limited random loss of genomic regions supporting the use of whole genome amplification for genomic analysis.

  18. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  19. Gene expression analysis on small numbers of invasive cells collected by chemotaxis from primary mammary tumors of the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segall Jeffrey E

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA microarrays have the potential to identify the genes involved in invasion and metastasis. However, when used with whole tumor tissue, the results average the expression patterns of different cell types. We have combined chemotaxis-based cell collection of the invasive subpopulation of cells within the primary tumor with array-based gene expression analysis to identify the genes necessary for the process of carcinoma cell invasion. Results Invasive cells were collected from live primary tumors using microneedles containing chemotactic growth factors to mimic chemotactic signals thought to be present in the primary tumor. When used with mammary tumors of rats and mice, carcinoma cells and macrophages constitute the invasive cell population. Microbeads conjugated with monoclonal anti-CD11b (Mac-1α antibodies were used to separate macrophages from carcinoma cells. We utilized PCR-based cDNA amplification from small number of cells and compared it to the quality and complexity of conventionally generated cDNA to determine if amplified cDNA could be used with fidelity for array analysis of this cell population. These techniques showed a very high level of correlation indicating that the PCR based amplification technique yields a cDNA population that resembles, with high fidelity, the original template population present in the small number of cells used to prepare the cDNA for use with the chip. Conclusions The specific collection of invasive cells from a primary tumor and the analysis of gene expression in these cells are is now possible. By further comparing the gene expression patterns of cells collected by invasion into microneedles with that of carcinoma cells obtained from the whole primary tumor, the blood, and whole metastatic tumors, genes that contribute to the invasive process in carcinoma cells may be identified.

  20. Quantitative image analysis of intra-tumoral bFGF level as a molecular marker of paclitaxel resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wientjes M Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in chemoresistance is controversial; some studies showed a relationship between higher bFGF level and chemoresistance while other studies showed the opposite finding. The goal of the present study was to quantify bFGF levels in archived tumor tissues, and to determine its relationship with chemosensitivity. Methods We established an image analysis-based method to quantify and convert the immunostaining intensity of intra-tumor bFGF to concentrations; this was accomplished by generating standard curves using human xenograft tumors as the renewable tissue source for simultaneous image analysis and ELISA. The relationships between bFGF concentrations and tumor chemosensitivity of patient tumors (n = 87 to paclitaxel were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Results The image analysis results were compared to our previous results obtained using a conventional, semi-quantitative visual scoring method. While both analyses indicated an inverse relationship between bFGF level and tumor sensitivity to paclitaxel, the image analysis method, by providing bFGF levels in individual tumors and therefore more data points (87 numerical values as opposed to four groups of staining intensities, further enabled the quantitative analysis of the relationship in subgroups of tumors with different pathobiological properties. The results show significant correlation between bFGF level and tumor sensitivity to the antiproliferation effect, but not the apoptotic effect, of paclitaxel. We further found stronger correlations of bFGF level and paclitaxel sensitivity in four tumor subgroups (high stage, positive p53 staining, negative aFGF staining, containing higher-than-median bFGF level, compared to all other groups. These findings suggest that the relationship between intra-tumoral bFGF level and paclitaxel sensitivity was context-dependent, which may explain the previous contradictory findings

  1. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or near-dip

  2. Pattern of malignant tumors in children: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1990 to 1999 data from 32743 cancer patients (males 18502, females 14241) were analyzed to know the frequency of the most common cancers in local and well as well as afghan refugees. There were 3760 children with biopsy proven cancers 2910 belonged to the north-west frontier province (NWFP), while the remaining 850 were Afghan refugees. Among children of NWFP male were 1945 (67%) and 965(33%) females. In Afghan children, males were 570(67%) and females were 280(33%). The most common tumors in children of NWFP were lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), myeloid leukemia, soft tissue sarcoma wilms, tumours, retinoblastoma, bone tumor neuroblastoma, and ovarian tumors. Whereas Afghan children had Lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, wilms, tumor, retinoblastoma, tumors of soft tissue bones CNS, neuroblastoma and ovarian tumors. (author)

  3. Mutational analysis of the NF1 GAP-related domain in neuroectodermal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinanzi, C.; Basso, G.; Perilongo, G. [Universita di Padova (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To try to contribute to the more precise characterization of the function of the NF1 gene in tumorigenesis we have analyzed the most conserved region of its coding sequence, the GAP-related domain (NF1 GRD), which is attributed with tumor suppressor function. The rationale for the study was based on the likelihood of finding structural alterations resulting in loss of function of this region, in situations such as tumors of neuroepithelial tissues. In these situations, the activity of the NF1 gene product, neurofibromis, a GTPase activating protein, seems to be crucial in regulating the mechanisms of signal transduction mediated by p21 ras. We have studied the NF1 GRD region by PCR amplification of each exon (exons 21-27a) followed by subsequent PAGE and SSCP analysis of the amplification products in 60 primary sporadic neuroectodermal tumors. Our sample included: 14 neuroblastoma, 11 glioblastoma, 8 medulloblastoma, 7 ependimoma, 6 peripheral PNET, 1 ganglioneuroma, 1 glioma, 1 Ewing sarcoma, 1 meningioma and 1 schwannoma. We have not identified structural alterations of the NF1 GRD region in the tumors analysed, with one possible exception now in the process of being characterized. We can conclude that the loss of the NF1 gene tumor suppressor function that might lead or contribute to the development of malignancies in tissues of neuroectodermal origin is not due to structural abnormalities of the region of the gene interacting with p21 ras, either as a negative regulator or as a downstream effector of it. These data, together with the observation that the oncogene ras 21 is not typically mutated in neuroectodermal tumors, and that GTP-ras has been found normally regulated in neurofibromis-deficient melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, seem to support the hypothesis that the antioncogene activity of the NF1 gene could be totally independent from its interaction with ras.

  4. Factors for tumor progression in patients with skull base chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Tian, Kaibing; Wang, Ke; Ma, Junpeng; Ru, Xiaojuan; Du, Jiang; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting

    2016-09-01

    Skull base chordoma is a rare and fatal disease, recurrence of which is inevitable, albeit variable. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathologic features of disease progression, identify prognostic factors, and construct a nomogram for predicting progression in individual patients. Data of 229 patients with skull base chordoma treated by one institution between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved and grouped as primary and recurrent. Kaplan-Meier survival of progression was estimated, taking competing risks into account. Multivariable Cox regression was used to investigate survival predictors. The primary group consisted by 183 cases, gained more benefits on 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (51%) and mean PFS time (66.9 months) than the recurrent group (46 cases), in which 5-year postrecurrent PFS was 14%, and mean postrecurrent PFS time was 29.5 months. In the primary group, visual deficits, pathological subtypes, extent of bone invasion, preoperative Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, and variation in perioperative KPS were identified as independent predictors of PFS. A nomogram to predict 3-year and 5-year PFS consisted of these factors, was well calibrated and had good discriminative ability (adjusted Harrell C statistic, 0.68). In the recurrent group, marginal resection (P = 0.018) and adjuvant radiotherapy (P = 0.043) were verified as protective factors associated with postrecurrent PFS. Factors for tumor progression demonstrated some differences between primary and recurrent cases. The nomogram appears useful for risk stratification of tumor progression in primary cases. Further studies will be necessary to identify the rapid-growth histopathological subtype as an independent predictor of rapid progression.

  5. Diaphragm motion characterization using chest motion data for biomechanics-based lung tumor tracking during EBRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Elham; Gaede, Stewart; Lee, Ting-Yim; Samani, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in image-guided interventions, lung cancer External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is still very challenging due to respiration induced tumor motion. Among various proposed methods of tumor motion compensation, real-time tumor tracking is known to be one of the most effective solutions as it allows for maximum normal tissue sparing, less overall radiation exposure and a shorter treatment session. As such, we propose a biomechanics-based real-time tumor tracking method for effective lung cancer radiotherapy. In the proposed algorithm, the required boundary conditions for the lung Finite Element model, including diaphragm motion, are obtained using the chest surface motion as a surrogate signal. The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a function which is capable of inputting the chest surface motion data and outputting the diaphragm motion in real-time. For this purpose, after quantifying the diaphragm motion with a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) model, correlation coefficient between the model parameters of diaphragm motion and chest motion data was obtained through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Preliminary results obtained in this study indicate that the PCA coefficients representing the diaphragm motion can be obtained through chest surface motion tracking with high accuracy.

  6. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  7. Curettage of benign bone tumors and tumor like lesions: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zile Singh Kundu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Curettage is one of the most common treatment options for benign lytic bone tumors and tumor like lesions. The resultant defect is usually filled. We report our outcome curettage of benign bone tumors and tumor like lesions without filling the cavity. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied 42 patients (28 males and 14 females with benign bone tumors who had undergone curettage without grafting or filling of the defect by any other bone graft substitute. The age of the patients ranged from 14 to 66 years. The most common histological diagnosis was that of giant cell tumor followed by simple bone cyst, aneurysamal bone cyst, enchondroma, fibrous dysplasia, chondromyxoid fibroma, and chondroblastoma and giant cell reparative granuloma. Of the 15 giant cell tumors, 4 were radiographic grade 1 lesions, 8 were grade 2 and 3 grade 3. The mean maximum diameter of the cysts was 5.1 (range 1.1-9 cm cm and the mean volume of the lesions was 34.89 cm 3 (range 0.94-194.52 cm 3 . The plain radiographs of the part before and after curettage were reviewed to establish the size of the initial defect and the rate of reconstitution, filling and remodeling of the bone defect. Patients were reviewed every 3 monthly for a minimum period of 2 years. Results: Most of the bone defects completely reconstituted to a normal appearance while the rest filled partially. Two patients had preoperative and three had postoperative fractures. All the fractures healed uneventfully. Local recurrence occurred in three patients with giant cell tumor who were then reoperated. All other patients had unrestricted activities of daily living after surgery. The rate of bone reconstitution, risk of subsequent fracture or the incidence of complications was related to the size of the cyst/tumor at diagnosis. The benign cystic bone lesions with volume greater than approximately 70 cm 3 were found to have higher incidence of complications. Conclusion: This study

  8. Tumor recurrence and tumor-related mortality in endometrial cancer: Analysis in 276 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tejerizo-Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this manuscript, we assessed tumor recurrence and tumor-related mortality in a clinical series of endometrial cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective evaluation of 276 patients (mean age 64 years with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer treated at a single hospital in Madrid (Spain was conducted. The median follow-up was estimated using the inverse Kaplan–Meier method. RESULTS: Salient findings were endometrioid carcinoma (84.8% of cases, grade G1 (48.9% and stages IB (35.1% and IC (23.2%. Myometrial infiltration >50% was documented in 31.2% of cases and lymphovascular space invasion in 11.9%. After surgery, 52.5% of patients were classified into the low risk group, 21.4% into the intermediate risk group and 26.1% into the high risk group. Tumor recurrence occurred in 14.5% of patients, with an estimated median follow-up of 45 months (95% confidence interval (CI: 41.2–48.8, locoregional recurrence in 42.5% and distant recurrences in 57.5%. Furthermore, 40% of tumor recurrences developed during the first year after primary treatment and 90% over the first 3 years of follow-up. The tumor-related mortality rate was 15.9%. The estimated median follow-up was 46 months (95% CI: 43.0–49.0. Furthermore, 5.07% of death because of tumor developed during the first year after primary treatment and 13.77% over the first 3 years of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The rates of tumor-related death and tumor recurrence in endometrial cancer patients are low, with the highest percentages occurring within 3 years of primary treatment. Most of the recurrences occur outside the pelvis.

  9. Analysis of CD117-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Yuan Tzen; Bey-Liing Mau

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GISTs) that are negative for CD117 expression by immunohistochemistry and to characterize their malignant potential.METHODS: A total of 108 primary mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract were screened to select CD117-negative tumors, from which KIT(exons 9, 11, 13, and 17)and PDGFRA (exons 10, 12, 14, and 18) were sequenced to identify GISTs. Tumor recurrence and distant metastasis were used as the criteria of malignancy.RESULTS: The result showed that approximately 25%(29/108) of the gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors were negative for CD117 and approximately 6% (7/108)of the tumors were CD117-negative GISTs. All these CD117-negative tumors had a mutated KITand a wildtype PDGFRA. All CD117-negative GISTs with mutations at codons 557/558 of KIThad mitotic counts >10/50 high power field, and 75% (3/4) of them showed multiple recurrence or distant metastasis.CONCLUSION: CD1 17-negative KITmutated GISTs account for approximately 6% of the gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. Tumor recurrence or distant metastasis correlates to both theKITmutations at codons 557/558 and the mitotic counts, but not to the tumor size.

  10. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer. I. Analysis of tumor parameters, tumor dose and local control: the experience of the Gustave-Roussy Institute and the Princess Margaret Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study involved 463 breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at the Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients either had operable tumors, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Results were analyzed according to tumor response, local recurrence rate, tumor size, tumor fixation, nodal fixation and tumor dose. Conventional statistical analysis of local control showed two significant factors: tumor dose and tumor size. Multivariate analysis permitted to define an ''individual risk'' (IR) of local recurrence according to three independent factors: tumor size, tumor fixation, and nodal fixation. It was shown that the IR was a good prognostic factor for local control. Increase in tumor dose gave a similar effect in the local recurrence relative risk for all the IR groups. According to the slope of the dose-effect curve, it was deduced that a dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of local recurrence 2-fold. In fact, it was shown that tumor dose was the most significant independent factor on local control, able to produce up to a 10-fold increase compared to 2-fold decrease for tumor size. If the IR of local recurrence is known, a theoretical predictive value on local control, taking into account the tumor dose, can be determined according to the present data

  11. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF 5785 CASES WITH RESPIRATORY SYSTEM TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics and tendency of incidence of patients with respiratory system tumors during the past 23 y in Tianjin. Methods: All data in our research was obtained from the surgical pathology files of Department of Pathology of the general and the Second Hospitals of Tianjin Medical University between 1981 and 2003. All data was analyzed by Spss 11.5 statistics program. The comparisons were made by u-test, P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: 1. The detection rate of malignant tumors is significantly higher than that of benign tumors (U=52.68, p=0.000) in respiratory system. 2. The common sites of benign tumors are nose and pharynx, but the common sites of malignant tumors are lung and larynx. 3. The incidence of benign tumors generally peaks between the ages of 40 and 50, but the incidence of malignant tumor generally peaks between the ages of 50 and 60. 4. The commonest histological type of malignant tumors is squamous cell carcinoma, but the commonest histological type of benign tumors is papilloma. 5. The detection rate of malignant lung tumors steadily increased between 1981 and 1999 and increased sharply from 1999 to 2003, but the detection rate of malignant Nasopharyngeal tumors steadily decreased from 1981 to 2003. Between 1981 and 1997, the detection rate of malignant laryngeal tumors steadily increased, followed by a decrease between 1997 and 2003. Conclusion: The detection rate of malignant respiratory system tumors especially lung cancer is gradually increasing. Therefore early prevention and treatment are critical to patients' prognosis.

  12. Evaluation of inoperable pancreatic carcinoma based on tumor metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yasuhiko; Ueda, Michio; Kubota, Toru; Endo, Itaru; Sekido, Hitoshi; Togo, Shinji; Shimada, Hiroshi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    Many pancreatic cancers are detected only after they are far advanced, and thus show a poor prognosis. We evaluated the survival of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma, and strategy treatment. Subjects were 72 persons with advanced inoperable pancreatic carcinoma selected from among 144 examined at our department from May 1992 to March 2001. Patient factors (age, gender, and nutrition), tumor factors (hepatic metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and distant metastasis), and treatment (radiotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and hepatic arterial infusion therapy (HAI)) were studied and survival evaluated statistically. Overall mean survival was 175 days and the 1-year survival ratio was 13.5%. With multivariate analysis, prognostic factors were hepatic metastasis and radiotherapy. We therefore re-evaluated 56 patients treated with radiotherapy. In the group with no hepatic metastasis whose mean survival was 247 days, the prognostic factor was systemic chemotherapy. In the group with hepatic metastasis, mean survival was 140 days and the prognostic factor was the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) on admission. HAI was also a significant factor, which prolonged survival time with univariate analysis. Radiotherapy will be conducted for all inoperable pancreatic carcinomas. For the group with no hepatic metastasis, systemic chemotherapy is effective and for the group with hepatic metastasis. HAI will be selected. (author)

  13. Intramedullary tumors in children: analysis of 24 operated cases Tumores intramedulares em crianças: análise de 24 casos operados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Amoreira Gepp

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intramedullary tumors are rare. The authors reviewed 24 cases operated between 1996 and 2006. The study assessed the clinical characteristics and surgical results based upon the neurological function. METHOD: Medical records of patients with intramedullary astrocytoma and ependymoma were reviewed. The minimal follow up time was 6 months and, at the end of this period, a comparative analysis of the neurological function was performed based using the McCormick scale score. RESULTS: Most patients had astrocytoma (75%. Male gender was more prevalent (58.3%. The most common type of tumor was graded as I or II, and in three cases these were malignant. The total resection of the tumor was achieved in 20.8% of the cases. The statistical analysis did not show a statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative grades at McCormick scale. CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that microsurgery to intramedullary tumors did not significantly alter the neurological function after six months.Os tumores intramedulares são doenças raras. Os autores analisaram 24 casos operados entre 1996 e 2006. O estudo analisou as características clínicas e o resultado da cirurgia quanto à função neurológica. MÉTODO: Foram analisados pacientes com astrocitomas e ependimomas intramedulares. O tempo mínimo de acompanhamento foi de 6 meses e ao final deste período foi realizada a avaliação comparativa da variação do estado neurológico baseado na escala de McCormick. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes era de astrocitoma (75%. O gênero masculino foi mais prevalente (58,3%. A maioria dos tumores era de grau I ou II, 3 casos eram malignos. A ressecção total do tumor ocorreu em 20,8% dos casos. A avaliação estatística demonstrou que não houve diferença significativa entre o estado neurológico na escala de McCormick pré-operatória e pós-operatória. CONCLUSÕES: Os autores concluem que a microcirurgia para ressecção dos tumores

  14. [Endovascular management of skull base tumors. A practical review on literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Balderrama, Jorge; Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Lee, Angel; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Generally speaking, skull base tumors are very difficult-to-reach lesions. More or less, two thirds of those tumors correspond to meningiomas, which are highly vascular tumors. Tumors that are able to an embolization are juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, hemangiopericytomas, hemangioblastomas, meningiomas, metastatic lesions, paragangliomas, glomus tumors and other paragangliomas. Pre-operatory embolization of tumors arising in the skull base is a surgical strategy which allows to control probable hemorrhages secondary to the surgical resection of the tumor. The benefits of this sort of embolization have been partially demonstrated. However, there are concrete and objective results, as reduction in bleeding, time of surgery, post-operative hospital stay, and the use of blood transfusion; besides, another benefit reported is the lower morbimortality related to the surgical management of neural tissue and vascular structures. The aim of this article was to bring up to date the available information up to this moment, describe briefly the background of the pre-operative embolization of skull base tumors, and emphasize the knowledge related with the variables of this therapy, such as the types of hypervascular tumors, vascular anatomy related to this (according to type and position of the tumor), the types of embolization therapy in hypervascular tumors, as well as the materials that must be used. PMID:25078745

  15. Detection of Tumor Multifocality Is Important for Prediction of Tumor Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma: A Retrospective Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Jung-Soo; Sohn, Jin Hee; Kang, Guhyun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinicopathological characteristics and conclusive treatment modality for multifocal papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (mPTMC) have not been fully established. Methods: A retrospective study, systematic review, and meta-analysis were conducted to elucidate the clinicopathological significance of mPTMC. We investigated the multiplicity of 383 classical papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMCs) and the clinicopathological significance of incidental mPTMCs. Correlation between tumor recurrence and multifocality in PTMCs was evaluated through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Results: Tumor multifocality was identified in 103 of 383 PTMCs (26.9%). On linear regression analysis, primary tumor diameter was significantly correlated with tumor number (R2=0.014, p=.021) and supplemental tumor diameter (R2=0.117, p=.023). Of 103 mPTMCs, 61 (59.2%) were non-incidental, with tumor detected on preoperative ultrasonography, and 42 (40.8%) were diagnosed (incidental mPTMCs) on pathological examination. Lymph node metastasis and higher tumor stage were significantly correlated with tumor multifocality. However, there was no difference in nodal metastasis or tumor stage between incidental and non-incidental mPTMCs. On meta-analysis, tumor multifocality was significantly correlated with tumor recurrence in PTMCs (odds ratio, 2.002; 95% confidence interval, 1.475 to 2.719, paggressive tumor behavior. PMID:27271109

  16. Changing Histopathological Diagnostics by Genome-Based Tumor Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kloth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, tumors are classified by histopathological criteria, i.e., based on their specific morphological appearances. Consequently, current therapeutic decisions in oncology are strongly influenced by histology rather than underlying molecular or genomic aberrations. The increase of information on molecular changes however, enabled by the Human Genome Project and the International Cancer Genome Consortium as well as the manifold advances in molecular biology and high-throughput sequencing techniques, inaugurated the integration of genomic information into disease classification. Furthermore, in some cases it became evident that former classifications needed major revision and adaption. Such adaptations are often required by understanding the pathogenesis of a disease from a specific molecular alteration, using this molecular driver for targeted and highly effective therapies. Altogether, reclassifications should lead to higher information content of the underlying diagnoses, reflecting their molecular pathogenesis and resulting in optimized and individual therapeutic decisions. The objective of this article is to summarize some particularly important examples of genome-based classification approaches and associated therapeutic concepts. In addition to reviewing disease specific markers, we focus on potentially therapeutic or predictive markers and the relevance of molecular diagnostics in disease monitoring.

  17. A novel approach for the detection and genetic analysis of live melanoma circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody J Xu

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs.The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status.The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4% and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%. In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy.

  18. Analysis of limb function after various reconstruction methods according to tumor location following resection of pediatric malignant bone tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuhashi Yasuaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the reconstruction of the affected limb in pediatric malignant bone tumors, since the loss of joint function affects limb-length discrepancy expected in the future, reconstruction methods that not only maximally preserve the joint function but also maintain good limb function are necessary. We analysis limb function of reconstruction methods by tumor location following resection of pediatric malignant bone tumors. Patients and methods We classified the tumors according to their location into 3 types by preoperative MRI, and evaluated reconstruction methods after wide resection, paying attention to whether the joint function could be preserved. The mean age of the patients was 10.6 years, Osteosarcoma was observed in 26 patients, Ewing's sarcoma in 3, and PNET(primitive neuroectodermal tumor and chondrosarcoma (grade 1 in 1 each. Results Type I were those located in the diaphysis, and reconstruction was performed using a vascularized fibular graft(vascularized fibular graft. Type 2 were those located in contact with the epiphyseal line or within 1 cm from this line, and VFG was performed in 1, and distraction osteogenesis in 1. Type III were those extending from the diaphysis to the epiphysis beyond the epiphyseal line, and a Growing Kotz was mainly used in 10 patients. The mean functional assessment score was the highest for Type I (96%: n = 4 according to the type and for VFG (99% according to the reconstruction method. Conclusion The final functional results were the most satisfactory for Types I and II according to tumor location. Biological reconstruction such as VFG and distraction osteogenesis without a prosthesis are so high score in the MSTS rating system. Therefore, considering the function of the affected limb, a limb reconstruction method allowing the maximal preservation of joint function should be selected after careful evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy and the location of the tumor.

  19. Predicting Ovarian Cancer Patients' Clinical Response to Platinum-Based Chemotherapy by Their Tumor Proteomic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Levine, Douglas A; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Zhen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy in the United States with most patients diagnosed in the advanced stage of the disease. Platinum-based antineoplastic therapeutics is indispensable to treating advanced ovarian serous carcinoma. However, patients have heterogeneous responses to platinum drugs, and it is difficult to predict these interindividual differences before administering medication. In this study, we investigated the tumor proteomic profiles and clinical characteristics of 130 ovarian serous carcinoma patients analyzed by the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC), predicted the platinum drug response using supervised machine learning methods, and evaluated our prediction models through leave-one-out cross-validation. Our data-driven feature selection approach indicated that tumor proteomics profiles contain information for predicting binarized platinum response (P drug responses as well as provided insights into the biological processes influencing the efficacy of platinum-based therapeutics. Our analytical approach is also extensible to predicting response to other antineoplastic agents or treatment modalities for both ovarian and other cancers. PMID:27312948

  20. A superpixel-based framework for automatic tumor segmentation on breast DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ning; Wu, Jia; Weinstein, Susan P.; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Keller, Brad M.; Ashraf, Ahmed B.; Jiang, YunQing; Davatzikos, Christos; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2015-03-01

    Accurate and efficient automated tumor segmentation in breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is highly desirable for computer-aided tumor diagnosis. We propose a novel automatic segmentation framework which incorporates mean-shift smoothing, superpixel-wise classification, pixel-wise graph-cuts partitioning, and morphological refinement. A set of 15 breast DCE-MR images, obtained from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6657 I-SPY trial, were manually segmented to generate tumor masks (as ground truth) and breast masks (as regions of interest). Four state-of-the-art segmentation approaches based on diverse models were also utilized for comparison. Based on five standard evaluation metrics for segmentation, the proposed framework consistently outperformed all other approaches. The performance of the proposed framework was: 1) 0.83 for Dice similarity coefficient, 2) 0.96 for pixel-wise accuracy, 3) 0.72 for VOC score, 4) 0.79 mm for mean absolute difference, and 5) 11.71 mm for maximum Hausdorff distance, which surpassed the second best method (i.e., adaptive geodesic transformation), a semi-automatic algorithm depending on precise initialization. Our results suggest promising potential applications of our segmentation framework in assisting analysis of breast carcinomas.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters.METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans...... with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps...... of model rate constants k₁, k₃ and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake.RESULTS: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k₁ (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer...

  2. MOLECULAR AND CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF LUNG TUMOR CELL LINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have measured the levels of amplification of oncogenes and tumor marker genes or other genes of interest in nine human lung tumor cell lines in comparison to normal human bronchial epithelial cells or normal blood lymphocytes to test the hypothesis that aberrant amplification ...

  3. Retrospective analysis of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in Brazilians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Tito Salla

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuroma, neurofibroma, neurilemmoma, palisaded encapsulated neuroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST are peripheral nerve sheath tumors and present neural origin. The goal of this study was to describe the epidemiological data of oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in a sample of the Brazilian population. Biopsies requested from the Oral Pathology Service, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (MG, Brazil, between 1966 and 2006 were evaluated. Lesions diagnosed as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were submitted to morphologic and to immunohistochemical analyses. All cases were immunopositive to the S-100 protein. Thirty-five oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors were found, representing 0.16% of all lesions archived in the Oral Pathology Service. Traumatic neuroma (15 cases most frequently affected the mental foramen. Solitary neurofibroma (10 cases was more frequently observed in the palate. Neurofibroma associated with neurofibromatosis type I (2 cases was observed in the gingival and alveolar mucosa. Neurilemmoma (4 cases was more commonly observed in the buccal mucosa. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (3 cases occurred in the mandible, palate, and tongue. Palisaded encapsulated neuroma (1 case occurred in the buccal mucosa. The data confirmed that oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors are uncommon in the oral region, with some lesions presenting a predilection for a specific gender or site. This study may be useful in clinical dentistry and oral pathology practice and may be used as baseline data regarding oral peripheral nerve sheath tumors in other populations.

  4. Tailoring nanoparticle designs to target cancer based on tumor pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward A.; Dai, Qin; Sarsons, Christopher D.; Chen, Juan; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Hwang, David M.; Zheng, Gang; Cramb, David T.; Rinker, Kristina D.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles can provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. How nanoparticle size, shape, and surface chemistry can affect their accumulation, retention, and penetration in tumors remains heavily investigated, because such findings provide guiding principles for engineering optimal nanosystems for tumor targeting. Currently, the experimental focus has been on particle design and not the biological system. Here, we varied tumor volume to determine whether cancer pathophysiology can influence tumor accumulation and penetration of different sized nanoparticles. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to model the process of nanoparticle accumulation. We discovered that changes in pathophysiology associated with tumor volume can selectively change tumor uptake of nanoparticles of varying size. We further determine that nanoparticle retention within tumors depends on the frequency of interaction of particles with the perivascular extracellular matrix for smaller nanoparticles, whereas transport of larger nanomaterials is dominated by Brownian motion. These results reveal that nanoparticles can potentially be personalized according to a patient's disease state to achieve optimal diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes.

  5. 三叉-心脏反射在颅底肿瘤患者手术中的临床特征%Clinical analysis of trigemino-cardiac reflex during surgery for patients with skull base tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何悦; 周大彪; 王会文; 韩如泉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features,risky factors and outcome of the trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) during surgery for skull base tumors.Methods Two hundred and sixty-two neurosurgical patients with skull base tumors underwent general anesthesia and open surgery from October 2009 to December 2011 in department of neurosurgery of Beijing Tiantan Hospital.The occurrence of TCR and the type of tumor,the surgical approach as well as the postoperative complication relative to TCR was evaluated retrospectively.Results Seventeen patients occurred TCR events intraoperatively (6.5%).There were 8 men and 9 women with an average age of 40.5 years.Eleven of them (64.7%) underwent schwannoma surgery.Regarding with the surgical procedure,the suboccipital retrosigmoidal approach and the middle fossa transtentorial approach were most commonly associated with TCR in this series (88.2%).The heart rate and blood pressure returned to the patient's normal baseline level after cessation of the surgical manipulation.There was no TCR-relative complication in cardiovascular system.The postoperative course is uneventful in all 17 patients.Conclusions TCR may occur during surgery for skull base tumor,especially when performing schwannoma surgery and suboccipital retrosigmoidal or middle fossa transtentorial approach.Accurate recognition and management of TCR during skull base surgery often carry on favorable outcome.%目的 探讨颅底肿瘤手术中发生的三叉-心脏反射(TCR)的临床特征、相关因素和预后.方法 回顾2009年10月至2011年12月首都医科大学附属北京天坛医院神经外科262例颅底肿瘤患者在全身麻醉下开颅手术中发生的TCR,并分析与TCR相关的肿瘤类型和手术入路以及术后并发症.结果 17例患者术中发生TCR(占6.5%).其中男8例,女9例,平均年龄40.5岁.肿瘤类型以神经鞘瘤最多,共11例(64.7%);手术入路以枕下乙状窦后入路最多见,其次为中颅

  6. Ex vivo brain tumor analysis using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    A big challenge during neurosurgeries is to distinguish between healthy tissue and cancerous tissue, but currently a suitable non-invasive real time imaging modality is not available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a potential technique for such a modality. OCT has a penetration depth of 1-2 mm and a resolution of 1-15 μm which is sufficient to illustrate structural differences between healthy tissue and brain tumor. Therefore, we investigated gray and white matter of healthy central nervous system and meningioma samples with a Spectral Domain OCT System (Thorlabs Callisto). Additional OCT images were generated after paraffin embedding and after the samples were cut into 10 μm thin slices for histological investigation with a bright field microscope. All samples were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. In all cases B-scans and 3D images were made. Furthermore, a camera image of the investigated area was made by the built-in video camera of our OCT system. For orientation, the backsides of all samples were marked with blue ink. The structural differences between healthy tissue and meningioma samples were most pronounced directly after removal. After paraffin embedding these differences diminished. A correlation between OCT en face images and microscopy images can be seen. In order to increase contrast, post processing algorithms were applied. Hence we employed Spectroscopic OCT, pattern recognition algorithms and machine learning algorithms such as k-means Clustering and Principal Component Analysis.

  7. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I., E-mail: iespinoza@fis.puc.cl [Institute of Physics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Peschke, P. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Karger, C. P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  8. Progression and tumor heterogeneity analysis in early rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H. Lips (Esther); R. van Eijk (Ronald); E.J.R. de Graaf (Eelco); P. Doornebosch (Pascal); N.F.C.C. de Miranda (Noel); J. Oosting (Jan); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Robert); T. van Wezel (Tom); H. Morreau (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Adequate preoperative staging of large sessile rectal tumors requires identifying adenomas that already contain an invasive focus, specifically those that are growing in or beyond the submucosa. We systematically compared chromosomal instability patterns in adenoma and carcinoma

  9. Pretreatment Tumor Volume Estimation Based on Total Serum PSA in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Barroso Kato; Victor Srougi; Fernanda Aburesi Salvadori; Pedro Paulo Marino Rodrigues Ayres; Katia Moreira Leite; Miguel Srougi

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish a formula that estimates tumor volume in localized prostate cancer based on serum prostate specific antigen levels. One of the main prognostic variables in localized prostate cancer is tumor volume, which can be precisely defined only after prostate extirpation. The present study defines a simple method that allows for estimation of tumor volume before treatment, which can help to establish a better therapeutic strategy for each patient. METHODS: From 1997 to 2002, 73...

  10. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Xu; Xueying Mao; Ahmet Imrali; Ferrial Syed; Katherine Mutsvangwa; Daniel Berney; Paul Cathcart; John Hines; Jonathan Shamash; Yong-Jie Lu

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to st...

  11. A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Colin; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Volik, Stanislav; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Guiqing; Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Trask, Barbara J.; Waldman, Frederic; Costello, Joseph; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sridharan, Shivaranjani; Paris, Pamela; Tao, Quanzhou; Aerni, Sarah J.; Brown, Raymond P.; Bashir, Ali; Gray, Joe W.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter; Nefedov, Mikhail; Ried, Thomas; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Collins, Colin C.

    2008-04-03

    The genomes of many epithelial tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal rearrangements. All classes of genome rearrangements can be identified using End Sequencing Profiling (ESP), which relies on paired-end sequencing of cloned tumor genomes. In this study, brain, breast, ovary and prostate tumors along with three breast cancer cell lines were surveyed with ESP yielding the largest available collection of sequence-ready tumor genome breakpoints and providing evidence that some rearrangements may be recurrent. Sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed translocations and complex tumor genome structures that include coamplification and packaging of disparate genomic loci with associated molecular heterogeneity. Comparison of the tumor genomes suggests recurrent rearrangements. Some are likely to be novel structural polymorphisms, whereas others may be bona fide somatic rearrangements. A recurrent fusion transcript in breast tumors and a constitutional fusion transcript resulting from a segmental duplication were identified. Analysis of end sequences for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed candidate somatic mutations and an elevated rate of novel SNPs in an ovarian tumor. These results suggest that the genomes of many epithelial tumors may be far more dynamic and complex than previously appreciated and that genomic fusions including fusion transcripts and proteins may be common, possibly yielding tumor-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  12. The differentiation of malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors by F-18 FDG PET/CT studies-determination of maxSUV by analysis of ROC curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eun Jung; Cho, Ihn Ho; Chun, Kyung Ah; Won, Kyu Chang; Lee, Hyung Woo; Choi, Jun Heok; Shin, Duk Seop [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We evaluated the standard uptake value (SUV) of F-18 FDG at PET/CT for differentiation of benign from malignant tumor in primary musculoskeletal tumors. Forty-six tumors (11 benign and 12 malignant soft tissue tumors, 9 benign and 14 malignant bone tumors) were examined with F-18 FDG PET/CT (Discovery ST, GE) prior to tissue diagnosis. The maxSUV(maximum value of SUV) were calculated and compared between benign and malignant lesions. The lesion analysis was based on the transverse whole body image. The maxSUV with cutoff of 4.1 was used in distinguishing benign from malignant soft tissue tumor and 3.05 was used in bone tumor by ROC curve. There was a statistically significant difference in maxSUV between benign (n = 11; maxSUV 3.4 {+-} 3.2) and malignant (n = 12; maxSUV 14.8 {+-} 12.2) lesion in soft tissue tumor ({rho} = 0.001). Between benign bone tumor (n = 9; maxSUV 5.4 {+-} 4.0) and malignant bone tumor (n = 14; maxSUV 7.3 {+-} 3.2), there was not a significant difference in maxSUV. The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating malignant from benign soft tissue tumor was 83% and 91%, respectively. There were four false positive malignant bone tumor cases to include fibrous dysplasia, Langerhans-cell histiocytosis (n = 2) and osteoid osteoma. Also, one false positive case of malignant soft tissue tumor was nodular fasciitis. The maxSUV was useful for differentiation of benign from malignant lesion in primary soft tissue tumors. In bone tumor, the low maxSUV correlated well with benign lesions but high maxSUV did not always mean malignancy.

  13. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemkens, Bjorn, E-mail: b.stemkens@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tijssen, Rob H.N. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Senneville, Baudouin D. de [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); L' Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5251, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Heerkens, Hanne D.; Vulpen, Marco van; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Berg, Cornelis A.T. van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  14. Nonrigid registration algorithm for longitudinal breast MR images and the preliminary analysis of breast tumor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Dawant, Benoit M.; Welch, E. Brian; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Freehardt, Darla; Mayer, Ingrid; Kelley, Mark; Meszoely, Ingrid; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Although useful for the detection of breast cancers, conventional imaging methods, including mammography and ultrasonography, do not provide adequate information regarding response to therapy. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has emerged as a promising technique to provide relevant information on tumor status. Consequently, accurate longitudinal registration of breast MR images is critical for the comparison of changes induced by treatment at the voxel level. In this study, a nonrigid registration algorithm is proposed to allow for longitudinal registration of breast MR images obtained throughout the course of treatment. We accomplish this by modifying the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) through adding a tumor volume preserving constraint in the cost function. The registration results demonstrate the proposed algorithm can successfully register the longitudinal breast MR images and permit analysis of the parameter maps. We also propose a novel validation method to evaluate the proposed registration algorithm quantitatively. These validations also demonstrate that the proposed algorithm constrains tumor deformation well and performs better than the unconstrained ABA algorithm.

  15. Analysis of perfusion, microcirculation and drug transport in tumors. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Paolo; Cattaneo, Laura

    2013-11-01

    We address blood flow through a network of capillaries surrounded by a porous interstitium. We develop a computational model based on the Immersed Boundary method [C. S. Peskin. Acta Numer. 2002.]. The advantage of such an approach relies in its efficiency, because it does not need a full description of the real geometry allowing for a large economy of memory and CPU time and it facilitates handling fully realistic vascular networks [L. Cattaneo and P. Zunino. Technical report, MOX, Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano, 2013.]. The analysis of perfusion and drug release in vascularized tumors is a relevant application of such techniques. Blood vessels in tumors are substantially leakier than in healthy tissue and they are tortuous. These vascular abnormalities lead to an impaired blood supply and abnormal tumor microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and elevated interstitial fluid pressure that reduces the distribution of drugs through advection [L.T. Baxter and R.K. Jain. Microvascular Research, 1989]. Finally, we discuss the application of the model to deliver nanoparticles. In particular, transport of nanoparticles in the vessels network, their adhesion to the vessel wall and the drug release in the surrounding tissue will be addressed.

  16. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor–surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor–surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor–surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3–3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  17. Meta-analysis on the effects of octreotide on tumor mass in acromegaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giustina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The long-acting somatostatin analogue octreotide is used either as an adjuvant or primary therapy to lower growth hormone (GH levels in patients with acromegaly and may also induce pituitary tumor shrinkage. OBJECTIVE: We performed a meta-analysis to accurately assess the effect of octreotide on pituitary tumor shrinkage. DATA SOURCES: A computerized Medline and Embase search was undertaken to identify potentially eligible studies. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: Eligibility criteria included treatment with octreotide, availability of numerical metrics on tumor shrinkage and clear definition of a clinically relevant reduction in tumor size. Primary endpoints included the proportion of patients with tumor shrinkage and mean percentage reduction in tumor volume. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS: The electronic search identified 2202 articles. Of these, 41 studies fulfilling the eligibility criteria were selected for data extraction and analysis. In total, 1685 patients were included, ranging from 6 to 189 patients per trial. For the analysis of the effect of octreotide on pituitary tumor shrinkage a random effect model was used to account for differences in both effect size and sampling error. RESULTS: Octreotide was shown to induce tumor shrinkage in 53.0% [95% CI: 45.0%-61.0%] of treated patients. In patients treated with the LAR formulation of octreotide, this increased to 66.0%, [95% CI: 57.0%-74.0%. In the nine studies in which tumor shrinkage was quantified, the overall weighted mean percentage reduction in tumor size was 37.4% [95% CI: 22.4%-52.4%], rising to 50.6% [95% CI: 42.7%-58.4%] with octreotide LAR. LIMITATIONS: Most trials examined were open-label and had no control group. CONCLUSIONS: Octreotide LAR induces clinically relevant tumor shrinkage in more than half of patients with acromegaly.

  18. Blood-based Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caicun ZHOU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, "liquid biopsy" received enormous attentionas a new detecting method. As a non-invasive tumor screening method, the applications of liquid biopsyinclude early detection, monitoring relapse, assessment of therapy and molecule expression in lung cancer. The main source of liquid biopsy comes from circulating tumor cells (CTCs, ctDNA, and so on. This review will explore the biological characteristics, detection technologies and clinical applications of CTCs, ctDNA and other tumor markers in lung cancerand summarize liquid biopsy which in accord with three important criteria of high sensitivity (highspecificity, clinical utility and repeatability, especially a new method of ligand-targeted PCR (LT-PCR that showed a high sensitivity of 67.2% in stage I lung cancer. We expect that "liquid biopsy" could be really explored from scientific research to clinical application.

  19. Characterization of sonographically indeterminate ovarian tumors with MR imaging. A logistic regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to maximize the discrimination between benign and malignant masses in patients with sonographically indeterminate ovarian lesions by means of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and to develop a computer-assisted diagnosis system. Material and Methods: Findings in precontrast and Gd-DTPA contrast-enhanced MR images of 104 patients with 115 sonographically indeterminate ovarian masses were analyzed, and the results were correlated with histopathological findings. Of 115 lesions, 65 were benign (23 cystadenomas, 13 complex cysts, 11 teratomas, 6 fibrothecomas, 12 others) and 50 were malignant (32 ovarian carcinomas, 7 metastatic tumors of the ovary, 4 carcinomas of the fallopian tubes, 7 others). A logistic regression analysis was performed to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions, and a model of a computer-assisted diagnosis was developed. This model was prospectively tested in 75 cases of ovarian tumors found at other institutions. Results: From the univariate analysis, the following parameters were selected as significant for predicting malignancy (p≤0.05): A solid or cystic mass with a large solid component or wall thickness greater than 3 mm; complex internal architecture; ascites; and bilaterality. Based on these parameters, a model of a computer-assisted diagnosis system was developed with the logistic regression analysis. To distinguish benign from malignant lesions, the maximum cut-off point was obtained between 0.47 and 0.51. In a prospective application of this model, 87% of the lesions were accurately identified as benign or malignant. (orig.)

  20. Characterization of sonographically indeterminate ovarian tumors with MR imaging. A logistic regression analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Hatanaka, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Torashima, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Takahashi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Miyazaki, K. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Okamura, H. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kumamoto Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to maximize the discrimination between benign and malignant masses in patients with sonographically indeterminate ovarian lesions by means of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and to develop a computer-assisted diagnosis system. Material and Methods: Findings in precontrast and Gd-DTPA contrast-enhanced MR images of 104 patients with 115 sonographically indeterminate ovarian masses were analyzed, and the results were correlated with histopathological findings. Of 115 lesions, 65 were benign (23 cystadenomas, 13 complex cysts, 11 teratomas, 6 fibrothecomas, 12 others) and 50 were malignant (32 ovarian carcinomas, 7 metastatic tumors of the ovary, 4 carcinomas of the fallopian tubes, 7 others). A logistic regression analysis was performed to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions, and a model of a computer-assisted diagnosis was developed. This model was prospectively tested in 75 cases of ovarian tumors found at other institutions. Results: From the univariate analysis, the following parameters were selected as significant for predicting malignancy (p{<=}0.05): A solid or cystic mass with a large solid component or wall thickness greater than 3 mm; complex internal architecture; ascites; and bilaterality. Based on these parameters, a model of a computer-assisted diagnosis system was developed with the logistic regression analysis. To distinguish benign from malignant lesions, the maximum cut-off point was obtained between 0.47 and 0.51. In a prospective application of this model, 87% of the lesions were accurately identified as benign or malignant. (orig.).

  1. Continuous Flow Deformability-Based Separation of Circulating Tumor Cells Using Microfluidic Ratchets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Emily S; Jin, Chao; Guo, Quan; Ang, Richard R; Duffy, Simon P; Matthews, Kerryn; Azad, Arun; Abdi, Hamidreza; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Bazov, Jenny; Chi, Kim N; Black, Peter C; Ma, Hongshen

    2016-04-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer tremendous potential for the detection and characterization of cancer. A key challenge for their isolation and subsequent analysis is the extreme rarity of these cells in circulation. Here, a novel label-free method is described to enrich viable CTCs directly from whole blood based on their distinct deformability relative to hematological cells. This mechanism leverages the deformation of single cells through tapered micrometer scale constrictions using oscillatory flow in order to generate a ratcheting effect that produces distinct flow paths for CTCs, leukocytes, and erythrocytes. A label-free separation of circulating tumor cells from whole blood is demonstrated, where target cells can be separated from background cells based on deformability despite their nearly identical size. In doping experiments, this microfluidic device is able to capture >90% of cancer cells from unprocessed whole blood to achieve 10(4) -fold enrichment of target cells relative to leukocytes. In patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, where CTCs are not significantly larger than leukocytes, CTCs can be captured based on deformability at 25× greater yield than with the conventional CellSearch system. Finally, the CTCs separated using this approach are collected in suspension and are available for downstream molecular characterization. PMID:26917414

  2. Modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery based on tumor perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Abdollahi, Behnaz; Martinez, Carlos J.; Burey, Lacey A.; Landis, Melissa D.; Chang, Jenny C.; Ferrari, Mauro; Frieboes, Hermann B.

    2013-05-01

    Heterogeneities in the perfusion of solid tumors prevent optimal delivery of nanotherapeutics. Clinical imaging protocols for obtaining patient-specific data have proven difficult to implement. It is challenging to determine which perfusion features hold greater prognostic value and to relate measurements to vessel structure and function. With the advent of systemically administered nanotherapeutics whose delivery is dependent on overcoming diffusive and convective barriers to transport, such knowledge is increasingly important. We describe a framework for the automated evaluation of vascular perfusion curves measured at the single vessel level. Primary tumor fragments, collected from triple-negative breast cancer patients and grown as xenografts in mice, were injected with fluorescence contrast and monitored using intravital microscopy. The time to arterial peak and venous delay, two features whose probability distributions were measured directly from time-series curves, were analyzed using a fuzzy c-mean supervised classifier in order to rank individual tumors according to their perfusion characteristics. The resulting rankings correlated inversely with experimental nanoparticle accumulation measurements, enabling the modeling of nanotherapeutics delivery without requiring any underlying assumptions about tissue structure or function, or heterogeneities contained therein. With additional calibration, these methodologies may enable the investigation of nanotherapeutics delivery strategies in a variety of tumor models.

  3. Mathematical Based Calculation of Drug Penetration Depth in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cells’ growth which affect cells and make them damaged. Many treatment options for cancer exist. Chemotherapy as an important treatment option is the use of drugs to treat cancer. The anticancer drug travels to the tumor and then diffuses in it through capillaries. The diffusion of drugs in the solid tumor is limited by penetration depth which is different in case of different drugs and cancers. The computation of this depth is important as it helps physicians to investigate about treatment of infected tissue. Although many efforts have been made on studying and measuring drug penetration depth, less works have been done on computing this length from a mathematical point of view. In this paper, first we propose phase lagging model for diffusion of drug in the tumor. Then, using this model on one side and considering the classic diffusion on the other side, we compute the drug penetration depth in the solid tumor. This computed value of drug penetration depth is corroborated by comparison with the values measured by experiments.

  4. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Peifer, Martin; Bos, Marc; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Ansen, Sascha; Gardizi, Masyar; Nguyen, Chau; Berg, Johannes; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Solomon, Benjamin; Pao, William; Carter, Scott L.; Getz, Gad; Hayes, D. Neil; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Thunnissen, Erik; Travis, William D.; Perner, Sven; Wright, Gavin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Thomas, Roman; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Mueller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Menon, Roopika; Koenig, Katharina; Albus, Kerstin; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fassunke, Jana; Schmitz, Katja; Kuenstlinger, Helen; Kleine, Michaela; Binot, Elke; Querings, Silvia; Altmueller, Janine; Boessmann, Ingelore; Nuemberg, Peter; Schneider, Peter; Bogus, Magdalena; Buettner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Russell, Prudence; Thunnissen, Erik; Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Helland, Aslaug; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Chen, Yuan; Groen, Herman; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Clement, Joachim H.; Weder, Walter; Saenger, Joerg; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danille A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Nogova, Lucia; Sos, Martin L.; Mattonet, Christian; Toepelt, Karin; Scheffler, Matthias; Goekkurt, Eray; Kappes, Rainer; Krueger, Stefan; Kambartel, Kato; Behringer, Dirk; Schulte, Wolfgang; Galetke, Wolfgang; Randerath, Winfried; Heldwein, Matthias; Schlesinger, Andreas; Serke, Monika; Hekmat, Khosro; Frank, Konrad F.; Schnell, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Huenerlituerkoglu, Ali-Nuri; Schmitz, Stephan; Meffert, Lisa; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Litt-Lampe, Markus; Gerigk, Ulrich; Fricke, Rainer; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John K.; Hyde, Russell; Validire, Pierre; Girard, Philippe; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Hallek, Michael; Soria, Jean-Charles; Carter, Scott L.; Getz, Gad; Hayes, D. Neil; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Peifer, Martin; Bos, Marc; Pao, William; Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Thomas, Roman K.

    2013-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic interventi

  5. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper...... the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients...... agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Conclusion: Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region...

  6. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR BREAST MALIGNANT TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志民; 刘国津; 盖学良; 王晓军; 辛志泳

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To review the evolution of the current surgical treatment for breast malignant tumors over the past twenty years in the First Hospital of Jilin University (the former Bethune University of Medical Sciences). Methods: 1195 eligible patients with primary breast malignant tumor diagnosed and surgically treated at the First Teaching Hospital from January 1980 and December 2000 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The peak frequency was in 40-49 years of age (40.00%), the age of the patients with breast malignant tumors trends to become young. The most common pTNM classification was Stage Ⅱ. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (398 patients, 33.31%), and simple carcinoma (279 patients, 23.53%). Modified radical mastectomy was the most common operation procedure performed (779 patients, 65.19%), and was increasingly used while radical mastectomy was adopted decreasingly in recent decade. Conclusion: The variation of operation procedures performed on patients with breast malignant tumors reflected the advance of our understanding of the biology of cancer and the progression of new treatment principles.

  7. Improved classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins using data mining models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Geetha Ramani

    Full Text Available Detecting divergence between oncogenic tumors plays a pivotal role in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This research work was focused on designing a computational strategy to predict the class of lung cancer tumors from the structural and physicochemical properties (1497 attributes of protein sequences obtained from genes defined by microarray analysis. The proposed methodology involved the use of hybrid feature selection techniques (gain ratio and correlation based subset evaluators with Incremental Feature Selection followed by Bayesian Network prediction to discriminate lung cancer tumors as Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC and the COMMON classes. Moreover, this methodology eliminated the need for extensive data cleansing strategies on the protein properties and revealed the optimal and minimal set of features that contributed to lung cancer tumor classification with an improved accuracy compared to previous work. We also attempted to predict via supervised clustering the possible clusters in the lung tumor data. Our results revealed that supervised clustering algorithms exhibited poor performance in differentiating the lung tumor classes. Hybrid feature selection identified the distribution of solvent accessibility, polarizability and hydrophobicity as the highest ranked features with Incremental feature selection and Bayesian Network prediction generating the optimal Jack-knife cross validation accuracy of 87.6%. Precise categorization of oncogenic genes causing SCLC and NSCLC based on the structural and physicochemical properties of their protein sequences is expected to unravel the functionality of proteins that are essential in maintaining the genomic integrity of a cell and also act as an informative source for drug design, targeting essential protein properties and their composition that are found to exist in lung cancer tumors.

  8. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo ‘bioreactors’ for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro. (paper)

  9. PCR Expression Analysis Of the Estrogeninducible Gene Bcei in Gastrointestinal and Other Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Wundrack

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed to test for tumor cell specific expression of the BCEI gene. This new marker gene, reported at first for human breast cancer, was found specifically active in various gastrointestinal carcinomas by previously applying immunohistochemistry and RNA (Northern blot analysis. Presently, by using reverse transcription -PCR analysis, a series of primary tumor tissues and established tumor cell lines were testcd for BCEI transcription. This approach was compared to immunostaining achieved by an antibody directed against the BCEI gene’s product. The result demonstrate the superior sensitivity of PCR by indicating the gene’ s expression in cases where immunohistochemical testing remained negative.

  10. BRAIN TUMOR CLASSIFICATION USING NEURAL NETWORK BASED METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyani A. Bhawar*, Prof. Nitin K. Bhil

    2016-01-01

    MRI (Magnetic resonance Imaging) brain neoplasm pictures Classification may be a troublesome tasks due to the variance and complexity of tumors. This paper presents two Neural Network techniques for the classification of the magnetic resonance human brain images. The proposed Neural Network technique consists of 3 stages, namely, feature extraction, dimensionality reduction, and classification. In the first stage, we have obtained the options connected with tomography pictures victimization d...

  11. Dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay for ultra-sensitive detection of tumor marker protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Ma, Jiehua; Fan, Qiongxuan; Tao, Yaqin; Li, Genxi

    2016-06-14

    A novel dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay that utilizes manganese dioxide nanosheet-modified gold nanoparticles (MnO2-GNPs) as an activatable nanoprobe has been developed to detect tumor markers down to femtomolar levels. PMID:27247980

  12. Trajectory Based Traffic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin;

    2013-01-01

    We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point-and-click a......We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point......-and-click analysis, due to a novel and efficient indexing structure. With the web-site daisy.aau.dk/its/spqdemo/we will demonstrate several analyses, using a very large real-world data set consisting of 1.9 billion GPS records (1.5 million trajectories) recorded from more than 13000 vehicles, and touching most...

  13. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W.; Xie, X. Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  14. Genome wide in silico SNP-tumor association analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogenesis occurs, at least in part, due to the accumulation of mutations in critical genes that control the mechanisms of cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Publicly accessible databases contain millions of expressed sequence tag (EST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) records, which have the potential to assist in the identification of SNPs overrepresented in tumor tissue. An in silico SNP-tumor association study was performed utilizing tissue library and SNP information available in NCBI's dbEST (release 092002) and dbSNP (build 106). A total of 4865 SNPs were identified which were present at higher allele frequencies in tumor compared to normal tissues. A subset of 327 (6.7%) SNPs induce amino acid changes to the protein coding sequences. This approach identified several SNPs which have been previously associated with carcinogenesis, as well as a number of SNPs that now warrant further investigation This novel in silico approach can assist in prioritization of genes and SNPs in the effort to elucidate the genetic mechanisms underlying the development of cancer

  15. Demographic and histopathologic profile of pediatric brain tumors: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshil C Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few hospital-based or population-based studies are published in the context to the epidemiologic profile of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs in India and Indian subcontinent. Aim: To study the demographic and histopathologic profile of PBTs according to World Health Organization 2007 classification in a single tertiary health care center in India. Materials and Methods: Data regarding age, gender, topography, and histopathology of 76 pediatric patients (0–19 years with brain tumors operated over a period of 24 months (January-2012 to December-2013 was collected retrospectively and analyzed using EpiInfo 7. Chi-square test and test of proportions (Z-test were used wherever necessary. Results: PBTs were more common in males (55.3% as compared to females (44.7% with male to female ratio of 1.23:1. Mean age was 10.69 years. Frequency of tumors was higher in childhood age group (65.8% when compared to adolescent age group (34.2%. The most common anatomical site was cerebellum (39.5%, followed by hemispheres (22.4%. Supratentorial tumors (52.6% were predominant than infratentorial tumors (47.4%. Astrocytomas (40.8% and embryonal tumors (29.0% were the most common histological types almost contributing more than 2/3rd of all tumors. Craniopharyngiomas (11.8% and ependymomas (6.6% were the third and fourth most common tumors, respectively. Conclusion: Astrocytomas and medulloblastomas are the most common tumors among children and adolescents in our region, which needs special attention from the neurosurgical department of our institute. Demographic and histopathologic profile of cohort in the present study do not differ substantially from that found in other hospital-based and population-based studies except for slight higher frequency of craniopharyngiomas.

  16. Machine-learning based comparison of CT-perfusion maps and dual energy CT for pancreatic tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Michael; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Christian; Fritz, Franziska; Mayer, Philipp; Koell, Marco; Stiller, Wolfram; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2016-03-01

    Perfusion CT is well-suited for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors but tends to be associated with a high radiation exposure. Dual-energy CT (DECT) might be an alternative to perfusion CT, offering correlating contrasts while being acquired at lower radiation doses. While previous studies compared intensities of Dual Energy iodine maps and CT-perfusion maps, no study has assessed the combined discriminative power of all information that can be generated from an acquisition of both functional imaging methods. We therefore propose the use of a machine learning algorithm for assessing the amount of information that becomes available by the combination of multiple images. For this, we train a classifier on both imaging methods, using a new approach that allows us to train only from small regions of interests (ROIs). This makes our study comparable to other - ROI-based analysis - and still allows comparing the ability of both classifiers to discriminate between healthy and tumorous tissue. We were able to train classifiers that yield DICE scores over 80% with both imaging methods. This indicates that Dual Energy Iodine maps might be used for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors instead of Perfusion CT, although the detection rate is lower. We also present tumor risk maps that visualize possible tumorous areas in an intuitive way and can be used during diagnosis as an additional information source.

  17. Efficacy of HPV-16 E7 Based Vaccine in a TC-1 Tumoric Animal Model of Cervical Cancer - page 483

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Fazeli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus as an etiological agent of cervical cancer doesnot grow adequately in tissue culture systems. The tumor cell line TC-1 continuously expressesthe E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins of HPV, and is considered a suitable tool inlaboratory investigations and vaccine researches against cervical cancer.Materials and Methods: The TC-1 cell line was grown in RPMI 1650 supplemented with10% FBS, glutamine and antibiotics, and was used for tumor development in mice. Six toseven week-old tumor bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into 3 groups consisting of 7mice per group. The first group received pcDNA-E7, the second group received pcDNA3,and the third group received phosphate buffered saline (PBS. The treated animals weremonitored for their tumor size progression and survival. At last, the tumoric tissues fromautopsied animals were fixed and examined with Mayer's hematoxylin and eosin (H&E.All experiments were done in accordance with guidelines of the Laboratory Animal EthicalCommission of Tarbiat Modares University. Data analysis was performed using the onewayANOVA followed by Tukey's test in both experimental and control groups. A p-value<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There were significant decreases in tumor growth; there were also improvementsin survival among mice in the treated groups (p<0.041. H&E stained sections fromuntreated mice were studied independently in a blinded fashion by two observers andshowed malignant neoplasms composed of severely pleomorphic tumor cells with nuclearenlargement, high nuclear-cytoplasmic (N/C ratios, and prominent nucleoli in solid andfascicular patterns of growth. High mitotic activity with extensive necrosis was also notedin both test and control groups.Conclusion: The TC-1 lung metastatic model can be used to test the efficacy of variousE7-based therapeutic cancer vaccine strategies for cervical cancer and the prevention ofHPV-related neoplasia.

  18. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  19. Preoperative surgical planning and simulation of complex cranial base tumors in virtual reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zhi-qiang; LI Liang; MO Da-peng; ZHANG Jia-yong; ZHANG Yang; BAO Sheng-de

    2008-01-01

    @@ The extremely complex anatomic relationships among bone,tumor,blood vessels and cranial nerves remains a big challenge for cranial base tumor surgery.Therefore.a good understanding of the patient specific anatomy and a preoperative planning are helpful and crocial for the neurosurgeons.Three dimensional (3-D) visualization of various imaging techniques have been widely explored to enhance the comprehension of volumetric data for surgical planning.1 We used the Destroscope Virtual Reality (VR) System (Singapore,Volume Interaction Pte Ltd,software:RadioDexterTM 1.0) to optimize preoperative plan in the complex cranial base tumors.This system uses patient-specific,coregistered,fused radiology data sets that may be viewed stereoscopically and can be manipulated in a virtual reality environment.This article describes our experience with the Destroscope VR system in preoperative surgical planning and simulation for 5 patients with complex cranial base tumors and evaluates the clinical usefulness of this system.

  20. Vascular bone tumors: a proposal of a classification based on clinicopathological, radiographic and genetic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errani, Costantino [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Ortopedia Generale, Orthopaedic Service, Bagheria (Italy); Struttura Complessa Ortopedia Generale, Dipartimento Rizzoli-Sicilia, Bagheria, PA (Italy); Vanel, Daniel; Gambarotti, Marco; Alberghini, Marco [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Pathology Service, Bologna (Italy); Picci, Piero [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Laboratory for Cancer Research, Bologna (Italy); Faldini, Cesare [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Ortopedia Generale, Orthopaedic Service, Bagheria (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    The classification of vascular bone tumors remains challenging, with considerable morphological overlap spanning across benign to malignant categories. The vast majority of both benign and malignant vascular tumors are readily diagnosed based on their characteristic histological features, such as the formation of vascular spaces and the expression of endothelial markers. However, some vascular tumors have atypical histological features, such as a solid growth pattern, epithelioid change, or spindle cell morphology, which complicates their diagnosis. Pathologically, these tumors are remarkably similar, which makes differentiating them from each other very difficult. For this rare subset of vascular bone tumors, there remains considerable controversy with regard to the terminology and the classification that should be used. Moreover, one of the most confusing issues related to vascular bone tumors is the myriad of names that are used to describe them. Because the clinical behavior and, consequently, treatment and prognosis of vascular bone tumors can vary significantly, it is important to effectively and accurately distinguish them from each other. Upon review of the nomenclature and the characteristic clinicopathological, radiographic and genetic features of vascular bone tumors, we propose a classification scheme that includes hemangioma, hemangioendothelioma, angiosarcoma, and their epithelioid variants. (orig.)

  1. Vascular bone tumors: a proposal of a classification based on clinicopathological, radiographic and genetic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classification of vascular bone tumors remains challenging, with considerable morphological overlap spanning across benign to malignant categories. The vast majority of both benign and malignant vascular tumors are readily diagnosed based on their characteristic histological features, such as the formation of vascular spaces and the expression of endothelial markers. However, some vascular tumors have atypical histological features, such as a solid growth pattern, epithelioid change, or spindle cell morphology, which complicates their diagnosis. Pathologically, these tumors are remarkably similar, which makes differentiating them from each other very difficult. For this rare subset of vascular bone tumors, there remains considerable controversy with regard to the terminology and the classification that should be used. Moreover, one of the most confusing issues related to vascular bone tumors is the myriad of names that are used to describe them. Because the clinical behavior and, consequently, treatment and prognosis of vascular bone tumors can vary significantly, it is important to effectively and accurately distinguish them from each other. Upon review of the nomenclature and the characteristic clinicopathological, radiographic and genetic features of vascular bone tumors, we propose a classification scheme that includes hemangioma, hemangioendothelioma, angiosarcoma, and their epithelioid variants. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of dimeric cyclic RGD based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Wan, Shunan; Tian, Junmei; Chi, Xuemei; Du, Changli; Deng, Dawei; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2012-03-01

    Cell adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3 is an excellent target for tumor interventions because of its unique expression on the surface of several types of solid tumor cells and on almost all sprouting tumor vasculatures. In this manuscript, we describe the synthesis of near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02-labeled dimeric cyclic RGD peptides (ICG-Der-02-c(RGDyK)2) for in vivo tumor integrin targeting. The optical properties and structure of the probe were intensively characterized. Afterwards, the integrin specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 and U87MG tumor targeting. The results indicated that after labeling RGD peptide, the optical properties of ICG-Der-02 showed no obvious change. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-c(RGDyK)2 probe with high integrin affinity showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor integrin expression based upon the highly potent RGD peptide probe.

  3. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  4. Clinicopathologic and DNA cytometric analysis of carcinoid tumors of the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K; Kodama, T; Matsuno, Y; Yokose, T; Asamura, H; Kamiya, N; Shimosato, Y

    2001-10-01

    Twelve cases of carcinoid tumors of the thymus were reviewed in terms of clinicopathologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features and DNA ploidy patterns. The collective consisted of nine male and three female patients, aged 34 to 74 years, of whom five (42%) had symptoms. Eleven patients underwent surgical resection, and one with systemic metastases was autopsied. In the 11 resected patients, tumors had invaded surrounding structures in four cases, and mediastinal lymph node metastases were detected in six. Recurrence occurred in two of the resected patients (18%), and the 5-year survival rate was 82%. Histologically, all tumors showed an organoid growth pattern with delicate fibrovascular stroma. In addition, three tumors had unusual morphologic features such as combined features of carcinoid tumor and thymoma and solid growth pattern with occasional large tumor cells. Mitotic counts ranged from 1 to 14 per 10 high-power fields with a mean count of 4.9. Central necrosis within solid nests was observed in nine tumors. Classification of this series using the WHO histologic classification system resulted in categorization of all 12 tumors as atypical carcinoids. All tumors were positive for Grimelius staining and for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining documented the presence of moderately to strongly positive neuroendocrine markers such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neural cell adhesion molecule. No correlation between proliferative activity based on the Ki67 labeling index and prognosis or lymph node metastasis was found. Concerning DNA ploidy patterns, only one tumor with multiple lymph node metastases was considered to be aneuploid. In conclusion, although all of our cases were histologically classified as atypical carcinoid tumors of the thymus, most were diploid, and the patients enjoyed a relatively good prognosis.

  5. Malignancy and metastatic spread of Ewing Tumors explored based on the identification of angiogenic target structures

    OpenAIRE

    Fasan, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Ewing Family Tumors (EFT) are characterized by a high metastatic potential and malignant features were correlated with hypoxia and angiogenesis. Its transcriptome analysis revealed two genes highly up regulated or even specifically expressed in EFT. Chondromodulin-1 (CHM1), a cartilage specific angiogenesis inhibitor is believed to be involved in vasculogenic mimicry of tumor cells. GPR64, an orphan 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor is specifically expressed on epithelial cells of th...

  6. Tumor lysis syndrome associated with chemotherapy in primary retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma by ex vivo ATP-based tumor chemo-sensitivity assay (ATP-TCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qing Qian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ke-Qing Qian1, Heng Ye1, Yi-Wen Xiao1, Yong-Yi Bao2, Chun-Jian Qi11Department of Oncology; 2Department of Pathology, the Changzhou No. 2 People’s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou, ChinaAbstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS, a result of rapid cell lysis following tumor therapy, is a well recognized complication during the treatment of rapidly growing tumors. TLS rarely occurs in solid tumors. We present a case report of TLS in a patient with primary retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma. TLS occurred in the patient after four days’ combinational chemotherapy with cisplatin, adriamycin, and dacarbazine. These drugs were selected on the basis of an ex vivo ATP-based tumor sensitivity assay. TLS was properly controlled in the patient with concomitant remission of the sarcoma. Therefore, precautions should be taken to avoid this potentially fatal complication during treatment of solid tumors, especially with tumors highly sensitive to drugs.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma, ATP-based tumor sensitivity assay (ATP-TCA

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Individual Stromal Cell Populations Identifies Stroma-Tumor Crosstalk in Mouse Lung Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Choi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial cells revealed cell-type-specific differentially regulated genes, indicative of activated stroma. We developed a computational model for crosstalk signaling discovery based on ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signaling networks and identified known and novel tumor-stroma paracrine and tumor autocrine crosstalk-signaling pathways in NSCLC. We provide cellular and molecular insights into components of the lung cancer microenvironment that contribute to carcinogenesis. This study has the potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target tumor-stroma interactions and may complement conventional anti-cancer treatments.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of individual stromal cell populations identifies stroma-tumor crosstalk in mouse lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyejin; Sheng, Jianting; Gao, Dingcheng; Li, Fuhai; Durrans, Anna; Ryu, Seongho; Lee, Sharrell B; Narula, Navneet; Rafii, Shahin; Elemento, Olivier; Altorki, Nasser K; Wong, Stephen T C; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-02-24

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial cells revealed cell-type-specific differentially regulated genes, indicative of activated stroma. We developed a computational model for crosstalk signaling discovery based on ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signaling networks and identified known and novel tumor-stroma paracrine and tumor autocrine crosstalk-signaling pathways in NSCLC. We provide cellular and molecular insights into components of the lung cancer microenvironment that contribute to carcinogenesis. This study has the potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target tumor-stroma interactions and may complement conventional anti-cancer treatments. PMID:25704820

  9. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N4)-methylsemithiocarbazone (Cu-ATSM) using spontaneous clinical canine tumor models. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of five spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas were obtained; FDG on day 1 and 64Cu-ATSM on day 2 and 3 (approx. 3 and 24 hours pi.). Sub-volumes for dose escalation were defined by a threshold-based method for both tracers and five dose escalation levels were formed in each sub-volume. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were optimized based on the dose escalation regions for each scan for a total of three dose plans for each dog. The prescription dose for the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with construction of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients. Comparison of dose plans revealed varying degree of correlation between cases. Some cases displayed a separation of high-dose regions in the comparison of FDG vs. 64Cu-ATSM dose plans at both time points. Among the Dice correlation coefficients, the high dose regions showed the lowest degree of agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region definitions based on FDG, 64Cu-ATSM 3 h and 24 h uptake in canine tumors had different localization of the regional dose escalation levels. This indicates that 64Cu-ATSM at two

  10. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  11. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. (Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Gazdar, A.F. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA)); Von Hoff, D.D. (Univ. of Texas, San Antonio (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  12. Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Read, Jolene

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECV) are membrane compartments shed from all types of cells in various physiological and pathological states. In recent years, ECV have gained an increasing interest from the scientific community for their role as an intercellular communicator that plays important roles in modifying the tumor microenvironment. Multiple techniques have been established to collect ECV from conditioned media of cell culture or physiological fluids. The gold standard methodology is differential centrifugation. Although alternative techniques exist to collect ECV, these techniques have not proven suitable as a substitution for the ultracentrifugation procedure. PMID:27581023

  13. Meta-Analysis on the Effects of Octreotide on Tumor Mass in Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Giustina, Andrea; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Torri, Valter; Spinello, Maurizio; Floriani, Irene; Melmed, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Background The long-acting somatostatin analogue octreotide is used either as an adjuvant or primary therapy to lower growth hormone (GH) levels in patients with acromegaly and may also induce pituitary tumor shrinkage. Objective We performed a meta-analysis to accurately assess the effect of octreotide on pituitary tumor shrinkage. Data Sources A computerized Medline and Embase search was undertaken to identify potentially eligible studies. Study Eligibility Criteria Eligibility criteria inc...

  14. The Relationship between Parkinson Disease and Brain Tumor: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Shen, Ting; Jiang, Yasi; Xu, Lingjia; Si, Xiaoli; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological studies have investigated the association between Parkinson disease (PD) occurrence and the risk of brain tumors, while the results remain controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to clarify the exact relationship between PD and brain tumors. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect and CBM (China Biology Medicine Disc) before February 2016. Eligible studies were those that reported risk estimates of brain tumors among patients with PD or vice versa. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the outcomes. Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to explore the potential sources of heterogeneity. Results In total, eight studies involving 329,276 participants met our inclusion criteria. The pooled OR was 1.51 (95%CI 1.21–1.89), indicating that PD carried a higher risk of brain tumor. Analyses by temporal relationship found that the occurrence of brain tumor was significantly higher after the diagnosis of PD (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.18–2.05), but not statistically significant before PD diagnosis (OR 1.21, 95%CI 0.93–1.58). Subgroup analysis showed that gender differences, ethnicity differences and the characteristic of the tumor (benign or malignant) did not make much change in the association between brain tumor and PD. Conclusions Our meta-analysis collecting epidemiological studies suggested a positive association of PD with brain tumors, while the influence of anti-parkinson drugs and ascertainment bias could not be excluded. Further studies with larger sample size and more strict inclusion criteria should be conducted in the future. PMID:27764145

  15. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  16. Multiparameter analysis of human epithelial tumor cell lines by laser scanning cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollice, A A; Smith, C A; Brown, K; Farkas, D L; Silverman, J F; Shackney, S E

    2000-12-15

    Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is a relatively new slide-based technology developed for commercial use by CompuCyte (Cambridge, MA) for performing multiple fluorescence measurements on individual cells. Because techniques developed for performing four or more measurements on individual lymphoid cells based on light scatter as a triggering parameter for cell identification are not suitable for the identification of fixed epithelial tumor cells, an alternative approach is required for the analysis of such cells by LSC. Methods for sample preparation, event triggering, and the performance of multiple LSC measurements on disaggregated fixed human cells were developed using normal lymphocytes and two human breast cancer cell lines, JC-1939 and MCF-7, as test populations. Optimal conditions for individual cell identification by LSC were found to depend on several factors, including deposited cell density (cells per unit area), the dynamic range of probe fluorescence intensities, and intracellular distribution of the fluorescent probe. Sparsely deposited cells exhibited the least cell overlap and the brightest immunofluorescent staining. Major advantages of using DNA probes over a cytoplasmic immunofluorescent protein marker such as tubulin for event triggering are that the former exhibit greater fluorescence intensity within a relatively sharply demarcated nuclear region. The DNA-binding dye LDS-751 was found to be suboptimal for quantitative DNA measurements but useful as a triggering measurement that permits the performance of simultaneous fluorescein isothiocyanate-, phycoerythrin-, and indodicarbocyanine-based measurements on each cell. A major potential advantage of LSC over flow cytometry is the high yields of analyzable cells by LSC, permitting the performance of multiple panels of multicolor measurements on each tumor. In conclusion, we have developed and optimized a technique for performing multiple fluorescence measurements on fixed epithelial cells by LSC

  17. PD-L1 and Survival in Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Wu

    Full Text Available Numerous agents targeting PD-L1/PD-1 check-point are in clinical development. However, the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis of solid tumor is still in controversial. Here, we elicit a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the potential value of PD-L1 in the prognostic prediction in human solid tumors.Electronic databases were searched for studies evaluating the expression of PD-L1 and overall survival (OS of patients with solid tumors. Odds ratios (ORs from individual studies were calculated and pooled by using a random-effect model, and heterogeneity and publication bias analyses were also performed.A total of 3107 patients with solid tumor from 28 published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The median percentage of solid tumors with PD-L1 overexpression was 52.5%. PD-L1 overexpression was associated with worse OS at both 3 years (OR = 2.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.60 to 3.70, P < 0.0001 and 5 years (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.55, P = 0.0008 of solid tumors. Among the tumor types, PD-L1 was associated with worse 3 year-OS of esophageal cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and urothelial cancer, and 5 year-OS of esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer.These results suggest that expression of PD-L1 is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. However, the correlations between PD-L1 and prognosis are variant among different tumor types. More studies are needed to investigate the clinical value of PD-L1 expression in prognostic prediction and treatment option.

  18. Prognostic analysis of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a single unit experience with surgical treatment of primary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Hui; SONG Yan-yan; ZHANG Yun; WANG Ming; SHEN Dan-ping; SHENG Zhi-yong; NI Xing-zhi; WU Zhi-yong; LIU Qiang; SHEN Yan-ying

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the most common type of mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, is a recently recognized tumor. The biological behavior of GIST is highly variable. Surgical resection remains the major treatment for GIST. In this study we retrospectively analyzed our surgical experience with 181 GIST patients to determine the effects of the treatment and the pathological features and prognosis factors of these GIST patients.Methods The clinicopathological features and follow-up data of the 181 patients with GIST who had received surgical resection between January 1999 and December 2007 at Ren Ji Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemical stains including CD117 (KIT), CD34, and other markers were used. Tumor size, mitotic index and other pathological parameters were recorded. According to the consensus of NIH risk-group stratification system based on maximum tumor size and mitotic index (per 50 high power field), tumors were classified into very-low-risk group (15 tumors, 8.3%), low-risk group (48, 26.5%), intermediate-risk group (52, 28.7%) and high-risk group (66, 36.5%). Prognostic factors were analyzed by Cox analysis including age, sex, tumor size, tumor site, mitotic index, NIH categories and surgical procedures. Results One hundred and seven (59.1%) of the 181 tumors were located in the stomach, 51 (28.2%) in the small intestine, 9 (5.0%) in the colon and rectum, and 14 (7.7%) in other sites including the omentum and mesentery. The median age of the patients was 58 (range, 24-84) years, and 102 patients (56.4%) were male. Tumor size ranged from 0.5 to 30 cm, while the mean size was 7.02 cm. Metastasis was found in 7 patients. One hundred and seventy-six (97.2%) of the 181 patients underwent radical resection, and among them 26 patients received extensive resection with the adjacent organ adherent to the tumors. The positive rate for the KIT protein (CD117) in immunostaining was 94.5% (171/181), while

  19. Single-cell mutation analysis of tumors from stained histologic slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, I; Becker, K F; Röhrl, M H; Minkus, G; Schütze, K; Höfler, H

    1996-12-01

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues are a valuable resource for diagnosis and research. PCR is one of the most powerful methods of retrospective analysis of the DNA present in fixed tissues. One major problem with the molecular analysis of tissue samples, however, is cellular heterogeneity, ie, the large variety of cell types usually present in these specimens can mask cell-specific genetic alterations associated with disease. Herein we describe a procedure for obtaining and analyzing single cells recovered from stained histologic tissue sections without risking contamination from neighboring cells. An ultraviolet laser microbeam was used to physically destroy the tissue surrounding the single cells of interest. These cells, now freed from adjacent cells, were then easily retrieved with a motorized, computer-controlled micromanipulator and molecularly characterized through the use of PCR-based microanalysis. This accurate microdissection technique, followed by DNA amplification and direct sequencing, revealed a novel mutation in the gene coding for the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin in single tumor cells that was absent in the adjacent single epithelial cells of a patient with early gastric cancer of the diffuse type. In this form of malignancy, tumor cells lose homophilic cell-to-cell interactions and invade the connective tissue as single cells. E-cadherin gene mutations have previously been detected in advanced diffuse-type gastric cancer and gastric carcinoma cell lines. The present study suggests that E-cadherin gene mutations may be an early event in gastric tumorigenesis. The laser-based isolation and subsequent molecular characterization of individual cells, as described herein, allows for micrometer-sized precision and should prove useful in detecting the nucleic acid abnormalities that underlie cancer, infection, and genetic disease. PMID:8973475

  20. Wavelet-based 3D reconstruction of microcalcification clusters from two mammographic views: new evidence that fractal tumors are malignant and Euclidean tumors are benign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra A Batchelder

    Full Text Available The 2D Wavelet-Transform Modulus Maxima (WTMM method was used to detect microcalcifications (MC in human breast tissue seen in mammograms and to characterize the fractal geometry of benign and malignant MC clusters. This was done in the context of a preliminary analysis of a small dataset, via a novel way to partition the wavelet-transform space-scale skeleton. For the first time, the estimated 3D fractal structure of a breast lesion was inferred by pairing the information from two separate 2D projected mammographic views of the same breast, i.e. the cranial-caudal (CC and mediolateral-oblique (MLO views. As a novelty, we define the "CC-MLO fractal dimension plot", where a "fractal zone" and "Euclidean zones" (non-fractal are defined. 118 images (59 cases, 25 malignant and 34 benign obtained from a digital databank of mammograms with known radiologist diagnostics were analyzed to determine which cases would be plotted in the fractal zone and which cases would fall in the Euclidean zones. 92% of malignant breast lesions studied (23 out of 25 cases were in the fractal zone while 88% of the benign lesions were in the Euclidean zones (30 out of 34 cases. Furthermore, a Bayesian statistical analysis shows that, with 95% credibility, the probability that fractal breast lesions are malignant is between 74% and 98%. Alternatively, with 95% credibility, the probability that Euclidean breast lesions are benign is between 76% and 96%. These results support the notion that the fractal structure of malignant tumors is more likely to be associated with an invasive behavior into the surrounding tissue compared to the less invasive, Euclidean structure of benign tumors. Finally, based on indirect 3D reconstructions from the 2D views, we conjecture that all breast tumors considered in this study, benign and malignant, fractal or Euclidean, restrict their growth to 2-dimensional manifolds within the breast tissue.

  1. Quantification of iodine-131 in tumors using a threshold based on image contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNardo, G.L.; Shen, Sui; DeNardo, S.J.; Liao Shuquinn; DeNardo, D.A.; Yuan, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lamborn, K.R. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Accurate and reproducible quantification of tumor radioactivity by imaging requires definition of a region of interest (ROI) for the tumor. The use of a threshold for creating the tumor ROI based on tumor-to-background image contrast (image contrast) was examined. Quantification of iodine-131 in spheres in a phantom that simulated tumors in patients was investigated using planar imaging and geometric-mean and effective-point-source methods. Thresholds that provided the least quantitative error for spheres with different diameters (1-5 cm) and locations (0-11 cm deep in the body), {sup 131}I concentrations (0.037-3.2 MBq/ml), and sphere-to-background concentration ratios (1:0, 14:1 and 7:1) were investigated. The correlation between threshold and sphere image contrast was examined. The phantom study showed that an appropriate threshold value for quantification of tumor radioactivity could be determined using image contrast for a single view, provided that image contrast was {>=}1.5. The error of quantification was less than 10% for spheres with high image contrast ({>=}1.5) but was greater than 17% for spheres with low image contrast (<1.5). When image contrast-dependent thresholds were applied to patient studies, {sup 131}I concentrations determined by imaging were in good agreement with the concentrations determined by counting biopsy samples. Additionally, reproducibility was improved when compared with a visual boundary method. It is concluded that accurate and reproducible quantification of radioactivity in tumors is achievable using thresholds based on image contrast if image contrast is greater than or equal to 1.5. Optimal thresholds for quantification of tumor radioactivity were similar if image contrast was similar despite differing tumor diameters, locations and {sup 131}I concentrations. Under certain circumstances, the effective-point-source method was preferable to the geometric-mean method. (orig.) With 6 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  2. A Method for Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells Based on the Measurement of Single-Cell Metabolism in Droplet-Based Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ben, Fabio; Turetta, Matteo; Celetti, Giorgia; Piruska, Aigars; Bulfoni, Michela; Cesselli, Daniela; Huck, Wilhelm T S; Scoles, Giacinto

    2016-07-18

    The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood is strongly correlated with the progress of metastatic cancer. Current methods to detect CTCs are based on immunostaining or discrimination of physical properties. Herein, a label-free method is presented exploiting the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells. A single-cell analysis technique is used to measure the secretion of acid from individual living tumor cells compartmentalized in microfluidically prepared, monodisperse, picoliter (pL) droplets. As few as 10 tumor cells can be detected in a background of 200 000 white blood cells and proof-of-concept data is shown on the detection of CTCs in the blood of metastatic patients. PMID:27247024

  3. Prospective study of differential diagnosis of hepatic tumors by pattern-based classification of contrast-enhanced sonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazushi Numata; Tetsuo Isozaki; Manabu Morimoto; Kazuya Sugimori; Reiko Kunisaki; Toshio Morizane; Katsuaki Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of a pattern-based classification of contrast-enhanced sonographic findings for differential diagnosis of hepatic tumors.METHODS: We evaluated the enhancement pattern of the contrast-enhanced sonography images in 586 patients with 586 hepatic lesions, consisting of 383 hepatocellular carcinomas, 89 metastases, and 114 hemangiomas. After injecting a galactose-palmitic acid contrast agent, lesions were scanned by contrastenhanced harmonic gray-scale sonography in three phases: arterial, portal, and late. The enhancement patterns of the initial 303 lesions were classified retrospectively, and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify enhancement patterns that allowed differentiation between hepatic tumors. We then used the pattern-based classification of enhancement we had retrospectively devised to prospectively diagnose 283 liver tumors.RESULTS: Seven enhancement patterns were found to be significant predictors of different hepatic tumors.The presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous enhancement both in the arterial and portal phase was the typical enhancement pattern for hepatocellular carcinoma, while the presence of peritumoral vessels in the arterial phase and ring enhancement or a perfusion defect in the portal phase was the typical enhancement pattern for metastases, and the presence of peripheral nodular enhancement both in the arterial and portal phase was the typical enhancement pattern for hemangioma. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of prospective diagnosis based on the combinations of enhancement patterns, respectively, were 93.2%,96.2%, and 94.0% for hepatocellular carcinoma, 87.9%,99.6%, and 98.2% for metastasis, and 95.6%, 94.1%,and 94.3% for hemangioma.CONCLUSION: The pattern-based classification of the contrast-enhanced sonographic findings is useful for differentiating among hepatic tumors.

  4. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm3), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%; p < 0.001). Left

  5. Computational analysis of expression of human embryonic stem cell-associated signatures in tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaosheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancer stem cell model has been proposed based on the linkage between human embryonic stem cells and human cancer cells. However, the evidences supporting the cancer stem cell model remain to be collected. In this study, we extensively examined the expression of human embryonic stem cell-associated signatures including core genes, transcription factors, pathways and microRNAs in various cancers using the computational biology approach. Results We used the class comparison analysis and survival analysis algorithms to identify differentially expressed genes and their associated transcription factors, pathways and microRNAs among normal vs. tumor or good prognosis vs. poor prognosis phenotypes classes based on numerous human cancer gene expression data. We found that most of the human embryonic stem cell- associated signatures were frequently identified in the analysis, suggesting a strong linkage between human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Conclusions The present study revealed the close linkage between the human embryonic stem cell associated gene expression profiles and cancer-associated gene expression profiles, and therefore offered an indirect support for the cancer stem cell theory. However, many interest issues remain to be addressed further.

  6. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  7. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma, mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning.

  8. Staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: how we do it based on an evidence-based approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other common types of malignant tumors, the vast majority of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are well differentiated and slowly growing with only a minority showing aggressive behavior. It is important to accurately stage patients radiologically so the correct treatment can be implemented and to improve prognosis. In this article, we critically appraise the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging in the staging of neuroendocrine tumors. We also discuss our protocol for staging neuroendocrine tumors.

  9. Simulation of avascular tumor growth by agent-based game model involving phenotype-phenotype interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Hengtong; Zhang, Jiangang; Chen, Ke; Li, Yumin

    2015-01-01

    All tumors, both benign and metastatic, undergo an avascular growth stage with nutrients supplied by the surrounding tissue. This avascular growth process is much easier to carry out in more qualitative and quantitative experiments starting from tumor spheroids in vitro with reliable reproducibility. Essentially, this tumor progression would be described as a sequence of phenotypes. Using agent-based simulation in a two-dimensional spatial lattice, we constructed a composite growth model in which the phenotypic behavior of tumor cells depends on not only the local nutrient concentration and cell count but also the game among cells. Our simulation results demonstrated that in silico tumors are qualitatively similar to those observed in tumor spheroid experiments. We also found that the payoffs in the game between two living cell phenotypes can influence the growth velocity and surface roughness of tumors at the same time. Finally, this current model is flexible and can be easily extended to discuss other situations, such as environmental heterogeneity and mutation. PMID:26648395

  10. A bispecific peptide based near-infrared probe for in vivo tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Chen, Wei R.; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and HER2 are members of recepeter tyrosine kinase family. Overexpression of EGFR and HER2 has been observed in a variety of human tumors, making these receptors promising targets for tumor diagnosis. An affibody targeting HER2 and a nanobody targeting EGFR were reported before. In this Manuscript, we described an bispecific peptide combined with an affibody and a nanonbody through a linker―(G4S)3 . And the bispecific peptide was labeled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorochrome ICG-Der-02 for in vivo tumor EGFR and HER2 targeting. Afterwards, the EGFR and HER2 specificity of the fluorescent probe was tested in vitro for receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy and in vivo for subcutaneous MDA-MB-231 tumor targeting. The results indicated that the bispecific peptide had a high affinity to EGFR and HER2. Besides, in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting experiment indicated that the ICG-Der-02-( bispecific peptide) showed excellent tumor activity accumulation. Noninvasive NIR fluorescence imaging is able to detect tumor EGFR and HER2 expression based upon the highly potent bispecific peptide probe.

  11. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G; Helland, Aslaug; Rye, Inga H; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-

  12. A D-D/D-T fusion reaction based neutron generator system for liver tumor BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, H.; Lou, T.P.; Leung, K. N.; Reijonen, J.

    2003-04-02

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiation treatment modality used for highly malignant tumor treatments. Prior to irradiation with low energetic neutrons, a 10B compound is located selectively in the tumor cells. The effect of the treatment is based on the high LET radiation released in the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction with thermal neutrons. BNCT has been used experimentally for brain tumor and melanoma treatments. Lately applications of other severe tumor type treatments have been introduced. Results have shown that liver tumors can also be treated by BNCT. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, various compact neutron generators based on D-D or D-T fusion reactions are being developed. The earlier theoretical studies of the D-D or D-T fusion reaction based neutron generators have shown that the optimal moderator and reflector configuration for brain tumor BNCT can be created. In this work, the applicability of 2.5 MeV neutrons for liver tumor BNCT application was studied. The optimal neutron energy for external liver treatments is not known. Neutron beams of different energies (1eV < E < 100 keV) were simulated and the dose distribution in the liver was calculated with the MCNP simulation code. In order to obtain the optimal neutron energy spectrum with the D-D neutrons, various moderator designs were performed using MCNP simulations. In this article the neutron spectrum and the optimized beam shaping assembly for liver tumor treatments is presented.

  13. Systemic Administration of Interleukin 2 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Dendritic Cell-Based Tumor Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.; Fields, R. C.; Giedlin, M.; Mule, J. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have reported previously that murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with whole tumor lysates can mediate potent antitumor immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Because successful therapy was dependent on host immune T cells, we have now evaluated whether the systemic administration of the T cell stimulatory/growth promoting cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) could enhance tumor lysate-pulsed DC-based immunizations to further promote protective immunity toward, and therapeutic rejection of, syngeneic murine tumors. In three separate approaches using a weakly immunogenic sarcoma (MCA-207), the systemic administration of non-toxic doses of recombinant IL-2 (20,000 and 40,000 IU/dose) was capable of mediating significant increases in the potency of DC-based immunizations. IL-2 could augment the efficacy of tumor lysate-pulsed DC to induce protective immunity to lethal tumor challenge as well as enhance splenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and interferon-γ production in these treated mice. Moreover, treatment with the combination of tumor lysate-pulsed DC and IL-2 could also mediate regressions of established pulmonary 3-day micrometastases and 7-day macrometastases as well as established 14- and 28-day s.c. tumors, leading to either significant cure rates or prolongation in overall survival. Collectively, these findings show that nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-2 can potentiate the antitumor effects of tumor lysate-pulsed DC in vivo and provide preclinical rationale for the use of IL-2 in DC-based vaccine strategies in patients with advanced cancer.

  14. Pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy for resecting tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guang-yan; ZHANG Lei; GUO Chuan-bin; HUANG Min-xian; MAO Chi; PENG Xin

    2005-01-01

    Background Resection of tumors arising from the tongue base and the parapharyngeal space is difficult for exposure and manipulation because of their obscure location. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical approach of the pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy for resecting the tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space.Methods Fifty-one patients with tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space were treated using the mandibulotomy approach on the pre-mental foramen. In the present study, this technique was described in detail. The patients were followed up for three months to six years with a mean of 26 months. Results The tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space could be exposed clearly and be resected radically by surgical approach of pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy. The surgical complications were reduced. Conclusions Compared to other surgical approaches, such as lateral mandibulotomy, midline mandibulotomy, the suprahyoid parapharyngeal approach, and paramedian mandibulotomy, we found that the pre-mental foramen mandibulotomy is the ideal choice for resecting the tumors of tongue base and parapharyngeal space.

  15. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  16. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacatusu, I; Badea, N; Badea, G; Oprea, O; Mihaila, M A; Kaya, D A; Stan, R; Meghea, A

    2015-11-01

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5mg·mL(-1) has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5mg·mL(-1) lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications.

  17. Neural Network Based Augmented Reality for Detection of Brain Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Mithun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development in technology opened the door of fiction and reached reality. Major medical applications deals on robot-assisted surgery and image guided surgery. Because of this, substantial research is going on to implement Augmented Reality (AR in instruments which incorporate the surgeon’s intuitive capabilities. Augmented reality is the grouping of virtual entity or 3D stuffs which are overlapped on live camera feed information. The decisive aim of augmented reality is to enhancing the virtual video and a 3D object onto a real world on which it will raise the person’s conceptual understanding of the subject. In this paper we described a solution for initial prediction of tumour cells in MRI images of human brain using image processing technique the output of which will be the 3D slicedimage of the human brain. The sliced image is then virtually embedded on the top of human head during the time of surgery so that the surgeon can exactly locate the spot to be operated. Before augmenting the 3D sliced image Artificial neural network is used to select the appropriate image that contains tumor automatically in order to make the system more efficient.

  18. Stem cell-based therapies for tumors in the brain: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khalid

    2016-08-01

    Advances in understanding adult stem cell biology have facilitated the development of novel cell-based therapies for cancer. Recent developments in conventional therapies (eg, tumor resection techniques, chemotherapy strategies, and radiation therapy) for treating both metastatic and primary tumors in the brain, particularly glioblastoma have not resulted in a marked increase in patient survival. Preclinical studies have shown that multiple stem cell types exhibit inherent tropism and migrate to the sites of malignancy. Recent studies have validated the feasibility potential of using engineered stem cells as therapeutic agents to target and eliminate malignant tumor cells in the brain. This review will discuss the recent progress in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for tumors in the brain and also provide perspectives for future preclinical studies and clinical translation. PMID:27282399

  19. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  20. Molecular analysis of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors in a prospective randomized study: A report from EORTC study 26951.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Mathilde C M; Gorlia, Thierry; Kros, Johan M; Ibdaih, Ahmed; Brandes, Alba A; Bromberg, Jacolien E C; Mokhtari, Karima; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Teepen, Johannes L; Wesseling, Pieter; Vandenbos, Fanny; Grisold, Wolfgang; Sipos, László; Mirimanoff, Rene; Vecht, Charles J; Allgeier, Anouk; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the clinical outcome of anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors is variable, but also that the histological diagnosis is subject to interobserver variation. We investigated whether the assessment of 1p/19q codeletion, polysomy of chromosome 7, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification (EGFR(amp)), and loss of chromosome 10 or 10q offers additional prognostic information to the histological diagnosis and would allow molecular subtyping. For this study, we used the clinical data and tumor samples of the patients included in multicenter prospective phase III European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study 26951 on the effects of adjuvant procarbazine, chloroethyl cyclohexylnitrosourea (lomustine), and vincristine chemotherapy in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to assess copy number aberrations of chromosome 1p, 19q, 7, 10, and 10q and EGFR. Three different analyses were performed: on all included patients based on local pathology diagnosis, on the patients with confirmed anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors on central pathology review, and on this latter group but after excluding anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA) with necrosis. As a reference set for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), patients from the prospective randomized phase III study on GBM (EORTC 26981) were used as a benchmark. In 257 of 368 patients, central pathology review confirmed the presence of an anaplastic oligodendroglial tumor. Tumors with combined 1p and 19q loss (1p(loss)19q(loss)) were histopathologically diagnosed as anaplastic oligodendroglioma, were more frequently located in the frontal lobe, and had a better outcome. Anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors with EGFR(amp) were more frequently AOA, were more often localized outside the frontal lobe, and had a survival similar to that for GBM. Survival of patients with AOA harboring necrosis was in a similar range as for GBM, while patients

  1. Analysis of dendritic cells in tumor-free and tumor-containing sentinel lymph nodes from patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy allows identification of the first lymph node into which a primary tumor drains. In breast cancer, identification of tumor cells in the SLNs is a predictor of the tumor's metastatic potential. In the present article, we tested the hypotheses that a positive immune response can occur in tumor-free SLNs and that the activation state of dendritic cells (DCs), the major antigen presenting cells within SLNs, predicts the immune status and metastatic potential of the tumor. Fifty paraffin-embedded SLN sections, 25 tumor-free and 25 tumor-containing, from patients with breast cancer were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the immune maturation state of their DCs. In addition, 12 lymph nodes from noncancer-containing breasts were analyzed. Tissues were stained with antibodies against CD3, MHC class II, CD1a, CD83, IL-10, and IL-12. Mature DCs were defined by CD83 expression and immature DCs by CD1a expression. We found a trend toward higher numbers of mature CD83-positive DCs in tumor-free SLNs than in tumor-containing SLNs (P = 0.07). In addition, tumor-free SLNs were more likely to contain cells expressing IL-10 (P = 0.02) and, to a lesser extent, IL-12 (P = 0.12). In contrast, when all SLNs, both tumor-free and tumor-containing, were compared with uninvolved lymph nodes, the numbers of mature and immature DCs were similar. Our results suggest tumor-free SLNs are immunologically competent and potentially a site of tumor-specific T-cell activation, as evidenced by the presence of greater numbers of mature DCs and cytokine-producing cells in tumor-free SLNs

  2. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacatusu, I.; Badea, N.; Badea, G.; Oprea, O. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Mihaila, M.A. [Institute of Virusology “Stefan S. Nicolau”, Center of Immunology, Bravu Road, No. 285, 030304 Bucharest (Romania); Kaya, D.A. [Department of Field Crops, Faculty of Agriculture, Mustafa Kemal University, 31030 Antakya, Hatay (Turkey); Stan, R., E-mail: rl_stan2000@yahoo.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-01

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5 mg·mL{sup −1} has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5 mg·mL{sup −1} lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications. - Highlights: • Functional lipid nanocarriers with unique features and broad spectrum effectiveness • Lipid nanocarriers based on laureal leaf oil (LLO) and grape seed oil (GSO) • Antioxidant activity has reached 98% for nanocarriers containing 25% GSO and 2% LLO. • LLO exerts a significant cytotoxic effect against HeLa and MDA-MB 231 tumor

  3. Lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils with high activity against oxygen free radicals and tumor cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nano-dosage forms of phytochemicals represents a significant progress of the scientific approach in the biomedical research. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lipid nanocarriers based on natural oils (grape seed oil, fish oil and laurel leaf oil) in counteracting free radicals and combating certain tumor cells. No drug was encapsulated in the nanocarriers. The cytotoxic effect exerted by bioactive nanocarriers against two tumor cells, MDA-MB 231 and HeLa cell lines, and two normal cells, L929 and B16 cell lines, was measured using the MTT assay, while oxidative damage was assessed by measuring the total antioxidant activity using chemiluminescence analysis. The best performance was obtained for nanocarriers based on an association of grape seed and laurel leaf oils, with a capacity to scavenge about 98% oxygen free radicals. A dose of nanocarriers of 5 mg·mL−1 has led to a drastic decrease in tumor cell proliferation even in the absence of an antitumor drug (e.g. about 50% viability for MDA-MB 231 cell line and 60% viability for HeLa cell line). A comparative survival profile of normal and tumor cells, which were exposed to an effective dose of 2.5 mg·mL−1 lipid nanocarriers, has revealed a death rate of 20% for normal B16 cells and of 40% death rate for MDA-MB 231 and HeLa tumor cells. The results in this study imply that lipid nanocarriers based on grape seed oil in association with laurel leaf oil could be a candidate to reduce the delivery system toxicity and may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor drugs in clinical applications. - Highlights: • Functional lipid nanocarriers with unique features and broad spectrum effectiveness • Lipid nanocarriers based on laureal leaf oil (LLO) and grape seed oil (GSO) • Antioxidant activity has reached 98% for nanocarriers containing 25% GSO and 2% LLO. • LLO exerts a significant cytotoxic effect against HeLa and MDA-MB 231 tumor cells. • 50

  4. Differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors using deconvolution-based perfusion CT imaging: Feasibility of the method and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisdas, S. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt (Germany)], E-mail: sbisdas@yahoo.com; Baghi, M.; Wagenblast, J.; Knecht, R. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt (Germany); Thng, C.H. [Department of Oncologic Imaging, National Cancer Centre (Singapore); Koh, T.S. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Vogl, T.J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Aim: We evaluated the feasibility of perfusion CT (CTP) of the parotid gland and attempted to differentiate benign from malignant tumors. Materials and methods: CTP was performed in 17 patients with benign tumors and 10 patients with malignant parotid tumors. Data were postprocessed by using deconvolution-based perfusion analysis. Postprocessing-generated maps showed blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and capillary permeability surface product (PS). Regions of interest were placed through the tumor site and the contralateral healthy parotid tissue. Ratios of the perfusion values between the tumors and the contralateral healthy structures were also calculated. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined to compare the agreement between the two readers. Results: Perfusion maps of all tumors were successfully obtained. High Pearson correlation coefficients comparing the two readers' visually measured abnormalities were observed (r = 0.79-0.86, P = 0.001) for all perfusion maps, The MTT and PS values between malignant and benign tumors were not significantly different. The BF and BV values were statistically significant different between the benign and malignant tumors (0.00 < P < 0.02). Only the BV ratio criterion between malignant and benign neoplasms was statistically significant (P < 0.004). Conclusions: CTP of the parotid gland is feasible and may differentiate malignant from non-malignant lesions by means of absolute BF, BV and BV ratio values.

  5. Investigation of HER2 expression in canine mammary tumors by antibody-based, transcriptomic and mass spectrometry analysis: is the dog a suitable animal model for human breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrai, G P; Tanca, A; De Miglio, M R; Abbondio, M; Pisanu, S; Polinas, M; Pirino, S; Mohammed, S I; Uzzau, S; Addis, M F; Antuofermo, E

    2015-11-01

    Canine mammary tumors (CMTs) share many features with human breast cancer (HBC), specifically concerning cancer-related pathways. Although the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) plays a significant role as a therapeutic and prognostic biomarker in HBC, its relevance in the pathogenesis and prognosis of CMT is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate HER2 expression in canine mammary hyperplasic and neoplastic tissues as well as to evaluate the specificity of the most commonly used polyclonal anti HER2 antibody by multiple molecular approaches. HER2 protein and RNA expression were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and by quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. A strong cell membrane associated with non-specific cytoplasmic staining was observed in 22% of carcinomas by IHC. Adenomas and carcinomas exhibited a significantly higher HER2 mRNA expression when compared to normal mammary glands, although no significant difference between benign and malignant tumors was noticed by qRT-PCR. The IHC results suggest a lack of specificity of the FDA-approved antibody in CMT samples as further demonstrated by Western immunoblotting (WB) and reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA). Furthemore, HER2 was not detected by mass spectrometry (MS) in a protein-expressing carcinoma at the IHC investigation. This study highlights that caution needs to be used when trying to translate from human to veterinary medicine information concerning cancer-related biomarkers and pathways. Further investigations are necessary to carefully assess the diagnostic and biological role specifically exerted by HER2 in CMTs and the use of canine mammary tumors as a model of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer. PMID:26088453

  6. Analysis of ovarian tumor pathology by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrotra Ranjana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is the second most common cancer among women and the leading cause of death among gynecologic malignancies. In recent years, infrared (IR spectroscopy has gained attention as a simple and inexpensive method for the biomedical study of several diseases. In the present study infrared spectra of normal and malignant ovarian tissues were recorded in the 650 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1 region. Methods Post surgical tissue samples were taken from the normal and tumor sections of the tissue. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR data on twelve cases of ovarian cancer with different grades of malignancy from patients of different age groups were analyzed. Results Significant spectral differences between the normal and the ovarian cancerous tissues were observed. In particular changes in frequency and intensity in the spectral region of protein, nucleic acid and lipid vibrational modes were observed. It was evident that the sample-to-sample or patient-to-patient variations were small and the spectral differences between normal and diseased tissues were reproducible. Conclusion The measured spectroscopic features, which are the spectroscopic fingerprints of the tissues, provided the important differentiating information about the malignant and normal tissues. The findings of this study demonstrate the possible use of infrared spectroscopy in differentiating normal and malignant ovarian tissues.

  7. High Birth Weight Increases the Risk for Bone Tumor: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been several epidemiologic studies on the relationship between high birth weight and the risk for bone tumor in the past decades. However, due to the rarity of bone tumors, the sample size of individual studies was generally too small for reliable conclusions. Therefore, we have performed a meta-analysis to pool all published data on electronic databases with the purpose to clarify the potential relationship. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 18 independent studies with more than 2796 cases were included. As a result, high birth weight was found to increase the risk for bone tumor with an Odds Ratio (OR of 1.13, with the 95% confidence interval (95% CI ranging from 1.01 to 1.27. The OR of bone tumor for an increase of 500 gram of birth weight was 1.01 (95% CI 1.00–1.02; p = 0.048 for linear trend. Interestingly, individuals with high birth weight had a greater risk for osteosarcoma (OR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.06–1.40, p = 0.006 than those with normal birth weight. In addition, in the subgroup analysis by geographical region, elevated risk was detected among Europeans (OR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.00–1.29, p = 0.049. The present meta-analysis supported a positive association between high birth weight and bone tumor risk.

  8. Model-Based Evaluation of Spontaneous Tumor Regression in Pilocytic Astrocytoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Buder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA is the most common brain tumor in children. This tumor is usually benign and has a good prognosis. Total resection is the treatment of choice and will cure the majority of patients. However, often only partial resection is possible due to the location of the tumor. In that case, spontaneous regression, regrowth, or progression to a more aggressive form have been observed. The dependency between the residual tumor size and spontaneous regression is not understood yet. Therefore, the prognosis is largely unpredictable and there is controversy regarding the management of patients for whom complete resection cannot be achieved. Strategies span from pure observation (wait and see to combinations of surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Here, we introduce a mathematical model to investigate the growth and progression behavior of PA. In particular, we propose a Markov chain model incorporating cell proliferation and death as well as mutations. Our model analysis shows that the tumor behavior after partial resection is essentially determined by a risk coefficient γ, which can be deduced from epidemiological data about PA. Our results quantitatively predict the regression probability of a partially resected benign PA given the residual tumor size and lead to the hypothesis that this dependency is linear, implying that removing any amount of tumor mass will improve prognosis. This finding stands in contrast to diffuse malignant glioma where an extent of resection threshold has been experimentally shown, below which no benefit for survival is expected. These results have important implications for future therapeutic studies in PA that should include residual tumor volume as a prognostic factor.

  9. Three-dimensional MR imaging of skull-base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates skull base lesions and to evaluate the diagnostic value of three-dimensional (3D) MR imaging performed with 3D reconstruction of the head. MR imaging was performed at 1.0 T and a 1.5 T, M before and after application of Gd-DTPA. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 19 patients with skull base lesions were examined with standard 2D MR imaging and 3D fast low-angle shot imaging. A 3D reconstruction mode, based on the ray-tracing model, enabled us to construct arbitrarily complex extraction schemes. All 3D-reconstructions were compared with the surgical findings. The diagnoses included 10 benign skull base lesions and nine malignant lesions of the anterior and middle skull base. Gd-DTPA proved helpful in 82% of the cases

  10. Textural analysis of pre-therapeutic [18F]-FET-PET and its correlation with tumor grade and patient survival in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyka, Thomas; Hiob, Daniela; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neurosurgic Department, Munich (Germany); Schlegel, Juergen [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Bette, Stefanie [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Neuroradiologic department, Munich (Germany); Foerster, Stefan [Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen, TUM Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Amino acid positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET) is well established in the diagnostic work-up of malignant brain tumors. Analysis of FET-PET data using tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) has been shown to be highly valuable for the detection of viable hypermetabolic brain tumor tissue; however, it has not proven equally useful for tumor grading. Recently, textural features in 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET have been proposed as a method to quantify the heterogeneity of glucose metabolism in a variety of tumor entities. Herein we evaluate whether textural FET-PET features are of utility for grading and prognostication in patients with high-grade gliomas. One hundred thirteen patients (70 men, 43 women) with histologically proven high-grade gliomas were included in this retrospective study. All patients received static FET-PET scans prior to first-line therapy. TBR (max and mean), volumetric parameters and textural parameters based on gray-level neighborhood difference matrices were derived from static FET-PET images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and discriminant function analyses were used to assess the value for tumor grading. Kaplan-Meier curves and univariate and multivariate Cox regression were employed for analysis of progression-free and overall survival. All FET-PET textural parameters showed the ability to differentiate between World Health Organization (WHO) grade III and IV tumors (p < 0.001; AUC 0.775). Further improvement in discriminatory power was possible through a combination of texture and metabolic tumor volume, classifying 85 % of tumors correctly (AUC 0.830). TBR and volumetric parameters alone were correlated with tumor grade, but showed lower AUC values (0.644 and 0.710, respectively). Furthermore, a correlation of FET-PET texture but not TBR was shown with patient PFS and OS, proving significant in multivariate analysis as well. Volumetric parameters were predictive for OS, but this correlation did not

  11. Feasibility and utility of telephone-based psychological support for people with brain tumor: A single-case experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eJones

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of psychological distress are high following diagnosis and treatment of brain tumor. There can be multiple barriers to accessing psychological support, including physical and cognitive impairments and geographical limitations. Tele-based support could provide an effective and more flexible option for delivering psychological interventions. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility and utility of a telephone-based psychotherapy intervention for people with brain tumor. A single-case multiple-baseline design was employed with a 4-7 week baseline phase, 10-week treatment phase and 5-week maintenance phase including a booster session. Four participants with a benign or malignant brain tumor (3 males & 1 female; aged 34 to 49 years, received 10 sessions of tele-based therapy and a booster session at four weeks post-treatment. Levels of depression, anxiety, and illness cognitions were monitored on a weekly basis throughout each phase whilst measures of quality of life, stress and self-concept were administered at the start and end of each phase. Weekly measures were analysed using a combination of both visual analysis and Tau-U statistics. Of the four participants, two of them demonstrated significant gains in mental health (depression and/or anxiety and a significant decrease in their levels of helplessness (p<.05. The other two participants did not show gains in mental health or change in illness cognitions. All participants reported improvement in quality of life post-treatment. The results of the study provide preliminary support concerning the feasibility and utility of tele-based therapy for some people with brain tumor. Further research examining factors influencing the outcomes of tele-based psychological support is needed.

  12. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-1799 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-1799 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth/shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the ''ground truth'' with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy.

  13. Multiple template-based fluoroscopic tracking of lung tumor mass without implanted fiducial markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Gregory C.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-10-01

    Precise lung tumor localization in real time is particularly important for some motion management techniques, such as respiratory gating or beam tracking with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator, due to the reduced clinical tumor volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin and/or the escalated dose. There might be large uncertainties in deriving tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using a template matching method (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this paper, we present an extension of this method to multiple-template matching for directly tracking the lung tumor mass in fluoroscopy video. The basic idea is as follows: (i) during the patient setup session, a pair of orthogonal fluoroscopic image sequences are taken and processed off-line to generate a set of reference templates that correspond to different breathing phases and tumor positions; (ii) during treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired and processed; (iii) the similarity between each reference template and the processed incoming image is calculated; (iv) the tumor position in the incoming image is then estimated by combining the tumor centroid coordinates in reference templates with proper weights based on the measured similarities. With different handling of image processing and similarity calculation, two such multiple-template tracking techniques have been developed: one based on motion-enhanced templates and Pearson's correlation score while the other based on eigen templates and mean-squared error. The developed techniques have been tested on six sequences of fluoroscopic images from six lung cancer patients against the reference

  14. Radiation-Induced Middle Ear and Mastoid Opacification in Skull Base Tumors Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahmed, Salmaan [Department of Radiology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gidley, Paul W. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mahajan, Anita, E-mail: amahajan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of middle ear (ME) pathology in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 61 patients treated with RT between 2003 and 2008 for skull base tumors was conducted. Clinical outcomes and demographics were reviewed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed on the eustachian canal (EC), ME, mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea, internal auditory canal, lateral and posterior nasopharynx, and temporal lobes to relate doses to symptoms and radiographic change. Otomastoid opacification was rated 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe) by a neuroradiologist blinded to clinical outcomes and doses. Results: The median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 14-74 Gy). The ME mean dose was 14 Gy and 34 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3 opacification, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean mastoid dose was 10 Gy and 26 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean EC dose was 17 Gy and 32 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p = 0.0001). Otomastoid opacification resolved in 17 of 40 patients (42.5%), at a mean of 17 months after RT (range, 2-45 months). Otomastoid opacification persisted in 23 of 40 patients (57.5%), with a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 2-55 months). Multivariate analysis showed that mastoid dose >30 Gy (odds ratio = 28.0, p < 0.001) and posterior nasopharynx dose of >30 Gy (odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.009) were associated with Grade 2-3 effusions, whereas other factors including dose to EC and ME were not significant. Conclusions: A mean RT dose >30 Gy to the mastoid air cells or posterior nasopharynx is associated with increased risk of moderate to severe otomastoid opacification, which persisted in more than half of patients at 2-year follow-up.

  15. Endonasal Skull Base Tumor Removal Using Concentric Tube Continuum Robots: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Philip J; Gilbert, Hunter B; Webster, Robert J; Russell, Paul T; Weaver, Kyle D

    2015-03-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to experimentally evaluate the use of concentric tube continuum robots in endonasal skull base tumor removal. This new type of surgical robot offers many advantages over existing straight and rigid surgical tools including added dexterity, the ability to scale movements, and the ability to rotate the end effector while leaving the robot fixed in space. In this study, a concentric tube continuum robot was used to remove simulated pituitary tumors from a skull phantom. Design The robot was teleoperated by experienced skull base surgeons to remove a phantom pituitary tumor within a skull. Percentage resection was measured by weight. Resection duration was timed. Setting Academic research laboratory. Main Outcome Measures Percentage removal of tumor material and procedure duration. Results Average removal percentage of 79.8 ± 5.9% and average time to complete procedure of 12.5 ± 4.1 minutes (n = 20). Conclusions The robotic system presented here for use in endonasal skull base surgery shows promise in improving the dexterity, tool motion, and end effector capabilities currently available with straight and rigid tools while remaining an effective tool for resecting the tumor. PMID:27054057

  16. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  17. Numerical modelling and in vivo analysis of fluorescent and laser light backscattered from glial brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Kalyagina, Nina A.; Kholodtsova, Maria N.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Goryainov, Sergey A.; Potapov, Aleksander A.

    2012-03-01

    Brain glial tumors have peculiar features of the perifocal region extension, characterized by its indistinct area, which complicates determination of the borders for tissue resection. In the present study filter-reduced back-scattered laser light signals, compared to the data from mathematical modeling, were used for description of the brain white matter. The simulations of the scattered light distributions were performed in a Monte Carlo program using scattering and absorption parameters of the different grades of the brain glial tumors. The parameters were obtained by the Mie calculations for three main types of scatterers: myelinated axon fibers, cell nuclei and mitochondria. It was revealed that diffuse-reflected light, measured at the perifocal areas of the glial brain tumors, shows a significant difference relative to the signal, measured at the normal tissue, which signifies the possibility to provide diagnostically useful information on the tissue state, and to determine the borders of the tumor, thus to reduce the recurrence appearance. Differences in the values of ratios of diffuse reflectance from active growth parts of tumors and normal white matter can be useful for determination of the degree of tumor progress during the spectroscopic analysis.

  18. Tumor Targeting Potential of Lipid-Based Nano-Pharmaceuticals (LNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Yavlovich, Amichai; Puri, Anu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery has become the modality of interest for cancer/tumor therapy as it reduces the undesirable delivery to normal cells and improves efficacy of the pharmaceuticals. Among all the nanosystems, lipid-based nano-pharmaceuticals (LNPs) have been most extensively studied for cancer therapy. Doxil formulation was the first LNP that has been approved for cancer treatment. When conjugated with ligands, LNPs can be targeted to tumor cells. This chapter focuses on the targeting potential of LNPs for cancer therapy. We will discuss the advantages of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect (passive targeting) for preferential tumor accumulation of LNPs, the importance of pegylation to avoid reticulo-endothelial system uptake and active targeting strategies using various targeting ligands that can be coupled to the LNP surface to target the tumor region (tumor cells/tumor vasculature). Targeted LNPs show higher binding affinity, greater intracellular localization and thereby increased cancer cell killing in comparison to non targeted LNPs. However, contrasting reports exist that pose challenges to the notion that targeted LNPs are advantageous. Recent trends have also demonstrated the concept of dual targeting that simultaneously homes LNPs to receptors on the tumor cells and biomarkers expressed on the tumor vasculature. In addition, targeting with multiple ligands on the LNPs has also been explored. These approaches may prove to be a better answer for next generation of LNPs for delivery of anti-cancer agents. However, more extensive studies are required to get their clinical approval in anti-cancer therapy.

  19. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  20. Prognostic significance of tumor-associated macrophages in solid tumor: a meta-analysis of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong-wen Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs are considered with the capacity to have both negative and positive effects on tumor growth. The prognostic value of TAM for survival in patients with solid tumor remains controversial. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We conducted a meta-analysis of 55 studies (n = 8,692 patients that evaluated the correlation between TAM (detected by immunohistochemistry and clinical staging, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. The impact of M1 and M2 type TAM (n = 5 on survival was also examined. RESULTS: High density of TAM was significantly associated with late clinical staging in patients with breast cancer [risk ratio (RR  = 1.20 (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.14-1.28] and bladder cancer [RR = 3.30 (95%CI, 1.56-6.96] and with early clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer [RR = 0.52 (95%CI, 0.35-0.77]. Negative effects of TAM on OS was shown in patients with gastric cancer [RR = 1.64 (95%CI, 1.24-2.16], breast cancer [RR = 8.62 (95%CI, 3.10-23.95], bladder cancer [RR = 5.00 (95%CI, 1.98-12.63], ovarian cancer [RR = 2.55 (95%CI, 1.60-4.06], oral cancer [RR = 2.03 (95%CI, 1.47-2.80] and thyroid cancer [RR = 2.72 (95%CI, 1.26-5.86],and positive effects was displayed in patients with colorectal cancer [RR = 0.64 (95%CI, 0.43-0.96]. No significant effect was showed between TAM and DFS. There was also no significant effect of two phenotypes of TAM on survival. CONCLUSIONS: Although some modest bias cannot be excluded, high density of TAM seems to be associated with worse OS in patients with gastric cancer, urogenital cancer and head and neck cancer, with better OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  1. Alternative polyadenylation site analysis of tumor-related genes based on 3'RACE in gastric cancer cells%基于3'RACE的胃癌细胞肿瘤相关基因的APA位点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖登攀; 陈健; 康亚妮

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the alteration in alternative polyadenylation (APA) sites of tumor-related genes in gastric cancer cells. Methods We used 3'RACE to capture the APA sites of two tumor-related genes (HSP90αand SEC11A) in gastric cancer cell lines MKN45, MKN28 and AGS, and compared the results with annotated poly(A) sites in UCSC database. Results We found new APA sites in the two tumor-related genes in gastric cancer cells to produce new mRNA isoforms with different 3'UTRs. Conclusions There are new mRNA isoforms of HSP90αand SEC11A derived from ATA in gastric cancer cells, which provides new insights into the mechanisms of gastric tumorigenesis.%目的:分析胃癌细胞中肿瘤相关基因的APA(alternative polyadenylation)位点变化。方法我们选取肿瘤相关基因HSP90α和SEC11A,利用3'RACE方法在胃癌细胞系MKN45、MKN28和AGS中扩增其mRNA的3'端序列,经过测序,与已知数据库UCSC比对分析其APA位点变化。结果与正常数据库相比,胃癌细胞中HSP90α和SEC11A两个基因均出现新的APA位点,产生含有不同长度的3'UTR(untranslated region)的新mRNA异构体。结论胃癌细胞中HSP90α和SEC11A的APA位点发生变化,产生新的mRNA异构体,为研究肿瘤发生发展提供了新思路。

  2. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Genome Rearrangements in Eight Human Malignant Tumor Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex multifactorial, multistage process, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the copy number variation (CNV), breakpoint region (BPR) and fragile sites in 2,737 tumor samples from eight tumor entities and in 432 normal samples. CNV detection and BPR identification revealed that BPRs tended to accumulate in specific genomic regions in tumor samples whereas being dispersed genome-wide in the normal samples. Hotspots were observed, at which segments with similar alteration in copy number were overlapped along with BPRs adjacently clustered. Evaluation of BPR occurrence frequency showed that at least one was detected in about and more than 15% of samples for each tumor entity while BPRs were maximal in 12% of the normal samples. 127 of 2,716 tumor-relevant BPRs (termed ‘common BPRs’) exhibited also a noticeable occurrence frequency in the normal samples. Colocalization assessment identified 20,077 CNV-affecting genes and 169 of these being known tumor-related genes. The most noteworthy genes are KIAA0513 important for immunologic, synaptic and apoptotic signal pathways, intergenic non-coding RNA RP11-115C21.2 possibly acting as oncogene or tumor suppressor by changing the structure of chromatin, and ADAM32 likely importance in cancer cell proliferation and progression by ectodomain-shedding of diverse growth factors, and the well-known tumor suppressor gene p53. The BPR distributions indicate that CNV mutations are likely non-random in tumor genomes. The marked recurrence of BPRs at specific regions supports common progression mechanisms in tumors. The presence of hotspots together with common BPRs, despite its small group size, imply a relation between fragile sites and cancer-gene alteration. Our data further suggest that both protein-coding and non-coding genes possessing a range of biological functions might play a causative or functional role in tumor biology. This

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Genome Rearrangements in Eight Human Malignant Tumor Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Marczok

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is a complex multifactorial, multistage process, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the copy number variation (CNV, breakpoint region (BPR and fragile sites in 2,737 tumor samples from eight tumor entities and in 432 normal samples. CNV detection and BPR identification revealed that BPRs tended to accumulate in specific genomic regions in tumor samples whereas being dispersed genome-wide in the normal samples. Hotspots were observed, at which segments with similar alteration in copy number were overlapped along with BPRs adjacently clustered. Evaluation of BPR occurrence frequency showed that at least one was detected in about and more than 15% of samples for each tumor entity while BPRs were maximal in 12% of the normal samples. 127 of 2,716 tumor-relevant BPRs (termed 'common BPRs' exhibited also a noticeable occurrence frequency in the normal samples. Colocalization assessment identified 20,077 CNV-affecting genes and 169 of these being known tumor-related genes. The most noteworthy genes are KIAA0513 important for immunologic, synaptic and apoptotic signal pathways, intergenic non-coding RNA RP11-115C21.2 possibly acting as oncogene or tumor suppressor by changing the structure of chromatin, and ADAM32 likely importance in cancer cell proliferation and progression by ectodomain-shedding of diverse growth factors, and the well-known tumor suppressor gene p53. The BPR distributions indicate that CNV mutations are likely non-random in tumor genomes. The marked recurrence of BPRs at specific regions supports common progression mechanisms in tumors. The presence of hotspots together with common BPRs, despite its small group size, imply a relation between fragile sites and cancer-gene alteration. Our data further suggest that both protein-coding and non-coding genes possessing a range of biological functions might play a causative or functional role in tumor

  5. Dendritic Cell-Based Adjuvant Vaccination Targeting Wilms’ Tumor 1 in Patients with Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetaka Shimodaira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant recent advances in the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors, the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer involving metastasis to distant organs remains challenging. We conducted a phase I study to investigate the safety and immunogenicity of Wilms’ tumor (WT1 class I/II peptides-pulsed dendritic cell DC vaccination for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Standard treatment comprising surgical resection and chemotherapy was followed by one course of seven biweekly administrations of 1–2 × 107 DCs with 1–2 KE of OK-432 (streptococcal preparation in three patients. Clinical efficacy was confirmed based on WT1 expression using immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissues and immune monitoring using tetramer analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT assays. WT1 expression with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-class I molecules was detected in surgical resected tissues. Adverse reactions to DC vaccinations were tolerable under an adjuvant setting. WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells were detected by both modified WT1-peptide/HLA-A*24:02 tetramer analysis and/or interferon-γ-producing cells through the use of ELISPOT assays after the first DC vaccination. Immunity acquired from DC vaccination persisted for two years with prolonged disease-free and overall survival. The present study indicated that DC vaccination targeting WT1 demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity as an adjuvant therapy in patients with resectable advanced colorectal cancer.

  6. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  7. Dermoscopy analysis of RGB-images based on comparative features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myakinin, Oleg O.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Neretin, Evgeny Y.; Kozlov, Sergey V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for color and texture analysis for dermoscopic images of human skin based on Haar wavelets, Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and Histogram Analysis. This approach is a modification of «7-point checklist» clinical method. Thus, that is an "absolute" diagnostic method because one is using only features extracted from tumor's ROI (Region of Interest), which can be selected manually and/or using a special algorithm. We propose additional features extracted from the same image for comparative analysis of tumor and healthy skin. We used Euclidean distance, Cosine similarity, and Tanimoto coefficient as comparison metrics between color and texture features extracted from tumor's and healthy skin's ROI separately. A classifier for separating melanoma images from other tumors has been built by SVM (Support Vector Machine) algorithm. Classification's errors with and without comparative features between skin and tumor have been analyzed. Significant increase of recognition quality with comparative features has been demonstrated. Moreover, we analyzed two modes (manual and automatic) for ROI selecting on tumor and healthy skin areas. We have reached 91% of sensitivity using comparative features in contrast with 77% of sensitivity using the only "absolute" method. The specificity was the invariable (94%) in both cases.

  8. Correlation of a hypoxia based tumor control model with observed local control rates in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanzo, Michele; Stancanello, Joseph; Franchin, Giovanni; Sartor, Giovanna; Jena, Rajesh; Drigo, Annalisa; Dassie, Andrea; Gigante, Marco; Capra, Elvira [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Research and Clinical Collaborations, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Oncology Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano 33081 (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To extend the application of current radiation therapy (RT) based tumor control probability (TCP) models of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) to include the effects of hypoxia and chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: A TCP model is described based on the linear-quadratic model modified to account for repopulation, chemotherapy, heterogeneity of dose to the tumor, and hypoxia. Sensitivity analysis was performed to determine which parameters exert the greatest influence on the uncertainty of modeled TCP. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, the values of specific radiobiological parameters were set to nominal values reported in the literature for NPC or head and neck tumors. The remaining radiobiological parameters were determined by fitting TCP to clinical local control data from published randomized studies using both RT and CRT. Validation of the model was performed by comparison of estimated TCP and average overall local control rate (LCR) for 45 patients treated at the institution with conventional linear-accelerator-based or helical tomotherapy based intensity-modulated RT and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the model is most sensitive to the radiosensitivity term {alpha} and the dose per fraction. The estimated values of {alpha} and OER from data fitting were 0.396 Gy{sup -1} and 1.417. The model estimate of TCP (average 90.9%, range 26.9%-99.2%) showed good correlation with the LCR (86.7%). Conclusions: The model implemented in this work provides clinicians with a useful tool to predict the success rate of treatment, optimize treatment plans, and compare the effects of multimodality therapy.

  9. Treatment of malignant tumors of the skull base with multi-session radiosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon Gregory J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Malignant tumors that involve the skull base pose significant challenges to the clinician because of the proximity of critical neurovascular structures and limited effectiveness of surgical resection without major morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multi-session radiosurgery in patients with malignancies of the skull base. Methods Clinical and radiographic data for 37 patients treated with image-guided, multi-session radiosurgery between January 2002 and December 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. Lesions were classified according to involvement with the bones of the base of the skull and proximity to the cranial nerves. Results Our cohort consisted of 37 patients. Six patients with follow-up periods less than four weeks were eliminated from statistical consideration, thus leaving the data from 31 patients to be analyzed. The median follow-up was 37 weeks. Ten patients (32% were alive at the end of the follow-up period. At last follow-up, or the time of death from systemic disease, tumor regression or stable local disease was observed in 23 lesions, representing an overall tumor control rate of 74%. For the remainder of lesions, the median time to progression was 24 weeks. The median progression-free survival was 230 weeks. The median overall survival was 39 weeks. In the absence of tumor progression, there were no cranial nerve, brainstem or vascular complications referable specifically to CyberKnife® radiosurgery. Conclusion Our experience suggests that multi-session radiosurgery for the treatment of malignant skull base tumors is comparable to other radiosurgical techniques in progression-free survival, local tumor control, and adverse effects.

  10. STEP: spatiotemporal enhancement pattern for MR-based breast tumor diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Englander, Sarah; Baloch, Sajjad; Zacharaki, Evangelia I; Fan, Yong; Schnall, Mitchell D; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-07-01

    The authors propose a spatiotemporal enhancement pattern (STEP) for comprehensive characterization of breast tumors in contrast-enhanced MR images. By viewing serial contrast-enhanced MR images as a single spatiotemporal image, they formulate the STEP as a combination of (1) dynamic enhancement and architectural features of a tumor, and (2) the spatial variations of pixelwise temporal enhancements. Although the latter has been widely used by radiologists for diagnostic purposes, it has rarely been employed for computer-aided diagnosis. This article presents two major contributions. First, the STEP features are introduced to capture temporal enhancement and its spatial variations. This is essentially carried out through the Fourier transformation and pharmacokinetic modeling of various temporal enhancement features, followed by the calculation of moment invariants and Gabor texture features. Second, for effectively extracting the STEP features from tumors, we develop a graph-cut based segmentation algorithm that aims at refining coarse manual segmentations of tumors. The STEP features are assessed through their diagnostic performance for differentiating between benign and malignant tumors using a linear classifier (along with a simple ranking-based feature selection) in a leave-one-out cross-validation setting. The experimental results for the proposed features exhibit superior performance, when compared to the existing approaches, with the area under the ROC curve approaching 0.97.

  11. Analysis of tumor template from multiple compartments in a blood sample provides complementary access to peripheral tumor biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, William M; Carter, Chris; Simmons, Jill; Klem, Erich; Goodman, Nathan; Vahidi, Behrad; Romero, Juan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; O'Regan, Ruth; Gogineni, Keerthi; Schwartzberg, Lee; Austin, Laura K; Dempsey, Paul W; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Targeted cancer therapeutics are promised to have a major impact on cancer treatment and survival. Successful application of these novel treatments requires a molecular definition of a patient's disease typically achieved through the use of tissue biopsies. Alternatively, allowing longitudinal monitoring, biomarkers derived from blood, isolated either from circulating tumor cell derived DNA (ctcDNA) or circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ccfDNA) may be evaluated. In order to use blood derived templates for mutational profiling in clinical decisions, it is essential to understand the different template qualities and how they compare to biopsy derived template DNA as both blood-based templates are rare and distinct from the gold-standard. Using a next generation re-sequencing strategy, concordance of the mutational spectrum was evaluated in 32 patient-matched ctcDNA and ccfDNA templates with comparison to tissue biopsy derived DNA template. Different CTC antibody capture systems for DNA isolation from patient blood samples were also compared. Significant overlap was observed between ctcDNA, ccfDNA and tissue derived templates. Interestingly, if the results of ctcDNA and ccfDNA template sequencing were combined, productive samples showed similar detection frequency (56% vs 58%), were temporally flexible, and were complementary both to each other and the gold standard. These observations justify the use of a multiple template approach to the liquid biopsy, where germline, ctcDNA, and ccfDNA templates are employed for clinical diagnostic purposes and open a path to comprehensive blood derived biomarker access. PMID:27049831

  12. Molecular analysis of childhood primitive neuroectodermal tumors defines markers associated with poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheurlen, W G; Schwabe, G C; Joos, S;

    1998-01-01

    : In our study, amplification of c-myc was a poor-prognosis marker in PNET. LOH of chromosome 17p was associated with metastatic disease. Molecular analysis of primary tumors using these markers may be useful for stratification of children with PNET in future prospective studies. The other aberrations...

  13. Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Hongzhi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, W Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shively, John E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    The sensor team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the detection of biomarkers associated with the disease. We have previously demonstrated the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum and nipple aspirate fluid from breast cancer patients. In this publication, we report improvements to this technology that will facilitate transition to a point-of-care diagnostic system and/or robust research tool.

  14. MDM2 SNP309 contributes to tumor susceptibility: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoman Wo; Dong Han; Haiming Sun; Yang Liu; Xiangning Meng; Jing Bai; Feng Chen

    2011-01-01

    The potentially functional polymorphism,SNP309,in the promoter region of MDM2 gene has been implicated in cancer risk,but individual published studies showed inconclusive results.To obtain a more precise estimate of the association between MDM2 SNP309 and risk of cancer,we performed a meta-analysis of 70 individual studies in 59 publications that included 26,160 cases with different types of tumors and 33,046 controls.Summary odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using fixed- and random-effects models when appropriate.Overall,the variant genotypes were associated with a significantly increased cancer risk for all cancer types in different genetic models (GG vs.TT:OR,1.123; 95% CI,1.056-1.193; GG/GT vs.TT:OR,1.028; 95% CI,1.006-1.050).In the stratified analyses,the increased risk remained for the studies of most types of cancers,Asian populations,and hospital-/population-based studies in different genetic models,whereas significantly decreased risk was found in prostate cancer (GG vs.TT:OR,0.606; 95% CI,0.407-0.903; GG/GT vs.TT:OR,0.748; 95% CI,0.579-0.968).In conclusion,the data of meta-analysis suggests that MDM2 SNP309 is a potential biomarker for cancer risk.

  15. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  16. Radiological classification of renal angiomyolipomas based on 127 tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prando Adilson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Demonstrate radiological findings of 127 angiomyolipomas (AMLs and propose a classification based on the radiological evidence of fat. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The imaging findings of 85 consecutive patients with AMLs: isolated (n = 73, multiple without tuberous sclerosis (TS (n = 4 and multiple with TS (n = 8, were retrospectively reviewed. Eighteen AMLs (14% presented with hemorrhage. All patients were submitted to a dedicated helical CT or magnetic resonance studies. All hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions were grouped together since our objective was to analyze the presence of detectable fat. Out of 85 patients, 53 were monitored and 32 were treated surgically due to large perirenal component (n = 13, hemorrhage (n = 11 and impossibility of an adequate preoperative characterization (n = 8. There was not a case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC with fat component in this group of patients. RESULTS: Based on the presence and amount of detectable fat within the lesion, AMLs were classified in 4 distinct radiological patterns: Pattern-I, predominantly fatty (usually less than 2 cm in diameter and intrarenal: 54%; Pattern-II, partially fatty (intrarenal or exophytic: 29%; Pattern-III, minimally fatty (most exophytic and perirenal: 11%; and Pattern-IV, without fat (most exophytic and perirenal: 6%. CONCLUSIONS: This proposed classification might be useful to understand the imaging manifestations of AMLs, their differential diagnosis and determine when further radiological evaluation would be necessary. Small (< 1.5 cm, pattern-I AMLs tend to be intra-renal, homogeneous and predominantly fatty. As they grow they tend to be partially or completely exophytic and heterogeneous (patterns II and III. The rare pattern-IV AMLs, however, can be small or large, intra-renal or exophytic but are always homogeneous and hyperdense mass. Since no renal cell carcinoma was found in our series, from an evidence-based practice, all renal mass with detectable

  17. Radiological classification of renal angiomyolipomas based on 127 tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prando, Adilson [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: aprando@mpc.com.br

    2003-05-15

    Purpose: Demonstrate radiological findings of 127 angiomyolipomas (AMLs) and propose a classification based on the radiological evidence of fat. Materials And Methods: The imaging findings of 85 consecutive patients with AMLs: isolated (n = 73), multiple without tuberous sclerosis (TS) (n = 4) and multiple with TS (n = 8), were retrospectively reviewed. Eighteen AMLs (14%) presented with hemorrhage. All patients were submitted to a dedicated helical CT or magnetic resonance studies. All hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions were grouped together since our objective was to analyze the presence of detectable fat. Out of 85 patients, 53 were monitored and 32 were treated surgically due to large perirenal component (n = 13), hemorrhage (n = 11) and impossibility of an adequate preoperative characterization (n = 8). There was not a case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with fat component in this group of patients. Results: Based on the presence and amount of detectable fat within the lesion, AMLs were classified in 4 distinct radiological patterns: Pattern-I, predominantly fatty (usually less than 2 cm in diameter and intrarenal): 54%; Pattern-II, partially fatty (intrarenal or exo phytic): 29%; Pattern-III, minimally fatty (most exo phytic and peri renal): 11%; and Pattern-IV, without fat (most exo phytic and peri renal): 6%. Conclusions: This proposed classification might be useful to understand the imaging manifestations of AMLs, their differential diagnosis and determine when further radiological evaluation would be necessary. Small (< 1.5 cm), pattern-I AMLs tend to be intra-renal, homogeneous and predominantly fatty. As they grow they tend to be partially or completely exo phytic and heterogeneous (patterns II and III). The rare pattern-IV AMLs, however, can be small or large, intra-renal or exo phytic but are always homogeneous and hyperdense mass. Since no renal cell carcinoma was found in our series, from an evidence-based practice, all renal mass with

  18. Radiological classification of renal angiomyolipomas based on 127 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Demonstrate radiological findings of 127 angiomyolipomas (AMLs) and propose a classification based on the radiological evidence of fat. Materials And Methods: The imaging findings of 85 consecutive patients with AMLs: isolated (n = 73), multiple without tuberous sclerosis (TS) (n = 4) and multiple with TS (n = 8), were retrospectively reviewed. Eighteen AMLs (14%) presented with hemorrhage. All patients were submitted to a dedicated helical CT or magnetic resonance studies. All hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic lesions were grouped together since our objective was to analyze the presence of detectable fat. Out of 85 patients, 53 were monitored and 32 were treated surgically due to large perirenal component (n = 13), hemorrhage (n = 11) and impossibility of an adequate preoperative characterization (n = 8). There was not a case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with fat component in this group of patients. Results: Based on the presence and amount of detectable fat within the lesion, AMLs were classified in 4 distinct radiological patterns: Pattern-I, predominantly fatty (usually less than 2 cm in diameter and intrarenal): 54%; Pattern-II, partially fatty (intrarenal or exo phytic): 29%; Pattern-III, minimally fatty (most exo phytic and peri renal): 11%; and Pattern-IV, without fat (most exo phytic and peri renal): 6%. Conclusions: This proposed classification might be useful to understand the imaging manifestations of AMLs, their differential diagnosis and determine when further radiological evaluation would be necessary. Small (< 1.5 cm), pattern-I AMLs tend to be intra-renal, homogeneous and predominantly fatty. As they grow they tend to be partially or completely exo phytic and heterogeneous (patterns II and III). The rare pattern-IV AMLs, however, can be small or large, intra-renal or exo phytic but are always homogeneous and hyperdense mass. Since no renal cell carcinoma was found in our series, from an evidence-based practice, all renal mass with

  19. Tumor Classification Using High-Order Gene Expression Profiles Based on Multilinear ICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-gang Du

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. Independent Components Analysis (ICA maximizes the statistical independence of the representational components of a training gene expression profiles (GEP ensemble, but it cannot distinguish relations between the different factors, or different modes, and it is not available to high-order GEP Data Mining. In order to generalize ICA, we introduce Multilinear-ICA and apply it to tumor classification using high order GEP. Firstly, we introduce the basis conceptions and operations of tensor and recommend Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier and Multilinear-ICA. Secondly, the higher score genes of original high order GEP are selected by using t-statistics and tabulate tensors. Thirdly, the tensors are performed by Multilinear-ICA. Finally, the SVM is used to classify the tumor subtypes. Results. To show the validity of the proposed method, we apply it to tumor classification using high order GEP. Though we only use three datasets, the experimental results show that the method is effective and feasible. Through this survey, we hope to gain some insight into the problem of high order GEP tumor classification, in aid of further developing more effective tumor classification algorithms.

  20. Quantitative Spatiotemporal Analysis of Antibody Fragment Diffusion and Endocytic Consumption in Tumor Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-based cancer treatment depends upon distribution of the targeting macromolecule throughout tumor tissue, and spatial heterogeneity could significantly limit efficacy in many cases. Antibody distribution in tumor tissue is a function of drug dosage, antigen concentration, binding affinity, antigen internalization, drug extravasation from blood vessels, diffusion in the tumor extracellular matrix, and systemic clearance rates. We have isolated the effects of a subset of these variables by live-cell microscopic imaging of single-chain antibody fragments against carcinoembryonic antigen in LS174T tumor spheroids. The measured rates of scFv penetration and retention were compared with theoretical predictions based on simple scaling criteria. The theory predicts that antibody dose must be large enough to drive a sufficient diffusive flux of antibody to overcome cellular internalization, and exposure time must be long enough to allow penetration to the spheroid center. The experimental results in spheroids are quantitatively consistent with these predictions. Therefore, simple scaling criteria can be applied to accurately predict antibody and antibody fragment penetration distance in tumor tissue. PMID:18451160

  1. Verification of MLC based real-time tumor tracking using an electronic portal imaging device

    OpenAIRE

    Han-Oh, Sarah; Yi, Byong Yong; Lerma, Fritz; Berman, Barry L.; Gui, Minzhi; Yu, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors have developed a novel technique using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to verify the geometrical accuracy of delivery of dose-rate-regulated tracking (DRRT). This technique, called verification of real-time tracking with EPID (VORTE), can potentially be used for both on-line and off-line quality assurance (QA) of MLC-based dynamic tumor tracking.

  2. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diac...

  3. Brain tumor delineation based on CT and MR imaging. Implications for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, M A; Wijrdeman, H K; Struikmans, H; Witkamp, T; Moerland, M A

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact MRI may have on radiotherapy treatment planning of brain tumors. The authors analyzed differences in size and position of treatment fields as indicated by three observers (two radiotherapists and one neuroradiologist) using CT or MR based radiotherapy planning proced

  4. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie; Binderup, Tina; Pedersen, Martin Cramer;

    2015-01-01

    64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model...

  5. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per;

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior ...

  6. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min−1 100 mL−1); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min−1 100 mL−1; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min−1 100 mL−1, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE

  7. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, Caecilia S., E-mail: caecilia.reiner@usz.ch; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  8. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  9. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  10. Genome-wide copy number analysis of cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells and their corresponding archival primary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Roy, Ritu; Sosa, Eduardo V; Hauranieh, Louai; Kablanian, Andrea; Eisenbud, Lauren E; Ryazantsev, Artem; Au, Alfred; Scott, Janet H; Melisko, Michelle; Park, John W

    2014-12-01

    A debilitating complication of breast cancer is the metastatic spread of tumor cells to the leptomeninges or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients diagnosed with this aggressive clinical syndrome, known as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, have very poor prognosis. Despite improvements in detecting cerebrospinal fluid tumor cells (CSFTCs), information regarding their molecular biology is extremely limited. In our recent work, we utilized a protocol previously used for circulating tumor cell isolation to purify tumor cells from the CSF. We then performed genomic characterization of CSFTCs as well as archival tumors from the same patient. Here, we describe the microarray data and quality controls associated with our study published in the Cancer Research journal in 2013 [1]. We also provide an R script containing code for quality control of microarray data and assessment of copy number calls. The microarray data has been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under accession # GSE46068.

  11. The potential diagnostic power of circulating tumor cell analysis for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kirsty; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Taylor, Melissa; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Planchard, David; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lindsay, Colin R; Besse, Benjamin; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genotyping tumor biopsies for targetable somatic alterations has become routine practice. However, serial biopsies have limitations: they may be technically difficult or impossible and could incur serious risks to patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer an alternative source for tumor analysis that is easily accessible and presents the potential to identify predictive biomarkers to tailor therapies on a personalized basis. Examined here is our current knowledge of CTC detection and characterization in NSCLC and their potential role in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged and ROS1-rearranged patients. This is followed by discussion of the ongoing issues such as the question of CTC partnership as diagnostic tools in NSCLC. PMID:26564313

  12. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  13. Atlas to patient registration with brain tumor based on a mesh-free method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Idanis; Boulanger, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Brain atlas to patient registration in the presence of tumors is a challenging task because its presence cause brain structure deformations and introduce large intensity variation between the affected areas. This large dissimilarity affects the results of traditional registration methods based on intensity or shape similarities. In order to overcome these problems, we propose a novel method that brings closer the atlas and the patient's image by simulating the mechanical behavior of brain deformation under a tumor pressure. The proposed method use a mesh-free total Lagrangian Explicit Dynamic algorithm for the simulation of atlas deformation and a data driven model of the tumor using multi-modal MRI segmentation. Experimental results look structurally very similar to the patient's image and outperform two of the top ranking algorithms.

  14. Tumor spheroid assembly on hyaluronic acid-based structures: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marco P; Costa, Elisabete C; Miguel, Sónia P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell culture is the main methodology used for screening anticancer therapeutics. However, these 2D cellular models misrepresent the architecture of native tumors, leading, in some cases, to unsuccessful prediction of cancer cell response to drugs. To overcome such limitations, cell growth in three dimensions (3D) arises as an alternative to reproduce in vitro the cellular arrangement found in tumors. Among the 3D cancer models developed so far, spheroids are the most attractive since these are cellular aggregates that broadly mimic many features of solid tumors affecting humans, like cell-cell interactions. One of the most applied techniques for producing spheroids is the liquid overlay technique, in which cells aggregate due to their limited adhesion to certain biomaterials, usually agarose or agar. Recently, the suitability of hyaluronic acid (HA) for spheroids assembly and HA-cell surface receptor interactions has been investigated. Ergo, this review gathers a summary of different studies where HA-based structures were developed and used for tumor spheroids production in order to be used in vitro as reliable 3D tumor models for therapeutic screening purposes. PMID:27312623

  15. Establishment of multiplexed, microsphere-based flow cytometric assay for multiple human tumor markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai SUN; Qian WANG; Xiao-hui HUANG; Mao-chuan ZHEN; Wen LI; Long-juan ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The multiplexed, microsphere-based flow cytometric assay (MFCA) for mul- tiple human tumor markers was established for the early screening and detection of suspected cancer patients. Methods: Covalent coupling of capture antibodies directed against their respective tumor markers to fluorescent microspheres was performed by following the protocols recommended by a commercial corporation with some modifications. The coupling efficiency and cross-reactivity were iden- tified by the Luminex 100 system and associated software. The standard curve was constructed by using serial dilution of recombinant tumor marker standards and was validated by comparison with ELISA for quantifying the tumor markers in serum samples. Results: The identifications revealed that the coupling proce- dures were successful without non-specific cross-reactivity and the standard curve was highly efficient. However, it was necessary to ensure the quality con- trol of the coupling process since slight variations in the coupling procedures could profoundly affect the density of capture reagents coupled to the microspheres and consequently adversely affect the assay precision. In addition to its multi-analyte capability, the MFCA system had definite advantages, such as higher reproducibility, greater dynamic range of measurement, and considerably less preparation time and labor over the conventional "gold standard", which was the ELISA. Conclusion: The successful establishment of the MFCA system for the simultaneous detection of multiple tumor markers will provide the foundation for the further study of clinical applications.

  16. Analysis of the DNDI gene in men with sporadic and familial testicular germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linger, Rachel; Dudakia, Darshna; Huddart, Robert; Tucker, Kathy; Friedlander, Michael; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Hogg, David; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Lohynska, Radka; Daugaard, Gedske; Richard, Stephane; Chompret, Agnes; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Bonaiti-Pellie, Catherine; Heidenreich, Axel; Albers, Peter; Olah, Edith; Geczi, Lajos; Bodrogi, Istvan; Daly, Peter A.; Guilford, Parry; Fossi, Sophie D.; Heimdal, Ketil; Tjulandin, Sergei A.; Liubchenko, Ludmila; Stoll, Hans; Weber, Walter; Einhorn, Lawrence; McMaster, Mary; Korde, Larissa; Greene, Mark H.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Cortessis, Victoria; Easton, Douglas F.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Stratton, Michael R.; Rapley, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    A base substitution in the mouse DndI gene resulting in a truncated Dnd protein has been shown to be responsible for germ cell loss and the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) in the 129 strain of mice. We investigated the human orthologue of this gene in 263 patients (165 with a famil

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Peter J Nelson; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  18. Clinicopathological analysis of unusual rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor in brain parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-wei LIU

    2014-03-01

    lesion was observed to locate in brain parenchyma and there was no evidence of tumor infiltrating in ventricular system. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was removed totally. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was distinctive in its juxtaposition of patterned neurocytic and pilocytic astroglial components. The neurocytic component showed the tumor cells had small, uniform round nuclei with scant cytoplasm and formed narrow perivascular pseudorosettes or Homer-Wright-like rosettes arrays of neurocytic nuclei around delicate eosinophilic neuropil cores. The glial component tended to exhibit pilocytic astrocytoma-like morphology with long, hair-like processes and Rosenthal fibers. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor cells in glial component were diffusely positive for GFAP and S-100, but negative for NeuN, Syn and NSE. However, perivascular pseudorosettes or Homer-Wright-like rosettes were positive for Syn and Olig-2, and negative for GFAP. Ki-67 index was low and less than 1%. Based on clinical presentation and histological findings, a final histological diagnosis of RGNT in brain parenchyma, WHO grade Ⅰ, was made according to the criteria of WHO classification. The patient has not received chemotherapy and attended follow-up for 12 months, without any neurological deficit or signs of recurrence.  Conclusions RGNT is a rare tumor and classified as mixed neuronal-glial tumor. RGNT probably derives from a common progenitor cell originated from subependymal plate or brain parenchyma, able to differentiate toward both glial and neuronal phenotype. RGNT in brain parenchyma is also observed to have the similar biological behaviors and histopathological characteristics with its intra-ventricular counterpart. With similarities in histological findings, it may be difficult to differentiate RGNT from extraventricular neurocytoma, dysembry oplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT, and ependymoma with neuronal differentiation or neuropil-like islands

  19. Gamma knife radiosurgery for glomus jugulare tumors: Therapeutic advantages of minimalism in the skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Manish

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Glomus jugulare (GJ tumors are paragangliomas found in the region of the jugular foramen. Surgery with/without embolization and conventional radiotherapy has been the traditional management option. Aim: To analyze the efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS as a primary or an adjunctive form of therapy. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis of patients who received GKS at a tertiary neurosurgical center was performed. Materials and Methods: Of the 1601 patients who underwent GKS from 1997 to 2006, 24 patients with GJ underwent 25 procedures. Results: The average age of the cohort was 46.6 years (range, 22-76 years and the male to female ratio was 1:2. The most common neurological deficit was IX, X, XI cranial nerve paresis (15/24. Fifteen patients received primary GKS. Mean tumor size was 8.7 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc. The coverage achieved was 93.1% (range 90-97% using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.4 Gy (range 12-25 Gy at a mean isodose of 49.5% (range 45-50%. Thirteen patients (six primary and seven secondary were available for follow-up at a median interval of 24 months (range seven to 48 months. The average tumor size was 7.9 cc (range 1.1-17.2 cc. Using a mean tumor margin dose of 16.3 Gy (range 12-20 Gy 93.6% coverage (range 91-97% was achieved. Six patients improved clinically. A single patient developed transient trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up was available for 10 patients; seven recorded a decrease in size. There was no tumor progression. Conclusions: Gamma knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective primary and secondary modality of treatment for GJ.

  20. A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

  1. Straight sinus: ultrastructural analysis aimed at surgical tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Marcelo Campos Moraes; Tirapelli, Luis Fernando; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Colli, Benedicto Oscar

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurate knowledge of the anatomy of the straight sinus (SS) is relevant for surgical purposes. During one surgical procedure involving the removal of part of the SS wall, the authors observed that the venous blood flow was maintained in the SS, possibly through a vein-like structure within the dural sinus or dural multiple layers. This observation and its divergence from descriptions of the histological features of the SS walls motivated the present study. The authors aimed to investigate whether it is possible to dissect the SS walls while keeping the lumen intact, and to describe the histological and ultrastructural composition of the SS wall. METHODS A total of 22 cadaveric specimens were used. The SS was divided into three portions: anterior, middle, and posterior. The characteristics of the SS walls were analyzed, and the feasibility of dissecting them while keeping the SS lumen intact was assessed. The thickness and the number of collagen fibers and other tissues in the SS walls were compared with the same variables in other venous sinuses. Masson's trichrome and Verhoeff's stains were used to assess collagen and elastic fibers, respectively. The data were analyzed using Zeiss image analysis software (KS400). RESULTS A vein-like structure independent of the SS walls was found in at least one of the portions of the SS in 8 of 22 samples (36.36%). The inferior wall could be delaminated in at least one portion in 21 of 22 samples (95.45%), whereas the lateral walls could seldom be delaminated. The inferior wall of the SS was thicker (p collagen and greater amounts of other tissues-including elastic fibers, connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerve fibers (p collagen. Delamination of the inferior wall of the SS was mostly possible in its inferior wall, but an attempt to delaminate the lateral walls is not recommended. Ultrastructural assessment corroborated a recent report of the presence of muscle fibers in the inferior wall of the SS. PMID:26745473

  2. Predicting outcomes in glioblastoma patients using computerized analysis of tumor shape: preliminary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Czarnek, Nicholas M.; Collins, Leslie M.; Peters, Katherine B.; Clark, Kal

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor characterized by very poor survival. However, while some patients survive only a few months, some might live for multiple years. Accurate prognosis of survival and stratification of patients allows for making more personalized treatment decisions and moves treatment of GBM one step closer toward the paradigm of precision medicine. While some molecular biomarkers are being investigated, medical imaging remains significantly underutilized for prognostication in GBM. In this study, we investigated whether computer analysis of tumor shape can contribute toward accurate prognosis of outcomes. Specifically, we implemented applied computer algorithms to extract 5 shape features from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 22 GBM patients. Then, we determined whether each one of the features can accurately distinguish between patients with good and poor outcomes. We found that that one of the 5 analyzed features showed prognostic value of survival. The prognostic feature describes how well the 3D tumor shape fills its minimum bounding ellipsoid. Specifically, for low values (less or equal than the median) the proportion of patients that survived more than a year was 27% while for high values (higher than median) the proportion of patients with survival of more than 1 year was 82%. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05) even though the number of patients analyzed in this pilot study was low. We concluded that computerized, 3D analysis of tumor shape in MRI may strongly contribute to accurate prognostication and stratification of patients for therapy in GBM.

  3. A clinicopathological analysis of papillary endolymphatic sac tumor in inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIN Yu-jing

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST is a rare tumor originating fromendolymphatic epithelium of inner ear. This tumor exhibits low-grade malignancy with benign histopathological appearance and clinically destructive behavior which occurs in the skull base and frequently invades the posterior petrous bone, the mastoid, semicircular canal, cerebellopontine angle structures and cranial nerve. The presence of intracranial ELST always makes the diagnosis challenge for clinicians and pathologists. Herein we describe a case of ELST in skull base. The clinicopathology of this tumor and its differential diagnosis are discussed. Methods The clinical manifestation of a patient with primary ELST occurring in right cerebellopontine angle was presented retrospectively. Resected mass was routinely paraffin-embedded and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Dako EnVision immunohistochemical staining system was used to detect the tumor antigen expressions, including cytokeratin (CK, vimentin (Vim, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, synaptophysin (Syn, chromogranin A (CgA, S-100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, thyroglobulin (TG, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 and Ki-67. Results A 32-year-old male patient presented with 20-year history of progressive hearing loss. MRI scan revealed an expansile lytic lesion of the mastoid process of the right petrous bone, measuring 4.20 cm × 3.30 cm × 2.00 cm, occupied the right cerebellopontine angle with infiltration of surrounding dura mater. But the lesion did not break the dura mater and invade the brain parenchyma. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was removed totally. Histological examination revealed a papillary, cystic or glandular architecture in mass. The papillary and glandular structures were lined by a single layer of flattened cuboidal-to-columnar cells. The stroma of the papillary fronds was richly vascularized and chronically inflamed. There

  4. Random feature subspace ensemble based Extreme Learning Machine for liver tumor detection and segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weimin; Yang, Yongzhong; Lin, Zhiping; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhou, Jiayin; Duan, Yuping; Xiong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to detect and segment liver tumors. The detection and segmentation of liver tumors can be formulized as novelty detection or two-class classification problem. Each voxel is characterized by a rich feature vector, and a classifier using random feature subspace ensemble is trained to classify the voxels. Since Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) has advantages of very fast learning speed and good generalization ability, it is chosen to be the base classifier in the ensemble. Besides, majority voting is incorporated for fusion of classification results from the ensemble of base classifiers. In order to further increase testing accuracy, ELM autoencoder is implemented as a pre-training step. In automatic liver tumor detection, ELM is trained as a one-class classifier with only healthy liver samples, and the performance is compared with two-class ELM. In liver tumor segmentation, a semi-automatic approach is adopted by selecting samples in 3D space to train the classifier. The proposed method is tested and evaluated on a group of patients' CT data and experiment show promising results. PMID:25571035

  5. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  6. Anti-tumor effects of metformin in animal models of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that metformin can reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in diabetes patients. However, the direct anti-HCC effects of metformin have hardly been studied in patients, but have been extensively investigated in animal models of HCC. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies evaluating the effects of metformin on HCC.We collected the relevant studies by searching EMBASE, Medline (OvidSP, Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed Publisher, and Google Scholar. Studies were included according to the following inclusion criteria: HCC, animal study, and metformin intervention. Study quality was assessed using SYRCLE's risk of bias tool. A meta-analysis was performed for the outcome measures: tumor growth (tumor volume, weight and size, tumor number and incidence.The search resulted in 573 references, of which 13 could be included in the review and 12 included in the meta-analysis. The study characteristics of the included studies varied considerably. Two studies used rats, while the others used mice. Only one study used female animals, nine used male, and three studies didn't mention the gender of animals in their experiments. The quality of the included studies was low to moderate based on the assessment of their risk of bias. The meta-analysis showed that metformin significantly inhibited the growth of HCC tumour (SMD -2.20[-2.96,-1.43]; n=16, but no significant effect on the number of tumors (SMD-1.05[-2.13,0.03]; n=5 or the incidence of HCC was observed (RR 0.62[0.33,1.16]; n=6. To investigate the potential sources of significant heterogeneities found in outcome of tumor growth (I2=81%, subgroup analyses of scales of growth measures and of types of animal models used were performed.Metformin appears to have a direct anti-HCC effect in animal models. Although the intrinsic limitations of animal studies, this systematic review could provide an important reference for future

  7. MASSIVE PARALLEL DNA PYROSEQUENCING ANALYSIS OF THE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR BRG1/SMARCA4 IN LUNG PRIMARY TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Nieto, Salvador; Cañanda, Andres; Pros, Eva; Pinto, Ana Isabel; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Pisano, David; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The tumor suppressor gene, SMARCA4 (or BRG1), which encodes the ATPase component of the chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF, is commonly inactivated by mutations and deletions in lung cancer cell lines. However, SMARCA4 alterations appear to be rare in lung primary tumors. Ultra-deep sequencing technologies provide a promising alternative to achieve a sensitivity superior to that of current sequencing strategies. Here we used ultra-deep pyrosequencing to screen for mutati...

  8. A curcumin-based TPA four-branched copper(II) complex probe for in vivo early tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multibranched Cu(II) complex CuL2 curcumin-based was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The photophysical properties of the complex have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The results show that the target complex exhibits higher quantum yield and larger two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) region compared with its free ligand. The cell imaging studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the complex shows good photostability and excellent tumor targeting capability to tested cancerous cells, which can be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Graphical abstract: A multibranched Cu(II) complex was prepared from curcumin. The photophysical properties of the obtained complex have been investigated. The results exhibit that the complex has high capability to test cancerous cells and can distinguish between the cancerous and noncancerous cells, which should be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Highlights: • A novel multi-branched copper complex was synthesized. • The obtained compounds exhibited obvious TPA in high polar solvents. • The complex is a low toxicity at low-micromolar concentrations. • The complex exhibits larger TPA cross-section and brighter TPF imaging. • The complex has excellent targeting capability to tested cancerous cells

  9. A curcumin-based TPA four-branched copper(II) complex probe for in vivo early tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pi, Zongxin [Department of Chemical and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei 230001 (China); Wang, Jiafeng; Jiang, Bo [Department of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230038 (China); Cheng, Gang [Department of Chemical and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei 230001 (China); Zhou, Shuangsheng, E-mail: zshuangsheng@126.com [Department of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230038 (China); Center of Modern Experimental Technology, Anhui University, Hefei 230038 (China)

    2015-01-01

    A multibranched Cu(II) complex CuL{sub 2} curcumin-based was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The photophysical properties of the complex have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The results show that the target complex exhibits higher quantum yield and larger two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) region compared with its free ligand. The cell imaging studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the complex shows good photostability and excellent tumor targeting capability to tested cancerous cells, which can be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Graphical abstract: A multibranched Cu(II) complex was prepared from curcumin. The photophysical properties of the obtained complex have been investigated. The results exhibit that the complex has high capability to test cancerous cells and can distinguish between the cancerous and noncancerous cells, which should be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Highlights: • A novel multi-branched copper complex was synthesized. • The obtained compounds exhibited obvious TPA in high polar solvents. • The complex is a low toxicity at low-micromolar concentrations. • The complex exhibits larger TPA cross-section and brighter TPF imaging. • The complex has excellent targeting capability to tested cancerous cells.

  10. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 127 cases Tumores odontogênicos: análise de 127 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nunes SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty-seven cases of histologically confirmed odontogenic tumors were retrieved from a total of 5,289 oral and maxillary lesions diagnosed at the Division of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, during a period of 30 years (l970-l999. The most common histological diagnosis was odontoma (50.40%, followed by ameloblastoma (30.70%. The prevalence of odontogenic tumors was greater in females and the peak incidence occurred in the second and third decades of life. The main anatomical location was the mandible, and no malignant tumors were found.De uma série de 5.289 casos de lesões orais e dos maxilares diagnosticadas no Laboratório de Patologia Oral da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte no período de 30 anos (1970-1999, foram analisados 127 casos de tumores odontogênicos confirmados histologicamente. A lesão mais freqüente foi o odontoma (50,40% seguida pelo ameloblastoma (30,70%. A prevalência de tumores odontogênicos foi maior nas mulheres e o pico de incidência ocorreu na segunda e terceira décadas de vida. A localização anatômica mais comum foi a mandíbula e não foram encontrados casos de tumores malignos.

  11. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros N Sergentanis

    Full Text Available This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS tumors.Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software.A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls. In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, 10 study arms, meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13-1.43, 16 study arms and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03-1.32, six arms. Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2 females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05-1.36, six study arms and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28-1.71, seven arms. In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22-2.04, nine study arms, whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings.Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males.

  12. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa of the uterine cervix associated with intraabdominal "PEComatosis": A clinicopathological study with comparative genomic hybridization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Linglei

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization recently recognized a family of neoplasms showing at least partial morphological or immunohistochemical evidence of a putative perivascular epithelioid cell (PEC differentiation. These tumors include angiomyolipoma (AML, clear cell "sugar" tumors of the lung (CCST, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM, clear cell myomelanocytic tumors of the falciform ligament and distinctive clear cell tumors at various other anatomic sites. Case presentation & methods A 41-year old gravida-1 para-1 with tuberous sclerosis presented with an incidentally identified 2.2 cm mass. The morphology and immunohistochemical profile was consistent with PEComa. Distinct aggregates of HMB-45 epithelioid cells were present in an occasionally distinctive perivascular distribution in the myometrium, small bowel lamina propria and ovarian hila. These distinctive aggregates, for which we propose the designation "PEComatosis" based on their intraabdominal distribution, did not display cytological atypia, mitotic activity or necrosis. CGH and DNA ploidy analysis showed a balanced chromosomal profile and diploid nuclei, respectively. There was no recurrence or metastases at 35 months' follow-up. Fifty-one previously reported cases of non-AML, LAM and CCST PEComas [perivascular epithelioid cell tumors- not otherwise specified (PEComa-NOS] are reviewed. Conclusions The lesions may be a reflection of tumor multicentricity, in which each may be a potential nidus for the development of future more well-developed tumors. Alternatively, they may be a manifestation of a poorly understood "field effect", in which there is an increased propensity to develop tumors of this type throughout the abdomen. Finally, and least likely in our opinion, they may represent tumor spread from its primary site.

  13. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Julia; Eder, Johanna; Pratscher, Barbara; Brandt, Sabine; Schneller, Doris; Müllegger, Robert; Vogl, Claus; Trautinger, Franz; Brem, Gottfried; Burgstaller, Joerg P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no appar...

  14. Analysis of G-banding in tumor cell lines derived from human neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua Zou; Yanhui Li

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The application of neural stem cell (NSC) is restricted because of its tumorigenesis, and the possible pathogenesis needs investigation.OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences of chromosomal G-banding between human NSCs (hNSCs) derived tumor cell line and hNSCs derived normal cell lines.DESIGN: A randomized controlled observation.SETTING: Building of Anatomy, Peking University Health Science Center.MATERIALS: The hNSC lines and hNSC-derived tumor cell lines were provided by the Research Center of Stem Cells, Peking University; DMEM/F12 (1:1) medium, N2 additive, B27 additive epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were produced by GIBCO BRL Company (USA); fetal bovine serum by HYCLONE Company (USA).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center from February 2003 to July 2004. Human fetal striatal NSCs were inoculated hypodermically on the right scapular of nude mice; Normal human fetal striatal NSCs were cultured to 5-8 passages as controls. Karyotyping was performed on the 5th passage of hNSC-derived tumor cells at 6 weeks after hN-SC transplantation into nude mice (T1) and tumor cells at 15 weeks after transplantation (T2). Metaphase chromosomes were examined with microscope, G-banding cytogenetic analysis and karyotyping were performed according to the Cytoscan Karyotyping FISH and CGH software system (United biotechnology USA Corporation).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: G-banded analytical results of human fetal striatal nerve stem cells derived tumor cell lines (T1 and T2) of metaphase chromosomes were observed.RESULTS: ① Chromosome analysis of hNSC-derived tumor cell lines 1 (T1): Twenty-five well-spread metaphases were randomly selected for analysis. The karyotypes were 64, XX (8, 32%); 65, XX (1, 4%); 67,XX (5, 20%); 68, XX (11, 44%). The modal number of chromosomes in this cell lines was 68, which were all hypotriploid. The analysis of 8 G

  15. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  16. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H [University of Central Florida, FL (United States); Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L [M D Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A, E-mail: anand.santhanam@orlandohealth.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-07

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  17. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Neelakkantan, Harini; Ruddy, Bari H.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  18. First experience with a novel luminescence-based optical sensor for measurement of oxygenation in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate a novel luminescence-based fiber-optic sensor (OxyLite system) for the measurement of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in tumors and for the detection of changes in pO2 as a function of time. The new method was used simultaneously with the laser Doppler flowmetry method for the measurement of relative tissue perfusion. Materials and methods. Blood perfusion and pO2 were measured continuously via fiber-optic sensors inserted into SA-1 tumors in anesthetized A/J mice. The changes in blood flow and oxygenation of tumors were induced by transient changes of the parameters of anesthesia and by injection of a vasoactive drug hydralazine. Results. Both optical methods used in the study successfully detected the induced changes in blood flow and pO2. The measurements of pO2 were well correlated with measurements of microcirculatory blood perfusion. In the majority of pO2 measurements, we observed an unexpected behavior of the signal during the stabilization process immediately after the insertion of the probe into tumor. This behaviour of the pO2 signal was most probably caused by local tissue damage induced by the insertion of the probe. Conclusion. The novel luminescence-based optical oximetry can reliably detect local pO2 changes in tumors as a function of time but some aspects of prolonged pO2 measurement by this method require further investigation. (author)

  19. Single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome predicts drug sensitivity of single cells within human myeloma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, A K; Mukherjee, U K; Harding, T; Jang, J S; Stessman, H; Li, Y; Abyzov, A; Jen, J; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Van Ness, B

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by significant genetic diversity at subclonal levels that have a defining role in the heterogeneity of tumor progression, clinical aggressiveness and drug sensitivity. Although genome profiling studies have demonstrated heterogeneity in subclonal architecture that may ultimately lead to relapse, a gene expression-based prediction program that can identify, distinguish and quantify drug response in sub-populations within a bulk population of myeloma cells is lacking. In this study, we performed targeted transcriptome analysis on 528 pre-treatment single cells from 11 myeloma cell lines and 418 single cells from 8 drug-naïve MM patients, followed by intensive bioinformatics and statistical analysis for prediction of proteasome inhibitor sensitivity in individual cells. Using our previously reported drug response gene expression profile signature at the single-cell level, we developed an R Statistical analysis package available at https://github.com/bvnlabSCATTome, SCATTome (single-cell analysis of targeted transcriptome), that restructures the data obtained from Fluidigm single-cell quantitative real-time-PCR analysis run, filters missing data, performs scaling of filtered data, builds classification models and predicts drug response of individual cells based on targeted transcriptome using an assortment of machine learning methods. Application of SCATT should contribute to clinically relevant analysis of intratumor heterogeneity, and better inform drug choices based on subclonal cellular responses. PMID:26710886

  20. Expectant Management of Vestibular Schwannoma: A Retrospective Multivariate Analysis of Tumor Growth and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Mark; Skilbeck, Christopher; Saeed, Shakeel; Bradford, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective observational study to assess the consequences of conservative management of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Data were collected from tertiary neuro-otological referral units in United Kingdom. The study included 59 patients who were managed conservatively with radiological diagnosis of VS. The main outcome measures were growth rate and rate of failure of conservative management. Multivariate analysis sought correlation between tumor growth and (i) demographic feature...

  1. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Satoshi Nagano; Masahiro Yokouchi; Takao Setoguchi; Hiromi Sasaki; Hirofumi Shimada; Ichiro Kawamura; Yasuhiro Ishidou; Junichi Kamizono; Takuya Yamamoto; Hideki Kawamura; Setsuro Komiya

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST) owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases) treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed...

  2. Clinical results of stereotactic body frame based fractionated radiation therapy for primary or metastatic thoracic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Univ. of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy for treating primary or metastatic thoracic tumors using a stereotactic body frame. Between January 1998 and February 2004, 101 lesions from 91 patients with thoracic tumors were prospectively reviewed. A dose of 10-12 Gy per fraction was given three to four times over consecutive days to a total dose of 30-48 Gy (median 40 Gy). The overall response rate was 82%, with 20 (22%) complete responses and 55 (60%) partial responses. The one- and two-year local progression free survival rates were 90% and 81%, respectively. The patients who received 48 Gy showed a better local tumor control than those who received less than 48 Gy (Fisher exact test; p=0.004). No pulmonary complications greater than a RTOG toxicity criteria grade 2 were observed. The experience of stereotactic body frame based radiation therapy appears to be a safe and promising treatment modality for the local management of primary or metastatic lung tumors. The optimal total dose, fractionation schedule and treatment volume need to be determined after a further follow-up of these results.

  3. New Functional Signatures for Understanding Melanoma Biology from Tumor Cell Lineage-Specific Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Rambow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular signatures specific to particular tumor types are required to design treatments for resistant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether tumors and corresponding cell lines used for drug development share such signatures. We developed similarity core analysis (SCA, a universal and unsupervised computational framework for extracting core molecular features common to tumors and cell lines. We applied SCA to mRNA/miRNA expression data from various sources, comparing melanoma cell lines and metastases. The signature obtained was associated with phenotypic characteristics in vitro, and the core genes CAPN3 and TRIM63 were implicated in melanoma cell migration/invasion. About 90% of the melanoma signature genes belong to an intrinsic network of transcription factors governing neural development (TFAP2A, DLX2, ALX1, MITF, PAX3, SOX10, LEF1, and GAS7 and miRNAs (211-5p, 221-3p, and 10a-5p. The SCA signature effectively discriminated between two subpopulations of melanoma patients differing in overall survival, and classified MEKi/BRAFi-resistant and -sensitive melanoma cell lines.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Chemotherapeutic Effects in Tumors Using In Vivo Staining and Correlative Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Kook Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To microscopically analyze the chemotherapeutic response of tumors using in vivo staining based on an annexinV-Cy5.5 probe and independently asses their apoptotic count using quantitative histological analysis. Methods: Lewis Lung Carcinomas cells, that are sensitive (CS-LLC and resistant (CR-LLC to chemotherapy were implanted in nude mice and grown to tumours. Mice were treated with cyclophosphamide and injected with a Cy5.5-annexinV fluorescent probe. In vivo imaging was performed using Fluorescence Molecular Tomography. Subsequently tumours were excised and prepared for histology. The histological tumour sections were stained for apoptosis using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. A minimum of ten tissue sections were analyzed per tumour for apoptosis quantification by TUNEL staining and corresponding Cy5.5 distribution. Results: We detected higher levels of apoptosis and corresponding higher levels of Cy5.5 fluorescence in the CS-LLC vs. the CR-LLC tumours. The cell count rate on CS-LLC sections over CR-LLC was found to be ∼2 :1 where the corresponding area observed on Cy5.5 distribution measurements revealed a ∼1.7 :1 ratio of CS-LLC over CR-LLC. These observations are consistent with the higher apoptotic index expected from the CS-LLC cell line. Conclusions: Quantitative analysis of histological slices revealed higher fluorescence and higher apoptotic count in the CS-LLC tumour images compared to the CR-LLC tumour images. These observations demonstrate that the annexinV-Cy5.5 probe sensed the chemotherapeutic effect of cyclophospamide and further confirmed in vivo FMT measurements.

  5. [Operational Management of Multidisciplinary Organ-Based Tumor Units in Our Cancer Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Tsujie, Masanori; Ichimura, Noriko; Yukawa, Masao; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the advances in diagnosis and treatment, it is imperative to develop a multidisciplinary approach for the management of cancer patients. In our cancer center, multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units have been organized for team medical care. These units consist of cancer specialists from multiple departments including medical oncology, surgery, radiology, histopathology, and nursing. Members of each unit regularly conduct meetings to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, as well as to report the progress of cancer patients. Co-operation with the counseling and support center, utilization of the computerized medical record system, and using brochures for advertisement, all play important roles in adequate management of multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units. PMID:27210090

  6. Prevalencia de tumores odontogénicos en el Hospital Base Valdivia: periodo 1989-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Thiers

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este artículo corresponde a un estudio observacional de tipo descriptivo de corte transversal, tiene como objetivo determinar la prevalencia de tumores odontogénicos en la población atendida en el Hospital Base Valdivia, en un periodo de 20 años (1989-2008, según la nueva clasificación de lesiones tumorales de la WHO, 2005. Metodología: Se revisaron 2.078 informes de biopsias correspondientes a lesiones de la cavidad oral de los archivos de informes del servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital Base Valdivia entre enero del año 1989 y diciembre del año 2008. Como criterios de inclusión están la presencia de un diagnóstico histopatológico en la ficha y legibilidad de ésta. Las variables a analizar incluyen: edad, género, diagnóstico histopatológico, tipo de tumor y área de localización. Los datos recolectados fueron tabulados en planilla de base de datos, para su posterior análisis estadístico. Resultados: De las 2.078 biopsias del territorio bucal, 31 corresponden a tumores odontogénicos, lo que representa un 1,5% de todas las lesiones biopsiadas del territorio oral. Una lesión maligna fue encontrada y corresponde a carcinoma ameloblástico infiltrante. La lesión más frecuente correspondió a tumor odontogénico queratoquístico (41,9%, seguido por el ameloblastoma (22,6% y, por último, odontoma (16,1%. El promedio de edad de 35,7 años. El área más frecuente de presentación es el área molar mandibular (54,8%. Conclusión: Los tumores odontogénicos son de baja prevalencia en la población valdiviana atendida en el Hosptial Base Valdivia entre los años 1989-2008. No tiene predilección por género. La lesión más prevalente es el tumor odontogénico queratoqísitico.

  7. Tumor estromal gastrointestinal: análise de fatores relacionados ao prognóstico Gastrointesinal stromal tumor: analysis of factors related to the prognostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Panno Basilio de Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: estudar os critérios morfológicos e imunoistoquímicos relacionados ao prognóstico dos tumores estromais gastrointestinais. MÉTODOS: o estudo foi retrospectivo de 42 casos de tumor estromal gastrointestinal (GIST. Vinte e cinco casos foram obtidos no arquivo do Serviço de Anatomia Patológica do Hospital Universitário Gaffrée e Guinle e os outros dezessete, do Serviço de Anatomia Patológica do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho. RESULTADOS: de acordo com a análise univariada os tumores maiores que 5 cm, com número de mitoses maior que 5/50 CGA, presença de necrose, de alto risco, revelaram significância em relação a redução da sobrevida (p= 0,017, 0,010, 0,001 e 0,016, respectivamente. Os outros fatores analisados (subtipo histológico, topografia e imunofenótipo não mostraram significância. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados confirmam a utilidade do grau de risco, do tamanho tumoral, do índice mitótico e da necrose como fatores preditores do comportamento biológico dos tumores estromais gastrointestinais.OBJECTIVE: study the morphologic criteria and immunohistochemical related with the prognostic of the gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: the study was retrospective of 42 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST. Twenty-five cases were obtained in the file of the Services of Pathological Anatomy of the Hospital Gaffrée and Guinle and the other 17 of Pathological Anatomy of the Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho. RESULTS: in agreement with the univaried analysis, the tumors largest than 5 cm, with mitoses number greater than 5/50 CGA, presence of necrosis, high risk, revealed significance with regarding the reduction of the survival (P = 0.017, 0.01, 0.001 and 0.016, respectively. The other analyzed factors (histological subtype, topography and imunophenotype they didn't show significance. CONCLUSION: the results confirm the usefulness of the risk degree, the tumorous size, the mitotic index and the

  8. Comparison of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques for treatment of pelvic tumors. Analysis of acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective analysis reports on the comparative outcome of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities between conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in the treatment of patients with pelvic tumors. From January 2002 to December 2008, 69 patients with pelvic tumors underwent whole pelvic CRT and 65 underwent whole pelvic IMRT to treat pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor regions. Total dose to the whole pelvis ranged from 50 to 50.4 Gy in 25 to 28 daily fractions. Chemotherapy (CT) regimen, when employed, was based upon primary tumor. Acute GI and GU toxicities were graded by RTOG/EORTC acute radiation morbidity criteria. Absence of GI symptoms during radiotherapy (grade 0) was more frequently observed in the IMRT group (43.1% versus 8.7; p < 0.001) and medication for diarrhea (Grade 2) was more frequently used in the CRT group (65.2% versus 38.5%; p = 0.002). Acute GI grade 1 and 3 side effects incidence was similar in both groups (18.5% versus 18.8%; p = 0.95 and 0% versus 7.2%; p = 0.058, respectively). Incidence of GU toxicity was similar in both groups (grade 0: 61.5% versus 66.6%, p = 0.54; grade 1: 20% versus 8.7%, p = 0.06; grade 2: 18.5% versus 23.5%, p = 0.50 and grade 3: 0% versus 1.5%, p > 0.99). This comparative case series shows less grade 2 acute GI toxicity in patients treated with whole pelvic IMRT in comparison with those treated with CRT. Incidence of acute GU toxicity was similar in both groups

  9. Analysis of reproducibility of respiration-triggered gated radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) can decrease the toxicity of chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) by allowing use of smaller treatment fields. RGRT requires a predictable relationship between tumor position and external surrogate, which must be verified during treatment. Time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI) identifies mean intra-fractional positions of moving structures, and was used to study reproducibility of anatomy during RGRT for lung tumors. Materials and methods: TI-EPIs were acquired using an amorphous silicon-based electronic portal imaging system (EPID, aS500) in continuous image acquisition mode in 11 patients treated with audio-coached RGRT at end-inspiration. The Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used for 4DCT imaging and RGRT delivery. All TI-EPI portals were co-registered to corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) of the planning 4DCT using the spinal column. Displacements in tumor position or that of an adjacent bronchus during RGRT was measured relative to the reference structure on the DRR. Results: Vertebra-matched portals revealed systematic (Σ) and random (σ) errors of 1.8 and 1.3 mm in medial-lateral direction and 1.7 and 1.7 mm in cranial-caudal direction, indicating a reproducible tumor/bronchus position during the RPM-triggered gates. Conclusions: RGRT delivery at end-inspiration can achieve reproducible internal anatomy in 'gated' fields delivered with audio-coaching

  10. Mutational analysis of single circulating tumor cells by next generation sequencing in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardi, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Gabellini, Stefano; Simi, Lisa; Mancini, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Leo, Angelo; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) represent a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor potentially allowing real-time monitoring of cancer biology and therapies in individual patients. The purpose of the study was to explore the applicability of a protocol for the molecular characterization of single CTCs by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in order to investigate cell heterogeneity and provide a tool for a personalized medicine approach. CTCs were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch in blood from four metastatic breast cancer patients and singularly isolated by DEPArray. Upon whole genome amplification 3–5 single CTCs per patient were analyzed by NGS for 50 cancer-related genes. We found 51 sequence variants in 25 genes. We observed inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in the mutational status of CTCs. The highest number of somatic deleterious mutations was found in the gene TP53, whose mutation is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The discordance between the mutational status of the primary tumor and CTCs observed in 3 patients suggests that, in advanced stages of cancer, CTC characteristics are more closely linked to the dynamic modifications of the disease status. In one patient the mutational profiles of CTCs before and during treatment shared only few sequence variants. This study supports the applicability of a non-invasive approach based on the liquid biopsy in metastatic breast cancer patients which, in perspective, should allow investigating the clonal evolution of the tumor for the development of new therapeutic strategies in precision medicine. PMID:27034166

  11. Analysis of colon tumors in rats by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Janaína; Hage, Raduan; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.; Silveira, Fabricio; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T.; Munin, Egberto; Plapler, Hélio

    2007-02-01

    Biomedical applications of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy have increased their importance at the last ten years. This technique can determinate the molecular composition of materials, allowing a sensible and fast biological diagnosis. It has showed to be a promising tool for health diagnosis due to its high sensibility. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in humans beings. In the last decades many experimental models have been developed in animals based in the use of chemical composites to induce the formation and development of these tumors, many of them present similar characteristics to those of natural occurrence aiming to the attainment of information on genesis, evolution, as well as diagnosis and more efficient therapies for treating these neoplasias. Amongst the most used chemical composites is the 1,2- dimetilhydrazine (DMH) because its morphological and histological similarity to those tumors. This study aims to compare in vivo normal colon tissue and tumoral colon tissue, induced by DMH, in rats by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to permit the use in the near future for an efficient diagnosis in real time besides being useful as an auxiliary method for several therapies, including the photodynamic therapy.

  12. Risk analysis of fatal and incidental lung tumors in wister rats after inhalation of plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer risk analysis was done in animal studies for inhalation of plutonium dioxide. Female Wister rats were exposed to an aerosol of plutonium with AMAD of 0.4-0.5 μm and followed up until they died. We made some model analyses using their likelihood function. This approach enables us to consider temporal variation in dose-response analysis. Each rat contributes to the total likelihood depending on fatal or incidental tumors. In Weibul model analysis, the logarithm of the hazard function can be linearly modeled with the term of log (dose), log-L model, and additional term of the square of log (dose), log-LQ model. The likelihood ratio statistics gave a significantly better fit of the log-LQ model. However, if data more than 4 Gy were excluded, there was no significant difference between both models. The ratio of hazard function at 1 Gy and 0 Gy, the excess relative risk, showed 30 for total tumors. This result was much different from those in PNL data (Sanders et al.). The difference of pulmonary deposition depending upon particle size would cause different tumor incidence. Our studies indicated significant increase of occurrence of fatal lung cancer at an average dose of 0.5 Gy and thus did not suggest that a life-span effective threshold for death was about 1 Gy to the lung, which is shown in some papers. In contrast PNL, the incidence of adenoma showing the maximum at 0.5 Gy decreased with increasing lung dose from 1.5 Gy or higher, where malignant tumors such as adenocarcinomas increased. This phenomenon was analyzed with carcinogenesis models. (author)

  13. Challenges in management of phyllodes tumors of the breast: A retrospective analysis of 150 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ramakant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phyllodes tumors (PT of the breast seem to get pre-operatively misdiagnosed as fibroadenomas resulting in inadequate resections and high local recurrence rates. Materials and Methods: Data of 150 patients with PT of the breast managed from January, 2003 to February, 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Statistical analysis performed using SPSS version 17 (Pearson Chi-square test and analysis of variance test for analysis. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare clinico-pathological profile and recurrence rates in patients with benign (B, borderline malignant (BL and malignant (M PT. Results: In a total of 150 patients with PT (n = 77 B, n = 24 BL, n = 49 M, mean age was 36.92, 44.04 and 40.46 years respectively (P 0.015 and mean tumor size being 8.15 cm, 14.7 cm and 12.9 cm respectively (P 0.000. Pre-operatively cytology suggestive of PT in 24% patients with B PT and 63% in M PT; core tissue biopsy suggestive of PT in 85.4% patients with B PT and 100% in M PT. Recurrence seen in 34.7% out of which 32.7% were post-lumpectomy performed elsewhere. Majority of B PT had lumpectomy (49.3%/wide local excision (WLE, 31.2% compared with M PT where 55.1% had simple mastectomy (SM due to large tumor size. Local recurrence was more in M PT (53% compared with B PT (20%. We found recurrence rates in L (39.3% compared with WLE (27.3% and SM (33.9% (P 0.049. Conclusions: Larger tumor size, incomplete resection and M/BL histology predicted higher recurrence in PT. Core biopsy is much more accurate than fine needle cytology in the diagnosis.

  14. Incidence, histopathology, and surgical outcome of tumors of spinal cord, nerve roots, meninges, and vertebral column - Data based on single institutional (Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences) experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; Kirmani, Altaf Rehman; Wani, Muhammed Afzal; Bhat, Mohammed Haneef

    2016-01-01

    Context: In the absence of a community-based study on the spinal tumors in the Valley, medical records of the only Regional Neurosurgical Center are available. Aim: The aim of this study is to establish a hospital-based regional epidemiology of spinal tumors in the Valley since the data are derived from a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 531 malignant and nonmalignant tumors of spinal cord, its coverings and vertebrae, which were managed in a Regional Neurosurgical Center under a standard and uniform medical-protocol over 30-year period from 1983 to 2014. Results: The hospital-based incidence for all spinal tumors was 0.24/100,000 persons per year. The malignant spinal cord and vertebral tumors comprised 32.58% (173/531) of all tumors, and benign spinal cord and vertebral tumors comprised 67.42% (358/531). The extradural–intradural tumors such as metastatic lesions and primary malignant vertebral tumors were on rise with 16.38% (87/531) cases. The children below 18 years were 5.46% (29/531), of which 55.17% (16/29) were below 9 years. The most common primary bone malignancy was multiple myeloma (54.54% =12/22). Histopathologically, the most common metastatic deposit in the spinal canal was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (24.61% =16/65). A mortality of 3.20% (17/531) was noted. Recurrences were noted in 4.90% (26/531), and adjuvant therapies were given to 16.38% (87/531) patients. Conclusion: The malignant spinal cord and vertebral tumors, especially metastatic deposits, are on rise in elderly population. The surgical outcome, in terms of recovery and spinal stability, of benign tumors, is comparatively better than malignant ones. The study reveals a low regional incidence (hospital-based) of spinal tumors. PMID:27365955

  15. Multifunctional nanosheets based on folic acid modified manganese oxide for tumor-targeting theranostic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Bingxiang; Zhao, Hongjuan; Niu, Mengya; Hu, Yujie; Zheng, Cuixia; Zhang, Hongling; Chang, Junbiao; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It is highly desirable to develop smart nanocarriers with stimuli-responsive drug-releasing and diagnostic-imaging functions for cancer theranostics. Herein, we develop a reduction and pH dual-responsive tumor theranostic platform based on degradable manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanosheets. The MnO2 nanosheets with a size of 20-60 nm were first synthesized and modified with (3-Aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS) to get amine-functionalized MnO2, and then functionalized by NH2-PEG2000-COOH (PEG). The tumor-targeting group, folic acid (FA), was finally conjugated with the PEGylated MnO2 nanosheets. Then, doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapeutic agent, was loaded onto the modified nanosheets through a physical adsorption, which was designated as MnO2-PEG-FA/DOX. The prepared MnO2-PEG-FA/DOX nanosheets with good biocompatibility can not only efficiently deliver DOX to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, leading to enhanced anti-tumor efficiency, but can also respond to a slightly acidic environment and high concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), which caused degradation of MnO2 into manganese ions enabling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The longitudinal relaxation rate r 1 was 2.26 mM-1 s-1 at pH 5.0 containing 2 mM GSH. These reduction and pH dual-responsive biodegradable nanosheets combining efficient MRI and chemotherapy provide a novel and promising platform for tumor-targeting theranostic application.

  16. CT imaging spectrum of pancreatic serous tumors: Based on new pathologic classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim@radcom.snu.ac.k [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min A. [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the variety of CT findings based on new pathologic classification. Materials and methods: During a 10-year period, 59 histopathologically proven pancreatic SCTs and 13 SCTs confirmed with typical image findings and strict clinical criteria were enlisted. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the following items in consensus: location, size, outer margin, tumor shape, the presence of mural nodule, communication with main pancreatic duct (MPD), the presence and extent of MPD dilatation, calcification, central scar, and attenuation on pre- and post-contrast CT images. In addition, typicality of CT findings was determined. A typical finding was defined as a honeycomb appearance without or with oligocystic portion. In the cases with atypical features, the type of atypical features and differential diagnosis were recorded. For the shape of the tumor, tumors were categorized into the following groups: honeycomb without or with oligocystic, pleomorphic, purely oligolocular, unilocular cystic, hypovascular solid, hypervascular solid without or with oligocystic portion, and fingerlike cystic patterns. Results: 28 SCTs (38.9%) presented a honeycomb appearance with (n = 14) or without oligocystic portion (n = 14) and were classified as typical cases. The remaining 44 atypical cases (61.1%) presented the following: purely oligolocular pattern in 18; hypervascular solid without (n = 7) or with oligocystic portion (n = 2) in 9; pleomorphic in 8; unilocular cystic in 7; and fingerlike cystic pattern in 2. Most of the lesions manifesting as hypervascular solid lesions were confused with true solid hypervascular tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors or solid pseudopapillary tumors. For most of the remaining atypical lesions, mucinous cystic neoplasm or branch duct type IPMN were included as a differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Serous cystic tumors of the pancreas can have variable CT appearances ranging from compactly

  17. Comparative methylome analysis in solid tumors reveals aberrant methylation at chromosome 6p in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altered patterns of DNA methylation are key features of cancer. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has the highest incidence in Southern China. Aberrant methylation at the promoter region of tumor suppressors is frequently reported in NPC; however, genome-wide methylation changes have not been comprehensively investigated. Therefore, we systematically analyzed methylome data in 25 primary NPC tumors and nontumor counterparts using a high-throughput approach with the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Comparatively, we examined the methylome data of 11 types of solid tumors collected by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In NPC, the hypermethylation pattern was more dominant than hypomethylation and the majority of de novo methylated loci were within or close to CpG islands in tumors. The comparative methylome analysis reveals hypermethylation at chromosome 6p21.3 frequently occurred in NPC (false discovery rate; FDR=1.33 × 10−9), but was less obvious in other types of solid tumors except for prostate and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer (FDR<10−3). Bisulfite pyrosequencing results further confirmed the aberrant methylation at 6p in an additional patient cohort. Evident enrichment of the repressive mark H3K27me3 and active mark H3K4me3 derived from human embryonic stem cells were found at these regions, indicating both DNA methylation and histone modification function together, leading to epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Our study highlights the importance of epigenetic deregulation in NPC. Polycomb Complex 2 (PRC2), responsible for H3K27 trimethylation, is a promising therapeutic target. A key genomic region on 6p with aberrant methylation was identified. This region contains several important genes having potential use as biomarkers for NPC detection

  18. Blood interference in fluorescence spectrum : Experiment, analysis and comparison with intraoperativemeasurements on brain tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Lowndes, Shannely

    2010-01-01

    The optical touch pointer (OTP), a fluorescence spectroscopy based system, assists brain surgeons during guided brain tumor resection in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). After recording and analyzing the autofluorescence spectrum of the tissue, it is possible to distinguish malignant from healthy brain tissue. A challenge during the intraoperative measurements is the interference of blood. If it gets in contact with the laser pointer, the blood blocks the light transmission to and...

  19. BRAIN TUMOR CLASSIFICATION BASED ON CLUSTERED DISCRETE COSINE TRANSFORM IN COMPRESSED DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Anitha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel method to classify the brain tumors by means of efficient and integrated methods so as to increase the classification accuracy. In conventional systems, the problem being the same to extract the feature sets from the database and classify tumors based on the features sets. The main idea in plethora of earlier researches related to any classification method is to increase the classification accuracy.The actual need is to achieve a better accuracy in classification, by extracting more relevant feature sets after dimensionality reduction. There exists a trade-off between accuracy and the number of feature sets. Hence the focus in this study is to implement Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT on the brain tumor images for various classes. Using DCT, by itself, it offers a fair dimension reduction in feature sets.Later on, sequentially K-means algorithm is applied on DCT coefficients to cluster the feature sets. These cluster information are considered as refined feature sets and classified using Support Vector Machine (SVM is proposed in this study. This method of using DCT helps to adjust and vary the performance of classification based on the count of the DCT coefficients taken into account. There exists a good demand for an automatic classification of brain tumors which grealtly helps in the process of diagnosis. In this novel work, an average of 97% and a maximum of 100% classification accuracy has been achieved. This research is basically aiming and opening a new way of classification under compressed domain. Hence this study may be highly suitable for diagnosing under mobile computing and internet based medical diagnosis.

  20. Real-time tumor motion estimation using respiratory surrogate via memory-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory tumor motion is a major challenge in radiation therapy for thoracic and abdominal cancers. Effective motion management requires an accurate knowledge of the real-time tumor motion. External respiration monitoring devices (optical, etc) provide a noninvasive, non-ionizing, low-cost and practical approach to obtain the respiratory signal. Due to the highly complex and nonlinear relations between tumor and surrogate motion, its ultimate success hinges on the ability to accurately infer the tumor motion from respiratory surrogates. Given their widespread use in the clinic, such a method is critically needed. We propose to use a powerful memory-based learning method to find the complex relations between tumor motion and respiratory surrogates. The method first stores the training data in memory and then finds relevant data to answer a particular query. Nearby data points are assigned high relevance (or weights) and conversely distant data are assigned low relevance. By fitting relatively simple models to local patches instead of fitting one single global model, it is able to capture highly nonlinear and complex relations between the internal tumor motion and external surrogates accurately. Due to the local nature of weighting functions, the method is inherently robust to outliers in the training data. Moreover, both training and adapting to new data are performed almost instantaneously with memory-based learning, making it suitable for dynamically following variable internal/external relations. We evaluated the method using respiratory motion data from 11 patients. The data set consists of simultaneous measurement of 3D tumor motion and 1D abdominal surface (used as the surrogate signal in this study). There are a total of 171 respiratory traces, with an average peak-to-peak amplitude of ∼15 mm and average duration of ∼115 s per trace. Given only 5 s (roughly one breath) pretreatment training data, the method achieved an average 3D error of 1.5 mm and 95

  1. Electroporation-based treatment planning for deep-seated tumors based on automatic liver segmentation of MRI images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Pavliha

    Full Text Available Electroporation is the phenomenon that occurs when a cell is exposed to a high electric field, which causes transient cell membrane permeabilization. A paramount electroporation-based application is electrochemotherapy, which is performed by delivering high-voltage electric pulses that enable the chemotherapeutic drug to more effectively destroy the tumor cells. Electrochemotherapy can be used for treating deep-seated metastases (e.g. in the liver, bone, brain, soft tissue using variable-geometry long-needle electrodes. To treat deep-seated tumors, patient-specific treatment planning of the electroporation-based treatment is required. Treatment planning is based on generating a 3D model of the organ and target tissue subject to electroporation (i.e. tumor nodules. The generation of the 3D model is done by segmentation algorithms. We implemented and evaluated three automatic liver segmentation algorithms: region growing, adaptive threshold, and active contours (snakes. The algorithms were optimized using a seven-case dataset manually segmented by the radiologist as a training set, and finally validated using an additional four-case dataset that was previously not included in the optimization dataset. The presented results demonstrate that patient's medical images that were not included in the training set can be successfully segmented using our three algorithms. Besides electroporation-based treatments, these algorithms can be used in applications where automatic liver segmentation is required.

  2. DNA Analysis in Samples From Younger Patients With Germ Cell Tumors and Their Parents or Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Seminoma; Testicular Teratoma; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  3. Error analysis of tumor blood flow measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed error analysis of tumor blood flow (TBF) measurement using dynamic contrast-enhanced data and model-independent deconvolution analysis, based on computer simulations. For analysis, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) consisting of gamma-variate functions using an adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model under various plasma flow (Fp), mean capillary transit time (Tc), permeability-surface area product (PS) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values. Deconvolution analyses based on truncated singular value decomposition with a fixed threshold value (TSVD-F), with an adaptive threshold value (TSVD-A) and with the threshold value determined by generalized cross validation (TSVD-G) were used to estimate Fp values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIF. First, we investigated the relationship between the optimal threshold value and SNR in TSVD-F, and then derived the equation describing the relationship between the threshold value and SNR for TSVD-A. Second, we investigated the dependences of the estimated Fp values on Tc, PS, the total duration for data acquisition and the shape of AIF. Although TSVD-F with a threshold value of 0.025, TSVD-A with the threshold value determined by the equation derived in this study and TSVD-G could estimate the Fp values in a similar manner, the standard deviation of the estimates was the smallest and largest for TSVD-A and TSVD-G, respectively. PS did not largely affect the estimates, while Tc did in all methods. Increasing the total duration significantly improved the variations in the estimates in all methods. TSVD-G was most sensitive to the shape of AIF, especially when the total duration was short. In conclusion, this study will be useful for understanding the reliability and limitation of model-independent deconvolution analysis when applied to TBF measurement using an extravascular

  4. Metabolic imaging of the tumor treated by KillerRed fluorescent protein-based photodynamic therapy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Shuang; Qin, Lingsong; Wang, Anle; Liu, Zheng; Yang, Fei; Jin, Honglin; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-02-01

    KillerRed is a unique red fluorescent protein exhibiting excellent phototoxic properties. It has the ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), for killing tumor cells in vitro upon laser irradiation and has the potential to act as a photosensitizer in the application of tumor therapy. Here, we investigated the effects of KillerRed-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) on tumor growth in vivo and examined the subsequent tumor metabolic states including the changes of pyridine nucleotide (PN) and flavoprotein (Fp), two important metabolic coenzymes of tumor cells. Results showed that the tumor was scabbed in response to 561 nm laser irradiation at 80 mV for 3 min, and the tumor growth had been significantly inhibited by KillerRed-based PDT treatment compared to control groups. More importantly, a home-made cryo-imaging redox scanner was used to measure intrinsic fluorescence and exogenous KillerRed fluorescence signals in tumors. The flavoprotein was remarkable elevated and the PN was seldom increased with concomitant photobleaching of KillerRed fluorescence after irradiation, suggesting that flavoprotein and PN were oxidized in the course of KillerRed-based PDT.

  5. Electrosprayed nanocomposites based on hyaluronic acid derivative and Soluplus for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jongkook; Heo, Moon Young; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite (NC) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE) and Soluplus (SP) was fabricated by electrospraying for the tumor-targeted delivery of resveratrol (RSV). Amphiphilic property of both HACE and SP has been used to entrap RSV in the internal cavity of NC. Electrospraying with established experimental conditions produced HACE/SP/RSV NC with 230nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >80% drug entrapment efficiency. Sustained and pH-dependent drug release profiles were observed in drug release test. Cellular uptake efficiency of HACE/SP NC was higher than that of SP NC, mainly based on HA-CD44 receptor interaction, in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human breast cancer) cells. Selective tumor targetability of HACE/SP NC, compared to SP NC, was also confirmed in MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenograted mouse model using a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. According to the results of pharmacokinetic study in rats, decreased in vivo clearance and increased half-life of RSV in NC group, compared to drug solution group, were shown. Given that these experimental results, developed HACE/SP NC can be a promising theranostic nanosystem for CD44 receptor-expressed cancers. PMID:27208440

  6. The first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment in tumor tissues based on original research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Katarzyna; Frączek, Toma; Kamiński, Rafal; Sitkiewicz, Anna; Kobos, Jozef; Paneth, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Thanks to proteomics and metabolomics, for the past several years there has been a real explosion of information on the biology of cancer, which has been achieved by spectroscopic methods, including mass spectrometry. These modern techniques can provide answers to key questions about tissue structure and mechanisms of its pathological changes. However, despite the thousands of spectroscopic studies in medicine, there is no consensus on issues ranging from the choice of research tools, acquisition and preparation of test material to the interpretation and validation of the results, which greatly reduces the possibility of transforming the achieved knowledge to progress in the treatment of individual patients. The aim of this study was to verify the utility of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in the evaluation of tumor tissues. Based on experimentation on animal tissues and human neoplasms, the first protocol of stable isotope ratio assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in tumor tissues was established. PMID:26619108

  7. Electroporation-Based Treatment Planning for Deep-Seated Tumors Based on Automatic Liver Segmentation of MRI Images

    OpenAIRE

    Pavliha, Denis; Serša, Gregor; Marolt-Mušič, Maja; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is the phenomenon that occurs when a cell is exposed to a high electric field, which causes transient cell membrane permeabilization. A paramount electroporation-based application is electrochemotherapy, which is performed by delivering high-voltage electric pulses that enable the chemotherapeutic drug to more effectively destroy the tumor cells. Electrochemotherapy can be used for treating deep-seated metastases (e.g. in the liver, bone, brain, soft tissue) using variable-geo...

  8. Tumor-based case-control studies of infection and cancer: muddling the when and where of molecular epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Eric A; Wacholder, Sholom; Katki, Hormuzd A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    We describe the "tumor-based case-control" study as a type of epidemiologic study used to evaluate associations between infectious agents and cancer. These studies assess exposure using diseased tissues from affected individuals (i.e., evaluating tumor tissue for cancer cases), but they must utilize nondiseased tissues to assess control subjects, who do not have the disease of interest. This approach can lead to exposure misclassification in two ways. First, concerning the "when" of exposure assessment, retrospective assessment of tissues may not accurately measure exposure at the key earlier time point (i.e., during the etiologic window). Second, concerning the "where" of exposure assessment, use of different tissues in cases and controls can have different accuracy for detecting the exposure (i.e., differential exposure misclassification). We present an example concerning the association of human papillomavirus with various cancers, where tumor-based case-control studies likely overestimate risk associated with infection. In another example, we illustrate how tumor-based case-control studies of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer underestimate risk. Tumor-based case-control studies can demonstrate infection within tumor cells, providing qualitative information about disease etiology. However, measures of association calculated in tumor-based case-control studies are prone to over- or underestimating the relationship between infections and subsequent cancer risk. PMID:25063520

  9. Comparative analysis of CT and pathological findings of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪林; 王晓琪; 邱士军

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To improve the qualitative diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors by computed tomography (CT). Methods: CT findings of 64 cases of pathologically confirmed nerve sheath tumors were compared with the pathological findings of the tumors. Results: Low density of the tumors shown in plain CT images was related to dominating reticular structure in the tumor as found pathologically. Tumors with intact capsule found by pathological findings were shown with smooth margin in CT images. Inhomogeneous density and enhancement of the tumors in CT images was related to tumor necrosis, liquefaction and cystic degeneration, and inhomogeneous enhancement also involved the reticular structure. Conclusion: Nerve sheath tumors are characterized by distribution along the nerves, lower density than that of muscles in plain CT images, and inhomogeneous enhancement in enhanced CT, which can help differentiate nerve sheath tumors from other soft tissue tumors. When nerve sheath tumors lack distinctive CT features, the diagnoses have to depend on their pathological findings.

  10. Clinical Outcome of Patients with Breast Phyllodes Tumors: A Retrospective Analysis of 129 Cases in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Akrami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phyllodes tumors are uncommon neoplasms of the breast. Data about their outcome is limited. This study aims to evaluate patients diagnosed with phyllodes tumors in terms of local recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 129 women with phyllodes tumors who referred to our center from 1999 to 2013. Clinical and pathological features, local and regional recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival were determined. SPSS 15.0 statistical software was used for analysis. Results:Mean patient age was 39 years (17-67 years. Mean size of the tumor was 5.38 cm. There were 105 (81.4% benign, 8 (6.2% borderline and 16 (12.4% malignant tumors. The mean follow-up period of patients was 28 months (6 to 128 months. The rate of local recurrence among benign tumors was 3.8% (4 cases; in borderline cases the rate was 12.5% (1 case and for malignant cases, it was 18.7% (3 cases. Three patients each recurred twice and one patient had local recurrence for a third time. Two patients died of malignant tumor-related disease - one due to advanced regional recurrence and lung metastasis, and the other to wide-spread metastasis. Another patient died from an unrelated cause (myocardial infarction one year after surgery. For those with malignant phyllodes tumors, the five-year overall survival was 77.8% and disease-free survival rate was 85.7%. Conclusion: Although, the prognosis for phyllodes tumors is good, the malignancy rate is higher in older patients and those with larger tumors. A higher local recurrence rate in malignant phyllodes tumors suggests the importance for adequate resection of margins in surgical management of these tumors.

  11. CGH analysis of secondary genetic changes in Ewing tumors: correlation with metastatic disease in a series of 43 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, S; Schleiermacher, G; Peter, M; Mairal, A; Oberlin, O; Delattre, O; Aurias, A

    2001-10-01

    The occurrence of secondary chromosome changes is frequent in Ewing tumors, in particular trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 12, and unbalanced (1;16) translocations leading to gains of 1q and losses of 16q. The prognostic value of these secondary aberrations has not been statistically demonstrated. We report here a CGH analysis of a series of 43 primary tumors corresponding to 21 localized and 22 metastatic tumors. For five of them, a sufficient amount of DNA for the CGH analysis was available from the frozen samples. For 19 samples, a preliminary step of DOP-PCR amplification of the DNA was necessary. For the last 19 tumors, DNA was obtained after DOP-PCR amplification of small amount of DNA contaminating the RNA. As a whole, the main chromosome imbalances previously described, such as trisomies for 1q, 8, and 12, were observed. It is noteworthy that the mean number of imbalances was more frequent in localized versus metastatic tumors. Gain of 1q was more frequent in metastatic than in localized tumors. Nevertheless, these two results do not reach statistical significance. Conversely, a statistically significant excess of copy number of chromosome 2 was observed in non-metastatic tumors, suggesting that this imbalance, which has never been previously reported, could be associated with more favorable tumor behavior. PMID:11672775

  12. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  13. Tumor targeting profiling of hyaluronan-coated lipid based-nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahy, Shoshy; Goldsmith, Meir; Leviatan-Ben-Arye, Shani; Kisin-Finfer, Einat; Redy, Orit; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Shabat, Doron; Godin, Biana; Peer, Dan

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a naturally occurring high Mw (HMw) glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to play crucial roles in cell growth, embryonic development, healing processes, inflammation, and tumor development and progression. Low Mw (LMw, Hyaluronan (HA), a naturally occurring high Mw (HMw) glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to play crucial roles in cell growth, embryonic development, healing processes, inflammation, and tumor development and progression. Low Mw (LMw, <10 kDa) HA has been reported to provoke inflammatory responses, such as induction of cytokines, chemokines, reactive nitrogen species and growth factors. Herein, we prepared and characterized two types of HA coated (LMw and HMw) lipid-based targeted and stabilized nanoparticles (tsNPs) and tested their binding to tumor cells expressing the HA receptor (CD44), systemic immunotoxicity, and biodistribution in tumor bearing mice. In vitro, the Mw of the surface anchored HA had a significant influence on the affinity towards CD44 on B16F10 murine melanoma cells. LMw HA-tsNPs exhibited weak binding, while binding of tsNPs coated with HMw HA was characterized by high binding. Both types of tsNPs had no measured effect on cytokine induction in vivo following intravenous administration to healthy C57BL/6 mice suggesting no immune activation. HMw HA-tsNPs showed enhanced circulation time and tumor targeting specificity, mainly by accumulating in the tumor and its vicinity compared with LMw HA-tsNPs. Finally, we show that methotrexate (MTX), a drug commonly used in cancer chemotherapy, entrapped in HMw HA-tsNPs slowly diffused from the particles with a half-life of 13.75 days, and improved the therapeutic outcome in a murine B16F10 melanoma model compared with NPs suggesting an active cellular targeting beyond the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Taken together, these findings have major implications for the use of high molecular weight HA in nanomedicine as a selective and safe active cellular

  14. Tumor-stroma metabolic relationship based on lactate shuttle can sustain prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cell adopts peculiar metabolic strategies aimed to sustain the continuous proliferation in an environment characterized by relevant fluctuations in oxygen and nutrient levels. Monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 can drive such adaptation permitting the transport across plasma membrane of different monocarboxylic acids involved in energy metabolism. Role of MCTs in tumor-stroma metabolic relationship was investigated in vitro and in vivo using transformed prostate epithelial cells, carcinoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts. Moreover prostate tissues from carcinoma and benign hypertrophy cases were analyzed for individuating clinical-pathological implications of MCT1 and MCT4 expression. Transformed prostate epithelial (TPE) and prostate cancer (PCa) cells express both MCT1 and MCT4 and demonstrated variable dependence on aerobic glycolysis for maintaining their proliferative rate. In glucose-restriction the presence of L-lactate determined, after 24 h of treatment, in PCa cells the up-regulation of MCT1 and of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX1), and reduced the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase respect to untreated cells. The blockade of MCT1 function, performed by si RNA silencing, determined an appreciable antiproliferative effect when L-lactate was utilized as energetic fuel. Accordingly L-lactate released by high glycolytic human diploid fibroblasts WI-38 sustained survival and growth of TPE and PCa cells in low glucose culture medium. In parallel, the treatment with conditioned medium from PCa cells was sufficient to induce glycolytic metabolism in WI-38 cells, with upregulation of HIF-1a and MCT4. Co-injection of PCa cells with high glycolytic WI-38 fibroblasts determined an impressive increase in tumor growth rate in a xenograft model that was abrogated by MCT1 silencing in PCa cells. The possible interplay based on L-lactate shuttle between tumor and stroma was confirmed also in human PCa tissue where we observed a positive

  15. SERS-based nanobiosensing for ultrasensitive detection of the p53 tumor suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenici F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabio Domenici, Anna Rita Bizzarri, Salvatore Cannistraro Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Faculty of Science, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy Background: One of the main challenges in biomedicine is improvement of detection sensitivity to achieve tumor marker recognition at a very low concentration when the disease is not significantly advanced. A pivotal role in cancer defense is played by the p53 tumor suppressor, therefore its detection with high sensitivity may contribute considerably to early diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present a new analytical method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which could significantly increase the sensitivity of traditional bioaffinity techniques. p53 molecules were anchored to gold nanoparticles by means of the bifunctional linker 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP. The characteristic vibrational bands of the p53-4-ATP nanoparticle system were then used to identify the p53 molecules when they were captured by a recognition substrate comprising a monolayer of azurin in molecules possessing significant affinity for this tumor suppressor. The Raman signal enhancement achieved by 4-ATP-mediated crosslinking of p53 to 50 nm gold nanoparticles enabled detect of this protein at a concentration down to 5 × 10-13 M. Keywords: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, p53, ultrasensitive detection, atomic force microscopy

  16. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer.

  17. A HYBRID APPROACH BASED SEGMENTATION TECHNIQUE FOR BRAIN TUMOR IN MRI IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Anithadevi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic image segmentation becomes very crucial for tumor detection in medical image processing. Manual and semi automatic segmentation techniques require more time and knowledge. However these drawbacks had overcome by automatic segmentation still there needs to develop more appropriate techniques for medical image segmentation. Therefore, we proposed hybrid approach based image segmentation using the combined features of region growing and threshold segmentation technique. It is followed by pre-processing stage to provide an accurate brain tumor extraction by the help of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. If the tumor has holes in it, the region growing segmentation algorithm can’t reveal but the proposed hybrid segmentation technique can be achieved and the result as well improved. Hence the result used to made assessment with the various performance measures as DICE, Jaccard similarity, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. These similarity measures have been extensively used for evaluation with the ground truth of each processed image and its results are compared and analyzed.

  18. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  19. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:27529139

  20. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Menglong; Quan, Long; Yang, Yan; Qin, Qianqing; Zhu, Wenbin

    2015-02-01

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy.

  1. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported

  2. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Zakiyah; Aziz, Nazrina; Ahmad, Yuhaniz; Azwan, Zairul; Raduan, Farhana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  3. Clinical Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Serum Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of serum tumor markers is valuable for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers are frequently used for the management of cancer patients. However, single markers are less efficient but marker combinations increase the cost, which is troublesome for clinics. To find an optimal serum marker combination panel that benefits the patients and the medical management system as well, four routine lung cancer serum markers (SCCA, NSE, CEA, and CYFRA21-1 were evaluated individually and in combination. Meanwhile, the costs and effects of these markers in clinical practice in China were assessed by cost-effectiveness analysis. As expected, combinations of these tumor markers improved their sensitivity for lung cancer and different combination panels had their own usefulness. NSE + CEA + CYFRA21-1 was the optimal combination panel with highest Youden’s index (0.64, higher sensitivity (75.76%, and specificity (88.57%, which can aid the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. Nevertheless, the most cost-effective combination was SCCA + CEA, which can be used to screen the high-risk group.

  4. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Jaedicke, Volker; Stroop, Ralf; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2015-07-01

    Non-contact imaging methods to distinguish between healthy tissue and brain tumor tissue during surgery would be highly desirable but are not yet available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technology with a resolution around 1-15 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm that may satisfy the demands. To analyze its potential, we measured ex vivo human brain tumor tissue samples from 10 patients with a Spectral Domain OCT system (Thorlabs Callisto: center wavelength of 930 nm) and compared the results with standard histology. In detail, three different measurements were made for each sample. First the sample was measured directly after surgery. Then it was embedded in paraffin (also H and E staining) and examined for the second time. At last, the slices of each paraffin block cut by the pathology were measured. Each time a B-scan was created and for a better comparison with the histology a 3D image was generated, in order to get the corresponding en face images. In both, histopathological diagnosis and the analysis of the OCT images, different types of brain tumor showed difference in structure. This has been affirmed by two blinded investigators. Nevertheless the difference between two images of samples taken directly after surgery is less distinct. To enhance the contrast in the images further, we employ Spectroscopic OCT and pattern recognition algorithms and compare these results to the histopathological standard.

  5. Survival analysis of colorectal cancer patients with tumor recurrence using global score test methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zain, Zakiyah, E-mail: zac@uum.edu.my; Ahmad, Yuhaniz, E-mail: yuhaniz@uum.edu.my [School of Quantitative Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, UUM Sintok 06010, Kedah (Malaysia); Azwan, Zairul, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Raduan, Farhana, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com; Sagap, Ismail, E-mail: zairulazwan@gmail.com, E-mail: farhanaraduan@gmail.com, E-mail: drisagap@yahoo.com [Surgery Department, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Jalan Yaacob Latif, 56000 Bandar Tun Razak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Aziz, Nazrina, E-mail: nazrina@uum.edu.my

    2014-12-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third and the second most common cancer worldwide in men and women respectively, and the second in Malaysia for both genders. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are among the options available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. In clinical trials, the main purpose is often to compare efficacy between experimental and control treatments. Treatment comparisons often involve several responses or endpoints, and this situation complicates the analysis. In the case of colorectal cancer, sets of responses concerned with survival times include: times from tumor removal until the first, the second and the third tumor recurrences, and time to death. For a patient, the time to recurrence is correlated to the overall survival. In this study, global score test methodology is used in combining the univariate score statistics for comparing treatments with respect to each survival endpoint into a single statistic. The data of tumor recurrence and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients are taken from a Malaysian hospital. The results are found to be similar to those computed using the established Wei, Lin and Weissfeld method. Key factors such as ethnic, gender, age and stage at diagnose are also reported.

  6. Tumor Detection in Digital Mammogram Based on Support Vector Machine Using Co-occurrence Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SayedMasoud Hashemi Amroabadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths among women. Mammography is currently the best method for early detection. Due to the breast tissue type and different kinds of lesions, by using low dose x-ray in mammography, the detection of lesions in mammograms becomes very ambiguous and a tedious work . Early detection is the most effective ways to reduce the mortality rate. Our main aim in this paper is detection and recognition of tumors in digital mammograms. Mammograms usually have a large size so the processing of the entire mammogram takes a lot of time. To reduce the size and therefore the processing time and also to decrease the False Positive Rate, a two-step algorithm is used. At the first step some unimportant regions such as background and pectoral muscle are eliminated and at the second step an ROI detection algorithm is proposed which extracts the most likely regions to tumors. To recognize the tumors in the detected regions, some features are extracted from each region. To find the most effective features for tumor detection, several data mining feature extraction and feature selection methods are used and then compared. To increase the performance and reduce the number of features a GA based algorithm is proposed. Finally, SVM is used as our classifier, because it has the best results in comparison with other tools in our application. Experimental results show that the performance of proposed methods is better than other previous methods. The True Positive Rate using SVM is 94.59% and the False Positive Rate is 22.95%.

  7. Involvement of specific matrix metalloproteinases during tumor necrosis factor/IFNgamma-based cancer therapy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roy, Maarten; Van Lint, Philippe; Van Laere, Ineke; Wielockx, Ben; Wilson, Carole; López-Otin, Carlos; Shapiro, Stephen; Libert, Claude

    2007-09-01

    The potent antitumor activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in combination with IFN-gamma can only be applied in local regimens due to their strong proinflammatory properties. It has been shown that the broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor BB-94 protects against TNF/IFNgamma-induced toxicity without blocking the antitumor effect. Here, we tried to explain this protective role of BB-94 and sought to assign roles to specific MMPs in TNF/IFNgamma-induced toxicity. By studying the expression of MMP genes in different organs and in the tumor, we observed that the expression levels of MMP-7, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-12 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 are clearly up-regulated in the liver during therapy. MMP-8 and MMP-9 are also up-regulated in the lung and kidney, respectively. In the tumor, most MMP genes are expressed, but only MMP-3 is up-regulated during TNF/IFNgamma treatment. Using MMP-deficient or double-deficient mice, we have shown a mediating role for MMP-3 during TNF/IFNgamma treatment in tumor-free and B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice. By contrast, MMP-12 seemed to have some protective role in both models. However, because most phenotypes were not extremely outspoken, we have to conclude, based on the set of MMP-deficient mice we have studied, that inhibition of a single MMP will probably not increase the therapeutic value of TNF/IFNgamma, but that rather, broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors will be required. PMID:17876053

  8. Combined analysis of cell growth and apoptosis-regulating proteins in HPVs associated anogenital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical course of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated with Bowenoid papulosis and condyloma acuminatum of anogenital tumors are still unknown. Here we evaluated molecules that are relevant to cellular proliferation and regulation of apoptosis in HPV associated anogenital tumors. We investigated the levels of telomerase activity, and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) family (c-IAP1, c-IAP2, XIAP) and c-Myc mRNA expression levels in 20 specimens of Bowenoid papulosis and 36 specimens of condyloma acuminatum in anogenital areas. Overall, phosphorylated (p-) AKT, p-ribosomal protein S6 (S6) and p-4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) expression levels were examined by immunohistochemistry in anogenital tumors both with and without positive telomerase activity. Positive telomerase activity was detected in 41.7% of Bowenoid papulosis and 27.3% of condyloma acuminatum compared to normal skin (p < 0.001). In contrast, the expression levels of Bowenoid papulosis indicated that c-IAP1, c-IAP2 and XIAP mRNA were significantly upregulated compared to those in both condyloma acuminatum samples (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.022, respectively) and normal skin (p < 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.034, respectively). Overall, 30% of Bowenoid papulosis with high risk HPV strongly promoted IAPs family and c-Myc but condyloma acuminatum did not significantly activate those genes. Immunohistochemically, p-Akt and p-S6 expressions were associated with positive telomerase activity but not with p-4EBP1 expression. Combined analysis of the IAPs family, c-Myc mRNA expression, telomerase activity levels and p-Akt/p-S6 expressions may provide clinically relevant molecular markers in HPV associated anogenital tumors

  9. MDM2 SNP309, gene-gene interaction, and tumor susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in multiple cellular pathways including apoptosis, transcriptional control, and cell cycle regulation. In the last decade it has been demonstrated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at codon 72 of the p53 gene is associated with the risk for development of various neoplasms. MDM2 SNP309 is a single nucleotide T to G polymorphism located in the MDM2 gene promoter. From the time that this well-characterized functional polymorphism was identified, a variety of case-control studies have been published that investigate the possible association between MDM2 SNP309 and cancer risk. However, the results of the published studies, as well as the subsequent meta-analyses, remain contradictory. Methods To investigate whether currently published epidemiological studies can clarify the potential interaction between MDM2 SNP309 and the functional genetic variant in p53 codon72 (Arg72Pro and p53 mutation status, we performed a meta-analysis of the risk estimate on 27,813 cases with various tumor types and 30,295 controls. Results The data we reviewed indicated that variant homozygote 309GG and heterozygote 309TG were associated with a significant increased risk of all tumor types (homozygote comparison: odds ratio (OR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.13-1.37; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17. We also found that the combination of GG and Pro/Pro, TG and Pro/Pro, GG and Arg/Arg significantly increased the risk of cancer (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.77-6.47; OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.26-2.81; OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.01-3.78, respectively. In a stratified analysis by tumor location, we also found a significant increased risk in brain, liver, stomach and uterus cancer (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.06-2.03; OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.57-3.18; OR = 1.54, 95%CI = 1.04-2.29; OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.29, respectively. However, no association was seen between MDM2 SNP309 and tumor susceptibility

  10. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rozario, T; Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (United States); Klash, S [Premier Cancer Centers, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  11. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant

  12. Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor-specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A; Parmar, Chirag K; Gillespie, James W; Praveen, Kulkarni P; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water-insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer cells rather than nontarget, non cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, the targeted phage micelles triggered a dramatic tumor reduction and extensive necrosis as a result of improved tumor delivery of paclitaxel. The enhanced anticancer effect was also verified by an enhanced apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation following the treatment with the targeted micellar paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. The absence of hepatotoxicity and pathologic changes in tissue sections of vital organs, together with maintenance of overall health of mice following the treatment, further support its translational potential as an effective and safe chemotherapy for improved breast cancer treatment. PMID:25239936

  13. Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A.; Parmar, Chirag K.; Gillespie, James W.; Praveen, Kulkarni P.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG- PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer cells rather than non-target, non- cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, the targeted phage-micelles triggered a dramatic tumor reduction and extensive necrosis as a result of improved tumor delivery of paclitaxel. The enhanced anticancer effect was also verified by an enhanced apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation following the treatment with the targeted micellar paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. The absence of hepatotoxicity and pathological changes in tissue sections of vital organs, together with maintenance of overall health of mice following the treatment, further support its translational potential as an effective and safe chemotherapy for improved breast cancer treatment. PMID:25239936

  14. Comparison of methods for proliferative index analysis for grading pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Pamela P; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Davison, Jon M; Hartman, Douglas J

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of proliferative activity is required for grading well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, a standardized method for obtaining the Ki-67 proliferative index is lacking. This study compared proliferative activity obtained by 3 methods: single-field hot spot (Ki-67 HS) and 10 consecutive field average (Ki-67 CFA) using the Ventana image analysis system (Ventana Medical Systems, Tucson, AZ) and mitotic index (MI). These methods resulted in discrepant grades in 30 (67%) of our 45 cases. With the current Ki-67 cutoff of more than 2% for intermediate-grade tumors, MI, CFA, and HS resulted in specificities of 91%, 94%, and 31%, respectively, for detecting metastasis, with positive predictive values (PPVs) of 25%, 67%, and 31%, respectively. At a higher Ki-67 cutoff of 7.5%, HS analysis resulted in a specificity of 94% and PPV of 71% for predicting metastasis. While single-field HS analysis may be practical and reliable at a higher cutoff, this study emphasizes the variability that can exist when different methods of assessment are used.

  15. Genome-wide gene copy number and expression analysis of primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Gene copy number alterations play an important role in the development of gastric cancer and a change in gene copy number is one of the main mechanisms for a cancer cell to control the expression of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. To highlight genes of potential biological and clinical relevance in gastric cancer, we carried out a systematic array-based survey of gene expression and copy number levels in primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines and validated the results using an affinity capture based transcript analysis (TRAC assay) and real-time qRT-PCR. Integrated microarray analysis revealed altogether 256 genes that were located in recurrent regions of gains or losses and had at least a 2-fold copy number- associated change in their gene expression. The expression levels of 13 of these genes, ALPK2, ASAP1, CEACAM5, CYP3A4, ENAH, ERBB2, HHIPL2, LTB4R, MMP9, PERLD1, PNMT, PTPRA, and OSMR, were validated in a total of 118 gastric samples using either the qRT-PCR or TRAC assay. All of these 13 genes were differentially expressed between cancerous samples and nonmalignant tissues (p < 0.05) and the association between copy number and gene expression changes was validated for nine (69.2%) of these genes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, integrated gene expression and copy number microarray analysis highlighted genes that may be critically important for gastric carcinogenesis. TRAC and qRT-PCR analyses validated the microarray results and therefore the role of these genes as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer

  16. A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing a single tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope delays tumor growth in a murine model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Kouiavskaia, Diana V; Parkins, Christopher J; Caposio, Patrizia; Botto, Sara; Alexander, Richard B; Jarvis, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly immunogenic virus that results in a persistent, life-long infection in the host typically with no ill effects. Certain unique features of CMV, including its capacity to actively replicate in the presence of strong host CMV-specific immunity, may give CMV an advantage compared with other virus-based vaccine delivery platforms. In the present study, we tested the utility of mouse CMV (mCMV)-based vaccines expressing human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer immunotherapy in double-transgenic mice expressing PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2bxPSA F1 mice). We assessed the capacity of 2 mCMV-based vectors to induce PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses and affect the growth of PSA-expressing Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate tumors (TRAMP-PSA). In the absence of tumor challenge, immunization with mCMV vectors expressing either a H2-D(b)-restricted epitope PSA(65-73) (mCMV/PSA(65-73)) or the full-length gene for PSA (mCMV/PSA(FL)) induced comparable levels of CD8 T-cell responses that increased (inflated) with time. Upon challenge with TRAMP-PSA tumor cells, animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(65-73) had delay of tumor growth and increased PSA-specific CD8 T-cell responses, whereas animals immunized with mCMV/PSA(FL) showed progressive tumor growth and no increase in number of splenic PSA(65-73)-specific T cells. The data show that a prototype CMV-based prostate cancer vaccine can induce an effective antitumor immune response in a "humanized" double-transgenic mouse model. The observation that mCMV/PSA(FL) is not effective against TRAMP-PSA is consistent with our previous findings that HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted immune responses to PSA are associated with suppression of effective CD8 T-cell responses to TRAMP-PSA tumors.

  17. Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Tao WANG; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A.; Parmar, Chirag K.; Gillespie, James W.; Praveen, Kulkarni P.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG- PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer ...

  18. SU-E-J-249: Characterization of Gynecological Tumor Heterogeneity Using Texture Analysis in the Context of An 18F-FDG PET Adaptive Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, J [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, J; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC (United States); Das, S [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a method to examine gynecological tumor heterogeneity using texture analysis in the context of an adaptive PET protocol in order to establish if texture metrics from baseline PET-CT predict tumor response better than SUV metrics alone as well as determine texture features correlating with tumor response during radiation therapy. Methods: This IRB approved protocol included 29 women with node positive gynecological cancers visible on FDG-PET treated with EBRT to the PET positive nodes. A baseline and intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained. Tumor outcome was determined based on RECIST on posttreatment PET-CT. Primary GTVs were segmented using 40% threshold and a semi-automatic gradient-based contouring tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). SUV histogram features, Metabolic Volume (MV), and Total Lesion Glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. Four 3D texture matrices describing local and regional relationships between voxel intensities in the GTV were generated: co-occurrence, run length, size zone, and neighborhood difference. From these, 39 texture features were calculated. Prognostic power of baseline features derived from gradientbased and threshold GTVs were determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Receiver Operating Characteristics and logistic regression was performed using JMP (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) to find probabilities of predicting response. Changes in features during treatment were determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Of the 29 patients, there were 16 complete responders, 7 partial responders, and 6 non-responders. Comparing CR/PR vs. NR for gradient-based GTVs, 7 texture values, TLG, and SUV kurtosis had a p < 0.05. Threshold GTVs yielded 4 texture features and TLG with p < 0.05. From baseline to intra-treatment, 14 texture features, SUVmean, SUVmax, MV, and TLG changed with p < 0.05. Conclusion: Texture analysis of PET imaged gynecological tumors is an effective method for early prognosis and should

  19. Skull Base Clear Cell Carcinoma, Metastasis of Renal Primary Tumor: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilson Sepúlveda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with cranial nerve VI bilateral paresis, absence of pharyngeal reflex, dysarthria, right tongue deviation, and right facial paralysis. Imaging studies showed an expansive process in the cranial base with clivus and petrous apex osteolysis. A biopsy confirmed the presence of clear cell adenocarcinoma and suspicion of renal tumor metastases. Abdominal imaging studies revealed a mass in the right kidney. Consequently, radiotherapy was performed, and the patient was enrolled in a palliative care and pain control program.

  20. Esophagus sparing with IMRT in lung tumor irradiation: An EUD-based optimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate (1) the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to optimize dose escalation of lung tumors when the esophagus overlaps the planning target volume (PTV) and (2) the potential benefit of further dose escalation in only the part of the PTV that does not overlap the esophagus. Methods and Materials: The treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) scans of patients with primary lung tumors located in different regions of the left and right lung were used for the optimization of beamlet intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. In all cases, the PTV overlapped part of the esophagus. The dose in the PTV was maximized according to 7 different primary cost functions: 2 plans that made use of mean dose (MD) (the reference plan, in which the 95% isodose surface covered the PTV and a second plan that had no constraint on the minimum isodose), 3 plans based on maximizing gEUD for the whole PTV with ever increasing assumptions for tumor aggressiveness, and 2 plans that used different gEUD values in 2 simultaneous, overlapping target volumes (the whole PTV and the PTV minus esophagus). Beam arrangements and NTCP-based costlets for the organs at risk (OARs) were kept identical to the original conformal plan for each case. Regardless of optimization method, the relative ranking of the resulting plans was evaluated in terms of the absence of cold spots within the PTV and the final gEUD computed for the whole PTV. Results: Because the MD-optimized plans lacked a constraint on minimum PTV coverage, they resulted in cold spots that affected approximately 5% of the PTV volume. When optimizing over the whole PTV volume, gEUD-optimized plans resulted in higher equivalent uniform PTV doses than did the reference plan while still maintaining normal-tissue constraints. However, only under the assumption of extremely aggressive tumors could cold spots in the PTV be avoided. Generally, high-level overall results are obtained

  1. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Guo; Dongmei Liu; Bin Gao; Xiaohui Zhang; Minli You; Hui Ren; Hongbo Zhang; Santos, Hélder A.; Feng Xu

    2016-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT i...

  2. Novel Morphologic and Genetic Analysis of Cancer Cells in a 3D Microenvironment Identifies STAT3 as a Regulator of Tumor Permeability Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Chul; Jeong, Hyobin; Son, Sung Hwa; Kim, YounHa; Han, Daeyoung; Goughnour, Peter C; Kang, Taehee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Moon, Hyo Eun; Paek, Sun Ha; Hwang, Daehee; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-03-01

    Tumor permeability is a critical determinant of drug delivery and sensitivity, but systematic methods to identify factors that perform permeability barrier functions in the tumor microenvironment are not yet available. Multicellular tumor spheroids have become tractable in vitro models to study the impact of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on cellular behavior. In this study, we characterized the spheroid-forming potential of cancer cells and correlated the resulting spheroid morphologies with genetic information to identify conserved cellular processes associated with spheroid structure. Spheroids generated from 100 different cancer cell lines were classified into four distinct groups based on morphology. In particular, round and compact spheroids exhibited highly hypoxic inner cores and permeability barriers against anticancer drugs. Through systematic and correlative analysis, we reveal JAK-STAT signaling as one of the signature pathways activated in round spheroids. Accordingly, STAT3 inhibition in spheroids generated from the established cancer cells and primary glioblastoma patient-derived cells altered the rounded morphology and increased drug sensitivity. Furthermore, combined administration of the STAT3 inhibitor and 5-fluorouracil to a mouse xenograft model markedly reduced tumor growth compared with monotherapy. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the ability to integrate 3D culture and genetic profiling to determine the factors underlying the integrity of the permeability barrier in the tumor microenvironment, and may help to identify and exploit novel mechanisms of drug resistance.

  3. Prognosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus:Assessment Based on Clinical and Computer Tomography Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia,Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC complicated by portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT have an extremely poor prognosis. It is important to select adequate therapeutic options based on reliable prognostic factors using imaging studies and clinical data. Prognostic factors were analyzed in patients with HCC with PVTT in the first branch or main trunk of the portal vein. From 2000 to 2007, 107 consecutive patients with HCC with PVTT in the major portal vein were reviewed, and diagnostic images and clinical characteristics were retrospectively observed. Thirty-eight possible prognostic factors for survival were analyzed by the log-rank test and multivariate analysis using Coxʼs proportional hazards model. Median overall survival was 14 months following PVTT diagnosis. Survival rates at 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years were 72.1%, 52.6%, 32.6%, and 29.6%, respectively. Independent prognostic factors for longer survival included:patient age <65 years, Child-Pugh classification A/B, PVTT treatment, accumulation of Lipiodol in the PVTT after TACE, initial radical treatment for HCC, HCC located in a single lobe of the liver, and no invasion of HCC to the hepatic vein or bile duct. Survival was associated with liver function, tumor extension, and treatment for HCC and PVTT.

  4. Mosaic zebrafish transgenesis for functional genomic analysis of candidate cooperative genes in tumor pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Choong Yong; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhu, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive genomic analysis has uncovered surprisingly large numbers of genetic alterations in various types of cancers. To robustly and efficiently identify oncogenic "drivers" among these tumors and define their complex relationships with concurrent genetic alterations during tumor pathogenesis remains a daunting task. Recently, zebrafish have emerged as an important animal model for studying human diseases, largely because of their ease of maintenance, high fecundity, obvious advantages for in vivo imaging, high conservation of oncogenes and their molecular pathways, susceptibility to tumorigenesis and, most importantly, the availability of transgenic techniques suitable for use in the fish. Transgenic zebrafish models of cancer have been widely used to dissect oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor types. However, developing a stable transgenic fish model is both tedious and time-consuming, and it is even more difficult and more time-consuming to dissect the cooperation of multiple genes in disease pathogenesis using this approach, which requires the generation of multiple transgenic lines with overexpression of the individual genes of interest followed by complicated breeding of these stable transgenic lines. Hence, use of a mosaic transient transgenic approach in zebrafish offers unique advantages for functional genomic analysis in vivo. Briefly, candidate transgenes can be coinjected into one-cell-stage wild-type or transgenic zebrafish embryos and allowed to integrate together into each somatic cell in a mosaic pattern that leads to mixed genotypes in the same primarily injected animal. This permits one to investigate in a faster and less expensive manner whether and how the candidate genes can collaborate with each other to drive tumorigenesis. By transient overexpression of activated ALK in the transgenic fish overexpressing MYCN, we demonstrate here the cooperation of these two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of a pediatric cancer, neuroblastoma that has

  5. Reproducibility of Digital PCR Assays for Circulating Tumor DNA Analysis in Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrebien, Sarah; O’Leary, Ben; Beaney, Matthew; Schiavon, Gaia; Fribbens, Charlotte; Bhambra, Amarjit; Johnson, Richard; Turner, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis has the potential to allow non-invasive analysis of tumor mutations in advanced cancer. In this study we assessed the reproducibility of digital PCR (dPCR) assays of circulating tumor DNA in a cohort of patients with advanced breast cancer and assessed delayed plasma processing using cell free DNA preservative tubes. We recruited a cohort of 96 paired samples from 71 women with advanced breast cancer who had paired blood samples processed either immediately or delayed in preservative tubes with processing 48–72 hours after collection. Plasma DNA was analysed with multiplex digital PCR (mdPCR) assays for hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, ESR1 and ERBB2, and for AKT1 E17K. There was 94.8% (91/96) agreement in mutation calling between immediate and delayed processed tubes, kappa 0.88 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Discordance in mutation calling resulted from low allele frequency and likely stochastic effects. In concordant samples there was high correlation in mutant copies per ml plasma (r2 = 0.98; pprocessed tubes, although overall quantification of total cell free plasma DNA had similar prognostic effects in immediate (HR 3.6) and delayed (HR 3.0) tubes. There was moderate agreement in changes in allele fraction between sequential samples in quantitative mutation tracking (r = 0.84, p = 0.0002). Delayed processing of samples using preservative tubes allows for centralized ctDNA digital PCR mutation screening in advanced breast cancer. The potential of preservative tubes in quantitative mutation tracking requires further research. PMID:27760227

  6. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in breast cancer: a diagnostic tool for prognosis and molecular analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoshen Dong; R.Katherine Alpaugh; Massimo Cristofanilli

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is characterized by a combination of tumor growth,proliferation and metastatic progression and is typically managed with palliative intent.The benefit of standard systemic therapies is relatively limited and the disease is considered incurable suggesting the need to investigate the biological drivers of the various phases of the metastatic process in order to improve the selection of molecularly driven therapies.The detection,enumeration and molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an intriguing opportunity to advance this knowledge.CTCs enumerated by the Food and Drugs Administration-cleared CellSearchTM system are an independent prognostic factor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in MBC patients.Several published papers demonstrated the poor prognosis for MBC patients that presented basal CTC count ≥5 in 7.5 mL of blood.Therefore,the enumeration of CTCs during treatment for MBC provides a tool with the ability to predict progression of disease earlier than standard timing of anatomical assessment using conventional radiological tests.During the metastatic process cancer cells exhibit morphological and phenotypic plasticity undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).This important phenomenon is associated with down regulation of epithelial marker (e.g.,EpCAM) with potential limitations in the applicability of current CTCs enrichment methods.Such observations translated in a number of investigations aimed at improving our capabilities to enumerate and perform molecular characterization of CTCs.Theoretically,the phenotypic analysis of CTCs can represent a "liquid" biopsy of breast tumor that is able to identify a new potential target against the metastatic disease and advance the development and monitoring of personalized therapies.

  7. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, M.; Mojra, A.; Sadeghi, S.

    2016-02-01

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors.

  8. Parameter estimation of brain tumors using intraoperative thermal imaging based on artificial tactile sensing in conjunction with artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative Thermal Imaging (ITI) is a new minimally invasive diagnosis technique that can potentially locate margins of brain tumor in order to achieve maximum tumor resection with least morbidity. This study introduces a new approach to ITI based on artificial tactile sensing (ATS) technology in conjunction with artificial neural networks (ANN) and feasibility and applicability of this method in diagnosis and localization of brain tumors is investigated. In order to analyze validity and reliability of the proposed method, two simulations were performed. (i) An in vitro experimental setup was designed and fabricated using a resistance heater embedded in agar tissue phantom in order to simulate heat generation by a tumor in the brain tissue; and (ii) A case report patient with parafalcine meningioma was presented to simulate ITI in the neurosurgical procedure. In the case report, both brain and tumor geometries were constructed from MRI data and tumor temperature and depth of location were estimated. For experimental tests, a novel assisted surgery robot was developed to palpate the tissue phantom surface to measure temperature variations and ANN was trained to estimate the simulated tumor’s power and depth. Results affirm that ITI based ATS is a non-invasive method which can be useful to detect, localize and characterize brain tumors. (paper)

  9. Mutational Analysis of p27 (CDKN1 B and p18 (CDKN2C in Sporadic Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors Argues against Tumor-Suppressor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lindberg

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs arise sporadically or are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MENi syndrome or von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. About 90% of patients with familial MENi display detectable MEN1 gene (menin mutations. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 (CDKN1 B is a downstream target of menin and has been recently shown to be responsible for the multiple endocrine neoplasia-like syndrome in rats, where affected animals develop multiple tumors and hyperplasia in endocrine tissues, including the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. A germline nonsense truncation mutation of p27 has been recently described in a suspected MENi family without MENi mutation, raising the possibility that p27 mutation could be responsible for MENi phenotype. Somatic MENi mutations occur at low frequency in sporadic PETs; here, we subjected p27 to mutational analysis in 27 sporadic PETs. As an additional menin target, analysis of the p18(CDKN2C gene was included. In the p27 gene, one common polymorphism (V1 09G and one novel polymorphism (g/a in the noncoding part of exon 2 were identified. Three known polymorphisms were found in the p18 gene. These data suggest that p27 and p18 are unlikely to present classic tumor-suppressor genes in sporadic PETs.

  10. Development of a new rapid isolation device for circulating tumor cells (CTCs using 3D palladium filter and its application for genetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Yusa

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the blood of patients with epithelial malignancies provide a promising and minimally invasive source for early detection of metastasis, monitoring of therapeutic effects and basic research addressing the mechanism of metastasis. In this study, we developed a new filtration-based, sensitive CTC isolation device. This device consists of a 3-dimensional (3D palladium (Pd filter with an 8 µm-sized pore in the lower layer and a 30 µm-sized pocket in the upper layer to trap CTCs on a filter micro-fabricated by precise lithography plus electroforming process. This is a simple pump-less device driven by gravity flow and can enrich CTCs from whole blood within 20 min. After on-device staining of CTCs for 30 min, the filter cassette was removed from the device, fixed in a cassette holder and set up on the upright fluorescence microscope. Enumeration and isolation of CTCs for subsequent genetic analysis from the beginning were completed within 1.5 hr and 2 hr, respectively. Cell spike experiments demonstrated that the recovery rate of tumor cells from blood by this Pd filter device was more than 85%. Single living tumor cells were efficiently isolated from these spiked tumor cells by a micromanipulator, and KRAS mutation, HER2 gene amplification and overexpression, for example, were successfully detected from such isolated single tumor cells. Sequential analysis of blood from mice bearing metastasis revealed that CTC increased with progression of metastasis. Furthermore, a significant increase in the number of CTCs from the blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer was observed compared with patients without metastasis and healthy volunteers. These results suggest that this new 3D Pd filter-based device would be a useful tool for the rapid, cost effective and sensitive detection, enumeration, isolation and genetic analysis of CTCs from peripheral blood in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  11. Classification of Extraovarian Implants in Patients With Ovarian Serous Borderline Tumors (Tumors of Low Malignant Potential) Based on Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Jesse K; Gilks, C Blake; Kalloger, Steve; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-09-01

    The classification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants predicts patient outcome in patients with high-stage ovarian serous borderline tumors (tumors of low malignant potential). However, the morphologic criteria used to classify implants vary between studies. To date, there has been no large-scale study with follow-up data comparing the prognostic significance of competing criteria. Peritoneal and/or lymph node implants from 181 patients with high-stage serous borderline tumors were evaluated independently by 3 pathologists for the following 8 morphologic features: micropapillary architecture; glandular architecture; nests of epithelial cells with surrounding retraction artifact set in densely fibrotic stroma; low-power destructive tissue invasion; single eosinophilic epithelial cells within desmoplastic stroma; mitotic activity; nuclear pleomorphism; and nucleoli. Follow-up of 156 (86%) patients ranged from 11 to 264 months (mean, 89 mo; median, 94 mo). Implants with low-power destructive invasion into underlying tissue were the best predictor of adverse patient outcome with 69% overall and 59% disease-free survival (P<0.01). In the evaluation of individual morphologic features, the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion also had excellent reproducibility between observers (κ=0.84). Extraovarian implants with micropapillary architecture or solid nests with clefts were often associated with tissue invasion but did not add significant prognostic value beyond destructive tissue invasion alone. Implants without attached normal tissue were not associated with adverse outcome and appear to be noninvasive. Because the presence of invasion in an extraovarian implant is associated with an overall survival analogous to that of low-grade serous carcinoma, the designation low-grade serous carcinoma is recommended. Even though the low-power destructive tissue invasion criterion has excellent interobserver reproducibility, it is further

  12. Podoplanin expression in tumor-free resection margins of oral squamous cell carcinomas: an immunohistochemical and fractal analysis study

    OpenAIRE

    Margaritescu, C.; Raica, M; PIRICI, D.; Simionescu, C.; Mogoanta, L.; Stinga, A.C.; Stinga, A.S.; Ribatti, Doménico

    2010-01-01

    Podoplanin is involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression in head and neck malignancies and its expression is not restricted to lymphatic vessel endothelium. The aim of this study was to establish podoplanin expression in the tumor-free resection margins of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and to evaluate the geometric complexity of the lymphatic vessels in oral mucosa by utilizing fractal analysis. As concerns the podoplanin expression in noncancerous tissue, forty tumor-free r...

  13. Transcriptome Analysis of Individual Stromal Cell Populations Identifies Stroma-Tumor Crosstalk in Mouse Lung Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejin Choi; Jianting Sheng; Dingcheng Gao; Fuhai Li; Anna Durrans; Seongho Ryu; Sharrell B. Lee; Navneet Narula; Shahin Rafii; Olivier Elemento; Nasser K. Altorki; Stephen T.C. Wong; Vivek Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial c...

  14. Anatomical specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in glioblastomas: a voxel-based mapping analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xing [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Yinyan [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Capital Medical University, Department of Neuropathology, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing (China); Wang, Kai; Ma, Jun; Li, Shaowu [Capital Medical University, Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Liu, Shuai [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Departments of Neurosurgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China); Liu, Yong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China); Jiang, Tao [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Beijing Academy of Critical Illness in Brain, Department of Clinical Oncology, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-15

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a common genetic alteration in malignant gliomas and contributes to the angiogenesis of tumors. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical specificity of VEGF expression levels in glioblastomas using voxel-based neuroimaging analysis. Clinical information, MR scans, and immunohistochemistry stains of 209 patients with glioblastomas were reviewed. All tumor lesions were segmented manually and subsequently registered to standard brain space. Voxel-based regression analysis was performed to correlate the brain regions of tumor involvement with the level of VEGF expression. Brain regions identified as significantly associated with high or low VEGF expression were preserved following permutation correction. High VEGF expression was detected in 123 (58.9 %) of the 209 patients. Voxel-based statistical analysis demonstrated that high VEGF expression was more likely in tumors located in the left frontal lobe and the right caudate and low VEGF expression was more likely in tumors that occurred in the posterior region of the right lateral ventricle. Voxel-based neuroimaging analysis revealed the anatomic specificity of VEGF expression in glioblastoma, which may further our understanding of genetic heterogeneity during tumor origination. This finding provides primary theoretical support for potential future application of customized antiangiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  15. Anatomical specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in glioblastomas: a voxel-based mapping analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a common genetic alteration in malignant gliomas and contributes to the angiogenesis of tumors. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical specificity of VEGF expression levels in glioblastomas using voxel-based neuroimaging analysis. Clinical information, MR scans, and immunohistochemistry stains of 209 patients with glioblastomas were reviewed. All tumor lesions were segmented manually and subsequently registered to standard brain space. Voxel-based regression analysis was performed to correlate the brain regions of tumor involvement with the level of VEGF expression. Brain regions identified as significantly associated with high or low VEGF expression were preserved following permutation correction. High VEGF expression was detected in 123 (58.9 %) of the 209 patients. Voxel-based statistical analysis demonstrated that high VEGF expression was more likely in tumors located in the left frontal lobe and the right caudate and low VEGF expression was more likely in tumors that occurred in the posterior region of the right lateral ventricle. Voxel-based neuroimaging analysis revealed the anatomic specificity of VEGF expression in glioblastoma, which may further our understanding of genetic heterogeneity during tumor origination. This finding provides primary theoretical support for potential future application of customized antiangiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  16. Genetic alterations of hepatocellular carcinoma by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and cloning sequencing of tumor differential DNA fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xian; Wen-Ming Cong; Shu-Hui Zhang; Meng-Chao Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the genetic alterations and their association with clinicopathological characteristics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to find the tumor related DNA fragments.METHODS: DNA isolated from tumors and corresponding noncancerous liver tissues of 56 HCC patients was amplified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)with 10 random 10-mer arbitrary primers. The RAPD bands showing obvious differences in tumor tissue DNA corresponding to that of normal tissue were separated,purified, cloned and sequenced. DNA sequences were analyzed and compared with GenBank data.RESULTS: A total of 56 cases of HCC were demonstrated to have genetic alterations, which were detected by at least one primer. The detestability of genetic alterations ranged from 20% to 70% in each case, and 17.9% to 50% in each primer. Serum HBV infection, tumor size,histological grade, tumor capsule, as well as tumor intrahepatic metastasis, might be correlated with genetic alterations on certain primers. A band with a higher intensity of 480 bp or so amplified fragments in tumor DNA relative to normal DNA could be seen in 27 of 56 tumor samples using primer 4. Sequence analysis of these fragments showed 91% homology with Homo sapiens double homeobox protein DUX10 gene.CONCLUSION: Genetic alterations are a frequent event in HCC, and tumor related DNA fragments have been found in this study, which may be associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. RAPD is an effective method for the identification and analysis of genetic alterations in HCC, and may provide new information for further evaluating the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  17. Enhanced tumor delivery and antitumor response of doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanoparticles formulated based on a Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Zheng, Chunli; Xin, Junbo; Chen, Fangcheng; Ling, Hua; Sun, Linlin; Webster, Thomas J; Ming, Xin; Liu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was developed here to prepare albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs) for improving the therapeutic and safety profiles of chemotherapeutic agents. This approach involved crosslinking bovine serum albumin (BSA) using a Schiff base-containing vanillin, into NPs and loading doxorubicin (DOX) into the NPs by incubation. The resultant NPs (DOX-BSA-V-NPs) displayed a particle size of 100.5±1.3 nm with a zeta potential of -23.05±1.45 mV and also showed high drug-loading efficiency and excellent stability with respect to storage and temperature. The encapsulation of DOX into the BSA-V-NPs was confirmed by dynamic scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy. DOX-BSA-V-NPs exhibited a significantly faster DOX release at pH 6.5 than pH 7.4, as well as in a solution with a higher glutathione concentration. In vitro studies showed that the cellular uptake of DOX-BSA-V-NPs was time-dependent, concentration-dependent, and faster than free DOX, while the cytotoxicity of DOX-BSA-V-NPs (IC50 value of 3.693 μg/mL) was superior to free DOX (IC50 value of 4.007 μg/mL). More importantly, DOX-BSA-V-NPs showed a longer mean survival time of 24.83 days, a higher tumor inhibition rate of 56.66%, and a decreased distribution in the heart than other DOX formulations in animal studies using a tumor xenograft model. Thus, the vanillin-based albumin NPs were shown here to be a promising carrier for tumor-targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and, thus, should be further studied. PMID:27574421

  18. Enhanced tumor delivery and antitumor response of doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanoparticles formulated based on a Schiff base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Zheng, Chunli; Xin, Junbo; Chen, Fangcheng; Ling, Hua; Sun, Linlin; Webster, Thomas J; Ming, Xin; Liu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was developed here to prepare albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs) for improving the therapeutic and safety profiles of chemotherapeutic agents. This approach involved crosslinking bovine serum albumin (BSA) using a Schiff base-containing vanillin, into NPs and loading doxorubicin (DOX) into the NPs by incubation. The resultant NPs (DOX-BSA-V-NPs) displayed a particle size of 100.5±1.3 nm with a zeta potential of −23.05±1.45 mV and also showed high drug-loading efficiency and excellent stability with respect to storage and temperature. The encapsulation of DOX into the BSA-V-NPs was confirmed by dynamic scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy. DOX-BSA-V-NPs exhibited a significantly faster DOX release at pH 6.5 than pH 7.4, as well as in a solution with a higher glutathione concentration. In vitro studies showed that the cellular uptake of DOX-BSA-V-NPs was time-dependent, concentration-dependent, and faster than free DOX, while the cytotoxicity of DOX-BSA-V-NPs (IC50 value of 3.693 μg/mL) was superior to free DOX (IC50 value of 4.007 μg/mL). More importantly, DOX-BSA-V-NPs showed a longer mean survival time of 24.83 days, a higher tumor inhibition rate of 56.66%, and a decreased distribution in the heart than other DOX formulations in animal studies using a tumor xenograft model. Thus, the vanillin-based albumin NPs were shown here to be a promising carrier for tumor-targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and, thus, should be further studied. PMID:27574421

  19. Protein expression based multimarker analysis of breast cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran Ayyappan K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue microarray (TMA data are commonly used to validate the prognostic accuracy of tumor markers. For example, breast cancer TMA data have led to the identification of several promising prognostic markers of survival time. Several studies have shown that TMA data can also be used to cluster patients into clinically distinct groups. Here we use breast cancer TMA data to cluster patients into distinct prognostic groups. Methods We apply weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA to TMA data consisting of 26 putative tumor biomarkers measured on 82 breast cancer patients. Based on this analysis we identify three groups of patients with low (5.4%, moderate (22% and high (50% mortality rates, respectively. We then develop a simple threshold rule using a subset of three markers (p53, Na-KATPase-β1, and TGF β receptor II that can approximately define these mortality groups. We compare the results of this correlation network analysis with results from a standard Cox regression analysis. Results We find that the rule-based grouping variable (referred to as WGCNA* is an independent predictor of survival time. While WGCNA* is based on protein measurements (TMA data, it validated in two independent Affymetrix microarray gene expression data (which measure mRNA abundance. We find that the WGCNA patient groups differed by 35% from mortality groups defined by a more conventional stepwise Cox regression analysis approach. Conclusions We show that correlation network methods, which are primarily used to analyze the relationships between gene products, are also useful for analyzing the relationships between patients and for defining distinct patient groups based on TMA data. We identify a rule based on three tumor markers for predicting breast cancer survival outcomes.

  20. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing;

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......Search, our method detected significantly higher positive rates in 40 NSCLC in all stages, including N0M0, N+M0 and M1, and was less affected by chemotherapy. This simple, robust and clinically-applicable technology detects viable CTCs from solid and hematopoietic malignancies in early to late stages...... blood samples from patients with 6 different solid organ carcinomas and lymphomas. Significantly, CTC-positive rates increased remarkably with tumor progression from N0M0, N+M0 to M1 in each of 5 tested cancers (lung, colon, liver, gastric and pancreatic cancer, and glioma). Among 21 non-small cell lung...

  1. Comparison of hand-sewn and stapled anastomoses in surgeries of gastrointestinal tumors based on clinical practice of China

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bin-wei; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jun-ru; Feng, Zhong-xu

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a lack of studies comparing stapled suturing and hand-sewn suturing in the surgeries of gastrointestinal tumors based on the clinical practice of Chinese surgeons. Methods Data were retrospectively collected from 499 patients who underwent surgery to remove gastrointestinal tumors from January 2008 to December 2009. The patients were divided into two groups according to the method of digestive tract reconstruction: 296 patients received stapled suturing and 203 patients re...

  2. Prognostic and predictive value of circulating tumor cell analysis in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Albuquerque Andreia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic and predictive values of circulating tumor cell (CTC analysis in colorectal cancer patients. Patients and methods Presence of CTCs was evaluated in 60 colorectal cancer patients before systemic therapy - from which 33 patients were also evaluable for CTC analysis during the first 3 months of treatment - through immunomagnetic enrichment, using the antibodies BM7 and VU1D9 (targeting mucin 1 and EpCAM, respectively, followed by real-time RT-PCR analysis of the tumor-associated genes KRT19, MUC1, EPCAM, CEACAM5 and BIRC5. Results Patients were stratified into groups according to CTC detection (CTC negative, when all marker genes were negative; and CTC positive when at least one of the marker genes was positive. Patients with CTC positivity at baseline had a significant shorter median progression-free survival (median PFS 181.0 days; 95% CI 146.9-215.1 compared with patients with no CTCs (median PFS 329.0 days; 95% CI 299.6-358.4; Log-rank P Conclusion The present study provides evidence of a strong correlation between CTC detection and radiographic disease progression in patients receiving chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that in addition to the current prognostic factors, CTC analysis represent a potential complementary tool for prediction of colorectal cancer patients’ outcome. Moreover, the present test allows for molecular characterization of CTCs, which may be of relevance to the creation of personalized therapies.

  3. Hand-Based Biometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebis, George (Inventor); Amayeh, Gholamreza (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Hand-based biometric analysis systems and techniques are described which provide robust hand-based identification and verification. An image of a hand is obtained, which is then segmented into a palm region and separate finger regions. Acquisition of the image is performed without requiring particular orientation or placement restrictions. Segmentation is performed without the use of reference points on the images. Each segment is analyzed by calculating a set of Zernike moment descriptors for the segment. The feature parameters thus obtained are then fused and compared to stored sets of descriptors in enrollment templates to arrive at an identity decision. By using Zernike moments, and through additional manipulation, the biometric analysis is invariant to rotation, scale, or translation or an in put image. Additionally, the analysis utilizes re-use of commonly-seen terms in Zernike calculations to achieve additional efficiencies over traditional Zernike moment calculation.

  4. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evodiamine (EVO and rutaecarpine (RUT are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs’ IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4–44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8–138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds.

  5. Folate-targeted gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as a bimodal contrast agent for tumor fluorescent and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Kawano, Kumi; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    To enhance tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals via the selective accumulation of contrast agents, we prepared folate-modified gadolinium-lipid-based nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents. Folate-modified nanoparticles were comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid lipid, cationic cholesterol derivatives, folate-conjugated PEG-lipid, and Cy7-PEG-lipid. Folate receptor-mediated cellular nanoparticle association was examined in KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor. The biodistribution of nanoparticles after their intravenous injection into KB tumor-bearing mice was measured. Mice were imaged through in vivo fluorescence imaging and MRI 24 h after nanoparticle injection, and the intensity enhancement of the tumor MRI signal was evaluated. Increased cellular association of folate-modified nanoparticles was inhibited by excess free folic acid, indicating that nanoparticle association was folate receptor-mediated. Irrespective of folate modification, the amount of nanoparticles in blood 24 h after injection was ca. 10% of the injected dose. Compared with non-modified nanoparticles, folate-modified nanoparticles exhibited significant accumulation in tumor tissues without altering other biodistribution, as well as enhanced tumor fluorescence and MRI signal intensity. The results support the feasibility of MRI- and in vivo fluorescence imaging-based tumor visualization using folate-modified nanoparticles and provide opportunities to develop folate targeting-based imaging applications.

  6. A polymer-based magnetic resonance tracer for visualization of solid tumors by 13C spectroscopic imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Suzuki

    Full Text Available Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG, a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection.

  7. Digital Sorting of Pure Cell Populations Enables Unambiguous Genetic Analysis of Heterogeneous Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumors by Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Chiara; Forcato, Claudio; Buson, Genny; Fontana, Francesca; Mangano, Chiara; Doffini, Anna; Sero, Valeria; Lanzellotto, Rossana; Signorini, Giulio; Calanca, Alex; Sergio, Maximilian; Romano, Rita; Gianni, Stefano; Medoro, Gianni; Giorgini, Giuseppe; Morreau, Hans; Barberis, Massimo; Corver, Willem E; Manaresi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology requires an accurate characterization of a tumor molecular profile for patient stratification. Though targeted deep sequencing is an effective tool to detect the presence of somatic sequence variants, a significant number of patient specimens do not meet the requirements needed for routine clinical application. Analysis is hindered by contamination of normal cells and inherent tumor heterogeneity, compounded with challenges of dealing with minute amounts of tissue and DNA damages common in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Here we present an innovative workflow using DEPArray™ system, a microchip-based digital sorter to achieve 100%-pure, homogenous subpopulations of cells from FFPE samples. Cells are distinguished by fluorescently labeled antibodies and DNA content. The ability to address tumor heterogeneity enables unambiguous determination of true-positive sequence variants, loss-of-heterozygosity as well as copy number variants. The proposed strategy overcomes the inherent trade-offs made between sensitivity and specificity in detecting genetic variants from a mixed population, thus rescuing for analysis even the smaller clinical samples with low tumor cellularity. PMID:26864208

  8. Digital Sorting of Pure Cell Populations Enables Unambiguous Genetic Analysis of Heterogeneous Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumors by Next Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Chiara; Forcato, Claudio; Buson, Genny; Fontana, Francesca; Mangano, Chiara; Doffini, Anna; Sero, Valeria; Lanzellotto, Rossana; Signorini, Giulio; Calanca, Alex; Sergio, Maximilian; Romano, Rita; Gianni, Stefano; Medoro, Gianni; Giorgini, Giuseppe; Morreau, Hans; Barberis, Massimo; Corver, Willem E.; Manaresi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology requires an accurate characterization of a tumor molecular profile for patient stratification. Though targeted deep sequencing is an effective tool to detect the presence of somatic sequence variants, a significant number of patient specimens do not meet the requirements needed for routine clinical application. Analysis is hindered by contamination of normal cells and inherent tumor heterogeneity, compounded with challenges of dealing with minute amounts of tissue and DNA damages common in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Here we present an innovative workflow using DEPArray™ system, a microchip-based digital sorter to achieve 100%-pure, homogenous subpopulations of cells from FFPE samples. Cells are distinguished by fluorescently labeled antibodies and DNA content. The ability to address tumor heterogeneity enables unambiguous determination of true-positive sequence variants, loss-of-heterozygosity as well as copy number variants. The proposed strategy overcomes the inherent trade-offs made between sensitivity and specificity in detecting genetic variants from a mixed population, thus rescuing for analysis even the smaller clinical samples with low tumor cellularity. PMID:26864208

  9. Aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of tumor marker nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Chen, Xuejuan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Jilin

    2016-01-01

    We present an aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor for label-free detection of nucleolin. The sensor cantilevers in the microcantilever array were functionalized with nucleolin aptamer (AS1411) while the reference cantilevers were modified by 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) to eliminate environmental disturbances. The interaction between nucleolin and AS1411 induced surface stress changes, resulting in a differential deflection between sensor and reference cantilevers. The amplitude of differential cantilever deflection had a good linear relationship with the nucleolin concentration ranging from 10 nM to 250 nM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The detection limit was about 1.0 nM, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The aptamer-based microcantilever sensor demonstrated good selectivity and was facile, rapid, and reagentless. Our results show the potential for the application of microcantilever biosensor system as a powerful tool to detect tumor markers with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26695322

  10. Role of Endoscopic Skull Base and Keyhole Surgery for Pituitary and Parasellar Tumors Impacting Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel F; Griffiths, Chester F; Takasumi, Yuki; Rhee, John; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Krauss, Howard R

    2015-12-01

    Significant advances over the last 2 decades in imaging technology, instrumentation, anatomical knowledge, and reconstructive techniques have resulted in the endonasal endoscopic approach becoming an integral part of modern skull base surgery. With growing use and greater experience, surgical outcomes continue to incrementally improve across many skull base pathologies, including those tumors that impact vision and ocular motility. The importance of the learning curve and use of a multi-disciplinary approach is critical to maximizing success, minimizing complications, and enhancing quality of life in these patients. Realizing the limits of the endonasal route and reasonable use of transcranial approaches such as the supraorbital eyebrow craniotomy, it may br appropriate to consider nonsurgical therapy including various forms of radiotherapy [corrected] and medical treatment options. PMID:26576016

  11. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors: a single center long-term clinical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a central role in the treatment of sinonasal malignancies, either as postoperative or as primary therapy. To study the efficacy and safety of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors a single center retrospective evaluation focusing on survival and therapy related toxicity was performed. One hundred twenty two patients with primary (n = 82) or recurrent (n = 40) malignant sinonasal tumors were treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy between 1999 and 2009 at the University Clinic of Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Center and retrospectively analyzed. Most patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas (n = 47) or squamous cell carcinoma (n = 26). 99 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. The median total dose was 64 Gy in conventional fractionation (1.8–2 Gy). Overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test and Fishers Exact test were applied for univariate analysis, Cox-regression was used for multivariate analysis. Median follow up was 36 months. 1-, 3- and 5-year estimated overall survival rates were 90, 70 and 54 % respectively. Median progression free survival and local recurrence free survival was 45 and 63 months respectively. Progression free survival and local recurrence free survival at 1, 3 and 5 years were 76, 57 and 47, and 79, 60 and 51 % respectively. 19 patients (15.5 %) were diagnosed with distant metastases. Univariate analysis revealed significantly improved OS and LRFS for treatment of tumors after primary diagnosis, first series of irradiation and radiation dose ≥60 Gy. Multivariate analysis revealed only treatment in primary situation as an independent prognostic factor for OS and LRFS. Acute CTC grade III mucositis was seen in 5 patients (4.1 %) and CTC grade II dysgeusia in 19 patients (15.6 %). Dysgeusia, dysosmia and ocular toxicity were the most common late adverse

  12. Quantification of morphology of canine circumanal gland tumors: a fractal based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šoštarić-Zuckermann, I C; Severin, K; Huzak, M; Hohšteter, M; Gudan Kurilj, A; Artuković, B; Džaja, A; Grabarević, Ž

    2016-01-01

    Circumanal gland tumors are very common neoplasms of dogs. Their classification relies on microscopic examination and is further supported by a few immunohistochemical markers that help indicate their prognosis. However, new additional tests would be highly useful. The purpose of this study was to develop such a test using fractal analysis which is increasingly being applied in science, especially in the field of biomedicine. A total of 53 circumanal gland tumors were chosen from our department archives. After a precise histological classification according to the World Health Organization classification, the number of de novo classified samples was as follows: 15 adenomas, 11 epitheliomas, 21 well differentiated carcinomas, 6 poorly differentiated carcinomas. Ten samples of normal circumanal gland were also included as control. All samples were immunohistochemicaly stained with vimentin. All immunohistochemical reactions were photographed at two different magnifications -100X and 400X and converted to 1 bit in black and white (bitmap) images thus enhancing the positive vimentin reactions. These images were used for the assessment of fractal dimension applying the box counting method and computer software Fractalyse. To determine the significance of results, conventional statistics were performed using Statistica software. The overall vimentin stain score was significantly higher in epitheliomas and carcinomas than in normal circumanal glands (CG) or adenomas. Mean values of fractal dimension estimated at magnification 100X and 400X were as follows: normal CG 1.318 and 1.372, CG adenomas 1.384 and 1.408, CG epitheliomas 1.547 and 1.597, CG well differentiated carcinomas 1.569 and 1.607, CG poorly differentiated carcinomas 1.679 and 1.723. Significant differences (at level of 5%) of these values were observed between individual groups of CG adenomas or normal CG, and epitheliomas or carcinomas. The above results indicate vimentin immunohistochemistry staining and

  13. An accuracy analysis of Cyberknife tumor tracking radiotherapy according to unpredictable change of respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Min; Lee, Chang Yeol; Huh, Hyun Do; Kim, Wan Sun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha university hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Cyber-Knife tumor tracking system, based on the correlation relationship between the position of a tumor which moves in response to the real time respiratory cycle signal and respiration was obtained by the LED marker attached to the outside of the patient, the location of the tumor to predict in advance, the movement of the tumor in synchronization with the therapeutic device to track real-time tumor, is a system for treating. The purpose of this study, in the cyber knife tumor tracking radiation therapy, trying to evaluate the accuracy of tumor tracking radiation therapy system due to the change in the form of unpredictable sudden breathing due to cough and sleep. Materials and Methods : Breathing Log files that were used in the study, based on the Respiratory gating radiotherapy and Cyber-knife tracking radiosurgery breathing Log files of patients who received herein, measured using the Log files in the form of a Sinusoidal pattern and Sudden change pattern. it has been reconstituted as possible. Enter the reconstructed respiratory Log file cyber knife dynamic chest Phantom, so that it is possible to implement a motion due to respiration, add manufacturing the driving apparatus of the existing dynamic chest Phantom, Phantom the form of respiration we have developed a program that can be applied to. Movement of the phantom inside the target (Ball cube target) was driven by the displacement of three sizes of according to the size of the respiratory vertical (Superior-Inferior) direction to the 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm. Insert crosses two EBT3 films in phantom inside the target in response to changes in the target movement, the End-to-End (E2E) test provided in Cyber-Knife manufacturer depending on the form of the breathing five times each. It was determined by carrying. Accuracy of tumor tracking system is indicated by the target error by analyzing the inserted film, additional E2E test is analyzed by measuring the correlation error while being advanced. If the target

  14. Prognostic significance of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 in human soft tissue tumors - a clinicopathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Asha S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is a key signaling molecule and a central cytoplasmic transcription factor, implicated in the regulation of growth. Its aberrant activation has been demonstrated to correlate with many types of human malignancy. However, whether constitutive STAT3 signaling plays a key role in the survival and growth of soft-tissue tumors is still unclear and hence needs to be elucidated further. In our study we examined the expression levels of STAT3 and pSTAT3 in different grades of soft tissue tumors and correlated with its clinicopathological characteristics. Methods Expression levels of STAT3 and pSTAT3 in soft tissue tumors were studied using Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and Reverse transcriptase- PCR and correlated with its clinicopathological characteristics using Chi squared or Fisher's exact test and by logistic regression analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Intercooled Stata software (Intercooled Stata 8.2 version. Results Of the 82 soft tissue tumor samples, fifty four (65.8% showed immunoreactivity for STAT3 and twenty eight (34.1% for pSTAT3. Expression of STAT3 and pSTAT3 was significantly associated with tumor grade (P Conclusion These findings suggest that constitutive activation of STAT3 is an important factor related to carcinogenesis of human soft tissue tumors and is significantly associated with its clinicopathological parameters which may possibly have potential diagnostic implications.

  15. Enzyme responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor therapy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reduce the toxic side effects of traditional chemotherapeutics in vivo, we designed and constructed a biocompatible, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). MMPs substrate peptide containing PLGLAR (sensitive to MMPs) was immobilized onto the surfaces of amino-functionalized MSNs via an amidation reaction, serving as MMPs sensitive intermediate linker. Bovine serum albumin was then covalently coupled to linker as end-cap for sealing the mesopores of MSNs. Lactobionic acid was further conjugated to the system as targeting motif. Doxorubicin hydrochloride was used as the model anticancer drug in this study. A series of characterizations revealed that the system was successfully constructed. The peptide-functionalized MSNs system demonstrated relatively high sensitivity to MMPs for triggering drug delivery, which was potentially important for tumor therapy since the tumor’s microenvironment overexpressed MMPs in nature. The in vivo experiments proved that the system could efficiently inhibit the tumor growth with minimal side effects. This study provides an approach for the development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics toward efficient cancer treatment. (paper)

  16. Optimal biliary drainage for inoperable Klatskin's tumor based on Bismuth type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate differences in the effects of biliary drainage procedures in patients with inoperable Klatskin's tumor based on Bismuth type, considering endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD), external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (EPTBD) and internal biliary stenting via the PTBD tract (IPTBD).METHODS: The initial success rate, cumulative patency rate, and complication rate were compared retrospectively, according to the Bismuth type and ERBD,EPTBD, and IPTBD. Patency was defined as the duration for adequate initial bile drainage or to the point of the patient's death associated with inadequate drainage.RESULTS: One hundred thirty-four patients (93 men,41 women; 21 Bismuth type Ⅱ, 47 Ⅲ, 66 Ⅳ; 34 ERBD,66 EPTBD, 34 IPTBD) were recruited. There were no differences in demographics among the groups.Adequate initial relief of jaundice was achieved in 91% of patients without a significant difference in the results among different procedures or Bismuth types. The cumulative patency rates for ERBD and IPTBD were better than those for EPTBD with Bismuth type Ⅲ.IPTBD provided an excellent response for Bismuth type Ⅳ. However, there was no difference in the patency rate among drainage procedures for Bismuth type Ⅱ.Procedure-related cholangitis occurred less frequently with EPTBD than with ERBD and IPTBD.CONCLUSION: ERBD is recommended as the firstline drainage procedure for the palliation of jaundice in patients with inoperable Klatskin's tumor of Bismuth type Ⅱ or Ⅲ, but IPTBD is the best option for Bismuth type Ⅳ.

  17. Phase- and GVF-Based Level Set Segmentation of Ultrasonic Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Gao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatically extracting breast tumor boundaries in ultrasound images is a difficult task due to the speckle noise, the low image contrast, the variance in shapes, and the local changes of image intensity. In this paper, an improved edge-based active contour model in a variational level set formulation is proposed for semi-automatically capturing ultrasonic breast tumor boundaries. First, we apply the phase asymmetry approach to enhance the edges, and then we define a new edge stopping function, which can increase the robustness to the intensity inhomogeneities. To extend the capture range of the method and provide good convergence to boundary concavities, we use the phase information to obtain an improved edge map, which can be used to calculate the gradient vector flow (GVF. Combining the edge stopping term and the improved GVF in the level set framework, the proposed method can robustly cope with noise, and it can extract the low contrast and/or concave boundaries well. Experiments on breast ultrasound images show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-art methods.

  18. Preclinical experiments for analysis of tumor regression due to negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test the potential therapeutic value of negative pions in comparison with conventional x-rays, cobalt-60 γ rays, and high energy electrons and photons (Betatron), experimental analyses with induced tumors (transplant tumors) after irradiation are to be performed in vivo and in vitro (tumor cell suspensions, cell cultures, spontaneous tumors, carcinoma in ascites form); in addition to tumors primarily of mice, human cell tumors will be used; studies will also be made of cell kinetics with various cell types (normal cells, transformed (malignant) cells, beam-resistant, beam-sensitive types) using cell cultures from Chinese hamsters. An attempt will be made to compare slow- and fast-growing tumors. In a second phase, human tumors in conditioned animals will be tested in situ or as cell cultures. Skin, small intestine, regenerating liver and kidney, together with cell cultures, will serve as normal reaction systems

  19. Data from a comparative proteomic analysis of tumor-derived lung-cancer CD105(+) endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongwei; Cheng, Xiao; Pei, Yihua; Fu, Jianguo; Lyu, Zhi; Peng, Huifang; Yao, Qin; Jiang, Yu; Luo, Lianzhong; Zhuo, Huiqin

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that tumor-derived endothelial cells (TECs) are more relevant for the study of tumor angiogenesis and for screening antiangiogenic drugs than normal ECs (NECs). In this data article, high-purity (>98%) primary CD105(+) NECs and TECs purified from a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma model bearing 0.5 cm tumors were identified using 2D-PAGE and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS/MS). All the identified proteins were categorized functionally by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, and gene-pathway annotated by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Finally, protein-protein interaction networks were also built. The proteomics and bioinformatics data presented here provide novel insights into the molecular characteristics and the early modulation of the TEC proteome in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27081670

  20. Comprehesive analysis on the histological classifications in 42 197 cases of ovarian tumors in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:The histological types of ovarian tumors were investigated and analyzed in China in order to compare with those in other countries,which will benefit to the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer.Methods:The pathological data from 42 197 cases of ovarian tumors in ten years during 1980 to 1989 were registered according to the WHO classification for ovarian tumors. Some indefinite cases pathologically in the first diagnosis should bereconfirmed according to the WHO classification.Results: Forty-two thousand one hundred and ninety seven cases ofovarian tumors were selected from all tumors in 21 provinces and 3 major regional cities in China.There were 10 288(24.4%) malignant tumors in all cases.They were composed by 5 650(54.9%) cases of epithelial tumors,1 871(18.2%) cases of germ cell tumors,837(8.5%) cases of sex cord tumors,1 003(9.7%) cases of secondarytumors,and 891(8.7%) cases of other tumors.The malignant tumors constituent ratios were 58.5% and 50.9% respectively in the north and south of the Yangtze River..The histological types of ovarian tumors were about the same ratios,but the malignant tumors were different in Chinese six major administrative region andalso in the region both north and south of the Yangtzy River.The ratio of borderline epithelial ovarian tumors to epithelial tumors was 1:5.9.Borderlineserous cystadenocarcnoma appeared to be similar to borderline mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in frequency.Serous cystadenocarcinoma was found to be the most frequent one in malignant epithelial tumors.Conclusion:Compared with reports abroad,the different types of malignant ovarian tumors inChina represent a different distributive pattern.The malignant epithelial ovarian tumors were lower than that in other countries (55% vs 80%-90%),while the malignant germ cell tumors and sex cord stromal tumors were 6 and 3 times higher thanthose abroad,the main metastasizing tumors come from gastroenteric carcinoma,while the metastasizing tumors from breast

  1. Cytogenetic analysis of 101 giant cell tumors of bone: nonrandom patterns of telomeric associations and other structural aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorunova, Ludmila; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Follerås, Gunnar; Heim, Sverre; Mandahl, Nils; Mertens, Fredrik

    2009-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a benign but locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. We performed cytogenetic analysis on 101 GCTB from 92 patients. Karyotypes were obtained from 95 tumors, 47 of which had clonal aberrations. The majority of the cytogenetically abnormal GCTB had multiple, up to 28 per tumor, clones. Clonal telomeric associations (tas) and other structural and numerical changes were found in about 70, 60, and 30%, respectively, of clonally abnormal tumors. Forty-seven aberrations were recurrent, of which 35 are novel. The vast majority of the recurrent aberrations were tas, confirming the important role of telomeric fusions in the development of GCTB. The frequency of tas in GCTB cultures increased with passaging, suggesting a selective advantage of tas-positive cells in vitro. The termini most frequently involved in tas were 22p, 13p, 15p, 21p, 14p, 19q, 1q, 12p, 11p, and 20q. The frequency of tas (irrespective of their clonality) was significantly higher in tumors carrying clonal changes, indicating that tas are precursors of other types of aberrations. In line with this assumption, the chromosomes preferentially involved in tas in a given tumor were also the ones most often affected by other rearrangements. We did not find the previously reported amplicon in 20q11.1, assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 10 tumors. Nor did we find any association between cytogenetic features and adverse clinical outcome. Thus, local recurrences probably depend more on the adequacy of surgical treatment than on the intrinsic biology of the tumors. PMID:19396867

  2. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20–36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20–36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  3. Identification of HNPCC by Molecular Analysis of Colorectal and Endometrial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. A. Vasen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, Lynch syndrome is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and other cancers and the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI in tumors. The Bethesda guidelines have been proposed for the identification of families suspected of HNPCC that require further molecular analysis. We have evaluated the yield of MSI-analysis in a large series of Dutch families suspected of HNPCC. We also analysed whether the loss of mismatch repair (MMR protein detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC of colorectal cancer (CRC and endometrial cancer correlated with the presence of MSI and/or a MMR gene mutation. The results showed that the Bethesda criteria with a few modifications are appropriate to identify families eligible for genetic testing. In addition, we found that MSI and IHC-analysis of CRC using antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 proteins are equally effective for identifying carriers of the known MMR gene defects. However, as long as the role of other putative MMR genes in hereditary CRC has not been elucidated, IHC-analysis cannot completely replace MSI. For this reason, we prefer MSI-analysis as first step in families suspected of HNPCC. On the other hand, in families fulfilling the revised Amsterdam criteria in which the probability of detecting a mutation is relatively high, we would recommend IHC as first diagnostic step because the result might predict the specific underlying MMR gene mutation. MSI or IHC-analysis of endometrial cancer alone was found to be less sensitive compared with these tests performed in colorectal cancer. Therefore, probably the best approach in the analysis of this cancer is to perform both techniques. The identification of HNPCC is important as it makes it possible to target effective preventative measures. Our studies showed that MSI and IHC analysis of colorectal and endometrial cancer, are reliable

  4. Surgical techniques and outcomes in the treatment of malignant tongue base tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kljajić Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Prognosis of patients with malignant tongue base tumors is poor. Survival is low, in spite of different treatment modalities. Most patients seek treatment too late, when their disease has already progressed to stage III or IV. The aim of this investigation was to compare different treatment modalities in patients with malignant tongue base tumors. Material and methods We have analyzed a total of 82 patients (72 men and 6 women treated at the ENT Clinic, Clinical Center Novi Sad, between 1992 and 2004. The average age of our patients was 59 years. In regard to lifestyle habits, out of 82 patients, 67 were smokers and 57 were alcohol users (16 of the latter were treated alcoholics. The majority (54/82 of patients were both smokers and alcohol users. Results There were 6% of patients (5/82 with stage I disease, 15% of patients (12/82 with stage II, 24% of patients (20/82 with stage III and 55% of patient (45/82 with stage IV disease. Planocellular cancer was diagnosed in 79/82 patients, and the remaining (3/82 had transitional cell carcinoma. Surgical treatment alone was performed in 17 patients, seven were treated with radiation only, and nine only with chemotherapy. Combined surgical and radiation therapy was performed in 28 patients, and 5 were treated with all three. Ten patients were not treated with any therapy. Tongue base resection only was performed in 12 patients, tongue base resection with epiglottectomy in 20, tongue base resection with supraglottic laryngectomy in 13 and tongue base resection with total laryngectomy in 5 patients. In radiation only cases, 25% of patients survived 20 months, whereas in surgery only cases, 25% of patients survived 27 months. Five-year survival after combined surgical and radiation therapy was 35%. Conclusion Development of tongue base carcinoma is strongly associated with alcohol and tobacco consumption. Survival is low, despite various treatment modalities. However, combined therapy is the

  5. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:23948749

  6. Targeted multidrug-resistance reversal in tumor based on PEG-PLL-PLGA polymer nano drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Liting Guo,1 Haijun Zhang,1 Fei Wang,1 Ping Liu,1 Yonglu Wang,1,2 Guohua Xia,1 Ran Liu,1 Xueming Li,2 Haixiang Yin,2 Hulin Jiang,3 Baoan Chen11Department of Hematology and Oncology (Key Department of Jiangsu Medicine, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 2School of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Technology, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The study investigated the reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR and the biodistribution of nanoparticles (NPs that target leukemia cells in a nude mice model via a surface-bound transferrin (Tf. The cytotoxic cargo of daunorubicin (DNR and tetrandrine (Tet was protected in the NPs by an outer coat composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG-poly-l-lysine (PLL-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA NPs. Injection of DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs into nude mice bearing MDR leukemia cell K562/A02 xenografts was shown to inhibit tumor growth, and contemporaneous immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue showed the targeted NPs induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Targeted tumor cells exhibited a marked increase in Tf receptor expression, with noticeable decreases in P-glycoprotein, MDR protein, and nuclear factor κB, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, the concentration of DNR was shown to increase in plasma, tumor tissue, and major organs. Flow cytometry analysis with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF dye, NIR797, was used to study the effectiveness of Tf as a targeting group for leukemia cells, a finding that was supported by NIRF imaging in tumor-bearing nude mice. In summary, our studies show that DNR-Tet-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA NPs provide a specific and effective means to target cytotoxic drugs to MDR tumor cells.Keywords: PEG-PLL-PLGA nanoparticles, transferrin, tetrandrine, multidrug resistance

  7. Proficient Feature Extraction Strategy for Performance Enhancement of NN Based Early Breast Tumor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondker Jahid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra Wideband is one of the promising microwave imaging techniques for breast tumor prognosis. The basic principle of tumor detection depends on the dielectric properties discrepancies between healthy and tumorous tissue. Usually, the tumor affected tissues scatter more signal than the healthy one and are used for early tumor detection through received pulses. Feedforward backpropagation neural network(NN was so far used for some research works by showing its detection efficiency up to 1mm (radius size with 95.8% accuracy. This paper introduces an efficient feature extraction method to further improve the performance by considering four main features of backpropagation NN. This performance is being increased to 99.99%. This strategy is well justified for classifying the normal and tumor affected breast with 100% accuracy in its early stage. It also enhances the training and testing performances by reducing the required duration. The overall performance is 99.99% verified by using thirteen different tumor sizes.

  8. Ciliated muconodular papillary tumors of the lung: a clinicopathologic analysis of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Tsugumasa; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kosuge, Tomoo; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Asamura, Hisao; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Ciliated muconodular papillary tumors (CMPTs) are rare peripheral nodules of the lung first described in 2002. Because of their rarity and nonstandardized diagnostic terminology, CMPTs have been poorly recognized among pathologists. To better characterize these lesions, we undertook a detailed clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 10 archival cases. Ten CMPTs occurred in 7 men and 3 women with a median age of 62 years. All were small peripheral nonendobronchial nodules with a mean diameter of 1.0 cm. All but 1 tumor were incidentally detected by computed tomography-based screening, all of which were radiologically interpreted as adenocarcinomas. Although limited surgery treated all but 1 CMPT, they followed a benign course with no recurrence at a mean follow-up of 43 months (range: 2 to 88 mo). Histologically, CMPTs showed glandular and/or papillary architecture, comprising a vaguely organized mixture of nonatypical ciliated columnar cells, mucous cells, and basal cells, often enveloped by copious intra-alveolar mucin. Micropapillary tufts of ciliated cells and seemingly discontinuous growth along alveolar walls were occasionally present, mimicking adenocarcinomas. Ciliated cells and basal cells were immunopositive for TTF-1 and p40, respectively, whereas mucous cells lacked HNF4α expression. CMPTs are rare, likely benign, underrecognized processes of the lung that should be distinguished from adenocarcinomas. PMID:25803171

  9. Analysis of potential response predictors to capecitabine/temozolomide in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cives, M; Ghayouri, M; Morse, B; Brelsford, M; Black, M; Rizzo, A; Meeker, A; Strosberg, J

    2016-09-01

    The capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) regimen is active in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), with response rates ranging from 30 to 70%. Small retrospective studies suggest that O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency predicts response to temozolomide. High tumor proliferative activity is also commonly perceived as a significant predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is unclear whether chromosomal instability (CIN), which correlates with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is a predictive factor. In this study, we evaluated 143 patients with advanced pNET who underwent treatment with CAPTEM for radiographic and biochemical response. MGMT expression (n=52), grade (n=128) and ALT activation (n=46) were investigated as potential predictive biomarkers. Treatment with CAPTEM was associated with an overall response rate (ORR) of 54% by RECIST 1.1. Response to CAPTEM was not influenced by MGMT expression, proliferative activity or ALT pathway activation. Based on these results, no biomarker-driven selection criteria for use of the CAPTEM regimen can be recommended at this time. PMID:27552969

  10. Analysis of pairwise correlations in multi-parametric PET/MR data for biological tumor characterization and treatment individualization strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore simultaneous functional PET/MR for biological characterization of tumors and potential future treatment adaptations. To investigate the extent of complementarity between different PET/MR-based functional datasets, a pairwise correlation analysis was performed. Functional datasets of N=15 head and neck (HN) cancer patients were evaluated. For patients of group A (N=7), combined PET/MR datasets including FDG-PET and ADC maps were available. Patients of group B (N=8) had FMISO-PET, DCE-MRI and ADC maps from combined PET/MRI, an additional dynamic FMISO-PET/CT acquired directly after FMISO tracer injection as well as an FDG-PET/CT acquired a few days earlier. From DCE-MR, parameter maps Ktrans, ve and vp were obtained with the extended Tofts model. Moreover, parameter maps of mean DCE enhancement, ΔSDCE, and mean FMISO signal 0-4 min p.i., anti AFMISO, were derived. Pairwise correlations were quantified using the Spearman correlation coefficient (r) on both a voxel and a regional level within the gross tumor volume. Between some pairs of functional imaging modalities moderate correlations were observed with respect to the median over all patient datasets, whereas distinct correlations were only present on an individual basis. Highest inter-modality median correlations on the voxel level were obtained for FDG/FMISO (r = 0.56), FDG/ anti AFMISO (r = 0.55), anti AFMISO/ΔSDCE (r = 0.46), and FDG/ADC (r = -0.39). Correlations on the regional level showed comparable results. The results of this study suggest that the examined functional datasets provide complementary information. However, only pairwise correlations were examined, and correlations could still exist between combinations of three or more datasets. These results might contribute to the future design of individually adapted treatment approaches based on multiparametric functional imaging.

  11. Brain tumor grading based on Neural Networks and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuehao Pan; Weimin Huang; Zhiping Lin; Wanzheng Zhu; Jiayin Zhou; Wong, Jocelyn; Zhongxiang Ding

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies brain tumor grading using multiphase MRI images and compares the results with various configurations of deep learning structure and baseline Neural Networks. The MRI images are used directly into the learning machine, with some combination operations between multiphase MRIs. Compared to other researches, which involve additional effort to design and choose feature sets, the approach used in this paper leverages the learning capability of deep learning machine. We present the grading performance on the testing data measured by the sensitivity and specificity. The results show a maximum improvement of 18% on grading performance of Convolutional Neural Networks based on sensitivity and specificity compared to Neural Networks. We also visualize the kernels trained in different layers and display some self-learned features obtained from Convolutional Neural Networks. PMID:26736358

  12. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pie Huda

    Full Text Available 64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model was used for the investigations, and it was found that the approximately 13 nm nanodiscs, due to their size, permeate deeply into cancer tissue. This makes them promising candidates for both drug delivery purposes and as advanced imaging agents. For the radiolabelling, a simple approach for 64Cu radiolabelling of proteins via a chelating agent, DOTA, was developed. The reaction was performed at sufficiently mild conditions to be compatible with labelling of the protein part of a lipid-protein particle while fully conserving the particle structure including the amphipathic protein fold.

  13. Development and optimization of targeted radionuclide tumor therapy using folate based radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Josefine Astrid

    The folate receptor (FR) has been used for a quarter of a century as a tumor-associated target for selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents to cancer cells. While several folic acid radioconjugates have been successfully employed for imaging purposes in (pre)clinical studies, a therapeutic application of folic acid radioconjugates has not yet reached the critical stage which would allow a clinical translation. Due to a substantial expression of the FR in the proximal tubule cells, radiofolates accumulate in the kidneys which are at risk of damage by particle-radiation. To improve this situation, we aimed to develop and evaluate strategies for the performance of FR-targeted radionuclide therapy by decreasing the renal uptake of radiofolates and thereby reducing potential nephrotoxic effects. Two different strategies were investigated. First, the combination of radiofolates with chemotherapeutic agents such as pemetrexed (PMX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and secondly, an approach based on radioiodinated fol...

  14. PET/CT Based In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu Labelled Nanodiscs in Tumor Bearing Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Pie; Binderup, Tina; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing; Kjær, Andreas; Jensen, Mikael; Arleth, Lise

    2015-01-01

    64Cu radiolabelled nanodiscs based on the 11 α-helix MSP1E3D1 protein and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine lipids were, for the first time, followed in vivo by positron emission tomography for evaluating the biodistribution of nanodiscs. A cancer tumor bearing mouse model was used for the investigations, and it was found that the approximately 13 nm nanodiscs, due to their size, permeate deeply into cancer tissue. This makes them promising candidates for both drug delivery purposes and as advanced imaging agents. For the radiolabelling, a simple approach for 64Cu radiolabelling of proteins via a chelating agent, DOTA, was developed. The reaction was performed at sufficiently mild conditions to be compatible with labelling of the protein part of a lipid-protein particle while fully conserving the particle structure including the amphipathic protein fold. PMID:26132074

  15. A Tumor Growth Model with Unmolded Dynamics Based on an Online Feedback Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ArashPourhashemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we identify tumor growth system by an online feedback neural network model based on back-propagation method. The modeling and identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is the process of developing and improving a mathematical representation of a system using experimental data. So, it is a problem of considerable importance through the use of measured experimental data in biomedical modeling. As is obvious, in biomedical researches it is really difficult and in some cases impossible to implement research on real patient or such a system which is not possible to empirical tests. To deal with, we need sometime a model close to real system in order to forecast dynamic systems so as to perform researches on models and design controller for control of system.

  16. Brain tumor grading based on Neural Networks and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuehao Pan; Weimin Huang; Zhiping Lin; Wanzheng Zhu; Jiayin Zhou; Wong, Jocelyn; Zhongxiang Ding

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies brain tumor grading using multiphase MRI images and compares the results with various configurations of deep learning structure and baseline Neural Networks. The MRI images are used directly into the learning machine, with some combination operations between multiphase MRIs. Compared to other researches, which involve additional effort to design and choose feature sets, the approach used in this paper leverages the learning capability of deep learning machine. We present the grading performance on the testing data measured by the sensitivity and specificity. The results show a maximum improvement of 18% on grading performance of Convolutional Neural Networks based on sensitivity and specificity compared to Neural Networks. We also visualize the kernels trained in different layers and display some self-learned features obtained from Convolutional Neural Networks.

  17. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    Full Text Available Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33 of cytokeratin (CK positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively. The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02. Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04 in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively. We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker

  18. Optimization and Evaluation of a Novel Size Based Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Mao, Xueying; Imrali, Ahmet; Syed, Ferrial; Mutsvangwa, Katherine; Berney, Daniel; Cathcart, Paul; Hines, John; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood has the potential to provide a far easier "liquid biopsy" than tumor tissue biopsies, to monitor tumor cell populations during disease progression and in response to therapies. Many CTC isolation technologies have been developed. We optimized the Parsortix system, an epitope independent, size and compressibility-based platform for CTCs isolation, making it possible to harvest CTCs at the speed and sample volume comparable to standard CellSearch system. We captured more than half of cancer cells from different cancer cell lines spiked in blood samples from healthy donors using this system. Cell loss during immunostaining of cells transferred and fixed on the slides is a major problem for analyzing rare cell samples. We developed a novel cell transfer and fixation method to retain >90% of cells on the slide after the immunofluorescence process without affecting signal strength and specificity. Using this optimized method, we evaluated the Parsortix system for CTC harvest in prostate cancer patients in comparison to immunobead based CTC isolation systems IsoFlux and CellSearch. We harvested a similar number (p = 0.33) of cytokeratin (CK) positive CTCs using Parsortix and IsoFlux from 7.5 mL blood samples of 10 prostate cancer patients (an average of 33.8 and 37.6 respectively). The purity of the CTCs harvested by Parsortix at 3.1% was significantly higher than IsoFlux at 1.0% (p = 0.02). Parsortix harvested significantly more CK positive CTCs than CellSearch (p = 0.04) in seven prostate cancer patient samples, where both systems were utilized (an average of 32.1 and 10.1 respectively). We also captured CTC clusters using Parsortix. Using four-color immunofluorescence we found that 85.8% of PC3 cells expressed EpCAM, 91.7% expressed CK and 2.5% cells lacked both epithelial markers. Interestingly, 95.6% of PC3 cells expressed Vimentin, including those cells that lacked both epithelial marker expression

  19. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  20. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He, E-mail: mzhang_he@126.com; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  1. Computer-based image studies on tumor nests mathematical features of breast cancer and their clinical prognostic value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The expending and invasive features of tumor nests could reflect the malignant biological behaviors of breast invasive ductal carcinoma. Useful information on cancer invasiveness hidden within tumor nests could be extracted and analyzed by computer image processing and big data analysis. METHODS: Tissue microarrays from invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 202 were first stained with cytokeratin by immunohistochemical method to clearly demarcate the tumor nests. Then an expert-aided computer analysis system was developed to study the mathematical and geometrical features of the tumor nests. Computer recognition system and imaging analysis software extracted tumor nests information, and mathematical features of tumor nests were calculated. The relationship between tumor nests mathematical parameters and patients' 5-year disease free survival was studied. RESULTS: There were 8 mathematical parameters extracted by expert-aided computer analysis system. Three mathematical parameters (number, circularity and total perimeter with area under curve >0.5 and 4 mathematical parameters (average area, average perimeter, total area/total perimeter, average (area/perimeter with area under curve <0.5 in ROC analysis were combined into integrated parameter 1 and integrated parameter 2, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that integrated parameter 1 (P = 0.040 was independent prognostic factor of patients' 5-year disease free survival. The hazard risk ratio of integrated parameter 1 was 1.454 (HR 95% CI [1.017-2.078], higher than that of N stage (HR 1.396, 95% CI [1.125-1.733] and hormone receptor status (HR 0.575, 95% CI [0.353-0.936], but lower than that of histological grading (HR 3.370, 95% CI [1.125-5.364] and T stage (HR 1.610, 95% CI [1.026 -2.527]. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated integrated parameter 1 of mathematical features (number, circularity and total perimeter of tumor nests could be a useful parameter to predict the

  2. Novel molecular and computational methods improve the accuracy of insertion site analysis in Sleeping Beauty-induced tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Brett

    Full Text Available The recent development of the Sleeping Beauty (SB system has led to the development of novel mouse models of cancer. Unlike spontaneous models, SB causes cancer through the action of mutagenic transposons that are mobilized in the genomes of somatic cells to induce mutations in cancer genes. While previous methods have successfully identified many transposon-tagged mutations in SB-induced tumors, limitations in DNA sequencing technology have prevented a comprehensive analysis of large tumor cohorts. Here we describe a novel method for producing genetic profiles of SB-induced tumors using Illumina sequencing. This method has dramatically increased the number of transposon-induced mutations identified in each tumor sample to reveal a level of genetic complexity much greater than previously appreciated. In addition, Illumina sequencing has allowed us to more precisely determine the depth of sequencing required to obtain a reproducible signature of transposon-induced mutations within tumor samples. The use of Illumina sequencing to characterize SB-induced tumors should significantly reduce sampling error that undoubtedly occurs using previous sequencing methods. As a consequence, the improved accuracy and precision provided by this method will allow candidate cancer genes to be identified with greater confidence. Overall, this method will facilitate ongoing efforts to decipher the genetic complexity of the human cancer genome by providing more accurate comparative information from Sleeping Beauty models of cancer.

  3. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors: results and correlation with surgical specimen analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Grigio, Henrique Ramos; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Tyng, Chiang J.; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Aguiar Junior, Samuel; Lopes, Ademar, E-mail: chojniak@uol.com.br [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors in obtaining appropriate samples for histological analysis, and compare its diagnosis with the results of the surgical pathology as available. Materials and Methods: The authors reviewed medical records, imaging and histological reports of 262 patients with soft-tissue tumors submitted to CT-guided core needle biopsy in an oncologic reference center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Appropriate samples were obtained in 215 (82.1%) out of the 262 patients. The most prevalent tumors were sarcomas (38.6%), metastatic carcinomas (28.8%), benign mesenchymal tumors (20.5%) and lymphomas (9.3%). Histological grading was feasible in 92.8% of sarcoma patients, with the majority of them (77.9%) being classified as high grade tumors. Out of the total sample, 116 patients (44.3%) underwent surgical excision and diagnosis confirmation. Core biopsy demonstrated 94.6% accuracy in the identification of sarcomas, with 96.4% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. A significant intermethod agreement about histological grading was observed between core biopsy and surgical resection (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.75). Conclusion: CT-guided core needle biopsy demonstrated a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of soft tissue tumors as well as in the histological grading of sarcomas, allowing an appropriate therapeutic planning (author)

  4. Low-Dose Decitabine-Based Chemoimmunotherapy for Patients with Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors: A Phase I/II Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation is one of the main drivers of tumor initiation and progression. The reversibility of methylation modulation makes it an attractive target for novel anticancer therapies. Clinical studies have demonstrated that high-dose decitabine, a hypomethylating agent, results in some clinical benefits in patients with refractory advanced tumors; however, they are extremely toxic. Low doses of decitabine minimize toxicity while potentially improving the targeted effects of DNA hypomethylation. Based on these mechanisms, low-dose decitabine combined with chemoimmunotherapy may be a new treatment option for patients with refractory advanced tumors. We proposed the regimen of low-dose decitabine-based chemoimmunotherapy for patients with refractory advanced solid tumors. A favorable adverse event profile was observed in our trial that was highlighted by the finding that most of these adverse events were grades 1-2. Besides, the activity of our cohort was optimistic and the clinical benefit rate was up to 60%, and the median PFS was prolonged compared with PFS to previous treatment. We also identified a significant correlation between the PFS to previous treatment and clinical response. The low-dose DAC decitabine-based chemoimmunotherapy might be a promising protocol for improving the specificity and efficiency of patients with refractory advanced solid tumors. This trial is registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database (identifier NCT01799083.

  5. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking...... of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. RESULTS: We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice......-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo. CONCLUSION: The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we...

  6. Expression of tumor related gene NAG6 in gastric cancer and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Mei Zhang; Shou-Rong Sheng; Xiao-Yan Wang; Liang-Hua Bin; Jie-Ru Wang; Gui-Yuan Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: NAG6 gene is a novel tumor related gene identified recently. This study was designed to examine the expression of this gene in gastric cancer and corresponding normal tissues, and to investigate its role in the occurrence and development of gastric cancer, also to study if the genetic structure of NAG6 was altered in gastric cancer.METHODS: Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blot analysis and dot hybridization were used to compare the expression level of NAG6 gene in 42cases of gastric cancer tissues with their corresponding normal tissues of the same patients respectively. In addition,restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was adopted to study if the genetic structure of NAG6 was altered in gastric carcinomas.RESULTS: The expression of NAG6 in 57.1% gastric cancer tissues (25/42) was absent by RT-PCR analysis. The downregulation rate of NAG6 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding normal tissues (P<0.01). However no correlation between the downregulation of NAG6 and lymph-node and/or distance metastasis was found in this study (P>0.05). Dot hybridization confirmed the results of RT-PCR. Furthermore,the results of EcoRI RFLP analysis of NAG6 gene demonstrated that 3 of 7 cases of gastric cancer showed loss of 5 kb fragment in comparison with their corresponding normal tissues.CONCLUSION: NAG6 gene is significantly down regulated in gastric cancer. The loss of genetic materials may be the cause of down-regulation of NAG6 expression. This seems to suggest that NAG6 may represent a candidate of putative tumor suppressor gene at 7q31-32 loci associated with gastric carcinoma. The down-regulation of this gene may play a role in occurrence and development of this disease, however it may not be associated with lymph node and/or distance metastasis.

  7. Dual FISH analysis of benign and malignant tumors of the salivary glands and paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Karl; Ganssmann, Stefan; Affolter, Annette; Schäfer, Carsten; Riedel, Frank; Arens, Norbert; Finger, Sonja; Hörmann, Karl

    2005-11-01

    To date, the underlying genomic changes in benign and malignant tumors of salivary-gland and paranasal-sinus origin are poorly understood. This is due in part to the low incidence of these tumors and the enormous histological variety of tumors within this head and neck region. We examined 58 of these tumors (14 adenoid cystic carcinomas, 9 adenocarcinomas, 5 cylindrical carcinomas, 11 pleomorphic adenomas, and 19 inverted papillomas) by dual fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with centromere-specific probes on six chromosomes (3, 7, 9, 11, 17, and 18) for numerical changes. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, monosomy of chromosome 17 and polysomy of chromosomes 3, 9 and 11 were most frequently encountered. In adenocarcinomas, monosomy of chromosome 17 and polysomy of chromosomes 7 and 11 were most frequent. In cylindrical cell carcinomas, polysomy of chromosomes 7, 9, 11 and 17 was present in the majority of tumors. Disomy is rare, even in benign tumors. Polysomy is more frequent in malignant tumors than in benign. Tetrasomy is found almost only in malignant tumors. In summary, the occurrence of polysomy might reflect a step towards malignancy in tumors of the salivary glands and paranasal mucosa. Polysomy of chromosome 11 could be defined as typical for all investigated histological types of malignant tumor in this region of the head and neck. PMID:16211271

  8. Gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. Pt. 1. The analysis of tumor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, Seiji; Seo, Yoshinobu; Nakagawara, Jyoji [Nakamura Memorial Hospital, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Forty-three patients with the unilateral type of acoustic neurinoma who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery were analyzed from the viewpoint of tumor control. The follow-up period ranged from 22 to 55 months. The tumors were treated with marginal radiation doses of 9-15 Gy with multiple isocenters. The actuarial tumor reduction rates were 42% at one year, 75% at 2 years, and 92% at 3 years after gamma knife radiosurgery. Transient tumor expansion was seen in 33% of patients, which correlated with previous surgical cases. The present control rate was 91%. SPECT was performed on 15 selected patients before and 1 year and 2 years afte